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Located on the famous Sheikh Zayed Road, in the heart of Dubai, Stables Bar & Restaurant is the perfect contrast of bustling city life and indolent rustic charm. The Stables comprises of an intimate ground floor farm shop, a dramatic first floor Stables Bar, a wine shop on the 2nd floor and a stunning Racecourse Restaurant with a live open kitchen.

While the "Meydan Table" unveils its sumptuous feasts at dinner, the Ascot or Aintree tables will unwind you with its indulgent delicacies and drinks. The afternoon naps at the Red Rum Stall...your very own stable hand at your beck and call…Fine wine to sip and papers to read in peace…Those luxurious moments to seize…in the revelry of a crowd…the intimacy of two finds its haven allowed… The Racecourse restaurant and its signature menus by Chef Romain Camos invitingly calls out to the dapper appetites and dainty dolls... Amidst the affluent view of rich burgundy-and-green...enriched by a warm wood scene... bursts of basking sunlight... soft glow of the incandescent in pale moonlight... courtyard merriment and regal fare... walk through the farm gates... it's not often to see the rare... in the airy atmosphere inherent, at the STABLES BAR & RESTAURANT.

Welcome the opulent equine experience...


 
 
 
 
 
 
 



NEW LUNCHTIME PROMOTION

Odds On /Favourite ONLY Aed. 49.00/1 Selected Main Course (Any dish from the menu)

& 1 Regular Beverage 12 pm – 3 pm Everyday (Except Friday) (*) Starred items not included in this offer

FRIDAY CARVERY BRUNCH ONLY Aed 175 from 1pm until 4pm inclusive of all food and beverages Already INFAMOUS LADIES DAY EVERY FRIDAY from 4pm until 8pmFREE FLOWING PINK CHAMPAGNE Monday Mademoiselle FREE Cocktails for Ladies 8pm until Midnight LIVE MUSIC NIGHTS UNPLUGGED on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays from 8pm


 
 
 
 
 



 

 

THE PADDOCK MENU Sandwiches on either White, Brown, Ciabatta or a Baguette All served with homemade hand cut chips and coleslaw Cheese and Tomato (v) Aed. 25.00 Tuna and Sweet corn with Cheese Aed. 30.00 Ham, Cheese and Tomato (p) Aed. 30.00 (NEW) Cheese and Pickle (v) Aed. 25.00 (NEW) Cheese and Onion (v) Aed. 25.00 Bacon, Lettuce and Tomato (p) Aed. 30.00 Beef and Horseradish Aed. 30.00 Ham and Mustard (p) Aed. 30.00 Chicken breast layered with green salad and mayonnaise Aed. 30.00 Bacon or Sausage Bap (p) Aed. 18.00 Stables own Club Sandwich (p) Toasted bread with chicken mayo mix, crispy bacon, fried egg, lettuce, cheese and tomato Aed. 30.00 Steak baguette with caramelized onions Aed.35.00 (NEW) Cheddar Cheese, Chilli & Bacon Bits on Toast (p) Aed. 20.00 (NEW) 3 slices of Cheddar Cheese on Toast(v) Aed. 20.00

If there is a sandwich you would like and is not on this list please just ask, and we will see if we have the ingredients to make it for you

(p) Contains Pork

(v) Vegetarian

(a) contains alcohol


GRAZING Warm salad of Foie Gras & Mixed Grapes with Balsamic dressing Aed. 45.00 Traditional Ploughman’s Salad (p) Ham, Cheddar Cheese, pickled onion, tomato, cucumber& sliced bread Aed. 35.00 (NEW) Nicoise Salad Aed. 35.00 (NEW)

Tiger Prawn Salad Aed. 50.00

Caesar Salad – with or without Char grilled Chicken(p) Aed. 30.00/40.00 (NEW)Greek Salad (v) Aed. 35.00 A salad of grilled goat’s cheese with red pepper coulis (v) Aed. 35.00

STARTERS ORDERS They’re off Garlic bread with cheese (v) Aed. 20.00 Home made Soup of the day (see specials blackboard) Aed. 20.00 (NEW) Chicken Wings (6 pcs / 12 pcs) Aed. 35.00 / 55.00 Grilled mussels and clams farce with garlic parsley butter and flaked almonds Aed. 50.00 A Volcano of Prawns with a Marie Rose sauce Aed. 50.00 (NEW) Vegetable Spring Rolls and Samosas (v) Aed 35.00

(p) Contains Pork

(v) Vegetarian

(a) contains alcohol


THE STABLES CLASSICS The Stables famous posh Fish and homemade hand cut chips served with Manchester caviar Aed. 50.00 ‘Manager’s choice’ Stables Roast of The Day with all the trimmings (a) Aed. 50.00 Stables Homemade Pie of The Day (see specials on blackboard) Aed. 50.00 Stables Chicken Curry, served with basmati rice, papadum and homemade chutney Aed. 50.00 (NEW) Mutton Rogan Josh Curry, served with basmati rice, papadumand home made chutney Aed. 50.00 Stables Own Homemade8oz Prime 100% Beef Burger layered with cheddar cheese, tomato & served with homemade hand cut chips Aed. 40.00 Chef’s special Lancashire Hot Pot Aed. 50.00 ‘Regular’s favourite’ All Day English Breakfast with all the trimmings (p) 2 bacon rashers, 2 English pork sausage, 2 fried eggs, black pudding, grilled tomato, mushrooms, baked beans & toast Aed. 40.00 Trio of English Bangers and Mash served with onion gravy (p) Aed. 45.00 (NEW) Welsh Lambs Liver and Bacon with mash (p) Aed. 55.00 (NEW) Bacon, Cabbage and mustard mash (p) Aed. 45.00 (NEW) Trio of English Pork sausages with homemade hand cut chips covered with Chip Shop Curry Sauce (p) Aed. 45.00

(p) Contains Pork

(v) Vegetarian

(a) contains alcohol


THE FINAL BEND

Mushroom Risotto (v) Aed. 40.00 Prawn risotto Aed. 50.00 Penne Arrabiata (v) Aed. 45.00 (NEW) Tiger Prawn Penne Arrabiata Aed. 60.00 Penne Carbonara (p) Aed. 45.00 Homemade Beef Lasagne Aed. 45.00 Selection of mixed kebabs with mint and chive dips Aed. 45.00 Supreme of chicken farce with sun blush tomato and pesto served with sauté potato Aed. 50.00 Supreme of salmon served with star anise sauce Aed. 55.00

(p) Contains Pork

(v) Vegetarian

(a) contains alcohol


THE HOME STRAIGHT From the Grill (NEW) Carmarthenshire Lamb Chops served with mint sauce Aed. 90.00 (*) English Pork Ribs (p) Aed. 65.00 Honey Roasted Dutch Gammon with a fried egg or pineapple Aed. 50.00 8oz or 16oz Prime Western Australian Organic Fillet Steak Aed. 120.00 / Aed 225.00(*) 8oz or 16oz Prime Western Australian Organic Ribeye Steak Aed. 85.00 / Aed 160.00(*) 8 oz or 16oz Prime Western Australian Organic Sirloin Steak Aed. 75.00 / Aed 140.00 All above served with onion rings and a whole grilled tomato with a choice of homemade hand cut chips or Mash and Vegetables Including your choice of sauce: Peppercorn sauce/Brown steak sauce/Mushroom sauce

(NEW) ‘Owners choice’ 18 oz Tenderloin iconic cut Chateaubriand carved at your table by our Executive Head Chef RomainCamos served with herb roasted new potatoes and béarnaise sauce (needs 25 minutes notice and serves 2 people) Aed295.00 (*) (NEW) Mixed Grill (p) Welsh Lamb chop, 4oz Sirloin Steak, Chicken breast, Pork Sausage, rasher of bacon, fried egg served with grilled tomato, large field mushrooms, onion rings, homemade hand cut chips or mash Aed. 80.00 (*) (NEW) Mighty Stables Grill (p) Welsh Lamb chops, 4oz Sirloin steak, 4 oz Gammon Steak, Lamb Kebab, Chicken breast, 2 Pork Sausage, fried egg, served with grilled tomato, large field mushrooms, onion rings, homemade hand cut chips or mash Aed 120.00 (*)

(p) Contains Pork

(v) Vegetarian

(a) contains alcohol


PLATTER for ONE or SHARING English Platter (p) Fish & Chips, beef & horseradish, baked beans, mushy peas, fried bread Aed. 45.00/89.00 Oriental Platter Sweet & Sour fish, batter fried prawns, stir fried chicken, small bowl of egg fried rice, soup, vegetable spring rolls Aed. 45.00/89.00 Indian Platter Traditional Indian Curry Sauce, Tikka Kebab, Chicken & Lamb Kebab, Poratha, Ghee, Rice, Vegetable Samosa and Papodum Aed. 45.00/89.00 Arabic Platter Hummus, Tabouleh, Fattoush salad, Vine Leaves, Meat Samosa, Moutabel, Mixed olives and Arabic bread Aed. 45.00/89.00 Seafood Platter Smoked salmon, Mussels, Clams, Volcano of prawn marie rose, King prawns sautéed in garlic butter served with sliced French baguette Aed. 49.00/99.00 Mediterranean Platter (p) Selection of Fine French Ham and Italian Meats, Mini Bruschetta, and Mediterranean vegetables Aed. 49.00/99.00 (NEW) American Platter (p) Chicken wings, onion rings, potato wedges, chicken drumstick, pork ribs Aed. 49.00 / 99.00 (*) Sharing Platter not included in the Odds On Favorite promotion


 
 
 
 
 (p) Contains Pork

(v) Vegetarian

(a) contains alcohol


CARRYING EXTRA WEIGHT Home made hand cut chips (v) Aed. 15.00 Mixed leaved salad (v) Aed. 10.00 Mixed vegetables (v) Aed. 15.00 Mashed potatoes (v) Aed. 15.00 Onion rings (v) Aed. 15.00

(p) Contains Pork

(v) Vegetarian

(a) contains alcohol


THE FINAL FURLONG White and dark chocolate cheese cake with raspberry coulis Aed. 20.00 Traditional Bread and Butter Pudding with vanilla ice cream and butterscotch sauce Aed. 20.00 Chef’s Original Sticky Toffee pudding served with honey comb ice cream Aed. 20.00 Apple &Wild Rhubarb crumble served with English Custard Aed. 20.00 (NEW) TRIO of Stables Homemade Ice cream Select from Honeycomb, vanilla, chocolate, or strawberry Aed. 20.00 Banana Fries served with chocolate sauce & vanilla icecream Aed. 20.00 Sabayon of Forest Fruits Aed. 20.00 (NEW) Trio of assorted desserts Aed. 25.00 Stables Cheese plate English cheddar, Goat’s cheese, Blue cheese, camembert served with mixed grapes and assorted biscuits Aed. 45.00

Put the blanket on Tea

Aed. 15.00

Coffee Mug

Aed.15.00

Cappuccino

Aed. 15.00

Latte

Aed. 15.00

Liquor coffee(of your choice) (a) Aed. 45.00 (a) contains alcohol


THE HISTORY OF HORSE RACING

The competitive racing of horses is one of humankind's most ancient sports, having its origins among the prehistoric nomadic tribesmen of Central Asia who first domesticated the horse about 4500 BC. For thousands of years, horse racing flourished as the sport of kings and the nobility. Modern racing, however, exists primarily because it is a major venue for legalized gambling. By far the most popular form of the sport is the racing of mounted THOROUGHBRED horses over flat courses at distances from three-quarters of a mile to two miles. Other major forms of horse racing are harness racing, steeplechase racing, and QUARTER HORSE racing. Thoroughbred Racing By the time humans began to keep written records, horse racing was an organized sport in all major civilizations from Central Asia to the Mediterranean. Both chariot and mounted horse racing were events in the ancient Greek Olympics by 638 BC, and the sport became a public obsession in the Roman Empire. The origins of modern racing lie in the 12th century, when English knights returned from the Crusades with swift Arab horses. Over the next 400 years, an increasing number of Arab stallions were imported and bred to English mares to produce horses that combined speed and endurance. Matching the fastest of these animals in two-horse races for a private wager became a popular diversion of the nobility. Horse racing began to become a professional sport during the reign (1702-14) of Queen Anne, when match racing gave way to races involving several horses on which the spectators wagered. Racecourses sprang up all over England, offering increasingly large purses to attract the best horses. These purses in turn made breeding and owning horses for racing profitable. With the rapid expansion of the sport came the need for a central governing authority. In 1750 racing's elite met at Newmarket to form the Jockey Club, which to this day exercises complete control over English racing. The Jockey Club wrote complete rules of racing and sanctioned racecourses to conduct meetings under those rules. Standards defining the quality of races soon led to the designation of certain races as the ultimate tests of excellence. Since 1814, five races for three-year-old horses have been designated as "classics." Three races, open to male horses (colts) and female horses (fillies), make up the English Triple Crown: the 2,000 Guineas, the Epsom Derby (see DERBY, THE), and the St. Leger Stakes. Two races, open to fillies only, are the 1,000 Guineas and the Epsom Oaks. The Jockey Club also took steps to regulate the breeding of racehorses. James Weatherby, whose family served as accountants to the members of the Jockey Club, was assigned the task of tracing the pedigree, or complete family history, of every horse racing in England. In 1791 the results of his research were published as the Introduction to the General Stud Book. From 1793 to the present, members of the Weatherby family have meticulously recorded the pedigree of every foal born to those racehorses in subsequent volumes of the General Stud Book. By the early 1800s the only horses that could be called "Thoroughbreds" and allowed to race were those descended from horses listed in the General Stud Book. Thoroughbreds are so inbred that the pedigree of every single animal can be traced back father-to-father to one of three stallions, called the "foundation sires." These stallions were the Byerley Turk, foaled c.1679; the Darley Arabian, foaled c.1700; and the Godolphin Arabian, foaled c.1724.

Breeding Although science has been unable to come up with any breeding system that guarantees the birth of a champion, breeders over the centuries have produced an increasingly higher percentage of Thoroughbreds who are successful on the racetrack by following two basic principles. The first is that Thoroughbreds with superior racing ability are more likely to produce offspring with superior racing ability. The second is that horses with certain pedigrees are more likely to pass along their racing ability to their offspring. Male Thoroughbreds (stallions) have the highest breeding value because they can mate with about 40 mares a year. The worth of champions, especially winners of Triple Crown races, is so high that groups of investors called breeding syndicates may be formed. Each of the approximately 40 shares of the syndicate entitles its owner to breed one mare to the stallion each year. One share, for a great horse, may cost several million dollars. A share's owner may resell that share at any time. Farms that produce foals for sale at auction are called commercial breeders. The most successful are E. J. Taylor, Spendthrift Farms, Claiborne Farms, Gainsworthy Farm, and Bluegrass Farm, all in Kentucky. Farms that produce foals to race themselves are called home breeders, and these include such famous stables as Calumet Farms, Elmendorf Farm, and Green-tree Stable in Kentucky and Harbor View Farm in Florida.


 

  Betting

Wagering on the outcome of horse races has been an integral part of the appeal of the sport since prehistory and today is the sole reason horse racing has survived as a major professional sport. All betting at American tracks today is done under the pari-mutuel wagering system, which was developed by a Frenchman named Pierre Oller in the late 19th century. Under this system, a fixed percentage (14 percent-25 percent) of the total amount wagered is taken out for track operating expenses, racing purses, and state and local taxes. The remaining sum is divided by the number of individual wagers to determine the payoff, or return on each bet. The projected payoff, or "odds," are continuously calculated by the track's computers and posted on the track odds board during the betting period before each race. Odds of "21," for example, mean that the bettor will receive $2 profit for every $1 wagered if his or her horse wins. At all tracks, bettors may wager on a horse to win (finish first), place (finish first or second), or show (finish first, second, or third). Other popular wagers are the daily double (picking the winners of two consecutive races), exactas (picking the first and second horses in order), quinellas (picking the first and second horses in either order), and the pick six (picking the winners of six consecutive races). Handicapping The difficult art of predicting the winner of a horse race is called handicapping. The process of handicapping involves evaluating the demonstrated abilities of a horse in light of the conditions under which it will be racing on a given day. To gauge these abilities, handicappers use past performances, detailed published records of preceding races. These past performances indicate the horse's speed, its ability to win, and whether the performances tend to be getting better or worse. The conditions under which the horse will be racing include the quality of the competition in the race, the distance of the race, the type of racing surface (dirt or grass), and the current state of that surface (fast, sloppy, and so on). The term handicapping also has a related but somewhat different meaning: in some races, varying amounts of extra weight are assigned to horses based on age or ability in order to equalize the field. Steeplechase, Hurdle, and Point-To-Point Racing Steeplechases are races over a 2- to 4-mi (3.2- to 6.4-km) course that includes such obstacles as brush fences, stone walls, timber rails, and water jumps. The sport developed from the English and Irish pastime of fox hunting, when hunters would test the speed of their mounts during the cross-country chase. Organized steeplechase racing began about 1830, and has continued to be a popular sport in England to this day. The most famous steeplechase race in the world is England's Grand National, held every year since 1839 at Aintree. Steeplechase racing is occasionally conducted at several U.S. Thoroughbred race tracks. The most significant race is the U.S. Grand National Steeplechase held yearly at Belmont Park. Hurdling is a form of steeplechasing that is less physically demanding of the horses. The obstacles consist solely of hurdles 1 to 2 ft (0.3 to 0.6 m) lower than the obstacles on a steeplechase course, and the races are normally less than 2 mi in length. Hurdling races are often used for training horses that will later compete in steeplechases. Horses chosen for steeplechase training are usually Thoroughbreds selected for their endurance, calm temperament, and larger-than-normal size. Point-to-point races are held for amateurs on about 120 courses throughout the British Isles. Originally run straight across country (hence the name), these races are now conducted on oval tracks with built-in fences, often on farmland.

 

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