Independent Schools Guide 2021: Bayside & South East

Page 1

INDEPENDENT

SCHOOLS GUIDE 2021

WELLBEING FOSTERING RESILIENCE & CALM

INNOVATION TECHNOLOGY IN THE CLASSROOM

LEARNING IN A CHANGING WORLD PLUS SCHOOL PROFILES

B AY S I D E & S O U T H E A S T




WHEELERS HILL

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M A LV E R N

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CAULFIELD

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YA R R A J U N C T I O N

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NANJING CHINA

Mind for life. Caulfield Grammar School nourishes learners to know who they are, what they value and why they are valued. We cultivate character, compassion, creativity and connection. Our learners are nurtured to find their own path, be themselves, and thrive to pursue greatness in life. To register for a Campus Tour or Open Day visit caulfieldgs.vic.edu.au/visit-us To view our Video Tours visit caulfieldgs.vic.edu.au/video-tours MALVERN CAMPUS ELC to Year 6 CAULFIELD CAMPUS Years 7 to 12 BOARDING Years 9 to 12

Co-educational caulfieldgs.vic.edu.au

+61 3 9524 6333



Bayside’s School of Choice Visit St Leonard’s College

St Leonard’s College is one of Australia’s ������������������������������������������� ���������������������������������������� Join us for a College tour to explore our ���������������������������������������������� how St Leonard’s College can provide your child ����������������������������

Please visit our website to book a tour.

163 South Road, Brighton East VIC 3187

stleonards.vic.edu.au

|


Set for success

A

s the effects of COVID-19 reverberated around the world last year, schools acted quickly to keep students engaged and connected. When campus gates closed, virtual classrooms opened; as physical events were cancelled, important milestones were marked in creative new ways; and as we all adapted to a new normal, staff and students rallied together to support each other and lend a hand to the wider community. With a new school year now well underway and the hallways full of chatter once again, schools are using the experiences of 2020 as a springboard for innovation. Mindfulness and gratitude are being practiced daily as part of wellbeing programs designed to foster resilience, with the simple act of connecting recognised as a powerful tool in calming young minds and lifting spirits. Beyond the classroom, co-curricular activities – from aerobics to chess – are providing a multitude of benefits to students’ emotional, physical, cognitive and social development. Inside state-of-the-art “Makerspaces” and “STEM laboratories”, students are developing their critical thinking skills by tinkering, coding and problem-solving, while hands-on social and environmental programs are opening their eyes to real-world issues and equipping them with the skills to rise to the challenges of our times as compassionate and confident future leaders. In this edition of Domain Review’s Independent Schools Guide, we explore how Victoria’s independent schools are adapting to our rapidly changing world and setting up their students for future success.

CONTENTS Caulfield Grammar School

11

Cornish College

13

Geelong Grammar School

17

Haileybury 23 Loreto Mandeville Hall Toorak

25

Melbourne Girls Grammar

27

Mentone Girls’ Grammar

31

Mentone Grammar

33

Sacré Cœur

37

Shelford Girls’ Grammar

39

St Catherine’s School

41

St Leonard’s College

43

St Michael’s Grammar School

47

Wesley College

51

Woodleigh School

53

Xavier College

55

COVER IMAGE: FERRAN TRAITÉ

EDITOR \ JESSICA GOLDING SENIOR BUSINESS MANAGER, EDUCATION \ KIMBERLY BARRY EDUCATION ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE \ KATE WITTON PRODUCTION & EDITORIAL \ MEDIAXPRESS

Independent Schools Guide 2021 is published by Domain Holdings Australia Limited. Printed by Elephant Group (Aust) Pty Ltd, 24c Victoria Street, Windsor, VIC, 3181 and distributed as a special supplement of Domain Review. All material published in the Independent Schools Guide 2021 is copyright and no part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. Domain Holdings Australia LImited and all related companies (together the “publisher”) hereby expressly disclaim, to the full extent permitted by the law, all and any liability whatsoever (including any liability for damages, consequential damages, costs, expenses or the like, “liability”) to any person howsoever arising from or in connection with any copy, information, advertising or other material in Independent Schools Guide 2021 (“copy”), including, but not limited to, any liability arising from or in connection with any action or inaction by any person in reliance on any copy, and each consequence of such action or inaction. The publisher also expressly disclaims any and all liability arising from or in connection with any negligence whatsoever of the publisher. Inclusion of copy must not be construed, deemed of inferred by any person to constitute any endorsement of the same by the publisher.

I N DEPE N DE N T SCHOOL S GU IDE 2021

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FOSTERING RESILIENCE & WELLBEING

The pandemic has resulted in student uncertainty but these programs aim to hand them control. BY PETER HANLON

8

THE SIMPLE ART OF CONNECTING

W

hen Hugh van Cuylenburg wowed the Mentone Grammar community in 2016 with his presentations about the power of The Resilience Project, it invited a natural next step for the school’s wellbeing focus, which was already underpinned by Yale University’s RULER Program up to the end of year 9. “We looked at our year 10 and VCE students and felt they needed something different,” Mentone Grammar’s director of student wellbeing, Cameron Lancaster, says. “The Resilience Project fitted with what we were looking to do – it’s tenets of gratitude, empathy and mindfulness fitted with the direction we wanted to go.” Van Cuylenburg’s inspiration for The Resilience Project was time spent in northern India, living alongside people who had little yet were gloriously happy. At Mentone Grammar, the connection it fosters as part of the curriculum – through groups of 16-17 students engaging with their mentors in roll call each morning, taking part in activities that have mindfulness and gratitude built in, and through longer weekly sessions for deeper exploration – has been powerful at a disjointed time. “During COVID, the connections our staff and students had with each other were a reason we feel we coped with remote learning as well as we did,” Lancaster says. “It was those touch bases‚ the conversations, little things like, ‘We’re going to have a pizza lunch’, and everyone was online cooking their own pizza. We had‚ ‘Red Day’, ‘Funny Hat Day’, all sorts of things. “They might sound simple, but if you can get the students buying into them,

I N DEPE N DE N T SCHOOL S GU IDE 2021

they see that others are still doing the same things they’re doing. When students feel like they’re acting in isolation or are literally on their own, that’s when we worry more about their mental health. When they’re checking in and maintaining that sense of connection, that was very, very important for us last year.” Rupert Saunders, a senior clinical advisor with Headspace, says the simple act of connecting can be a powerful tool in trying to calm the upheaval caused by


the pandemic and the uncertainty it has created about the future. “Have conversations, frank and open, about how they’re feeling,” he suggests, an approach that can combat anxiety both at home and in the classroom. “You might get shut down, but you need to say, ‘That’s cool. I’ll come back to you when you’re feeling more comfortable. I’m here for you.’ Give that message of love and support.” At Methodist Ladies’ College, teaching hope and optimism at such a time is

helped by concentrating on the small, everyday things that can be controlled and steering students away from dwelling on the uncertain big picture. MLC’s director of student wellbeing, Lisa Gatliff, highlights the importance of creating certainty where possible‚ in building a routine around healthy eating, exercise and that vital act of connection‚ and finding positivity and happiness in helping others. “We have a strong community service focus, on doing something beyond yourself,” she says. “It was really pleasing [in 2020] to see how many students took up their own individual ways of helping others in the community, doing things like knitting blankets for disadvantaged children in South Africa, or doing artworks for residents in aged care. “For many of them, that sense of focusing outward was something they could do and be in control of.” Recognising that visual contact between teachers and students was important for learning and wellbeing, every MLC student had a designated teacher to oversee their wellbeing. The school worked hard on maintaining these one-on-one catch-ups last year and has continued it since the return to face-toface learning. The idea that every student has multiple support networks around them‚ classroom and wellbeing teachers, counsellors, co-ordinators, nurses‚ is strongly promoted. Gatliff sees young people who have engaged with these networks like never before and is optimistic about the resilience that such engagement has helped build. “I think that’s a message of hope for the future,” she says.

‘It was really pleasing to see how many students took up their own individual ways of helping others in the community. LISA GATLIFF

I N DEPE N DE N T SCHOOL S GU IDE 2021

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WHEELERS HILL

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M A LV E R N

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CAULFIELD

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YA R R A J U N C T I O N

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NANJING CHINA

Mind for life. Caulfield Grammar School nourishes learners to know who they are, what they value and why they are valued. We cultivate character, compassion, creativity and connection. Our learners are nurtured to find their own path, be themselves, and thrive to pursue greatness in life. To register for a Campus Tour or Open Day visit caulfieldgs.vic.edu.au/visit-us To view our Video Tours visit caulfieldgs.vic.edu.au/video-tours WHEELERS HILL CAMPUS ELC to Year 12 MALVERN CAMPUS ELC to Year 6 CAULFIELD CAMPUS Years 7 to 12 BOARDING Years 9 to 12

Co-educational caulfieldgs.vic.edu.au +61 39524 6333


Caulfield Grammar School

Wheelers Hill Campus 74-82 Jells Road, Wheelers Hill VIC 3150 Malvern Campus 5 Willoby Avenue, Glen Iris VIC 3146 Caulfield Campus 217 Glen Eira Road, St Kilda East VIC 3183

TH E BA SIC S

Caulfield Grammar School prides itself on focusing on the whole person. We have a strong history of academic

Enquiries

achievement and are committed to exceptional results for our

Principal Ashleigh Martin A strong advocate for values-based leadership and

caulfieldgs.vic.edu.au

student’s learning journey. We believe in developing a “Mind

cgs@caulfieldgs.vic.edu.au

for life” so that learners are equipped with the mental,

Years

emotional and academic capabilities they need to follow –

Early Learning – Year 12

whatever path they choose.

Denomination

As a leading independent co-educational school, we proudly

Grammar – in the way we teach, the breadth of co-curricular

develop beyond their academic

Co-educational

valued. We cultivate compassion, creativity and connection.

Ashleigh

young people to

Gender

to know who they are, what they value and why they are These competencies are nurtured in several ways at Caulfield

believes in enabling

Anglican

offer a thriving learning environment that nourishes students

student-led learning, passionately

+61 3 9524 6333

students. We recognise, however, that this is only part of a

Fees ELC $19,308 – Year 12 $33,084

offerings and our commitment to every learner’s wellbeing.

Boarding \ Yes

We are known for our passionate vision for innovation in education, offering modern learning facilities and forward-

Scholarships \ Yes

thinking curriculum.

ATAR \ 85.8*

achievements to find

IB \ PYP – authorised to

their own individual

deliver. MYP – candidate

pathway.

school.

* Results are provided by the school, Domain does not warrant their accuracy

I M M E RS I O N

E N VI R O N M E N T

CO - CURRICUL AR

WELLBEING

Students “learn by doing”

Our unique Yarra Junction

Sport, Music, Dance, Theatre

Our school-wide approach

through authentic real-world

campus challenges students

and Visual Arts opportunities

focuses on nurturing the

connection and

in a natural learning

designed to maximise

whole student to meet their

collaboration, developing

environment – developing

engagement for beginner to

spiritual, physical,

skills to navigate our rapidly

leadership and life skills to

elite level students –

intellectual, relational, and

changing world via Sport,

consider the effect of their

supported by outstanding

emotional needs –

Music, Language, Arts and

actions on the world around

resources and specialists.

cultivating a culture of care.

STEM programs.

them.

I N DEPE N DE N T SCHOOL S GU IDE 2021

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Doing things differently today. Making a difference tomorrow.

For too long, children have been taught what to think, rather than how to think. At Cornish College education goes hand in hand with exploration. Set on 100 acres of natural parkland, our students are encouraged to connect with nature, identify problems and work together to find creative solutions. Because it’s by embracing challenges and pioneering new ground that we can bring about a sustainable future for all.

cornishcollege.vic.edu.au 9781 9000


Cornish College

65 Riverend Road, Bangholme VIC 3175

TH E BA SIC S

When you choose Cornish College, you choose a wealth of educational experiences. From our passionate, experienced

Enquiries

staff to the many co-curricular opportunities, Cornish offers

+61 3 9781 9000

an education quite like no other.

cornishcollege.vic.edu.au

Located on 100 acres of natural parkland, Cornish provides

admissions@cornishcollege.

Early Learning to Year 12 students the space to stretch their

vic.edu.au

legs and their curiosity, exploring knowledge beyond the Principal Nicola Forrest Nicola joined Cornish in 2013 and was appointed Principal in August 2019. She presents workshops and keynote addresses for educators throughout Australia in curriculum design, pedagogical

Early Learning – Year 12

the key to our vision of educating students for a sustainable, thriving future. We are committed to this vision, engaging our

Denomination

students beyond textbooks and encouraging a different way

Associated with the Uniting

of thinking, one which considers how our decisions impact the

Church

world around us.

Gender

Our motto is “Make a Difference”. At the heart of this is our

Co-educational

dedication to developing independence, compassion and

Fees

personal excellence amongst our students, ensuring they have

$11,788 – $20,724

the capacity and the desire to make a difference, both locally

Boarding \ No

and globally. “At Cornish, we are developing a curriculum to educate for a

leadership and

sustainable future now, with structures that mobilise the

innovation in middle

attitudes, skills, knowledge and values required for young

years education.

Years

classroom walls and in nature’s classroom. Our environment is

Scholarships \ Yes

people to become the best individuals they have the capacity to be,” Principal Nicola Forrest said.

* Results are provided by the school, Domain does not warrant their accuracy

W H Y C O R N I S H?

COMMUNIT Y

F O RWA R D -T H I N KI N G

OUR SUCCESS

Our inspiring learning

We are a supportive and

Cornish offers education of a

Cornish excels in academia,

environment and holistic

cohesive community that

different kind. We give

sport, the arts, and social

approach to education

values and prioritises the

students the tools to thrive

and environmental

empowers students to be

wellbeing of each person.

now and into the future to

leadership. We have award-

curious, courageous and

Cornish has a strong and

meet the socio-cultural,

winning learning spaces and

compassionate. Our expert

welcoming relationship with

economic, technological and

teachers who are thought

teachers design meaningful

all those integral to our

environmental challenges of

leaders. Success is evident in

curriculum that challenges

development – parents,

our time.

the way our students make a

and extends future leaders.

alumni and friends.

difference.

I N DEPE N DE N T SCHOOL S GU IDE 2021

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TECHNOLOGY AND THE CLASSROOM

STEM subjects provide opportunities for critical thinking and problem solving. BY PETER HANLON

14

NAVIGATING THE REAL WORLD

M

icah Wilkins doesn’t remember the acronym STEM being used in his school days, which ended in the early 2000s, around the time it was popularised. Now, as head of digital learning and innovation at Camberwell Girls Grammar School, the catch-all for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics is part of his everyday world. Yet for all of the advances made in how science and technology is taught in the classroom, the principle behind STEM learning remains the same as when Wilkins took on an elective called electronics in year 9 and used a soldering iron, among other tools, to construct a small recording device. (He laughs, recalling that his never actually worked, while another classmate’s exploded.) “The thinking then is not dissimilar to what we’re trying to get our students to do now,” he says. “We’re working with real-world problems; we’re using tools of the trade; we are asking big questions and being curious with our learning. “It’s that whole process of problemsolving, tinkering, playing, taking risks and trying different things to see if they work. That’s the essence of what we’re trying to do in STEM programs at school.” Dean Pearman, head of digital learning and practice at Wesley College, agrees that for all of the wonderful learning environments that school Makerspaces and STEM laboratories now offer students, to see them as purely the domain of the technologically minded is to miss a crucial part of the picture. At Wesley, digital technology studies sit under the holistic-approach-to-

I N DEPE N DE N T SCHOOL S GU IDE 2021

learning umbrella that envelops every class and subject, from prep to year 12. It recognises the importance of technology in the life of the community and is used not simply to design and build amazing things but to embed the necessary skills in cyber safety and in digital privacy and wellbeing that will help young people thrive after walking out through the school gate for the last time. “There are misconceptions around


STEM and what it means,” Pearman says. “When you start to suggest that you have to be innately good at technology to be involved in STEM spaces and labs, you’re missing a whole range of other avenues in which students can work in that very same space. “Our approach is, ‘You’re a maker’‚ you can be a baker, a fashion designer, an interior designer. It’s not just pigeonholing students to use technology;

it’s how they think and solve problems that we’re most interested in.” At CGGS, a fleet of robots including NAO, DASH, EV3s and SPHERO help students learn coding, which Wilkins simplifies as “the language that sits behind all the web interfaces we see, all the apps we use and many of the games we play”. Yet behind the otherworldliness of the “bots” are much broader learning opportunities. “Through robotics we ask, ‘How are we developing those important transferable skills such as critical thinking and creativity? How are we developing teamwork and organisation?’ “Doing STEM for us is, yes, you will learn some of those techy skills that are important. But underpinning that is a way of seeing and navigating the world that is more important,” says Wilkins. “Many schools can talk about their laser cutters and 3D printers, their NAO bots and SPHEROs, but on the ground, what does it actually look like, and what does it mean for learning? “For us, it’s about developing the thinking of our students.” At Wesley, the remote learning experience of 2020 underscored for Pearman that technology at its core is a building material, and that young people will find meaningful ways to use it no matter what hurdles appear in their path. The broader benefits make the STEM experience all the more compelling. “When you have been through our Makerspace or STEM lab during your educational journey at Wesley‚ to solve problems and be exposed to a designthinking process will set our students up for when they go into the workforce,” Pearman says.

‘Yes, you will learn some of those techy skills that are important. But underpinning that is a way of seeing and navigating the world that is more important.’ MICAH WILKINS

I N DEPE N DE N T SCHOOL S GU IDE 2021

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Geelong Grammar School

BOSTOCK HOUSE 139 Noble Street, Newtown VIC 3220 CORIO CAMPUS 50 Biddlecombe Avenue, Corio VIC 3214 TIMBERTOP CAMPUS Private Mail Bag, Mansfield VIC 3722 TOORAK CAMPUS

TH E BA SIC S

14 Douglas Street, Toorak VIC 3142

Enquiries +61 3 5273 9307

Principal Rebecca Cody

At Geelong Grammar School (GGS) we do things differently;

ggs.vic.edu.au

knowing it takes more than theory to make an impact beyond

admissions@ggs.vic.edu.au

the classroom. Our educational theory is intentional and

Years

enduring; we exist to enable wisdom.

ELC – Year 12

Students as young as three years of age can begin their GGS

Denomination

adventure at Bostock House or Toorak Campus. As they enter

Anglican

early adolescence, their learning continues into Middle School Joining the school in 2018, Rebecca’s approach centres on an unwavering commitment to the

Gender

at the Corio Campus, followed by a transformative year at

Co-educational

Timbertop. With enlivened spirit and tenacity, our students

Fees

return to Corio Campus to complete Senior School.

Please see our website

We are Australia’s largest co-educational boarding

Boarding \ Yes

philosophy and

community and celebrate a culturally rich blend of students,

practice of holistic

from rural to regional, interstate to overseas. We encourage

Scholarships \ Yes

education, and the

and celebrate diversity and want all our learners to feel a

ATAR \ Median 81.70*

far-reaching impact this has on shaping a buoyant, more

genuine sense of belonging within a caring and inclusive

IB \ Median 35*

environment.

adaptable and

At GGS, it is our privilege to enable wisdom by providing a

enlightened world.

holistic education that prioritises learning and academic skills, as well as the values of courage, curiosity and compassion. We offer a unique pathway for growth; an educational experience that is academically challenging and underpinned by three strategic educational pillars; Adventure Education, Positive Education and Creative Education.

* Results are provided by the school, Domain does not warrant their accuracy

A DV E N T U R E E D

P O S ITIV E E D

C R E AT IV E E D

B OA R D I N G

Our unique Timbertop

Positive Education places

Our newest Strategic Pillar.

With ample open space and

campus provides learners

wellbeing at the heart of our

Cultivating the skills of

exceptional facilities, GGS

with a transformative year of

learning community.

communication,

uniquely satisfies a student’s

Adventure Education:

Equipping our learners with

collaboration, critical

desire for space and play,

experiential learning through

the knowledge and skills to

thinking, problem posing and

underpinned by a well-

and with nature helps to

nurture their own wellbeing

problem solving. Prioritising

established House System

develop competence in

and foster a deeper purpose

transferable competencies

that provides the structure

practical ways and promotes

to contribute to the

for young people to flourish

and support for young

independence and resilience.

wellbeing of others.

in a fast-changing world.

learners to thrive.

I N DEPE N DE N T SCHOOL S GU IDE 2021

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FORGING AHEAD IN THE VIRTUAL SPACE

When the foundations are strong, a school can embrace the challenges that lie ahead. BY SARAH MARINOS

20

FROM OBSTACLE TO OPPORTUNITY

F

or the past 129 years, some elements of Haileybury have remained the same – the outstanding academic results, the calibre of its teachers and the focus on building a strong foundation of literacy and numeracy skills paired with analytical and creative thinking. But the independent school has never rested on its laurels. Instead, under the leadership of CEO and principal Derek Scott, Haileybury has built a reputation for adapting and innovating to keep pace with an ever-changing educational landscape. That ability to evolve to stay one step ahead was in evidence last year as the effects of COVID-19 reverberated around the world and schools faced the challenge of online teaching. For Haileybury, the challenge was swiftly converted into an opportunity with the lessons from 2020 being harnessed to strengthen the school’s approach to education further. “For us, three things came out of the pandemic,” explains Scott. “Firstly, the absolute importance of strong foundational skills in primary school literacy and numeracy. We were able to deliver that through 2020, and we ran a full virtual school day for our primary school children. Our testing at the end of the year showed that our primary school students learned at the same pace academically as they usually did in the classroom – they missed being in the classroom, but they learned.” The second lesson from the pandemic was the real importance of people-topeople contact and how much students learn through playing and engaging with each other, says Scott.

I N DEPE N DE N T SCHOOL S GU IDE 2021

“Thirdly, we saw how good educators could be at working in different ways and the great capacity of students to learn in different forms, such as online and in the virtual space.” Haileybury long ago embraced the potential of technology to enhance the educational experience for teachers and students, and the school continues to forge ahead in the virtual space. Later


A DV ER T IS IN G F E AT UR E

this year, based on major international and national research results, Haileybury will launch a new virtual school model. “The virtual school will benefit our existing students and students outside Haileybury,” says Scott. “We have multiple campuses in Melbourne, and we have students across those campuses doing VCE who attend the same virtual class. We also have some classes running

between Melbourne and our Darwin campus. We are looking at using that model in junior and middle school and opening it up to students outside our school. “There is great potential to open up a range of elective subjects that can be delivered in the virtual space and that space breaks down barriers around progressions of learning. For example, you can have a year 7 student who has a great aptitude for technology and coding, and they can take that subject in the virtual space and be operating at year 11 or 12 levels. They can follow their passion and build skills and fast-track that subject, but progress at the same level as their peers in other subjects, like humanities, for example. “Differentiated individual learning is a real opportunity, and there have been many other opportunities brought about by the delivery of interesting subject matter and good teaching through the virtual space. Now is the time to take up those opportunities.” Scott also believes it is time to step away from the concept of virtual and online learning as “remote” learning. He says “remote” has negative connotations, and instead, the virtual school and classroom is forward-looking and promises to add breadth and depth to the educational landscape. “You have to look at the world young people are heading out into – it’s changing rapidly,” says Scott. “So, what does that mean in terms of core skills for students? Literacy and numeracy are still important, but so is the capacity to think and move quickly and to be flexible in how you approach the future.”

‘Literacy and numeracy are still important, but so is the capacity to think and move quickly and to be flexible in how you approach the future.’ DEREK SCOTT

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH

I N DEPE N DE N T SCHOOL S GU IDE 2021

21



Haileybury

Haileybury – Newlands and Senior School 855 Springvale Road, Keysborough VIC 3173 Haileybury – Castlefield 120 South Road, Brighton East VIC 3187 Haileybury – Edrington 138 High Street, Berwick VIC 3806 Haileybury – City

TH E BA SIC S

383 King Street, West Melbourne VIC 3003

Enquiries

Haileybury Rendall School – Darwin

+61 3 9904 6000

6057 Berrimah Road, Berrimah NT 0828

haileybury.vic.edu.au

Haileybury International School

admissions@haileybury.vic.

6 Gongxue Road, Gaocun County, Wuqing District, Tianjin, China

Principal

There is a reason more parents choose to send their children

Derek Scott

to Haileybury than any other school in Australia. As one of the

Under the awardwinning leadership of CEO|Principal Derek Scott, Haileybury has become one of

edu.au Years ELC – Year 12

Asia-Pacific region’s leading independent schools, we provide

Denomination

an environment in which every student matters every day.

NA

With campuses in Keysborough, Brighton, Berwick,

Gender

Melbourne, China and Darwin, Haileybury is acclaimed for

Parallel Education – boys and

outstanding academic results, small class sizes, extensive co-

girls share facilities but

curricular choices and state of-the-art facilities. The school

attend single-gender classes

academic schools

achieves exceptional national testing and VCE results, placing

with outstanding

Fees

it among Australia’s leading schools. It has high expectations

haileybury.vic.edu.au

the nation’s leading

NAPLAN and VCE results.

of students and provides the support they need to excel.

Boarding \ Haileybury

In 2020 Haileybury was named Non-Government Primary

Rendall School, Darwin

School of the Year and Deputy Principal (Junior School),

Scholarships \ Yes

Grenville Green was named Non-Government Primary School Principal of the Year at the Australian Education Awards.

ATAR \ Median 91*

Haileybury’s Parallel Education Model means students learn together until the end of Year 4, then attend separate schools on the same campus from Years 5 to 12. This approach recognises the diverse educational needs of girls and boys.

* Results are provided by the school, Domain does not warrant their accuracy

S O C IA L J U S TI C E

WELLBEING

SPORT

THE ARTS

Haileybury’s Program is built

We provide a supportive

Haileybury Sport aims to

The Arts are an integral part

upon social justice and a

environment, including a

promote participation in

of the curriculum. All

sense of fairness. This

Pastoral Care Program

healthy activities and

students enjoy aspects of

creates student awareness

tailored to each schooling

provide appropriate

visual art, music, drama and

of their community, as well

stage. A Health and

opportunities for all students

dance, which encourages

as their own self-worth. Each

Wellbeing Program runs from

of differing interests and

them to expand their minds

campus supports numerous

Preparatory to Pre-Senior,

abilities. Across the year,

and appreciate culture and

charities throughout the

while Senior School has a

girls and boys can choose

creativity through a wide

year.

Personal Excellence Program.

from more than 30 sports.

array of subjects.

I N DEPE N DE N T SCHOOL S GU IDE 2021

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At Loreto Toorak she’ll learn justice, sincerity, verity, felicity and freedom... Our Positive Education approach is grounded in our Loreto values and guided by our vision to create a learning community which is strengths-focused, engenders resilience and enables individuals to flourish. 2021 School Tours @ 9.00am; Thursday 27 May, Wednesday 15 September, Thursday 21 October Enquiries: +61 3 8290 7500 admissions@loretotoorak.vic.edu.au AN INDEPENDENT CATHOLIC SCHOOL FOR GIRLS ELC TO VCE


Loreto Mandeville Hall Toorak

10 Mandeville Crescent, Toorak VIC 3142

TH E BA SIC S

Loreto Toorak is an Independent Catholic Girls’ School embracing genuine values of freedom, justice, sincerity, verity

Enquiries

and felicity to foster a mutual respect and deep

+61 3 98238100

understanding of the individual and a compassion for the

loretotoorak.vic.edu.au

broader community.

admissions@loretotoorak. vic.edu.au

To become confident, self-assured women, girls need the Principal Susan Stevens Dr Susan Stevens, PhD Melb, MEd (EdAdmin), MMusic,

right challenges. Loreto Toorak has created an environment

Years

where your daughter will be nurtured, challenged and

Preparatory – Year 12

encouraged to discover her true self.

Denomination

is only one aspect of our holistic approach to education.

AMusA, Grad Dip (AdolHealth &

She overcame extraordinary opposition and hostility to found

Welfare), Grad Dip

the Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary (IBVM), known as the

MACEA, MAICD. Principal for 17 years, active contributor

academic program is integral to the education of heart and

organisations.

Fees $19,750 – $28,490 Boarding \ No Scholarships \ Yes

Today there are seven Loreto Schools in Australia and more than 90 throughout the world. An extensive and challenging

in several

Girls only (Co-ed ELC)

Loreto Sisters.

she chairs and is an on many boards

Gender

Established in 1924, the foundations began more than 400 years ago with a truly remarkable English woman, Mary Ward.

Theology, FACE,

Catholic

Excellent academic results are achieved each year, but this

ATAR \ Median 90.8*

mind, which is cherished at Loreto Toorak. A love of learning is fostered by specialist teachers who share a passion for their subjects with programs that aim to foster individual needs. The opportunities we provide will challenge and extend your daughter, helping her to graduate with an inner belief that there is much she can achieve. * Results are provided by the school, Domain does not warrant their accuracy

R E S I LI E N C E

SPORT

MUSIC

L A N G UAG E S

Positive Education is taught

Physical education includes

Music is a rich and diverse

Four languages are taught at

throughout the school

20 different sports. A

component of our education.

Loreto Toorak: Chinese

incorporating the tenets of

member of Girls Sport

There are 25 ensemble

(Mandarin), French,

positive psychology.

Victoria, we compete against

groups available for

Indonesian and Italian. These

Designed to promote

23 girls’ schools during a

students. These include

are taught in our Junior

wellbeing as an integral

weekly competition. We

bands, choirs, orchestras,

School – Rathfarnham

component of the Loreto

engage many top specialist

instrumental ensembles,

through to VCE.

education, it supports and

coaches across several

chamber groups and voice

strengthens our existing

sports to challenge our

programs.

academic framework.

students. I N DEPE N DE N T SCHOOL S GU IDE 2021

25


Writing

Guitar

LEARNING

Project Work

Acting

Singing

INFLUENCE

Public Speaking YouTube Channel Educating Others

Family from Brazil

Travel CULTURE

Language

MEET JULIA... Commenced: Year 3 Current age: 12

Creative communicator

MEET THE FUTURE


Melbourne Girls Grammar

Merton Hall (Year 5 – Year 12) 86 Anderson Street, South Yarra VIC 3141 Morris Hall (Prep – Year 4) 100 Caroline Street, South Yarra VIC 3141 Early Learning Centre 63 Clowes St, South Yarra VIC 3141

TH E BA SIC S

MGGS is a school where challenge and choice create opportunities for every girl to discover and pursue her

Enquiries

strengths, passions, and goals. We believe that an exceptional

+61 3 9862 9200

education is not only about academic skills, but also

mggs.vic.edu.au

emotional and physical wellbeing.

enrolments@mggs.vic. edu.au

We have always been a future-focused community and are Principal Toni E. Meath Principal Dr Meath believes that learning is for all. Education is about developing the whole person. Dr Meath and the school share a vision, mission and values to create an excellent learning environment.

innovative in our approach to preparing students for life in an

Years

increasingly complex and globally connected world. We focus

ELC – Year 12

on reinforcing strong values and lifelong skills like resilience

Denomination

and independence, instilling in our Grammarians the courage

Anglican

they need to excel in life beyond school.

Gender

Students engage in experiences that develop their learnings

Girls only

in a way that suits them, individual passions are encouraged

Fees

as we support each and every student: the Early Learning and

Please visit mggs.vic.edu.au

Junior Years provide the foundations of positive learning,

Boarding \ Yes

reinforcing that anything is possible, and where imagination, curiosity and inquiry lead to discovery; the Middle Years

Scholarships \ Yes

(Years 5-8) provide the opportunity to dive deeper into key

ATAR \ Information about

learning concepts with real-world experiences to assist

VCE results can be found on our website

understanding; the Senior Years (Years 9-12) provide the launching pad for self-motivated learning. Graduates of MGGS are bold, dynamic and courageous leaders who develop the resilience, persistence and confidence to achieve their best in any path they choose.

I N N OVATI O N

E N T E R PR I S E

WELLBEING

C R E ATIVIT Y

With a focus on personalised

We champion the

Holistic wellbeing is an

Project-based learning tasks

learning, students

development of enterprising

essential component of a

enable students to explore

collaborate and solve

mindsets. Students interact

healthy life. To support and

real-world problems and

problems while thinking

with companies and industry

extend every girl’s capability,

develop creative solutions.

critically. Students enjoy

sectors solving real-world

we provide dedicated staff,

We foster budding futurists

authentic opportunities to

problems, attend

facilities and programs.

who explore new ways of

engage with emerging

internships, attain micro

thinking and are empathetic

technologies as we arm the

credentials and meet visiting

and conceptual in their

next generation with skills

entrepreneurs to share

approach.

for the future.

experiences. I N DEPE N DE N T SCHOOL S GU IDE 2021

27


INSTILLING BELONGING AND HOPE

Relationships are central to creating an environment in which young people thrive. BY SARAH MARINOS

28

MAKING EVERY GIRL COUNT

W

hen Natalie Charles took up the reins at Mentone Girls’ Grammar at the start of 2020, she had no idea of the challenges the year would bring. But as the COVID-19 pandemic and its effects rippled through the school, she relied on some fundamental principles to navigate unpredictability and a switch to remote learning, and to help maintain a firm sense of school community. Throughout the pandemic, instilling and maintaining hope in students, as well as a sense of purpose, meaning and belonging, has stood Mentone Girls Grammar in good stead. Looking ahead, Charles has a firm belief in the empowerment of young women and in the immense value of equipping them with the self-belief and resilience that will serve them well in the world outside the school gates. “Our duty at the school is to nurture young women into the community and society that they will be part of,” says Charles. “I want our girls to be critical thinkers because the world needs that. We want to help develop young women who can question, use their voice for good and who are unafraid of listening to their conscience and acting accordingly. “I want our girls to have the resilience to adapt to an ever-changing landscape. I want them to be flexible and open in their thinking, and I want them to be as human as possible because the humanity deep inside them will see them lead a full and good life.” Creating an environment that recognises the importance of community and of healthy and respectful relationships is a cornerstone of a good school, says Charles.

I N DEPE N DE N T SCHOOL S GU IDE 2021

“The best schools explicitly nurture community and relationships that bind everyone to each other – staff in their faculties, students in the classrooms and families. Schools forget the importance of relationships at their peril,” she says.


A DV ER T IS IN G F E AT UR E

“In Mentone, we have the beauty of being able to see the community that we sit within. We have a long history in this community, which is illustrated by our many connections to local organisations, such as surf lifesaving and Moorabbin

Airport, where our students can learn how to fly.” Strong relationships and community inevitably foster essential values of purpose, meaning and belonging – all values that Charles gives a high priority. “Relationships are the core means by which a young person will flourish. If they are seen, heard and known, we can provide them with purpose, meaning and a sense of belonging,” she says. “I want well beings at this school, and well beings are formed through relationships, being given a sense of purpose about who they are and what they’ve got to offer, and being able to find meaning, and belonging. When that is all in place, you get top ATARs, and you see girls getting their pilot’s licence because they have a strong sense that they can be who they need to be.” As well as an expansive academic curriculum, Mentone Girls’ Grammar places great emphasis on extra-curricular choices and on student wellbeing with an age- and stage-appropriate pastoral care program. Girls are also encouraged to develop leadership skills and to pursue their passions. “We provide many pathways in the curriculum where students can explore their interests and discover their leadership abilities,” explains Charles. “In year 6, the girls receive a badge and portfolio – and they lead their peers in that portfolio for the year. There are also leadership opportunities with the student executive and house captain roles, but I expect our girls to lead with or without a badge. In essence, we are in the business of providing students with hope, which is the most glorious thing to give a young person.”

‘Our duty at the school is to nurture young women into the community and society that they will be part of.’ NATALIE CHARLES

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH

I N DEPE N DE N T SCHOOL S GU IDE 2021

29


Empowering Girls

Where every girl is known, seen and heard. APPLY TODAY mentonegirls.vic.edu.au


Mentone Girls’ Grammar

11 Mentone Parade, Mentone VIC 3194

TH E BA SIC S

Now is the time for women to thrive, to take their place as role models and leaders in our society in ways not previously seen.

Enquiries

Because we are a small school with a big history, we are in the

03 9581 1200

enviable position of being able to create an environment

mentonegirls.vic.edu.au

where every girl is known, seen and heard so that a strong

info@mentonegirls.vic.edu. au

sense of belonging, underpinned by high quality teaching and

Years

learning, is a feature of their time with us. Principal Natalie Charles Natalie Charles was appointed to the position of Principal in 2020, not only for her sectoral experience and outstanding educational

ELC – Year 12

For whilst we may be blessed with state of the art facilities, a brand new Aquatic Centre and recently laid playing fields,

Denomination

the true measurement of a school’s worth lies not in its

Anglican

physical environs nor in the glossiness of a prospectus but in

Gender

the quality of relationships that create the daily experiences

Girls only

for its students. It is in how well its students are taught and

Fees

mentored; challenged and nurtured to be the kind of

$12,215 – $27,515

thoughtful, compassionate, creative, intelligent and moral

Boarding \ No

leaders that our world needs right now.

Scholarships \ Yes

leadership but also

ATAR \ Dux 99.95

for her passion,

(2020 data)*

empathy and humour, and fierce commitment to excellence in girls’ education.

* Results are provided by the school, Domain does not warrant their accuracy

BELONGING

H O PE

PU R P O S E

Q UA LIT Y T E AC H I N G

With relationships forming

We have the fundamental

Through our holistic

Our teachers are dedicated

the cornerstone of any great

belief in the potential,

approach of supporting the

mentors and facilitators

school, it is no surprise that

humanity and goodness of

whole girl we are focused on

from ELC to Year 12. They

our nurturing environment

every child. For it is with hope

our purpose – empowering

exceed our expectations

creates a strong sense of

that we “find reasons” to

students to become

because they love their

belonging that underpins

strive, to learn and to grow.

confident, capable young

students and vocation in

women.

equal measure.

their time with us.

I N DEPE N DE N T SCHOOL S GU IDE 2021

31


HAPPY

&

HEALTHY

HIGH ACHIEVING Mentone Grammar’s academic, cocurricular and wellbeing programs are designed for the holistic development of our students both on site and off site so that they can achieve their personal best and be happy and healthy young people. This is delivered within our highly acknowledged Together-Apart-Together coeducational model. From our Early Learning Centre through to Year 12, we provide age and stage appropriate programs designed to engage the modern learner in a dynamic environment.

EXPERIENCE MENTONE GRAMMAR AT A SCHOOL TOUR Book online or contact us for more information at: www.mentonegrammar.net

www.mentonegrammar.net 63 Venice Street Mentone T: +61 9584 4211


Mentone Grammar

63 Venice Street, Mentone VIC 3194

TH E BA SIC S

Established in 1923, Mentone Grammar is an Anglican independent school rich in tradition and contemporary in

Enquiries

thinking. We take a leading role in educating girls and boys

+61 3 9584 4211

with our unique co-educational model that is responsive to

mentonegrammar.net

children’s development from ELC to Year 12.

enquiry@mentonegrammar. net

Mentone Grammar is renowned for its successful learning model of Together-Apart-Together, where girls and boys in the

Years

Principal

Middle Years (5-9) learn within a coeducational environment

ELC – Year 12

Mal Cater

in gender specific classes. In Early Learning through to Year 4

Denomination

and in Years 10-12, students learn in a fully co-educational

Anglican

environment.

Gender

Mr Cater became Principal of Mentone Grammar in 2007,

We are ideally located by the beach and close to public

continuing his long

transport. In addition to our Mentone Campus, our school also

association with the

provides 17 hectares of lush playing fields at Keysborough and

school. As an Old

a beachside camp at Shoreham on the Mornington Peninsula.

Mentonian (1981), he returned to the school after tertiary studies and employment in commerce in 1986.

Co-educational Fees $15,360 – $30,283 Boarding \ No

Our Creativity Centre is an outstanding facility which includes a 450-seat theatre, visual arts studios for painting,

Scholarships \ Yes

sculpture, drawing, digital photography, printmaking and

ATAR \ Median 84, Dux 99.7*

visual communication design and specialist labs for robotics, animation, 3D printing, materials and food technology. In addition, there is a recording studio which is part of an extensive new music school and drama studio. School tours are held every term, or private tours are offered by appointment with the Registrar.

* Results are provided by the school, Domain does not warrant their accuracy

ARTS

SPORT

SCIENCE

G R E E N WAYS

Our school also has a

Mentone Grammar has a

Our state-of-the-art Science

Our unique Greenways

deserving reputation as a

proud sporting history and is

and Environmental Studies

Program for Year 9 includes

leader in the visual and

a powerful contender in the

Centre with specialist

running their own campus

performing arts with an

AGSV program. Our Coaching

laboratories for chemistry,

cafe, learning valuable skills

events calendar filled with

Academy provides specialist

biology, physics and

in hospitality, financial

extraordinary productions

coaching in a broad range of

environmental science

literacy, marketing and

and celebrations of artistic

sports and makes the most

provides students with the

business. As well as four-

and performance excellence.

of our excellent sports

resources they need to

week Learning Journeys

facilities.

engage with our challenging

away from the classroom.

curriculum. I N DEPE N DE N T SCHOOL S GU IDE 2021

33


NURTURING CURIOSITY & INTEREST

Science and the arts work hand in hand to inspire and engage young learners. BY EFFIE MANN

34

BALANCING STEM AND THE ARTS

A

lannah Tuohy is “extremely interested” in outer space. Mention the chemistry of icy moons or the possibility of extraterrestrial life and her voice brightens with enthusiasm. “I’m looking at a course in bioinformatics and chemistry, and in the future, I’d like to work as a researcher,” she says. The science whizz has an impressive record. Recently awarded an Australian Youth Aerospace Leader Scholarship and a virtual software development award, Alannah was selected to attend the National Youth Science Forum in Canberra in January. She credits much of her success to the “supportive, tight-knit community” of Sacré Cœur, an independent Catholic college for girls, in Melbourne’s southeast, where she is in year 12. “The teachers really take the time to make sure each person understands the concepts and gets the support they require,” she says. It’s no surprise, then, that Sacré Cœur inspires girls’ involvement in STEM disciplines, but the school also champions the creative arts. Indiana Rickard-Smith, who graduated in 2020 with a perfect score in media and has been selected to exhibit her work alongside other high-achieving students in Victoria’s Top Arts program, says her artistic passions and abilities were “validated and encouraged” by the school. It’s this cross-curricular approach, connecting scientific and artistic exploration, that Sacré Cœur principal Adelina Melia-Douvos says supports contemporary learning. “We offer our girls a wide-ranging and

I N DEPE N DE N T SCHOOL S GU IDE 2021

highly engaging curriculum, where they can explore their passions and interests,” she says. “They will always find an area of study in which they can really excel, something that ignites their passion and gets them excited about coming to school each day.” A new, four-level building, which will open to students during term two, neatly underscores her point. Designed by architect Paul Hede, of Hede Architects, the impressive modern space links the existing older buildings


beautifully. It will provide students of all ages with access to state-of-the-art classrooms, science labs, research libraries, and studios for photography and art. “Our holistic approach to education will be complemented by the new building” Melia-Douvos says. “In bringing together classes across disciplines, we are encouraging students to remain curious and interested in all aspects of the curriculum.” The spaces will flow easily between

each other and from indoor to outdoor, providing classrooms with a healthy dose of natural light and fresh air, and encouraging collaboration amongst students of all ages. “The idea is ‘around the classroom’,” Melia-Douvos says. “We want students to move around and find new ways to work together, to collaborate on projects comfortably and in an environment that inspires and supports them.” With this at the forefront of the design, the new building has breakout areas throughout, where students can spill from classrooms and continue to discuss and work together in smaller groups. Even the deep stairs have been designed for students to sit together and discuss what they’ve learnt in class. A rooftop garden will be able to host larger plays and performances, bring multiple class groups together and double as a classroom when desired. The building also has a modern attitude, with an energy-efficient design that keeps it cool in summer and warm in winter. Other environmentally-friendly additions include solar panels and toilets that flush captured rainwater. Melia-Douvos says a lot of consideration has gone into choosing furniture too. Adaptable modular furniture and cosy nooks encourage students to curl up with their reading material, research in comfort or gather with peers. Colours and textures have also taken careful planning. “We wanted to create rooms that are comfortable and soothing but also inspiring and conducive to learning.”

‘In bringing together classes across all disciplines, we are encouraging students to remain curious and interested in all aspects of the curriculum.’ ADELINA MELIA-DOUVOS

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH

I N DEPE N DE N T SCHOOL S GU IDE 2021

35


Her f u tu r e is b r ig h t With a proud tradition that has traversed two centuries, Sacré C±ur has always educated young women to meet the needs of an ever-changing world. Our experienced and empathetic teachers cultivate minds, hearts and hands, nurturing young women to embrace the future with courage and kindness. Guiding girls with care from Prep through to VCE, at Sacré &±XU we create confident and empowered young women. Book a tour at www.sac.vic.edu.au -172 Burke Rd, Glen Iris.

Courage X kindness = the Sacre Coeur way

Sacré Cœur


Sacré Cœur

172 Burke Road, Glen Iris VIC 3146

TH E BA SIC S

The transformation of heads and hearts lies at the heart of a Sacré Cœur education. Our holistic approach to educating

Enquiries

young women unites academic endeavour with a deep

+61 3 9835 2700

commitment to each child; this is the truest expression of the

sac.vic.edu.au

Sacré Cœur way.

admissions@sac.vic.edu.au

Laughter, inclusivity, friendship and diversity of opportunity

Years

are evidenced in a Sacré Cœur education. Our students feel a

Prep – Year 12

Principal

palpable sense of belonging and connection to their lived

Adelina

experience and benefit from of a rich diversity of faiths within

Denomination

Melia-Douvos A passionate and highly experienced women, Adelina

them to think broadly about issues impacting the world, we

student wellbeing, knowing it is the foundation to the holistic growth and achievement of each student. She has been at Sacré Cœur since 2011.

Girls only

community. Through immersion experiences, a shared commitment to social justice and an education that guides

deep commitment to

Gender

The girls are guided to be innovative and responsive to their

educator of young Melia-Douvos holds a

Catholic

our community.

Fees Prep $4,783 – Year 12 $27,379 Boarding \ No

nurture our students to be agents of change. They are encouraged to raise their voices and to look outwardly,

Scholarships \ Yes

applying their wisdom and skill.

ATAR \ 90.05*

Our students learn from highly qualified and passionate teachers, many of whom are curriculum experts and VCE assessors. Our teachers embrace each child as an individual, meeting their learning and wellbeing needs; as a result, our young women flourish and achieve exceptional results. We are privileged to belong to an international Sacred Heart family of over 150 schools across 41 countries.

* Results are provided by the school, Domain does not warrant their accuracy

JUNIOR SCHOOL

Y E A R 9 PR O G R A M

C R E ATIVIT Y

N E W FAC I LIT I E S

Children are naturally

Called Notre Monde, the

Creativity is a cornerstone of

From mid-2021, we will enjoy

enthusiastic and curious.

program focuses on fostering

a Sacré Cœur education.

exciting new learning spaces

The learning experiences we

growth in resilience,

From the creative and

in our four-storey science,

deliver build upon their

communication, teamwork,

performing arts to design

technology, arts and

inquisitiveness in a

creativity, leadership and

thinking in STEM, we nurture

resource centre. Students

stimulating and caring

problem solving.

creative thinking so that our

will learn in inspiring and

environment. Our new fee

Mindfulness, community

young women can see and

collaborative spaces,

schedule makes it more

service and physical

solve the challenges of today

including a rooftop garden

accessible than ever before.

challenge also form an

and the future.

and specially designed junior

integral part.

playgrounds. I N DEPE N DE N T SCHOOL S GU IDE 2021

37


Connected. Challenged. Cared for. Book a school tour at shelford.vic.edu.au Shelford Girls’ Grammar 3 Hood Crescent Caulfield, phone 03 9524 7333


Shelford Girls’ Grammar

3 Hood Crescent, Caulfield VIC 3161

TH E BA SIC S

With a rich and proud history of educating girls, Shelford Girls’ Grammar is a small, inclusive school with a wonderful sense of

Enquiries

community. For 123 years Shelford has been a strong advocate

+61 3 9524 7333

for girls’ education, preparing girls and young women for a

shelford.vic.edu.au

complex and changing world.

information@shelford.vic. edu.au

Our school has an outstanding academic tradition and Principal Katrina Brennan With a child-centred philosophy of education, Katrina’s

offers students a range of subjects, right through from Prep to

Years

VCE level. Shelford has exceptional Visual and Performing Arts

Prep – Year 12

programs, extensive sporting opportunities and a strong co-

Denomination

curricular program including exchanges, camps, debating and

Anglican

a unique Year 9 Challenge program.

Gender

Our students flourish because they learn in a community

passion for engaging

that nurtures, stimulates and challenges them, and in which

and empowering her

they are encouraged to be courageous. Our girls are able to

students is matched

explore, be curious and try out new things in a supportive,

by her deep connection to the Shelford community and respect for the diversity within it.

Girls only Fees POA Boarding \ No

positive environment, where high standards and the pursuit of

Scholarships \ Yes

excellence are part of the historical fabric of the school. Exceptional teaching staff who are highly qualified and passionate educators work collaboratively to know and nurture each and every student. ● A wonderful sense of community ● Inclusive, welcoming students from all backgrounds ● Each student is known and valued ● Outstanding academic tradition and excellent VCE results ● Extensive sporting opportunities ● Exceptional Visual and Performing Arts programs

R E S PE C T

I N T E G RIT Y

PA S S I O N

C R E ATIVIT Y

Sitting at the core of every

Courteous, reliable, honest,

Within a culture that fosters

Shelford students are taught

interaction at Shelford,

loyal and trustworthy

a love of learning, Shelford

to embrace the challenges of

students are taught to

behaviour is encouraged and

students are given the

the 21st century and respond

respect any difference in

developed in students. They

freedom, courage and

with curiosity, imagination

others, be mindful of the

make ethical and principled

confidence to try new things,

and innovative thinking.

needs of their peers and care

decisions for themselves,

and encouraged to discover

for their community through

and our community.

and develop their strengths

engagement and service.

and interests.

I N DEPE N DE N T SCHOOL S GU IDE 2021

39


She

who dares

Courage to take risks Curiosity to explore Strength to lead

ST CATHERINE’S SCHOOL www.stcatherines.net.au

Toorak VIC ELC to Year 12 Day & Boarding School for Girls (ELC includes boys)


St Catherine’s School

17 Heyington Place, Toorak VIC 3142

TH E BA SIC S

St Catherine’s girls dare to reach their potential through approaching all endeavours with the courage to take risks, the

Enquiries

curiosity to explore and the strength to lead. The moment a

+61 3 9822 1285

student walks through Heyington Gates, there is the

stcatherines.net.au

possibility to prosper, behind every door, in every classroom

admissions@stcatherines. net.au

resides an impending miracle.

Years

Here, there is a deep commitment to exploring every Principal Michelle Carroll Mrs Michelle Carroll is passionate about providing a progressive, innovative and engaging educational environment, where individual strengths flourish and girls are

possibility with every student, expanding a sense of

3YO ELC – Year 12

themselves and nurturing the promise that resides within

Denomination

every student.

Non-denominational

The school environment plays a key role in fulfilling the

Girls Prep – Year 12

the practice of inquiry. At St Catherine’s, our academic

Fees

approach to learning aims to empower students to think, both

$15,460 – $36,040

creatively and critically, developing a deeper understanding of

Boarding \ Yes

themselves and the complex world in which we live.

Scholarships \ Yes

A strong focus on the skills required in the 21st century including problem solving, communication, negotiation,

into confident and

presentation, planning and research skills encouraging a

women.

Co-educational – ELC,

education which, at its core, develops rigorous thinking and

empowered to grow capable young

Gender

potential of each student and our commitment is to an

climate that enables our girls to speak out, speak often and feel comfortable in doing so. Our students graduate well prepared for their futures with the support provided to explore tertiary pathways and career opportunities that enhance their capacities and individual employability.

WELLBEING

ELC

JUNIOR SCHOOL

SENIOR SCHOOL

The physical, emotional and

The environment at

Our Junior School education

Our new Senior Years

social wellbeing of our

St Catherine’s supports

embraces the Harvard

Academic Model includes the

students is at the forefront

every child to reach their

University led Cultures of

introduction of Independent

of all that we do at

potential through

Thinking approach. Small

Learning Tutorials (ILTs). ILTs

St Catherine’s. Our

exploration, imagination,

class sizes, personalised

embrace the benefits of both

integrated approach

discovery and belonging. Our

academic care and

face-to-face teaching and

encourages positive

range of specialist classes

exceptional educational

online delivery to include

relationships, a commitment

including PMP, Music, French

opportunities ensure

flexi-tutes, masterclasses

to learning and the

and STEM build on their

students engage

and asynchronous online

development of leadership.

sense of discovery.

purposefully with learning.

tutorials.

I N DEPE N DE N T SCHOOL S GU IDE 2021

41


The Known

Bayside’s School of Choice

Book a tour today at stleonards.vic.edu.au

At St Leonard’s College we believe that by giving each child a strong sense of being known, nurtured and loved, we develop in them ������������������������������ �����������������������

The Nurtured

��������������������������������� ����������������������������������� throughout a student’s life at the �������������������������������� the strengths, weaknesses, interests and passions of their students and regularly meet with them to discuss and support their personal and academic development. The program is based on our whole child philosophy of pastoral care, which seeks ������������������������������������������ and values young people need today and tomorrow.

The Loved

163 South Road, Brighton East VIC 3187 9909 9300


St Leonard’s College

163 South Road, Brighton East VIC 3187

TH E BA SIC S

St Leonard’s College is one of Australia’s leading independent co-educational schools and Melbourne’s bayside school of

Enquiries

choice, educating students from ELC3 to Year 12.

+61 3 9909 9300

Renowned for pedagogical innovation and leadership, and a

stleonards.vic.edu.au enrolment@stleonards.vic.

strong community spirit, we have been providing young people

edu.au

with exceptional educational experiences for more than 100

Years

years. Principal Stuart Davis Stuart Davis, is a highly experienced educational leader committed to providing young people with an exemplary education. He seeks to uphold the St Leonard’s College tradition of excellence, community spirit and a strong sense of care.

ELC – 12, VCE and

Our students are educated in a physically, emotionally and

International Baccalaureate

spiritually safe environment where they are genuinely known,

Diploma Programme

nurtured and loved. We are unwavering in our commitment to

Gender

developing the whole child – head, heart and soul.

Co-educational

In addition to the VCE, we offer the International

Fees

Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (IBDP) – the tertiary entrance qualification most respected and widely recognised

$19,557 – $33,351

by the world’s leading universities. Our highly qualified and

Boarding \ No

committed staff teach across both the VCE and IBDP,

Scholarships \ Yes

ensuring our students enjoy the best support and tuition

ATAR \ Combined 90.85*

available. Our students excel academically and enjoy a diverse

IB \ 96.88*

array of co-curricular experiences. Our outstanding facilities include the recently completed: world-class performing arts centre, STEM laboratories, and purpose-built Year 12 centre. St Leonard’s College welcomes waitlist applications for places in Junior School (ELC, prep and Years 1 to 4); Years 5, 7, 10 and 11. Limited places are also available in other year levels as they arise.

* Results are provided by the school, Domain does not warrant their accuracy

ACA D E M I C

C O - C U R R I C U LU M

WELLBEING

S O C IA L J U S T I C E

Our extensive range of

Students develop skills and

Our commitment to student

Our education prepares

subjects includes

interests in debating, public

wellbeing and the highest

students to take their place

Mathematics, Science, LOTE,

speaking, drama, music,

standards of pastoral care is

in the world and make

English, Music, STEM and a

sport, photography, media

unwavering. Ensuring each

meaningful contributions to

range of humanities and

production and outdoor

child feels safe and valued,

society. Our students are

social sciences. Students

education. Our students

and develops a strong sense

passionate about helping

excel in the da Vinci

enjoy success in state,

of belonging is paramount to

those in need through fund-

Decathlon, Tournament of

national and international

the St Leonard’s College

raising activities and

Minds and Future Problem

competitions.

educational philosophy.

student-led social action

Solving.

programs. I N DEPE N DE N T SCHOOL S GU IDE 2021

43


ENGAGING WITH REALWORLD ISSUES

Hands-on programs are opening students’ eyes to real-world issues and setting them up for success. BY JOANNE BROOKFIELD

44

RISING TO THE CHALLENGES

H

anging in the corridors of Siena College in Camberwell are various embroidered textiles, handmade by the Kopanang women from Tsakane, South Africa. The Kopanang community project was created to provide these women, many of whom have been impacted by HIV/AIDS and endemic poverty, with the opportunity to learn embroidery and craft skills, which enable them to generate a small income. “That’s a really important visual reminder to the girls that our community extends to these people,” says Bronwyne Ilott, head of justice education at Siena, a Catholic girls’ school in the Dominican tradition. Each year – in non-COVID times, at least – year 11 students have the opportunity to travel there for one of the school’s two immersion programs. The other is an indigenous immersion program in the Northern Territory, offered to years 9, 10 and 11 students. “It’s a true immersion in every sense of the word,” says Ilott. “They leave comfortable, suburban Melbourne and they actually go and live in the homes of these women. “It’s transformative. Girls come back changed in all sorts of ways,” she adds, giving the example of a student who was so moved by developing this new perspective on the world that she went on to study global politics at university and is looking at humanitarian work. “She would not be unique, in that, that’s a lingering effect of that kind of experience.” Siena isn’t the only school tackling real-world topics in and outside the classroom by providing their students with experiences and programs that are not only allowing them to address the

I N DEPE N DE N T SCHOOL S GU IDE 2021

issues of our times, like social justice and climate change but equipping them with the skills to rise to these challenges as future adults and leaders. Yarra Valley Grammar, an Anglican co-ed school in Ringwood, embraces a World Religions Week and Diversity Week. “We’ve taken students out of the school to experience a range of cultural and social settings to open their eyes,” says chaplain Paul Joy. To learn about other beliefs has meant


visits to places of worship from Islamic, Buddhist, Jewish and Catholic faiths. “A highlight is always the Sikh temple in Blackburn who wouldn’t let us leave without serving us lunch – that’s 150 students all sitting in rows on the floor,” says Joy. Diversity Week has included visits to Chinese, Italian and Hellenic museums and students rolling up their sleeves and pitching in with feeding the elderly, disadvantaged students and the homeless.

Like Siena, which has an Eco Warriors group, formed with students across all year levels as part of its commitment to Sustainable Development Goals (a global agenda, adopted by countries in 2015), Caulfield Grammar School is also encouraging students to learn more about the natural environment and sustainability in a hands-on way at its Yarra Junction campus. In the mid-1940s, the Cuming family donated 335 acres to the school, and the result was a campus that would “provide students from the city an understanding of rural life in a setting with a strong focus on community living”, explains campus head Tim O’Connor. “Students are hands-on exploring paddock-to-plate concepts on the dairy farm, in the veggie garden and in the kitchen,” he says. “They are accommodated in purpose-built ecocabins that allow them to monitor their energy use. These things combine to encourage students to consider how our lifestyle choices can impact the world around us. “We owe it to our young people to make learning relevant to them. Welldesigned learning experiences allow students to understand how theoretical concepts apply in a real-world setting.” The benefits of this type of learning are transferable skills, like communication, negotiation, ownership and empathy, which apply beyond adolescence. “Our students lead the way for our school in terms of wanting to see the adults around them make responsible environmental choices, so I’m very optimistic that sustainability will remain an important consideration for them as adults.”

‘[Students] leave comfortable, suburban Melbourne and they actually go and live in the homes of these women ... It’s transformative.’ BRONWYNE ILOTT

I N DEPE N DE N T SCHOOL S GU IDE 2021

45


Apply now for 2023. Limited places available for 2022. Our future-focused and individual approach to each student’s journey ensures that they live meaningful lives inspired by a commitment to making the world a better place. Visit stmichaels.vic.edu.au Co-educational | K–12 | St Kilda | 8530 3310


St Michael’s Grammar School

25 Chapel Street, St Kilda VIC 3182

TH E BA SIC S

St Michael’s is one of Australia’s leading independent coeducational schools, educating more than 1200 students from

Enquiries

Kindergarten to VCE.

+61 3 8530 3310

Educational excellence matters at St Michael’s. We prepare

stmichaels.vic.edu.au enrolments@stmichaels.vic.

young people to flourish in the contemporary context, and

edu.au

enable them to build the skills and develop the personal Principal HEAD OF SCHOOL Terrie Jones Commencing as Head of the School in 2018, Mrs Terrie Jones’ experience in educational leadership complements a demonstrated track

qualities that will serve them throughout their lives. St

Years

Michael’s staff members are committed to exercising and

3-Year-Old Kindergarten –

challenge students while facilitating their individual growth.

Gender

We encourage students to develop their identity as learners

Co-educational

and work alongside them to pave their way to the destinations

Fees

they wish to embrace beyond school.

$20,221 (Kindergarten) –

St Kilda. Our location provides a vast array of opportunities to business communities for the betterment of the world.

outcomes.

$32,535 (Year 12)

We have the advantage of being a K-12 school on one site in

innovative, evidence-

meaningful student

Anglican

Our rich and diverse curriculum and co-curricular programs

learn from and with the creative, academic, not-for-profit and

based curriculum

Denomination

autonomous learning, problem-solving and collaboration.

record in developing

that translates into

Year 12

extending each student’s capacity for critical thinking,

Boarding \ No Scholarships \ Yes

Students perform, exhibit, play sport and learn in some of Melbourne’s most iconic, creative and professional spaces. Our welcoming and supportive environment enables each student to develop a strong sense of their gifts and to instil a purpose that will imbue their life with meaning.

* Results are provided by the school, Domain does not warrant their accuracy

K-12 E D U CATI O N

E XC E L L E N C E

WELLBEING

C O - E D U CATI O N A L

We have evolved our

Each student’s holistic

A focus on positive,

Learning together as equals,

approach to teaching,

development is our central

respectful relationships and

girls and boys develop a

learning and caring, building

concern. We strive for

trust gives life to the school’s

shared appreciation and

on our strengths as a

personal excellence in all

core values of dignity,

acceptance of each other.

Kindergarten to Year 12

learning areas, providing

respect, care and

Our students encounter a

school on one campus. We

students with clear

compassion, which are

range of approaches to

offer students greater

expectations and skilled

enacted daily in the quality

learning, personalities and

support, detailed guidance,

instruction while inspiring

of rapport that students

perspectives, underpinning

and increased diversity of

curiosity, motivation and

enjoy with their peers and

our commitment to

opportunities.

confidence.

staff.

inclusion. I N DEPE N DE N T SCHOOL S GU IDE 2021

47


FINDING PASSION AND PURPOSE

Engaging in co-curricular activities and clubs has a multitude of benefits. BY JOANNE BROOKFIELD

48

BEYOND THE CLASSROOM

T

he late British educationist and creativity expert, Sir Ken Robinson, defined in his book The Element a particular point at which natural talent meets personal passion, leading in turn to achievement at the highest levels. “It’s a fantastic book that talks about how finding your passion really helps you find yourself,” says Ivanhoe Girls’ Grammar School’s head of senior school and deputy principal Davina McClure. “I think students do find their element when they have that choice of being involved in a co-curricular activity.” At Ivanhoe, there are more than 30 clubs and activities available to students, in addition to performing arts groups and sports teams. “We have more than 20 ensembles that include choirs, chamber groups, orchestras and bands,” she says. As part of Girls Schools Victoria (GSV), Ivanhoe’s students have the opportunity to compete in week-day inter-school sports that include softball, badminton, volleyball, indoor cricket and hockey, with the school also offering its own sports program, which takes in different experiences like circuit training, aerobics and fencing. Those who might not be athletically inclined also have a range of other options, from areas as diverse as coding and chess, to gardening and knitting. “Co-curricular activities are significant for enriching students on an emotional, cognitive, physical, and social level,” says Megan Fritsch. As president of the Career Industry Council of Australia, Fritsch knows the value of such activities when it comes time for students to enter the workforce.

I N DEPE N DE N T SCHOOL S GU IDE 2021

“The rewards of co-curricular activities in schools have been researched pretty well and it is now ascertained that students who participate in these activities show better academic results, stronger relationships in schools and are more likely to lead a healthy and active lifestyle,” she says.


“Experiences and skills acquired through these co-curricular activities make students proactive and prepared for their future endeavours,” she adds, which is why they are so appealing to employers when they see them on CVs. For former Wesley College student Caity Price, this was certainly her

experience. Now 24, she is working at the Australian Securities and Investments Commission as a market surveillance analyst, having graduated with arts/law degrees and been admitted as a solicitor by the Supreme Court of Victoria. While attending Wesley from kindergarten through to year 12, she played violin in the orchestra and was on the school’s softball and skiing teams. “In some ways, I think being involved in co-curricular things took some pressure off doing well purely in academics at school,” she reflects. “It was nice to get away from studying and get involved in school in a capacity that wasn’t just about class work.” Discovering a passion for these sports, she also joined clubs outside of school, which opened up further social and travel opportunities. It also helped her transition into tertiary education. “Especially at uni, I played a lot of softball, and went to UniGames, which enabled me to get involved in campus life in ways I otherwise wouldn’t have,” she says. This included founding a softball club, which led to her sitting as a board member on ANU Sport. Looking back now, she can see so many other benefits that set her up for success. Not only did playing sports teach her about “hard work, diligence and empathy in understanding people from different backgrounds”, she says she also acquired a suite of professional skills such as “managing people, following through with a strategic purpose, creating both long and short term direction of an entity, managing logistics and finances”. “Without a doubt, I could not have gone without this on my resume when I was applying for grad jobs.”

‘Co-curricular activities are significant for enriching students on an emotional, cognitive, physical, and social level.’ MEGAN FRITSCH

I N DEPE N DE N T SCHOOL S GU IDE 2021

49


TOURS REGISTER TODAY Reserve your place at an upcoming campus tour or explore Wesley through a virtual tour today. wesley tours


Wesley College

Wesley College St Kilda Road Campus 577 St Kilda Road, Melbourne VIC 3004 Wesley College Glen Waverley Campus 620 High Street Road, Glen Waverley VIC 3150 Wesley College Elsternwick Campus 5 Gladstone Parade, Elsternwick VIC 3185

TH E BA SIC S

Wesley College is a leading co-educational, open-entry school. Established more than 150 years ago, the college has enriched

Enquiries

the lives of thousands of students through its outstanding

+61 3 8102 6508

liberal, broad-based curriculum. Students from a range of

wesleycollege.edu.au

international locations and cultures choose Wesley because of

admissions@wesleycollege. edu.au

our strong tradition of academic excellence, outstanding Principal Nick Evans Nick Evans has a 20year association with the college as a student, teacher and

curricular and co-curricular programs and state-of-the-art

Years

facilities.

3YO ECLC – Year 12

Wesley has three metropolitan campuses in Melbourne:

Uniting Church

● Glen Waverley, three-year-olds to Year 12

Gender

● St Kilda Road, three-year-olds to Year 12

Co-educational

Wesley is one of the top Victorian Certificate of Education

in leadership roles.

(VCE) and International Baccalaureate (IB) schools in

Following roles as

Australia, and one of the only schools in Victoria to offer the IB

Deputy Headmaster and Head of Senior School at Melbourne Grammar School, Nick returned to Wesley in 2019.

Denomination

● Elsternwick, three-year-olds to Year 9

Fees $23,110 – $34,610 Boarding \ Yes

continuum from Primary through to Middle and Senior Schools. We provide a diverse breadth of subjects for

Scholarships \ Yes

students to choose from, including six languages.

ATAR \ 86.4*

We offer a True Education, ensuring all students are enthused with a lifelong desire to learn, grow and contribute to the world.

* Results are provided by the school, Domain does not warrant their accuracy

CO - CURRICUL AR

WELLBEING

E X PE R I E N T IA L

B OA R D I N G

Our rich variety of co-

Each campus is organised

Wesley offers a unique

“Learning in Residence” at

curricular activities include

into three mini schools:

residential learning program

Glen Waverley enhances

visual and performing arts,

Junior, Middle and Senior

in Western Australia; and

students’ development

sport, music, outdoor

School. These provide

three Outdoor Education

across many areas. Students

education and community

holistic learning and pastoral

camps in Victoria at Chum

reside in contemporary

service, with 19 sports, 23

care suited to students’

Creek, Camp Mallana and

houses and access

bands, 21 chamber

developmental stages.

Lochend.

structured programs that

ensembles, 16 choirs, 10

focus on academic

orchestras, 7 musicals and

extension, life skills, career

4 plays.

preparation and wellbeing. I N DEPE N DE N T SCHOOL S GU IDE 2021

51


ADVENTUROUS

MINDS are expressive and imaginative. Original, passionate and persistent. Adventurous Minds create and innovate, �����������������������������������������������������������

BOOK YOUR PLACE AT ONE OF OUR REGULAR INFORMATION SESSIONS OR CAMPUS TOURS

www.woodleigh.school/enrol

M O R N I N G T O N P E N I N S U L A • E A R LY C H I L D H O O D T O Y E A R 12

5971 6100

woodleigh.vic.edu.au


Woodleigh School

Senior Campus and Main Reception – Years 7-12 485 Golf Links Road, Langwarrin South VIC 3911 Minimbah Campus – 3 YO ECC – Year 6 3 Minimbah Court, Frankston South VIC 3199 Penbank Campus – 3 YO ECC – Year 6 460 Mornington Tyabb Road, Moorooduc VIC 3933

TH E BA SIC S

A Woodleigh education provides more than just an excellent academic preparation for the future. It offers a journey of

Enquiries

experiential learning and discovery, which prepares each

+61 3 5971 6100

individual for life’s challenges beyond school.

woodleigh.vic.edu.au enrol@woodleigh.vic.edu.au

Woodleigh encourages students to be adventurous with

Principal

their learning. It affirms creativity, independence, self-

Years

motivation and initiative; elements you can sense as soon as

3YO ECC – Year 12

you enter the school.

Denomination

David Baker David is the progressive, community-minded principal who leads

Our three unique campuses, Minimbah in Frankston South,

passionate advocate for holistic education, he knows

Fees

boys and girls for adult life.

Visit website for details

We see the development of academic learning, personal

Boarding \ No

wellbeing, and student engagement as being interdependent.

Scholarships \ Yes

As a result, we promote the development of student outcomes across the essential elements of learning: the understanding of concepts, the acquisition of knowledge, the

staff flourish when

mastery of skills and the ability to perform meaningful tasks in

they have a sense of

real-world settings. We understand that such deep learning

and connectedness.

Co-educational

belief that this is the only suitable setting to educate both

that students and

agency, belonging

Gender

South, are entirely co-educational and committed to the

Woodleigh School’s development. A

Non-denominational

Penbank in Moorooduc and the Senior Campus in Langwarrin

happens best in safe, supportive and respectful environments where students can take risks, question their assumptions, respond creatively, and explore new ways of thinking.

A DV E N T U R O U S M I N D S

THE THREE Rs

M I N D, H E A R T, H A N D

R E A L WO R L D

Adventurous Minds are

The Three Rs, Respect for

We nurture the learning of

At Woodleigh, learning by

known, valued and

Self, Others and The

young people who can apply

doing is at our core. By

challenged by the expert

Environment, act as

their knowledge to solve real-

offering a real, meaningful

teachers and staff at

guidelines for behaviour in all

world challenges and make a

and in-context curriculum,

Woodleigh School. Here, staff

areas of Woodleigh School

difference in others’ lives. We

delivered by expert staff in

walk with students, guiding

life, with students

learn by doing, and we learn

an environment that is safe,

them to solve problems,

encouraged to employ them

socially – developing positive

supportive and respectful,

master skills, acquire

to help navigate any situation

relationships and promoting

deep, life-long learning

knowledge and develop new

they encounter.

active citizenship.

naturally occurs.

understandings. I N DEPE N DE N T SCHOOL S GU IDE 2021

53


A Xavier education can take you there. BOOK A TOUR xavier.vic.edu.au/our-tours

Building the Possible x a v i e r.v i c . e d u . a u


Xavier College

Senior Campus 135 Barkers Road, Kew VIC 3101 Burke Hall Campus Studley Park Road, Kew VIC 3101 Kostka Hall Campus 47 South Road, Brighton VIC 3186

TH E BA SIC S

Xavier College strives to form exceptional graduates through inspiring learning experiences and our distinct Jesuit

Enquiries

character.

+61 3 9854 5307

Xavier College was opened by the Society of Jesus (the

xavier.vic.edu.au admissions@xavier.vic.

Jesuits) in 1878 and to this day continues to enlighten

edu.au

generations of fine young men.

Years

“Cura Personalis” is a term that encapsulates a Xavier Principal

College education. In caring for the individual, our focus is to

William Doherty

develop our students’ heads, hearts and hands. This is key to

“With passion and purpose, we seek to forge young men of

Denomination

engage successfully in the challenging world they are entering.

Catholic

At the Kostka Hall and Burke Hall campuses, the college

character, of conscience,

Kindergarten to Year 4) and Middle Years (boys only, Years 5

compassion and

to 8) students. At the Senior Campus, Senior Years students

competent challenge our

Gender Co-educational 3-year-old Kindergarten – Year 4; boys only from Year 5 – Year 12 Fees

(boys Years 9 to 12) also have the opportunity to board.

Year 12 – $31,210

Our students are at the heart of all that we do. Through

students to pursue

their Xavier journey, we strive to form exceptional Xavier

their best, to make a

graduates who are authentic, spiritual, positive, inspiring,

contribution, and so

resilient and empathetic.

unlock their every

Year 12

forming the “whole person”, which will help our students

enrols both Early Years (co-educational, three-year-old

commitment. We

3-year-old Kindergarten –

Boarding \ Yes Scholarships \ Yes

potential.”

ACA D E M I C S

S E RVI C E

SPORT

B OA R D I N G

Xavier College is a high

Embedded within the

Sport plays a significant role

Boarding has been a part of

performing academic school

philosophy of a Jesuit

in the life of a Xavier student.

the very fabric of Xavier

and has been consistently

education is a commitment

The college provides a

since 1878. With outstanding

ranked within the top

to service. Students are

unique, participation-based,

staff to student ratios, the

secondary schools in the

encouraged to be “Men and

challenging and rewarding

Boarding House maintains a

state. Students are

Women for Others” and to

program that offers 29

personal feel where all boys

supported in an environment

utilise their God-given gifts

different sports across the

are known and engaged by

where they can flourish and

to be of service to those in

college’s three campuses.

the specialist boarding staff.

pursue excellence in all

the community and beyond.

things. I N DEPE N DE N T SCHOOL S GU IDE 2021

55


Empowering Girls

Where every girl is known, seen and heard. APPLY TODAY mentonegirls.vic.edu.au


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