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www.Oman.DoingBusinessGuide.co.uk

Doing Business with Oman

Muttrah Corniche, Muscat, Oman

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CONTENTS 7 Oman overview Welcome from Samantha Pileggi Director of Commercial Operations, Institute of Export & International Trade

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12

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Foreword from Hamish Cowell, British Ambassador to Oman

Introduction from Gareth Stevens, Director of the Department for International Trade Oman

Why Oman?

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16 About the Department for International Trade (DIT) 18 About UK Export Finance (UKEF) 24 About this Guide 2


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Help available for you

28 Why Oman? 29 30 31 32 33

• • • • •

Summary Geography Government Economic overview UK and Oman trade

40 Help available for you 42

43 44

• Support from the British Business Forum Oman (BBF) • Support from the Oman Chamber of Commerce & Industry (OCCI) • Support from Ithraa • Support from the UK Department for International Trade (DIT) • Support from the Institute of Export & International Trade (IOE&IT)

54 Getting here and advice about your stay 59 60 61 62

• • • • •

Entry requirements Local laws and customs Safety and security Natural disasters Health

66 Sector–specific opportunities 69

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73 74 76 77

• Opportunities in Oman • Government tenders • Special Economic Zone in Duqm (SEZAD) • Education and training sector • Energy sector • Healthcare sector • Infrastructure sector • Tourism sector


CONTENTS 82 Preparing to export 85 86 89

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• Consultation and bespoke research • Start-up considerations • Financial considerations

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How to do business with Oman

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• Legal considerations • Taxation • Customs and documentation 101 • Shipping your goods

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108 Business etiquette, language & culture 109 • • • • 110 • •

Religion Language Dress Greetings Meetings Summary

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116 What are the challenges? 117 • Challenges when doing business with Oman

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www.Oman.DoingBusinessGuide.co.uk

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CONTENTS Resources

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122 Resources 123 What does membership of the Institute of Export & International Trade mean?

136 Market experts contact details

126 IOE&IT Qualifications

155 Useful links

129 The British Embassy Muscat

163 Map of Oman

132 Supporting organisations contact details

166 Quick facts

148 Trade shows

SUPPORTING ORGANISATIONS

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Oman overview

The Sultanate of Oman is the third-largest state in the Arabian Peninsula, and is a founding member of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC). It is a stable, and relatively prosperous, business-friendly country in what is sometimes a difficult, but strategically important, region. The capital, Muscat, is a commercial centre and major port in the north, with traditional and modern architecture overlooking the Gulf of Oman.

Whilst Oman’s key economic priority investment is still in the oil and gas sector, its main economic goals are set out in the long-term strategy, ’Oman 2020: Vision for Oman’s Economy’ (Vision 2020). To diversify the economy away from reliance on hydrocarbons, Oman is developing other sectors such as the petrochemical, metals and minerals, ports and logistics, fisheries and tourism sector. The bilateral relationship between

MARKET EXPERTS

Thank you to our Market Experts


Oman and the UK is particularly close, with a long history. Many senior Omani business and political leaders were educated in the UK and consider the UK their second home, and business ties between the two countries are strong. Oman is now one of the UK’s largest export markets in the GCC, receiving £1.9 billion of goods plus £880 million of services from the UK in 2018. Furthermore, given its strategic position as a major trading hub in the region, Oman is an important partner and base for UK companies in the Gulf.

MARKET EXPERTS

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Welcome from Samantha Pileggi – Director of Commercial Operations, Institute of Export & International Trade

This ‘Doing Business with Oman Guide’ looks at the second-largest state in the Arabian Peninsula and a market with significant ties to the UK. A founding member of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) and the League of Arab States, Oman neighbours Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Yemen, making it a key transit point for the oil and gas industry. It is the oldest independent state in the Arab world and is also one of the more traditional countries in the Gulf region. Its population of five million people contains a significant number of expatriates. With English largely spoken and with the country ranked 68th in the World Bank’s 2020 ‘Doing Business’ rankings, several UK businesses are already operating in Oman, including Shell, BP, BAE and Rolls Royce. Indeed, the UK has often been among Oman’s largest investors. British standards are widely used in the country and there are thousands of UK expatriates living there.

Though the energy sector makes up around half of its GDP and almost three-quarters of its export earnings, recent diversification strategies from its government have opened opportunities for businesses from all sectors – particularly in infrastructure, healthcare and education. According to the ONS, the value of UK exports to Oman rocketed up to just under £1.5 billion in 2016 from around £750 million in 2015. The UK’s strongest exports to Oman have typically been machinery, education and training, construction products, defence equipment and business services.

There are, of course, challenges to be overcome when selling into Oman – as there are with any market. If you’re looking to set up a local operation, this can take time as you’re required to get a government licence and to employ Omani nationals. When

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exporting to Oman, you should also be aware of the risk of payment delays – though this is something the Institute can help you with through our template international terms and conditions, which include payment terms.

As mentioned, Oman is one of the more traditional Gulf nations in terms of culture, so sensitivity and respect for Islamic beliefs and practices is a must. In terms of business culture, don’t be put off if Omanis turn up late to your meetings as they are quite relaxed and flexible with their time, though they will expect their overseas visitors to be on time. Also bear in mind that, in Omani culture, the weekend takes place on Friday and Saturday.

Strong personal relationships are really important as Omani business people will tend to work with people they are familiar with and who they can trust. A degree of patience is therefore a must during the initial meetings and don’t be afraid to open up a little bit – they will want to get to know you!

As ever, we at the Institute are more than happy to support you should you enter the Omani market through our training courses, qualifications, technical helpline and online resources. Samantha Pileggi Director of Commercial Operations, Institute of Export & International Trade www.export.org.uk

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Oman. BP & Oman. There’s energy energy in There’s this pa rtnership. this partnership. In 2017 we delivered first gas from Khazzan, one East’s largest gas projects. Our of the Middle East’s innovative technology technology is enabling production of up innovative feet of gas per da y, energy that to 1 billion cubic feet day, vital to power power homes and businesses in Oman. is vital And as part of our long-term commitment to investment programme Oman our social investment wering generations of Omanis to come. is empo empowering We’re proud to help build a bright future future for for Oman. We’re


Foreword from Hamish Cowell CMG, Her Majesty’s Ambassador to the Sultanate of Oman

I am delighted to welcome you to this guide on doing business with Oman. The Institute of Export & International Trade is working with the British Government to help companies find new business opportunities globally, and we look forward to helping you enter the Omani market successfully.

The UK and Oman enjoy a special and long-standing friendship dating back hundreds of years, and which spans the whole of our respective societies – from political to defence to economic, and of course, to trade. Iconic British brands have had a long affinity with Oman; HSBC have been here for 70 years and are one of the largest banks in the country; BAE Systems have been here for 60 years and are a major supplier to the Omani Ministry of Defence; BP and Shell are leading players in the oil and gas sector; and British engineering and construction companies have built key national infrastructure, including the Sultan Qaboos Grand Mosque and Royal Opera House in Muscat.

The UK has a very close commercial relationship with Oman, and we are proud of our market share here. Bilateral trade reached £1.6 billion in 2018. Oman is our 52nd largest export market and 65th largest trading partner. The UK also accounts for nearly 50% of all foreign direct investment (FDI) into Oman, with large recurring investments in the oil and gas sector.

Oman and the UK have developed particularly strong links in oil and gas, defence, financial and professional services, education, healthcare, and retail. Oman is a politically and economically stable country, which enjoys good relationships with all of its neighbours in the region. With an expansive Indian Ocean coastline, as well as its Gulf one, Oman offers a strategically advantageous place to do business in the Middle East and beyond – outside the Strait of Hormuz, on the open ocean, and in very close proximity to major east-west global shipping routes. Oman offers excellent opportunities for companies with high-quality products looking for long-term relationships. I hope that my DIT team in Muscat can join the IOE&IT in supporting you to develop your business with Oman – a market bursting with opportunities for companies who are prepared to invest the time and effort into understanding local needs and requirements. It’s useful to come in with an understanding of how the Omanis like to do business, and how to access decision makers. I hope this guide will help you explore it further. Please get in touch and ask how we can help.

Hamish Cowell CMG Her Majesty’s Ambassador to Oman

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Introduction from Gareth Stevens, Director – Department for International Trade Oman

At the Department for International Trade, our focus is on working with export-ready UK companies in order to promote British goods and services overseas, such that we can ensure British companies are successful operating in the global economy.

In Oman, we are a team of six people based out of the British Embassy Muscat. We work across a wide range of sectors (defence, oil and gas, education, healthcare, creative industries and infrastructure – just to name a few) to help British companies win export contracts, and to be generally successful operating in Oman.

Through our Overseas Market Introduction Service (OMIS), we are able to provide market access support, country and sector-specific business advice, and targeted in-country visits for export-ready UK companies.

We also offer tailored support to Omani companies seeking to expand their businesses into the UK, and we assist companies who are seeking to grow their UK businesses through outward direct investment into Oman. I trust that this guide will allow you to discover the many trade and investment opportunities to be seized in Oman. Our dynamic and experienced export and investment promotion team is committed to facilitating your business development.

We look forward to hearing from you.

Gareth Stevens Director – Department for International Trade Oman

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Department for International Trade (DIT) DIT is the British Government department that helps UK-based companies succeed in an increasingly global economy. DIT also helps overseas companies bring their high quality investment to the UK’s economy. DIT’s range of expert services are tailored to the needs of individual businesses to maximise their international success. DIT provides companies with knowledge, advice and practical support. Through a range of unique services, including participation at selected tradeshows, outward trade missions and providing bespoke market intelligence, DIT can help you crack foreign markets and get to grips quickly with overseas regulations and business practice.

With headquarters in London, DIT have professional advisers around the UK and staff across more than 100 countries. Contact DIT

Contact your local International Trade Team or Scottish Development International (SDI), Welsh Government (WG) or Invest Northern Ireland (INI) offices to find out more about the range of services available to you. You can find your nearest International Trade Team at:

https://www.great.gov.uk/contact/office-finder/ General enquiry number: +44 (0) 207 215 5000 Department for International Trade 3 Whitehall Place London SW1A 2AW United Kingdom Email: enquiries@trade.gov.uk

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WHO MADE SURE THE SHOW WENT ON FOR A THEATRE COMPANY IN THE MIDDLE EAST? Without support from UK Export Finance, White Light wouldn’t have been able to take on a major contract for a theme park in the Middle East. Working with their bank we were able to provide a government-backed guarantee. This freed up White Light’s working capital to take on the contract, which in turn boosted their revenues by over 20%. TO FIND OUT MORE VISIT GREAT.GOV.UK/GET-FINANCE AND DISCOVER THE EXPORTERS’ EDGE.


UK Export Finance is the UK's export credit agency 2XUPLVVLRQLVWRHQVXUHWKDWQRYLDEOH8.H[SRUWIDLOVIRUODFNRIILQDQFH RU LQVXUDQFH IURP WKH SULYDWH VHFWRU ZKLOH RSHUDWLQJ DW QR QHW FRVW WR WKHWD[SD\HU :HKHOS8.FRPSDQLHVRIDOOVL]HVDQGLQDOOVHFWRUVZLQIXOILODQGJHW SDLGIRUH[SRUWFRQWUDFWV:HSURYLGHLQVXUDQFHWRH[SRUWHUVDQG JXDUDQWHHVWREDQNVWRVKDUHWKHULVNVRISURYLGLQJH[SRUWILQDQFH,Q DGGLWLRQZHFDQPDNHORDQVWRRYHUVHDVEX\HUVRIJRRGVDQGVHUYLFHV IURPWKH8. $VWKHZRUOG VILUVWH[SRUWFUHGLWDJHQF\HVWDEOLVKHGLQZH YH EHHQLQQRYDWLQJVLQFHGD\RQH/DVW\HDUZHSURYLGHGśELOOLRQRI VXSSRUWIRU8.H[SRUWVKHOSLQJFRPSDQLHVVHOOWRPDUNHWV DURXQGWKHZRUOGDQGVXSSRUWLQJDQHVWLPDWHG8.IXOOWLPH HTXLYDOHQWMREV RIDOOFRPSDQLHVVXSSRUWHGZLWKILQDQFHDQGLQVXUDQFHZHUHVPDOO WRPHGLXPVL]HGEXVLQHVVHV.

To check your eligibility for trade finance and insurance Yisit: www.great.gov.uk/WUDGH-finance

UK Export Finance is the operating name of the Export Credits Guarantee Department (ECGD)

Website: www.gov.uk/uk-export-finance Telephone: +44 (0) 20 7271 8010 Email: customer.service@ukexportfinance.gov.uk


The Anglo-Omani Society (AOS) is a charitable organisation working with the objective of preserving the longstanding friendship between Britain and Oman. The Society was formed in January 1976 with HM Sultan Qaboos bin Said Al Said as the Society’s Patron and HE The Ambassador of the Sultanate of Oman in London as its President. The Role of The Anglo-Omani Society

• To advance the education of the British public about all aspects of Oman. • To advance the education of Omani nationals about all aspects of the UK. • To improve understanding between Oman and the UK and to promote a lasting friendship between the two countries. • To provide bursaries, scholarships and grants for Omani and British students and projects. The Society achieves its objectives through a series of cultural, educational and networking events held in London and Muscat. In London it arranges a regular lecture programme on subjects relating to Oman which showcase well-known and experienced speakers. The Society offers a focus for the government, academic and private sectors of both countries to develop their cross-cultural activities, and offers support for external projects that are aligned to its charitable objects.

In addition, The Anglo-Omani Society engages with younger citizens of both countries through its New Generation Group (NGG), which operates an active programme of events and annual delegations to the UK and Oman.

Corporate Membership of the Anglo-Omani Society is open to all organisations with a professional interest in Oman. If you have established operations in the Sultanate or you are exploring future opportunities, we recommend membership of the AOS as the principal bridge of friendship between our two nations. For any questions about this please contact our Membership Officer on membership@angloomanisociety.com. 34 Sackville Street | London | W1S 3ED Tel: +44 (0)20 7851 7439 | www.angloomanisociety.com


About International Market Advisor (IMA)

International Market Advisor (IMA) works with British and foreign government departments, Embassies, High Commissions and international Chambers of Commerce throughout the world. Our work helps to identify the most efficient ways for British companies to trade with and invest in opportunity-rich overseas markets.

During the last ten years IMA has worked with the British Government's overseas trade and investment department, the Department for International Trade (DIT) [formerly UK Trade & Investment (UKTI)], and has written, designed, produced, launched and distributed over one million copies of more than 100 countryspecific print and multi-media based reports, guides and publications, including the internationally-recognised ‘Doing Business Guide’ series of trade publications.

These are composed of market and industry sector-specific, multi-format print and digital trade reports, together with some of the internet’s most visited international trade websites – all of which are designed to advise and assist UK companies looking to trade with and invest in overseas markets. These reports and guides are then distributed free-ofcharge through the IMA and DIT global networks – over 500 distribution outlets in total. Further distribution takes place at global exhibitions, roadshows, conferences and trade missions, and IMA receives daily requests for additional copies of the guides from these networks and from businesses considering exporting. Each of IMA’s 'Doing Business Guides’ is produced in three formats: a full colour, glossy, paper-based brochure; a supporting fully-interactive and updatable multi-media based website; and the website contents available as a free-ofcharge downloadable smartphone/ tablet app.

The guides’ contents focus on the market in question, how to approach that market and the help and support available, and include informative market overviews, plus details of business opportunities, listings with website links to British and Foreign Government support services and essential private sector serviceprovider profiles.

Sponsoring a ‘Doing Business Guide’ therefore offers a unique opportunity to positively promote your products and services to high-profile business leaders, specific exporters, investors and effective business travellers who will be actively seeking out service providers to assist them in developing their business interests in the targeted markets.

For more information on IMA please visit our website:

www.DoingBusinessGuides.com Contact IMA Office address

IMA Ltd. 2nd Floor, 32 Park Green Macclesfield SK11 7NA Email: info@ima.uk.com

General enquiries switchboard T: +44 (0) 1298 79562

Media enquiries Newsdesk & out of hours T: +44 (0) 1298 79562

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ABOUT THIS GUIDE

This guide aims to provide a route map of the way ahead, together with signposts to other sources of help.

The main objective of this Doing Business with Oman Guide is to provide you with basic knowledge about Oman; an overview of its economy, business culture, potential opportunities and to identify the main issues associated with initial research, market entry, risk management and cultural and language issues.

We do not pretend to provide all the answers in the guide, but novice exporters in particular will find it a useful starting point. Further assistance is available from the Department for International Trade (DIT) team in Oman. Full contact details are available in this guide. To help your business succeed in Oman we have carefully selected a variety of essential service providers as ‘Market Experts’. The guide is available in 4 formats: •

the website: www.Oman.DoingBusinessGuide.co.uk

this full colour hard-copy brochure

a ‘free’ downloadable 'mobile device-friendly’ app – available from the

PDF download/e-flipbook (available on the guide website)

Apple App Store and Google Play Store

Doing Business with Oman Guide Team: Project Director:

Craig Smith

Sponsorship Managers:

James Clowes / Cheryl Hughes

Managing Editors:

Creative Managers:

Creative Consultants:

Production Co-ordinator:

Olivia Taylor / Brian Underwood Paul King / Claire King

Twistedgifted / www.twistedgifted.com

Megan Collingwood / Kitty Waldron-Draba

www.Oman.DoingBusinessGuide.co.uk

Printed using materials from sustainable sources

‘Doing Business with Oman Guide’ published in the UK by International Market Advisor Ltd. © 2019 International Market Advisor Ltd (unless otherwise stated). All rights reserved. Contains public sector information licensed under the Open Government Licence v3.0.

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Our Oman practice

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OMAN

The Sultanate of Oman is the third-largest state in the Arabian Peninsula, and is a founding member of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC).


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WHY OMAn?


Why Oman?

Summary Area: 309,500 km2

GDP per capita: US $18,970

Population: 4.18 million

Annual inflation rate: 0.9%

Urban population: 84.5%

General government gross debt: 53.4% of GDP

Population density: 15.604 people per km2

Fiscal balance: -7.9% of GDP

Population growth rate: 3.039% change

Current account balance: -US $4.3 billion/-5.5% of GDP

Capital city: Muscat

Exports of goods to UK: £182 million

Official language: Arabic

Exports of services to UK: £87 million

Currency: Omani Rial (OMR)

Imports of goods from UK: £1,069 million

Nominal GDP: US $79.3 billion

Imports of services from UK: £509 million

Real annual GDP growth: 1.8% [Source – FCO Economics Unit (Oct 2019), UN Statistics Division, World Bank, gov.uk]

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Visit the Website and download the free Mobile App


The Sultanate of Oman is the third-largest state in the Arabian Peninsula, and is a founding member of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC). It is a stable, and relatively prosperous, business-friendly country in what is sometimes a difficult, but strategically important, region.

In addition to providing the benefit of a stable rule of law and a developed market, Oman provides strong commercial opportunities for British businesses across a number of sectors, and is also a good starting point for UK companies wishing to enter other GCC markets.

It is roughly the size of the British Isles, with a population of over 6 million people, of which 44% are expatriates – 7,000 of whom are British nationals, the largest Western expatriate group.

Contact a DIT Export Adviser at: https://www. great.gov.uk/contact/triage/location/ for a free consultation if you are interested in exporting to Oman.

It is an Arab nation and its official religion is Islam. Although Arabic is the official language, English is widely spoken too. The bilateral relationship between Oman and the UK is particularly close, with a long history. Many senior Omani business and political leaders were educated in the UK and consider the UK their second home, and business ties between the two countries are strong. The largest source of foreign direct investment (FDI) in Oman by far is from the UK, which (according to Omani statistics) accounts for over 45% of total FDI, and there is a strong appetite in Oman to see more trade with the UK. Since Sultan Qaboos bin Said Al Said began his reign in 1970, Oman has experienced impressive levels of development and is seeking to capitalise further on its strategic location on the Indian Ocean with large-scale infrastructure developments, including the construction of an ambitious new special economic zone (SEZ) in the southern town of Duqm, a few miles from major Indian Ocean shipping lanes.

Contact UK Export Finance (UKEF) about trade finance and insurance cover for UK companies. You can also check the current UKEF cover position for Oman. See: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/country-coverpolicy-and-indicators#oman. [Source – FCO Overseas Business Risk: Oman, Government of Oman, DIT Trade and Investment guide: Oman, gov.uk]

Geography The Sultanate of Oman, once famous for its frankincense, is an Arab country about the size of the British Isles, located on the eastern coast of the Arabian Peninsula, and is bordered by Saudi Arabia to the west, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) to the northwest and Yemen to the southwest. It is strategically located at the confluence of the Persian Gulf and the Arabian Sea, close to major Indian Ocean shipping lanes, and shares marine borders with Pakistan and Iran. Most of the country’s interior is a dry, treeless and sandy desert, peopled mainly by Bedouin nomads and criss-crossed by oil and gas pipelines, whereas the verdant coastal Dhofar region in the south and the north coastal area

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between mountains and sea, are famous for their produce. The capital, Muscat, is a commercial centre and major port in the north, with traditional and modern architecture overlooking the Gulf of Oman. The interior climate is hot and dry, and the coastal climate is hot and humid, with temperatures of up to 43°C not uncommon in summer. The Dhofar region in the south experiences summer monsoon rains, although rainfall throughout the country is minimal. Winter temperatures are milder, averaging around 17°C.

Government Political context Sultan Qaboos bin Said Al Said came to power in 1970, ousting his father Sa’id in a bloodless coup, and reversing his father’s very conservative policies. He has since led the country through 49 years of steady development, relying on a moderate stream of oil revenue to build up a solid infrastructure with sound education and health systems. In 1996, Oman’s first written constitution and Basic Law established a succession mechanism, codified the system of government, set out provisions for the development of the political and legal systems, and provided a blueprint for the direction of future economic policy. The Basic Law also created an appointed upper chamber (State Council) to complement the elected 84-seat lower chamber (Consultative Council).

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Following mainly peaceful protests in early 2011 demanding more jobs, higher salaries, increased media freedoms and an end to corruption, the Sultan announced a number of reforms focusing on tackling unemployment, the establishment of 50,000 new jobs for Omanis, an increase in job seekers’ allowance, a statutory minimum wage and the introduction of an allowance to meet the rising cost of living.

requirement for expatriate workers to secure residence visas for their families to join them. There is also a national minimum wage and a minimum 3% annual salary increase which apply only to Omani employees. [Source – FCO Overseas Business Risk: Oman, gov.uk]

Economic overview The Sultan also introduced a number of amendments to Oman’s 1966 constitution, giving the elected Shura Council and the appointed State Council more legislative and regulatory powers. Oman now has good relations with its GCC partners (Bahrain, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Kuwait), as well as good working relations with Iran. Oman has therefore been useful in promoting further co-operation between the GCC states and Yemen and Iran. Business and labour laws All foreign workers are dependent on their employers for residency rights and are subject to a sponsorship system. The Omani labour law, which covers every person who is legally employed, gives both local and foreign workers a number of rights, including anti-discrimination rules, a framework for the resolution of labour disputes, and the recognition of women’s rights such as maternity leave. Trade unions are permitted to operate freely and have the right to strike. No one is permitted to work more than nine hours a day, or more than 45 hours a week, unless by mutual agreement. However, there are some employment restrictions on expatriates, for example, expatriate female workers often face difficulty getting work visas, and there is also a minimum wage

121 projects/initiatives were identified as part of Oman’s National Programme for Enhancing Economic Diversification (Tanfeedh), approved in 2016, which aim to accelerate diversification in targeted sectors such as manufacturing, tourism, and logistics. Oil and gas wealth has given prosperity to Omanis – nominal GDP in 2018 was US $82.2 billion and GDP per capita was relatively high at around US $19,000 in 2018. This prosperity is largely being invested into social development and modern infrastructure programmes such as those identified above. Whilst Oman’s key economic priority investment is still in the oil and gas sector, its main economic goals are set out in the long-term strategy, ’Oman 2020: Vision for Oman’s Economy’ (Vision 2020), originally launched in 1995 and in successive five-year plans. These goals are to create employment for Omanis by way of more private-sector jobs, and to diversify the economy away from reliance on hydrocarbons by developing other sectors such as: •

petrochemical

metals and minerals

ports and logistics

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fisheries

tourism

See Oman’s inward investment and export development agency (Ithraa) site at: https://ithraa.om/Economic-Overview for further details of its current ‘Vision 2020’ five-year development plan covering the period 2016-2020, as well as the next 20-year development plan, ‘Vision 2040’. Growth potential Oman’s real annual GDP growth in 2018 was 2.1% and there is now significant government spending on large-scale infrastructure projects as a result of a record oil and gas revenue and the government’s ‘Vision 2020’ strategy. See the World Bank’s Economic Update for Oman (April 2019) at: https://www.world bank.org/en/country/gcc/publication/omaneconomic-update-april-2019 for growth projections for 2020 and beyond.

Oman is ranked 68th out of 190 countries in the World Bank’s 2020 Ease of Doing Business Index (the UK ranks 8th): http://www.doingbusiness.org/en/data/ exploreeconomies/oman

The World Economic Forum’s Global Competitiveness Report 2018-19 ranks Oman 47th out of 140 (the UK ranks 8th): http://reports.weforum.org/globalcompetitiveness-report-2018/countryeconomy-profiles/#economy=OMN

Oman ranks 144th out of 190 economies for Ease of Getting Credit in the World Bank’s “Doing Business” report 2020. See: http://www.doingbusiness.org/en/data/ exploreeconomies/oman#DB_gc

Contact a DIT Export Adviser at: https://www.great.gov.uk/contact/triage/ location/ for a free consultation if you are interested in exporting to Oman.

Free trade agreements (FTAs) Oman is a member of the Greater Arab Free Trade Area (GAFTA), which gives it duty-free access throughout all GAFTA states.

Contact UK Export Finance (UKEF) about trade finance and insurance cover for UK companies. You can also check the current UKEF cover position for Oman. See: https:// www.gov.uk/guidance/country-cover-policyand-indicators#oman.

Oman also has FTAs with Singapore, Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Liechtenstein and the USA, and the GCC is negotiating an FTA with the European Union (EU).

[Source – World Trade Organization, FCO Economics Unit, DIT Trade and Investment guide: Oman, UKEF, gov.uk]

[Source – Government of Oman, DIT Trade and Investment guide: Oman, World Bank, FCO Overseas Business Risk: Oman, GAFTA, gov.uk]

World Rankings • In Transparency International's latest 2018 Corruption Perceptions Index (announced January 2019), Oman is ranked 53rd out of 180 countries (the UK ranks 11th). See: https://www.transparency.org/country/ OMN

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UK and Oman trade Oman is now one of the UK’s largest export markets in the GCC, receiving £1.9 billion of goods plus £880 million of services from the UK in 2018.

www.Oman.DoingBusinessGuide.co.uk


The UK’s main exports include: •

business services

machinery, tools and equipment

construction products

education and training

defence equipment

The UK is Oman’s largest source of foreign direct investment (FDI), providing over £3 billion of investment, particularly in the hydrocarbons sector. Benefits for UK businesses There are a number of reasons to choose Oman as an export destination. Benefits for UK businesses exporting to Oman include: •

the UK is Oman’s biggest foreign investor

the strong bilateral relationship between Oman and the UK

English is widely spoken and is commonly used as the business language

British standards are widely used

over 7,000 UK residents make up the largest Western expatriate segment

the majority of Western tourists come from the UK

Strengths of the market Strengths of the Omani market include: •

proximity to other Gulf markets

good connectivity by air to all major cities

strong government investment in infrastructure, healthcare and education

no personal income tax

full repatriation of capital, net profit and royalties

Many senior Omani business and political figures were educated in the UK, and consider it their second home. These strong business ties between both countries create a strong appetite for continued bilateral trade and investment. Furthermore, given its strategic position as a major trading hub in the region, Oman is an important partner and base for UK companies in the Gulf. There are a number of UK companies already operating in Oman including Carillion, Interserve, Taylor Woodrow, Atkins, Mott MacDonald, Petrofac, Jacobs, Turner & Townsend, Shell, BP, Ultra Electronics, Babcock, CfBT, BAE and Rolls Royce. In addition, a number of British banks, law and accounting firms and smaller service organisations also operate in Oman, and many Omani companies have UK partners.

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BP and Oman Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s energy in this partnership

A positive environment for investment Building an industrial facility the size of a small town in the middle of the desert and in less than four years would not be possible in a country that did not have a business-friendly environment and talented people. The Sultanate of Oman boasts both of these attributes and more â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and BP is proud to have been doing business here for many years. UK businesses considering doing business in Oman will find great capability and dedication. It is a youthful and tolerant country. English is widely spoken. At a time of rapid change throughout the world, Oman manages to embrace the challenges and opportunities this brings alongside great respect for its own rich heritage. At a strategic level, while oil and gas remain important to its economic future, the country is set on a course of diversification â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and the private sector is recognised as a crucial part of that. Enhancing the business environment, encouraging growth of the SME sector, improving government efficiency and modification of the Foreign Capital Investment Law will facilitate this. Raising education standards is also underway and will enhance local employment opportunities in the private sector. While the Duqm Special Economic Zone (SEZAD) is being developed as the biggest such area in the Middle East and will become a major marine, logistics and industrial hub for Oman and the wider region.


BP in Oman BP’s purpose is to provide heat, light and mobility solutions for a changing world. A world which is seeing rapid population growth, increasing demand for energy and a transition to a low carbon economy. Our business in Oman is a key part of this transition. We have in fact, in one form or another, been closely involved for almost a hundred years with the development of hydrocarbons in Oman. First oil, then gas was discovered at various locations across the country and BP’s presence has now grown to encompass a range of associated businesses which make a significant contribution to the economy and society at large. Our main area of activity today is the production of natural gas. Reliable gas supplies are vital for both the transition to lower carbon energy and for the aforementioned diversification into energy-intensive industries like petrochemicals, steel and aluminium. In addition to gas production, BP also operates several ‘downstream’ businesses, including petrochemicals, fuel bunkering, lubricants and technical services.

History of the Khazzan gas development Around a decade ago, BP became involved in appraising the Block 61 concession area in south-central Oman for potential gas production. This was a remote area where gas reserves were known to exist, but in challenging geological conditions, some five kilometres below the desert surface. A successful appraisal process saw BP awarded an Exploration and Production Sharing Agreement to explore for and produce gas from the area, which was then revised in 2013. A Joint Venture was set up, with BP having a 60% interest. Oman Oil Company for Exploration & Production now holds a 30% interest and PC Oman, a wholly owned subsidiary of Petronas, holds 10%. Known as Khazzan, this was to become one of the biggest ‘unconventional’ gas projects in the Middle East and BP’s largest-ever investment in Oman. It was also one of BP’s most technically-challenging and significant projects globally.


Getting to First Gas The Khazzan gas development Phase 1

1billion

ft3 gas per day

29,000 barrels

of condensate per day

Phase 2 (Ghazeer)

0.5billion ft3 gas per day

15,000 barrels

of condensate per day

From scratch, the equivalent of a small town had to be built, with people, materials and expertise all brought in from outside the area to do so. An entire infrastructure of transport links, utilities and accommodation was built even as drilling was beginning. In September 2017, just three and a half years after that work began, the first gas began to flow from the field. This marked the end of the first phase of project and, to the credit of all parties involved, was delivered ahead of schedule and below budget. Khazzan currently delivers around 1 billion cubic feet of gas and 29,000 barrels of condensate each day.

Looking to the future In April 2018, the second phase of Khazzan field development, called Ghazeer, was sanctioned. Development work is well underway here and the project is expected to come onstream in 2021, delivering an additional 0.5 billion cubic feet and over 15,000 barrels of condensate per day.


Our wider contribution to Oman (In Country Value) BP Oman’s overall goal is to create a sustainable legacy that supports Oman’s strategic goals for energy security and long-term economic diversification, while empowering local people, helping create a self-sufficient and progressive future. BP is proud to be supporting Oman in this regard and does so via an In Country Value (ICV) programme that has three main strategies: supporting local business growth and overall economic productivity; encouraging the development of Omani skills and capability; and generating employment and training opportunities. Working with Omani suppliers Contracts have been awarded to Omani companies across a wide variety of areas at Khazzan since the beginning of project development: everything from access road-building and other basic infrastructure provision to on-site catering and security. Around 40% by value of contracts have contributed to ICV since the start of the Khazzan project, while currently, 89% of contracts by number are held by Omani-registered companies (end 2018). A dedicated Vendor Development Programme and Joint Supplier Registration System have also been set up by BP to build capability to the benefit of the wider industrial sector. Omanisation and capability development Some 77% of BP Oman employees are Omanis - the aim is for that to reach 90% by 2025. Exciting career opportunities, worldclass training and development and an inclusive working culture are strong attractions offered by BP in Oman. Over 60 Omani graduates have been recruited to date via the Graduate Challenger programme launched in 2010. The Technicians Training Development programme was set up in 2012 to recruit Khazzan’s engineers of the future. In 2018, 20 technicians joined the 80 who had previously graduated from the programme. In 2019, BP Oman has around 20 staff working in BP’s worldwide operations, helping boost their capabilities. An increased focus on diversity and inclusion has resulted in a 40% increase in females being taken on by the business between 2017 and 2018.

Social Investment Programme BP Oman’s Social Investment Programme (SIP) celebrated its fifth anniversary in 2018 - around 55,000 people from across Oman have now benefitted from over 70 initiatives that have made up the scheme so far. Young people, entrepreneurs and communities are the main targets and the 2018/19 programme aims to build on the greater integration and connection between the different initiatives begun in 2017. This fifth edition of the SIP featured 19 initiatives and involved 14 partners, with the initiatives falling into three themes - Enterprise Development, Education and Energy Sustainability.


OMAn

If you are a UK-registered company you can benefit from a unique programme, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Exporting is GREATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, presenting real-time export opportunities that you can apply for online.


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HElP AVAILABLE FOR YOU


INTEGRATED PRODUCT Ports

Freezones

Freight

Logistics

USA

ASIA

EUROPE

CHINA MENA

HONG KONG

OMAN AFRICA

RE LOCATE

On the primary global trade routes

In the center of growing markets of GCC, Indian Sub-continent and African markets

On the East-West trade route 40% shorter shipping time from Asia to the GCC

RE CONNECT 18 Globally th

8 Globally th

2Weeks

Ports connectivity & service Roads quality

To major global ports


Help available for you

Support from the British Business Forum Oman (BBF) The British Business Forum in the Sultanate of Oman was established over twenty years ago as a group for business people with the objective of exchanging views and opinions about existing and potential business opportunities in the Sultanate and how best to promote trade between the United Kingdom and Oman. Each month BBF host an event in association with the DIT section of the British Embassy. Contact BBF at: http://www.bbfoman.org/ for further information. [Source – BBF Oman]

Support from Ithraa Established in 1996, Ithraa is Oman's awardwinning inward investment and export development agency. They are an ambitious organisation committed to promoting the business benefits of Oman to a global audience, strengthening the image and profile of the Sultanate as an investment and business destination, and building a strong economy. They offer a portfolio of confidential support services to companies interested in growing or establishing their business in Oman. Because of their unique alliance with government departments and the business community, they are able to offer:

Support from the Oman Chamber of Commerce & Industry (OCCI)

The Oman Chamber of Commerce and Industry (OCCI) was established in 1973 as a public utility organisation aiming to regularise business interests, and to develop, defend and represent them at different fora.

introductions to government, business support organisations and experts in areas such as research, ICT, PR and marketing

market intelligence based on your specific requirements

organisation of visits aimed at meeting decision makers and key areas of interest

a dedicated account manager to support the development of your investment project

relocation advice, such as availability and cost of commercial property

The OCCI is the representative of the private sector in local and international events and in all decisions of interest and is keen to develop the potential of the private sector using all available resources. The OCCI’s head office is in Muscat, and it has branches in all Arab governorates. Contact the Oman Chamber of Commerce and Industry at: https://chamberoman.om/ for further information.

For further information contact Ithraa at: https://ithraa.om/Contact-Us.

[Source – OCCI]

[Source – Ithraa]

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Support from the UK Department for International Trade (DIT)

find out about services offered by ‘GREAT’ partners

The UK Department for International Trade (DIT) provides tailored support packages for companies who are:

use the selling online overseas tool at: https://www.great.gov.uk/selling-onlineoverseas/ to find the best marketplaces to showcase your products online

take advantage of special deals negotiated by the government for UK businesses, and find out more about the UK Government’s E-Exporting Programme at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/ e-exporting

apply at: https://www.great.gov.uk/ export-opportunities/ for overseas export opportunities for your products or services

create a business profile at: https://www. great.gov.uk/find-a-buyer/, which will allow you to promote your products and services to international buyers

first time exporters (FTEs)

small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs)

medium-sized businesses (MSBs)

Business opportunities If you are a UK-registered company you can benefit from a unique programme, ‘Exporting is GREAT’, presenting real-time export opportunities that you can apply for online. This is part of the drive to significantly increase the number of UK companies exporting. ‘Exporting is GREAT’ is part of the UK Government’s ‘GREAT’ campaign, and presents live export opportunities to UK businesses across a range of media outlets and digital channels. Hundreds of these export opportunities, with a potential total value of more than £300 million, are hosted on: https://www.great.gov.uk/.

search for events, trade fairs, missions and webinars relevant to your sector or overseas markets at: https://www.events. great.gov.uk/ehome/index.php?eventid =200183029&

‘GREAT’ has tailored support and advice for UK businesses on how to start exporting or increase the amount of goods and services they sell overseas.

see upcoming DIT international ministerial visits at: https://www.events. great.gov.uk/ehome/index.php?eventid =200183333&

apply for a trade show access grant at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/ tradeshow-access-programme to attend an overseas event

contact a trade adviser in your area at: https://www.great.gov.uk/contact/ office-finder/

You can: •

43

read guidance for new, occasional and frequent exporters

Visit the Website and download the free Mobile App


Getting local market help to sell overseas DIT has trade specialists who can help you commission services from local experts overseas. This includes:

For further information about DIT services, see: https://www.gov.uk/government/ organisations/department-for-internationaltrade/about-our-services.

country and sector advice

[Source – DIT, gov.uk]

local market research

support during overseas visits

identification of possible business partners

preparation for exhibitions and events

To find out more about commissioning any of these services, contact a DIT Trade Adviser in your region at: https://www.great.gov.uk/ contact/triage/location/ for a free consultation, or see further details at: https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations /department-for-international-trade/aboutour-services. In-market support If you already trade internationally, and have decided Oman is part of your business strategy, you are advised to contact DIT at the British Embassy Muscat prior to your visit to discuss your objectives and what help you may need. See: https://www.gov.uk/world/ organisations/department-for-internationaltrade-oman#contact-us. They can provide a range of Oman-specific services for you, including the provision of market information, validated lists of agents/potential partners, key market players or potential customers; establishing interest from such contacts; and arranging in-market appointments. In addition, they can also organise events for you to meet contacts in Oman, or to promote your company and your products/services.

Support from the Institute of Export & International Trade (IOE&IT) Raising the profile of international trade qualifications and experienced members is only part of how IOE&IT membership is essential for any individual or business involved with global trade. Importantly, the IOE&IT also offer access to a unique range of benefits and services specific to international trade: •

Help with any export issues you come across. Our team of experts can help with questions on documentation, export controls, the UK Bribery Act, customs and VAT procedures, regulatory and compliance issues, insurance issues, payment terms, transport and logistics. Members get free access to our experts via a technical helpline. See: https://www. export.org.uk/page/Export_Helpline

A voice for your ideas and concerns. We represent your point of view and feed back to government, HMRC and other influencing bodies on issues that impact you, plus participate in Institute responses to central government with regard to proposed legislative changes

A complete range of international trade qualifications for those that have no experience, up to those who wish to qualify themselves to take a business degree. The Institute's qualifications are widely recognised as providing both

44


employers and employees with the necessary international business practice linked to satisfying career planning and development. See: https://www.export. org.uk/page/qualifications •

A range of short courses giving you the skills and expertise you need to gain a competitive advantage in the challenging and complex world of export, import and international trade. See: https://www. export.org.uk/page/TrainingCourses

An extensive events programme to help you share information and connect at every level in the international trade community, whether it is sector-specific or regional. See: https://www.export.org. uk/events/event_list.asp

Inclusion in surveys to research the attitudes and changes to world trade

Open to Export Open to Export is the IOE&IT’s free online advice service for UK companies looking to grow internationally. It offers free information and support on anything to do with exporting and hosts online discussions via its forum, webinars and social media, where businesses can ask any export question and learn from each other. Open to Export can be accessed at: http://opentoexport.com/. [Source – Institute of Export & International Trade]

For more information on how the IOE&IT can help you, or on becoming a member, contact the IOE&IT at: https://www.export. org.uk/page/about.

45

www.Oman.DoingBusinessGuide.co.uk


Side view of Muscat International Airport in Oman

OMAn

Your passport should be valid for a minimum period of six months from the date of entry into Oman.


54

GETTInG HERE AND ADVICE ABOUT YOUR STAY


Experience luxury and Exceptional hospitality at Hormuz Grand Muscat, A Radisson Collection Hotel

Individual, iconic & inspiring, Hormuz Grand Muscat offers a distinctive guest experience â&#x20AC;&#x201C; an invitation to immerse oneself in the best a location has to offer. It is enviably positioned between the Al Hajar Mountains; it is perfectly in tune with Omanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stunning nature, and is the ideal business and leisure destination.


a panorama of valleys and mountains. It is a fascinating place, where traditional design is supreme and the décor exudes elegance.

The Hormuz Grand Muscat prioritizes guests' comfort and creates a suitable environment with impeccable amenities that allow guests to concentrate on their business trips and feel at home when it’s time to relax. The Hotel also provided the right service and technology that helps the business traveller to feel at ease when staying here. Guests are treated to warm and efficient services and pampered with the famed Arabic hospitality, which imbue the Hotel with that distinct feeling of being at home.

With Oman’s expanding economy and business clientele, the Hotel stands prominently at the entrance to the business districts, occupying an enviable position in the market. Overlooking the mountains of Muscat, Hormuz Grand’s iconic style and modern features are designed to exceed the expectations of the modern traveller. All guest rooms and suites boast unique features and spectacular views, presenting

Hormuz Grand continues to hold its place at the top as the most favoured destination, despite the opening up of several new hotels within and outside the capital. Its location near the new Muscat International Airport and the Madinat Al Irfan development, which includes the exhibition center, has made it popular for business travellers.

Meeting expectations Opened on September 7th 2014, the Hormuz Grand Muscat has 231 elegantly appointed rooms and suites and enjoys a fabulous location in close proximity to the Muscat Hills Golf Club and Al Mouj Golf Course; it is the ideal base to visit all sites within Muscat vicinity. In addition to that, the Hormuz Grand offers 1478 square meters of exceptional conference and business spaces, which combined with the Hotel’s team of highly trained and experienced banqueting staff, can turn any event into resounding success. Surrounded by luxurious and modern touches, the stylish yet professional environment of the conference and meeting facilities is truly tailored to suit modern business.


Commitment to excellence Hormuz Grand, who was recently awarded the Oman’s Most Trusted Brand in the luxury hospitality segment, believes in the winning combination of luxury and exceptional experiences.

The ability of the team to engage with guests, understanding their needs and coming up with the exceptional elements, elevates the experience and is essentially what maintains return loyalty. The importance of personal experience combined with rich input of Omani hospitality enables the hotel to achieve a seamless human interaction during the service process

Led by a ‘Yes I Can!’ customer service attitude, guests will always feel welcomed and personally recognized. Spontaneous surprises and thoughtful gestures will create memorable moments for guests, whether they stay for a week or just come by for a meal.

While the warm and plush settings of the property plays a major part in attracting bookings, it is the character of a Radisson Collection Hotel that feels authentic to its location and offers the ultimate template for contemporary living – united by modern design and exceptional experience across dining, fitness, wellness and sustainability.

The easy access to the airport, free Wi-Fi, three restaurants serving world class cuisines, a spectacular pool, a well-equipped gym & leisure facilities and designated Spa make the Hormuz Grand Muscat the first stop in Oman for any traveller.

This is the key in ensuring successful events and repeat business.


Hormuz Grand Muscat, A Radisson collection Hotel P.O BOX 128, PC 111- Seeb, Muscat, Sultanate of Oman Telephone: +968 24350500 / Fax: +968 24350599 Email: reservations.muscat@radissoncollection.com radissoncollection.com/hormuz-grand-hotel


Getting here and advice about your stay

Entry requirements Passport validity Your passport should be valid for a minimum period of six months from the date of entry into Oman. However, Oman does not recognise dual nationality, so if you hold both British and Oman nationalities and this becomes known to the Omani authorities, they could confiscate either your Omani or British passport. Visas British nationals need a visa to enter Oman, which you should apply for before you travel. Applications for an e-visa can be made through the Royal Oman Police portal at: https://evisa.rop.gov.om/. UK Emergency Travel Documents UK Emergency Travel Documents (ETDs) are valid for entry, exit and transit in Oman, but they must have at least six months’ remaining validity, and can cause delays. You are therefore advised to carefully check your passport to ensure it is legal and valid so that ideally you can avoid the need for an ETD. Yellow fever certificate requirements You can check whether you need a yellow fever certificate by visiting the National Travel Health Network and Centre’s TravelHealthPro website at: https://travelhealthpro.org.uk/ country/170/oman#Vaccine_ recommendations. Travelling with medication Some prescribed and over-the-counter medicines available in the UK are banned in Oman, so if you are travelling to Oman with

59

prescription drugs, you will need to carry a copy of the prescription. For further information, check with Oman’s Ministry of Health at: https://www.moh.gov.om/en/ home well in advance of travel. [Source – Government of Oman, FCO Foreign Travel Advice: Oman, gov.uk]

Local laws and customs Local laws reflect the fact that Oman is an Islamic country. You should respect local traditions, customs, laws and religions at all times and be aware of your actions to ensure that they do not offend, especially if you intend to visit religious areas, or during the holy month of Ramadan, when eating, drinking, smoking, playing loud music and dancing in public places during daylight hours is strictly forbidden. In 2020, the holy month of Ramadan is expected to start on 24th April and finish on 23rd May. See the UK Government’s guidance on travelling during Ramadan at: https:// www.gov.uk/guidance/travelling-duringramadan. Omanis observe some additional religious anniversaries that may not be celebrated in other Gulf countries. Assaults against foreign women are relatively rare, but you should take care when walking or travelling alone, and maintain at least the same level of personal security awareness as you would in the UK. If you are a resident of Oman you must carry your Omani ID at all times. Alternatively, if you are just visiting, you should carry a copy of your passport and keep the original in a safe place.

Visit the Website and download the free Mobile App


Legal issues Never photograph the police, police escorts, or the military. These are all considered criminal offences in Oman. You could become subject to a travel ban and prevented from leaving Oman if you become involved in a commercial dispute or a criminal investigation, until the issue is fully resolved. You will need to have paid all outstanding debts and traffic fines before leaving the country. You can pay fines at the airport. Importing drugs and pornography into Oman is illegal and can lead to imprisonment. There is no distinction in Oman between ‘soft’ and ‘hard’ drugs and penalties for drug trafficking, smuggling and possession of even residual amounts, are severe and can even lead to the death penalty. In Oman, it is an offence to drink, or be drunk, in public. However, you can purchase a licence from the Royal Oman Police to drink alcohol at home, and licensed hotels and restaurants sell alcohol. Many Omanis hold conservative social views. It is against the law to live together, or share the same hotel room, with someone of the opposite sex to whom you are not married or closely related. Homosexuality is illegal in Oman. Before you travel, you are advised to see the UK Government’s information and advice page for the LGBT community at: https://www.gov. uk/guidance/lesbian-gay-bisexual-andtransgender-foreign-travel-advice.

Safety and security Road travel You can drive a rental car with a valid UK driving licence for up to six weeks, after which you will need to get a local licence. You should check with your car hire company for information on their requirements before you travel. If you are involved in a major road traffic accident you must stay with your vehicle and call the Royal Oman Police (ROP) on 9999. If you are involved in a minor accident, it may not be necessary to call the police, but you should follow the procedures set out on the ROP website. You must keep a Minor Road Traffic Accident form in your car, which you can download from the ROP website at: http://www.rop.gov. om/english/mobile-service.html, or from your insurance company. Car rental companies are responsible for keeping forms in their cars. Outside Muscat, driving can be dangerous, with the risk of hitting wandering camels or goats. In addition, rainfall can cause sudden and severe flooding in dry riverbeds and on roads that cross them. Although the standard of Omani roads is generally good, driving standards in Oman may not always be as disciplined as those in the UK and the rate of traffic accidents in Oman is significantly higher. The wearing of seatbelts is compulsory for all passengers and child car seats are mandatory for all children under four. It is illegal to use a mobile phone whilst driving and there is zero tolerance towards drink-driving.

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Travel to the desert and mountains can be dangerous unless you are in an adequately equipped 4x4 vehicle. Always travel in convoy, take a good supply of water and a mobile telephone with you, leaving a copy of your travel plans with a friend or relative. You should also make sure you are adequately insured. Sea travel Vessels operating in the Gulf of Oman, Northern Arabian Sea, Gulf of Aden and Bab El Mandeb regions may be at an increased risk of maritime attack, and reports of piracy attacks on local fishing dhows in the area around the Gulf of Aden and Horn of Africa continue. You should therefore make careful enquiries before entering any of these waters or visiting any ports, and also consider how regional tensions may affect your route. The International Naval Counter Piracy Forces advise that all sailing yachts under their own passage should remain out of the designated high risk area (https://on-shore.mschoa.org/), or face the risk of being hijacked and held hostage for ransom. For more information and advice, see the UK Government’s piracy and armed robbery at sea advice at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance /sea-river-and-piracy-safety.

Developments in the Middle East have an impact on local public opinion. You should be aware of local sensitivities and be alert to any local and regional developments which could trigger public disturbances. Terrorism Terrorist attacks are likely in Oman. You should always maintain a high level of security awareness as indiscriminate attacks against civilian targets and Western interests – including crowded places frequented by foreigners such as international hotels, restaurants and bars, beaches, and shopping centres, as well as energy sector facilities, residential compounds, mosques, military, oil, transport and aviation interests – cannot be ruled out. You should also be vigilant around significant high profile occasions and events, particularly in public places. Always report anything suspicious to the local authorities. Visit: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/reduceyour-risk-from-terrorism-while-abroad to find out how to minimise your risk and what to do in the event of a terrorist attack. [Source – Foreign Travel Advice: Oman, gov.uk]

Natural disasters The safety of tourist boats may not be up to UK standards. Make sure life jackets are available for all passengers. Demonstrations There is a possibility of unannounced demonstrations throughout Oman. If you encounter a large public gathering or demonstration, leave the area immediately.

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Tropical storms Although Oman’s climate is generally very dry, heavy rains can fall in the winter, and flash floods can cause injuries and deaths. In the summer months, cyclones from the Indian Ocean do occasionally make a landfall. You are advised to check local weather forecasts and seek advice about travelling conditions, particularly if you are considering any off-road travel.

www.Oman.DoingBusinessGuide.co.uk


Health You should visit your GP or health provider a minimum of eight weeks prior to travelling to Oman, to assess any health risks specific to you or the country itself, and to allow time for any necessary vaccinations. For information and advice about any risks, visit the Oman-specific pages of the TravelHealthPro website at: https://travel healthpro.org.uk/country/170/oman. You can also receive useful information, advice and guidance from the NHS via the FitForTravel website at: https://www.fitfortravel.nhs.uk/ destinations and the NHS Choices website at: https://www.nhs.uk/using-the-nhs/health care-abroad/. Some medicines prescribed or purchased in the UK can be of an alternative legal status and regulations surrounding their usage may vary in other countries. If it is necessary for you to travel with either prescription or over-the-counter medication, you should consult the National Travel Health Network and Centre (NaTHNaC) or TravelHealthPro at: https://travelhealthpro.org.uk/factsheet/43/ medicines-abroad. If you are travelling to Oman with prescription drugs, you should carry a copy of the prescription. For further information on the legal status of a specific medicine, you should contact the Oman Embassy in London, at: http://oman.embassyhome page.com/ before you travel. Although healthcare facilities in Oman are similar to those in the UK, British nationals need to use the private healthcare system.

If you do not have travel insurance or the means to settle any charges, you may be prevented from leaving the country until the debt is paid, so you should ensure you have adequate travel health insurance and funding to cover both the cost of medical treatment and possible repatriation. Be aware that the heat in Oman can be extreme and deaths do occur due to dehydration and heat exhaustion. If you need emergency medical assistance in Oman, dial 9999 and ask for an ambulance, and contact your insurance company promptly if you are referred to a medical facility for treatment. FCO Foreign travel advice If you are travelling to Oman for business, the Foreign & Commonwealth Office (FCO) has travel advice to help you prepare for your visit overseas and to stay safe and secure while you are there. For up-to-the-minute advice please visit the foreign travel pages on the gov.uk website: https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice /oman. Travel insurance Make sure you have comprehensive travel and medical insurance before you travel, as well as accessible funds to cover the cost of any medical treatment abroad and repatriation. [Source – Foreign Travel Advice: Oman, gov.uk]

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Good Desig n C reates Va l u e


Old city Sur

OMAN

In addition to providing the benefit of a stable rule of law and a developed market, Oman provides strong commercial opportunities for British businesses across a number of sectors.


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SECTORâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;SPECIFIC OPPORTUNITIES


Berkeley Engineering is an engineering and management consultancy with a head office in Mayfair, London and engineering hubs in Reading, Saudi Arabia and Oman. Our organisation has been created to assist our clients in the execution of projects in the upstream oil and gas, refining and petrochemicals sectors.

Our Project Execution teams all specialise in delivering customised engineering and management services. In all cases, the roles and responsibilities are very much tailored to match the client’s needs and project structures. Our commitment to innovation and excellence in all areas has seen BEC become a global preferred partner to many leading names. Queen’s Award Winners

The Queen’s Award for International Trade represents the latest milestone in BEC’s journey – a major achievement as one of just over 200 companies recognised from more than four million registered businesses nationwide. Made just once a year, The Queen’s Awards represent the most prestigious honour for UK businesses, recognising outstanding achievement among companies in four categories which also include Innovation, Promoting Opportunity (through Social Mobility) and Sustainable Development. BEC is one of just a handful of organisations supporting the oil and gas sector to have been recognised in The Queen’s Awards this year.

Berkeley Engineering 52 Berkeley Square, Mayfair, London W1J 5BT. United Kingdom


Experience We have Engineering and Project Management experience, have provided technical assistance and have taken lead roles in the execution of challenging projects. We have undertaken this work for large clients in the engineering and construction contracting industry, as well as major oil, gas and petrochemicals companies. Our consultants have worked on a wide range of projects.

Our Mission Our mission is to build Berkeley Engineering to be instantly recognised for excellence and the quality of service that it provides to its customers.

We achieve our mission by focusing on our goals: • • • • •

Safety First Cost Efficiency Strong Leadership Technical Excellence Exceed Client Expectation

Our Work with the Department for International Trade We have been a long-term supporter of the Department for International Trade, continuously working with the department since 2009, when we were exporting to Kazakhstan and Nigeria. After several years of growth in Saudi Arabia we opened an Oman office in 2019, where we are now actively engaged in the energy sector, and delivering an impressive and varied portfolio of projects.

We will strive to overcome all challenges in order to guarantee the success of a project. Berkeley Engineering offers a full range of services including: 1. Conceptual Design 2. Front-End Engineering (development and delivery of design documents) 3. Design verification and endorsement 4. Engineering Management 5. Project Management Consultancy 6. Qualified Safety Engineering (including fire systems, HAZOP chairing) 7. Procurement Management 8. Construction Management 9. Commissioning Management

T: +44 207 4936167 | E: info@berkeleyeng.com | www.berkeleyeng.com


Sector-specific opportunities

agreements should be registered with the Oman Ministry of Commerce and Industry (MOCI).

Opportunities in Oman In addition to providing the benefit of a stable rule of law and a developed market, Oman provides strong commercial opportunities for British businesses across a number of sectors. Contact the Department for International Trade (DIT) trade specialists to find local representatives for your products via: https://www.gov.uk/overseas-customersexport-opportunities. From its worldwide network, DIT can provide international export sales leads. Find export opportunities in Oman at: https://www.great. gov.uk/export-opportunities/. For more information about opportunities and advice on doing business in Oman contact DIT at: https://www.gov.uk/world/ organisations/department-for-internationaltrade-oman#contact-us. [Source – DIT Trade and Investment guide: Oman, gov.uk]

Do not forget to check that your goods meet legal requirements for export at the UK Export Control Joint Unit (ECJU) (formerly known as the Export Control Organisation) at: https://www.gov.uk/government/ organisations/export-control-organisation.

Check with the DIT team in Muscat at: https://www.gov.uk/world/organisations/ department-for-international-trade-oman #contact-us for assistance and information about third-party advisers if you decide to have your tender bids submitted by a domestic company or consultant. You should be aware that the Omani In-Country Value (ICV) initiative promotes the increased use of local workforces, sub-contractors and supply chains – see: http://www.incountryvalueoman.net/Home. [Source – FCO Overseas Business Risk: Oman, Government of Oman, DIT Trade and Investment guide: Oman, gov.uk]

Special Economic Zone in Duqm (SEZAD) SEZAD is the largest special economic zone in the Middle East. The area is divided into eight main sections, including the port, dry dock, oil refinery, regional airport, heavy, medium and light-industry complexes and residential/commercial and tourism areas, as well as a logistic services area. It is hoped that SEZAD will become a logistic and marine hub, not only for Oman, but for the Gulf region on the Arabian Sea outside the Strait of Hormuz.

Government tenders Public tendering is required for all purchases above OMR 10,000 (approximately US $26,000). Partnering with an Omani firm is likely to improve your chance of success, with the local agent participating in the tendering process on your behalf. Agency

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The area will house an advanced petrochemical industries complex which will use secured oil and natural gas supplies. It will also house an integrated manufacturing industry area utilising available natural resources in Al Wusta Governorate.

Visit the Website and download the free Mobile App


Furthermore, as the area is known for its abundant fish resources, it is expected that SEZAD will become a hub for fish processing industries and aquaculture projects. The SEZAD Authority offers business incentives to foreign companies wishing to invest, including: •

100% freehold by foreigners

tax exemption for up to 30 years (renewable for a similar period)

easy recruitment of expatriate manpower

issuance of entry visas and residency permits for expatriate manpower and their families

facilitation of customs procedures

Many additional services are also provided to investors in the area, such as registration of business and industrial activities, the issuing of licenses for tourism projects and the issuing of environmental permits. See: https://duqm.gov.om/ for further information and details of additional business incentives.

27 private colleges of higher education and 7 private universities had been developed in Oman by 2014. In 2005, The Research Council was established to move Oman towards being a knowledge-based economy. The target for research and development spending has been set for 2020 at 2% of the GDP. The UK remains one of the preferred destinations for Omanis studying overseas. British standards are widely applied in the education system. This has resulted in many UK affiliations with private local universities and colleges. The use of British standards for vocational training is also very popular. Oman is investing heavily in public and private schools to revamp its primary and secondary education system. It is also investing in universities to increase capacity in higher education. Oman is seeking to bridge the gap between the Omani education system and the skills needed to enter the employment market. There is also a growing demand for education and care for children with special needs and disabilities. There is a range of opportunities in this sector, including:

[Source – Government of Oman]

Education and training sector The Omani Government launched a programme in 1996 to promote private higher education institution development in Oman. Low-interest loans, lands and tax breaks were provided as subsidies.

vocational training in the private sector

consultancy, training and project management services to the public sector

improvement of special needs facilities and equipment

academic affiliations with private higher education institutions

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UNLOCKING IN-COUNTRY VALUE IN OMAN. WHAT WE DO As an international service provider to the oil, gas and p rrenewable enewa energy industries, Petrofac P etrofa ac de designs, sig builds, operates oper rates a and nd main maintains ta oil a nd ga acilities tto o unlock lock and gass ffacilities value thr oughout the a sset value throughout asset life ecycle. O ur ser vice o ffering lifecycle. Our service offering underpinned b is underpinned byy the provision o ills tr aining w ith provision off sk skills training with competency de velopment competency development and a ssurance fframeworks. rameworks. and assurance OUR OM AN STORY ST S TOR RY OMAN Local deli very ha ass always always Local delivery has centrral to to the way way w e been central we work in Oma n and and our our teams teams work Oman ha ave been supporting supporting the have Sultanate’s oil and and gas gas indus try Sultanate’s industry 88. In tha e since 19 1988. thatt time time,, w we ha ave been in volved w ith 1177 have involved with nd mega pr ojects , a nd major a and projects and ha ave ffocused ocused o on de veloping have developing workfo orce compe tence local workforce competence and generating generating in-co untry and in-country value (ICV). (ICV). value T hese projects projects ha avve enabled These have our clients; clients; bo th major our both

national and international oil and gas companies, including Petroleum Development Oman, Oman Oil Company Exploration and Production LLC, and BP to unlock more value from their assets. 10--YEAR FRAMEWORK FR 10-YEAR AGREEMENT AGREEMENT Our drive drive tto o deli ver led d Our deliver to us signing a long-term long-term to Framework A greement (F FA) A) Framework Agreement (FA) with P etroleum D evelopment with Petroleum Development Oman (P DO) ffor or the pr ovision Oman (PDO) provision of EP Cm ssupport upport ser vices ffor or of EPCm services nd major oil a nd ga mega a and and gass projects in the Sult anate. projects Sultanate. Projects deli vered thr ough Projects delivered through Aa re under taken b the F FA are undertaken byy our gr ro owing engineer ing a nd our growing engineering and projects cen tre in M uscat. projects centre Muscat. INVES STED IN OMAN OMAN INVESTED Having been present prre esent in Oman Oman Having for more more than than three thrree ee decades dec des deca for we fully fully ssupport upport the Sult anate’s we Sultanate’ drive for for in-country in-countrry vvalue alue drive

creation and are focused on developing the local supply chain and resources; working hard to be an integral part of the local communities where we operate. In the Sultanate, we directly employ around 1,000 people, with 30% Omanisation, and are indirectly responsible for a workforce of up to 12,000 people through our subc subcontractors. Through our our projects proje Through we ha ave generated generated ICV ICV in excess ex have of US$2.5 US$2.5 billion. Around Around 85% 85% of of this value value has has been created created of thrrough the purchase purchase of of local through and services. services. We We goods and are proactive prro oactive in sharing sharing o ur are our experience and and knowledge knowledge – experience whether related related to to capability capability whether capacity development development or capacity internattional tio or embedding international standards and and processes processes standards to support support and and enable our our to supply chain partners partner errs to to local supply achieve their full full potential. potential. achieve


ABB and Musandam Gas Plants

OUR OMAN PROJECTS

Suhar Refinery Improvement Improvement

Kauther Gas Plant and Compression Depletion Compression

Yibal Khufff Yibal Khuf

Khazzan Central Processing Processing Facility Khazzan Phase II – Ghazeer

Qarn Qarn Alam Co-Generation

Duqm Refinery Mabrouk Mabrouk North East Line Pipe Procurement Procurement Harweel Field Development Rabab Harweel oject Project Integrated Pr

Marmul Polymer Phase 3 (MPP3) Salalah LPG Extraction

Our people are at the core of our own business success and so we recognise the importance of a skilled, competent and capable workforce. We put training and development at the heart of our approach. And we are invested in the future of Oman’s energy industry, helping to develop workforce capability today, and for the n next generation. TA KATUF TAKATUF PETROF OF FAC OM AN PETROFAC OMAN We jointly jointly invested invested w ith We with Takatuf,, Oma n’s h uman Takatuf, Oman’s human resource provider, providerr, tto ob uild resource build Takatuf Petrofac Petrofac Oma n Takatuf Oman (TPO). T his US$30 US$30 million (TPO). This state-of--the-art ttechnical echnical state-of-the-art

training centre, opened its doors in 2018. TPO is preparing the next generation of skilled oil and gas workers through an experiential and immersive approach to industry training and competence assurance. The facility was designed and built by Petrofac based on real hydrocarbon plant the company constructs for industry. As a result it provides a hands-on and immersive training experience without the risks associated with live opera operations; reducing time to autonomy and a speeding up autonomy supply of of comp the supply competent job ready graduates. graduates. ready

Oman Oman has has been a in integral tegral part part of of o our ur his history tory a and nd w we e are are committed committed tto o ssupporting upporting the e Sultanate Sultanate tto o unlock e even ven more e value value thr through ough o our ur local presence, and sence nce, focus fo ocus on ICV ICV a nd long-term commitmentt tto m commitmen o supply chain ain and and people development.t. CONTA TACT US: Civil Service Employees Pension Fund Building Ghala, Muscat marketing@petrofac.com


research and development partnership with further education institutions

establishing new Early Years/nurseries and primary private schools

Contact the DIT team in Muscat at: DIT.Muscat@fco.gov.uk for more information on opportunities in the education and training sector in Oman. [Source – Ithraa, DIT Trade and Investment guide: Oman, gov.uk]

Energy sector Oil and gas Oman proactively encourages foreign investment in this sector. New onshore and offshore concessions have been issued. Oman is not a member of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). However, the country is the largest producer of oil and natural gas in the Middle East, and is the 26th largest dry natural gas producer in the world. In 2000 and 2005, two liquefied natural gas (LNG) companies were opened, subsequently increasing dry natural gas production by more than 80% between 2004 and 2013. Thus, increasing the sector’s importance to the Omani economy. The agreement between Oman and Iran to import 10 billion m³ of natural gas is currently expected to meet the feedstock needs which are required for expansion. This will then strengthen Oman’s industrial base. Power In the short-to-medium term, Oman’s power sector is expected to attract US $7 billion in new investments due to its continued rapid industrialisation and urbanisation. US $6 billion of this will be used for new power generation and in water desalinisation capacity. The rest will be used to expand Oman’s power transmission and distribution networks. 73 57


To other Middle Eastern countries, Oman is regarded as a trendsetter in the power and water sector as it has managed to make the sector attractive to developers internationally, who then go on to invest. This is due to Oman deregulating and liberalising the industry. Solar Oman receives extensive daily solar radiation, ranging from 5,500-6,000 wh/m² a day in July to 2,500-3,000 wh/m² a day in January due to its high ration of ‘sky clearness’. As a result, Oman has one of the highest solardensity energies in the world. By 2020, Oman aims to use renewable energy to meet 10% of its total electricity requirements. Opportunities There are opportunities for UK companies throughout the supply chain. Over the next 15 years, BP will drill 300 wells to flush gas trapped deep under the Omani desert. This project is worth £9.8 billion. BP has also recently announced a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to develop a new petrochemical project in Duqm. The Joint Supplier Registration System (JSRS) is a mandatory procurement requirement if you wish to secure direct contracts with any of the oil and gas operators in Oman which are subject to ministerial approval. See: https://www.businessgateways.com/ for further information. The In-Country Value (ICV) initiative promotes the increased use of local workforces, sub-contractors and supply chains. See: http://www.incountryvalueoman.net/Home. It is a priority in Oman’s energy sector. Many government-funded projects also insist that local small and medium enterprises (SMEs) make up at least 10% of the supply chain. Contact the DIT team in Muscat at:

DIT.Muscat@fco.gov.uk for more information on opportunities in the energy sector in Oman. [Source – Ithraa , DIT Trade and Investment guide: Oman, gov.uk]

Healthcare sector The determination of the Omani Government to provide free basic healthcare to citizens has resulted in a growth in health-related expenditures. The healthcare market in Oman is estimated to be worth US $2 billion. This is down to the growing population, as well as the rising numbers of lifestyle-related diseases and the increase in health insurance. Between 2015 and 2020, this is expected to grow with a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of approximately 9%. Oman’s healthcare infrastructure has improved, leading to the country now having around 65 modern hospitals, containing almost 6,000 beds, as well as over 242 health centres and roughly 1,000 private clinics. The Oman Department of Health’s ‘Health Vision 2050’ is a long-term strategy, with short-term five-year health development plans. The main focus for the next five-year plan includes: •

construction of seven hospitals, five health complexes and 27 health centres

expansion projects for some of the existing health institutions in all governorates

There are supply chain opportunities to support the health development plan: •

governance and leadership

health information system and use of data 74


Human Resources (HR) has a lack of expertise in advanced healthcare

technology, including equipment, digital systems and surgical equipment

quality of care

More projects will be announced when the next five-year cycle starts. Contact the DIT team in Muscat at: DIT.Muscat@fco.gov.uk for more information on opportunities in the healthcare sector in Oman. [Source – Ithraa, DIT Trade and Investment guide: Oman, gov.uk]

Infrastructure sector Under its ‘Vision 2020’, Oman has a massive infrastructure development programme underway, including large developmental projects worth about £50 billion, in various stages of development: •

new-build ports, airports, roads, hotels and resorts

industrial and special economic zones

new hospitals and health centres

new 2,244 km railway line connecting to the GCC rail network

Seaports In order to diversify its economy and move the country away from hydrocarbons, the Omani Government has heavily invested in seaport infrastructure developments to increase the overall quality of its sea trade. The port city of Sohar’s free trade zone,

Salalah Port and Mina Sultan Qaboos are examples of major investments that are taking place. The Duqm Port is another large-scale expansion undertaken in Oman, with the construction of a new port and dry-dock complex. The surrounding facilities are also being developed as a result of major investment in the port. Costing around US $1.7 billion, these developments will improve Oman’s trade, logistics and warehousing capabilities significantly, as well as increasing support for the tourism sector. Rail Oman is in agreement with its GCC neighbours to develop the first railway transportation system in the region. ‘Oman Rail’, the state-owned national rail project, will cost US $15 billion and will span 2,244 km in length. The ‘Oman Rail’ will run over nine segments between the Oman-UAE border in the north and the border with Yemen in the south. The specifications for the network state the railway line must be double tracked and non-electrified, with continuous-welded rail. This will require 12,000 km of rails, over 10 million sleepers and over 40 million rail fastenings. There are plans to add 46 stations and 8 maintenance yards allowing for both freight and passengers to make up the traffic of the railway. Airports Arrivals at Muscat International Airport are over 10 million per year, and should increase as Oman rolls-out infrastructure development plans and increases its offerings for visitors.

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There are three further phases planned for development, which will boost its large capacity of 12 million passengers per year to 48 million passengers by 2050.

Contact the DIT team in Muscat at: DIT.Muscat@fco.gov.uk for more information on opportunities in the infrastructure sector in Oman.

Housing It is likely that demand for affordable housing will increase in Oman due to the high proportion of young people that dominates the population.

[Source – Ithraa, DIT Trade and Investment guide: Oman, gov.uk]

There is a shortage of affordable rental accommodation in Muscat, even though in Muscat and North Batinah, one in every five families owns their own home.

Investments in Oman’s tourism sector are a common feature in the country’s economic plans. During the 8th five-year plan (20112015), US $1.46 billion was allocated to projects that the Omani Government company, OMRAN, undertook. OMRAN was set up in order to manage the assets and investments within the tourism sector.

12,000 affordable homes have been constructed as part of Oman’s 8th five-year plan. Prime residential projects are also being planned in Muscat. 398 high-end housing units, which will be spread across five residential zones, will be offered by Saraya Bandar Jissah’s US $593 million Integrated Tourism Complex. Water There is an increasing demand for desalinated water in Oman, fuelled by the growth in population and social development. The Omani Government has an active policy to move away from the use of groundwater as a source of potable water supply. Largesized desalination plants are needed to meet demand. US $1 billion has been invested by Sembcorp Salalah in order to develop, finance, own and operate the Salalah Independent Water and Power Plant.

Tourism sector

Two five-star hotels have recently opened in Oman — the Salalah Rotana Beach Resort in Salalah, and the mountaintop Alila Jabal Akhdar boutique hotel, both helping to improve the tourism sector in Oman. Oman’s tourist industry is growing at a fast rate. The Omani Government is hopeful that the country will have 12 million visitors by 2020, a significant increase from the 2.1 million in 2013. Contact the DIT team in Muscat at: DIT.Muscat@fco.gov.uk for more information on opportunities in the tourism sector in Oman. [Source – Ithraa]

The plant, with a water capacity of 69,000 cubic metres per day, is expected to meet the majority of Dhofar region’s water demands.

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www.Oman.DoingBusinessGuide.co.uk


Old Muscat buildings after sunset with a view over Al Jalai Fort, Middle East, Oman

OMAN

You should make regular visits to Oman as well as making contact with others in your industry/ sector. This will enable you to access the most up-to-date advice and information, and may lead to new insights, or at the very least, form the foundation for further research.


82

PREPARING TO EXPORT


We provide you you wi with th a suite of multi-modal ulti-modal transportaiton aiton and supplyy chain solutions solutions of solut ports, free zones, ones, nes, freight freight and integrated ed llogistics ogistics services ces


Preparing to export

Your aims: • Do you wish to buy from Oman, sell to Oman or both?

Consultation and bespoke research There is a range of online information for exporters, including advice and guidance on how to thoroughly research overseas markets. Visit: https://www.great.gov.uk/ for more information. Researching the Oman market You should make regular visits to Oman as well as making contact with others in your industry/sector. This will enable you to access the most up-to-date advice and information, and may lead to new insights, or at the very least, form the foundation for further research. Visit: https://www.great.gov.uk for information and guidance on how to develop your marketing strategy, competitor and SWOT analyses and customer/market segmentation. The IOE&IT can also offer help with this. Visit: https://www.export.org.uk/. You will need to determine whether there is a market for your product or service, if your pricing is competitive, whether you might need to change your product packaging or marketing, and whether to adapt your business model. The questions listed here should help to focus your thoughts. Your answers to them will highlight areas for further research and also suggest a way forward that is right for your company. You may then want to use this as a basis for developing a formal strategy, although this may not be necessary or appropriate for all companies:

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Do you wish to establish your own company presence in Oman, or consider for example direct sales, licensing or franchising?

Do you need to be involved in Oman at all?

Do you see Oman as part of a wider plan including e.g. other GCC markets, now or in the future?

Your company: • Can you carry out a detailed SWOT analysis of your company? •

Are your competitors already in Oman? If so, what are they doing?

Can you carry out a detailed SWOT analysis of your competitors?

What are the Unique Selling Points (USPs) of your product or service?

Do you know if there is a market for your product or service in Oman?

Do you know if you can be competitive in Oman?

Do you have the time and resources to handle e.g. the demands of communication, travel, product delivery and after-sales service?

Your knowledge: • Do you know how to secure payment for your products or service?

Visit the Website and download the free Mobile App


Do you know how to locate and screen potential partners, agents or distributors?

Have you carried out any Oman-specific customer segmentation, and do you know how to best reach potential customers in-market?

It is unlikely that you will have the answers to all these questions at the outset and these ‘knowledge gaps’ could form the basis for further research and investigation. Some of these questions will require quantitative research in your sector, while others involve more contextual and cultural considerations. Export plan Following your initial research, you will need to create an export plan, identifying your best route to market. Guidance on developing an export plan, including marketing strategy, customer segmentation, competitor and SWOT analyses, etc. is available on the: https://www.great.gov.uk/advice/create-anexport-plan/how-to-create-an-export-plan/ site, and also on the Institute of Export’s Open to Export site at: https://opentoexport.com/ info/export-action-plan/. One option to test how viable your product or service could be in the Oman market would be to attend trade shows held in the region each year. The Department for International Trade (DIT) provides funding for eligible businesses in the form of grants to enable them to attend trade shows overseas via the Tradeshow Access Programme. The funding helps your business to gather market knowledge, gain experience in attending and getting the most from overseas trade shows, and to receive advice and support from trade experts. Visit: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/tradeshowaccess-programme for more information.

Exhibitions held in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) draw a large number of Omani visitors. Major exhibitions include: •

Big Five (construction) 25th-28th November 2019: http://www.thebig5.ae/

ArabHealth 27th-30th January 2020: https://www.arabhealthonline.com/en/ Home.html

Index (buildings) 15th-17th September 2020: https://www.indexexhibition.com/

Gitex (IT/telecoms) 27th September-1st October 2020: https://www.gitex.com/

To discover further events and trade missions, visit the DIT events portal at: https://www. events.great.gov.uk/ehome/index.php? eventid=200183029&. For company launches and events held at British Embassy and Consulate locations, contact the Department for International Trade (DIT) in Oman at: https://www.gov.uk/ world/organisations/department-forinternational-trade-oman#contact-us. [Source – DIT, gov.uk]

Start-up considerations A long-term approach and a focus on relationship building in Oman are essential for successful market penetration and for sustaining market share. Omanis prefer to do business with people they know and trust. Personal contact with potential and existing partners/clients and regular visits to Oman are of the utmost importance and it is natural for a business relationship to be built over time. 86


Old Town in Muscat

Local partnerships or agents can play a crucial role in product promotion and marketing in Oman, and the success of a product often depends on the abilities of the local agent. A small number of family-owned business groups dominate the Omani market, the main groups being: •

Suhail Bahwan Group

Saud Bahwan Group

Galfar

Zubair Enterprises

Omar Zawawi Establishment (OMZEST)

Khimji Ramdas

W J Towell

Tawoos (Renaissance Group)

Mohsin Haider Darwish (MHD)

Whereas the majority of large contractors will have in-house sourcing ability, or an associate trading company dealing in supplies and equipment to complement their activity, to establish your business in Oman you will need to be represented by a local decision maker. The options include:

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a branch office (only applicable for contracts with Omani Government bodies)

a Commercial Representative Office (CRO)

a Commercial Agency

a Limited Liability Company (LLC)


You are advised to speak to local lawyers and accountants to check which option best suits your business. A list of English-speaking lawyers in Oman is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government /publications/oman-list-of-lawyers, or you can speak to the DIT team in Muscat at: http://www.gov.uk/world/organisations/ department-for-international-tradeoman#contact-us for assistance in locating potential lawyers and accountants. Commercial agents An Omani commercial agent supplies goods or services in Oman on behalf of all foreign bodies which do not have a registered entity in the market. Commercial agencies are governed by the Commercial Agencies Law (CAL). An agent will be more familiar with the Omani business environment and will be able to: •

keep in contact with your customers

seek new business for you

get information on the latest Omani market trends

All agency agreements have to be registered with the Oman Ministry of Commerce and Industry (MOCI), at: https://moci.gov.om/. However, you should be aware that agreements can be difficult to terminate, even if they are fixed-term, and are often weighted in favour of the local agent. It is not unusual for Omani Courts to award two-tothree year’s net profits as compensation for wrongful termination or unjustified failure to renew an agreement.

Agency agreement You should research a number of potential agents or distributors and visit the market a number of times to establish a personal relationship before choosing one. Look at their local reputation, marketing ability and resources, and beware of agents who are promoting products or services which are the same or similar to yours. The Department for International Trade (DIT) team in Muscat at: http://www.gov.uk/world/ organisations/department-for-internationaltrade-oman#contact-us can assist you in locating and meeting potential agents for your products in Oman. [Source – DIT Trade and Investment guide: Oman, gov.uk]

As an alternative to setting up an office in Oman, you may consider direct exports and sales, licensing, or franchising, for some products and services. Direct exports and sales Direct export means supplying your products or services directly to the customer and involves you taking care of the logistics of marketing, selling, sending overseas and getting paid. This could be an option if you are selling online or responding to enquiries from potential Omani purchasers. The main regulation governing advertising within Muscat is the Local Ordinance 25 of 1993, overseen by the Muscat Municipality. For further details contact: https://www.mm. gov.om/Default.aspx. Additional information on selling directly overseas can be found at: https://www.great.gov.uk/advice/defineroute-to-market/direct-sales/.

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The Department for International Trade (DIT) can help you export your goods to Oman through the E-Exporting Programme. Find out more at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/ e-exporting. DIT has also negotiated listings at betterthan-commercial rates. See online marketplaces in Oman at: https://www. great.gov.uk/selling-online-overseas/. Licensing or franchising Franchising is in demand in Oman, particularly in the restaurant, fast food and retail sectors, and licensing a product or service to be sold in Oman can be a relatively cheap way to enter the market as there are no set-up costs, apart from the cost of a legal agreement. Franchise relationships in Oman come under the authority of the Commercial Agencies Law (CAL), whereby the franchisor and the local franchisee must sign a formal contract approved by the Oman Chamber of Commerce and Industry (OCCI) at: https://chamberoman.om/ and registered with the Registrar of Agents and Commercial Agencies at the Oman Ministry of Commerce and Industry (MOCI) at: https://moci.gov.om/, as well as with the local municipality. However, you should undertake due diligence on licensees to ensure your Intellectual Property (IP) rights are fully protected. For further information about licensing IP, visit: https://www.gov.uk/ guidance/licensing-intellectual-property. For further information on franchising in Oman, contact the Middle East and North Africa Franchise Association (MENAFA) at: https://www.linkedin.com/company/menafa--middleeast-north-africa-franchiseassociates and the international section of the British Franchise Association website at: http://www.thebfa.org/international.

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Consumer protection If you are selling to consumers (rather than businesses) you should ensure you comply with relevant consumer protection laws, which guarantee consumer rights when buying goods and services. Professional indemnity insurance You may require professional indemnity insurance if you provide a service and need to protect yourself against negligence claims from clients or third parties in Oman. See: https://www.abi.org.uk/products-and-issues /choosing-the-right-insurance/businessinsurance/liability-insurance/professionalindemnity-insurance/ for further information, or alternatively contact the DIT team in Muscat at: http://www.gov.uk/world/ organisations/department-for-internationaltrade-oman#contact-us for contacts of local insurers or specialist brokers. [Source – DIT Trade and Investment guide: Oman, gov.uk]

Financial considerations Getting finance to fulfil an export contract Globally, Oman ranks 144th out of 190 economies for Ease of Getting Credit, in the World Bank’s “Doing Business” report 2020. See: http://www.doingbusiness.org/en/data/ exploreeconomies/oman#DB_gc. For UK companies that wish to sell products and services to Oman, there are schemes available to simplify the growth of your business and to fulfil an export contract. Contact your bank or financial adviser for more information about any current schemes. Alternatively the DIT team in Muscat at: https://www.gov.uk/world/organisations/ department-for-international-trade-oman #contact-us can help you find a financial adviser in Oman.

www.Oman.DoingBusinessGuide.co.uk


Your contract should specify the terms for payment, and use secure terms of payment in Oman through a letter of credit, cash, or partial payment in advance. Be aware that you should only use Open Account payment terms (delivery of goods or services before payment) once you have an established trading relationship. See the Institute of Export’s guide to payment terms, at: https://www.export.org.uk/page/Methods _of_Payment for advice and further information. Payment risks UK Export Finance (UKEF) helps UK companies to get paid by insuring against buyer default. You may have difficulty accessing foreign exchange. Be confident you will get paid for your export contract. Speak to one of UKEF’s export finance advisers at: https://www.gov. uk/government/publications/find-an-exportfinance-manager for free and impartial advice on your insurance options, or contact one of UKEF’s approved export insurance brokers at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications /uk-export-finance-insurance-list-of-approved -brokers/export-insurance-approved-brokers. Currency risks when exporting to Oman In order to fix your price, it is essential to fix your exchange rate. Before signing any contract you need to consider whether the best option for you is to agree terms in Pounds Sterling (GBP) or Omani Rial (OMR). It may also be advisable to seek expert financial advice on exchange rates (FX). [Source – DIT Trade and Investment guide: Oman, gov.uk, UKEF]

90


World W orl rld Cla Cl Class s B ss Business ussiness Ci Cities ties Sultanate Su ltanate of O Oman Oman


INCENTIVES AND F FACILITIES ACILITIES Lease period. Lease period period of lands and facilities facilities for for up to 30 years, years, renewable renewable ffor or the same peri od. Right period Right to waive waive the lease lease right right for for the remaining remaining peri od of the ccontract. ontract. Right buildings Right to sell constructions constructions and buil dings on the lleased eased land. Right Right to lease lease the buildings buildings and facilities facilities built built on the leased leased lands by by investors. investors. Right involve new Ri ght to in volve ne w partners in the llease ease ccontract. ontract. Fair evaluation buildings termination on of the llease ease ccontract. ontract. F air e valuation of buil dings and facilities facilities upon the terminati Rental annuallyy per squar square meter five R ental vvalue alue of OMR 1 annuall e me ter ffor or the first fiv e yyears ears ffor or industrial baisa/per meter uses (83.5 baisa/ per me ter per month). month). Exemption from nett pr profit period five projects. or industrial pr ojects. Ex emption fr om tax on ne ofit ffor or a peri od of fiv e yyears ears ffor Exemption from duties taxes production Ex emption fr om customs duti es and tax es on pr oduction inputs. Income fixed fixed duties es of 5%. Inc ome tax at a fix ed rate of 15% per annum and fix ed customs duti Developed with electricity, telecom, ectricity, tel ecom, rroads). oads). De veloped and equipped lands wi th basic basic services services ((water, water, el Percentage workforce P ercentage of fforeign oreign w orkforce touches up to 65%. T ransparent legal legal frameworks frameworks illustrating rights rights and obligations. obligations. Transparent Punctuality in service service delivery. delivery. Punctuality Freedom of working working around around the clock. clock. Freedom foreign ownership ownership allowed allowed within within Al Mazunah Free Free Zone Zone and Knowledge Knowledge Oasis 100% of foreign (KOM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; an ICT P ark); 70% of fforeign oreign o wnership in other other estates 100% of Gulf Muscat (KOM Park); ownership ownership in all the estates value-added. value-added. ownership Projects can receive receive 100% foreign foreign ownership. ownership. Projects Participation in in ternal and e xternal Omani Pr oducts Exhibi tions as part of 'Mad e in Participation internal external Products Exhibitions 'Made Oman' Campaign. Campaign. Oman' Participation in workshops, workshops, seminars and exhibitions, exhibitions, which which are are organised organised by by Madayn. Madayn. Participation Workforce townships townships equipped with with a variety variety of services services Workforce


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GCC countries enforce common labelling standards for all imported goods, and Omani law requires all labelling and packaging to be in Arabic or in Arabic and English.


94

HOW TO DO BUSINESS WITH OMAN


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How to do business with Oman

lists-the-consolidated-list-of-strategic-military -and-dual-use-items-that-require-exportauthorisation for details of the lists.

Legal considerations Companies operating in Oman should follow international accounting and corporate governance standards. The DIT team in Muscat at: https://www.gov. uk/world/organisations/department-forinternational-trade-oman#contact-us can help you find tax and legal advisers before entering into agreements in Oman. Standards and technical regulations The Directorate General of Standards and Specifications at the Oman Ministry of Commerce and Industry (MOCI) oversees standards. British, European, Japanese and US standards are usually well accepted because local production is limited. You are advised to check the guidance and latest advice about labelling and packaging regulations from Omani commercial agents, importers or cargo companies. Your product or service will need to conform to the legal requirements set out in the relevant Omani standard. All suppliers and manufacturers have an obligation to ensure products are safe and meet relevant safety standards, have clear instructions for proper use and include warnings against possible misuse. Controlled goods export licences Any goods, software, technical information and technology which are on the UK Strategic Export Control Lists will require a licence for Oman. See: https://www.gov.uk/government /publications/uk-strategic-export-control-

There are a number of open general export licences (OGELs) which are available for exporting military and certain dual-use controlled items to Oman – these have a straightforward registration process. Visit: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections /open-general-export-licences-ogels for further details of OGELs. If you cannot use an open licence you will have to apply for a standard licence. See: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/exportcontrols-military-goods-software-andtechnology. You should also check if you need an export licence, at: https://www. ecochecker.trade.gov.uk/spirefox5live/fox/ spire/OGEL_GOODS_CHECKER_LANDING _PAGE/new and apply via SPIRE: https://www .spire.trade.gov.uk/spire/fox/espire/LOGIN/ login. Some additional products, including consumer items, may require further certification or licensing before they can be exported to Oman. See the UK Government’s guidance on export licences and special rules at: https://www.gov.uk/starting-to-export/ licences. Import restrictions The importing of certain goods into Oman is prohibited. You should check with the Royal Oman Police (ROP) at: http://www.rop.gov. om/english/index.html, who are responsible for all customs-related matters. Product liability insurance Product liability insurance covers the cost of compensation for anyone injured by a faulty

98


product. If you design, manufacture or supply a physical product you should therefore consider taking out product liability insurance. See: https://www.abi.org.uk/products-andissues/choosing-the-right-insurance/business -insurance/liability-insurance/product-liability -insurance/ for further information, or alternatively contact the DIT team in Oman at: http://www.gov.uk/world/organisations /department-for-international-trade-oman #contact-us for contacts of local insurers or specialist brokers. [Source – Government of Oman, Association of British Insurers, DIT Trade and Investment guide: Oman, gov.uk]

Taxation Double taxation agreement The UK and Oman have signed a double taxation agreement, which allows some taxes paid in one country to be deducted in the other, so should prevent any double tax liability from UK and Oman authorities over the same income. See: www.gov.uk/government/ publications/oman-tax-treaties. The Omani Ministry of Finance (MOF) at: https://mof.gov.om/english/ oversees this agreement. Corporate tax A 12% uniform tax rate is applied to all taxpayers, including sole proprietorships, all companies registered in Oman and permanent establishments of foreign companies. However, a withholding tax of 10% is levied on certain payments. Income tax There is no personal income tax in Oman. Value added tax (VAT) VAT is not charged locally.

99

Provided you get and keep evidence of your export, and comply with all other laws, you can zero-rate the sale of your goods to Oman. You will need to ensure the goods are exported, and provide evidence within three months from the time of sale. Further information on VAT in non-EU markets and zero-rating conditions is available at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/vat-exportsdispatches-and-supplying-goods-abroad. Excise duty You will need to pay excise duty on any alcohol, alcohol fuel, tobacco or other excise-equivalent products you send to Oman. You can find out more about excise duty and duty drawback outside the EU at: https:// www.gov.uk/government/publications/ excise-notice-207-excise-duty-drawback/ excise-notice-207-excise-duty-drawback. The DIT team in Muscat at: https://www.gov. uk/world/organisations/department-forinternational-trade-oman#contact-us can help you find tax advisers before entering into agreements in Oman. More information on GST in non-EU markets can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance /vat-exports-dispatches-and-supplyinggoods-abroad. [Source – Government of Oman, DIT Trade and Investment guide: Oman, gov.uk]

Customs and documentation Customs The Royal Oman Police (ROP) is responsible for all customs-related matters in Oman. See: http://www.rop.gov.om/english/index.html for further information.

Visit the Website and download the free Mobile App


Most products are subject to a 5% duty, although products such as alcohol, cigarettes and pork products attract a much higher rate. You can find more about import tariffs in the EU’s Market Access Database (MADB) at: http://madb.europa.eu/madb/indexPubli.htm, which provides information on import conditions into Oman for EU exporting companies, including: •

import tariffs

customs clearance formalities and documentation

sanitary (animal-related) and phytosanitary (plant-related) restrictions

Documentation The Oman Embassy in London at: http://oman.embassyhomepage.com/# embassy-address-london, importers and banks can provide information on required documentation. In addition, you can check with the Directorate General of Customs at the Royal Oman Police (ROP) at: http://www. rop.gov.om/english/customs_services.html. The GCC’s Common Customs Law sets the framework for the import regulations of all GCC countries. However, each member state administers its own list of prohibited, restricted and exempted products. If you want to re-export within the other GCC states you will need to refer to their individual lists for details. See: https://www.customs.gov. om/dgcportal/laws-regulations for further information about the GCC’s Common Customs Law. More details of the export documents needed to move goods overseas can be found at the Institute of Export & International Trade site at: https://www.export.org.uk/page /Key_Exporting_Terms.

Complying with HMRC regulations to export To export your goods to Oman you must make export declarations to HMRC through the National Export System (NES). Visit: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/exportdeclarations-and-the-national-export-system -export-procedures for further details. You must classify your goods as part of the declaration, including a commodity code and a customs procedure code (CPC). Commodity codes and other details applying to exports in the UK Trade Tariff can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/trade-tariff. Contact the HMRC Tariff Classification Service at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/findingcommodity-codes-for-imports-or-exports# list-of-useful-contacts for more help. The EU’s Market Access Database (MADB) also has details about import tariffs in thirdcountry markets for companies exporting from the EU. In the event of a no-deal Brexit however, these details may no longer apply to UK companies, so you should check at the time. Visit: http://madb.europa.eu/madb/index Publi.htm. You must declare any goods that you take with you in your luggage to sell outside the EU. However, if the UK leaves the EU without a deal, you will need to declare goods you take to sell anywhere outside the UK. See: https://www.gov.uk/take-goods-sellabroad for further information. Temporary export of goods Oman does not recognise the ATA (Admission Temporaire/Temporary Admission) Carnet system. You therefore need to use a duplicate list to temporarily export goods to Oman. As with an ATA Carnet, you do not have to pay customs duty or tax. There is no fee. See: https://www.gov.uk/taking-goods-out-uktemporarily/duplicate-list.

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Before you export the goods, prepare a list on company stationery, which should include: •

a description of the goods

how many there are

serial numbers, if the goods have them

value of the goods

At customs, you will need to provide: •

two copies of the list

a completed HMRC form C&E 1246. See: https://www.gov.uk/government/up loads/system/uploads/attachment_ data/file/374161/ce1246.pdf (PDF, 638 KB)

Contact the HMRC Imports and Exports Helpline in advance to make the arrangements: •

Telephone: 0300 200 3700

Textphone: 0300 200 3719

Outside the UK: +44 29 2050 1261

Monday to Friday, 8am to 6pm

Visit: https://www.gov.uk/taking-goods-outuk-temporarily for further information. Licences You can check at: https://www.ecochecker. trade.gov.uk/spirefox5live/fox/spire/OGEL_ GOODS_CHECKER_LANDING_PAGE/new whether you can use an open general export licence (OGEL) for your temporary export. If not, you will need to apply for a temporary export licence. You will need a permanent export licence if the goods are not being returned. To apply for a temporary export licence, use the SPIRE system at: https://www.spire.trade. gov.uk/spire/fox/espire/LOGIN/login. 101

Labelling regulations GCC countries enforce common labelling standards for all imported goods, and Omani law requires all labelling and packaging to be in Arabic or in Arabic and English. Food labels should include product and brand names, as well as production and expiration dates and the country of origin together with the name and address of the manufacturer. They should also include the net weight and a list of ingredients. All fats and oils must be identified on labels, and pork products and those containing pork or pork lard must be clearly labelled together with an indication that meat and poultry has been slaughtered according to Islamic halal procedures. Full details of all labelling requirements should be checked with the necessary official Omani bodies, and you should work closely with your agent or importer for advice and guidance to ensure you comply. Contact the Department for International Trade (DIT) team in Muscat at: https://www. gov.uk/world/organisations/department-forinternational-trade-oman#contact-us for a list of Omani customs agents, or for further information and advice on labelling requirements. [Source – Government of Oman, DIT Trade and Investment guide: Oman, Official Journal of the European Union, European Commission, HMRC, Institute of Export & International Trade, gov.uk]

Shipping your goods You can use a freight forwarder to move your goods if you are not knowledgeable about international shipping procedures. A freight forwarder will have vast expertise and familiarity with local documentation requirements, regulations, transportation costs and banking practices in Oman.

www.Oman.DoingBusinessGuide.co.uk


The British International Freight Association (BIFA) at: http://www.bifa.org/home and the Freight Transport Association (FTA) at: http://www.fta.co.uk/ can assist in locating freight forwarders to transport your goods to Oman. Posting goods For information about sending goods by post to Oman visit Royal Mail at: https://www. royalmail.com/oman. [Source – Royal Mail]

Shipping restricted, banned and dangerous goods Certain goods are classed as restricted or dangerous. If you wish to import any of these goods into Oman, they are subject to special rules. For more information visit: https://www. gov.uk/shipping-dangerous-goods/what-aredangerous-goods. You can employ a local agent who will have knowledge of the latest import licensing requirements. For information and assistance contact the Department for International Trade (DIT) team in Muscat at: https://www. gov.uk/world/organisations/department-forinternational-trade-oman#contact-us. Terms of delivery You should have a clear written contract in all international commercial transactions, to minimise any risk of misunderstanding. Incoterms are a series of widely used commercial terms for international trade in goods, which clarify, for example: •

where the goods will be delivered

who arranges transport

who handles customs procedures

who is responsible for insuring the goods, and who pays for insurance

who pays any duties and taxes

Incoterms do not apply to the delivery of services. Contracts for the international delivery of services should include a Service Level Agreement (SLA), focusing on desired outcomes such as what the service should achieve. International trade rules changed in September 2019, so you should check with the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), which publishes Incoterm rules, at: https://iccwbo.org/resources-for-business/ incoterms-rules, for details of the new rules, and also with the UK Government for further general advice and details about current Incoterms at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/ international-trade-paperwork-the-basics #international-trade-contracts-andincoterms. UK Export Finance The UK Government’s credit agency, UKEF, wins export contracts by providing attractive financing terms to their buyers. They can help you: •

to fulfil orders by supporting working capital loans

to get paid by insuring against buyer default

You can find out more about UKEF’s services and products at: https://www.gov.uk/ government/collections/uk-export-financeproducts-and-services. For new business enquiries, email UKEF at: customer.service@ukexportfinance.gov.uk or telephone: 020 7271 8010 between 9am and 5pm. For up-to-date country-specific information on the support available see UKEF’s cover policy and indicators for Oman at: https://www. gov.uk/guidance/country-cover-policy-andindicators#oman. [Source – ICC, DIT, UKEF, gov.uk]

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HQGRID¿[HGWHUPFRQWUDFWZLWKRXWWKH IRUHLJQSULQFLSDOEHLQJUHTXLUHGWRSD\ FRPSHQVDWLRQHTXLYDOHQWWRWKHDYHUDJH RIFRPPLVVLRQVSUR¿WVUHFHLYHGE\WKH DJHQWRYHUWKHSUHYLRXVWKUHHWR¿YH \HDUV Ź +  RZHYHUIROORZLQJDQDPHQGPHQW WRWKH&$/LQPDQ\RIWKH protections afforded to registered FRPPHUFLDODJHQWVKDYHEHHQUHPRYHG SDUWLFXODUO\WKHLUULJKWVWRH[FOXVLYLW\ RUFRPSHQVDWLRQRQQRQUHQHZDO DOWKRXJKOHJDODGYLFHVKRXOGEHWDNHQ WRHQVXUHWKHDJHQF\DJUHHPHQWLV GUDIWHGLQWKHPRVWDGYDQWDJHRXV PDQQHUIRUWKHIRUHLJQSULQFLSDO Challenges and opportunities in Oman 7KHUHDUHGRFXPHQWDU\KXUGOHVWR RYHUFRPHZKHQHVWDEOLVKLQJDQHQWLW\LQ 2PDQEXWLWLVDFWXDOO\PRUHVWUHDPOLQHG than certain other countries in the region DQGLPSURYHPHQWVDUHEHLQJLPSOHPHQWHG RQDUHJXODUEDVLV 0DQ\IRUHLJQHQWUDQWVUHTXLUHDQ2PDQL partner (there are exceptions and possible nominee shareholder arrangements that FDQEHHQWHUHGLQWR $Q2PDQLSDUWQHUFDQ SURYLGHYLWDOORFDOPDUNHWNQRZOHGJHDQG KHOS³RSHQGRRUV´ 7KH0LQLVWU\RI0DQSRZHUZLOOUHTXLUHDQ\ This article is for general information only. It is not legal advice and should not be acted or relied on as being so, accordingly Addleshaw Goddard disclaims any responsibility. It does not create a solicitorclient relationship between Addleshaw Goddard and any other person. Legal advice should be taken before applying any information in this document to any facts and circumstances.

HQWLW\HVWDEOLVKHGLQ2PDQWRHPSOR\D VSHFL¿HGSHUFHQWDJHRI2PDQQDWLRQDOVLQ LWVZRUNIRUFH UHIHUUHGWRDV³2PDQLVDWLRQ´  DQGVRPHUROHVDUHUHVHUYHGWR2PDQL QDWLRQDOVHJ352VVHFUHWDULHVDQG GULYHUV2PDQLVDWLRQUDWHVYDU\EHWZHHQ DQGGHSHQGLQJRQWKHVHFWRU DQGWKHUHTXLUHPHQWVDUHJHQHUDOO\ORZHU IRUIUHHDQGHFRQRPLF]RQHHQWLWLHV There is corporation and withholding tax in Oman but the Sultanate has entered into PDQ\VWURQJGRXEOHWD[DWLRQWUHDWLHVZLWK YDULRXVFRXQWULHV DQGWKHUHLVFXUUHQWO\QR SHUVRQDOLQFRPHWD[DSSOLHGWRLQGLYLGXDOV  &RPSHWLWLRQLQWHOOHFWXDOSURSHUW\DQGDQWL PRQH\ODXQGHULQJODZVKDYHUHFHQWO\EHHQ introduced to strengthen Omanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s legal UHJLPH Oman maintains strong diplomatic relations ZLWKLWVUHJLRQDOQHLJKERXUV7KH6XOWDQDWH SOD\HGDVLJQL¿FDQWUROHLQEURNHULQJWKH Iran â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nuclear dealâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and has maintained a neutral position during the current blockade LPSRVHGRQ4DWDUE\6DXGL$UDELDWKH 8QLWHG$UDE(PLUDWHV%DKUDLQDQG(J\SW

)RUIXUWKHULQIRUPDWLRQSOHDVHFRQWDFW OLIVER STEVENS 3DUWQHUDQG+HDGRI&RUSRUDWH Oman  RVWHYHQV#DJODZFRP


Grand Mosque Muscat

OMAN

Although Oman is one of the most progressive GCC states and is open-minded and tolerant, many Omanis are conservative.


108

BUSINESS ETIQUETTE, LANGUAGE & CULTURE


Business etiquette, language & culture

Religion Although Oman is one of the most progressive GCC states and is open-minded and tolerant, many Omanis are conservative. Islam is the national culture and, together with local traditions, customs, laws and religions, should be respected. You should dress conservatively in public places, particularly at religious sites. Be aware of your actions to ensure that they do not offend, particularly during the holy month of Ramadan and religious festivals. Official holidays in Oman are generally the same as those observed in most Muslim countries, including: Eid al-Fitr (end of Ramadan), Eid al-Adha (Festival of Sacrifice) and the Prophet Mohammed’s birthday. In 2020, the holy month of Ramadan is expected to start on 24th April and finish on 23rd May. See the UK Government’s guidance on travelling during Ramadan at: https://www. gov.uk/guidance/travelling-during-ramadan. Omanis observe some additional religious anniversaries that may not be celebrated in other Gulf countries.

Your interpreter is one of your key assets, so needs to be chosen carefully. It is recommended you use a professional interpreter for negotiations and avoid using electronic translation for your correspondence. It is a good idea for initial written approaches to Omani companies to be in both Arabic and English, and your literature and business cards should be translated too – you should have one side of your business card printed in Arabic. Lists of local interpreters and translators can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/ publications/oman-list-of-lawyers, or from DIT at the British Embassy Muscat.

Dress Western-style clothing is common amongst expats, but you should dress modestly in public – women should wear dresses covering their arms and legs, and headscarves too, in more rural areas. Men can wear traditional suit trousers, although it may be too warm for a jacket as well. Clothing should be smart but conservative.

Greetings Language Arabic is the official language of Oman, although English is widely spoken throughout the country and it is common for written correspondence to be in English. However, Arabic is often preferred within government. Persian, Urdu and Tagalog are also fairly common. Interpreters It helps to have a working knowledge of Arabic. If not, you can consider hiring a professional interpreter for your meetings. 109

Handshakes are the norm, although some women may not be comfortable with this – men should wait to see if a woman extends her hand first. You should maintain eye contact and greet the most senior person first, using Arabic titles such as Sheikh or Haji whenever possible as a sign of respect. Hours of business The working week starts on Sunday and ends on Thursday. Friday and Saturday are the official days of rest, although some – including many non-government offices – may work

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on Saturday. Hours of business are usually 8am to 1pm, then 3.30pm to 6.30pm.

exchange business cards immediately after introductions, presenting them with both hands, and with the Arabic side face-upwards

never offer or receive anything with your left hand

study the cards once received, then keep them on the table, do not put them away immediately

spend time getting to know new associates, and avoid a hard-sell approach or appearing impatient

not appear angry or raise your voice

Meetings You will need introductions to develop your business in this market. It is common to establish new business contacts via an introduction by mutual contact, exhibitions, networking receptions or through the Embassy in the form of an Overseas Market Introduction Service (OMIS). Through an OMIS, the British Embassy Muscat can provide a programme-arranging service, whereby your company can be introduced to the most appropriate contacts and an appointment confirmed on your behalf. Face-to-face meetings are preferred as phone calls or emails are sometimes seen as impersonal. Appointments should be made no more than two weeks in advance and confirmed a few days before the actual meeting, together with an agenda if available. It is useful to allocate extra time in case the meeting should go on longer or start later than anticipated. Morning and early evenings are the most usual times for meetings, but make sure you avoid prayer times when scheduling. The pace of life is slower in the Gulf, and punctuality is not a particularly high priority. However, you should try to be punctual to create a good impression. As with other Gulf nations, you must be patient getting to know your contacts through face-to-face meetings over time.

You should be aware that verbal commitments are treated very seriously in Arabic business culture, and it is advised that you consult a lawyer prior to signing an agreement in Oman. A list of lawyers is available from the British Embassy Muscat, or at: https://www. gov.uk/government/publications/oman-listof-lawyers.

Summary Omanis prefer to do business with people they know and trust. Personal contact with potential and existing partners/clients and regular visits to Oman are of the utmost importance and it is natural for a business relationship to be built over time. Remember, relationships are most important. You should show long-term commitment to Oman and your Omani contacts – keep in touch between contracts or projects.

During meetings you should: [Source – DIT Trade and Investment guide: Oman, gov.uk]

110


> Clear, consistent content is vital to making your business understood overseas. So don't leave it to chance.

> Well-known companies we already work with include: Serco, Experian, Intertek, IKEA and Caterpillar > For a structured approach to translation, please read the article that follows

T: 0115 9705633 | E: office@astls.co.uk | www.astlanguage.com


If you're reading this guide, the chances are you're either a seasoned exporter, or you're committed to investigating new export opportunities for your business. Whichever category you fall into, you'll have a good idea of the huge investment in time, effort and resources which is required for export success.

Your priority will be to get your product or service to market, and it's a fact of life that procurement of peripheral resources such as translation is often left to the last minute. In this article we'd like to demonstrate to you how building translation into the early planning stages of your export campaigns can pay dividends.

The internet, mobile connectivity and social media mean that now more than ever before customers, be they B2B or B2C, are buying goods and services within the context of a connected world of instant communication. Buying decisions carried out in isolation of wider and constantly changing sector, economic or social contexts are a thing of the past. This means that increasingly any product or service has to be supported with professional technical, marketing or other contextual content.

As examples of this, exporters need their technical documentation to be easily assimilated, their marketing content to be compelling, and their website to be informative and memorable. Human resources departments on the other hand need sensitive localisation of policies & procedures in line with local legislation, corporate guidelines and house style. After all an international expansion strategy or company restructuring could easily be undermined by insensitive internal communication.

In non English-speaking markets, all of the above can be achieved by working with a reliable and professional translation partner. So how can really good translation help build your export success: •

clear and accurate foreignlanguage branding and content will motivate foreign customers to buy from you

consistent and harmonised messaging helps to convey and reinforce your company's values and ethos corporate and operational risk through poor quality communication and misunderstanding is eliminated overall brand integrity and reputation are enhanced


The following components are key to a successful translation project, and show how AST can make the process of internationalising outward-facing and internal communications simpler, more professional and more costeffective: Rigorous selection of translators

AST’s ISO9001 certified and ISO17100 compliant processes mean that the company has approved sector-specialist translators whatever the language and deadline requirements, with experienced proofreaders to give the text precision and professionalism to really focus the reader’s attention. Translation memory technology

Client-facing documents produced periodically often contain sections which stay the same and sections which need updating. Similarly company websites and technical data or manuals can contain identical paragraphs and sections. Translation Memory technology is used in this situation to identify duplicate and legacy text. The duplicates are logged and reused – leading to reduced turnaround times and resulting

cost savings – with company wordings for products, processes, titles and descriptions translated consistently. Terminology management

The key words used to describe your company’s products, services and processes support your brand and identity. This is equally true in your foreign language communications. Unfortunately, once translated it is often easy to lose control of key terms, leading to uncertainty as to whether the translations are having the desired impact. AST’s terminology management prevents this. Glossaries are maintained in multiple languages and client terminology is checked in each language by industry sector experts. As the glossary grows it can be reused with each new project, so client content is always on-message and brand integrity consistent.

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Skyline of Muscat

OMAN

Oman is a relatively easy place to do business. However, a high level of business loyalty and a long-term approach are essential for success in this market, and there can be a number of challenges.


116

WHAT ARE THE CHALLENGES?


What are the challenges?

Challenges when doing business with Oman Oman is a relatively easy place to do business. However, a high level of business loyalty and a long-term approach are essential for success in this market, and there can be a number of challenges, such as: •

time to set up a local operation (if outside free trade zones)

time to obtain required government licences

local ownership requirements (if outside free trade zones)

requirement to employ a quota of Omanis to comply with Omanisation rules (which aim to improve local employment prospects and reduce reliance on imported labour)

risk of payment delays

However, British goods and services are highly regarded for quality, although price is normally a determining factor of sale. Bribery and corruption Bribery is illegal. It is an offence for British nationals or someone who is ordinarily resident in the UK, a body incorporated in the UK or a Scottish partnership, to bribe anywhere in the world.

117

In addition, a commercial organisation carrying on a business in the UK can be liable for the conduct of a person who is neither a UK national, nor resident in the UK, nor a body incorporated or formed in the UK. In this case it does not matter whether the acts or omissions which form part of the offence take place in the UK or elsewhere. Oman joined over 120 other countries by acceding to the United Nations Convention Against Corruption (“UNCAC”) in January 2014. See: https://www.unodc.org/unodc/ en/treaties/CAC/ for further details. In Transparency International's latest 2018 Corruption Perceptions Index (announced January 2019), Oman is ranked 53rd out of 180 countries (the UK ranks 11th). See: https://www.transparency.org/country/OMN. Visit the Business Anti-Corruption portal at: https://www.ganintegrity.com/portal/countryprofiles/oman/ and the UK Government’s anti-bribery policy details at: https://www. gov.uk/anti-bribery-policy for procedures you can establish to protect your company from corruption risks. Intellectual Property (IP) IP rights are territorial, which means that they only give protection within the countries where they are registered. You should therefore consider registering your IP rights (if appropriate) in all your export markets.

www.Oman.DoingBusinessGuide.co.uk


Oman is bound by the Trademarks Law of the GCC (see: https://wipolex.wipo.int/en/ legislation/details/14730), and has a comprehensive regime for the protection of IP rights (IPR), including both the registration of trademarks and names, as well as civil and criminal penalties for a breach. However, although IPR enforcement can be poor, challenges can often be successful. A GCC-wide patent can be obtained by filing an application with the Patent Office in Saudi Arabia. Certificates of Patents granted by the GCC Patent Office secure legal protection of the inventor’s rights in all GCC member states (UAE, Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, Oman, Qatar and Kuwait). For further information see the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) site at: https://wipolex.wipo.int/en/legislation/ profile/OM.

Oman’s overall 2018 International Property Rights Index (IPRI) score increased by 0.052 to 6.331, placing it 4th in the Middle East and North Africa region, and 38th (out of 125) in the world. See: https://www.international propertyrightsindex.org/country/oman. [Source – GAN, Transparency International, World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), FCO Overseas Business Risk: Oman, DIT Trade and Investment guide: Oman, Property Rights Alliance, gov.uk]

Protective security advice The UK Government has advice on crime and fraud prevention in international trade, at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/crime-andfraud-prevention-for-businesses-ininternational-trade.

You should ensure that your IP rights are protected by contacting a local lawyer who is specialised in Intellectual Property. A list of potential lawyers is available at: https://www. gov.uk/government/publications/oman-listof-lawyers. Further information is provided on the UK Government’s Intellectual Property page at: https://www.gov.uk/intellectual-property-anoverview, and at the Intellectual Property Office – the UK Government agency providing free and impartial advice on protecting and registering your IP in the UK and abroad. See: https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations /intellectual-property-office.

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T h e n ew Outwa rd B ou n d O m a n D es e r t tra i n i n g c e ntre d esi g n e d by l o c a l a rc h ite cts 2 3 D e g re es N o r th h a s b e e n l a b e l l e d â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;a b s o l u t e l y e x c e p t i o n a l â&#x20AC;&#x2122; b y i n d e p e n d e n t a ss e ss o r s . T h e fa c i li ty i s t h e fi r st g ove r n m e nt fu n d e d bu il di n g c o m p l ete l y re li a nt o n s o l a r e n e rgy a n d is th e re ci pi ent of severa l i n dustr y a wa rd s i n c lu di n g : A I A M E B e s t B u i l t A r c h i t e c tu r e , B e s t S u s t a i n a b l e B u i l d i n g ( D o s s i e r C o n s t r u c t i o n Aw a r d s 2 0 1 7 ) a n d S u s t a i n a b i l i t y I n i t i a t i v e o f t h e Ye a r (C o n s t r u c t i o n We e k O m a n Aw a r d s 2 0 1 8) .


OMAN

The Sultanate of Oman, once famous for its frankincense, is an Arab country about the size of the British Isles, located on the eastern coast of the Arabian Peninsula.


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RESOURCES


What does membership of the Institute of Export & International Trade mean?

To most the Institute of Export & International Trade simply plods away providing much needed qualifications to professionalise the industry however, did you realise that our helpline is one of the busiest and best in the industry? It’s all part of membership and, if you need more than a phone call, we can put together a project to fulfil your needs. 2015 saw the launch of our Technical Help for Exporters that recognises the volume of legislation and regulation that covers our industry and gives you the comfort of knowing that if you don’t know, you know someone who does!

Innovation is key to the success of the Institute and new ideas include our New Exporter package. This allows a business to enter a new market secure in the knowledge that they have an understanding of how they will operate and comply with any specific regulations and standards. Practical help and assistance is always available from the Institute so any additional training can be tailored to the business and the team that needs the knowledge. The work of the IOE&IT also extends to representing membership views. Knowledge gained from our members’ feedback, those who get involved with

the forums and Special Interest Groups, and those who attend our training courses or study with us, enables us to represent the industry at government levels in both the process and delivery of policy for international trade. These views also help us to ensure that the training programmes are effective and pertinent to the industry needs. Our Diploma in World Customs Compliance and Regulation is testament to the way we listen to our members’ needs. This was driven by Nissan, Adidas, John Lewis and many others and will neatly dovetail into any AEO work ensuring that quality standards are met at manager and junior staffing levels.


www.export.org.uk

Starting in 1935, the Institute committed itself to building competence and growing confidence for businesses trading in goods and services, which at the time, was a far reaching remit. Over the years this remit has seen us develop from simply providing training in short course format over a day, or perhaps two, into a fully-fledged Ofqual Awarding Organisation that operates specifically to deliver international trade education.

our young people at an earlier stage. We need to engage the next generation in thinking about how world trade works and how it will be great for British businesses. They need to know how items arrive in the shops which, in turn, will begin to spark ideas. As these young people join companies they will bring a fresh outlook that all things are possible especially if you operate globally.

This status allows our individual members and corporates alike to be sure that they are part of a quality organisation with plans for growth integrated with a sustainable future for the global prosperity of UKPlc.

Why not call us and get involved? It has never been more important that we act as an industry to help â&#x20AC;&#x201C; we need experts and commitment to professionalising international trade from businesses large and small â&#x20AC;&#x201C; help your institute to stay ahead of the curve.

Part of our work includes mapping existing qualifications to roles and producing training needs analyses to ensure staffing progression and continuity. The need to upskill our workforce to match those of our competitors is a key element vital for growth. Our focus is on recognising that International trade needs specific knowledge, coupled with a strong belief that we must start to talk to

Institute of Export & International Trade Export House Minerva Business Park, Lynch Wood, Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, PE2 6FT, UK Telephone: +44(0)1733 - 404400 Fax: +44(0)1733 - 404444

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www.export.org.uk

@ioexport

Choosing a great export training partner can really help your company take off in the export trade! We can help develop new ideas and find ways to drive down costs and produce sustainable improvements in your export business. Join us today

Membership : Training : QualiďŹ cations : Advice

Call: +44 (0) 1733 404 400 : email: institute@export.org.uk


IOE&IT Qualifications in brief www.export.org.uk/page/qualifications Level 1 Level 2 Level 3

Level 4 Level 5

Level 7

Young International Trader (Available electronically) International Trade Logistic Operations* Certificate of International Trade Level 3 Customs Practitioner Award Certificate in Customs Legislation and Procedures (Delivered by KGH Customs) Certificate in Customs Duty Calculation (Delivered by KGH Customs) Diploma in International Trade Customs Practitioner Award Diploma in International Trade Diploma in World Customs Compliance and Regulations Foundation Degree jointly delivered with the University of Plymouth MSc International Trade, Strategy and Operations with Warwick University

Specialist Courses •

• • •

Award in International Transport and Documentation International Marketing Specialist Finance of International Trade Specialist Selling Services, Software and Skills Overseas

Apprenticeships Working in conjunction with employers and Universities, the Institute has access to qualifications which are available now and funded through the apprenticeship levy, these apply for professional and degree qualifications, including Bachelors and Masters Degrees. • • •

International Freight Forwarding Specialist Apprenticeship (Level 3) Chartered Manager Degree Apprenticeship (BSc Professional Management Practice) with the University of Plymouth Supply Chain Leadership Degree Apprenticeship (BSc Professional Practice in Supply Chain Leadership) with CP Training Services

Using our 4 Pillars of Learning, the IOE&IT qualifications offer students the opportunity to apply their learning to their current employer, or a business that they know well:

Learning Pillar 1: World Business Environment Learning Pillar 2: Market Research & marketing / selling in a different culture Learning Pillar 3: Finance of international trade, getting paid and how foreign exchange works Learning Pillar 4: Compliance, regulations and logistics OR Selling services overseas

As part of IOE&IT qualifications, students will plan, research and implement a work-based project that will act as a useful strategic management tool in each of the main topics they study. Each paper will produce a useful piece of work based on the company’s own product or offering which allows the student to gain new knowledge to be useful in the business. This style of work-based projects ensures that all study is relevant to the student’s business context. Working on these projects using the organisation’s structure provides excellent opportunities for the student to apply theoretical ideas in real world contexts.

The employee will essentially become a practitioner-researcher to undertake each project, producing pieces of work with the potential to yield tangible benefits for the sponsor business – a benefit for both the student who qualifies and the employer who has a set of reports specifically about exporting and their own business.

*International Trade Logistic Operations is delivered through our approved centres

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The British Embassy Muscat maintains and develops relations between the UK and Oman.

They provide a range of services in Oman to the public and to business. They have 14 UK-based staff and over 50 staff employed locally.

Find out more on their UK and Oman news page, here: www.gov.uk/world/oman/news. The British Embassy Muscat provides services to British nationals living in and visiting Oman. You can access UK Government services while in Oman, here: www.gov.uk/world/oman. 

Urgent assistance If you are in Oman and you need urgent help (for example, you have been attacked, arrested or someone has died), call +968 2460 9000. If you are in the UK and worried about a British national in Oman, call 020 7008 1500. Get an emergency travel document You can apply for an emergency travel document if you are abroad and your passport has been lost or stolen, damaged or expired, and you cannot get a new or replacement passport in time to travel. Apply online for an emergency travel document at: www.gov.uk/ emergency-travel-document.

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If the person needing the emergency travel document is under 16, a parent or guardian should apply on their behalf. If you are travelling in more than 3 weeks, check if you can get a new or replacement passport in time to travel, here: www.gov.uk/renew-adult-passport. If you are not a British citizen or have not had a British passport before If you are not sure, check if you are a British citizen, here: www.gov.uk/checkbritish-citizenship.

If you are not a British citizen but think you may be eligible, contact us to apply for an emergency travel document, here: www.gov.uk/world/organisations/ british-embassy-muscat#contact-us.


Other consular services Notarial and documentary services The British Embassy Muscat may be able to offer notarial services, including affirmations and affidavits, certificates and certified copies of documents such as passports. See the full list of notarial and documentary services they provide, here: www.gov.uk/guidance/notarialand-documentary-services-guide-foroman--3.

Consular fees The British Embassy Muscat charges fees for some of their services. See the full list of consular fees in Oman, here: www.gov.uk/government/publications/ oman-consular-fees.

Contact details British Embassy PO Box 185 Mina Al Fahal  116 Muscat Muscat Oman Telephone enquiries: +968 2460 9000 Fax general: +968 2460 9010 Fax commercial: +968 2460 9012 Fax consular:  +968 2460 9011 Visa International Enquiry Service:  www.gov.uk/contact-ukvi-outside-uk

Opening hours: Sunday to Thursday, 7:30am to 2:30pm (Local) Sunday to Thursday, 4:30am to 11:30am (GMT)

If you need to visit the British Embassy for a consular issue, you may need to make an appointment. For all notarial and documentary services an appointment has to be made in advance of your visit. Contact form for consular enquiries: https://www.contact-embassy.service. gov.uk/?country=Oman&post=British% 20Embassy%20Muscat For enquiries that are not about consular issues, email: muscat.enquiries@fco.gov.uk Commercial: DIT.Muscat@fco.gov.uk 

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Renaissance Village Duqm Looking after your people

www.renaissanceservices.com

Delivering higher standar tandards at lowerr cos costs through economies of scale s • More than 18,500 Beds • Cuisine prepared to suit all tastes • 24/7 Reception • Mosque • 24/7 Clinic • Dining Facility – Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner,, Packed Meals • Housekeeping • Laundry • Indoor Recreational Facilities – Pool Tab Tables, Swimming Pool, Multi-purpose hall, TTable able Tennis • Outdoor Recreational Facilities – A full-size green football pitch • Gymnasiums – Fully equipped state-of-the-art equipment • Free-to-Air Satellite Stations • Library • Reading Lounges •*VTWSL[L>PÄ*VUULJ[P]P[`• Guaranteed rating as a 100% ICV spend F or a ccomplete omplete turnk ey so lution ffor or yyour our w orkforce’s ac commodation, For turnkey solution workforce’s accommodation, plea se ccontact ontact us o n + 24700127 24700127 9 68 or rrenaissance@tiscooman.com enaissance@tiscooman.com please on 968 w ww.duqmvillage.com www.duqmvillage.com

Renaissance Village Duqm is a multiple award-winning concept designed to provide accommodation for all levels of employees in an organisation. All categories of accommodation include meals, laundry, recreational facilities and essential support services.

Senior Executive En-suite room with area:: living area Rate per person per day OMR 24.620 / USD 64.00 Senior Single Premium En-suite: Rate per person per day OMR 19.230 / USD 50.00 Senior Single En-suite:: Standard En-suite Rate per person per day OMR 15.380 / USD 40.00 2 in a room En-suite: En-suite: Rate per person per day OMR 11.540 / USD 30.00

2019 MEED National Award for ‘Best Residential Project of the Year’ Year’ and ‘Best Social, Cultural and Heritage Project of the Year’

2019 Al Roya Economic Award for ‘Best Large Private Sector Project’

6 in a room: room: Rate per person per day OMR 4.620 / USD 12.00 8 in a room: room: Rate per person per day OMR 3.860 / USD 10.00

CR No. 1522850 1522850

3 in a room En-suite: En-suite: Rate per person per day OMR 9.615 / USD 25.00


The Institute of Export & International Trade Export House Minerva Business Park Lynch Wood Peterborough PE2 6FT, UK T: +44 (0) 1733 404400 www.export.org.uk

Department for International Trade (DIT)

Department for International Trade (DIT)

SUPPORTING ORGANISATIONS

The Institute of Export & International Trade

If you have a specific enquiry about the Oman market that is not addressed by the information in this guide, you may contact: E: enquiries@trade.gov.uk T: +44 (0)20 7215 5000

Otherwise contact DIT at the British Embassy Muscat directly for more information and advice on opportunities for doing business in Oman: UK Department for International Trade Oman British Embassy PO Box 185 Mina Al Fahal 116 Muscat Muscat Oman

E: DIT.Muscat@fco.gov.uk T: +968 2460 9000

www.Oman.DoingBusinessGuide.co.uk

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SUPPORTING ORGANISATIONS

UK Export Finance UK Export Finance is the UK’s export credit agency. UKEF’s mission is to ensure that no viable UK export fails for lack of finance or insurance from the private sector, while operating at no net cost to the taxpayer.

We help UK companies of all sizes and in all sectors win, fulfil and get paid for export contracts. We provide insurance to exporters and guarantees to banks to share the risks of providing export finance. In addition, we can make loans to overseas buyers of goods and services from the UK. As the world's first export credit agency, established in 1919, we've been innovating since day one.

• •

Last year, we provided £2.5 billion of support for UK exports, helping 191 companies sell to 75 markets around the world. 77% of all companies we supported were small to medium-sized businesses.

We also lent £666 million directly to overseas buyers to help them buy from the UK more than double the amount for 2016 to 2017.

New business enquiries: To check your eligibility for trade finance and insurance: www.great.gov.uk/get-finance T: +44 (0) 20 7271 8010 E: customer.service@ukexport finance.gov.uk

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Visit the Website and download the free Mobile App


.

British Expertise

British Expertise 23 Grafton Street London W1S 4EY

T: +44 (0) 20 7824 1920 F: +44 (0) 20 7824 1929 E

+

0

www.britishexpertise.org

International Market Advisor

International Market Advisor IMA Ltd 2nd Floor 32 Park Green Macclesfield SK11 7NA

SUPPORTING ORGANISATIONS

e

Email: info@ima.uk.com

General enquiries switchboard T: +44 (0) 1298 79562

www.DoingBusinessGuides.com

Media enquiries Newsdesk & out of hours T: +44 (0) 1298 79562

www.Oman.DoingBusinessGuide.co.uk

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D e l i v e r i n g Va l u e A p p r o p r i a te to P l a c e

‫ﺷﻤﺎل‬ ‫ﻤﺎ‬ ‫درﺟﺔﺷﻤ‬ ‫ﺔ‬ w w w. 2 3 d e g r e e s N . c o m


23 Degrees North PO Box 809 Madinat Sultan Qaboos PC 115 Oman

T: +968 24603378 E: enquiries@23degreesN.com

MARKET ExPERTS

Architecture/Design

www.23degreesN.com

Contact name: Nadia Maqbool E: nmaqbool@23degreesn.com Instagram:  @23degreesN Twitter:  @23degreesN Facebook:  @23degreesN

Law

Addleshaw Goddard Level 4, Unit 402 Beach One, Shatti Al Qurum PO Box 4, PC 102, Al Qurum, Muscat Sultanate of Oman

T: +968 2495 0700 F: +968 2464 9044

Oliver Stevens Partner and Head of Corporate Oman E: o.stevens@aglaw.com www.addleshawgoddard.com

www.Oman.DoingBusinessGuide.co.uk

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MARKET ExPERTS

Insurance

Al Ahlia Insurance Company SAOG   (Part of RSA Insurance Group) T: +968 2476 6800 E: aaic@om,rsagroup.com www.alahliarsa.com

Moving & Relocations

Allied Logistics LLC T/F: +968 220 71177 GSM: +968 978 40711 GSM: +968 971 36210

E: enquiries@alliedlogistics.co.om www.alliedlogistics.co.om

Language

AST Language Services Ltd Unit 8, Ayr Street, Nottingham NG7 4Fx United Kingdom T: +44 (0) 115 970 5633 F: +44 (0) 845 051 8780 E: office@astls.co.uk

www.astlanguage.com

137

Visit the Website and download the free Mobile App


Oman Global Logistics Group (ASYAD) PO BOx 470, P.C. 115 Madinat Sultan Qaboos Sultanate of Oman Email: marketing@asyad.om

MARKET ExPERTS

Logistics

Website: www.Asyad.om

Engineering

Berkeley Engineering 52 Berkeley Square Mayfair London W1J 5BT, United Kingdom

T: +44 207 4936167 F: +44 207 4958063 E: info@berkeleyeng.com www.berkeleyeng.com

Case study

BP Exploration (Epsilon) Ltd PO Box 1649 PC 130 (Al Aziba) Muscat, Sultanate of Oman T: +968 2212 1000

www.bp.com/en/global/corporate /what-we-do/bp-worldwide/bp-inoman.html Contact name: Kitty Hamilton Email: Kitty.Hamilton@bp.com

www.Oman.DoingBusinessGuide.co.uk

138


Celebrity Global Holdings Limited E: Investoman@celebrity-global.com http://celebrity-global.com

MARKET ExPERTS

Investment Services/Investment Consultancy Services

Real Estate

Hamptons International T: +968 24 699 773 M:Â +968 98 294 201

Email: muscat@hamptons.om Website: www.hamptons.om

Hotel

Hormuz Grand Muscat P.O BOx 128 PC 111- Seeb Muscat Sultanate of Oman

T: +968 24350500 F: +968 24350599 E: reservations.muscat@ radissoncollection.com

radissoncollection.com/ hormuz-grand-hotel

www.Oman.DoingBusinessGuide.co.uk

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HSBC Bank Oman S.A.O.G Al Khuwair Muscat Oman T: 800 74 722

www.hsbc.co.om

MARKET ExPERTS

Banking/Financial Services

Accountants/Professional Business Services

Mazars in Oman Office no. 412, 4th Floor, Maktabi, Al Wutayyah, Muscat, Sultanate of Oman

T: +968 2456 2001/+968 2456 1005/ +968 2456 1119 F: +968 2413 7650 E: contact@mazars.om www.mazars.om

Contact names: Abbas Al-Humaid CPA, CFE, CMC, CFC, CMgr CARL Partner

International Mazars Group - Belgium Managing partner, Mazars Oman

M: +968 9938 5151 E: abbas@mazars.om

Dr. Jonathan D. Stearns MBA Partner M: +968 9675 0679 E: jonathan@mazars.om 

www.Oman.DoingBusinessGuide.co.uk

142


MARKET ExPERTS

Travel/Business Airline Services

Oman Air SAOC Oman Air 177-179 Hammersmith Road London W6 8BS

T: 08444 822 309 E: uk.sme@omanair.com www.omanair.com

Contact names: Jas Gill, Corporate & SME Account Manager 

Darren McCormick, Corporate & SME Account Manager

Tourism Development/Property Real Estate Services

Oman Tourism Development Company - OMRAN omran.om T: (968) 24391111

143

Visit the Website and download the free Mobile App


Ooredoo Oman Company contact details: W: Ooredoo.om/business Twitter: www.twitter.com/ OoredooOman

MARKET ExPERTS

ICT/Telecommunications

Facebook: www.facebook.com/ OoredooOman Instagram: www.instagram.com/ OoredooOman YouTube: www.youtube.com/ OoredooOman Snapchat: Ooredoo_Oman

Case study

Petrofac Oman Civil Service Employees Pension Fund Building Building No. 175 Second Floor Exhibition Street Way No.61 Ghala Muscat PO Box:110 P.C:136 Muscat

T: +968 24484525 F: +968 24487942 E: marketing@Petrofac.com

www.Oman.DoingBusinessGuide.co.uk

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Public Establishment for Industrial Estates - Madayn PO Box 200 Rusayl. PC 124 Sultanate of Oman

T: 00968 24170700 E: invest@madayn.om

MARKET ExPERTS

Free Zones/Industrial Estate Services

madayn.om

Contact name:Â Investor Services Department

Integrated Facilities Management and Accommodation Solutions

Renaissance Services SAOG Mr. Hussain Mohammed Al Lawati Chief Commercial Officer P.O. Box 1676, Muttrah 114, Sultanate of Oman

E: hussain.allawati@tiscooman.com T: +968 24700127 M: +968 98294667

Business Association

The Anglo-Omani Society 34 Sackville Street London W1S 3ED T: +44 (0)20 7851 7439

www.angloomanisociety.com

www.Oman.DoingBusinessGuide.co.uk

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Trade shows

A trade show is a method of promoting a business through the exhibition of goods and services, an organised exhibition of products, based on a central theme, where manufacturers meet to show their products to potential buyers.

Taking part in overseas exhibitions is an effective way for you to test markets, attract customers, appoint agents or distributors and make sales. DIT's Tradeshow Access Programme (TAP) provides grant support for eligible SME firms to attend trade shows overseas. Participation is usually as part of a group, a great advantage for inexperienced businesses, and is usually led by one of DIT's Accredited Trade Associations (ATOs). ATOs work with DIT to raise the profile of UK groups and sectors at key exhibitions.

For more information visit: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/tradeshow-access-programme.

IOE&ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s events: www.export.org.uk/events/event _list.asp 10 Times (formerly BizTradeShows.com): www.10times.com/oman British Expertise Events: https://www.britishexpertise.org/ events/ EventsEye.com online database: www.eventseye.com DIT online events search facility: https://www.events.great.gov.uk/ ehome/index.php?eventid=20018 3029&

www.Oman.DoingBusinessGuide.co.uk

148


CASE STUDY A fr fresh esh approach approach to the QHSE awar awareness eness posters at Renaissance In 2018, we continued with the QHSE awar awareness eness WVZ[LYZ WVZ[LYZ [[V V WYV]PKL WYV]PKL PUMVYTH[PVU PUMVYTH[PVU V VU U ZZWLJPĂ&#x201E;J WLJPĂ&#x201E;J [VWPJZ [VWPJZ covering four areas: areas: Safety Raiser posters (general hazards), hazards), Our Health posters (occupational health), Food Safety posters sters (food and hygiene) and Environment Protection posters (environmental information).

Encouraging safer driving at Renaissance To T o encourage safe driving practices, Renaissance programme: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Driving Safely the initiated a programme: Wayâ&#x20AC;? in 2017. The pr ogramme Renaissance Wayâ&#x20AC;? programme Radio-Frequency monitors driver performance using Radio-Frequency 0KLU[PĂ&#x201E;JH[PVU 9-0+ 9-0+ JJHYKZ HYKZ [V [V PPKLU[PM` KLU[PM` ]]PVSH[PVUZ PVSH[PVUZ 0KLU[PĂ&#x201E;JH[PVU HJYVZZ Ă&#x201E;]L Ă&#x201E;]L W YLKLĂ&#x201E;ULK JJYP[LYPH YP[LYPH ; OL W YVNYHTTL HJYVZZ WYLKLĂ&#x201E;ULK ;OL WYVNYHTTL oduced in February 2017, is aimed at which was intr introduced ing the safety of our drivers, who ar ensuring aree all me employees. This initiative pr omotes a safe full-time promotes g cultur e, ensuring compliance with rroad oad safety driving culture, ations and decr easing vehicle maintenance, regulations decreasing by impr oving vehicle life. thereby improving art of this pr ogramme, by the end of 2018, we As part programme, nstalled RFID cards cards on 134 of our vehicles, had installed covering ing 65% of the total vehicles owned and ated by Renaissance. operated Rate off driver violations per vehic vehicle le 2018 Driver seat belt 0.25 Harsh acceleration 0.09 Harsh braking 4.73 peeding on public road 1.14 Overspeeding peeding on graded road 0 Overspeeding peeding on blacktop road 0.00 Overspeeding

2017 0.93 0.05 3.95 1.51 0 0.16

Through gh pr proactive measures, oactive measur es, including coaching HUKZWLJPĂ&#x201E;J[YHPUPUNZLZZPVUZ^LOH]LYLK\JLK[OL  WLJPĂ&#x201E;J[YHPUPUNZLZZPVUZ^LOH]LYLK\JLK[OL average ge number of driver violations per vehicle veh by 6% in 2018, 2018,when whencompared compar ed to 2017.


ĂƐĞ^ƚƵĚLJĨŽƌ͚ŽŝŶŐƵƐŝŶĞƐƐŝŶKŵĂŶ'ƵŝĚĞ͛


CASE STUDY Renaissance operations at Al Mouj, Muscat With over 2,000 pr properties, operties, Al Mouj Muscat is an award-winning award-winning waterfront development in Muscat, Oman. Al Mouj features features waterfront high-quality assets including a marina, a golf course and club, international hotels, hotels,and andresidential residential r retail projects. projects. international and retail Renaissance currently currently provides provides integrated facilities management (IFM) services covering 650,000 sq.mt. Our activities include waste management, housekeeping, landscaping, and infrastructur infrastructuree maintenance and community liaison services.

Waste Wa aste manage management

To T o better manage waste and rreduce educe the impact of the community on the natural envir environment, onment, we have implemented leading waste management practices ctices at the site. W Wee collect waste from from the community along two str streams, eams, split between general household waste and recyclable recyclable waste. ste. t We We also l collect ll t 250 tons t on average of organic organic waste fr from om landscaping and common green green areas. areas. In 2018, we where we launched â&#x20AC;&#x153;Recycle Waste Waste Cagesâ&#x20AC;? jointly with Al Mouj where installed waste cages at various points in the community community.. Once the cages ar aree full, the waste was collected by our partner organisation, organisation, Al nal Rahma Charitable Association, who sells the waste to exter external ]]LUKVYZHUKILULĂ&#x201E;[ZMYVT[OLWYVJLLKZ-\Y[OLY^LJHYY`V\[ILHJO LUKVYZHUKILULĂ&#x201E;[ZMYVT[OLWYVJLLKZ-\Y[OLY^LJHYY`V\[ILHJO cleaning activities at Al Mouj where where we complement manual waste collection with mechanical equipment to ensure ensure that the 1.25 km stretch stretch of sandy beach is clean and of international international standar standards. ds.

Energy Energy management

gy management, Renaissance together As part of our initiatives in ener energy with Al Mouj has tar geted to reduce reduce by up to 25% common area area targeted electricity usage by 2020 thr ough the intr oduction of LED lights and through introduction area lighting. In 2019, Renaissance is changing the timing of public area [HYNL[PUN 00:6 :6   HHUK UK 0:6 0:6   JLY[PĂ&#x201E;JH[PVUZ JLY[PĂ&#x201E;JH[PVUZ ZZWLJPĂ&#x201E;JHSS` WLJPĂ&#x201E;JHSS` MMVY VY (S (S [HYNL[PUN  Mouj facilities facilities management operations. management operations.

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In addition to traditional IFM services to Al Mouj, Renaissance has launched specialised Home Car Caree Solutions. This service is aimed at Al ehensive Mouj residents residents who wish to sign up for a complete and compr comprehensive annual maintenance contract. T To o enable this service, in 2018 we ovides easy launched our mobile application called Pr Protek, otek, which pr provides access and real-time real-time tracking of the various services and activities that we carry out under Home Care Care Solutions. For 2019, we plan to expand the user base of this mobile application by launching it to new areas ar eas in Muscat.

Renaissance servicing Sarif Sar eea 3, the Sareea largest military exer cise in Oman exercise In October 2018, Renaissance provided infrastructure, provided infrastructure, accommodation and facilities management services to Saif Sareea 3, a combined military Sareea exercise between British and exercise Forces. Omani Armed Forces. forces, we installed T o serve the forces, To state-of-the-art cabins that featur featuree advanced design and technology at thr ee camps. The three construction and installation WYVJLZZ [VVR IL[^LLU Ă&#x201E;]L HUK WYVJLZZ[VVRIL[^LLUĂ&#x201E;]LHUK were six months; porta-cabins were LX\PWWLK ^ P[O 9  JLY[PĂ&#x201E;LK JLY[PĂ&#x201E;LK LX\PWWLK ^P[O 9 air conditioning units and solar panels to power emer gency emergency drench showers; we installed drench more than 1,500 LED lights in more educe the porta-cabins, to rreduce energy consumption and we energy care to ensure ensure took additional care segregated that all waste was segregated according to its type: paper according paper,, plastic, food, or human waste. were designed with The cabins were longevity in mind so that even exercises, they after the military exercises, could be rrepurposed epurposed or rreused eused at the same site. At the end of Saif Sar eea 3, the Ministry of Sareea Defence in Oman took over the site and ar ently using the aree curr currently same site for their tr oops. troops.


Useful Links Country information:

Export ďŹ nance & insurance:

BBC Website: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/country_ profiles/default.stm

British Insurance Brokers Association (BIBA): www.biba.org.uk

FCO Country Profile: https://www.gov.uk/foreign-traveladvice/oman

UK Export Finance (formerly ECGD): www.gov.uk/government/organisations/ uk-export-finance

Culture & communications: ICC â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The international language association: http://www.icc-languages.eu/ Customs & regulations: HM Revenue & Customs: https://www.gov.uk/government/ organisations/hm-revenue-customs

Intellectual Property: Intellectual Property Office: https://www.gov.uk/government/ organisations/intellectual-property-office World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO): http://www.wipo.int/treaties/en/text.jsp? file_id=288514 Standards & technical regulations:

Economic information: The Economist: https://www.economist.com/topics Trading Economics: www.tradingeconomics.com Export control: Export Control Joint Unit: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/ beginners-guide-to-export-controls

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British Standards Institution (BSI): https://www.bsigroup.com/en-GB/ industries-and-sectors/import-export/ Export Control Joint Unit (ECJU): https://www.gov.uk/government/ organisations/export-control-organisation Intellectual Property Office: https://www.gov.uk/government/ organisations/intellectual-property-office National Physical Laboratory: http://www.npl.co.uk/

Visit the Website and download the free Mobile App


TravelHealthPro: https://travelhealthpro.org.uk/countries

Trade statistics: HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC): https://www.uktradeinfo.com/statistics/ buildyourowntables/pages/table.aspx

NHS (Scotland): http://www.fitfortravel.nhs.uk/ destinations.aspx

National Statistics Information: https://www.gov.uk/search/researchand-statistics?content_store_document_ type=upcoming_statistics

NHS Choices: https://www.nhs.uk/using-the-nhs/health care-abroad/

Office for National Statistics: http://www.ons.gov.uk/

International trade: British Chambers of Commerce (BCC): www.britishchambers.org.uk

Trade shows: British Expertise Events: https://www.britishexpertise.org/events/

British Council: www.britishcouncil.org

EventsEye.com online database: www.eventseye.com

British Expertise: www.britishexpertise.org

DIT Events Portal: https://www.events.great.gov.uk/ehome /index.php?eventid=200183029&

British Franchise Association: http://www.thebfa.org/international

Travel advice: FCO Travel: www.gov.uk/browse/abroad FCO Foreign Travel Insurance: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/foreigntravel-insurance Healthcare abroad: Travel Health: www.travelhealth.co.uk

Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure (CPNI): http://www.cpni.gov.uk/ Confederation of British Industry (CBI): www.cbi.org.uk Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (BEIS): https://www.gov.uk/government/ organisations/department-for-businessenergy-and-industrial-strategy

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Department for International Trade (DIT): https://www.gov.uk/government/ organisations/department-forinternational-trade DIT E-Exporting Programme: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/e-exporting Exporting is GREAT: https://www.great.gov.uk/ Foreign & Commonwealth Office (FCO): www.gov.uk/government/organisations /foreign-commonwealth-office Institute of Directors (IoD): www.iod.com Institute of Export & International Trade (IOE&IT): www.export.org.uk International Monetary Fund (IMF): http://www.imf.org/external/index.htm Market Access Database: http://madb.europa.eu/madb/index Publi.htm Open to Export: http://opentoexport.com/ Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD): http://www.oecd.org/ Overseas Business Risk: https://www.gov.uk/government/ collections/overseas-business-risk

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Transparency International: http://www.transparency.org/ UK Trade Tariff: https://www.gov.uk/trade-tariff UK Visas: https://www.gov.uk/government/ organisations/uk-visas-and-immigration World Bank Group economy rankings: http://www.doingbusiness.org/en/rankings World Economic Forum Global Competitiveness Report: http://reports.weforum.org/globalcompetitiveness-report-2019 Omani websites: Arab Interior Ministers Council (site not in English): http://www.aim-council.org/ British Business Forum Oman (BBF): http://www.bbfoman.org/ British Council Oman: https://www.britishcouncil.om/en Dhofar Municipality: http://www.dm.gov.om/index.aspx Directorate General of Civil Aviation and Meteorology: http://www.met.gov.om/opencms/ export/sites/default/dgman/en/home/ index.html

Visit the Website and download the free Mobile App


Duqm Special Economic Zone (SEZAD): https://duqm.gov.om/

Oman Embassy London: http://oman.embassyhomepage.com/

In-Country Initiative (ICV): http://www.incountryvalueoman.net/ Home

Oman Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries Wealth: http://www.maf.gov.om/

Ithraa: https://www.ithraa.om/

Oman Ministry of Civil Service: http://portal.mocs.gov.om/

Joint Supplier Registration System (JSRS): https://www.businessgateways.com/

Oman Ministry of Commerce and Industry (MOCI): https://moci.gov.om/

Middle-East Desalination Research Center (MEDRC): https://www.medrc.org/

Oman Ministry of Defence: http://www.mod.gov.om/EN-US

Muscat International Airport: https://www.muscatairport.co.om/

Oman Ministry of Education (MOE): https://home.moe.gov.om/

Muscat Municipality: https://www.mm.gov.om/Default.aspx

Oman Ministry of Endowments & Religious Affairs: https://www.mara.gov.om/

Muscat Securities Market (MSM): https://www.msm.gov.om/ National Committee for Combating Human Trafficking: http://www.ncchtoman.gov.om/english /default.asp

Oman Ministry of Environment and Climate Affairs: https://www.meca.gov.om/ar/index.php Oman Ministry of Finance (MOF): https://mof.gov.om/english/

Oman Air: https://www.omanair.com/uk/en

Oman Ministry of Foreign Affairs: https://www.mofa.gov.om/?lang=en

Oman Chamber of Commerce and Industry (OCCI): https://chamberoman.om/

Oman Ministry of Health (MOH): https://www.moh.gov.om/en/home

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Oman Ministry of Heritage and Culture: https://www.mhc.gov.om/

Oman Ministry of Transport & Communications (MOTC): https://www.motc.gov.om/DefaultEn.aspx

Oman Ministry of Higher Education (MOHE): https://www.mohe.gov.om/default.aspx ?culture=en

Oman Tourism: https://omantourism.gov.om/wps/ portal/mot/tourism/oman/home

Oman Ministry of Information: https://www.omaninfo.om/english/

Oman Tender Board: https://etendering.tenderboard.gov.om/ product/publicDash?CTRL_STRDIRECTION =LTR

Oman Ministry of Justice (site not in English): https://www.moj.gov.om/Master.aspx#/

Royal Oman Police (ROP): http://www.rop.gov.om/english/index.html

Oman Ministry of Legal Affairs: http://www.mola.gov.om/eng/

State General Reserve Fund (SGRF): https://www.sgrf.gov.om/

Oman Ministry of Manpower: https://www.manpower.gov.om/portal/ index.aspx Oman Ministry of Regional Municipalities and Water Resources: https://mrmwr.gov.om/ Oman Ministry of Social Development: https://www.mosd.gov.om/index.php/en /home Oman Ministry of Sports Affairs: http://mosa.gov.om/mosa/

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Disclaimer Whereas every effort has been made to ensure that the information given in this Guide is accurate, neither International Market Advisor (IMA), the Institute of Export & International Trade (IOE&IT), the British Embassy Muscat, the Embassy of Sultanate of Oman-London, UK Export Finance (UKEF), Department for International Trade (DIT), or the Foreign & Commonwealth Office (FCO), accept liability for any errors, omissions or misleading statements and no warranty is given or responsibility accepted as to the standing of any individual, firm, company or other organisation mentioned. The purpose of the Doing Business Guides, prepared by International Market Advisor (IMA) is to provide information to help recipients form their own judgments about making business decisions as to whether to invest or operate in a particular country.

In particular, none of the report's contents should be construed as advice or solicitation to purchase or sell securities, commodities or any other form of financial instrument. No liability is accepted by IMA, IOE&IT, the British Embassy Muscat, the Embassy of Sultanate of OmanLondon, UKEF, DIT, or the FCO for any loss or damage (whether consequential or otherwise) which may arise out of or in connection with the report. No warranty is given, or responsibility accepted as to the standing of any individual, firm, company or other organisation mentioned. Contains public sector information licensed under the Open Government Licence v3.0.

The report's contents were believed (at the time that the report was prepared) to be reliable, but no representations or warranties, express or implied, are made or given by IMA, the IOE&IT, the British Embassy Muscat, the Embassy of Sultanate of Oman-London, UKEF, DIT or the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) as to the accuracy of the report, its completeness or its suitability for any purpose.

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Quick facts Location: Middle East, bordering the Arabian Sea, Gulf of Oman, and Persian Gulf, between Yemen and the UAE Area: 309,500 km2 Population: 4.18 million Urban population: 84.5% Capital city: Muscat GDP per capita: US $18,970 Languages: Arabic (official), English, Baluchi, Swahili, Urdu, Indian dialects Religion: Muslim 85.9%, Christian 6.5%, Hindu 5.5%, Buddhist 0.8%, Jewish <0.1%, other 1%, unaffiliated 0.2% (2010 est.) Government: absolute monarchy Legal system: mixed legal system of Anglo-Saxon law and Islamic law Currency: Omani Rial (OMR) Climate: dry desert; hot, humid along coast; hot, dry interior; strong southwest summer monsoon (May to September) in far south Natural resources: petroleum, copper, asbestos, some marble, limestone, chromium, gypsum, natural gas Natural hazards: summer winds often raise large sandstorms and dust storms in interior; periodic droughts Time difference: UTC+4 Internet country code: .om National holidays: National Day, 18th November; note - coincides with the birthday of Sultan Qaboos, 18th November (1940) National symbols: khanjar dagger superimposed on two crossed swords; national colours: red, white, green

[Source – FCO Economics Unit, CIA World Factbook (October 2019)]


Profile for Doing Business Guides

Doing Business with Oman Guide  

The Sultanate of Oman is the third-largest state in the Arabian Peninsula, and is a founding member of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC). I...

Doing Business with Oman Guide  

The Sultanate of Oman is the third-largest state in the Arabian Peninsula, and is a founding member of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC). I...