Dogwood Alliance 25th Anniversary Report

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FROM THIS 25 TO THE NEXT 25 YEARS OF

FORESTS, CLIMATE, & JUSTICE. RIGHT PLACE.

RIGHT TIME. 25th Anniversary Report


CHIEF PARR OF THE PEE DEE INDIAN TRIBE


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DOGWOOD ALLIANCE ADVANCES ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE AND CLIMATE ACTION BY MOBILIZING DIVERSE VOICES TO PROTECT SOUTHERN FORESTS AND COMMUNITIES FROM INDUSTRIAL LOGGING.


FORESTS. FORESTS.

25 YEARS SOLUTIONS FROM THE START.... AND STILL GROWING STRONG.

19961999

Foundational Years

Dogwood founded by grassroots organizations and community groups to protect Southern forests from the expansion of chip mills supplying wood for increased US paper production. OUR IMPACT: • Federal government and 4 states (TN, VA, NC, and MO) conduct comprehensive studies of the economic and environmental impacts of chip mills and industrial logging. • State policy enacted that stopped the expansion of chip mills in NC and MO. • Dogwood receives EPA award for its grassroots efforts to educate the public.

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OUR SOUTHERN FORESTS ARE SOME OF THE MOST BIODIVERSE IN THE WORLD.

They provide tourism, recreation, clean air, clean water, regional climate regulation, and protection from extreme weather events. Yet, industrial logging and wood production are destroying and degrading our Southern forests and communities. Forest protection, restoration, and expansion must become a top priority in the US.

20002013

The Paper Campaign A failure of government to regulate forestry industry led to over a decade of grassroots campaigning directly targeting the largest paper consumers and producers impacting Southern forests.

VICTORIES: • Office Supply giants Staples, Office Depot, and others adopted the first-ever corporate environmental paper purchasing policies aimed at protecting forests. • Paper Packaging giants Johnson & Johnson, GlaxoSmithKline, Universal Music Group, and fast food giants including McDonalds, Pizza Hut, and KFC/Yum! Brands adopt paper policies aimed at protecting forests. • Ground breaking commitments to improve forest practices from the South’s largest paper producers including Bowater, Georgia-Pacific, and International Paper. • The conversion of natural forests to plantations on the Cumberland Plateau comes to halt. • Paper industry giants invest over $25 million in the protection and restoration of endangered forests and increase protection for over 90 million acres of Southern forests.


CLIMATE. CLIMATE.

CLIMATE CHANGE IS THE NUMBER ONE THREAT FACING THE WORLD TODAY.

JUSTICE. JUSTICE.

To protect our communities and our future, we need to address the problem before it is too late. Scientists confirm, we must reduce the amount of carbon dioxide being emitted into the atmosphere immediately. We cannot solve the climate crisis without our forests.

20132021

Our Forests Aren’t Fuel

Clearcutting of Southern US forests for wood pellet biomass to fuel power stations in Europe under the guise of “renewable” climate friendly energy began to ramp up in 2014. In response, we launched the Our Forests Aren’t Fuel Campaign with NRDC and European partners. VICTORIES: • Wall Street Journal covers the launch of the Our Forests Aren’t Fuel Campaign. • On-the-ground investigations leads to sustained, high-profile international news coverage exposing the clearcutting of mature Southern wetland forests for wood pellets, debunking industry and EU government claims. • Outreach to frontline communities sparks a region-wide movement exposing the health and environmental justice impacts of the wood pellet industry. • Proposed wood pellet mill in South Carolina stopped by local citizens. • NC DEQ requires Enviva to install pollution control equipment at wood pellet mills, costing the company millions of dollars. • Belgium agrees to end its use of biomass for electricity. • NC Gov. Roy Cooper expresses concern about the wood pellet industry in front of Congress. • NC excludes biomass in the state’s renewable energy plan. • Georgia forest resolution opposing biomass introduced with bi-partisan support.

COMMUNITIES AT THE FRONTLINES OF FOREST DESTRUCTION ARE OFTEN THOSE ALREADY EXPERIENCING OPPRESSION. Communities of color, Indigenous communities, low-income, and/ or rural populations disproportionately bear the impacts of climate change as well as the health, economic, and social costs associated with industrial practices. It is critical that impacted communities are leading the forest protection movement.

20172021

Forests and Frontline Communities Dogwood’s leadership at the intersection of forests, climate, and justice in the Southern US catalyzes a national and regional movement.

VICTORIES: • Release of report with IPCC scientist Dr. William Moomaw sparked a movement of scientists pressuring Congress to protect forests from logging as a vital climate solution. • Stand4Forests Platform elevates protecting forests from logging as a national priority among forest and environmental justice organizations. • Justice 1st Tour with New Alpha Community Development Corporation engages 300 organizations across 13 states in the South, bringing a message of 100% clean energy, forest protection and environmental justice to frontline communities.


LEADING A GLOBAL CALL TO END BIOMASS Dogwood Alliance’s reach has grown beyond the Southern US to impact global industries and policies. Since 2013, the Netherlands has imported vast amounts of wood from Southern US forests to burn in coal-fired power stations, and since 2016, we have played the vital role of providing strategy support and resources to Dutch grassroots partners. In 2020, 98% of Dutch citizens polled favored ending subsidies for biomass. In February 2021, the Netherlands declared there would be no new subsidies for woody biomass without a phase-out plan and has created pressure for utilities to develop those plans before the deadline for new subsidies. To fuel public awareness and combat corporate messaging in Europe, Dogwood Alliance led on-the-ground investigative tours of Southern forests logged for wood

NOW 2020 and 2021

“Dogwood Alliance’s foundation in ecology and ecological principles as well as its regional focus in my backyard were a combination of ingredients that I didn’t realize I’d been looking for. After 18 years of fighting off the petrochemical industry in the Arctic, it was refreshing to get behind David (Dogwood) to engage Goliath on a local battlefield.”

—MARTIN LEVISEN, DOGWOOD ALLIANCE FOREST DEFENDER DONOR

75%

+ 6

INCREASE IN INDIVIDUAL DONATIONS

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pellet exports to the EU and UK for European media. Dogwood Alliance also joined in coalition with international environmental advocacy groups, to launch Cut Carbon Not Forests, a hard-hitting campaign to expose the UK’s wasteful subsidies for companies that burn trees for electricity and to put pressure on policy makers to support reform to end the UK’s reliance on biomass. In the fall of 2021, increased scrutiny pushed Drax Group—a company with numerous Southern US pellet mill facilities that falsely claims its biomass-fueled power stations can operate with carbon neutrality— off the S&P’s Clean Energy Index. This reflects a growing recognition among industry experts and the public that biomass is no better for the climate than burning coal.

Greta Thunberg publicly shares support for ending subsidies for the wood pellet industry.

+1 BILLION

REACH ACROSS MEDIA CHANNELS

FRONTLINE ORGANIZING RESILIENCY AND ENTREPRENEURIAL SOLUTIONS TRAINING (OR FOREST) is a network of over 40 activists, organizers, and community leaders representing at least 22 organizations from North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, and Georgia. The program mobilizes partners and builds spaces through Summit gatherings with workshops and trainings. Responding to the pandemic, many members of the FOREST Circle took to the internet to continue their mission: to provide a collective space that intentionally fosters creativity and sustainability, while preparing frontline organizations through power building, education, and resource sharing.


$331,500

2020-21 GRANT SUPPORT PROVIDED DIRECTLY BY DOGWOOD TO COMMUNITY GROUPS ACROSS THE SOUTH

“Ceres Trust is grateful for Dogwood’s work to boldly protect Southern forests, to be in community with all who love and live in the forest, and to a healthy future for all coming generations.”

= pellet mills = communities we work in

—KATHRYN GILJE (CERES TRUST)

7.9 MILLION METRIC TONS OF WOOD PELLETS EXPORTED FROM THE SOUTHERN US IN 2020

INSPIRING REGIONALLY, ACTING NATIONALLY We have the solutions for our forests, and we are going to get them in front of this administration by working together. For decades, forest policy in the US has served to ensure economic returns for large corporations and private landowners at the expense of healthy forests, workers, and communities. The forestry industry has manipulated language use and understanding of forest ecology to their advantage: using wildfires as a rationale for logging, referring to tree plantations as equivalent to “forests,” and advocating for younger trees as having more climate benefit than old growth. These narratives are neither scientific knowledge nor common sense. The forest products industry is

FRONTLINE COMMUNITIES AND AREAS OF IMPACT

driving massive carbon emissions, degrading forests, polluting the air and water, and compromising vital ecosystem services. These impacts, like many other extractive industries, disproportionately harm underresourced communities and communities of color. On January 27, 2021, President Biden signed a series of Executive Orders on Climate Change. One Executive Order protects 30% of US lands by 2030. Another for Environmental Justice directs all federal agencies to allocate 40% of sustainability investments “low income and communities of color” including Black, Indigenous, and People

of Color communities that have borne the brunt of pollution impacts. The Executive Orders are a pivotal opportunity over the next four years to change the dominant thinking about forests and address longstanding inequities related to US forest protection. This is not enough. We must persist in holding policymakers and industries accountable. On International Day of Forests, March 21, 2021, we partnered with Friends of the Earth, Biofuelwatch, and Robeson County Cooperative for Sustainable Development to release a petition urging President Biden to continue to hold the forest industry responsible for its climate, biodiversity, and community impacts. Over 70,000 people have already signed the petition.


I think when you’re calling for justice, there’s no wrong place, wrong time, for one thing. But I also think that

RIGHT PLACE. RIGHT TIME. 8

RIGHT PLACE. RIGHT TIME.

RIGHT NOW, SEEMS LIKE A MOMENT OF GALVANIZATION.” —MARY ANNAÏSE HEGLAR, CLIMATE JUSTICE LEADER

FORESTS. 25 years strong, Dogwood Alliance joins together


Perhaps [the] most important thing is that over the last decade or so people from every corner have come together to build a vast movement.

YOU CAN SEE IT CHANGING OUR POLITICS IN REAL TIME.”

—BILL MCKIBBEN, AUTHOR, EDUCATOR, ENVIRONMENTALIST

WE’RE IN THE MIDDLE [OF] THIS HUGELY IMPORTANT CULTURAL RECKONING

with systemic racism and how we’ve treated black and brown immigrants, underprivileged, poor people. I think that it makes complete sense to take that one degree further. It’s time to recognize that we have treated the south lands with the same systemic oppression.” —JANISSE RAY, AWARD-WINNING AUTHOR

CLIMATE.

JUSTICE.

with communities to protect forests, challenge climate change, and fight for justice.


R P

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RIGHTTHIS IS THE TIME. PLACE. From Executive Director and Co-Founder, Danna Smith

THE COMING DECADE WILL BE ONE OF THE MOST CRITICAL IN HUMAN HISTORY. By 2030, we as a species will have turned decisively away from extractive industries, mismanagement of our natural world, and the burning of fossil fuels. Dogwood Alliance will play a central role in making this happen. From our grassroots forest protection work in the 90s that led to the first-ever multi-agency federal study of Southern forests, through our early victories holding Staples, KFC, Georgia-Pacific, International Paper, and other corporate giants accountable for their impacts on Southern forests, to rebranding biomass as a false climate solution, time and again we have proven that people-power, backed by science, hard evidence, and compelling story-telling that highlights the damage industrial logging does to forests and communities works. This work does not just matter because of what we have already achieved. It matters because it provides important lessons and a strong foundation for how we move forward together in the years to come. Whether it’s building community-level resistance, developing viable economic alternatives, or

centering the skills, stories, and needs of frontline communities, we have consistently helped push the movement itself to be better and to do more. Now, we need to pick up the pace once again. As the world grapples with the twin weights of the climate crisis and systemic racism and inequity, a whole new generation of citizens is rising up to demand more. Disillusioned with ideas of incremental change and consumercentric environmentalism, they are identifying the challenge for what it really is—and what Dogwood has always known it to be—a question of power, of politics, and of who gets to decide the fate of this planet we call home. We are at a time when we are now seeing, at the national level, environmental justice and climate change at the forefront of the national conversation. A time when listening to the climate scientists, addressing racial injustice, and advancing a just green economy are stated national policy priorities. We’re learning to be a partner in a way that allows historically marginalized communities to lead, while we use our resources and expertise to support their vision, work, and victory.

As we celebrate our 25th year, we know Southern US forests will be central to meaningful climate action. We recommit ourselves to transform not just how those forests are managed, but how all of us— especially those who have traditionally been locked out of decision making—relate to the ecosystems that we rely on for survival. In doing so, our goal is not just to protect Southern forests or Southern communities. Instead, it is to provide a model and a beacon for the entire climate movement. Just like the trees in the forests we seek to protect, we know we are only a part of a much bigger whole. That’s why we are already helping build the largest, most diverse, and most powerful social movement the world has ever seen. Now is the time. This is the place. We have solutions... and they not only include forests, they also include you.

RIGHT


RIGHT FORESTS. PLACE.

We must protect nature for fresh water, clean air, storm protection, climate stabilization, and wildlife.

WE MUST END THE FURTHER DESTRUCTION OF OUR FORESTS & COMMUNITIES BY THE WOOD PELLET BIOENERGY INDUSTRY Over a million acres of US forests have already been cut for biomass.

W

ood pellet bioenergy threatens our forests, climate, and communities. Forests across the US are being cleared for wood pellets, which are being exported to the EU and UK where they are burned in power stations for electricity. The science confirms that this socalled “green renewable” alternative to fossil fuels releases more carbon at the smokestack than coal. At a time when we are in a global climate, biodiversity, and racial justice crisis, clearing forests as fuel to generate electricity is taking us in the wrong direction. Not only do power stations that burn biomass emit massive amounts of carbon,

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fueling the climate crisis, but industrial logging also harms precious forests and the wildlife that depend on them. Equally as important, the processing of trees into wood pellets creates harmful air pollution linked to serious health problems. Wood pellet mills are twice as likely to be sited in environmental justice-designated communities. That’s why Dogwood Alliance and our allies are leading the charge to stop the burning of our forests as fuel.


WE HAVE THE

SOLUTIONS.

CITIZENS VS. BIOMASS

FIGHT BIOMASS EFFORTS IN THE SOUTHERN US

Several residents knew what was coming when the Renewable Biomass Group sought to bring a wood pellet biomass plant to the rural, predominantly Black community of Adel in Cook County, Georgia. “Our town is an environmental justice community that has been targeted over and over by polluters,” said Dr. Treva Gear, Chair of the Concerned Citizens of Cook County (or 4C). “If the proposed wood pellet plant is allowed to be built, it will be the death knell for our small town. The help provided by the Dogwood Alliance has allowed us to bring the fight all the way to the federal level and has given us hope that we can stop it.”

Dogwood shares resources and experience in collaboration with impacted communities on the ground. All across the Southeast, our team joins local partners in raising awareness and compelling government at the local, state, and federal levels to end the pollution and forest destruction from existing facilities as well as to stop the expansion of new facilities.

In spite of overwhelming opposition from citizens, rezoning for the plant was approved. Now, Dogwood Alliance and 4C are taking steps and mobilizing support to prevent the biomass wood pellet plant from breaking ground, including filing a formal petition with the EPA and engaging in direct communications with the community’s elected representatives to encourage them to honor what the community is clearly saying: “Stop the Plant!”

RIGHT

“I appreciate Dogwood Alliances’ bold stand to stop the wood pellet industry’s decimation of our Southern forests. The damage they do to our woodland environments and the nearby communities is inexcusable. Dogwood Alliance has done an amazing job of educating the public and putting pressure on the right officials to actually move toward stopping this industry from expanding. I plan to continue to be a good steward of my forest land and to continue to support Dogwood Alliance. Congratulations, and thank you for your 25 years of service!”—JANE RITCHIE (LANDOWNER AND DOGWOOD DONOR, NORTH CAROLINA)

SUPPORT ANTI-BIOMASS PARTNERS IN EUROPE We’re making sure the world sees how destructive this industry is. Dogwood’s European partners are using our research, resources, and input from our frontline partners in affected communities to end biomass subsidies in the EU.


RIGHT CLIMATE. PLACE.

We have to be in the climate conversation, connected through collaboration.

OUR LIVES, OUR COMMUNITIES ARE AT RISK Natural forests are the most efficient climate-stabilizing technology we have.

W

hen left standing, natural forests can pull vast amounts of carbon out of the atmosphere, storing it in plants and soil. They’re also the best natural defense against the impacts of extreme weather events, providing flood control and stabilizing fresh water supplies. When cleared, forests release carbon and their ability to help stabilize the climate is compromised. The South is the world’s largest wood-producing region. Logging rates in the Southeastern United States are four times as great as South American rainforests. The large-scale industrial logging of forests in the US poses one of the largest threats to climate progress.

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While forests are finally getting on the national climate policy radar, government and industry often promote increased logging as a climate solution in direct conflict with top scientists and environmental justice communities. We cannot solve the climate, biodiversity, or environmental justice crises without a major scale-up in forest protection and restoration. That’s why we are working with groups at the federal, state, and local levels to create policy changes that will safeguard our forests for the future and to transition the forest economy away from forest destruction and towards equity and protection.


WE HAVE THE

SOLUTIONS.

CHANGE COMES FROM COMMUNITY ACTION A long history of land exploitation, pollution, and injustice in the Southern US has left a legacy of economic inequity. The degradation of forests, air, water and rural communities has had disproportionate impacts on low-wealth communities of color which are being hit hardest by the effects of climate change. The need to address climate change, green jobs, and justice has now been recognized as a national priority. It’s time to elevate a new vision for the South, a vision grounded in equity and one that accelerates the protection of forests, air, and water. That’s why Dogwood Alliance joined climate and justice leaders to create the Southern Communities for a Green New Deal (SC4GND), a new policy platform that builds on the Green New Deal to center and serve low-income communities and communities of color on the frontlines of the climate crisis in the South. Wood production and industrial logging topped the list of climate justice priorities in the SC4GND platform endorsed by more than 300 organizations.

RIGHT

“From its inception, Dogwood Alliance has worked in local communities to affect positive change. Dogwood is very effective in working at the intersection of the climate crisis, biodiversity loss, and environmental justice, which is critical to long-term success.”

—PHILIP BLUMENTHAL (BLUMENTHAL FOUNDATION)

SHAPE FEDERAL POLICIES WITH REGIONAL IMPACT Dogwood is working with impacted communities across the South to educate the Biden Administration on the necessity for standing forests and eliminating wood pellets.

MOVE STATE LEADERS TO ACT Dogwood drives direct action with regional partners to challenge industry-funded greenwashing and to promote an end to biomass production.

BUILD A SOUTHERN MOVEMENT FOR A GREEN NEW DEAL Dogwood is helping to build a stronger, more effective climate justice movement across the South.


RIGHT JUSTICE. PLACE.

Impacted communities lead the forest protection movement.

INDUSTRIAL LOGGING AND THE BIOMASS INDUSTRY ARE ENVIRONMENTAL INJUSTICES It is critical that impacted communities, who have often been silenced or sidelined by corporations, industries, and government officials, are leading the forest protection movement.

F

orest protection is a central component of a just solution to the climate crisis. Communities living at the frontlines of forest destruction are often the same ones who are most vulnerable to the effects of climate change and face oppressive, polluting, and extractive industries. Communities of color, Indigenous communities, low-income, and/or rural populations disproportionately bear the impacts of climate change as well as the health, economic, and social costs associated with industrial practices.

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Only approximately 10% of the forestland in the Southern US is publicly owned compared to 33% nationwide. Of the 90% in private ownership, less than 1% is owned by people of color.


WE SUPPORT

COMMUNITY SOLUTIONS.

PARTNERS IN PRESERVATION The Yadkin-Pee Dee River has been the site of human civilization for over twelve thousand years as home to the Pee Dee Tribe and other indigenous societies. Today, numerous biomass facilities threaten the future of the region’s rich resources which provide drinking water for surrounding communities. Through a partnership with Dogwood Alliance and the New Alpha Community Development Corporation, the newly opened Pee Dee Indian Tribe Educational Center in McColl, SC is a place where people can learn about the culture, history, and language of the Pee Dee Indian Tribe and see the value of preserving wetland forests. This communityled vision and project by the Pee Dee Indian Tribe is a solution that can be replicated in other communities impacted by climate change and flooding. This generative economy project has now captured the attention of bipartisan leaders as a strategy for building climate resiliency and developing new engines of economic development tied to land conservation and advancing wetland forest protection.

RIGHT

“When you look at the history of this country, and when we talk about institutionalized racism, from slavery to the days of segregation to this current time, if you are going to practice institutional racism, if you want to have power and control, then the first thing you have to do is make sure that the people that you are using have no assets.”

­ REV. LEO WOODBERRY, DIRECTOR NEW ALPHA COMMUNITY — DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION AND DOGWOOD ALLIANCE BOARD MEMBER

CONNECT LOCAL LEADERS

On-the-ground networkbuilding, as with the Community Action Network, empowers regional voices.

COLLABORATE TO EXPAND COMMUNITY POWER Just as with the Pee Dee Tribe Education Cultural Center, Dogwood shares resources to support community-led initiatives.

INVEST IN NEW VOICES AND IDEAS We value and are guided by next-generation climate activists such as those in the FOREST Circle.


Openlands, Clean Air Carolina, LA Dept. of Wildlife & Fisheries, Wild WNC, Maine Environmental Education Association, Ohio Environmental Council, Jo Daviess Conservation Foundation, People’s Alliance, St. Johns Riverkeeper, Ohio nterfaith Power and Light, Trees Atlanta, Rural Advancement Foundation International, Clean Air Task Force, NC Policy Watch, Community Roots, Forest Stewards’ Guild, Indiana Land Protection Alliance, NC Interfaith Power and Light, Healthy Gulf, Reality Climate Project, Open Space Institute, Hood Huggers International, Western Reserve Land Conservancy, Comite Schone Lucht, Alliance for the Great Lakes, Illinois Environmental Council, Wisconsin Conservation Voters, Indiana Native Plant Society, Forsyth Farmers Market, Georgia Climate Change Coalition, Ecology Center, Naturaland Trust,Young Democrats of South Carolina, Renewable Energy Transition Initiative (RETI), Satilla Riverkeeper, riends of the Earth, Friends of the Earth - Denmark, Durham People’s Alliance, Vermont Institute of Natural Science, Greenpeace, Canary Coalition, Friends of the Boundary Waters Wilderness, Gulf Coast Center for Law & Policy, Kentucky Resources Council, Tecumseh Land Trust, Virginia Conservation Network, Southern Alliance for Clean Energy, Environment North Carolina, Rainforest Alliance, JAPRI, Farm Labor Organizing Committee, Whitney M. Slater oundation, Sunrise Movement, Glynn Environmental Coalition, Hillside Trust, GASP, Natural Resources Council of Maine, Transform NC, Altamaha Riverkeeper, NC Environmental Justice Network, Boothbay Region Land Trust, Minnesota Environmental Partnership, Center for Sustainable Communities, Blue Hill Heritage Trust, Sierra Club Chapters, Michigan Climate Action Network,Wild Virginia, Savannah Sustainability Group, Sustain Charlotte, Farming4Justice, Pacific Rivers, The EcoStewards Program, Environmental Law and Policy Center, Democracy NC, Save the BlackWater, Vermont Natural Resource Council, Coastal Rivers Conservation Trust, Biofuelwatch, Minnesota Land Trust, arthShare Illinois, NC Climate Justice Collective, Working Films, Liberty Prairie Foundation, Youth For a Cleaner Environment, Heartlands Conservancy, Little River Wetlands Project, Southeast Climate & Energy Network, Northeast Wisconsin Land Trust, SouthWings, Trees, Water & People, African American Environmentalist Association, Education Justice Alliance, Kentucky Conservation Committee, Global Justice Ecology Project, Gulf Restoration Network, Chesapeake Climate Action Network, White River Partnership, Rainforest Action Network, Waxman Strategies, Rachel Carson Council, Minnesota Center for Environmental Advocacy, Green the Church, Friends of Baxter State Park, Mothers and Others for Clean Air, Student Action with Farmworkers, Center for a Sustainable Coast, Wilderness Watch, EEECHO, Hayti Heritage Center, Low Country Alliance for Model Communities, Environment Georgia, Green Worker Team, Georgia State University Center for Sustainability, Squam Lakes Conservation Society, Shirley Heinze Land Trust, Oceana, Savannah Chatham Sustainability Coalition, South Carolina State University Environmental Action Club, Climate Justice Alliance, Environmental Education Council of Ohio, Sol Nation, One Hundred Miles, Ammonoosuc Conservation Trust, Environmental Education Association of Illinois, Natuur en Milieu, Student Conservation Association, Gaston Youth, The Conservation Foundation, Kent Environmental Council, Waterkeeper Alliance, Coastal GA Sierra Club, Center for Neighborhood Technology, Ogeechee Riverkeepers, Concerned Citizens of Richmond County, West Michigan Environmental Action Council, ACRES Land Trust, Great River Greening, National Wildlife Federation, Friends of the Grand Rapids parks, Lake Forest Open Lands, Citizens for a Safe Environment, NC WARN, Well Fed Savannah, Center for Biological Diversity, Prairie Rivers Network, Student Environmental Education Coalition, Virginia Civic Engagement Table, Friends of Blue Hill Bay, National Action Network, East Michigan Environmental Action Council, Mothers Out Front, Cope Environmental Center, Georgia Canoeing Association, Appalachia Ohio Alliance, Sycamore Land Trust, Natural Land Institute, Green Energy Ohio, Harambee House, LEAF Community Arts, Black Warrior Riverkeeper, NC League of Conservation Voters, Maine Conservation Voters, WWALS Suwanee Riverkeeper, Asheville Greenworks, Earth Day Network, Center for a Sustainable Economy, Suwannee Riverkeeper, Maine and Trust Network, Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League, The Amphibian Foundation, Keep Indianapolis Beautiful, National Indian Carbon Coalition, Minnesota Naturalist’s Association, Gloster Economic Development Alliance, Harris Center for Conservation Education, Prairie Enthusiasts, John Muir Project, Three Valley Conservation Trust, American Forest Foundation, Michigan Interfaith Power and Light, Kentucky Audubon Council, DE Coal Ash Coalition, OREST, Southern Environmental Law Center, South Hero Land Trust, French Broad River Keeper, Bonnyvale Environmental Education Center, Virginia Interfaith Center for Public Policy, Flint Riverkeeper, Global Forest Coalition, Conservation Trust for North Carolina, GA Beyond Coal, GEOS Institute, Wild West Institute, Cavalier Manor Civic League, North Charleston Citizen’s Climate Lobby, Wilderness Center, Sound Rivers, Kentucky Natural Lands Trust, llerbe Creek Watershed, Alabama Interfaith Power and Light, Organized Uplifting Resources & Strategies, Green Building Alliance, Citizens Watch of Portsmouth, Presumpscot Regional Land Trust, Lakelands Citizens for Clean Air, riends of Casco Bay, Oak Heritage Conservancy,Wiregrass Coalition, Conservation Voters of SC, Hip-Hop Caucus,Waterkeepers Florida,The Boone Conservancy, Passumpsic Valley Land Trust, Montana Wilderness Association, Upper Valley Land Trust, Athens4Everyone, 350.org, PeeDee Indian Tribe, SEEDS, Green Mountain Club, New Virginia Majority, Southeast CARE Coalition, 1000 Friends of Wisconsin, Iowa Interfaith Power and Light, Palmetto Cycling Coalition/ C Livable Communities Alliance, Minnesota Environmental Fund, Young People’s Guild, Action NC, Georgia Conservation Voters, South Carolina Environmental Justice Network, Little Justice Environmental Justice Organization, The Wilderness Society, Our Santa Fe River, Maine Lakes Society, Beyond Extreme Energy, Chesapeake Bay Foundation, Sustainable Sandhills, Robeson County Cooperative for Sustainable Development, Stand.Earth, Australian Rainforest Conservation Society, Wild South, Indigienous Environmental Network, Georgia ForestWatch, Toxic Free NC, Three Rivers Land Trust, Green Mountain Conservation Group, Our Revolution, SC, Public Lab, Tzedek, Blue Green Alliance, outheast Land Trust of NH, Appalachian Voices, Lansing Climate Action, Georgia Interfaith Power & Light, Enivronmental Integrity Project, Center for Sustainable Communities,Virginia Beach Justice Initiative, Georgia Audubon Society, Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project, Hoosier Environmental Council, Students Against Violence on the Environment (SAVE), Kentucky Heartwood, Downeast Lakes Land Trust, Barrington Area Conservation Trust, Keep Durham Beautiful, Long Branch Environmental Conservation Center, Sierra Club, Greening Georgia, Friends of the Mississippi River, Piscataquog Land Conservancy, Plastic Ocean Project, Environmental Quality Institute, Darlington Branch

TOGETHER, WE WIN.

THANK YOU FOR LOVING FORESTS.

RESPONSIBLE IN PURPOSE AND IN PRACTICE. OUR SUPPORTERS INVEST IN DOGWOOD ALLIANCE BECAUSE WE PUT OUR RESOURCES TO WORK. We empower our teams to deliver through proven programs, community grants, and smart investments.

SOURCES OF SUPPORT

EXPENSES

~60% OF OUR SUPPORT comes from individual donors.

~70% OF OUR SPENDING goes directly to programs.

Contributions: $1,496,023 (59%)

Our Forests Aren’t Fuel Program (33.1%)

Grants: $1,010,400 (40%)

Community Solutions (Wetland Forest Initiative)

(12%)

Statement of Activities for Year Ended December 31, 2020 Other: $17,382

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(including interest and in-kind) (<1%)

Program Management/ Fundraising/ Administrative (~30%)

Forests and Climate Program (24.2%)


RIGHT PLACE. RIGHT TIME . RIGHT NOW. BE AN

ADVOCATE.

USE YOUR VOICE. Using the tools on our site or in your community, let your elected officials know where you stand, and share the impact Dogwood Alliance is having locally, nationally, and internationally with others. This is a critical moment for the planet and your voice makes a difference.

Start online at dogwoodalliance.org/act-now

BE A

DONOR.

INVEST IN THE WORK. Your financial contribution underwrites Dogwood Alliance’s efforts to preserve our Southern forests by organizing, supporting frontline communities, advocating for better state-level and federal regulations and policies, and working overseas to stop demand for our forests as fuel. Join with forest lovers across the country and the globe as a Dogwood Alliance supporter.

Start online at dogwoodalliance.org/donate

JOIN THIS MOVEMENT TO PRESERVE OUR FORESTS AND GROW COMMUNITIES.


PO Box 7645, Asheville, NC 28802 Tel: 828.251.2525 • Fax: 828.615.1250 info@dogwoodalliance.org • dogwoodalliance.org @dogwoodalliance

/dogwoodalliance

Donate at dogwoodalliance.org/donate To mitigate the impact of printing and paper usage on forests, we have only done a limited run of 100 copies of our 25th Anniversary Annual Report using 100% post consumer recycled paper. The online version can be found at dogwoodalliance.org/about-us/reports


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