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Dog News The Digest Volume 27, Issue 44

of American Dogs $5.00

November 4, 2011


Dog News 3


Contents

10 Editorial 14 Inside The Sport november 4, 2011 by Pat Trotter 18 The Lighter Side of Judging by michael faulkner 22 Question Of The Week by matthew h. stander 26 The Upside Of The Seesaw by sharon anderson 88 dog show calendar 30 Blinked In 90 handlers directory by denise flaim 92 subscription rates 34 Bests Of The Week 94 classified advertising 38 Ten Questions 96 advertising rates by lesley boyes 42 The “Pied Pipers” Of The Marsh: Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers by mj Nelson 44 What A Weekend! The Chihuahua Club of America National by william (billy) Miller 50 Off The Leash by shaun coen 52 Irish Red and White Setter National Specialty by corlie eldred 54 Required Reading, Cancelled Shows And More by matthew h. stander 60 Groomania Hosts World Team Grooming Championship 2011 by karl donvil 68 Vapor Wake Canines Deter Terrorism; Increase Travelers’ Safety by sharon pflaumer 70 The Gossip Column All advertisements are copyrighted by eugene z. zaphiris and owned by DOG NEWS, Harris 78 Click – Kennesaw Kennel Club Publications, unless received cameraby marcelo veras ready. Permission to reprint must be 84 Click - The Way We Were requested in writing. by matthew h. stander 86 Letters To The Editor DOG NEWS (ISSN 0886-2133)

Montgomery Round-Up Part II: 46 Parson Russell Terriers by Karen Fitzpatrick 82 Border Terriers by Julie Felten 95 Kerry Blue Terriers by Carol Brown

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is published weekly except the last two weeks in December by Harris Publications, 1115 Broadway, New York, N.Y. 10010. Periodical Postage paid at New York. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to DOG NEWS, 1115 Broadway, New York, N.Y. 10010


Contents

10 Editorial 14 Inside The Sport november 4, 2011 by Pat Trotter 18 The Lighter Side of Judging by michael faulkner 22 Question Of The Week by matthew h. stander 26 The Upside Of The Seesaw by sharon anderson 88 dog show calendar 30 Blinked In 90 handlers directory by denise flaim 92 subscription rates 34 Bests Of The Week 94 classified advertising 38 Ten Questions 96 advertising rates by lesley boyes 42 The “Pied Pipers” Of The Marsh: Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers by mj Nelson 44 What A Weekend! The Chihuahua Club of America National by william (billy) Miller 50 Off The Leash by shaun coen 52 Irish Red and White Setter National Specialty by corlie eldred 54 Required Reading, Cancelled Shows And More by matthew h. stander 60 Groomania Hosts World Team Grooming Championship 2011 by karl donvil 68 Vapor Wake Canines Deter Terrorism; Increase Travelers’ Safety by sharon pflaumer 70 The Gossip Column All advertisements are copyrighted by eugene z. zaphiris and owned by DOG NEWS, Harris 78 Click – Kennesaw Kennel Club Publications, unless received cameraby marcelo veras ready. Permission to reprint must be 84 Click - The Way We Were requested in writing. by matthew h. stander 86 Letters To The Editor DOG NEWS (ISSN 0886-2133)

Montgomery Round-Up Part II: 46 Parson Russell Terriers by Karen Fitzpatrick 82 Border Terriers by Julie Felten 95 Kerry Blue Terriers by Carol Brown

4 Dog News

is published weekly except the last two weeks in December by Harris Publications, 1115 Broadway, New York, N.Y. 10010. Periodical Postage paid at New York. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to DOG NEWS, 1115 Broadway, New York, N.Y. 10010


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*All Systems **The Dog News Top Ten List

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Dog News Cover story - NoveMBer 4, 2011

PUBLISHER

STANLEY R. HARRIS EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

EUGENE Z. ZAPHIRIS CREATIVE DIRECTOR

SEAN K. GAFFNEY ADVERTISING MANAGERS

SHAUN COEN Y. CHRISTOPHER KING *

ACCOUNTING

STEPHANIE BONILLA GENERAL TELEPHONE

212 807.7100 x588 FAX NUMBER

212 675.5994 EMAIL ADDRESS

dognews@harris-pub.com WEB ADDRESS: www.dognews.com SUBSCRIPTIONS

IAN MILLER 212 462.9624 CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Sharon Anderson Lesley Boyes Andrew Brace Agnes Buchwald Shaun Coen Carlotta Cooper Geoff Corish Michael Faulkner Allison Foley Arnold Goldman DVM Yossi Guy Ronnie Irving Desmond J. Murphy M. J. Nelson Robert Paust Sharon Pflaumer Kim Silva Frances O. Smith DVM PHD Matthew H. Stander Sari Brewster Tietjen Patricia Trotter Connie Vanacore Carla Viggiano Nick Waters Seymour Weiss Minta (Mike) Williquette DOG NEWS PHOTOGRAPHERS Chet Jezierski Perry Phillips Kitten Rodwell Leslie Simis

*The Dog News Top Ten List - All Breed

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DOG NEWS is sent to all AKC approved Conformation Judges every week on a complimentary basis. No part of this publication can be reproduced in any form without written permission from the editor. The opinions expressed by this publication do not necessarily express the opinions of the publisher. The editor reserves the right to edit all copy submitted.


*The Dog News Top Ten List

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The Importance Of Breeding

Pat Trotter raises a critical question in her “Inside the Sport” column in this week’s DOG NEWS asking when judging dogs became more important than breeding dogs. No doubt her thoughts were brought about by many of the recommendations of the Smith Committee’s proposals in regard to “Judging Approvals”. Nonetheless her comments go far beyond the positive (and negative) aspects of that Committee’s report and help to establish an understanding and need to re-emphasize the role of the breeder in our hobby/ sport today. The fact is that Pat’s observation that as people start judging, they breed less and less, even stopping altogether. Particularly is this true in America although to their credit less is that the case in the UK for sure. Encouraging good breeders to persevere is a major part of her thesis notwithstanding her admittance that among the aging process, the degree of difficulty in continuing breeding and other variables makes it somewhat understandable as to why so many judges who were breeding quality dogs stop doing so. That AKC has devised many methods to honor the breeder cannot be denied but she asks have they shot themselves in the foot by encouraging people to stop breeding after 12 years with five litters and four champions to start judging! Are those magical numbers somewhat akin to the “sixty points of light” which were at one time the magical numbers devised by some Board or some Staff? Whenever numbers are used as the foundation point for establishing talent and ability in the long run this will defeat the goals of a subjective situation--talent and ability or merely the ‘good old eye’ are more important than any numerical formula. That should be a given! Obviously there are many who are ill-equipped to judge after many years in the sport whilst others may be talented enough to judge after a shorter period of time. Pat asks “would better dog people continue breeding for a few more years if the system rewarded them accordingly”? Perhaps requiring breeders who want to work a little longer in the whelping box would result in a

more “hands-on” type of breeder-judge and be in the best interest of the sport. These pages urge one and all to read Mrs. Trotter’s column and give it further thought for those truly concerned for the future of not only the sport of the conformation dog but the existence of the American Kennel Club as well.

Opening The Door

Years ago when AKC decided to no longer license professional handlers, the door was opened for anyone to call themselves a handler who had a leash and a vehicle. Sadly many a show dog suffered through the years because many of these so-called handlers had little or no knowledge or even interest about the proper care of their dogs. This had the effect also of turning potential clients off as so many of these people lost dogs due to a lack of knowledge of animal husbandry. In the good old days and even in many circumstances today the professional handler received in-depth training in conditioning and selecting great dogs. They knew how to evaluate competitors’ dogs and in many an instance were people who you could trust to buy you a dog. How many handlers today would you trust to buy you a dog--for that matter how many judges today would you trust to buy you a dog, either? Sadly, very few-less than a handful of all-rounders that’s for sure! The need for experienced and well trained skilled dog people to continue the traditions of the past are as apparent and as few in the professional handling ranks as they are in the judges ranks as well. The judging and handling of breeding stock is a privilege and not a right which we must all fight to preserve. We need serious, qualified people with proven successes to perform these jobs for us. The talent pool is certainly there-it just must be properly refined.

Kennel Blindness

The ability to evaluate the quality of one’s own breeding stock much less the stock of others is one of the most difficult talents to recognize and implement as well. There are those who have been breeding for decades who just cannot tell the difference between a good dog and a bad one. What is the real experience of some breeders who mere-

Editorial NOVEMBER 4, 2011

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ly repeat the same breeding year after year? Does the fact that people make up so many champions in a year equate itself to quality dogs in our day and age when finishing a championship is easier than ever? Too many people breed mediocre dogs and become permanently satisfied with them. Others start from the stock of master breeders and breed down or up from there. One asks quite candidly if a test of one’s knowledge as a breeder would be more meaningful if the breeder had to produce four generations of dogs rather than five litters? How do you stand in that matter one must candidly ask!

Judges’ Critiques

Judges’ critiques can fall under the heading of meaningless platitudes in all too many an instance. Basically too many of them fail to explain anything about the judge’s thinking when he or she is making a final decision. Any of you who have judged at FCI type shows have been subjected to these critiques. How valuable they really are and to what extent the judge uses his knowledge in distinguishing among exhibits is almost arbitrary in nature. Too many people are fearful of upsetting the apple cart and only mention the positive aspects of the exhibit rather than to describe the faults as well. Hopefully in any of these instances the judge is strong enough to stand up and be counted on to express their honest opinion or else one may ask what’s the point of judging at all?

Thought For The Week

For a Board Member to miss a meeting due to a foreign judging assignment is not only inappropriate it is a willful disregard of his or her fiduciary obligation towards the corporation. By all rights the Member Club should revoke this person’s seat as a Delegate. There is no such thing as a conflict in schedule in this instance. If this kind of scheduling error does occur the solution is a simple and basic one. Beg out of the assignment-call the foreign kennel club and tell them in no uncertain terms I have made a mistake and my obligation is toward the AKC and not the foreign kennel club. Anything less is selfish and makes the individual involved unworthy of the honor calling himself or herself a member of the Board of the American Kennel Club.


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Fynn’s On The Move “True Balance Front to Rear”

Owners: Shadow Hill Springers Silsby Pelissero Charles Pelissero San Geronimo, California

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Co-Owner/Breeder Darkover Springers Bobbie Daniel Professionally Presented By: Ellen Cottingham Assisted by: Niki Travis, Brittney Brewer

Co-Breeder Pawmarc Springers Pat Wilaby Jensen


Multiple Best In Specialty Show & Best In Show Winning

GCh. & Can. Ch. Darkover Don’t Dream It’s Over GROUP FIRST Thank you Judge Mr. Eugene Blake

GROUP FIRST Thank you Judge Mr. Joe Tacker

GROUP FIRST Thank you Judge Ms. Charlotte Clem McGowan

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Inside The Sport

WHEN DID JUDGING DOGS BECOME MORE IMPORTANT THAN BREEDING DOGS?

W

hen did the judging of dogs became more important than the breeding of dogs? Although the exact answer to that complicated question is not clear, certainly the current trend in defining the importance of one’s self in dogs by something other than breeding quality dogs is disturbing. It hasn’t been all that long ago that AKC was registering about one and a half million dogs per year with approximately 2000 conformation judges to evaluate their worth. Consider that today we have more than 3000 conformation judges while fewer than onehalf million dogs are being registered annually. What’s wrong with this picture? Over the years it has been my observations that as people start judging, they breed less and even stop altogether. Certainly the aging process, the degree of difficulty in continuing breeding today and many other variables make this situation understandable. And of course the breeding and rearing of dogs is hard work At the same time, is this situation in the best interest of the sport? Shouldn’t we encourage good breeders to persevere? AKC rightly has devised many methods in recent years to encourage and honor breeders. However, are the powers-that-be inadvertently shooting themselves in the foot as it becomes more seductive for those breeders in the sport for 12 years to have five litters and four champions and start judging? Keep that thought. Although I personally was not prepared to judge dogs when I had achieved those particular credentials, I do not deny that the gifted may very well be ready to get on the fast forward track after this somewhat limited experience. Some people just have that natural “eye for a dog” and the decisionmaking ability that serves them and the sport so well. Those talented individuals are super students who grasp the essence of a breed effortlessly. The concept of rewarding exceptional new judges deserves the support of the fancy. Then there are some who have bred dogs for twenty years or more who unfortunately cannot evaluate the quality of their own breeding stock, much less the stock of others. Their “experience” is not a reflection of 20 years of learning but more like one year of learning twenty times over! The assumption is that repetition equals knowledge. One

BY PAT TROTTER 14 Dog News

could question the quote “practice makes perfect” and ask: Doesn’t practice also make permanent? Do we take for granted that breeders of champions are knowledgeable in a day and age when finishing a championship is easier than ever? The fact is that there are many people who breed mediocre dogs and become permanently satisfied with them. Others start with good stock from master breeders and breed down from there. Many years ago a judge in a very competitive breed was pontificating on the sacrifice of her breeding program with the statement, “I gave up breeding when I started judging.” A top professional handler who is truly an expert on that breed was heard to respond quietly, “And it’s a good thing too.” Obviously there are some who are ill-prepared to judge after years in the sport at the same time that there are other very qualified individuals ready to judge in short order. So this is not about criticizing the basic minimum requirements but to pose this question: Would better dog people continue breeding for a few more years if the system rewarded them accordingly? Would a test of one’s knowledge as a breeder be more meaningful if the breeder had to produce four generations of dogs rather than five litters? And just how much would that add to the registration numbers if we could keep breeders in the whelping box longer before they began their judging careers? Although I don’t know what the answers are, I feel it is my moral responsibility to pose some of these questions before we totally throw the baby out with the bath water. And perhaps requiring breeders who want to judge to work a little longer in the whelping box would make only an insignificant difference in registration numbers, if any at all. So be it. Yet I have to think that more “hands-on” experience at every level is in the best interest of the sport. When AKC decided to no longer license professional handlers, the door was opened for anyone to “handle” dogs that had a leash and a vehicle. The welfare of show dogs suffered over the years because many of these handlers had little “handson” knowledge about the care of dogs. Dogs were lost due to inadequate animal husbandry. At the same time, potential clients were turned off of the sport in short order because those they hired were not true professionals, and they did like being conned. In essence, the lack of expertise

negatively affected the sport. In my youth one rarely, if ever, heard of professional handlers losing dogs. The best professional handlers received in-depth training in those good old days that prepared them to continue their services to our sport later as outstanding judges. Because they had selected, conditioned and handled great dogs across the groups, such people had up close and personal experience and knowledge that produced what we all seek: wisdom. They knew how to evaluate their competition at the top, in itself a valuable lesson that later translated into judging dogs in the ring when one wore the badge. The late Corky Vroom was such a professional who could scan the ring he was in and know his competition from the 20 dogs in the class before the judge did. I always said that Corky was one of the few people who could buy me a dog! Is the judging process headed in the same direction that compromised the professional handler when AKC no longer licensed them? One would hope not as we need experienced leaders, breeders and skilled dog people to continue our sporting traditions. The recent Dr. Robert Smith-chaired committee’s decision to eliminate field representatives from the review committee evaluation of judges continues to trouble me at the same time I appreciate the input of world class senior judges in the process as well as all the rest of the good put forth by the committee. But does one have to be axed in order to include the other? In a perfect world wouldn’t field reps and respected senior judges work together to advance competent and qualified judges that benefit the sport? The judging of breeding stock is a privilege that is enjoyed by many in our sport. Yet to be a successful breeder, one must become the absolute best judge of one’s own stock. For reasons that are not clear to me, judges seem to be considered the most important persons at the dog show by many. Those who are not judges long to be judges. Maybe it’s time to acknowledge that also important to the dog show are the breeders who breed useful, correct quality dogs and the exhibitors who show those dogs in fit condition, properly groomed and trained. Such an acknowledgement takes nothing away from competent judges as it takes us back to the old school of thinking: Producing quality dogs is the most important element of this sport. Anything we can do to prime the pump of this thinking for aspiring judges and others is for the good of the order.


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The Lighter Side of Judging friends and mentors By Michael Faulkner

“M

entor” was adopted in English, from the character in the Odyssey, as a term meaning someone who imparts wisdom to and shares knowledge with a less experienced col-league. A “Friend” is defined as a person who one knows, likes and trusts. As a forever student of the sport of purebred dogs, I treasure the list of mentors and friends who have supported and who continue to support my never ending journey. While preparing for a judging weekend in the Peach Tree state, I phone one of my long-time mentors, who is also on the judging panel and who lives in Atlanta. “Hey there Dr. J – I am currently at the Richmond airport, headed your way. Let’s plan on dinner Friday and Saturday after the shows,” I remark. “Sounds like a plan,” he responds. “I will be driving down Friday late afternoon. When I arrive, I shall phone you and we’ll go to one of my favorite restaurants to eat…right next door to the hotel. Looks like a shack from the outside but they cook up some damn good food,” Dr. J. shares. “See you soon – I am looking forward to spending some quality time with you and I am requesting you do not drag anyone else along,” I add. “Sure thing. See you tomorrow – Bye!” Dr. J replies as I click the off button on my Dro-id. Tarnisha, the gate agent for Delta, calls zone four for boarding. Normally I fly USAIR and I have become accustomed to being upgraded to first class eighty percent of the time. However, due to the direct flight and the major difference in price, I am flying cattle class. Boarding the plane and sliding through the first class section, I find my zone four seat ---36C-- in the back of the plane. My prospective seat partners are a young couple covered in tattoos. A one-year-old is jumping up and down from lap to lap. “Great – so much for a relaxing, quiet flight of reading the latest download on my Kindle,” I think to myself. I slowly lower myself into seat 36C and buckle the seat belt, while making every effort to slow my breathing and relax. “Excuse me, excuse me, you don’t mind if I crawl over you...do you? My wife forgot her medication and I need to get it. Oh, 18 Dog News

my name is Roy.” He says while swinging his left leg over my waist and into the aisle. “Hi – my name is Lynnette and this is Roy Jr.,” the tattooed wife offers. “Hello,” I quickly respond. Roy unzips an orange duffle bag, retrieves a small plastic bottle, hands it to Lynette and starts to crawl over my lap again. “Wait a minute,” I offer, “It will be much easier if I just get out of my seat. Then you will only have to crawl over your wife.” “Oh we ain’t married yet. We have the kid and all... and we be engaged and all...and we plan on getting’ hitched sometime next year,” Roy explains while climbing over Roy, Jr. and his to-be-wife. I nod my head, smile, open my Kindle and begin to read the first page of my new download. Roy Jr., upset my attentions are elsewhere, squirms on his mother’s lap, attempting now to sit on mine. “I am sorry,” tattoedwife-to-be (TWB) offers nervously. “I hope he settles down after we take off!” “I am sure he will,” I encourage. “Is this his first flight?” I ask. “Oh, yes. This is Roy Jr.’s first flight and ours, too. We never flown before!” TWB blurts out with wide-eyed enthusiasm. “OK,” I think – trying to force an OBE (out of body experience) straight to first class---and failing to do so. Roy sidetracks the effort by handing me his small digital camera. “Thank you so much. Would you be nice enough to take our picture when we lift off?” Roy requests. With camera already in hand and everyone within eyesight watching to see if I really will do it, I reply – “Sure, no problem.” “Remember, we want you to snap the picture exactly when the front tires lift to go into the sky,” Roy instructs. “Got it,” I confirm. The plane stops taxiing and prepares for take off. Roy and Lynette hold hands---with Roy Jr. crammed in between for the photo. The engines roar...the plane shoots forward. The second I feel the tires lift toward the sky, I snap the photo and return the camera to Roy. Lynette and Roy Jr. settle in nicely for the trip, while Big Roy continues to snap photos from the window. With everything a bit too close for comfort, I pull the shopping mall magazine from the seat pocket in hopes of a quick escape. I slowly re-view each page, wondering how many giant, inflatable backyard movie screens or pocket-sized spy-pens have actually been sold through in-flight marketing. Disappointed when

I reach the last page, I return the magazine and notice Roy Jr. curled up asleep---snoozing in Lynette’s arms. Taking advantage of the downtime, I quietly open my Kin-dle, slide the on switch and start reading. I make it halfway through the third chapter. “Ladies and Gentlemen, in preparation for landing, please turn off all electronic devices, return your seats to their upright position and make sure your seat belts are secured. Thank you,” the disembodied voice of the Captain announces. In fear of Big Roy asking me to take additional photos of his first landing, I stay focused with my eyes closed until the plane is safely pulled to the gate. Being a true rebel, I unsnap my seatbelt before reaching the gate. I know it is so wrong, but it’s one of those control games I love playing with the flight attendants. I spring from my seat and let Lynette, Roy Jr. and Big Roy into the aisle to collect their bags. Now, I sit back down and wait until everyone leaves the plane. After a lengthy journey from the gate, to the tram, and to baggage claim, I find my black, ballistic-nylon garment bag on wheels with a fluorescent green wrapped handle circling carousel eight. I grab the handle, proceed to the courtesy phone and type in #15. “Hello...Crowne Plaza... this is Melissa. How can I help you?” “Hi Melissa. This is Mi-chael Faulkner and I need a shuttle to the hotel from the airport.” “Proceed through door@#$!#$ and across !@#$@ and walk to ramp !@#$#$!$ for hotel shuttle pick up – Bye!” Sighing quietly to myself, I turn towards a series of exit doors and ask a security guard for assistance. He shrugs, grunts and points his finger in the opposite direction, to the doors on the other side of the airport baggage claim. I find my way to the designated ramp, with the help of little signs hidden---barely visible to human vision--and within minutes, Lawrence, the shuttle driver, pulls up and helps with my bags. The hotel is only two miles from the airport. In no time, we arrive at the hotel, which is less than two miles from the airport. I tip Lawrence, proceed to check-in, collect my room key, and head toward the elevator in search of room 318. While passing through the lobby, I notice several friends and mentors (judges) gathered at a table eating dinner. I walk over and greet the crowd, as Ms. Beautiful Ankles (BA) jumps from the table and give me a wonderful hug. “Michael it is so good to see you and I must tell you how much I am enjoying your articles,” Ms. BA informs me. I begin to blush as she continues. “I am serious – the Continued on page 58


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Question ofthe Week

By Matthew H. Stander

We received not a single response to this week's Question, which was: Why Do You Think The Board Of Directors And The Delegates Of The American Kennel Club Refuse To Publicly Discuss And/Or Re-Evaluate Its Policies Insofar As Recognizing Foreign Countries And Foreign Judges Are Concerned?, so we are repeating an old Question of the Week, originally published May 21, 2010: Is it a solicitation for an assignment when a judge who has been hired to judge writes a show chairperson asking them to consider giving him/her provisional breeds not originally hired for should there be an overload?

John P. Wade Clearly this scenario is solicitation. When I was judging, clubs often requested either verbally or in writing I notify them of new provisional breeds. When properly documented and later responding to such a request a judge walks a very fine line. The response should only address the requested information, new provisional breeds and not be a request for an assignment. W. Terry Stacy I have no problem with this at all as long as the club then makes their own decision. Robin Stansell If the club had asked to be informed of any new breeds this would not be solicitation. However, an uninvited request to be considered to judge one’s new breeds would be soliciting. Kay Radcliffe “NO.”

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Peter A. Gaeta It has always been my opinion that once a judge has received a bona fide inquiry from an appropriately designated club official, what follows is a negotiation until the contract is reached. Thereafter, unless by invitation from the judge’s selection committee, any request by the judge could be considered solicitation. To avoid the appearance of any wrongdoing, I always encouraged judges’ selection committees to request, in the contract itself or by cover letter, contracted judges to communicate needs and new breeds to the committee. Doing so obviates the solicitation issue and is very helpful to clubs, especially in emergency situations when the latest information is not available in the printed directory.


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*The Dog News Top Ten List - All Breed

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Upside of the seesaw By Sharon Anderson

USA

takes Gold in Levin, France at the FCI World Agility Championships. Ashley Deacon and his Pyrenean Shepherd, Luka, achieved bowing status in the world of agility. The USA team supporters had a lot to cheer about throughout the three-day event. Tori Self and her Border Collie, Rev, took first place in the Large Dog Team jumping round. This was an outstanding win as the 19-year-old bested

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past champions and top handlers and dogs in the world. This is truly a success story of a junior handler that matured in the sport and moved to the top. She will certainly be a driving force in future AKC world teams. Veteran handler Barb Davis proved she could do it again with a new dog, Sketcher, as she took second place in small dog individual jumping. Barb has been on past medal winning teams with the father of Sketcher. A newcomer, Janet Dunn and her Papillon, Tantrum, took 4th place in Small Dog Team jumping. This proved that the top of the age end could also match the youth in the sport. She might have had to wear knee braces but that didn’t stop her and the fast accurate Papillon. The Medium team combined placed 10th. Sadly one team member did not make the trip as his mother unexpectedly passed away the day of departure. This was John Nys with his incredible Shetland Sheepdog, Rush, that won the individual silver medal last year. This is a first for the USA team as they have never had a team member not make the trip; some have made it to the competition but for a variety of reasons such as injury to themselves or the dog could not compete. All of the dogs and handlers performed in championship style in representing the AKC and USA when presented with very difficult courses and for the first time, nearly impossible course times. Many of the teams from all countries earned time faults even though they ran fast and clean. Judges David Powell of France offered very flowing courses but exceedingly tight course times and Rolf Graber of Switzerland presented many back jumping obstacles and numerous tunnels on his courses. The winners were Small Individual: 1st Italy; 2nd Japan and 3rd Great Britain – all had time faults. Medium Individual: 1st USA; 2nd France; 3rd Slovenia, these were all clean runs. Large Individual: 1st Netherland; 2nd Finland; 3rd Russia, all clean runs. The Team competition was as follows: Small: 1st Russia; 2nd Slovenia; 3rd Japan, all incurred time faults. Medium: 1st France; 2nd Switzerland; 3rd Great Britain, all incurred faults. Large: 1st Spain; 2nd Italy; 3rd Czech Republic, all incurred time faults. The top four placements

in the Medium Individual were all Pyrenean Shepherds. One wonders if the day of the Shetland Sheepdog dominating in the medium division is over. The winner of the small dog individual was an outstanding Jack Russell Terrier that was handled to perfection. It was interesting to see a Standard Poodle in full cut compete in large dog individual; usually dogs are shaved down to achieve maximum speed. France offered practice sites to the teams before the competition and the USA team took full advantage of 2 different days of practice as well as the Thursday pre-event practice at the show site. This is also when a thorough vet check is done on each dog entered and a verification that the dog running is the dog that was entered. What an outstanding job of preparing the team and coaching by Nancy Gyes and assistant coach, Kathy Leggett, as well as Captain, Carrie DeYoung. France definitely fell down on the job as a host country in the area of providing internet service to press and public. The AKC reporter had to rely on Facebook communication of results as the reaching of the AKC website was nearly impossible. The host hotel also was unable to handle the demand for internet service. This is the first time this has happened at a World Championship event. The video broadcast was available each day and this allowed viewers (for a fee) to watch the live action. It was interesting to see Silvia Trkman from Slovenia repeat medal placements with the same dog, a Pyrenean Shepherd, first in 2003 and now in 2011, quite an accomplishment. The FCI agility delegates from each country meet on the Monday following

the event to discuss the judging, courses and any problems from the Championship. It is interesting to hear the full discussion of likes and dislikes with the judges sitting in the hot seats listening to it all and having to answer all issues. Then the next year hosts are introduced and information handed out. It will be an event no one will want to miss as it will be held in beautiful Liberec, Czech Republic. This is near Prague, which is known for its colored glass work and Pilsner Beer, which ought to interest many. The dates for next year’s event are October 4 -7, 2012. It will be a four-day competition as the decision was made to return to four dog teams as previously had been run in the early years of the event. This will mean more runs and more time needed for the team competition; therefore it now will become a four-day event, Thursday thru Sunday. For information to hopefully plan early for this trip you may visit www.agility2012.cz . The closest large airport is Prague but the actual arena is in Liberec, about an hour away. For a full report on each run of all the 37 country entries you can visit the AKC website; events, agility, world championship. If you view the AKC Facebook page you will find several YouTube videos of runs by team members. One of the very informative videos is an overlay of the winning Border Collie large Individual and the USA gold winner Medium, Pyrenean Shepherd, running the course. This video shows outstanding handling and what a game of inches it is in agility to obtain the win. The December agility event of the Agility Invitational in Orlando, Florida is in full planning mode now that the World event is over. The first offering of the Junior Handler competition seems to be a booming success with 50 handlers entered with 65 dogs. This entry filled in four days time; way to go, supportive parents. The juniors will get two runs per dog. The division of competition is Open level agility courses that will have 4 H equipment for less experienced handlers and the more experienced handlers will be running on AKC equipment. There is a wide variety of dog breeds and states represented. This competition will partner well with the current 4H programs and without a doubt will expand junior entries greatly in the AKC future. The Agility Director for AKC, Carrie DeYoung, has worked with the 4H program for years as her two daughters competed in their agility


* *

*The Dog News Top Ten List - All Breed

Dog News 27


the top winning skye terrier in the history of the breed

y d d u

ch. cragsmoor

B

owners carolyn koch victor malzoni, jr. handlers larry cornelius marcelo veras breeders eugene z. zaphiris matthew h. stander

28 Dog News

goodman


three more consecutive group firsts

judges dr. harry smith mr. norman kenney mrs. barbara alderman

Dog News 29


Blinked In By Denise Flaim

In dogs, we talk about having an “eye.” That’s generally understood to be the ability to see quality, balance and type, synthesized into a kind of dog-centric omniscience that allows a judge to find true quality without needing the compass of a dog magazine to guide the pointed finger.

B

ut why it is, then, that some visionaries in the dog world, the master breeders who know so much, are frequently unable to articulate it? Would-be acolytes can sit at their hems for days, or years, awaiting pearls of wisdom that never arrive. In some cases, curmudgeons that they are, these Yodas of dogdom are simply unwilling to impart. (“Share, we will not.”) But just as often, the reason for their reticence is that their “eye” cannot be verbalized; it comes from a much deeper reservoir. Several years ago, I purchased a copy of “Blink” by Malcolm Gladwell. Subtitled “The Power of Thinking Without Thinking,” it sets out to explain what happens in that sliver of a second when we encounter an object, or a person, or a situation, and assess it. The book’s opening chapter describes the acquisition of a Greek kouros by the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles. Anxious to add this nude study of an adolescent Greek boy to its collection (price tag: just south of $10 million), the museum was nonetheless concerned about its pristine condition: The near-perfect statue seemed too good to be true. For more than a year, the Getty performed all the tests it could muster to challenge the authenticity of the statue. A geologist analyzed the marble – yes, it came from an ancient Greek quarry, and was covered in a layer of calcite consistent with its 2,000-year age. Lawyers vetted the papers that documented the statue’s provenance, confirming its change of hands from a Swiss physician to a Greek art dealer. Everything panned out: The statue was not a fake. Or was it? Because despite what the scientists said, art curators had a very different reaction. One by one, they were brought

30 Dog News

in to see this classical “find,” and one by one, their reaction to it was visceral – and negative. “Intuitive repulsion,” remembered curator. Another described feeling as if there was a sheet of glass separating him from the statue. “Fresh” was the reaction of a third – not the first word you want to come to mind when the subject is supposed to have been kicking around for millennia. While at first blush the antiquities experts could not articulate what was wrong, what they knew in their deepest gut that something was. What went on in that “blink,” that moment that the art curators set their eyes on the kouros? A complicated, sprawling, indefinable process in which their brains called forth and synthesized all the details they had absorbed through decades of handling classical treasures. The sheen of the marble, the translucence of a hand, the slope of an eyebrow – repeated exposure to every nuance of ancient Greek sculpture had given them a sixth sense about what was “off.” (Is it or isn’t it? With more digging, certain factual hiccups – such as the forgery of the provenance documents – surfaced. The experts are still arguing, and the work is displayed at the Getty with this label: “Greek, about 530 B.C., or modern forgery.”) It’s not too difficult to make the leap to dog breeders. Those that have been around for decades have stroked, palpated, pondered and puzzled over thousands of dogs. Like curators, if they make an error, they pay for it dearly, by letting a great one get away, or investing in a mediocrity. Their eyes – and their hands – have synthesized this knowledge, oftentimes without their awareness. This is why, when some long-

time breeders cup a newly whelped puppy in their hands, feel that jolt of electricity go up their spine, and whisper, “This is the one,” but cannot articulate why, it is not tomfoolery. It is that inexplicable, but incontrovertible knowingness that we call an “eye.” But to the newbie, it can come across as vague and elliptical, a kind of “no there there.” Whether you are interested in a kouros or a Cavalier, the answer to developing an eye, then, is about constant exposure – in particular, exposure to the right dogs. Those antiquities curators did not get their “blink” knowledge from trading in a bunch of Roman knock-offs. They got it through exposure to excellence. When traveling to the West Coast, I was chatting with a judge who remarked favorably about the large entry of a certain breed of hounds. “There is nothing objectionable about them,” I said. “Most all are sound and typey, but there is not one spectacular dog among them – no standout, no one that gives me goosebumps.” “I think that’s good, when you’re just starting to judge a breed,” the judge replied. Her thinking was that an entry that hovers in the chunkiest part of the bell curve gives you a baseline, a bit of bread and butter before you graduate to the croche en bouche. I couldn’t disagree more. When you want to master a breed, you should seek to take in only the best, so that becomes your default, the high water mark that informs your own “blink” moments. The late Anne Rogers Clark spoke about carrying her ideal representative of a breed in her head, to have something to compare others to. (“How close does this Afghan Hound approach Shirkhan of Grandeur?”) Plato had the same thought, hence his eponymous Platonic ideal. If a new judge does not see quality in sufficient numbers, then he or she may not be able to recognize it, because, amid the inundation of mediocrity, quality can come across as foreign, or – worse – incorrect. Dogs are not statues, and breeders are not art curators … or are we? We both strive for balance, beauty, longevity, authenticity and an aesthetic ideal. To be true connoisseurs, we often devote ourselves to stalking perfection in a small corner of our sprawling world, whether it’s Papillons or postmodernism. We are in constant pursuit of that career-altering rarity, the great one. And we all strive, sometime in our lifelong dedication to these exquisite works of canvas and marble, flesh and fur, to master the knowingness contained in that single, solitary blink.


*The Dog News Top Ten List - Breed points

Dog News 31


Sire: Deja Vu Up Close & Personal Dam: Blackwater Silhouette

Best of Breed Atlantic states Briard Club/ Briard Club of America specialty Harrisburg

Best of Breed Michigan ohio Briard Club/ Briard Club of America Specialty Canfield

Best of Breed Atlantic states Briard Club/ Briard Club of America supported entry Greensboro Best of opposite sex

Briard Club of America National specialty 2011

the Number one* Briard *The Dog News Top Ten List - Breed points

32 Dog News


Dog News 33


NOVEMBER 4, 2011

Bests of the Week Saline County Kennel Club Maltese GCh. Ta-Jon’s Just Bee-Ing Silly Judge Mrs. Jacqueline Stacy Owners Tammy Simon and Tim Lehman Handler Tim Lehman Caribe Kennel Club Scottish Terrier Ch. McVan’s Be Bop Baby Judge Mr. Kent Delaney Owners Vandra Huber & Rebecca Cross Handler Rebecca Cross Empire Kennel Club English Springer Spaniel Ch. Wynmoor Champagne Supernova Judge Mrs. Judy Webb Owners C. Florence, B. Fink, E. Kerfoot, K. Goodhue-McWilliams, and D. Streng Handler Robin Novack Upper Potomac Valley Kennel Club - Saturday Parson Russell Terrier GCh. Foxbend Colour Me More Judge Mr. Mark R. Kennedy Owners Jane Gardner and Douglas Rapport Handler Dana Ann Bryson Travis County Kennel Club - Saturday Cardigan Welsh Corgi GCh. Aubrey’s Tails of Mystery Judge Mrs. Stephanie Seabrook Hedgepath Owners Cynthia & Vincent Savioli Handler Sherri Hurst Kennesaw Kennel Club - Saturday Miniature Pinscher GCh. Marlex Classic Red Glare Judge Mr. Kenneth McDermott Owners Leah Monte & Armando Angelbello Handler Armando Angelbello

To report an AKC All Breed Best In Show or National Specialty Win Call, Fax or Email before 12:00 Noon Tuesday Fax: 212 675-5994 • Phone: 212 462-9588 • Email: Dognews@harris-pub.com 34 Dog News

Stephenville Kennel Club Affenpinscher GCh. Tamarin Top Banana Judge Dr. Steve Keating Owner Myrna Kahlo Handler Jorge Olivera Delaware Ohio Kennel Club - I & II Standard Poodle GCh. Jaset’s Satisfaction Judge Mrs. Dorothy Dalton Judge Mr. Norman Patton Owners Beth Harris, Michele Molnar & Jamie Danburg Handler Ann Rairigh Queensboro Kennel Club - Saturday German Wirehaired Pointer GCh. Mt. View’s Ripsnorter Silver Charm Judge Mrs. Mary Anne Brocious Owners Claire Wisch and Kelly Wisch Handler Phil Booth   Vancouver Kennel Club - Saturday Irish Water Spaniel GCh. Whistlestop’s Fire & Ice Judge Mr. George Vukich Owners Stacy Duncan and Colleen McDaniel Handler Stacy Duncan


*The Dog News Top Ten List - All Breed

Dog News 35


36 Dog News


*Number Two overall, The Dog News Top Ten List - All Breed

Dog News 37


10 quESTioNS ASkED BY LESLEY BoYES of:

John & Pam

Mandeville

Born: John: Oceanport, New Jersey Pam: Mt. Holly, New Jersey Reside: Somerset, New Jersey Married: 121/2 years

One Two Three Four Five Six Seven Eight Nine Ten

What year did you start showing dogs and what breeds were they?

John: 1966 – Old English Sheepdogs Pam: 1986 – Soft Coated Wheaten Terriers

Which dog no longer being shown would you liked to have shown or owned?

John: Mick – the Kerry Blue, Ch Torums Scarf Michael and Coco – the Norfolk, Ch Cracknor Cause Celebre Pam: …in addition to the above The Wheaten terrier, Brett, Ch. SharD’s Let The Games Begin.

Why do you think most people want to judge?

John: Another way to participate/continue in the sport. Pam: They’re delusional.

Who are your non-dog heros or heroines exclusive of immediate relatives?

John: Magic Johnson, Gloria Steinem. Pam: Thurgood Marshall, Harvey Milk.

If you could change one thing about your relationship what would it be?

John: To have met Pam decades before I did. Pam: I’d be nicer to John.

How would you describe yourselves in personal ads?

John: Evil humored, leftist, dog lover, likes to read. Pam: Bitch, bitch, bitch.

Do you think there are too many dog shows?

John: Let the marketplace decide with the caveat AKC should have long since inaugurated a premier circuit. Pam: No. But I think there are too many mundane dog shows.

Which are your three favorite dog shows?

John: Montgomery County, Westminster, Great Western. Pam: MCKC, GWT, Bucks.

Do you think there should be a limit on the number of times a dog may be exhibited in a year?

John: No. Pam: Generally no…but I do think a limit would result in top-winning dogs going head to head more often.

How do you react to people flying in and out of shows on the same weekend?

38 Dog News

John: It’s a great way to embarrass yourself. Pam: Private plane? Sounds good to me. Commercial? You must be kidding.


Multiple Best In Show Multiple Best In Specialty Show

GCh. Foursquare I’ll Be a shostopa tu PreSented By JaSon BaIley, aKC reg. Handler

“McGee” & Jason Add Another Great Win

Best In shoW AlbAny Kennel Club • OCtOber 22, 2011 best In shOw Judge: Mrs. MIChele bIllIngs grOup Judge Mr. tOM nesbItt FOURSQUARE PUGS, reg PUG DOG CLUB OF AMERICA BREEDERS OF THE YEAR AKC BREEDERS OF MERIT Dr. DaviD anD JuDith Johnson brEEDErs/ownErs 511 Wareham Street • Middleboro, Massachussetts 02346

Dog News 39


d e e r B f o Best g Club o D o r o b t Ha h t u r a l l A GCh. Sole Baye V g n i d d i K Just

Baye D v Sole L O G IE X h PI Allarut . h C : Dam

TWIST WITH A L E M R A C .HILINE’S Sire: Ch

Nanae “Justin”

Handled Exclusively By Bergit & Hans Kabel Assisted by Murayama and Teruko Miller

Co-Owned By Ruth Ziegler - “Allaruth” and Yvonne B. Phelps - “Sole Baye” Los Angeles and El Monte, California 310 472-7993 • 626 448-3424

40 Dog News

is


THANK YOU JUDGE: MRs. Linda caldwell GROUP First Santa Ana Kennel Club • Judge Mr. Merle Taylor Group First Burbank Kennel Club • Judge Mr. Yoshio Mori Dog News 41


NovA SCoTIA DuCK ToLLINg ReTRIeveR

THE “PIED PIPERS” OF THE MARSH In Robert Browning’s poem, “The Pied Piper of Hamelin,” a strange figure clad in a coat half yellow and half red appeared in Hamelin and offered to rid the town of rats, which he did by playing his pipes and luring them to their death by drowning in the Weser River. When he returned to the town for payment, the town council refused to pay him so he retaliated by again playing his pipes and luring all the children out of the town.

Ch MACH3 Foxgrove’s Don’t Call Me Jack CD JH WC ADCH (“Ripper”), Terry and Kim Simons’ Toller at the AKC Eukanuba Agility Invitational.

“Dux” (GCh Can Ch NSDTRC Ch UKC HRCh Cedar Fog Midnight Seduxtion UD RN MH AX MXJ XF WCX WVX CWCI), Kathy Guerra’s Toller shows some of the “spark” that makes the breed successful in a number of dog sports.

T

“Neon” (NSDTRC/Am/Can/UKC Ch U-CDX HR Lonetree’s Neon Storm CDX RE OA OAJ SH WCX VCX CWCX CCDX), Corinne Williams Toller, contradicts the professional trainer who said “Tollers don’t like water.”

BY M.J. NELSON 42 Dog News

hus, the term “Pied Piper” came to mean anything capable of luring someone or something into doing something they ordinarily would not do or going somewhere they ordinarily would not have gone and the phrase “Pay the Piper” came to mean facing the inevitable consequences of your actions. In 2003, a strangely named breed of red dogs was admitted to the AKC’s sporting group. The job of the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever was to draw waterfowl within range of the hunters’ guns by running, jumping and playing along the shore in full view of the rafts of diving ducks in the middle of the marsh or lake. The playful actions of the dog arouse the curiosity of the birds and they swim in to see what the dog is doing, which brings them into gun range for the hunters. The Toller is then sent to retrieve the dead or crippled birds, which to the dogs is payment for their work. Like most of the breeds in the sporting group, Tollers have proven to be adept at many dog sports in addition to their work in the field. “Tollers were bred to work closely with a hunter so they love to work, which for them is play. If the ‘work’ is fun and active, they will do well at most anything. Also their size and agility makes it pretty easy for them to do most sports,” said Corinne Williams, who owns “Neon” (NSDTRC/Am/ CoNtiNueD oN page 66


Dog News 43


The Chihuahua Club of America National Specialty

What A Weekend! By William H. (Billy) miller • PHotos By Krista DrooP

T

he Fall National of the Chihuahua Club of America is always held in Chicago, Illinois. Our exciting weekend started this year on Thursday, October 6th. Three seminars were well attended. First, there was a seminar presented by the AKC on “how to prepare for an AKC inspection.” Afterwards, a grooming seminar was held, where 2 Long coats and 2 Smooth coats were groomed. Participants were able to move between tables to see what was being accomplished. Club President Kyle Potts did an excellent job organizing this event. We were fortunate in our third educational experience to have well known handler Carlos Puig present a handling seminar. This event was the talk of the weekend. He did an excellent job relaying valuable information about his craft. Thursday night, there was time to meet with old friends and make new friendships at the welcoming party, sponsored by Purina. Exhibitors from all over the globe spent time “talking Chihuahuas” and telling wonderful stories of years gone by. Many people carried the welcoming party into the lounge and talked the night away. On Friday, the show began

44 Dog News

with our obedience competition. While the entries were not large in number, Judge Mr. Kent Delaney certainly enjoyed adjudicating over some very clever dogs. The Highest Scoring Dog in Regular classes was a little fawn bitch named Linda’s Rosita Bonita UDX VER RA. She is owned and trained by Linda Nolan Dillard. The Highest Combined Score in Open B & Utility classes was Temple’s The Moose Is Loose UD BN GN GO VER RAE3. Donna Brittain is the proud owner/trainer of this little star. There was a Rally demonstration after the obedience competition. A well-attended Judges Seminar was presented by Billy Miller (pretending to be Myrle Hale) and Linda George. Members were invited to attend. There was some lively discussion about the breed standard. We were very appreciative of the judges in attendance taking their time to learn about our breed. At the conclusion of the Judges Seminar, many club members grabbed a quick bite to eat prior to the start of the Sweepstakes. Because Carlos Puig was judging, many people were excited to watch as he chose his winners. Carlos has handled several top

winners in the breed and has a deep affection for Chihuahuas. His Best in Sweepstakes was the diminutive smooth male, Gaston El Dragon Aqlla owned by Barbara Pendergrass. Best of Opposite to Best in Sweepstakes was a litter sister of the Best in Sweeps boy! Gaga Lady De Aqlla, was breeder-owner-handled to her win. Mr. Christianson is from Peru and was certainly delighted with his success. The Long coat Variety winner was Carousel’s An Affair to Remember shown by his breeder, Beth M. Thursby. Best of Opposite in the Long coats was TrueBlue’s Aurora Borealis owned and bred by Charlaine Laplante. Our General Meeting was held at the conclusion of the Sweepstakes competition. Gloria and Art Johnson were awarded the Good Sportsmanship award. Linda Nolan Dillard’s Chihuahua “Rosie” was honored as AKC’s first UDX Chihuahua. That evening, James and Susan Hanke hosted our club match. Well known handler Ruth West judged the Smooth coats and well respected breeder Barbara Breidenbeck judged the Long coats. Billy Miller judged the overall Best in Match competition and rewarded a lovely Long coat dog that was shown by breeder/owner Sandra Pessina of Sand-Man Chihuahuas.


Saturday began with the Junior Showmanship competition. Lauren Payne judged this event. As a judge of juniors and several toy breeds, this well-known Chihuahua exhibitor has a long history with the breed and junior showmanship. I have many wonderful memories of her as a young girl showing her fearless Chihuahuas in a ring filled with much larger dogs. Being the daughter of long time Chihuahua breeder, Susan Payne, Lauren has a vast amount of knowledge in the presentation of our breed. Her winner for Best Junior Handler was Kirsten Potts from Texas. This young lady is an amazing handler and I love watching her show a Chihuahua. She has been very successful showing Chihuahuas in the regular classes. Recently, she has been delving out and showing other breeds. Kirsten is the grand-daughter of the late multi-group judge Jack Potts and her mother is our club president. Surely, we will see her on the lead of a top winner one day soon! Then, Mr. Michael Dachel began his adjudication over the Smooth coats. There were some strong classes of nice males but, a winner had to be chosen. Winners Dog came from the Bred by class. Dartan Firecracker CoNtiNueD oN page 80

Dog News 45


MR PART TWO

ONTGOMERY OUND- P OCTOBER - 2011

Parson russell Terriers

U

By Karen Fitzpatrick

While in Monroe, MI at the All Terrier show the weekend before Hatboro, Devon and MCKC, the scuttlebutt started to surface concerning the weather in PA. It wasn’t hard to imagine, as the weather in MI was simply horrid. It was cold, damp and rainy and I was dreading the upcoming week in PA if this was the prerequisite of the weather to come. The word that had started to travel throughout the showground was that Hatboro might have to move its location due to flooding and Devon was going to cancel. One could only surmise at how rumors get started and of course no one really knew what the circumstances truly were and what we would encounter when we arrived in Wrightstown. One thing we all knew though, we wouldn’t miss that weekend for anything. We were heading east come rain or shine!

W

e arrived early on Wednesday, trailer in tow as the norm for this weekend for us, and ready for anything that we might need. The weather was great, not a problem thank goodness. I was pleasantly surprised at the new layout and how things were set up at Hatboro! Mr. Black simply tackled the situation and made it amazingly better than ever! It was GREAT! We had no problem with soft areas, although I’m sure there were some but he managed to set things up avoiding them. One would never know there was ever a problem at 46 Dog News

all and it was just a super 2-day spectacular! Our hats off to you Mr. Black! Our judge for day 1 of Hatboro was Mrs. Linda D. Caldwell from Kapolei, HI. In her usual fashion and handled expertly by Dana Ann Bryson, taking Best Of Breed was the lovely GCh Foxbend Colour Me More. Bred by S & D Crawford and owned by D Rapport and J Gardner. Best of Opposite was given to 8-year-old Ch Edison’s TNT Aftershock. A veteran exhibited in excellent form and standing the test of time! Bred by Bonnie Edison and owned by Kellie and Dan Dahlberg.

Winners Dog was Foxbend Almost a Saint, owned and bred by David and Susan Crawford. Winners Bitch, Best of Winners and finishing her Championship was the lovely Fox Valley Echo. Bred by M & T Turner and owned by John Martin. Select Dog was GCh Windy Ridge A Starry Night. Bred by R, G & D Warner, owned by B Hughes & J Berkau. Select Bitch was Ch Willow Walks Southern Belle. Bred by C Briant and owned by D & J Wallace. Award of Merits were as follows: Ch Telltale Rednock Joint Venture, Ch Fox Valley Twist and Shout and GCh Cobblestones Six Million Dollar Man. CoNtiNueD oN page 82


*The Dog News Top Ten List - Breed points


48 Dog News


Off The Leash W

ith Election Day already upon us (November 8!), it’s an appropriate time to consider who we elect to office and how their beliefs and policies affect us as dog owners and breeders. How many of us really know where our candidates stand on issues that can have serious repercussions on rights to own and breed dogs responsibly? In my own hometown there will be an election this Tuesday for County Legislator. I happen to personally know one of the candidates, a friend, former neighbor and fellow dog owner, who previously served on the Board of Trustees. As a Trustee, she was instrumental in opening a dog park in town and ensuring a regular police presence at the park to make sure owners were complying with licensing regulations. I’m confident she will continue to act in the best interests of responsible dog owners should she will the election. But what if she doesn’t win? I’m embarrassed to admit that I have no idea where the other candidate stands on any issues of canine legislation and I fear I am not alone in my failure to seek out those answers. In fact, I know I am not alone in this regard, as my recent conversations with fellow dog owning neighbors will attest. And I suspect that in towns all across America voters are unsure of where all the candidates stand on issues of canine legislation. It’s vitally important that all dog owners and breeders remain vigilant and committed to electing and enlightening legislators about the often contentious issues of canine legislation. While the American Kennel Club does a fantastic job of keeping dog fanciers in the loop with issues near and dear to their constituents’ hearts, the general dog owning public is often left in the dark regarding issues that affect their lifestyles until it’s too late. Breed specific legislation usually occurs on a local level, when the outrage and knee-jerk reactions over a sensational headline comes to a head, resulting in a ban on the offending breed. “Pit bulls” and any dog resembling them are usually the focus of such attempted bans, though the Doberman, Rottweiler, Akita, Bullmastiff, Cane Corso, and a whole host of other tough breeds du jour are often targeted as well. Owners of these breeds often find themselves suddenly facing higher costs of licensing

50 Dog News

By Shaun Coen their dogs, or having to muzzle them, or having to purchase exorbitant insurance policies. It becomes an uphill battle and a tremendous expense. As a result, some owners feel they have no choice but to relinquish pets to shelters. Other local ordinances such as limit laws and mandatory spay/ neuter laws also challenge the rights to own and breed dogs responsibly and threaten the future of breeding programs and dog shows altogether. The threat is so pervasive and persistent that the AKC’s Government Relations Department, under the direction of Sheila Goffe, now offers up a template letter as part of its “tool box” to combat damaging canine legislation. All dog owners are urged to consult the AKC’s web site and spend some time clicking the links to educate themselves and in turn their legislators. The sample letter succinctly instructs, “Breed-specific legislation is an ineffective solution to animal control problems because it does not address the real cause of the issue—irresponsible ownership.” It prompts dog owners to include some personal information about themselves and offers alternative solutions: “A

better use of taxpayer funds would be to concentrate animal control efforts on irresponsible dog owners who do not adequately care for or control their animals, and on individual dogs whose behavior demonstrates that they are a problem for their community.” It’s precise, intelligent, respectful, and it works. Even though BSL has been defeated and overturned in many communities and states it continues to be introduced and dog owners must remain vigilant and united in combating these efforts at all levels. Many dog owners feel overwhelmed and unprepared when faced with legislation that threatens their right to own and breed dogs responsibly. For fanciers that are constantly on the go—from judges and professional handlers with full schedules to the weekend warriors that hold other jobs during the week to the hobby breeders that spend nearly all of their waking hours tending to their dogs— it’s difficult to stay abreast of the avalanche of antidog owning and breeding legislation. The AKC certainly does its part in this area but it’s up to owners and

breeders to do theirs, too. The AKC has two funds to which dog lovers can contribute to help in these areas: The Canine Legislation Support Fund (CLSF), which is used to educate and lobby elected officials at the federal, state and local levels, and the AKC Political Action Committee (PAC). The AKC PAC funds are used to contribute to campaigns to elect dog-friendly leadership in Congress and state houses across the nation. Unlike the PAC funds, the CLSF may not be used to contribute to campaigns. The PAC funds can only be used in campaigns and may not be used to lobby officials once they are in office or to influence legislation. While it’s always a worthwhile contribution, there’s never been a better time to contribute to the CLSF, as it is currently offering a special promotion. For every $25 donation to the AKC CLSF, you will receive a ticket for a drawing to win a Westminster Getaway, which includes a three-night hotel stay at the Affinia Manhattan, two tickets to the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show at Madison Square Garden, two tickets to the Take the Lead Party, two tickets to the Purina Appreciation Dinner, two tickets to Barkfest at Bonhams, and a 2012 Westminster catalog and poster. For $100 you get five tickets, and the drawing is limited to 1,000 tickets. To download a ticket, log on to http:// images.akc.org/pdf/WGForm_10192011. pdf. Who knows, you may end up with a whirlwind Westminster week while helping ensure that you can continue to own and breed dogs responsibly.

To stay abreast of the legislative issues in your areas, connect with the Federations of AKC Dog Clubs and other allied groups. The following is a list of current contacts: Alabama:
Alabama Canine Coalition
Baba Monk, President
334-5670673
Info@alabamacaninecoalition.org Arkansas:
Grover Jameson • 479-965-2078
• Ark.STEPP@ymail.com California:
California Federation of Dog Clubs 
 Judythe Coffman, President
661-256-6743
judy@cfodconline.org Sacramento Council of Dog Clubs 
Joan Gibson Reid
• 916-689-1661
jgrcorgis@comcast.net The Animal Council 
 Sharon Coleman
 • 650-692-0126 
• TheAnimalCouncil@aol.com Concerned Dog Owners of California 
 Sharon Shilkoff
 • sharon@cdoca.org Colorado: 
Colorado Federation of Dog Clubs
 Linda Hart
• 303-842-1033
• Kharahs@comcast.net Connecticut: 
Connecticut Dog Federation
 Ralph Slater
• 860-434-1925
• westhighlander10@aol.com Delaware:
Delaware Dog Owners Association
 David Lawson
• 302-632-3848
• info@delawaredogs.org Florida: 
Florida Association of Kennel Clubs
 Leah James
• Presleah@aol.com Georgia 
Georgia Canine Coalition
 Gail LaBerge
 • 770-271-7246
• OUTLAND@laberge.org &
Lynette White
• 770-801-0780 Idaho: 
Idaho Dog Coalition
 Wyoma Clouss
 • 208-345-5197
• info@idahodogcoalition.org Illinois: 
Illinois Dog Clubs and Breeders Association
 Diane Selmer
• 630-554-0134
• MAJWIZ@aol.com Illinois Federation of Dog Clubs and Owners
 Steve Hayden
• hybrk1@comcast.net Indiana:
Indiana Purebred Dog Alliance
 P.O. Box 503066
Indianapolis, IN 46250
• Carole Creech
 317-694-9236
&
Jaye Athy
812-623-5150
• INPurebredDogs@yahoo.com Kansas:
Kansas Federation of Dog Clubs
 Patricia Deshler
• wichitapudel@aol.com
&
 Lori Neer
• agilitydog@twinvalley.net Maine: 
Federation of Maine Dog Clubs and Responsible Dog Owners
 Jay Kitchener, Secretary
• 207-646-8121
• Jay.kitchener@yahoo.com Maryland: 
Maryland Dog Federation
 Adrianne Lefkowitz
• 301-693-2256
• marylanddogfederation@yahoo.com

Massachusetts: 
Massachusetts Federation of Dog Clubs & Responsible Dog Owners
• info@massfeddogs.org Michigan: 
Michigan Association for Pure-Bred Dogs
 Al Stinson, D.M.V.
• 517-655-5363
• LSFC2@aol.com Protect MI Dogs
• Karen Palmer, Secretary
• info@protectmidogs.org Mississippi: 
Mississippi Canine Coalition
 Cyndi Flautt, President
• caretti1@comcast.net
&
 Linda Chase, Legislative Chair
• lhasasbychance@yahoo.com Missouri: 
Missouri Federation of Animal Owners
 Karen Strange
• 573-480-2389
• kjeeper@yhti.net New Hampshire: 
Dog Owners of the Granite State
 Joyce Arivella 
• nhdogs@gmail.com New Jersey: 
New Jersey Federation of Dog Clubs
 Linda Deutsch
• 908-996-4009
• taadeutsch@yahoo.com New York: 
Responsible Dog Owners Association of New York
 Ann Lettis
• 718-317-5804
• lettis@webtv.net North Carolina:
North Carolina Federation of Dog Clubs
 Steve Wallis
• 919-782-2558
• wallissm@bellsouth.net Ohio: 
Ohio Valley Dog Owners
 Norma Woolf
• 513-932-3176
• ovdogo@canismajor.com Oklahoma:
Oklahoma Animal Interest Alliance
 Denise Travis
405-818-5666
Dogdoc88@flash.net Oregon:
National Animal Interest Alliance
 Patti Strand
• 503-761-1139 • NAIA@naiaonline.org Pennsylvania:
Pennsylvania Federation of Dog Clubs
 Nina Schaefer
• PennaFedDogClubs@aol.com South Carolina:
South Carolina Federation of Dog Clubs
 Linda Witouski
• 570-527-6135
• dropfred13@aol.com Tennessee:
Responsible Animal Owners of Tennessee
 Donna Malone 
• 901-353-1805
• raotinc@aol.com Texas:
Responsible Pet Owners Alliance
 Mary Beth Duerler
• 210-822-6763
• rpoa@texas.net Vermont:
Vermont Federation of Dog Clubs
 Deborah Brown
• 802-372-4234
• nllabs@together.net Virginia:
Virginia Federation of Dog Clubs & Breeders
 Mariane Herndon
• marianer@verizon.net
& Sharyn Hutchens
• sharyn@timbreblue.com Wisconsin:
Dog Federation of Wisconsin 
 Joy Brand
• 414-254-9057
• doglaw@dfow.net


Another “FIRST” for Alexander Hounds First and Only Multiple Group Winning, BEST IN SHOW Winner (25 days into acceptance) American English Coonhound

Best In Show Winning

Ch. Alexanders Color Me Bad Ginn Thank You Judges Mr. William Cunningham for the Group First & Judge Mr. Charles Olvis for the Best In Show. Ginn was handled to this spectacular win by Curt Willis Breeder Owner Handler Amanda Alexander Alexanderhounds@msn.com

*Flash* -Back Back- to Firsts Group Hound Tennessee le, Nashvil u Judges o Thank Y lliam Mr. Wi am and h g n i n Cun n Camp a V a n e Ms. Ne

GINN’S SON,

Ch. Color Me Bad Double Stuff Oreo takes Two Group Seconds Thank you Judges Mrs. Gloria Geringer and Mrs. June Penta

Dog News 51


Trophies and ribbons on display

Photo by Keith Eldred

Best of Breed GCH Tymaran Masterful

The Pacific Northwest welcomed the Irish Red and White Setter National Specialty with great hospitality and wonderful weather on September 23, 2011. The specialty was held in conjunction with the Gig Harbor Kennel Club show at the Sanders Field Cultural Event Center, at the Mason County Fairgrounds in Shelton, Washington, just northwest of Olympia. The 25 dogs present represented the largest gathering ever of Irish Red and White Setters Photo by Roberts Photography for a show in the western part of the United States.

IrIsh red and WhIte se by CORlIE EldREd • PHOTOS by KEITH EldREd & RObERTS PHOTOGRAPHy

More of the Best of Breed line up

Photo by Keith Eldred

T

his was the third national specialty for the breed held since it achieved full recognition by the American Kennel Club in January, 2009. The specialties are held in a different region of the country each fall. Last year’s show was in eastern Pennsylvania, and next year’s event will be held in Wilmot, Wisconsin. Thanks to show chair Leta Graham and her committee, the events of the specialty ran smoothly all day. First, came the obedience competition, judged by Christopher Cornell. Sandy Rust’s 10 ½ year old “Hobo” (CH Vanders Vagabond Lord CDX, RE, JH, OA, NAJ) demonstrated his abilities in both Open B and Graduate Open, and Sandy also competed with her younger dog Cody (CH Redbranch Look at Me Now RA) in Beginner Novice B. Spectators were able to see that in addition to being a superb working hunting dog and a breathtaking sight in the show ring, the Irish Red and White Best of Winners Nyastar’s Thief of Hearts of Riverrun Photo by Roberts Photography Setter is also capable of competing successfully in many other areas. Across the country, the breed can be seen participating in not only obedience, but rally, tracking, agility, therapy dog activities, and more. Meanwhile, IRWS breeder Diane Wurz, of Redbranch Kennels in Washington, led a well-received seminar for 9 judges. In addition to viewing a powerpoint presentation and having the opportunity to ask questions of Diane, the judges were mentored at ringside by breeder Tami Orcutt of Magairlin kennels in Connecticut, and had the opportunity after the show to go over and evaluate a cross-section of the entrants. Puppy and Veteran Sweepstakes were judged by Ms Leslie Ann Russell, who commented afterward that it was very enjoyable to have judged the event. She said that they were wonderful dogs, and showed good body type overall. Her Best Puppy in Sweeps was Waidman’s Her Name Up In Lights!, owned by Kevin Cooper & Stella Cooper and Christina Phillips, and Best Veteran was LocMor Auld Lang Syne, also owned by Christina Phillips. Four junior handlers, two in the Open Intermediate Photo by Roberts Best of Opposite Sex CH Blue Chip Roisin @ MTN.STAR and two in Photography the Open Senior division, demonstrated their poise, confidence, and excellent handling skills to

52 Dog News


Best of Opposite Sex CH Blue Chip Roisin @ MTN.STAR

Best of up Breed linePhoto up by Keith Eldred Photo by Keith Eldred More of the Part Bestof ofthe Breed line

Photo by Roberts Photography

More of the Best of Breed line up

Photo by Keith Eldred

tter National Specialty Specialty judge Richard Byrd. His choice for Best some hard times, the handsome Jackwood Junior Handler was Haley Pemble of Snohomish, seemed to enjoy being featured in the “Parade Washington. of Rescues” and making new friends. As the regular classes began, judge Byrd After a long day in the sun, IRWSA members found himself evaluating what he called “a enjoyed a delicious banquet at the Red Lion fine selection of red and white dogs,” saying, “I Hotel in Olympia, where yearly awards were appreciated judging them, and only wish I had Best of Winners Nyastar’s Thief of Hearts of Riverrun Photo by Roberts Photography presented. The IRWSA’s “Trinity Award”, for a Bestdog of Winners Nyastar’s of Hearts of the time to go out in the field with them!” He achieving a showThief championship as Riverrun well added that you can go around the country and as titles in hunting and performance areas, only see one or two dogs of the breed entered was given to its second recipient in the breed’s in a show, so “it is really nice to get them all history, Sandy Rust’s and Patsy Wallace-Jones’ together, to be able to go over the dogs all “Hobo”, who had shown off his abilities earlier together at one time.” in the obedience and show rings. Over the next two days, the IRWSA Final results of the judging are as follows: sponsored all-breed hunt tests, which were held in Oakville, WA. A number of the red BOB: GCH Tymaran Masterful (owners Lawrence and whites had stayed to compete at the Gig and Sharon DeRosa) Harbor shows back at the fairgrounds, but 5 BOW: Nyastar’s Thief of Hearts of Riverrun were entered in the hunt tests Saturday, and 4 (owners Kellyn Miller & Shawn Hazen & Katia on Sunday, with a wide range of experience Ramirez) levels, from senior hunter to 7-month-old puppy! BOS: CH Blue Chip Roisin @ Mtn.Star (owners The red and white setters tend to be a closeHarvey Hazen and Barbara Hazen) working dog, and some demonstrate that Winner’s Bitch: Waidman’s Her Name up in they have retained the “setting” or crouching Lights! (owners Kevin Cooper & Stella Cooper & pointing style from the early days of their history. Christina Phillips) It was a beautiful sight to watch them doing Select Dog: CH Shireoak Spring Twister (owners what they have been bred for for centuries. BJ Parsons & Kathy Gaut) Two of the judges who had attended the Select Bitch: CH Lohmann’s Bella JH (owners judges’ seminar came out to watch the action. Chris Orcutt & Bob & Evangeline Devlin and Zach At the end of a wonderful weekend, & Tami Orcutt) participants headed back to homes far and Awards of Merit: GCH O’Dobhailien Kyla JH near, including California, Michigan, and (owners Christopher Orcutt & Zachary Orcutt); Connecticut. Tami Orcutt said,”We came to CH Waidman’s Ailidh JH (owners Christina Phillips see old friends and get to know new people and Taylor Phillips); Waidman’s Her Name up in and their dogs.” That seemed to be a recurring Lights! (owners Kevin Cooper & Stella Cooper & theme throughout the weekend. Christina Phillips). Huge thanks go to all who coordinated the plans for this event, especially Leta Graham IRWS enthusiasts also enjoyed meeting and her co-workers. A special shout-out goes “Jackwood”, an Irish Red and White Setter to Christina Phillips for putting together an rescue dog adopted by Peggy Shaw from amazing collection of raffle items. Until we Seattle two years ago. Having gone through meet again next year in Wisconsin, may the luck of the Irish be with you all!

Photo by Roberts Ph

Dog News 53


And More

REQUIRED READING, CANCELLED SHOWS...

P

at Trotter raises the critical question in this week’s issue asking when did judging of dogs become more important than the breeding of them! She is absolutely right, of course, in raising this question and while her thoughts and answers may not be on the same level as mine I believe a partial answer to her question is that this occurred when AKC permitted judges to make all of their income or supplement their incomes through judging assignments. Judging became and has become a business rather than a hobby follow through for all too many people. I strongly believe that when a judge is overheard saying, “I’ve got to go back to work,” they are justifying their existence as paid employees at dog shows. And I have no problem whatsoever with the professional handler turned judge who adopts this kind of attitude and philosophy. This person has been making his or her money from dogs usually the greater part of their adult life. They are merely continuing their earning capabilities by turning from being a professional handler to a professional judge! It’s the breeder/exhibitor or just plain exhibitor turned judge who I believe should be limited in the amount of fees they may charge show-giving clubs. The status of the delegate/ judge is somewhat defined in that he or she may only charge legitimate expenses. No fees although certain people indicate a sum for a charity, which of course is a debatable move. The question of how much judges may or should charge in the way of fees is a major question to discuss. In England most judges are paid set-upon fees PLUS an honorarium of say 50 pounds. Judging is an extension of a hobby and as such major fees are neither

expected nor usually required at shows in the UK--except by some Americans, of course. As for FCI this too is the case although of course with the FCI at its major events the judges are so repetitive as to be labeled ridiculous, which unfortunately is becoming a problem with the World Challenge event at the Invitational. Same people being paid huge expenses--fees unknown! Yet the philosophy remains the same--should there be a limit on fees paid as well as expenses paid or is the sky the limit and whatever the market can bear the payment to be made? Furthermore the art of breeding has become secondary to the profession of judging as AKC persists in continuing a show philosophy established in the ‘30’s and ‘40’s, which is outdated today. The need to fill group assignments for the extraordinary number of allbreeds held every weekend has corrupted the basic necessity of requiring judges to be breed proficient individuals. Unless and until a total analysis is made of the existing show scene and how it applies to modern day life in America I fear that the decline in show relevance will continue at a disheartening rate. Realism must replace convenience and the hard facts faced that today’s show scene in America needs a major revamp. Do you ever remember as many shows being cancelled due to weather problems as has been happening of late? Last week two shows in Virginia never took place due to the freak snowstorm in the Northeast while the impenetrable Springfield Show on Sunday at Eastern States had to be cancelled as well due to the lack of electric power. The Saturday show was held. Of course some say this is the Queensboro jinx. Queensboro being a show granted a hardship for a year or two by the Board to find a new site in New York City where it was formed, which hardship seems to have been extended in perpetuity to Springfield,

Mass. Of course the shows forced to cancel due to Hurricane Irene are still waiting to be heard from insofar as whether or not any refunds will be made to the exhibitors. The most recent cancellations were in fact more immediate Acts of God, if in fact that sort of distinction can be made, and probably have less reason to refund monies than the Irene affected shows. Nonetheless certainly in both cases the finances should be made public if only to keep people aware of what the show expenditures had been. I thought Ronnie Irving’s article last week about Term Limits was on all fours! His experience and background and input may have persuaded some to vote against term limits had it been presented prior to the last vote. Although I must say that just off the top I find the freshness of the three names of the candidates nominated by the Nominating Committee to be most welcomed. I really only know one of the three people--that being Tom Powers but right now am tending to think that the other two people read as being on a par with him. I understand Larry Sorenson, a really nice guy, has submitted petitions and will be running from the floorhis I believe is the first set of petitions to be sent in. Larry is a former employee-indeed I believe a discharged former employee who as I say is a very nice guy. What qualifies him to be elected as a Board Member to guide and run the corporation is unclear to me but I presume we can expect a bunch full more of wannabes. Let’s hope their qualifications as business people extend to movers and shakers and not people with little or no real business activities and successes.

BY MATTHEW H. STANDER / Middleburg KC Photos by Charlie & Liz Muthard 54 Dog News


Dog News 55


*

**

*All Systems **CC System

56 Dog News


Dog News 57


The Lighter Side of Judging Continued FROM page 18

magazine comes and I tear out your articles so I can read them on the plane. OMG – I, too, have had so many OBEs.” BA continues to share her stories and I listen with admiration. “Oh, why don’t you join us for dinner?” BA asks. “No, I am a little tired and I am going to order room service and call it a night,” I explain. “OK…see you tomorrow,” BA adds. Turning to walk away, I can’t help but look to the ground and admire her perfect ankles---one more time. Her joie de vivre leaves me smiling, as I enter the lift to the third floor. Room #318 is a typical Crowne Plaza room. I place my Black Ballistic Nylon garment bag on the bed, unzip the sides, and carefully pull out my three pressed outfits and hang them neatly in the closet. As a Priority Club Member, I am treated to one drink coupon, one 15% off a meal coupon, and an adorable little bag filled with earplugs, sleeping mask and scented spray. I open the cute little bag, sort through the goodies and immediately float into an OBE--wondering if I should spray my face or the pillow. Now I must admit for years I thought the scented spray was aromatherapy, to be sprayed on your face and inhaled. It was not until my close friend and mentor Dr. D and I had the pleasure of shar-ing an in-room-dining experience (I was a bit under the weather and did not want to dine out). “Dr. D,” I shared enthusiastically, “I love these cute little bags they leave on the bed. The aromatherapy spray is just wonderful!” “I did not get any aromatherapy in my bag,” Dr. D complained. “Oh, it’s wonderful!” I informed him earnestly. “You can use some of mine.” I pulled out the bottle and sprayed it all over my face, breathed in deeply for its healing properties. Dr. D. buckled over grabbing his gut in a state of totally para-lytic laughter and managed to inform me the aromatherapy spray was actually linen spray for the sheets. Standing in room 318, now, and holding the little bottle between my thumb and forefinger, I spray the pillows, sheets and mist a little across my face--- for old times and a little laugh. After room service, I call the front desk for a 5:30 AM wake up call. There is a sign on the nightstand that reads – “Your wakeup call is guaranteed – if you do not receive your wakeup call your night’s stay is free.” Again, another brilliant marketing scheme thought of by whom?, I ask. “Hello – I would like a wake up call for 5:30 AM. Room 318,” I request. “Thank you, Mr. Faulkner, will that be all?” she asks. “Well – how do you know if you actually wake me up in the morning, or if I am the one to whom you are speaking,” I put forward. “Well, sir, we usually call twice to make sure,” she re-plies. Chuckling myself to sleep, I awake at exactly 5:30 AM with the first call.... 58 Dog News

followed by an additional call at 5:35. First thing – coffee with a little cream, crawl back in bed, under the covers, drink coffee while watching CNN. Finish coffee... brew second cup while showering and shaving...put on underwear...socks... drink second cup...go back into the bathroom...brush teeth... put on trousers...shirt...belt...shoes and tie. Grab my man bag...wallet...room key... jacket...copy of USA News from outside my door...and head to the lobby for the judges’ shuttle to the show.

T

he lobby is rather quiet, and having arrived a bit early for the shuttle, I choose to sit on the opposite side of the wall, facing the elevators in the lounge area. The seats are more comfortable and the view is a bit more pleasing. I pull out the program for the day and notice I start judging at 9:10, with the majority of other judges beginning at 8:30 AM. My watch reads 7:10 and there is no sign of any fellow judge or shuttle van. Flipping through the breeds I am scheduled to judge I kill an additional ten minutes and decide to walk outside and check to see if the shuttle has arrived. I approach the doors---they auto-matically slide open---and there is nothing in sight. I return to the Bell Boy (BB) and in-quire, “Good morning, I am one of the judges with the kennel club and I was wondering what time the shuttle will be leaving?” “I am sorry, sir, but the shuttle has already left,” he informs me matter-of-factly. “That is not possible. I have been sitting on the other side of that wall (I point) and surely they would not have left with out looking for me,” I plead. “Well, they did.” He remarks in a cavalier fashion. “Well, if this just doesn’t suck,” I say out loud. “Is there a shuttle driver from the hotel who can take me?” I ask. “Nope. I will call you a driver and he should be here in a few minutes,” BB responds. Retrieving the show program from my man bag, I give BB the address and directions to the show. “I know where the show is – it’s at the Expo Center – your driver knows right where to take ya.” A black Town Car with tinted windows pulls outside the door. I climb in the back seat. “Good morning – I take it BB explained to you where I need to go.” “Yah, maaaan. - Not a problem. I know where you go and it will not take long. How are you this morning sir?” the driver asks me. “I am fine now – I missed the shuttle and I am running a bit late for the dog show,” I reply nervously. “Oh, how nice maaaaaan. I like dogs...dogs are so nice – I have dogs in my homelaaaand and I

miss them very much.” Knowing better, I choose not to stimulate the dog conversation and change the conversa-tion to the task at hand. “How much further to the Expo Center and what will the total charges be?” I ask. “For you, sir, the charge is only $12.00 and this does not include tip, maaaan.” The black Towne Car swings in front of the new convention center and drops me off. Looking around I see no cars, no dogs, no RVs --nothing. “OK... relax!!!” I think, calming myself. “This is a huge complex and the dog show is probably in another wing on the opposite side of the building. Walk inside...get directions...and all will be well” The complex is enormous. New paint and carpet smells fill the air. I walk for what seems forever and there is no sign of human life. I turn left, pushing through a set of double doors into a vast storage room filled with boxes in search of someone who can point me into the direction of the dog show. Walking further down an aisle, past several forklifts, I find an electrician working high up on scaffolding. “Excuse me sir – sorry to bother you – I am here for the Dog Show. Could you tell me where the show is located?” I ask and plead at the same time. Mr. Electric looks at me like I’m smoking something he would like. “Hey man ---I have no idea if there is a dog show here --- go through those doors over there and make the first left turn and there is a security office on the left, fourth door down ---they will be able to help you.” “Thanks!” I say while running through the doors and down the hall. It is 8:00 AM and I have no !@#$#@ idea where the dog show is. Reaching the security office door, I slow down, take a deep breath and casually enter like nothing is wrong. “Good morning, I am looking for the Dog Show.” “Dog Show---Wait a minute please.” Jerrell the security guard picks up the phone, hits an extension and places the receiver to his ear. “Yep ...Hey...morning…got some man here wanting to know where the dog show is. Uhuh... yep…. that’s what I thought! Hey man, have a good one.” “Sir – there is no Dog Show here.” Needing a major OBE, I force myself to stay focused, relax and stay calm. Once again, I pull the judging program from my Man Bag and show Jerrell the directions and location. “Whoa! Man you are way off track---you need to go to the Expo Center South,” he informs me incredulously. It’s at least a thirty minute drive from here.” Eight ten in the morning and I start judging in one hour and the show starts in twenty minutes. “Can you call me a cab?” I implore. Jerrell picks up the phone again and within seconds procures me a cab. “Thank you so much – now where do I meet the cab and how in the hell do I get out of this place?” “Follow me,” Jerrell chuck-les in response to my outburst, while escorting me through the monolithic maze and I Continued on page 00


The Lighter Side of Judging Continued FROM page 58

meet the cabby exactly where I was dropped earlier. The traditional, slightly seedy cab immediately puts me at ease and I am comforted by the sensible, straightforward manner of the driver, who at the age of around sixty-five, ap-pears to have spent the majority of his life in Atlanta. I give an abridged version of my earlier adventure, while passing the judging program, once again to Jackson, the driver. I know this to be so, as unlike the other driver, Jackson has his ID proudly displayed on the dash for my viewing pleasure. Jackson views the address. “Sir, you are exactly thirty-six miles from the show site and it will take me at least twenty to twenty five minutes at best,” he informs me professionally. “Forge ahead! Thank you!!” I reply. Spying the me-ter, I monitor the total along the way and figure it is going to cost me at least thirty dol-lars for the trip. “So, what happened to your transportation?” Jackson inquires. “Hell if I know---I was down in the hotel lobby twenty minutes early and the next thing I know, my friends have left without me and no one checked to see if I had a ride.” I chuckle.

W

ith very little traffic on the interstate, Jackson makes very good time in support of my effort to get to the show. We pull up to the show entrance at 8:30 AM. “You can drop me off right here, Jackson, I will walk to the building and it will save you having to explain to the parking attendant. “The total is $35.00 and would you like a receipt?” I hand Jack-son $40.00 and say, “Thanks, have a great day and I appreciate your service.” With re-ceipt and Man Bag in hand, I approach Expo South as The Star-Spangled Banner broad-casts from the exterior speakers. I stop on the sidewalk as numerous owners and handlers run around, through doors, oblivious to the playing of the National Anthem. “……….And the home of the brave…” The singing stops. I enter the side door and immediately go the judges’ room. With twenty minutes to spare, I opt for a bottle of water and a little downtime after the somewhat lunatic morning. BA waves and smiles from a distance on her the way to her ring, Ms. P and Mr. C walk off with Mr. A. I am greeted by one of my mentors and friends, Ms. GS. Ms. GS, like Dr. J, was and still remains in-strumental in my understanding and application of a certain Herding breed. “Michael, Dear – good to see you. Have you talked with Dr. J? Do you know when he is coming down?” she inquires. “Yes, no worries...he is heading to the hotel late this afternoon and we have already made plans for dinner,” I reassure. “Oh, wonderful,” remarks Ms.GS. “I must be off to my ring – see you later.” A quick peck on Ms. GS’s cheek and I exit and go directly to the superintendent’s station to pick up my judge’s badge. As usual I am the first to rip open the plastic-wrapped purple

62 Dog News

badge. I proudly spear it through my lapel, while giving superintendent, Mr. O, a big hug. I march to ring 12 to judge a large entry of Labradors and along the way I stop and greet fellow judge and friend, Ms. P, who is engrossed in her task at hand. I breeze through ninety-four Labradors---other than stopping after every class to sanitize my hands. Thank God for the extra bottle in my Man Bag and the extra thick roll of Bounty on my table. I return to the hospitality room for lunch. En route, I pass LJ, a handler whom I have known for years and who, in a short period of time, has worked very hard to understand, breed and succeed in my own breed. I give LJ a wink and air kiss in passing--remembering like it was yesterday, when she asked me to show her how to groom a Golden. I turn to the left and DH approaches, whom, like LJ, I mentored in Golden Re-trievers and who worked for me during my handling years. He, too, has made me ex-tremely proud with his dedication to the breed and his success over the years. We quickly give each other a man hug ---a one-hand shake with the other arm around the shoulder and I retreat for lunch. The judges, who traveled on the morning’s shuttle bus, have filled the lunchroom - you know the ones that took off without me---friends and mentors alike. I stop in search of an empty chair and give another mentor, friend and fellow artist, a big hug. I locate a vacant folding chair at the second row of tables. I crawl and bump my way through my col-leagues and hang my Man Bag over the back the chair, while heading for the food line. Along the way, I bump into the backs of Ms. P and Mr. C. and stop for social chitchat, sharing the tale of my morning detour. “Can you believe I missed the shuttle? I was sitting in the lounge from 6:55 to 7:40,” I inform...expecting a modicum of sympathy. “Well, yes – you should have been sitting near the elevators or the front door. How could we have seen you through the wall?” re-marks Ms. P. “At the very least, I would have thought someone would have checked or called my room.” I state. “They asked if you were coming on the shuttle and I said you did not judge until after 10:00AM,” chuckles Mr.C. “I actually started at 9:10,” I share. Ms. P, laughing, re-marks, “After which, I said you would probably jog to the show and not to worry. So, we left without you!” announces Ms. P with a big smile on her face. “With friends like you two, who needs enemies?” I quietly laugh to myself. The day finishes early despite

large entries---thanks to the organization of the superinten-dents. ALL of us board the shuttle back to the Crowne Plaza. I grab a seat next to Ms. B, a fellow Sporting Dog enthusiast. The thirty-minute ride seems more like ten minutes. Ms. B and I share breeding stories, pictures of our young breeding stock and discuss, with specific details, our observations of the day--mentors, friends and colleagues performing a verbal dance based on common interests. Dr. J phones from his car and says, “Hey there - I am running a bit late due to rush hour traffic.” “Not a problem,” I reply, “Call me when you arrive. I will help you with your bags and then we can go to dinner. I am going to sit in the lounge for a bit and visit, I add. “O.K. See you soon.” Dr. J signs off. I meet up with Ms. B, Mr. R and Dr. N in the bar. After an hour or so, the three of them retreat to the hotel restaurant to fully utilize their free drink and 15% off coupons. My Droid rings and Dr. J announces his arrival. I quickly march towards the sliding glass door, pay my respects to BB and collect Dr. J’s luggage, while he negotiates with the va-let-parking attendant. “Now, we will be coming right back down to collect the car and go to dinner, so don’t lose it,” instructs. Dr. J. I give Dr. J. a big hug and we proceed to check in. BB stops me along the way as Dr. J goes to the desk. “I see your father has arrived,” he says. I nod my head and join Dr. J at the desk. I follow him to the second floor room, #209, and he patiently, and with author-ity, instructs me as to where to place his personal items. “Now, please put my garment bag on right side of the bed. That’s it!” Dr. J unzips his black, ballistic nylon garment bag on wheels and hands me his three neatly pressed outfits to hang in the hall closet. “Now, let’s head down to get some good food,” he adds. I drive to the local restaurant and valet park Dr. J’s car. The restaurant is very noisy, crowded and we are pleased to be seated quickly at the bar. Dr. J coaches me on the menu, gives me a brief history of the restaurant and begins to fill me in on his most recent judging trip to Hawaii. I recommend a particular brew to Dr. J to compliment his seafood. “What the hell---you’re never too old to try and learn something new,” Dr. J proclaims. With this said – I hear LJ’s voice from behind my right shoulder. “Hey great to see you guy here. GM and I love this place and you have to try the Fried Lobster Tails. They are the best,” he suggests. “What the hell – you’re never too old to try and learn something new,” I say – smiling at the thought of having a wonderful meal with my mentor, sur-rounded by friends.


The AKC/Eukanuba National Championship Issue of Dog News

“The Silver Issue” will be published

Friday, December 16, 2011 The Advertising Deadline is

Friday, December, 9, 2011 Dog News 59


Groomania Hosts World Team Grooming Championship 2011 Story and photos by Karl Donvil

A

fter the big rehearsal last year it looks like the Groomania team was ready to host the World Team Grooming Championship 2011 in Kortrijk on 16-18 September. The company Transgroom is the spirit behind it all. It offers a whole team of workers to arrange everything in the best possible way. While Darren is the manager of the company, it is Kitty who takes care of this event. They offered a full 3-day program starting on Friday with demonstrations and seminars given by the best groomers one can find. They were very well presented. The TV crew recorded everything. People could attend the seminars in a special part of the hall, apart from the competition area. On Saturday there were more seminars to follow but it was also time for the Groomania International grooming competition attended by competitors from all over Europe and even outside. Sunday started with “model dogs�, a competition mostly attended by children. They were given a model dog to trim and turn into something nice according to a certain breed, but it could as well be a fantasy. Lovely and amazing to see how passionate some are and what they are able to perform. At the same time the Groomania competition for Beginners took place. But the apotheosis came around two o’clock at the start of the World Team Grooming Competition. Each National team had one team member specialized in a discipline, Handstripping, Pure Breeds, Spaniels and Poodles. It was France that finally won. Although very well organized I have two comments. There was not an official catalog with all the participants and some explanation. That is why I cannot tell you how many participants were in competition, who participated in what, what were their nationalities, etc. Another and much more important comment is the fact that on Sunday for the World Championship, the poor dogs were on the table for more than 4 hours. I have no problems with trimming dogs as they adore in general to be trimmed if done professionally. But if they need to stand on their feet for so long without moving, on a table and without a break to stretch the legs, drink some water and make a pee pee, then there is something terribly wrong with the rules for such a competition. The judging took much too long and after that there was the deliberation and proclamation. For this and in the interest of the Grooming competitions, think in the interest of the animals first and change the rules. Take care there is a way to let the dogs go out for a few minutes, after maximum two hours, and certainly take care they can drink. I was nicely surprised by the podium. Not only was it very nice but large enough to hold the dogs but it had two steps for each place, the dog on top and the trophies, flowers and gifts one step lower. This was so convenient for the photos as now one sees the dog completely and also the trophies and gifts from the sponsors. Besides that there was each time a new plate indicating the category. That could perhaps be somewhat larger for the audience but again it was very convenient for the photos. Congratulations to the Groomania team for another fantastic competition and splendid organization.

60 Dog News


Dog News 61


The Lighter Side of Judging Continued FROM page 58

meet the cabby exactly where I was dropped earlier. The traditional, slightly seedy cab immediately puts me at ease and I am comforted by the sensible, straightforward manner of the driver, who at the age of around sixty-five, ap-pears to have spent the majority of his life in Atlanta. I give an abridged version of my earlier adventure, while passing the judging program, once again to Jackson, the driver. I know this to be so, as unlike the other driver, Jackson has his ID proudly displayed on the dash for my viewing pleasure. Jackson views the address. “Sir, you are exactly thirty-six miles from the show site and it will take me at least twenty to twenty five minutes at best,” he informs me professionally. “Forge ahead! Thank you!!” I reply. Spying the me-ter, I monitor the total along the way and figure it is going to cost me at least thirty dol-lars for the trip. “So, what happened to your transportation?” Jackson inquires. “Hell if I know---I was down in the hotel lobby twenty minutes early and the next thing I know, my friends have left without me and no one checked to see if I had a ride.” I chuckle.

W

ith very little traffic on the interstate, Jackson makes very good time in support of my effort to get to the show. We pull up to the show entrance at 8:30 AM. “You can drop me off right here, Jackson, I will walk to the building and it will save you having to explain to the parking attendant. “The total is $35.00 and would you like a receipt?” I hand Jack-son $40.00 and say, “Thanks, have a great day and I appreciate your service.” With re-ceipt and Man Bag in hand, I approach Expo South as The Star-Spangled Banner broad-casts from the exterior speakers. I stop on the sidewalk as numerous owners and handlers run around, through doors, oblivious to the playing of the National Anthem. “……….And the home of the brave…” The singing stops. I enter the side door and immediately go the judges’ room. With twenty minutes to spare, I opt for a bottle of water and a little downtime after the somewhat lunatic morning. BA waves and smiles from a distance on her the way to her ring, Ms. P and Mr. C walk off with Mr. A. I am greeted by one of my mentors and friends, Ms. GS. Ms. GS, like Dr. J, was and still remains in-strumental in my understanding and application of a certain Herding breed. “Michael, Dear – good to see you. Have you talked with Dr. J? Do you know when he is coming down?” she inquires. “Yes, no worries...he is heading to the hotel late this afternoon and we have already made plans for dinner,” I reassure. “Oh, wonderful,” remarks Ms.GS. “I must be off to my ring – see you later.” A quick peck on Ms. GS’s cheek and I exit and go directly to the superintendent’s station to pick up my judge’s badge. As usual I am the first to rip open the plastic-wrapped purple

62 Dog News

badge. I proudly spear it through my lapel, while giving superintendent, Mr. O, a big hug. I march to ring 12 to judge a large entry of Labradors and along the way I stop and greet fellow judge and friend, Ms. P, who is engrossed in her task at hand. I breeze through ninety-four Labradors---other than stopping after every class to sanitize my hands. Thank God for the extra bottle in my Man Bag and the extra thick roll of Bounty on my table. I return to the hospitality room for lunch. En route, I pass LJ, a handler whom I have known for years and who, in a short period of time, has worked very hard to understand, breed and succeed in my own breed. I give LJ a wink and air kiss in passing--remembering like it was yesterday, when she asked me to show her how to groom a Golden. I turn to the left and DH approaches, whom, like LJ, I mentored in Golden Re-trievers and who worked for me during my handling years. He, too, has made me ex-tremely proud with his dedication to the breed and his success over the years. We quickly give each other a man hug ---a one-hand shake with the other arm around the shoulder and I retreat for lunch. The judges, who traveled on the morning’s shuttle bus, have filled the lunchroom - you know the ones that took off without me---friends and mentors alike. I stop in search of an empty chair and give another mentor, friend and fellow artist, a big hug. I locate a vacant folding chair at the second row of tables. I crawl and bump my way through my col-leagues and hang my Man Bag over the back the chair, while heading for the food line. Along the way, I bump into the backs of Ms. P and Mr. C. and stop for social chitchat, sharing the tale of my morning detour. “Can you believe I missed the shuttle? I was sitting in the lounge from 6:55 to 7:40,” I inform...expecting a modicum of sympathy. “Well, yes – you should have been sitting near the elevators or the front door. How could we have seen you through the wall?” re-marks Ms. P. “At the very least, I would have thought someone would have checked or called my room.” I state. “They asked if you were coming on the shuttle and I said you did not judge until after 10:00AM,” chuckles Mr.C. “I actually started at 9:10,” I share. Ms. P, laughing, re-marks, “After which, I said you would probably jog to the show and not to worry. So, we left without you!” announces Ms. P with a big smile on her face. “With friends like you two, who needs enemies?” I quietly laugh to myself. The day finishes early despite

large entries---thanks to the organization of the superinten-dents. ALL of us board the shuttle back to the Crowne Plaza. I grab a seat next to Ms. B, a fellow Sporting Dog enthusiast. The thirty-minute ride seems more like ten minutes. Ms. B and I share breeding stories, pictures of our young breeding stock and discuss, with specific details, our observations of the day--mentors, friends and colleagues performing a verbal dance based on common interests. Dr. J phones from his car and says, “Hey there - I am running a bit late due to rush hour traffic.” “Not a problem,” I reply, “Call me when you arrive. I will help you with your bags and then we can go to dinner. I am going to sit in the lounge for a bit and visit, I add. “O.K. See you soon.” Dr. J signs off. I meet up with Ms. B, Mr. R and Dr. N in the bar. After an hour or so, the three of them retreat to the hotel restaurant to fully utilize their free drink and 15% off coupons. My Droid rings and Dr. J announces his arrival. I quickly march towards the sliding glass door, pay my respects to BB and collect Dr. J’s luggage, while he negotiates with the va-let-parking attendant. “Now, we will be coming right back down to collect the car and go to dinner, so don’t lose it,” instructs. Dr. J. I give Dr. J. a big hug and we proceed to check in. BB stops me along the way as Dr. J goes to the desk. “I see your father has arrived,” he says. I nod my head and join Dr. J at the desk. I follow him to the second floor room, #209, and he patiently, and with author-ity, instructs me as to where to place his personal items. “Now, please put my garment bag on right side of the bed. That’s it!” Dr. J unzips his black, ballistic nylon garment bag on wheels and hands me his three neatly pressed outfits to hang in the hall closet. “Now, let’s head down to get some good food,” he adds. I drive to the local restaurant and valet park Dr. J’s car. The restaurant is very noisy, crowded and we are pleased to be seated quickly at the bar. Dr. J coaches me on the menu, gives me a brief history of the restaurant and begins to fill me in on his most recent judging trip to Hawaii. I recommend a particular brew to Dr. J to compliment his seafood. “What the hell---you’re never too old to try and learn something new,” Dr. J proclaims. With this said – I hear LJ’s voice from behind my right shoulder. “Hey great to see you guy here. GM and I love this place and you have to try the Fried Lobster Tails. They are the best,” he suggests. “What the hell – you’re never too old to try and learn something new,” I say – smiling at the thought of having a wonderful meal with my mentor, sur-rounded by friends.


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*The Dog News Top Ten List

Dog News 63


64 Dog News


BEST IN SHOW JUDGE MR. DAVID KIRKLAND

GROUP JUDGE MS. ELIZABETH MUTHARD

Dog News 65


THE “PIED PIPERS” OF THE MARSH CoNtiNueD FRoM page 42

Can/uKC Ch u-CDX HR Lonetree’s Neon Storm CDX Re oA oAJ SH WCX vCX CWCX CCDX.) “But, their small size can be a challenge in the hunt tests. The other retriever breeds, for the most part, are much bigger than a Toller and even though the dogs in these tests don’t compete against each other, they do have to run the same tests over the same ground and through the same cover. While most Tollers can handle even a big bird like a mallard, it can be comical watching a dog bring in a duck that seems almost as big as the dog especially when a wing is fully covering the dog’s face.” “Tollers, like all retrievers, are hard-wired to retrieve. That natural instinct plus a good nose, keen eyesight and overall tractability or desire to please make them a very cooperative partner. Structurally they are strong and compact and their animated behavior gives them a certain ‘spark’ in any dog sport, said Kathy guerra, who owns gCh Can Ch NSDTRC Ch uKC HRCh Cedar Fog Midnight Seduxtion uD RN MH AX MXJ XF WCX WvX CWCI (“Dux”). “I have to agree that the breed’s smaller size can make it interesting in the hunt tests. Recently, at several tests, my Toller’s small size was a definite disadvantage. The cover was very high to the point where I couldn’t see my dog at times. Both water series were run on a river with a very strong current. Most of the other retrievers could touch bottom but my Toller had to swim against the current, which turned out to be a real problem as it pushed him away from the birds. However, he has a great heart and talent and he was able to recover and pass the test.” “Tollers are extremely intelligent and they love to be challenged. They can be willful and sometimes they will tell you how they think they should be doing something. If you are not careful, you will find that they have already trained you on how they want to do it. But, it is their willfulness that makes them successful. They will work through issues, problems and concepts as long as you take the time to understand them. They are very biddable dogs and love to work,” said Terry Simons, who with his wife, Kim, owns Ch MACH3 Foxgrove’s Don’t Call Me Jack CD JH WC ADCH (“Ripper”) that was also the fourth place finisher at the AKC Eukanuba Agility Invitational in the 20” division. “Tollers as a breed love games so any game— working in the field, agility, Frisbee, dock-diving or whatever else you want to do—which makes the reward of a tug or retrieving at the end of a training session a really good tool. This is one of the reasons

It has not always been easy to find trainers who are willing to be flexible enough to keep in mind that Tollers have to be trained differently than Labradors, according to Kathy Kobensky-Como who with her husband Jamie owns”Torque” (HR Am/Can/NSDTRC-US Ch Vermilion’s Twist’n Torque CDX RE MH WCX Can JH WCI.) 66 Dog News

Ch GMH Foxgrove’s Raisin Cain QFTR Am MH Am/Can WCX CD (“Raisin”), Sue Kish’s Toller with her “real trophies.” Raisin was the first female in the breed to earn the Grand Master Hunter title. “Tiaga” (Am/NSDTRC Ch Manitou Aqueus All Spruced Up MH AX AXJ VC) Danika Bannasch’s Toller, has sometimes had difficulty seeing birds fall in hunt tests due to her small size. Tiaga, however, did not consider herself disadvantaged.

that Tollers are so successful as drug detection dogs as it is trained as a game with tons of reward when they ‘find the pot’. But, they can be sensitive and fold under pressure so you have to be able to read them well. Shutting down may be from a lack of effort or due to total confusion and you need to be able to tell which is which in training. Basics have to be solid. You can’t skip steps when training this breed because they are smart, sometimes too smart. They may not be the very best breed for an inexperienced dog person,” said Sue Kish, who owns, among others, Ch gMH Foxgrove’s Raisin Cain QFTR Am MH Am/Can WCX CD (“Raisin”), the first female Toller to earn the Grand Master Hunter title. Being one of the “other breeds” in hunt tests has occasionally created problems for Toller people. “While running the ‘other or minority dogs’ in some hunt tests we’ve encountered skepticism with some experienced field people who have seen Tollers that were not well prepared for what they were expected to do in the tests. We have also had difficulty helping people find good trainers near them who are willing to be flexible in their training methods for hunt tests. Tollers need to be trained somewhat differently than Labradors. Tollers are very quick to learn any new activity and they enjoy doing many different things. It is really important to prove their versatility and to keep in mind that they were bred originally for retrieving. They were not just bred for the show ring or flyball or obedience,” said Kathy KoebenskyComo, who with her husband, Jamie, owns “Torque” (HR Am/Can/NSDTRC-uS Ch vermilion’s Twist’n Torque CDX Re MH WCX Can JH WCI), “Teaser” (Am/Can/NSDTRCuS Ch vermilion’s option Card CD Am/Can WC) “Riga “ (HR Am/Can/ Intern’l/ NSDTRC-uS Ch vermilion’s Rah Rah Ramona CD Re SH WCX Can JH WC TDI) and “Hannah” (BPISS SHR Am/ NSDTRC-uSA /Can Ch vermilion’s Holy Hannah RN JH WCI Can JH WC.) “I have heard other Toller people say that the hunt CoNtiNueD oN page 74


Vapor Wake Detection canines Deter terrorism; increase traVelers’ safety BY SHARON PFLAUMER All photos are courtesy of Auburn University Photographic Services.

T

o better secure train stations during the weeks preceding the 10th Anniversary of the terrorists’ attacks on 9/11, Amtrak® used Vapor Wake Detection canines in addition to traditional explosives detection canines. Vapor Wake Detection canines were first used by the New York Police Department (NYPD) and the Metro Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA). Today, the Amtrak Police Department is their biggest user. In fact, Amtrak has one of the largest transportation police department canine programs in the country. It has more than doubled the size of its Explosive Canine Detection Program to 45 teams, which includes 11 that received highly specialized training in Vapor Wake Detection. According to Amtrak Spokesperson Cliff Cole, the Vapor Wake Detection canines are being utilized “During our daily operations at certain stations across the country; prior to and during, special events such as the recent Winter Olympics in Canada, the Super Bowl and political conventions; and during regularly scheduled and random security searches and operations throughout the year.” Amtrak plans to further increase the canine detection squad patrolling stations, riding trains, and screening baggage and passengers for explosives as they board trains. Sampling the air plume Vapor Wake Detection involves a dog sampling the air plume or vapor wake that is emitted by people or explosives as they or it pass or are carried through an area. A vapor wake is a cloud of microscopic-sized particles. In the case of people, it consists of the millions of uniquely scented A puppy in skin cells that the human body Auburn’s detector sheds constantly. dog preparation “Vapor Wake Detection ca- program is nines can detect these odors acclimated to the with their keen sense of smell and trace them to their source: crowds of people, for example, a bomb hidden different floor under a person’s clothing.” says surfaces, and the John Pearce, the Associate Di- sights and sounds rector for the Canine Detection of Quintard Mall Research Institute at the Auburn in Oxford, Ala. University College of Veterinary Medicine. Pearce is a former military dog handler and instructor with 23 years of experience. After the terrorists’ attacks on 9/11, he worked with the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) in its effort to ramp up the number of available dog and handler explosives detection teams. TSA protects the nation’s transportation systems to ensure freedom of movement for people and commerce. The Canine Detection Research Institute After Richard Reid attempted to destroy a commercial aircraft in-flight by detonating explosives hidden in one of his shoes in 2001, Pearce was charged with de-

68 Dog News

Four Labrador retrievers trained in Vapor Wake Detection roamed the crowd during the 2009 presidential inauguration in an effort to keep spectators, participants, and the country’s new president safe. One of these canines is pictured above.

In August, U.S. Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano visited the Canine Detection Training Center for a first-hand look at Auburn’s bombsniffing dogs and the technology behind them.

Several large police agencies with robust missions within the U.S. have purchased and are using Auburn University Vapor Wake Detection canines.


veloping a procedure whereby dogs could detect explosives on a mobile target such as a person carrying them. In 2004, Auburn University solicited his help with starting what would become its Vapor Wake Detection™ program. For more than 20 years, the Canine Detection Research Institute at Auburn University has researched the process of canine olfaction. The dogs trained there do both explosives detection and Vapor Wake Detection with an extremely high rate of proficiency. They can detect explosives placed in a stationary location, i.e., fastened to the bottom of chair; as well as detect explosives being carried by a moving target, i.e., concealed under a person’s clothing as the person passes through an area. In the case of the latter, Vapor Wake Detection canines can then track the moving target and thus lead their handler to the location of the individual concealing the explosives. Even more impressive is the fact that Vapor Wake Detection canines can detect the scent of explosives that passed through an area prior to the time the dog and handler team arrived at that location. “We’ve had instances where a dog detected the odor of explosives that passed through an area 15 minutes before the dog got there.” Pearce says. “At this point, we really don’t know the maximum amount of time that could elapse before the dog wouldn’t be able to detect explosives that are no longer present. But we do know that the dogs’ proficiency at vapor wake detection increases over time with experience. So, it’s likely the amount of time elapsed would increase.” The time elapsed is likely to increase greatly. Law enforcement bloodhounds have been known to pick up 2-week-old scent tracks left by perpetrators. Here’s how the detector canines work Explosives detection canines are given a command like “Find” when their handler wants them to search an area for explosives. If the dogs find explosives, they communicate the location of the explosives to their handler by doing an “Alerting” behavior, i.e., sitting down and looking at their handler, barking, etc. Likewise, Vapor Wake Detection canines are cued to search an area for explosives by their handler and also “Alert” to the odor of explosives if they find them. However, because Vapor Wake Detection canines are so highly motivated to seek an odor, often, they do it without being cued. “Commands aren’t always necessary. These dogs actually look for opportunities to do their job and be rewarded. They love to work because we use reinforcementbased training.” Pearce says. The rewards given depend upon the individual dog and what it most desires. For some, it might be a food treat. For others, it might be a special toy or a game of tennis ball retrieving. Training Vapor Wake Detection canines are specifically bred, selected and trained. Puppies enter the detector dog rearing program at birth. During the next 12 months, they’re exposed to a variety of controlled environmental conditions. “Puppies are raised by prisoners in the Corrections Corporation of America and

Left: Canine Instructor Daniel McAfee and Orion. Above: A group of canines during a training session.

the Auburn University detector dog preparation program.” Pearce says. “The prisoners are trained to raise the puppies, and the prison counselors receive special training in order to manage the program. The training the prisoners receive helps in the development of the puppies and their becoming detector dogs. The training also provides rehabilitation for the prisoners and a trade upon competition of the program.” After completing the detector dog rearing program, the puppies are returned to the Auburn University Canine Detection Training Center for 6 weeks of vigorous basic training. During basic training, they learn the odors they will detect along with search patterns. That’s followed by a 10week basic explosives detection course and 2- or more weeks of additional training with the handler in an operational environment. Vapor Wake Detection training is not all that different from traditional explosives detection training according to Pearce. “Teaching a dog to find explosives in a stationary location is not that different from teaching a dog to find explosives on a moving target. It’s just a matter of repetition.” Vapor Wake Detection canines, as well traditional explosives detection canines, can be trained to detect new types of explosives in a matter of a few hours. That’s important because new types of explosives are constantly becoming available. “Once the dog understands the training process you’re using to teach it odors, it learns each new odor more quickly.” Pearce says. “For example, training a dog to detect the first odor takes approximately 180 to 210 trials or 6 or 7 days for it to begin to learn the odor. After that, you start seeing results in approximately 120 trials or 4 days. “As a result, it’s important to protect the integrity of the training process. These dogs are so eager to learn, they can easily learn the wrong odor. That becomes an ongoing concern immediately after they learn the first odor.” Characteristics of Vapor Wake Detection Canines Not every explosives detection canine has the makings of a successful Vapor Wake Detection canine. “We look for the dogs that have exceptional skill in traditional explosives detection work--The ones that have the keenest scent finding ability and are the quickest to locate odors. We also look for the ones that are more independent and self-motivated enough to want to search on their own without being cued.” Pearce says. Sporting breeds are being trained for Vapor Wake Detection exclusively. That’s

because they’re less obtrusive and people aren’t intimidated by them--Not because they have better scent finding ability than other breeds. “The dogs need to be able to work in close proximity to people for maximum efficiency.” Pearce says. “We use flop-eared breeds rather than pointed-eared breeds because they’re less disruptive. For example, a person with a Labrador retriever doesn’t have the same effect on a crowd that a breed with pointed ears does. If a handler walked toward a group of people with a German shepherd dog or a Belgian malinois, the people would be more likely to disperse than if the same handler approached with a Lab or a Golden.” Indeed, the general public’s response to the Vapor Wake Detection program introduced by Amtrak has been extremely positive according to Cole. “Amtrak implemented a trading card program that highlights each individual canine and its handler. The cards have been distributed to our younger travelers to help them better understand [the canines’] purpose and place them at ease when the canines are present in a particular station.” He says. Advantages Despite the fact that sporting breeds are non-threatening, the presence of Vapor Wake Detection canines is still a strong deterrent to terrorists. Further, while detection and screening equipment can be studied and compromised; terrorists cannot pre-determine the ability and response of each individual Vapor Wake Detection canine. Although it costs approximately $33,000 to train a Vapor Wake Detection canine, they’re still one of the most cost effective anti-terrorist measures available. Whereas check point screening equipment is stationary, Vapor Wake Detection canines quickly and easily move through crowded train stations or airports. Vapor Wake Detection canines also can screen large numbers of people for explosives rapidly and thus don’t slow traffic flow as people board trains or planes. And perhaps most important of all given the number of recent television and newspaper stories about it, Vapor Wake Detection canines identify sources without invading a person’s privacy. Rather than sniffing people, they sniff the plume of air given off by them. For more information, visit http:// www.vetmed.auburn.edu/vapor-wakedetection

Dog News 69


The

Gossip Column

W

hile PETER GREEN and BETH SWEIGART were flying back to the States on Monday from a judging assignment in Germany, son and daughter in law ANDREW & AMY GREEN were putting on the finishing touches for the surprise 75th birthday party that was held at their New Jersey home on Tuesday evening and hosted by BETH, AMY and ANDREW. Not an easy task when your home is without electricity, thanks to the nor’easter that roared through the area (the same storm that was responsible for the cancellation of dog shows up and down the east coast). Friends came from near and far to help PETER celebrate (get over) this milestone. Among the guests were RICHARD GREEN, PAM & JOHN BEALE, GLORVINA SCHWARTZ, LARRY CORNELIUS, JANE & BOB FORSYTH, NEENA & GEIR FLYCKTPEDERSEN, KATHY & RON MENAKER, MATT STANDER, PEGGY & DAVE HELMING, LETISHA WUBBELL, ERNESTO LARA, ROXANNE & CHARLIZE SUTTON, MARTY & MICHAEL PAWASARAT, TORIE STEELE, PAUL BUXBAUM, LIZ TOBIN, JOE VAUDO, JEAN & PAUL EDWARDS, KATHY FERRIS, KIM CALVACCA, KATHY & RON MENAKER, SUSAN & DENNIS SPRUNG, RITA & DOUG HOLLOWAY, BOBBY PAUST, LORI WILSON, YVONNE & GABRIEL RANGEL, BOB BLACK, BOB THOMAS, PAM & JOHN MANDEVILLE, LISA & IGGY WADDUS, RENEE GALIZZO, KAREN JUSTIN, CARL ENGLECKE and BENITA and PAUL KIELL. Professional handler TIM BRAZIER is recuperating in a Seattle hospital from triple bypass surgery that he underwent on Monday. He is doing well but will be sidelined for a while. All of us at DOG NEWS send hm our very best wishes for a complete and speedy recovery. Rhodesian Ridgeback breeder and multiple hound breed judge JUDITH HUPPERTS and her sister CAROLYN were driving back home to Illinois, following a judging assignment at the White Mountain Kennel Club shows in Arizona. While driving through the Cherokee Nation in Oklahoma their car was hit by a drunk driver

BY EUGENE Z. ZAPHIRIS 70 Dog News

and as a result JUDY was seriously injured and her sister was fortunate to receive lesser injuries. While her sister will be released from the hospital shortly, JUDY will remain hospitalized for several months with a broken neck (which requires a halo), broken ribs and ankle. While she recuperates friends can send cards and letters to JUDY at St. John’s Medical Center, 1923 South Utica Avenue, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104. The fall that hospitalized JANE KAY with a broken hip has resulted in a hip replacement. She is about to be released from the hospital and about to enter a rehab center. She can be reached at the Ridgecrest Nursing and Rehab, 1200 N. Stone Street, Deland, Florida 32720 telephone 386.734.4334. DICK HANNA, a longtime member of the Professional Handlers Association (as is his wife DEE) passed away last Saturday. They were longtime members of the Lizard Butte Kennel Club in Nampa, Idaho. DICK and DEE are two of nicest and most pleasant people one could ever have hoped to know. All of us at DOG NEWS send DEE and her family our deepest sympathies. HUGH JORDAN, longtime Old English Sheepdog fancier, passed away on October 26th in Whittier, California. He was a Delegate to the American Kennel Club and founded the Rio Hondo Kennel Club. He and his wife LINDA enjoyed much success in the show ring highlighted by their winning the Working group at the Westminster Kennel Club. We send our deepest sympathies to his wife LINDA their children and families. JAMES l. HAMILTON passed away on October 28th. Longtime Doberman Pinscher fancier, he was the past president of the Puget Sound Doberman Pinscher Club and member of the Mount Rainier Working Dog Club. Married for over fifty years to his wife MARGI, we send her and her family our deepest sympathies.


Dog News 71


SHE’S GOT “IT”

AND “IT” IS ~ NATURAL BEAUTY Number One* Belgian Tervuren through July, 2011 Lulu took some time off but she’s back! *The Dog News Top Ten List - Breed

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GCh. Mishaook’s Lulu @ Chateau Blanc HSc

The 2011 National Specialty Winner Multiple Group & Independent Specialty Winner

Breeder: Mishaook Lawrence “Skip” Stanbridge

Owners/Handlers Chateau Blanc Janina and Darlene Laurin

Dog News 73


THE “PIED PIPERS” OF THE MARSH CoNtiNueD FRoM page 00

test community was not welcoming to them because they had Tollers. While I’ve not had that experience, I have certainly gotten friendly ribbing about my ‘nontraditional’ breed but those same folks have also been our best supporters. My dog Taiga (Am/NSDTRC Ch Manitou Aqueus All Spruced up MH AX AXJ vC), is quite small and that was a challenge for her in the field as she just could not see the birds go down sometimes. But she did not consider herself disadvantaged! As far as the breed as a whole is concerned, Tollers must be one of the most versatile breeds with a lot of performance titles. At our national there are more performance entries than conformation and the greatest thing about the breed is that the majority of the breeders value field titles as much as conformation titles,” said Danika Bannasch, who also owns Am/NSDTRC Ch Quill’s Kit and Caboodle CD JH WCI MX MXJ VCX ROM (“Kefi”) and Am/Can/NSDTRC Ch Aqueus Flying Dutchman SH WCX (“gusto.”) Some of these owners of multi-titled Tollers have found one activity more difficult than others. “Field work, in my opinion, is the most difficult due to the need for property,” said John Simonson, who with his wife Marie owns Am/ Can Ch Am/Can oTCH Westerlea’s Sir edmund uDX4 oM1 MH CWCX (“eddy”) and Am/Can Can oTCH Ch Kilcreek’s Sir Winston uDX MH Am/Can WCX (“Winston.”) “In order to be competitive at the master level, you need to have a good training group, plenty of different grounds with ponds to teach the many concepts needed to be successful. one thing we found while training at the master level and also trying to train for utility obedience at the same time was that it was difficult to keep Eddy’s enthusiasm up for obedience if we had trained earlier in the day for the field. Field work was so much more exciting and obedience required me to learn how to make it interesting for him so he’d want to participate in the game. A really big challenge for us was training the different obedience exercises and sorting out the verbal and hand signal commands compared to what was used in the field. We eventually decided on our own set of signals for obedience which wouldn’t interfere with the hand signals in the field. Since Tollers tend to get bored by repetitive exercises, we tried to keep training unpredictable. It’s important to seek help before you dig too deep a hole and ruin your dog’s attitude. The breed’s size, musculature, intelligence, trainability and general upbeat, happy temperament helps the Toller to be successful in many different sports. Someone once told us that Tollers are like Border Collies but with an ‘off’ switch.” Although the breed has been eligible for AKC events only since 2003, there are some issues that have surfaced already with the breed. “I want to see a Toller still able to spend a day in the duck blind, that naturally picks up a bird, that comes back to his handler with it, that has water courage, not just water enthusiasm. I want to see

Simonson found it difficult to keep Eddy’s enthusiasm up for obedience if they had trained earlier in the day for the field, as field work was so much more exciting. 74 Dog News

Am/Can Ch Am/Can OTCH Westerlea’s Sir Edmund UDX4 OM1 MH CWCX (“Eddy”), John and Marie Simonson’s Toller, waits with John for the word from the judges to “go” at a hunt test.

a dog that also has good structure and conforms to the breed standard, not just red dogs that can hunt. There are agility people who want to make the breed smaller than the standard calls for and if they are successful, will change the breed in the process. We have some great ‘little’ agility dogs who would never make it in the marsh hunting. People who want a dog that fits in the under 18 inch category should get a dog whose standard also fits that height. I’m also concerned about breeders who have no mentors and no blueprint. Finally, the popularity of the breed means there is a larger market for the breed and more interest in breeding just to fill the demands of the market,” said Kish. “our greatest challenge is to keep the working ability in the breed,” said Williams. “Tollers have become very popular in recent years. The demand for them has increased the production of poorly bred dogs with poor working ability. There are many dogs that have conformation titles and perhaps one working title. I don’t think that ‘proves’ the work ethic in a Toller. As a field competitor and judge, I travel a lot and talk to people from all over the country. When one of my Tollers charges out to make a retrieve, I often hear ‘I didn’t know Tollers could work like that.’ or ‘Tollers I’ve seen don’t have that kind of desire.’ These people know what they are talking about because I’ve seen this myself. Recently a very good professional field trainer said ‘Tollers don’t like to work in the water.’ We need to keep good working desire and ability.” “With the acceptance by the AKC of the breed, there has been a lot more interest and awareness of the breed as they are seen in many performance events as well as the show ring. We feel it is paramount to keep new owners and especially new breeders ever mindful that Tollers were bred for retrieving and that should be an important part of any breeding program, keeping the natural instincts alive in the breed. Dogs that retrieve tennis balls in the back yard do not usually have the same natural desire as one who really enjoys retrieving birds in the marsh or the upland fields. The proof of a good retrieving dog lies in the titles and even more importantly in the field work that anyone can witness,” said Koebensky-Como. Simonson agreed. “As the breed becomes more popular, there are more people dabbling into breeding without actually working the dogs themselves or having someone else work the dogs in performance events. They place higher importance on the conformation championship riding the coattails of the dogs that can do the work and in time, this could easily lead to a split in the breed. Someone once said, ‘Pedigree indicates what the animal should be. Conformation indicates what the animal appears to be. Performance indicates what the animal actually is.’”


Dog News 75


*

*All Systems


Dog News 77


Click Kennesaw Kennel Club Photos by MARCELo VERAs

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Dog News 79


What A Weekend! Continued FROM page 45

was shown by longtime breeder/ owner/handler Darwin Delaney. This young dog made quite a picture when he stood with the others in the middle of the ring. Reserve Winners was the second place dog in the bred by class. Tammashann Saint I Ain’t is owned by Sharon TomanicaBrunsell. The lovely headed Winners Bitch came from the Open Bitch class. Dartan Million Dollar Baby was shown by Hiram Stewart. She is owned by Darwin Delaney. Darwin must be thrilled at the acquisition of Ch. Taradonna Bobby Dazzler from the U.K. This dog was the sire of both the Winners Dog and Winners Bitch. Reserve Winners Bitch went to Rebound Dream Girl owned by Susan Chulick. This bitch was also shown by Hiram Stewart. The Smooth Coat Veterans class had some very lovely entries. Mr. Dachel smiled as each “old girl” gaited around the ring. In the end, he awarded the class the Ch. Bayard’s Yodytoo of Kay Hill. “Yody” is owned by Margaret Curtis and handler, Jane G. Kay. Of course, Jane is most known for her famed Kay Hill Dobermans and her all rounder judging status but, her affection for Chihuahuas has been an ongoing love affair for many years. A multitude of wonderful Smooth Champions entered the ring. Mr. Dachel had a difficult task. After marking exhibits present, Mr. Dachel broke down his entry into small groups and made a short list with each group. Spectators were delighted in watching the quality entry in the ring. There were some nice dogs. In the end, GCH Ayrwen Star Kissed Delight was the winner! This little showgirl has won two National Specialty Best of Breeds in the past and set a Smooth coat show record that will be hard to follow! Bred by Gloria and Art Johnson, she has made the Chihuahua world proud over the past few years. Best of Opposite Sex to the Variety was awarded to GCH Sand-Man’s Obsidian. Bred by coowner Sandra Pessina, this little guy gave it all he had! He was shown by co-owner Sharon Newcomb. Best of Winners was awarded to the Bobby Dazzler daughter of Dar Delaney’s. Select Dog was awarded to GCH. Jo-li’s Simon Says-S owned/shown by famed Poodle exhibitor Janet Lange. Select Bitch was awarded to Aero’s Paint The Town Red owned by Lauren Etter. Award of Merits were given to the following dogs: Ch Tokugawa JP Sasuke, Dazzles Abigail Rose of Joslyn, and the fiesty veteran bitch. Along with the purchase of raffle 80 Dog News

tickets, club members had a chance to purchase the beautiful fundraising throws that are sold each year. Two dogs are chosen to represent the breed on the quilts: a Long coat and a Smooth coat. This year, the lovely Multi BIS/BISS/Nat’l Specialty winner Ch. Fresa’s Willy Marry Me represented the Smooth coat variety. Paula Murray did some tremendous winning with this little girl. Multi BIS/BISS/Nat’l BISS Ch. Nauset I Believe I Can Fly represented the Long Coat variety. Being the top winning Chihuahua in AKC history, Kenny Saenz, Erika Lanasa, and I will cherish the memories of showing this dog for the rest of our lives. Paula and Kenny had their picture taken with the quilt that donned their favorite Chihuahuas!

O

ur banquet was held Saturday night. Trophy Chairman Darwin Delaney gave raffled awards from the names of those who donated to the trophy fund. Each year, the club auction is held after the banquet. There were some wonderful items up for auction. I sat with AKC Judge Rey Burgos and his wife as they generously acquired Chihuahua carry bags. Everyone had a great time watching club member Frank Farkas act as auctioneer. Kenny Saenz was busy bidding on a limited edition Green Bay Packers signed football (on its way to a certain Packers fan!) On Sunday, Mr. Dachel began the regular classes for the Long coat variety. With some very nice boys for the taking, he ended up awarding Winners Dog to Hurd’s HI HO Silver. This boy was bred by longtime and greatly respected Chihuahua breeder-judge, Mr. Max Hurd. After all of the foreign winners at the spring national this year, I was tickled to see the dog come from the American bred class. Reserve Winners Dog was from the 9-12 Puppy class. Bloomsbury Burn Baby Burn was a particular favorite of mine at the Spring National. He was breeder/owner/ handled by Lynn Hurd from Canada. Max and Lynn bear the same last name with no relation. There were some lovely bitches entered. Winners Bitch came from the Bred-By class. Owned by Lynn and Jeff Hurd, Bloomsbury Bellissima took home the honors. Mollnar Witchful Thinking was awarded Reserve Winners Bitch. She is owned by Shellie Mollnar and shown by Hiram Stewart. With the classes completed,

the Best of Variety line up entered the ring. This entry was really lovely. Mr. Dachel examined his group and the lucky ones made the short list. In the end, Best of Variety was awarded to the spring National Winner GCH. Kokura JP Silent Rose owned by K. Yama of Japan. Best of Opposite was awarded to Ch. Will-CM Ready 4 Prime Time. This cream boy is owned by Mike Dunnington and Jill Hopper. Best of Winners was awarded to Max Hurd’s male (With all the Hurds it was confusing for me!) Select Dog was awarded to GCH. Kokura Yama JP Emirio owned by K. Yama and handler, Linda George. Select Bitch was awarded to Ch. Dartan Star Queen of Ayrwen owned by Gloria and Art Johnson. It is interesting to note that this bitch is the dam of the Smooth Variety winner. Awards of Merit were presented to the following dogs: GCH. Roseland Eli, GCH Victory Mask of Zorro, GCH Taradonna Flash Harry, and GCH Laud Ella Enchanted. There is nothing in the world to me like watching the two variety winners walk into the ring at the National. Terrier folk have similar feelings to being part of Montgomery weekend. It may seem rather dramatic but I am always on my toes with my eyes wide open in anticipation, rather like the Chihuahua! Both of his winners were former National winners. The petite Long coat girl took home the honors of being Best of Breed at the Chihuahua Club of America. Mr. Yama from Japan should be very proud of his accomplishments as a breeder. The handler, Paula Murray, has stood in this spot many times with other dogs before this one. Best of Opposite Sex to Best of Breed was awarded to the Smooth dog handled by Sharon Newcomb. This youngster will be one to watch in the future! With the show coming to a close, exhibitors headed off to make their way home. Words cannot express the appreciation that I have for Show Chair Patricia Witter. She was busy working during the entire weekend. Her attention to detail and excellence were evident in every aspect of the show. Mr. Dachel commented about his excellent ring stewards and Mrs. Witter. After all, there is no show without the efforts of those who are not there for the ribbons! I am looking forward to seeing everyone at the Spring National in Houston, Texas.


CHANCE HAPPENS...

GCh. Ruttkay Chance

Thank you Judge Mrs. Robert D. Smith Owner — Megan McLoughlin Breeder/Handler — L. Mae Evans, PHA Dog News 81


MonTgoMery round-uP 2011 CoNtiNueD FRoM page 46

Day 2 of Hatboro brought even warmer weather and a super day of sunshine. Judged by Mrs. Miriam Paula Pontes of Sao Paulo, Brazil. Best of Breed again was awarded to GCh Foxbend Colour Me More. Bred by D & S Crawford and owned by D. Rapport and J Gardner. BOS was given to another superb old-timer and still looking great, Ch Red Rock High Roller ME. Bred by K Raduziner & W Powell and beautifully presented by her owner, Karen Raduziner. Winners Dog was Brillwood Blues Brother at Rocky Ridge. Bred by L Edwards and owned by M Knoster. Winners Bitch and Best of Winners was Blue Ridges Off The Richter Scale. Bred by P Garber and owned by P Garber and K Dahlberg. Select Dog was GCh. Cobblestones Six Million Dollar Man and Select Bitch on the move up, was Ch Fox Valley Echo. AOM were as follows: GCh Foxer’s Moonshine, Ch Sunrock’s Diamondstud, and GCh Cobblestones Gathers No Moss. On to Day 3 at Devon. We arrived in Ludwig’s Corner to find also that although the rings had been rearranged a bit, things were just superb. All was dry and parking was on good ground. It was a stellar day, sunny and lovely and Devon as usual, did not disappoint! Judged by Mrs. Sally Yancey of Greensboro, NC. Mrs. Yancey again awarded her Best of Breed to GCh Foxbend Colour Me More. Best of Opposite was Ch Sunrock’s Diamondstud. Bred by D & R Anibal, K Owsley & C Howton. Owned by D Anibal and K Owsley. Winners Dog and Best of Winners was McAllisters Moonwalker. Bred by A Himburg & M Klengler and owned by Sinan Sahin. Winners Bitch was Her’s Bea Buzzin Around Outfoxed. Bred by C. Houlihan and owned by J Thatcher. Select Dog was again Ch Redrock High Roller ME. Select Bitch was GCh Premiere Gossip Girl @ Sunrock. Bred by S Leroy and owned by T & D Houser, K Owsley and D Anibal. As the tension rises and the buzz continues, our National Specialty is again at Montgomery County Kennel Club. Everyone is in anticipation. It’s always the highlight of the Parson weekend! Mr. Michael J Dougherty from Escondido, CA, had the privilege this year of judging our Parson Russell Terrier National Specialty. No newbie at this breed and an excellent terrier man, he has been judging them since 2003 and an excellent choice to judge our National Specialty. Beginning our fabulous day, and I can’t believe I am saying this, but another great year of superb weather. Warm, almost to the point of summery! To begin our National, Ms. Joan Scott of Childs, MD, synonymous in our breed for many years and a great judge of a Parson, was voted to judge our Sweepstakes. She awarded her Best In Sweepstakes to Ch Rag Valley Golden Girl. Bred

82 Dog News

by S. Youngblood and owned by S. Youngblood and M. Good. Her Best of Opposite to Best In Sweeps was Mystic I Wanna Be A Rockstar. Bred by Kim Baker and owned by K. Baker and K Neal. Her Best Veteran in Sweeps was Ch. Edison’s TNT Aftershock. Bred by B. Edison and owned by K & D Dahlberg. Mr. Dougherty began the task of sorting through the wonderful selection of Parsons. The quality of Parsons is excelling year after year and 2011 was no exception. For some reason the aura around the ring was that of friendly banter between people. It’s no secret that the air around this ring in the past has been that of controversy. It was the first year that I can remember where there was no animosity amongst exhibitors or spectators. It was truly a pleasure to be around this ring this year. I hope it will continue in the years to come. Karen Raduziner had a stellar day when Mr. Dougherty awarded her Best Bred By Exhibitor with her lovely Red Rock Original Sin. Owned and bred by her of course and also putting icing on the cake, she landed Best Puppy and Winners Bitch with the sweet Redrock Working Girl, a littermate to Red Rock Original Sin. Both sired by Ch Redrock Shaggy and out of Red Rock Fall From Grace. Owned/handled and bred also by K. Raduziner. Very nice dogs consistently coming from this kennel!! Turning heads this weekend was Mr. Dougherty’s choice for Winners Dog and Best of Winners and coming from a great kennel in Canada, was Foxbend Almost a Saint. Bred and owned by David and Susan Crawford. Sired by Ch Rednock Never a Saint and out of Ch Rednock Honeybunch. Type has been consistently produced from that dam! Remember this boy, he is one to watch and a half brother to the #1 Parson. But the highlight of the day was the lovely young move up, Fox Valley Echo, who caught the eye and expertise of Mr. Dougherty and was awarded Best of Breed. In only her 4th weekend out in her short career, she proved that she is the one to watch in the months to come. Handled by last years PRT National Best of Breed handler, Karen Fitzpatrick. Echo had a great time and has no idea of the future that beholds her or just how stunning she is! Echo is simply a beautiful example of a Parson Russell Terrier and hard to fault. Echo is bred by M & T Turner and owned by John Martin. Sired by Ch Fox Valley Eye Spy and out of Ch Fox Valley Tally Ho. Best of Opposite went to GCh Cobblestone’s Six Million Dollar Man. Another great moving dog having a stellar weekend for the Asher’s. Bred by Mike Asher and owned by Mike and Michelle Asher and Sharon Chase. Sired by Ch Cobblestones Pale Rider and out of Ch Fox Valley Cover Girl. Best Veteran/Select Dog and

Award of Merit was given to Ch Edison’s TNT Aftershock. What a great cluster he has had! But what a great Parson he is, and I shouldn’t call him a veteran, as he shows and looks like a youngster and handled expertly and lovingly by his owner, Kellie Dahlberg. Bred by Bonnie Edison and owned by Kellie and Dan Dahlberg. Sired by Ch Posey Canyon Summer Storm SE and out of Ch Edison’s Tennessee’N Time. Having an incredible year and a superb weekend, GCh Foxbend Colour Me More was given Select Bitch and an Award of Merit. Bred by David and Susan Crawford and owned by D Rapport and J Gardner. Sired by Ch Thunder Hill Soul Journey and out of Ch Rednock Honey Bunch. The 3rd Award of Merit was awarded to GCh Windy Ridge A Starry Night. A dog bred by R, G & D Warner and owned by B Hughes and J Berkau. Sired by Ch Bravo’s Sooper Dooper Cooper JE and out of Ch Stonebrook Sunny Blue Sky. Congratulations to all for another great year and job well done by all. A special thank you to our specialty coordinator, Mrs. Nancy Dougherty, and to Mary Strom-Bernard for the great pictures! See you next year!!

Border Terriers By Julie Felten

Photos courtesy of Kathy Henning

The venue was fabulous along with warm temperatures, bright sunny skies and topped with a marvelous entry of Border Terriers! Now here is a breed that just keeps getting better and better. To those of you who have worked so hard at your breeding programs, your efforts are clearly noted...and to those of you new to the breed, support your fellow breeders; they are doing a bang up job. The Border Terrier breed has improved so much over the last 5 years, I applaud all of you working towards the common goal and producing top quality exhibits. CoNtiNueD oN page 93


“DONNIE”

WE’VE ONLY JUST BEGUN… LAST TWO WEEKENDS… GROUP FIRST - JUDGE MR. KENNETH BUXTON GROUP THIRD - JUDGE DR. KLAUS ANSELM GROUP SECOND - JUDGE MRS. JOAN ANSELM

INDIAN CH., MULTIPLE BEST IN SHOW & BEST IN SPECIALTY SHOW WINNING, AKC

GCH. JASPAR’S DESTINY’S CHILD Sire: Top 20 Winner AKC/CAN GCH Dabney’s Phenomenon CD RA NA NAJ CGC ROM/CAN RN Dam: Jaspars Hip N Happening OFA Excellent • Thyroid Normal • Cardio Clear • VWD Carrier

Breeder-Owner Javinder Singh Pawar Javi_Singh@hotmail.com

Exclusively Handled by Linda & Chuck Whitney 813-907-8216 Acaciadobes@aol.com Dog News 83


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Dog News 85


Letters To The Editor KEEP IT UP! og News looks great! I have to say I read every issue cover to cover and although I am a “small time operator” in the world of dogs I love to see what is happening ( and what is NOT happening!) with the AKC, various breeds that are not my own and dogs and shows around the world. It is all fascinating to me. I especially enjoy Shaun Coen’s “Off The Leash” as he keeps the fancy up to date on legislative issues that are so important to us now and in the future. And who does not like to read the Gossip Column? Desi Murphy’s latest article about his uncle Johnny was a wonderful tribute and I often tell him his memory is like a steel trap. He just laughs. History is so important and the articles in Dog News are ones that keep that history alive. Although I never knew Ric Chashoudian, I did see him handle in my early days in dogs. Even then I knew he was someone special and the tributes to him have proven that to be true. A couple of other things...Why not have a column for the KC articles that fill the “Letters to the Editor” section instead of publishing them as letters? They really are more like announcements than letters. Also, obviously the AKC needs money. Here is an idea. With each dog registered the owner gets a coupon good for one year for an entry to any AKC sponsored event. This could be conformation, agility, rally or any other event. The event giving clubs or superintendents would collect the coupons, send them in and the AKC would reimburse them a portion of the entry fee ( or the whole amount). Not all new owners would use the coupons but it is a nice way to introduce them to the world of pure bred dogs. And, who knows, maybe they would enter again and pay the fee...again...and again...and again... Also, for the “newbies’”, I would like to see the premium lists revised and simplified. I cannot tell you how many times new owners have called me confused about what class to enter, when the entries close and more. Many miss entering sweepstakes because it is not clearly marked or in evidence in the premium list. Each missed entry is a missed opportunity for making money and encouraging participation in our sport. Let’s make it easy and simple to join in the wonderful world of the sport of dogs. Let’s encourage every new owner to participate in some way. We won’t get them all but we will get more than we have now and that is exactly what we need! Keep up the good work Dog News! Jan Dykema St. Helena, CA

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86 Dog News

ON BEHALF OF THE CHASHOUDIANS n behalf of the Chashoudian family we’d like to thank everyone for their support and kind words regarding the passing of our father, grandfather, great grandfather and brother Ric Chashoudian. He is survived by his sister Joan Chashoudian, daughter Kerri Chashoudian, grandson Daniel, great grandson Matthew and Daniel’s wife Melanie, daughter Kim Bachmann, grandson Gordy, his wife Anne Marie and granddaughter on the way (in March), grandsons Tim and Joe and granddaughter Kristen. He also left behind Lesley and Sandy, who were devoted wives, and still love and respect Ric to this day. He was only married three times, not four as some were led to believe. Dad left us way too soon. I can hear his voice asking, “How ya doing, Honey?” and can picture him sitting in our den (probably watching football) with the grandkids sitting around him getting the “talk” about doing well in school and minding their parents and making sure they all washed behind their ears (a family tradition when Grandpa visited and Dad’s playful way of teasing us.) We miss him so, so much! Regrettably, I must also alert anyone who acquires any of our dad’s sculptures, photographs or any of the wonderful artwork that he owned. Most of the family heirlooms including precious photographs loaned to him by our mother, Evonne Chashoudian, and others given to him throughout his personal life and career were taken from his home during his illness and soon after he passed away. Many bronzes and molds were taken as well. Please be sure to confirm that any artwork you intend to purchase is original and was acquired by the seller prior to Dad’s illness and passing which allegedly happened on Sept. 20, 2011. If you come across any photographs that may mean something to his family, please contact us at kerrichuchu@aol.com. We have been left with very few tangible memories to pass down to the family, including his bronzes and molds. At least we will always have our most cherished memories of Dad in our hearts. Thank you to all the people who supported our dad in his time of need. We would have been by his side as well, but he was taken from us while we were desperately trying to be with him. Kerri Turc Nashville, TN

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LATE ANSWER TO QUESTION OF THE WEEK FOR DOG NEWS OCTOBER 21, What Specific Changes In The Judging Approval Proposal Submitted By The Smith Committee And Adopted By The Board Do You Think Will Help Improve Judges To Perform As Judges? ROBIN STANSELL -I believe there are several improvements in the judging approval process. •Judges who have demonstrated exceptional quality can be recognized and advance more quickly. •Judge applicants can explain their educational experiences regardless if they are on the recognized educational component list. •The “one for one” limit for early applications has been removed. Judges education and experience in breeds can be recognized without overly restrictive limits. CRUFTS SCHEDULE AVAILABILITY Further to the recent announcement that schedules for Crufts 2012 will not be automatically sent out to the previous year’s exhibitors, the Kennel Club would like to clarify that print copies will still be readily available from a number of sources. 10,000 copies of the schedule are being printed next month and will be distributed through postal and telephone requests (subject to availability) as well as at a number of shows. Our Dogs and Dog World have kindly agreed to distribute copies through their stands at qualifying shows up to the closing date of postal entries, which is Monday 9th January 2012, and they will also be available from the Kennel Club Stand at LKA on 10th and 11th December. This year, two-thirds of entries were made online and the Kennel Club believes that this shows that most exhibitors would prefer to enter Crufts in this way. Anyone who has qualified to compete at Crufts 2012 is therefore encouraged to enter via the digital version of the schedule, which will be available from mid-November and allows viewers to enter their dogs through the Fosse Data online entry system, review information and has direct links to the websites of companies advertising in the printed version of the schedule. In order to receive a copy of the schedule by post, please send an A5 stamped addressed envelope to the value of 79 pence for first class or 65 pence for second class post to the Crufts Office, The Kennel Club, 1 Clarges Street, Piccadilly, London, W1J 8AB. Laura Quickfall London, England


Quality Northeast

WHISKEY

Multiple Group Winning

Flash IRST F P U O GR ster Glouce County Club Kennel 11 10/22/ Judge rbara a B . s r M Pepper

Specialty Best In Show Winning

GCH. SOMERRI JAMIESON’S SEA WHISKEY Number One* Norwegian Elkhound Bitch Specialty Best of Breed and Another Group Placing. Thank You Judge Dr. Gareth Morgan-Jones Elkhound Standard: Gait - Normal for an active dog constructed for agility and endurance. At a trot the stride is even and effortless; the back remains level. Owned & Bred by Jamieson Lewis Laura Hall Lewis Merrimack, NH OFA - Good

SOMERRI KENNELS 50 YEARS with 14 Generations of Norwegian Elkhounds Bea Hall & Ed Hall & Laura Hall Lewis & Alicia Lewis wwww.somerrikennels.com

Handled by Laura Hall Lewis Holly Lewis

*Number seven overall, Dog News, S.S. & C.C. All Breed points through September 2011

Dog News 87


Dog Show Calendar DECEMBER 1 - THURSDAY GA Savannah* (I) SAVANNAH KENNEL CLUB Coastal Empire Fair & Expo Center 4801 Meding St Savannah GA 31405 CLOSES: NOVEMBER 16 MB-F Inc., SUPT Judges And Their Assignments BEST IN SHOW Mrs. G. Geringer SPORTING Group: Dr. R. D. Smith Dr. R. D. Smith: All Sporting Breeds HOUND Group: Mrs. R. Smith Mrs. R. Smith: All Hound Breeds WORKING Group: Mr. R. D. Sharp Mr. R. D. Sharp: All Working Breeds TERRIER Group: Mrs. E. E. Mathis Mrs. E. E. Mathis: All Terrier Breeds TOY Group: Ms. C. C. McGowan Ms. C. C. McGowan: All Toy Breeds NON-SPORTING Group: Mr. W. E. Usherwood Mr. W. E. Usherwood: All Non-Sporting Breeds HERDING Group: Mrs. D. J. Buxton Mrs. D. J. Buxton: All Herding Breeds MISCELLANEOUS Group: Mrs. G. Geringer Mrs. G. Geringer: All Miscellaneous Breeds OBEDIENCE TRIAL CLASSES Mr. K. A. Buxton: Nov A, Nov B, Begnr Nov A, Begnr Nov B, Grad Novr, Open A, Open B, Grad Openr, Util A, Util B, Versatility, PreNovice JR SHOWMANSHIP: Mrs. J. M. Fazio DECEMBER 2 - FRIDAY AZ Yuma* (I/O) YUMA KENNEL CLUB Yuma County Fairgrounds 2520 E 32nd St CLOSES: NOVEMBER 16 Jack Bradshaw Dog Shows, SUPT FEE: $28.00-1st/ $20.00-2nd Judges And Their Assignments BEST IN SHOW Mrs. N. D. Simmons SPORTING Group: Mr. T. Gomez Mr. D. P. McFarlane: Ret-Gold, Ret-Lab, Span-Ckr (ASCOB) Mr. T. Gomez: Set-Irsh Rd&Wh, Span-AmW, Span-Boykin, Spin Ital Mrs. M. L. O’Connor-Clark: All Pointers, Set-Irsh, Span-Ckr (Parti), Span-Eng Spr, Span-Fld, Span-Wel Spr, Vizs Mr. R. D. Ennis: Balance of Sporting Breeds HOUND Group: D. Y. McCormack Mr. K. M. McDermott: Dach Dr. A. R. Sorkin: Greyhnd, Ibizan, Ir Wolf, PBGV, ScotDeer D. Y. McCormack: Balance of Hound Breeds WORKING Group: Mrs. T. Gomez Mr. A. J. Ferruggiaro: Cane Corso Dr. A. R. Sorkin: Sam Mrs. T. Gomez: Alas Mal, Boxer, Bullm, Grt Dane, Grt Pyr, Mast Mr. T. Gomez: Balance of Working Breeds TERRIER Group: Mr. A. J. Ferruggiaro Mr. A. J. Ferruggiaro: All Terrier Breeds TOY Group: Mr. K. M. McDermott Mr. A. J. Ferruggiaro: Eng Toy Sp (B & PC) Mrs. T. Gomez: Pom, Pood Toy Mr. K. M. McDermott: Balance of Toy Breeds NON-SPORTING Group: Mr. R. D. Ennis Mr. A. J. Ferruggiaro: Am Esk Dog, Fr Bull, Lhasa, Schip Mr. R. D. Ennis: Bulldog, Norwegian Lndhnd, Pood (Min), Shiba Inu Mrs. T. Gomez: Balance of Non-Sporting Breeds HERDING Group: Dr. A. R. Sorkin Dr. A. R. Sorkin: All Herding Breeds MISCELLANEOUS Group: Mrs. T. Gomez Mrs. T. Gomez: All Miscellaneous Breeds OBEDIENCE TRIAL CLASSES Mrs. N. D. Simmons: Nov A, Nov B, Grad Novr, Open A, Open B, Grad Openr, Util A, Util B, Versatility JR SHOWMANSHIP: Mrs. M. L. O’Connor-Clark

88 Dog News

GA Savannah* (I/O) BEAUFORT KENNEL CLUB, INC. Coastal Empire Fair & Expo Center 4801 Meding St Savannah GA 31405 CLOSES: NOVEMBER 16 MB-F Inc., SUPT FEE: $26.00 Judges And Their Assignments BEST IN SHOW Mrs. D. J. Buxton SPORTING Group: Mrs. G. Geringer Mrs. G. Geringer: All Sporting Breeds HOUND Group: Mr. W. E. Usherwood Mr. W. E. Usherwood: All Hound Breeds WORKING Group: Ms. C. C. McGowan Ms. C. C. McGowan: All Working Breeds TERRIER Group: Dr. R. D. Smith Dr. R. D. Smith: All Terrier Breeds TOY Group: Mrs. E. E. Mathis Mrs. E. E. Mathis: All Toy Breeds NON-SPORTING Group: Mr. R. D. Sharp Mr. R. D. Sharp: All Non-Sporting Breeds HERDING Group: Mrs. R. Smith Mrs. R. Smith: All Herding Breeds MISCELLANEOUS Group: Mrs. D. J. Buxton Mrs. D. J. Buxton: All Miscellaneous Breeds OBEDIENCE TRIAL CLASSES Mrs. J. P. Lynch: Nov A, Nov B, Begnr Nov A, Begnr Nov B, Grad Novr, Open A, Open B, Grad Openr, Util A, Util B, Versatility, PreNovice JR SHOWMANSHIP: Mr. W. E. Usherwood DECEMBER 3 - SATURDAY AZ Yuma* (I/O) YUMA KENNEL CLUB Yuma County Fairgrounds 2520 E 32nd St CLOSES: NOVEMBER 16 Jack Bradshaw Dog Shows, SUPT FEE: $28.00-1st/ $20.00-2nd Judges And Their Assignments BEST IN SHOW Mr. J. J. Ham SPORTING Group: Mr. R. D. Ennis Miss D. M. Macdonald: Spin Ital Mr. T. Gomez: Span-Irw, Span-Suss, Wirehair Ptg Grif Mr. R. D. Ennis: Set-Irsh Rd&Wh, Span-Boykin, Span-Ckr (Parti), Span-Fld Mr. D. P. McFarlane: All Pointers, Ret-Ches, Set-Irsh, Span-AmW, Span-Ckr (Black), Span-Eng Ckr, Span-Eng Spr, Span-Wel Spr, Vizs Mrs. M. L. O’Connor-Clark: Balance of Sporting Breeds HOUND Group: Miss D. M. Macdonald Dr. A. P. Bianchi: Afghan S. Cromer: Bgle Miss D. M. Macdonald: Balance of Hound Breeds WORKING Group: Mr. T. Gomez Mrs. J. L. Fink: Cane Corso Dr. A. P. Bianchi: Boxer, Dobe, Rottw Mr. T. Gomez: Alas Mal, Bullm, Grt Dane, Grt Pyr, Mast, Sam Mrs. T. Gomez: Balance of Working Breeds TERRIER Group: Mr. K. M. McDermott Mrs. T. Gomez: Manch Ter Mr. K. M. McDermott: Balance of Terrier Breeds TOY Group: Mr. A. J. Ferruggiaro Mr. K. M. McDermott: Pood Toy S. Cromer: Yorks Mr. A. J. Ferruggiaro: Affenp, Cav KC Spans, Chihua (Long), Chin Cr, Eng Toy Sp (KC & R), Min Pin, Pap, Pom, Silky Mr. R. D. Ennis: Balance of Toy Breeds NON-SPORTING Group: Mrs. T. Gomez Mr. A. J. Ferruggiaro: Boston, Bulldog Mrs. A. K. Catterson: Dalm, Shiba Inu Mrs. T. Gomez: Fr Bull, Norwegian Lndhnd, Pood (Min) Mr. R. D. Ennis: Balance of Non-Sporting Breeds HERDING Group: Dr. A. P. Bianchi Mrs. J. L. Fink: Beard Coll, Brdr Coll, Bouv, Briard, Card-WC, Pemb-WC, Shetld Mrs. T. Gomez: Balance of Herding Breeds MISCELLANEOUS Group: Dr. A. P. Bianchi Dr. A. P. Bianchi: All Miscellaneous Breeds OBEDIENCE TRIAL CLASSES Mr. J. J. Ham: Nov A, Nov B, Grad Novr, Open A, Open B, Grad Openr, Util A, Util B, Versatility JR SHOWMANSHIP: Mrs. J. L. Fink


Dog News 89


Handler’s Directory Robert A. Fisher Kaki Fisher

Jessy & Roxanne Sutton Professional Dog Handlers

Specializing in Terriers and Working Dogs

Professional Dog Handlers Frakari Kennels 194 Quivey Hill Road/P.O. Box 204 Middle Granville, NY 12849 518.642.9225 KNL • 440.813.6388 c kakifisher@earthlink.net 12.11

Jessy artofhandling@hotmail.com phone: 215-778-1253 Pkubacz@att.net

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Roxanne roxannestamm@hotmail.com phone: 513-235-2099

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(email)

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Sue Capone, PHA Regina Keiter SUE 570 992-5705 email: scapone@ptd.net

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REGINA 570 369-0192 email: rbriard2@ptd.net

113 Capone Lane Saylorburg, PA 18353

Diana Wilson

Show Dogs Beautifully Presented

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Kennels Logo © Debbie Goldstein

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Clint and Karen Livingston 1981 East 141 Avenue Brighton, Colorado 80602 210 865 8415 - Clint 210 865 2348 - Karen tclpdb@aol.com

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Carlos Carrizo

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LINDA CLARK

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AKC PHA RVT Tulsa, OK 918-625-8124 (cell) laclarkaht@aol.com www.wwpetcare.com

AKC Registered Handler

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Cell: 415 819-5773

Ernesto Lara

AKC Registered Handler Assisted by Leonardo Garcini

at

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Tiffany Saxon

P.O. Box 330 Tel: (717) 445-9936 1181 Reading Road Fax: (717) 445-0577 Bowmansville, PA 17507 email: elaratierra@aol.com 6.12 mobile: 717-475-7069

Professional Presentation & Care of show Dogs a Drienne o wen 6849 s haDow r iDge P l aCe a lta l oma , Ca 91701 909-472-5519 aDrienne @ newPointkennel . Com www . newPointkennel . Com om 7.12

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All Breed Dog Handler

1637 Moon Rock Rd Fallbrook, CA 92029

Office: 760-723-9564 Cell: 626-277-7172 t1saxon@roadrunner.com 1.11

90 Dog News

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CiriNo A Top ranked Cane Corso All Systems

Thank you Judge Mrs. Linda riedel

GCh. Wildwood’s Cirino Di Campo Multiple Group Placements Bite, Movement, Type, Temperament 2010 AKC/Eukanuba National Championship Best of Breed Winner.

oWNEr riChArD huDGENS hANDLEr LENArD CLAyToN BrEEDEr JEMyN SiMMoNS Dog News 91


Handler’s Directory Doug And Mandy Carlson AKC Registered Handlers Doug 405 370-1447 Mandy 405 826-3884 5.12

Guy H. Fisher

Professional Dog Handler Murbe Kennels DHG, PHA & AKC Registered

8260 McColl Drive W Savage, Minnesota 55378 Phone: 952 890-6010 www.Bluffhighkennel.com

11293 Dunnigan Road Emmett, Michigan 48022

Home 810 384-1844 Fax 810 384-8225 Cell 810 417-0469

E mail: murbe_boxers@msn.com Web site: www.murbeboxers.com

3.12

9.11

SHOWDOG HANDLERS

--ALL BREEDS-Jimmy & Mary Dwyer

www.PRODOGHANDLER.com

407 810-4036

akcdogs@aol.com 3.12

12.10

BRUCE & TARA SCHULTZ

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Board Certified Professional Handlers Members of P.H.A. www.SchultzDogHandling.com

12.11

92 Dog News

12.10

5540 San Miguel Rd. Bonita, California 91902

Bruce: 951 314-8357 Tara: 951 515-0241

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MonTgoMery round-uP 2011 CoNtiNueD FRoM page 82

D

uring the course of the weekend, I had the opportunity to have some one on one breeder discussions with a few Border folks. To me this is the highlight of any dog show, when good breeders can discuss dog breeding and what works and what doesn’t. I cherish these moments. One Border breeder shared with me her thinking regarding a particular stud dog that she recently introduced to her breeding program and why she chose him. Glancing in the ring the next day, focusing on her exhibit, I was able to follow clearly her breeding selection and what this dog will be able to contribute to her next generation. Can’t wait to ring watch again next year. Now on to the dog show winners. Judge Ms. Harriert Haydon is a breeder judge and has been breeding Border Terriers since 1984 under the Sunkist prefix and judging since 1994. This was Ms. Haydon’s second invitation to judge her beloved breed at Montgomery County, the most prestigious terrier show in the world! Ms. Haydon presided over her lovely entry of 69 in complete control. She seemed to know exactly what she was looking for and wasted no time finding it. She sorted through her entry focusing in on the breed nuances that are so specific to correct breed type. Her winners were as follows: WD (4-Points) Redgate’s Call Me Mr. Blue, by Ch Foxforest Casanova-Ch Foxforest No Mercy. Owners: Lisa Sauer & Judith Rivers. Breeder: Judith Rivers RWD Maustrappe’s Forces Of Nature, by Gch

Faireview Mile Marker SE-Ch Russethill’s Play With Fire. Owners: Kristin & Ronny Bjolbakk. Breeder: Elaine Brown, Beverly Kolb & Linda Hough WB/BOW (5-Points) Brightrain Towzie Tyke Gloria, by Ch Glebeheath Johnny The One-Ch Brightrain’s First Edition. Owners: Wayne & Joyce Kirn. Breeder: Kristen R. Gooodman RWB Fairview Double Back To Bandersnatch, by Ch Sunkist Sweet Music Man RA OA OAJ ME EE-Ch Bandersnatch Odyssey at Faireview ME. Owners: Margaret & Amanda Pough. Breeder: Margaret & Kathleen Henning 1/SEL-Working Bitch. Ch Bandersnatch Odyssey at Faireview ME, by Ch Firelands Up In Smoke-Ch Bandersnatch Rhapsody In Blue SE. Owners: Margaret & Kathleen Henning. Breeder: Margaret & Amanda Pough 1 Veteran, 7 Years & Over Dogs (class of 4) Ch Bendywood’s Thistlepatch, by Ch Tenpenny Prince Andrew-Ch Bendywood’s Bramble. Owners/Breeders: Betsy Kirkpatrick, Cindy Peebles & Mary Ellen Moehler. 1 Brace-Ch Meadowlake Martini After Dark, by Ch Meadowlake Devil’s Brew- Ch Meadowlake Mint Julep & Gch Meadowlake Simply Irresistible, by Ch Kandu’s Marathon Man-Ch Meadowlake Angel In My Pocket NA NAJ JE. Owners: Sandy L Moore & Karen Fitzpatrick. BEST OF BREED: B-GCH Faireview Mile Marker SE, by Ch Kandu’s Marathon Man RE SE-Ch Bandersnatch Odyssey At Faireview ME. Owners/Breeders: Margaret & Kathleen Henning OS-GCH Meadowlake Simply Sinful, by Ch Kandu’s Marathon Man SE RE-Ch meadowlake Angel In My Pocket NA NAJ JE. Owners: K Courtelis, K Fitzpatrick, J Wilkinson & David Fitzpatrick DVM. Breeders: Karen Fitzpatrick & T VanNiel SEL-GCH GIles Hill Fox’s Brush, by Ch Glebeheath Johnny The One-Ch Giles Hill Honeybee. Owners/Breeders: Carlie & David Krolick An interesting aside. Both Best of Breed and Best Opposite Sex are 1/2 brother 1/2 sister sharing a common sire, Ch Kandu’s Marathon Man RE SE. How’s that for judging consistency! Also both dogs were Breeder/Owner/Handled to their wins by two Midwest terrier gals. Since I am from the same area, I get to see them a lot and what they represent. Nice job ladies! It was also great to see the breed winner make the cut at the group level and the good sportsmanship displayed by fellow exhibitors who were sitting ringside clapping and cheering her on. Nice. Prior to the regular terrier group, the brace groups were held and owner Sandy L. Moore piloted her brace around the group ring for all to see. Once again, the Border folks were there in numbers cheering loud and clear for the little brown team! Go Sandy! Congratulations to all of the winners, owners and breeders. I applaud you all. CoNtiNueD oN page 95

Dog News 93


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Handler/Hobby Kennel Louisville-Cincinnati-Indianapolis Area Over 150 shows annually within 350 miles. Four Bedroom, 3 bath 3,000 sq. ft. Cedar/Rock Home with 16 Mason Fence Indoor-Outdoor Runs. Features include Large Heated Training Room, Feed Room, Grooming Room, Indoor Parking with Electric and Sewer Hookup for up to 42’ Motorhome. Multi Indoor Storage Areas. Large One B/R Townhouse-type Apartment In Kennel Building, plus another full B/R Apt. in Home. All this on 15 Acres with 7 Fenced Grass Paddocks for Dogs to Exercise. Asking $450,000.00, with possible Owner Financing. (812) 689-3274 4.11

Breeders Directory

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94 Dog News


MonTgoMery round-uP 2011 CoNtiNueD FRoM page 93

Kerry Blue Terriers By Carol Brown• photo courtesy of Chet Jezierski

Chelsea!! A beautiful young bitch from the UK swept the weekend and won the hearts and applause of the Kerry Blue Terrier Community. She is Gch Perrisblu Kennislain’s Chelsea, Bred by B & S Laing, Owned by Phil Davies and the Yingling family and Shown by (Mr. Kerry Himself) Bill McFadden. Unfortunately the Kerry entry was down by about 30 - 40% this year due to the fact that the local Kerry club was put in a position that made it necessary to cancel their Specialty and Sweepstakes.

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n Thursday at Hatboro, John Constantine’s Winners Bitch was Heritage Roxie Hart, bred and owned by Bill & Carol Kearney Winners Dog was Rollicking Definitely Declan, bred, owned and handled by Lahring & Edward Alberico of Canada. Best of Opposite Sex went to Gch TorumThe Spaniard, bred by Ron Ramsay of the UK, owned by Nick & Doreen Fletcher and shown by Klayton Harris. Chelsea was second in the Terrier Group. The entry at Friday’s Hatboro, supported by the United States Kerry Blue Terrier Club, included a Puppy Sweepstakes. Martha Nazak, who has been in the breed since the 1980’s judged - and made certain that the Kerries had a perfectly wonderful time. Best in Puppy Sweeps was the 15-18 month old puppy dog, Krisma’s Risky Business, bred by L & T Grier and owned by Paula K. Fox and Lois Grier. Best of Opposite Sex was the 6-9 month puppy bitch Cheron’s Dirty Water bred by C & R Purcell & E Cascarano and owned by Cheryl A Purcell. The regular classes were judged by Mrs Joan Schurr Kefeli. Winners Dog and Best of

Winners was Tontine’s Lightening Strikes, bred by Heather Hunter & Lou Perry and owned by Dwight & Cheryl Nevels, Jr. Winners Bitch was Heritage Roxie Hart, bred and owned by Bill & Carol Kearney. Best of Opposite Sex was Gch Heritage Mickey Devine of Kilgawny, bred & Owned by John & Kathy Garahan and Bill & Carol Kearney and Shown by Dana Bryson. Chelsea Won The Terrier Group! John Garahan, President of the United States Kerry Blue Terrier Club, reports that at the annual dinner and membership meeting, there was a competition between the Chapter Clubs for the best donated basket. The winning bids on each went to the Club”s Charitable funds. The most expensive basket was the Michigan basket that went for $350+. Three new Board members were seated and they were Monica Adair, Mary McGreevey and Diane Lee. All officers were returned and the new VP is Stephanie Clark. Saturday was the day for the U S Kerry Blue Terrier Club Futurity/Maturity. The Judges were Siobhan Manion-Conti of Connecticut, Linda Lopez of Florida and Nannette Loya of Colorado. The Best in Futurity Winner was the 12-15 month old bitch, Rollick’s Its My Party, bred by Charlotta

Mellin, owned by France Godbout & Judith Dolan and handled by Gene Possidento (this is the 3rd Futurity that Gene won). Best of Opposite Sex in Futurity was Teagan’s Komical Kienan a 9-12 month old puppy dog, bred by Heather Hunter and Alin Traughber. Heather is a young woman who grew up with Kerry Blues. I personally feel that Heather is the Future of the Breed. She and Lou Perry (Tontine) have given so very much to the Kerry Blue Terrier. The Maturity is open to dogs who were eligible for the Futurity last year. Best In Maturity was Adare’s Alainn Beineon Jr. Bred by Joy Ellwanger and Hank Hillard and owned by Joy Ellwanger. BOS in Maturity went to Lemerick’s CoCo Chanel, Bred by Michael Waggener, Charles Zuganelis, & Anastacia Martinez, owned by Harry Booker and shown by Michael Waggener. The Kerry Boutique was put together and run by Jaimie Ashby, assisted by Linda Pheasant. What a wonderful group of items, including the new 2012 Kerry Calendar (assembled by Barb Beuter and Melanie Feldges). The Calendar is a work of art, showing the Kerry Blues who were on top the year before, scenes from some of the specialties and owners’ photos of their dogs. At Devon the judge was Ms. Mike MacBeth of Canada. Her Winners Dog and Best of Winners was Rollicking Definitely Declan, bred, owned and handled by Lahring & Edward Alberico of Canada. Winners Bitch was Rollick’s Its my party Bred by C. Mellin & A. Wester of Sweden and owned by France Godbout and Judith Dolan of Canada. Best of Opposite Sex went to Gch Alainn Dugan, Bred by Sandy & Charley Redmon, Owned by George & Barbara Georghegan and Shown by Leonardo Garcini. Chelsea won the Terrier Group again (2 Group 1’s and 1 Group 2 - Our star was shining). Montgomery... A Beautiful Day to Watch Beautiful Dogs. The Specialty was dedicated to Commander Robert M. Nazak, a dedicated family man, Naval Academy graduate and friend to the Kerry Blue Terrier Community. We all miss Bob. Judge Michele Billings’ Winners Dog and Best of Winners was Hasani Rafiq Ramirez, Bred by Sergio Ramirez, Owned by Olivia Maupome & Dalmau Costa and Shown by Carlos de la Torre. Winners Bitch - was the lovely young girl who got third big major of the weekend --- Heritage Roxie Hart, bred and owned by Bill & Carol Kearney. Best of Opposite Sex - the second time Montgomery weekend was to incredible headed Gch TorumThe Spaniard, bred by Ron Ramsay (Mick’s Breeder), owned by Nick & Doreen Fletcher and shown by Klayton Harris. Chelsea was 3rd in the Terrier Group. Her record for the weekend was so impressive. I think we will all be watching her- what a beautiful bitch. Congratulations to all of the winners. Dog News 95


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96 Dog News

Dog News, November 4, 2011  

Dog News Volume 27, Issue 44 November 4, 2011

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