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THE DECISIVE MOMENT

Quarterly journal from the Documentary Group

September 2018 Edition 13 Photo: Christopher Page


Meet the Documentary Group Team Chairman : Mark A Phillips ARPS I have been interested in photography since my teens and have battled to find time throughout my career. In recent years I have managed a better balance (and am still working at it), but despite being an RPS member since the late 1980s, I only got around to applying for my Licentiateship in 2012 and my Associateship in 2014. My photography is focussed almost exclusively on longer term documentary projects. I am a member of Amersham Photographic Society and the PIC Group. I also regularly attend other contemporary and documentary events, such as PhotoForum and PhotoScratch in and around London. Secretary: David Barnes LRPS I have been interested in photography since childhood and have been actively taking and making images for many years with a few lapses caused by work and the onset of family responsibilities. I retired in 2005 after a career in the IT industry. I have since combined sport spectating with photography – I spend most Saturday afternoons in winter kneeling in the mud, camera in hand, at my local rugby club. I feel at home in towns and cities and spend time in London where there is always something happening that seems to me to be worth recording.

Committee Member and Group Webmaster: Steven Powell I have enjoyed a turbulent relationship with photography over most of my adult life with my technical ability often letting down my vision! Nevertheless I’m always ready for that one-ina-million shot which makes every thing worthwhile. I joined the Documentary Group in 2016 to see more examples of the style I love so much. As well as looking after our website and bimonthly competition, I’m occasionally called on to document interesting events at work to help promote the efforts of other teams. I’m aiming to achieve the LRPS accreditation (and catch up with the rest of the team). Sub Group Organisers: East Midlands: H  oward Fisher - docem@rps.org

Southern: Mo Connelly LRPS - docSouthern@rps.org

South East: J aney Devine FRPS - docse@rps.org

Thames Valley: Philip Joyce - doctv@rps.org

Northern: Gordon Bates LRPS - docnorthern@rps.org

East Anglia: Mark Stimpson - docea@rps.org

Yorkshire: Graham Evans - docyork@rps.org 2


Treasurer : Justin Cliffe LRPS I have been interested in photography since my late teens however family and work commitments took then priority and I’ve really only got back to it over the past 5 years since retiring from a life in the City. I joined the RPS, and the Documentary group, about 4 years ago and was awarded my LRPS in 2013. I am also a member of Woking Photographic Society and the Street Photography London collective. My particular interest is ‘street photography’, something that I’m able to combine with my part time work for a charity in London.

Committee Member and Decisive Moment Editor: Jhy Turley ARPS Photography has been part of my life ever since I was at art college. After a trip to Nepal in 2006 my passion was ignited and I’ve been developing my photographic abilities ever since. Having experimented in a variety of photographic genres I now focus on longer term documentary projects. I’ve worked closely with commercial photography throughout my career in advertising but enjoy all forms of documentary and travel for my personal work. I joined the DG to be part of a like minded community of peers and by happy chance have ended up editing our groups digital magazine.

DM Editorial team:

And the rest of the team:

Sub Editor: 

Bi-monthly competition manager:  Steven Powell

Dr Graham Wilson

Social Media:  Flickr:

Steven Powell Chris Barbara ARPS 3


Contents 5

A Word From Our Chair

6

Call for volunteers - DPoTY

8

Interview with Sefton Samuels FRPS

22

Documentary Group Project - Refocusing Perspectives

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11 November 2018 100 years on

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Forgotten Birmingham Archive - Stephen Taylor

52

Winner of the August 2018 Bi-Monthly Competition Winner

Member Images

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Chris Hilton - The Great Dorset Steam Fair

54 70 76 82 96

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Ann Chown ARPS - Fisherman of Hastings David Pollard - Indian Portraits

John Eaton - A Tajik Celebration

Tony Cortazzi - Chichester street Review - Visa pour l’image 2018


A Word From Our Chair This issue features an interview with Sefton Samuels, the social documentary photographer based in Manchester, who has worked for national newspapers, the BBC and Granada TV. His images and archives provide a perspective on Northerners - an iconic collection of photographs spanning five decades which exposes the true character of Northern England, on music (he was an accomplished jazz drummer) and on broader photojournalism from around the world. In this edition, our focus is on the ‘archive’, reflecting on its relationship to documentary practice. A photo archive is a collection of photographs created or brought together by an individual or institution; its importance is several fold. An archive is often thought of as a historical record; an essential tool for research. However it also offers an opportunity for reinterpretation, or to make comparisons or new connections. ‘Documentary’ does more than just document or provide a record. From its earliest days it has always been seen as more than just a record. John Grierson, the pioneering Scottish filmmaker, who is attributed with coining the term ‘documentary’ in 1926 defined it as: ‘the creative treatment of actuality’. Current or contemporary practice, as Stuart Franklin explains in ‘The Documentary Impulse’ can now encompass staged or manipulated images or found images (e.g. from archives) provided they are consistent with the author’s intent and narrative. Eugene Smith provides an even simpler view of documentary, being to make the viewer think. I regularly see exchanges in the Documentary Group Facebook page, questioning what documentary is. There is no simple answer. Our aim is to keep as broad a view as possible provided the images are consistent with the intent. The recent Robert Frank exhibition in Arles (see my review in RPS Doc blog) displayed many of the famous ‘The Americans’ images, but also showed work from his archives; from his early images in Switzerland, and later in France and his first American images. In so doing, it gave a sense of his development as a photographer. I have heard several people question why they were shown, as “they are clearly not as good as his images in The Americans”, but that somehow misses the whole point! The reason for including them is to illustrate the development of Frank. Every photographer evolves over time and has to learn their craft and develop their vision. An archive provides an opportunity to explore that development, and so, offers a window to better understand. Exploring our own archives, also provides that opportunity to reflect. Mark A Phillips, Chair, RPS Documentary Group 5


Call for volunteers

Get involved with our next Documentary Photographer of the Year competition. Your help and support is needed.

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Call for volunteers

We are in the process of developing DPoTY 2019, and for next year’s event we would like to try and exhibit winning entries in the different RPS Regions. We are looking for suitable locations, venues to exhibit work and maybe hold a local event or talk linked to the DPoTY. This will likely take place in late 2019. If you know of suitable locations and are able to help organise these locally please contact Mark Phillips (doc@rps.org). 7


Interview - Sefton Samuels FRPS

Sefton Samuels FRPS

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Interview - Sefton Samuels FRPS

Sefton Samuels is a northern photographer – he comes from the North and photographs in the North. In over five decades, since the late 1950s, he has captured the people and the landscapes of the North – a blend of street, documentary, portraiture, and photojournalism. Growing up at a time when there were no training facilities for photographers, equipment was expensive – including film, there was no internet, and no easy access to advice, you had to be passionate about photography to make it your profession. He says he became a professional photographer by chance and throughout our interview he described some of his most iconic images as ‘lucky’ or ‘a fluke’. This makes me think of the adage ‘the harder I work the luckier I get’. Now in his late eighties he’s still a feisty northerner, has come to terms with the digital age, uses a computer with ease, and is still passionate about his work and the North. Sefton is the author of several photo books, perhaps his best-known being ‘Northerners – Portrait of a no-nonsense people’ and ‘Jazz Legends’. Both these books are part of the V&A’s National Art Library. His work has been exhibited widely and is in the collections of the National Portrait Gallery and the Victoria & Albert Museum. He has won numerous competitions including the prestigious MILK contest and the Royal Academy of Arts’ Eyewitness street photography award. His exhibitions have been seen throughout the UK; apart from those in the North he has exhibited in London, including the NPG, Kings Place Gallery, the Proud Gallery, and the Barbican. The Guardian described him as “The photographic equivalent of Ken Loach” and Time Out as “Manchester’s finest”. After leaving school, Sefton trained in textiles and worked in mills throughout the north and northeast. However, music being his other passion (both jazz and classical), he also worked as a semiprofessional jazz drummer. A camera, though, was never far from his side. Liverpool Lad Leaping

Now in his late 80’s and (more or less) retired it was a pleasure to travel to Manchester to talk to him. 9


Interview - Sefton Samuels FRPS

Sir Bernard Lovell c1971

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Interview - Sefton Samuels FRPS

Alan Bennett 2006 - History Boys

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Interview - Sefton Samuels FRPS

MC What created your interest in photography? SS  In the mid-40s I borrowed my sister’s camera and that was it. MC  Who are your photographic influences? SS  Robert Capa, Henri Cartier Bresson, and Don McCullin. My original influences, though, were the images in the Family of Man Exhibition. MC Were you professionally trained? SS No, there was no training in those days, so I was self-taught. It’s all been a bit hit and miss. I even had to teach myself printing.  I was a member of camera clubs in the towns I was working in, as well as a country member of the Manchester APS. I always had a camera with me – originally a small 2 ¼ folding camera, optically pretty poor, with which I took images of wrestlers, jazz musicians and the realities of everyday life in the north. I came down to London once to have a look at the RPS Annual Exhibition and thought I’ll never be able to do anything as good as this. But I worked at it and in my mid 20’s I got a couple of pictures into the RPS exhibition and one into the London Salon, which was reproduced in The Listener. In those days, RPS distinctions were very respected. I achieved my ARPS in my late 20s, and followed it with my FRPS a few years later. Later, I became a member of the panel for Documentary and Photojournalism distinctions, which sadly is now defunct as they were dropped by the RPS.

Pensive Priest

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Interview - Sefton Samuels FRPS

George Best

Rosewoman, Michelle

Harold Riley

Arvid Yansons 1970jpg

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Interview - Sefton Samuels FRPS

“I was privileged, after a lot of effort, to take a series of portraits of LS Lowry” L.S. Lowry

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Interview - Sefton Samuels FRPS

MC When did you turn professional? SS  In 1960, I was named the Manchester Evening News “amateur photographer of the year”. By the 70s, I had no option but to become a professional photographer as work in the textile mills was disappearing. I started doing a bit of professional work for Saatchi in the north and I did the photographs for Michael Kennedy’s book “Portrait of Manchester”. After this, I did freelance work for the BBC, including the BBC Sports Department (where I took portraits of all the football teams and players in the North). I also worked for World of Sport and ITN, and freelanced with various national newspapers. I never became a staff photographer, but perhaps I should have done.  I also started Sefton’s Photo Library and had pictures from about 200 photographers as well as my own. But I’m not very commercially minded and eventually I sold it on. MC Do you think there is an influence on your photography from working in the mills and as a jazz drummer? SS Yes, my images of kids in the back streets comes from working in the mills and jazz drumming led to a book on jazz musicians. But I also love classical music.  I ran a group in the Manchester APS to promote documentary photography and photojournalism. We put on an exhibition in Manchester Town Hall: Manchester, The City Seen.  I was also interested in portraits and decided to do a series on prominent people who came from Manchester; many of these are in my book, Northerners. I was privileged, after a lot of effort, to take a series of portraits of LS Lowry, who was notorious for not allowing himself to be photographed. George Best’s boutique was opposite my office and one day he let me take a series of portraits of him; George Best at his peak. Sir John Barbirolll used my portraits of him as his publicity photos for two years. They’re with the National Portrait Gallery. I did others of Mike Atherton, Harold Wilson, Morrisey, Sir Peter Maxwell 15


Interview - Sefton Samuels FRPS

Sir John Barbirolli

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Interview - Sefton Samuels FRPS

Davies, John Ogdon, Daniel Barenboim, Ben Kingsley, Alan Bennett and many more. A lot of these were taken when I was ‘embedded’ for eighteen months with the Halle Orchestra. I have a book, Portraits, being published privately at present. MC What are you going to do with your archive? SS I hope the Manchester Central Library will take over my archive – they already have several hundred of my prints. I’m also in touch with the V&A about them taking part of it.  I think of you as a black and white photographer, but I know you use colour as well – how do you decide whether a photograph should be in colour or black and white?  Originally, I used black and white, but eventually began to work with colour. I had two cameras, one with black and white film and the other colour, and decided which to use after I’d seen them. These days its digital so you take in colour but convert it to black and white. MC Do you always take single images or do you sometimes have projects resulting in a series?  All my images can stand alone though I have sometimes done a series. The project with the Halle Orchestra and the portraits of prominent Mancunians for example. MC  You’ve never worked in the south. What makes you a proud northerner? SS I think we’re friendlier up here and more informal. We’ve great football teams. The people are hard working. MC  When you’re out and about do you ask permission to take photographs? SS  Never; it changes the dynamic of the photograph. MC Do you ever ask people to pose for you? Fred Dibnah

SS Never.

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Interview - Sefton Samuels FRPS

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Boy & Annual - Delamere Forest School


Interview - Sefton Samuels FRPS

Coal Miners

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Interview - Sefton Samuels FRPS

Harold Wilson

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Interview - Sefton Samuels FRPS

“I was pleased to give up my dark room” MC Do you use anything other than a camera? SS A drumstick? MC Lights, filters, tripod? SS  Occasionally a filter, nothing apart from that. I always use ambient light. MC  Did you have difficulty coming to terms with moving to digital and giving up your dark room? SS No, I moved to digital about 15 years ago and I was pleased to give up my dark room. MC What is your proudest achievement? SS Winning the MILK prize with a photo of a little girl, which went around the world and the George Best portrait, which is with the National Portrait Gallery. MC What is your personal favourite photograph? SS  Probably Lowry in his favourite position, with his feet up. MC What changes in photography in the last 50 years do you think have had the most impact on you as a photographer? SS Digital. MC  Sefton, thank you for allowing me to interview you it’s been a privilege. Interview by Mo Connelly LRPS For further information see: https://www.seftonphoto.co.uk Northerners: Portrait of a no-nonsense people ISBN 978-0-09-193893-2, published by Ebury Publishing

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Documentary Group Project - Refocusing Perspectives

Refocusing Perspectives Then and Now Photography of the First World War

The banner display - David Barnes

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Documentary Group Project - Refocusing Perspectives

The ‘Refocusing Perspectives: Then and Now Photography of the First World War’ project in 2017 was a partnership venture that brought together two academics from the University of Exeter with a group of participant volunteers, drawn from across the Special Interest Groups within the Royal Photographic Society (RPS). It was funded by the ‘Living Legacies’ First World War Public Engagement Centre at Queens University Belfast. Photography has long played a central role in the way in which people encounter the First World War, and the aim of the project was to prompt reflective engagement with this, set against the backdrop of the conflict’s on-going centenary commemorations. Two project workshops were held in March and August, at which guest speakers gave presentations to inspire the participants around the concept of ‘Then and Now’ comparative photography. This provided the prompt for individual contributions to the project. Over the summer, participants conducted research on various aspects of the First World War that were of personal interest to them. In October, this material was produced in a series of pop-up banner displays. The result was, in some ways, quite eclectic but this reflects the personal and authentic responses to the research challenge - the diverse and innovative ways in which these photographic practitioners chose to engage with the First World War and what it means to them today. The material in this article represents the fruit of their labours, as a piece of co-produced research. Professor David Harvey and I are grateful to our participants for their commitment and dedication to the project, and to the RPS for their broader support. A special thanks to David Barnes (Secretary of the Documentary Group), who acted as the principal point of contact. Dr James Wallis Research Fellow, University of Essex The following is abstracted from the work of participants and uses images from many sources.

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Documentary Group Project - Refocusing Perspectives

THE CRASH OF GERMAN ZEPPELIN L31 Margaret Beardsmore LRPS

L31 Crash-site, 2nd October 1916. Reproduced by kind permission of Ray Rimell.

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Documentary Group Project - Refocusing Perspectives

German Zeppelin Airships were the scourge of Britain during the First World War, due to the indiscriminate nature of their bombing. Captain Heinrich Mathy was the most experienced of the Zeppelin captains, with his airship L31 being one of the new super-Zeppelins. During September 1916, he and his crew witnessed the shooting down of several sister airships. Their mood must have been sombre on the night of 1st October as they ventured across the English Channel. L31 was soon exposed by searchlights, so took evasive action. However, Wulstan J Tempest of the Royal Flying Corps pursued the airship in his night-fighter - dispensing incendiary bullets until the airship burst into flames. The burning Zeppelin took almost five minutes to come down, eventually hitting an oak tree at Potter’s Bar (Hertfordshire). Captain Mathy and several of the crew chose to jump to their death rather than being engulfed by the inferno. The crew were buried in Mutton Lane Cemetery at Potter’s Bar. In the early 1960s they were re-interred in the German Military Cemetery at Cannock Chase (Staffordshire), along with over 2000 German personnel who died within the UK during the First World War. Part of L31’s fuselage was crafted into an altar cross, now situated in All Saint’s Chapel at Potter’s Bar.

Altar Cross made from L31 duralumin. Margaret Beardsmore LRPS

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Documentary Group Project - Refocusing Perspectives

Stow Maries Great War Aerodrome Tad Dippel

MT Shed ‘Tea Room’ at the Stow Maries Wing Aerial Sports Day, August 1918. Courtesy of Stow Maries Great War Aerodrome

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Documentary Group Project - Refocusing Perspectives

This research looked jointly at Stow Maries First World War Aerodrome in Essex, alongside 37 (Home Defence) Squadron, which was the only Royal Flying Corps (RFC) squadron to be based there. Stow Maries, vacated by 37 Squadron in March 1919, is unique in being the only RFC Aerodrome to have survived in such a complete state. It came into being during 1916, as part of a chain defending against German Zeppelin attacks on London. 37 Squadron consisted of 3 flights; ‘B’ Flight’s BE12 aircraft and men arrived at Stow Maries in September 1916. Goldhanger and Rochford Aerodromes hosted ‘A’ and ‘C’ Flights. The first operational sortie from Stow Maries was in response to a raid by six Zeppelins on 23/24 May 1917. By 1918, all three Flights had been located there, with a complement of 219 personnel and 16 aircraft. Parts of the aerodrome site have recently been restored, now functioning as a museum and workshop. Announced in September 2017, a National Lottery award of £4.3 million will enable other principal buildings (currently protected by scaffolding) to be restored, including the Officers’ Mess. The site of Stow Maries is becoming a living ‘Then and Now’.

MT Shed, now restored and still partly in use as a vehicle shed, August 2017. Tad Dippel

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Documentary Group Project - Refocusing Perspectives

Graffiti: The Enduring (Battlefield) Legacy ofGreat War Soldiers Ray Edwards

Advanced Dressing Station: Soldiers waiting to go into battle, Arras 1917. Š Imperial War Museums (Q 5113).

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Documentary Group Project - Refocusing Perspectives

Throughout history, there has always been a compulsion to leave one’s mark for posterity. Amidst the French and Belgian landscape of the former Western Front, there remain numerous examples of graffiti left by First World War soldiers of all nationalities. More often than not, they were simply name, rank, number and regiment – etched or scrawled into nearby stone or brick. The realities of war meant that soldiers were often uncertain about returning to those places they passed through, on their way to the front line. This very human connection was a means of recording one’s presence permanently, by saying ‘I was here at this moment and alive’. This testimony may have been carved ‘Then’ but is now forever frozen in time.

Soldier graffiti scratched on a brick wall in Arras, photographed in 2014. Its author was killed on 3rd December 1917 and is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial, at Louverval (France). Reproduced with permission from Colin W. Taylor, via the Great War Forum.

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Documentary Group Project - Refocusing Perspectives

War Memorials of the Salisbury Locale – Inception and Preservation David Glyde

Unveiled on village green 31 October 1920. Unknown photographer.

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Documentary Group Project - Refocusing Perspectives

First World War memorials in the Salisbury area vary in design from elaborate structures in stone and metal to plain stone crosses, as shown here. Conceived by local war committees and funded by public subscription, memorials were erected at a focal point on church or local council land. However, these authorities have no responsibility for their maintenance. Their continued preservation or restoration must be funded by public subscription and/or charitable funding organisations. In 2017, many memorials within the Salisbury area were well cared for. Dismantled in 1964 to make way for a through road, the Amesbury memorial was re-erected in the St Mary and St Melor churchyard without the broken lower section of the column. Funding from the War Memorials Trust and local public contributions in 2010 enabled restoration to its full graceful height. It was rededicated on 11 November 2011. By 2000, time and weather had decayed the original column of the Stratford Sub Castle memorial, originally carved by J. B. Hunt of Plymouth. Local subscription and a Council grant funded its replacement by an exact replica, carved by Jason Battle of Salisbury. The restored memorial was rededicated on 10 November 2002.

Site of village green 7 August 2017. David Glyde

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Documentary Group Project - Refocusing Perspectives

The Highway of Suffering: From the Somme to Camp Summerdown Alan Graham LRPS

Chateau Aveluy (France) during the 1918 German Spring Offensive. Reproduced with permission from Collection Feldpost 14, Gistel, Belgium.

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Documentary Group Project - Refocusing Perspectives

Over three million men took part in the Battle of the Somme, with one million becoming casualties. During and after each offensive, the Royal Army Medical Corps (RAMC) and Regimental Stretcher Bearers ventured out into No Man’s Land to collect the wounded. Casualties were moved away from the front line along the Casualty Evacuation Chain. They could, at any point during this process, be deemed fit enough to return to the front. The more serious the injury, the further back they went – either returning to England or being buried in a local cemetery. On Monday 9th October 1916, an attack on the German strong point nicknamed Stuff Redoubt took place. One RAMC stretcher bearer, Private 39227 Thomas Whiston received a gunshot wound to the foot, and was evacuated back to ‘Blighty’. His eight-day journey involved being carried by men, horse-drawn trams and motor ambulances. Makeshift medical facilities - such as Chateau Aveluy - assessed his condition before transportation back to London via train and boat. In November, he began convalescence at a camp near Eastbourne. Here discipline and fitness were reinstated through marching. In April 1917, he was sent back to France.

The site of Chateau Aveluy in 2017. The change in ground levels can still be seen through the undergrowth. Alan Graham LRPS.

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Documentary Group Project - Refocusing Perspectives

A World War One Landscape Underground – A Time Capsule of the Past Brett Killington

Graffiti left by a member of the British Expeditionary Force in the Auckland tunnel system (Arras, France). Brett Killington.

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Documentary Group Project - Refocusing Perspectives

One hundred years on, there remains little physical evidence above ground to denote the 1917 Battle of Arras. However, the underground complex beneath the battlefield provides a tangible connection to an event that resulted in 158,000 British casualties, amongst a combined Allied and German total of 300,000. This vast network of tunnels, caves and sewers functions as a ‘Time Capsule’ by speaking to us through the messages, drawings and names carved into the walls by former inhabitants. These included British soldiers passing through, signallers and cooks carrying out their duties, stretcher bearers poised to bring back the wounded via underground railways, and those that built and maintained this subterranean city: The New Zealand Tunnellers, alongside the Maori and Pacific Islanders from the New Zealand Pioneer Battalion. These images allow the viewer to glimpse a space left in darkness for nearly a century.

Graffiti left in the Auckland tunnel system by Private Solomon Isaac (New Zealand Army). Brett Killington.

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Documentary Group Project - Refocusing Perspectives

Excerpts from “My Father’s War Service 1916 – 1919” Torrie Smith

Royal Field Artillery ammunition limbers on the Ypres-Menin Road head towards the front line on 26th September 1917, during the Battle of Polygon Wood (part of the Battle of Passchendaele, July – November 1917). © Imperial War Museums (Q 2905).

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Documentary Group Project - Refocusing Perspectives

One hundred years on, there remains little physical evidence above ground to denote the 1917 Battle of Arras. However, the underground complex beneath the battlefield provides a tangible connection to an event that resulted in 158,000 British casualties, amongst a combined Allied and German total of 300,000. This vast network of tunnels, caves and sewers functions as a ‘Time Capsule’ by speaking to us through the messages, drawings and names carved into the walls by former inhabitants. These included British soldiers passing through, signallers and cooks carrying out their duties, stretcher bearers poised to bring back the wounded via underground railways, and those that built and maintained this subterranean city: The New Zealand Tunnellers, alongside the Maori and Pacific Islanders from the New Zealand Pioneer Battalion. These images allow the viewer to glimpse a space left in darkness for nearly a century.

The Ypres-Menin Road, September 2016. During the Battle of Polygon Wood, B Battery 296 Brigade RFA were stationed within yards of the left-hand side of this image. Edmund T Smith.

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Documentary Group Project - Refocusing Perspectives

Parallel Lives 1917 and 2017: Bernard and Patrick Val Straw This work compares the lives of two young men, Bernard and Patrick, separated by one hundred years. The First World War gave Bernard a life-time of experience between 1915 and 1917; Patrick is now building his own future within a world still shaped by the lives and deaths of Bernard and his fellow-soldiers.

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Documentary Group Project - Refocusing Perspectives

Bernard Attends small public school in Caterham, Surrey 1908- 1914, which inculcates an ethos of duty and service. An able musician and prefect. Matriculates from London University in 1914. Works as an insurance clerk 1914-15. Enlists with Loyal North Lancashire Regiment in September 1915 (Age 17). Applies for commission in Loyal North Lancashire Regiment in 1916 (Age 18). Commissioned on probation as Second Lieutenant July 1916 and joins Regiment at Brandhoek (Belgium) in October (Age 19). Becomes Intelligence Officer. Shot and dies on 31st July 1917, the first day of the Battle of Passchendaele, aged 19;

The weather was desperate; rain was pouring down all day and the trenches were in a terrible state… Casualties among officers were exceedingly heavy.

Bernard the soldier. Unknown photographer.

(War Diary/Intelligence Summary of Bernard’s Commanding Officer Lt Col R Hindle, 31-07-1917; National Archives WO 95/2924). Patrick Attends secondary school. An able musician and prefect. Attends Sixth Form College 2012-13 (Age 17). Becomes a sailing instructor and cyclist. Gains a place at Southampton University to read Engineering in 2013 – an intensive 4-year course (Age 18). Graduates with a First-Class Honours Degree in 2017 (Age 22).

Patrick starts Sixth Form College. Reproduced with permission from Patrick.

Cycles from Droitwich (Worcestershire, UK) to Rome and back during the summer of 2017. Ready for work and life.

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Documentary Group Project - Refocusing Perspectives

Indian Soldiers in Brighton and the legacy upon its community David Barnes

Burning Ghat on the Downs north of Brighton. Re-used under the terms of the Sikh Museum’s ‘Fair-Use’ policy.

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Documentary Group Project - Refocusing Perspectives

Following the outbreak of the First World War, Indian troops were scheduled to be garrisoned in Egypt. Early British losses in August 1914 saw them dispatched to Europe. Having arrived in late September, they were fighting around the Ypres area (Belgium) only a few weeks later. Wounded Indian soldiers were transported from the Western Front to Brighton, where they were distributed amongst buildings temporarily converted to hospitals (including the Royal Pavilion). Recovery and treatment saw many men either returned to the Front Line or sent home. Care was taken to respect the cultural and religious needs of Hindus, Sikhs and Muslims. Muslim men who died were taken to the Shah Jahan Mosque in Woking to be buried in accordance with Islamic tradition. The bodies of fifty-three Hindus and Sikhs were taken to a funeral pyre (ghat) on the nearby South Downs for cremation, prior to their ashes being scattered in the English Channel. It seems that very few of the soldiers stayed in Brighton beyond 1915. However, one notable impact was the building of a Chattri on the site of the ghat. An annual service of remembrance is now held there, with recent ceremonies attended by the Indian relatives of those cremated.

Annual commemoration at the Chattri, built on the site of the Burning Ghat. David Barnes

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11 Novem 100 years

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mber 2018 s on. Following the Documentary Group’s project to mark 100 years since the start of WWI. We now invite everyone to create one documentary image on Sunday, November 11, 2018. The project is a chance to compare the world we live in with that of 100 years ago showing what has changed and what has carried on untouched. Images can be any size and style but should have a capture date of Sunday, November 11 2018. You can submit entries for inclusion in our on-line gallery to hundredYearsOn@rps.org until Saturday, December 15. http://www.dvj-war.photography/WW1/ 43


Feature - Stephen Taylor - Forgotten Birmingham Archive

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Feature - Stephen Taylor - Forgotten Birmingham Archive

Forgotten Birmingham Archive

Stephen Taylor 45


Feature - Stephen Taylor - Forgotten Birmingham Archive

Although I have only been a member of the Royal Photographic Society for two years, my passion for the image began when I was a teenager. One of the customers on my paper round used to have the Amateur Photographer magazine, which I used to read while I did the deliveries. I still know where to find two disused Hasselblads (on the surface of the moon) from advertising at the time. It was very hard to develop my art, and I recall saving money from paper rounds, and working other jobs, to buy my first ‘real’ camera a Practika SLR with a half decent 50mm lens. At sixteen, I had no transport and so I simply wandered around taking pictures of life in general. Occasionally, I would stumble on something which excited me, and I enjoyed interacting with my subjects. It’s funny that, despite being a shy sixteen-year-old, having my camera opened doors and allowed me to take my images. It’s difficult to describe to photographers today what pre-digital looked like, but much was trial and error. My camera had no light meter, and I could not afford to buy one, so I remember carrying around a paper ‘shooting guide’ from a photographic magazine which allowed me to choose shutter speed and f stop to suit sunny/ Birmingham weather. Within a few months, and with some 1976 Christmas cash, I bought a Zenith enlarger, My mum allowed me to convert an outhouse (5ft x 8ft) which became my second home; three coats in the winter, and bare chested and underpants in the summer. I developed my own film and printed monochrome images - just the ones I thought were merit worthy. Many others were never bathed in the light of the enlarger bulb because the cost of photo paper and developer was not cheap. Several bus trips were made to Birmingham to find photo shops where chemicals were going past their ‘best before’ dates. I would return home with one or two bottles of developer or fixer which I could use immediately. This is probably the reason I have hundreds of negatives of Black Country and Birmingham life that were never printed.

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Feature - Stephen Taylor - Forgotten Birmingham Archive

About six months ago, my grown-up daughter Emma was ‘rummaging’ through the attic at home and discovered these ‘lost negatives’. She encouraged me to ‘digitize’ them, which I did, and I sent a few to the picture editor of The Birmingham Mail. There were some positive comments when the images were printed, and some were subsequently included in a Black Country weekly. Currently, there is a discussion taking place between an entrepreneur who owns a space where the photographs could be exhibited, and a book containing them has also been mooted. I’ve continued to record my life through a lens, and it gets harder to remember what a sixteen-year-old youth would have said to these adult ‘strangers’ to engage them and capture their images forever. Looking at my old monochrome images retrospectively, I am pleased that despite the forty years that has elapsed since the image bonded itself onto acetate I still find new things within them that captivate me. Clearly, I am self-taught within a lifetime classroom of human observation. A Greenwich University study, which I took part in, suggested that I possess a genetic trait of being a ‘super-recogniser‘ which, if nothing else, suggests that I am and always been predisposed to observing the human face. Sadly, this does not equate to composition, lighting or the technical knowledge all of which are needed to make an interesting image. I will, for as long as I can, record images for my own pleasure and enjoyment, and if other people enjoy them too, that’s a bonus. The images shown here include a study of a bunch of ‘navvies’ repairing a canal (1977) and the last day of work at a Graphite Factory in Old Hill (1976/7). More information can be found here: https://twitter.com/RegencyWharf/status/937718273893978112 https://www.birminghammail.co.uk/news/midlands-news/look-lostphotos-birmingham-discovered-13541175 47


Feature - Stephen Taylor - Forgotten Birmingham Archive

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Feature - Stephen Taylor - Forgotten Birmingham Archive

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Feature - Stephen Taylor - Forgotten Birmingham Archive

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Feature - Stephen Taylor - Forgotten Birmingham Archive

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Bi-Monthly Competition Winner

Winner of the August 2018 Bi-Monthly Competition

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Bi-Monthly Competition Winner

There were 43 entries for the third 2018 bi-monthly competition. As always we received the diverse range of images from across the group, so please keep entering your images. The winning image was ‘Pride Manchester’ by David Gleave.

The 2018 competition asks members to also include a little background to the image providing some context. Please keep an eye out for details on the group RPS page for more details. Each winner will receive a copy of The mind’s eye: writings on photography and photographers by Henri Cartier-Bresson. The next deadline is October 31st for images taken during August, September and October. Please send your submissions to dgcompetitions@rps.org and visit the competition page on the RPS website for details. 53


Members’ images - Ann Chown ARPS

Ann Chown ARPS Fisherman of Hastings I worked in an office my entire life, and when I hung up my boots ten years ago, I swapped my office desk for a camera with no idea of where it would lead me. Since then, I’ve photographed everything: landscapes, macro, wildlife - you name it - but I have been increasingly drawn towards documentary photography. I particularly enjoy taking pictures of people - I used to take candid pictures but was finding that a vital element of the picture I was after (in my mind) was often missing and the only way to get this element was to interact with my intended ‘subject’. My husband encouraged me to approach people to ask whether I could take their picture - something which I found quite daunting. What could happen? They could say ‘no’ and I would walk away: or they could say ‘yes’. I have got used to doing this now (with the odd feeling of ‘can I, can’t I?’) and would estimate 99% of people I have asked said ‘yes’ and that’s where the story begins for me. I now speak to a lot of people who I wouldn’t normally talk to and learn about their lives - I have met a man who was evacuated from his flat in north London following the Grenfell Tower fire, a sculptor sculpting a life-sized bronze of Rudyard Kipling, crofters in the North West of Scotland (another project which led to an exhibition), a teenage mono-cyclist, a Nicaraguan miller, several musicians and a photographer intent on taking pictures of clouds who has a strong belief in the power of thought - so much so that he feels he is able to move mountains (literally!). I started photographing the fishermen on The Stade in Hastings in 2013, initially candidly. They got used to me popping up every now and then and as they got to know me were happy to spend time chatting about their latest trip out to sea, the size of the catch, a grumble or two about the dreaded quotas imposed and the EU. I enjoyed talking to them and seeing the world from their perspective and it is this aspect of my photography which is really important to me. This was the start of my ‘fishermen’ project - I had no idea that in the next four years, the result of this small beginning, my confidence and feelings of self-worth would have improved beyond recognition. I have obtained my Associateship of the RPS, self-published a book of my photographs, had an exhibition at the Hastings Fishermen’s Museum (which lasted for a year), been interviewed for the local BBC TV news, met the then Home Secretary, won a bronze medal in the DPOTY 2017, and had my photographs archived as a historical record by the Fishermen’s Museum. www.annchownphotography.co.uk Mending the nets

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Members’ images - Ann Chown ARPS

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Members’ images - Ann Chown ARPS

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Members’ images - Ann Chown ARPS

PH5590 coming home 57


Kevin

Washing out the creels

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Man Shed

Filleting

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Members’ images - Ann Chown ARPS

Clearing out the nets 60


Members’ images - Ann Chown ARPS

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Members’ images - Ann Chown ARPS

Brothers 62


Members’ images - Ann Chown ARPS

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Members’ images - Chris Hilton

Chris Hilton The Great Dorset Steam Fair The sound of the steam whistles and the fairground organs, the smoke, the soot, the mud and the dust... The cacophony and chaos that is the world’s largest collection of working steam engines comes to a small corner of Dorset once a year.` There are show rings and side stalls, market stalls and junk stalls. Modern fairground rides cheek by jowl with steam gallopers and the Wall of Death. There’s music, singing, drinking, fighting, food stalls and Ferris wheels. There are old diggers and tractors, bygones from the farm, old tools and even older spares. Flags are flying, people are building roads, cooking bacon on the fire and towing steam trains. People are playing with cranes and slews, ancient rotovators and vintage one arm bandits. Then there’s the people, so many people, they’re in top hats and bowler hats, there are flat caps and neckerchiefs. Waistcoats and pocket watches, hobnail boots and clogs. They sleep in ratty old canvas tents and vintage caravans, beautiful gilded showman’s wagons or Gypsy wagons, barrel topped and Mollycroft. Sheperd’s huts and camper vans, new ones, old ones, even the odd one made out of a cement mixer. There’s heavy haulage, light haulage, recovery trucks, motorbikes, milk churns, models and collections of blow lamps. There are heavy horses and monster trucks, stunt teams, vintage fire engines, birds of prey, dancing sheep and acres and acres of portaloos.

Basically, there’s a lot going on and in the last nineteen years my wife and I have only missed it once. I used to photograph there with a 200 to 400mm lens but just as there have been changes to the event, there have been changes to the way I photograph it. I now get much closer and shoot wide at 24mm. Sometimes I shoot from the hip (not out of embarrassment but because I can often get good results from there), sometimes I approach with a smile whilst pointing to the camera, sometimes I ask and sometimes I just do it. Sometimes, but not often, I do it with a burst of flash and that brings us to the ethics of photographing strangers. Is it OK to photograph people just because they look odd? Well, I photographed a couple sat in their Land Rover (with a burst of flash to light the interior) and walked away. I checked the back of the camera and it looked good, so I went back and showed them. Oh, we’ve seen you walking around they said. I asked my wife why they would have noticed me in the crowd of thousands and she told me ‘it’s because you look like some weird, turn of the century, German hiker’. So, I guess, that as long as you look as odd as the people you are photographing then there is no ethical question to be answered. visuallycuriousphotography.com

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Top left: Suited, booted and stepping out at the Steam Fair.

Top left: The line of Showman’s Engines is routinely the largest ever assembled.

Top middle: Included in case a visual reference to the ‘turn of the century German Hiker’ was required. Top Right: In a nod to modernity the Yorkshire Puddings are now made flat and sold as monstrous wraps. Bottom left: Sometimes it can take a very long time to get the show set up. Bottom right: Shot in the diorama to remember the Great War. 64

Top Right: The Cider Tent where there’s more chance of tripping over the guy ropes my looking up to read the warning signs. Bottom left: The travelling community seems to be last bastion of the Silver Cross pram, they are often seen being dragged backwards through the mud. Bottom Right: Night falls and the fairground comes alive.


Members’ images - Chris Hilton

Suited, booted and stepping out at the Steam Fair 65


Members’ images - Chris Hilton

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Members’ images - Chris Hilton

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Members’ images - Chris Hilton

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Members’ images - Chris Hilton

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Members’ images - David Pollard

David Pollard Indian Portraits I have made several visits to India in recent years and there have been able to enjoy my favourite [form] of photography, portraying people in their environment, especially in monochrome. India is a country where colourful subjects abound and recording them in colour is the natural impulse. Today the end-product image isn’t dictated by the choice of film in the camera and so there is the opportunity to indulge in both formats. Indians are rarely reluctant to be photographed and I have found that being sensitive and asking politely invariably paves the way to better images and that anywhere that is safe for tourists is a safe place to photograph the people. Some of them, naturally, will see being photographed as a commercial opportunity and so I carry cash for that eventuality. There is also a fascination for them in being able to see the image immediately on the camera’s screen; I’m always happy to indulge this. One difficulty that I have encountered is with the very bright sunlight. This creates deep shadows and can lead to the subject’s eyes being obscured being able to see the eyes is critical to portraiture. If at all possible, I’ll move my subject in to the shade. Overcast days are better for my photography but are rare at the time of year that I visit. Two days of drizzle in Jaipur was a real bonus on a recent trip. Most of these pictures are simple portraits with the subject posing for the camera. Generally I’m looking for a less posed shot but taking the posed one first can create the opportunity. In compiling this set I have revisited images taken over a few years and attempted to give the set a coherent feel.

Top: Machine Minder in the Kitchen at the Golden Temple, Amritsar Middle: Farmer, Dasada, Gujarat Bottom: Market Porter, Chandni Chowk, Delhi 70


Members’ images - David Pollard

Bharathi Park, Pondicherry

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Members’ images - David Pollard Pilgrim at the Golden Temple, Amritsar

Policeman, Pondicherry Temple Guide, Kumbakonam, Tamil Nadu

Villager, Chanoud, Rajasthan.jpg 72


Members’ images - David Pollard Bus Service Supervisor, Ahmedabad

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Members’ images - David Pollard

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Schoolgirl, Chhatra Sagar, Rajasthan


Members’ images - David Pollard

News Vendor, Ahmedabad

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Members’ images - John Eaton

John Eaton A Tajik Celebration This unexpected photographic opportunity occurred on a trip along the ancient Silk Road across China. We were on the final leg of the trip travelling in the late afternoon at over 11000 ft along the Karakoram Highway from Kashgar to Taxgorgan. Taxgorgan is the last town of any size before the summit of the Karakoram Pass and the border between China and Pakistan. Our guide spotted a game of Buzkashi being played on the plateau in the distance, so we quickly changed our itinerary. Buzkashi is primarily an Afghan game; often referred to as the national game of Afghanistan. However, variations of it are played by all of the ethnic tribes of Central Asia. This particular game was being played by Tajik tribesmen.

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Buzkashi: Buzkashi is a bit like rugby on horseback! Tajiks only play it on special occasions. In this case, they were celebrating a local wedding with teams from the respective families. The rules are obtuse, and vague to the casual observer, but involve a rider on horseback getting the carcass of a freshly slaughtered ram (minus the head) into the goal, which is a pit at each end of the ‘pitch’ (an enormous, loosely defined area of dry, dusty scrub-land). The game is rough as riders attempt to hem-in the one with the carcass and prevent him moving whilst attempting to tug and steal the carcass. If he manages to breakaway, he gallops furiously toward the goal at the other end of the pitch and drops the carcass into it. The rider who accomplishes this gets a prize from the sponsors of the game, in our case, the families of the bride and groom, who also invited us to the wedding on the following day.


Members’ images - John Eaton

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Members’ images - John Eaton

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Members’ images - John Eaton

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Members’ images - John Eaton

A Tajik Wedding The next day, we again changed our plans to spend a couple of hours at the wedding. This was a very informal affair, held outdoors around the new home of the bride and groom, with anyone and everyone invited and lasting all day (unfortunately we had to leave before the actual ceremony). It was a big social occasion for the entire neighbourhood – people arrived on foot, horseback or motor-bike; music was provided by women on tambourines and men on flutes; the women dressed up a bit, the men less so; there was traditional dancing (men with men, women with women); and one group of men immediately engaged in a long-running card-game – to which the majestic Karakoram and Pamir ranges provided an impressive backdrop!

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Members’ images - John Eaton

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Members’ images - Tony Cortazzi

Tony Cortazzi Chichester street In the mid- to late-1990s, I was doing a course with the BFP (Bureau of Freelance Photographers) in which one of the assignments was “To present a photo essay suitable for submission to your local county magazine.” Sussex Life covers Chichester, where I live, and for a subject I chose ‘Street entertainment in Chichester.’ I opted to shoot in monochrome and use a Minox, this is a small, aperture-priority, semi-automatic, 35mm film camera with a fixed f2.8, 35mm manualfocus lens. Normally I would preset the lens to around f8 and focus to 10 feet which gives a reasonable depth of field. The beauty of this camera, despite its many drawbacks, is that when folded it is small and light enough to live in my shirt pocket, and more importantly, it is not conspicuous or intimidating. Ilford HP5 400ASA film was used throughout the project. Before taking any photographs, I always explained my project and chatted about their art or music and lifestyle. I can’t recall a single refusal, although a few were understandably hesitant about giving too much personal information. Initially, this process took me way out of my comfort zone, but it was well worth it to meet such colourful and interesting

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people. It probably took about 18 months before there was enough material for a draught submission but, ironically, when I approached ‘Sussex Life’ I was told that they liked the concept and pictures, but unfortunately were about to become a full colour publication. The picture that gave me the most satisfaction, although rather cluttered, is ‘The likely lads’; two unconventional characters from Liverpool with their grotesque puppets dangling from coat hangers. With the camera resting on the pavement this was the only shot where their pose echoed the mannequins in the window, it was pure luck that they were just in the frame. My most embarrassing moment was after talking to two children’s entertainers and, as usual explaining what I wanted to do, they waited until I had crouched down and taken the camera from my pocket before announcing over the megaphone “Ladies and gents, boys and girls, we are very fortunate today that this gentleman has travelled all the way from Fleet Street in London to take your photographs for the Daily Telegraph!”


Members’ images - Tony Cortazzi

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Members’ images - Tony Cortazzi

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Members’ images - Tony Cortazzi

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Members’ images - Tony Cortazzi

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Members’ images - Tony Cortazzi

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Members’ images - Tony Cortazzi

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Members’ images - Tony Cortazzi

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Review - Visa pour l’image 2018

Visa pour l’image 2018 David Fletcher LRPS

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Review - Visa pour l’image 2018

Visa pour l’Image is an annual festival of photojournalism held each autumn in Perpignan, France. Now in its 30th year, the festival concentrates on medium to long-term documentary projects and press photos. Unlike its near neighbour Les Rencontres d’Arles, all the venues at Visa are free to enter. The festival is huge, encompassing many sites across the city, but centred on a group of decommissioned religious buildings, notably the Couvent des Minimes. In this building alone, there were some 14 documentary series exhibited, plus the winners of the World Press Association awards 2018. All images are identically mounted and framed, with captions printed on the mounts below the photographs. Each series is preceded by an explanatory panel in three languages and a map showing the location(s) of the series on a world scale. This formal, detailed presentation gives a serious air to the photographs: the viewer is about to be informed rather than entertained. Perhaps because of the sheer space available, the number of photographs in each series is unusually large - some consisting of over 30 images. In addition there are serious subjects here - conflict, famine and pollution among others - so each series demands some time from the viewer in order to appreciate its message as well as its visual merits. This is not a festival to see in a day, but one which is certainly worth the journey. Placing the captions immediately below the photograph, within the frame, rather than on a separate plaque, works well in integrating the context with the image. I find it particularly irritating in art galleries having to search the wall for the label, which is sometimes at some distance from the image. Here, one follows the story clearly from the introductory panel through the photographs and captions. The only problem is that, because the captions are fairly lengthy, it is easy to concentrate on the story and not appreciate the photographs visually. For this reason, I found it best to stand back slightly and view all the photographs first, before returning to the beginning and reading each caption in turn.

Introductory panel for Colombia: (Re)Birth Many of the themes here are familiar from regular reporting in the media: conflicts in Syria, Yemen, the Congo, and Gaza; refugees and migrants from Myanmar, Mexico, and Afghanistan. But there are deeper documentary themes too: silver miners in Bolivia; prison reform in Papua New Guinea; the re-integration into society of ex-FARC guerrillas in Colombia; the large-scale industrial production of food; the campaign to reduce the spread of serious diseases by eliminating open-air defecation; and pollution in Dhaka. It is good to see that there are still magazines supporting this kind of photojournalism, notably Paris Match, Le Figaro and National Geographic. It is a shame that there are no British publications investing in this kind of reportage. At the state level too, the French are ahead of the British, the Centre National des Arts Plastiques having a specific fund to support contemporary documentary photography. Two of the projects on show here were supported by this fund. In the international press exhibition too, the British absence was notable: newspaper features from France, Denmark, Germany, Italy, Spain and the USA were on display, but nothing from the UK. Where were you, The Guardian?

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Review - Visa pour l’image 2018

Among the projects on display, I was most taken by Catalina Martin-Chico’s Colombia: (Re)Birth, the story of ex-guerrilla fighters with the Marxist rebel group FARC who are trying to re-integrate into normal society after more than fifty years of armed conflict in Colombia. Martin-Chico has focussed on the women among them - 40% of their number - and in particular the fact that they were forbidden to have children. Those who became pregnant were forced to have an abortion or abandon the baby to unknown parents. What’s more, Martin-Chirico relates personal stories - we learn something of their lives before, during and after the conflict.

While many of the series on display seemed slightly over-long and verging on self-indulgence, MartinChico’s avoided this pitfall, helped by the inclusion of personal stories from a number of individuals rather than general scenes. The series seemed to me to be in the tradition of W Eugene Smith spending extended periods of time with individuals in order to capture something their lives. There were also reminders of the potential power of a single image, of which I have selected three. In the section showing a selection of images from across the 30 years of the Festival there were two which struck me particularly.

Catalina Martin-Chico

Firstly, Nixon leaving the White House the day after he resigned, by Jean-Pierre Laffont. The symbolism here is strong: the helicopter is just leaving the ground, and two Marines are already rolling up the red carpet. Although the photo is in black and white, we know it is a red carpet, and although this probably happens every time the President departs in his helicopter, the message in this photo is that they couldn’t wait to get rid of Nixon.

Catalina Martin-Chico

Jean-Pierre Laffont 92


Review - Visa pour l’image 2018

Secondly, two soldiers standing eye to eye at the US military academy, West Point, by Pierre Boulat. The body language and facial expressions tell us immediately what the relationship is between these two soldiers. Although the age difference does not appear great, there is no doubt that the junior soldier is the one on the right who physically recoils from the intense gaze of the one on the left, who wears a slight sneer. Even with no caption, the dominant/submissive relationship is clear, and the bracketed note in the caption (AKA “Beast Barracks”) completes the story. It makes a shiver run down one’s spine.

Lastly, the winner of 2nd Prize Singles in the Contemporary Issues category of the World Press Awards. This was for me the best single image in the whole Festival on several counts.

Giulio Di Sturco Pierre Boulat / Cosmos

Firstly, the image is visually strong: the gaze between doctor and patient and back again via the pink mirror form a strong triangle; the doctor’s head and white-gloved hands form another one; the disembodied white-gloved hand entering from the left echoes those of the doctor and the bottle of pink liquid links with the mirror and the phone. Second, even without any additional context, the photograph says a lot but also poses questions. Like all the best photographs - at least documentary ones - we learn more as we look around the picture. Third, when we read the context - which we have probably already guessed because the image is so visually strong - we realise that this is both a topical subject and a delicate one sensitively treated. It is quite obvious what the subject of discussion is, but we do not need to see the visual details. The label gives us a fuller story about the popularity of Thailand as a destination for medical treatment in general, and gender-related surgery in particular. Finally, I have to admire the slight sense of humour in the image, without mocking a serious issue. 93


The Documentary Group focuses on photography which chronicles everyday life in the broadest possible way, as well as topical events and photography which preserves the present for the future, through both individual images and documentary ‘stories’. It is typically found in professional photojournalism, real life reportage, but importantly for us it is an amateur, artistic, or academic pursuit. The photographer attempts to produce truthful, objective, and usually candid photography of a particular subject, often of people.

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Members form a dynamic and diverse group of photographers globally who share a common interest in documentary and street photography. We welcome photographers of all skill levels and offer members a diverse programme of workshops, photoshoots, longerterm projects, a prestigious Documentary Photographer of the Year (DPoTY) competition, exhibitions, and a quarterly online journal “Decisive Moment’. In addition to our AGM and members gettogether we have an autumn prize-giving for the DPoTY incorporating a members social day. Some longer-term collaborative projects are in the pipeline for the future. Additionally, we have an active Flickr group and Facebook page. Overseas members pay £5 per annum for Group membership rather than the £15 paid by UK based members. The Documentary Group is always keen to expand its activities and relies on ideas and volunteer input from its members. If you’re not a member come and join us. See: http://www.rps.org/special-interest-groups/ documentary/about/dvj-membership Find us on the RPS website at: http://www.rps.org/special-interest-groups/documentary

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Three Ladies - Ryan Hardman LRPS

www.rps.org/special-interest-groups/documentary Designed, Edited & Published by Jhy Turley ARPS www.jhyturley.com

Profile for Documentary Group, Royal Photographic Society

RPS The Decisive Moment - Edition 13 - September 2018  

The Decisive Moment, published by the Royal Photographic Society's Documentary Group, is a quarterly journal that showcases the work of its...

RPS The Decisive Moment - Edition 13 - September 2018  

The Decisive Moment, published by the Royal Photographic Society's Documentary Group, is a quarterly journal that showcases the work of its...