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F420 The Innov-is F420 is packed with a huge range of features including 140 stitches, lettering, lock stitch button, automatic thread cutter, and Square Feed Drive System for strong, smooth, even sewing on all types of fabric.

Create your own style

55FE The feature-packed Innov-is 55 Fashion Edition will shape your fashion dreams into reality. 81 stitches including 10 one step button hole styles plus lettering together with the included 12 accessory feet make this an excellent all round machine.

27SE The Innov-is 27SE offers fantastic versatility for both the beginner and experienced sewer. With fingertip controls, 50 stitches including 5 one step button hole styles and a protective hard case; it’s ideal for all kinds of sewing.

brothersewing.co.uk


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INSIDE THIS ISSUE ¤ CROCHET PIÑATA CUSHION ¤ WOODEN BEAD TRIVETS ¤ PRINTED BEACH TOWEL ¤ BOTANICAL EMBROIDERED TEE ¤ RAINBOW SEQUIN BUMBAG ¤ MACRAMÉ WALL HANGING

wrap

Crochet

make

MAIN IMAGE PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: HELENA STEELE AND MATILDA SMITH

we’re n we’re rot old, etro


18

PATCHWORK PURSES

ON THE COVER PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: HELENA STEELE & MATILDA SMITH; MODEL: ALEXANDRA FIA

CONTENTS

55

94

issue number ninety-four

Scandi trivets

INTRODUCING.. LIVING The latest news from the world of handmade

Fill your life and home with crafted goodness

9 INTRODUCING…

43 LIVING

Handpicked crafty happenings

We find the loveliest hand-crafted, new season buys for your home

14 TRENDS Shop and make the hot tropics trend

46 HOME TOUR

18 PATCHWORK PURSES

Take a peek inside crafter and blogger Gillian Roe’s retro Scandi nest

Sew cassette tapes with retro vibes

51 SWIRL ART 26 TEA AND A CHAT

Use rope to make unique wrapped fibre art

Meet the two weaving women behind The London Loom

55 WOODEN TRIVETS Colour pops and geo shapes to play with

32 EMBROIDERED TEE

Talk to us! facebook.com/MollieMakes

pinterest.com/MollieMakes

4 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 94

@MollieMakes

MollieMakes

youtube.com/user/MollieMakes

Think outside the embroidery hoop with wearable botanical stitches

58 CROCHET RUG

36 GOOD READ

63 MACRAMÉ HANGING

How to share your creative story

Supersize your knots with roving yarn

39 SEQUIN BUMBAG

67 PULL-OUT PAPERS

Make a unicorn-worthy accessory to sparkle for festival season

Cheery botanical prints and patterns designed by illustrator Lucy Driscoll

A new take on a modern woven classic


NEVER MISS AN ISSUE 24 Subscribe UK Get the new Tilly and the Buttons book and a sewing pattern when you subscribe today

85 Subscribe overseas International subscribers save up to 78%

63

32

Botanical embroidery

Macramé wall art

SUMMER SHADES

76

Nothing makes me happier than feeling the sun on my face, and I love it when you get that same sense of joy from a craft project too. This month, we’ve injected colour and cheer into all our makes, from the zingy cassette tape purses on page 18 to the rainbow piñata cushion on page 76. Summer is the ideal time to dabble with diferent hues, be it botanical green embroidery updating a tee (page 32), a pop of pink on a jute crochet rug (page 58), or the out-and-out jazz of a statement sequin bumbag (page 39). And, you’ll find even more inspiration on page 26 from The London Loom, a crush-worthy weaving studio with colour and creativity at its heart.

Piñata cushion

LOVING

39

Sequin bumbag

Treats and treasures to fall in love with

Yvette Streeter Acting Editor

75 LOVING Beautiful things to adore and make

76 PIÑATA CUSHION Bring the fiesta with loop stitches and rainbow crochet stripes

81 PRINTED TOWEL Screen print your way to poolside glory

88 KIDS’ ACTIVITY ROLL A simple sew to get little ones organised for their summer adventures

93 CROCHET SANDALS

93

Crochet sandals

Sweetie-inspired, strappy zigzag numbers

96 TEMPLATES All the shapes for this issue’s makes

106 BACK PAGE PROJECT Geo Heaven’s Sarah Empson shares some of her 3D printing secrets Subscribe at molliemakes.com

Turn the page for more on your free gift! Then Turn to page 67 for your papers


PHOTOGRAPHY BY KAITLYN PHIPPS

Contributors

Emily Close When designer-maker Emily isn’t sewing, painting, gardening or crafting with her girls, you can find her with one of her many pets: a dog named Yuri, a cat named Chester, three chickens and Sandy the cornsnake. Sew Emily’s activity roll on page 88. www.sewdarnclose.com

Gillian Roe Blogger Gillian’s love of styling began at an early age, when her favourite thing to do was arrange her Cindy doll’s house. Today, she styles her Hampshire home, where she lives with her husband, children and whippet. Tour Gillian’s bright abode on page 46. www.talesfromahappyhouse.com

EDITORIAL Editor (on maternity leave) Cath Dean Acting Editor Yvette Streeter Senior Art Editor Helena Steele Deputy Art Editor Matilda Smith Commissioning Editor Lindsey Newns Production Editor Becca Parker Digital Editor (on maternity leave) Nina Dyer Digital Editor Hannah Carr Picture Editor Emma Georgiou molliemakes@immediate.co.uk

ADVERTISING Call: 0117 300 8206 Senior Advertising Manager Penny Stokes Client Partnership Manager Beckie Pring

MARKETING & CIRCULATION Head of Newstrade Marketing Martin Hoskins Newstrade Marketing Manager Janine Smith Subscriptions Director Jacky Perales-Morris Direct Marketing Manager Penny Clapp

PRODUCTION Production Director Sarah Powell Production Managers Louisa Molter/Rose Griffiths Production Coordinator Lily Owens-Crossman

LICENSING Director of International Licensing and Syndication Tim Hudson tim.hudson@immediate.co.uk

The London Loom Francesca and Brooke opened the doors to their creative East London studio at the beginning of last year. The pair published their first book one year later, and now weave 24/7, fuelled by bagels and Barbra Streisand. Read more about their weaving biz on page 26. www.thelondonloom.com

Lysa Flower Lysa loves fabric. She loves looking at it, touching it, thinking about it, cutting it, and of course sewing with it. More recently she’s been designing it. If she had to be a fabric print, she would be a polka dot. Make Lysa’s patchwork pouches on page 18. www.lysaflower.com

BUYING TEAM Paul Torre, Karen Flannigan

MANAGEMENT Publishing Director Catherine Potter Group Senior Editor Julie Taylor Chief Executive Officer Tom Bureau Managing Director, Bristol Andy Marshall

SUBSCRIPTIONS For new orders and back issues sales call 03330 162 148 or visit www. buysubscriptions.com/craft. For enquiries relating to your subscription email molliemakes@buysubscriptions.com or call +44 (0) 1604 973 757.

COPYRIGHT GUIDELINES FOR PROJECTS We have requested permission from designers so you can make and sell selected projects on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. Please credit the designer where appropriate and when requested. Mollie Makes encourages creativity and as well as making for gifts and for yourself, we want to help you make small batches of handmade items to sell. You can individually handmake as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell for yourself, a local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) or go into mass production, so you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine or its kit is prohibited. Please respect one another’s copyright.

Lucy Driscoll Lucy’s a Windsor-based illustrator and designer who uses old magazines and coloured paper to create collages for her stationery brand. She loves cycling her Dutch bike and is currently restoring a 1972 VW campervan. Find Lucy’s colourful papers on page 67. www.lucydriscoll.com

Esther Curtis Freelance illustrator Esther lives and works in Bristol. She draws inspiration from everywhere, but current obsessions include Patagonia, wild swimming, street food trucks and Japanese packaging. And bakewell tarts. See Esther’s illustration on page 36. www.esthercurtisdesign.com

Other contributors Emily Ashbourn, Valerie Bracegirdle, Lara Davies, Amy Ely, Georgie K Emery, Sarah Empson, Alexandra Fia @ Mustard Models, Kasia Fiszer, Nicky Gotobed, Holly Johnson, Ingrid Rasmussen, Belçim Sarıeyyüpoglu, Celine Semaan, Mandi Smethells, Isabella Strambio, Philip Sowels, Lottie Storey, Manuela Trani, Jessie Wright, SherrieYabsley

6 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 94

Mollie Makes is published by:

Immediate Media Company Limited, 2nd Floor, Tower House, Fairfax Street, Bristol, BS1 3BN. Tel: 0117 927 9009 We abide by IPSO’s rules and regulations. To give feedback about our magazines, please visit immediate.co.uk, email editorialcomplaints@immediate.co.uk or write to Yvette Streeter or Katherine Conlon, Immediate Media Co., Vineyard House, 44 Brook Green, London W6 7BT. Immediate Media Company Bristol Limited (company number 05715415) is registered in England and Wales. The registered ofice of Immediate Media Company Bristol Limited is at Vineyard House, 44 Brook Green, London W6 7BT. All information contained in this magazine is for information only and is, as far as we are aware, correct at the time of going to press. Immediate Media Company Bristol Limited cannot accept any responsibility for errors or inaccuracies in such information. Readers are advised to contact manufacturers and retailers directly with regard to the price of products/services referred to in this magazine. If you submit unsolicited material to us, you automatically grant Immediate Media Company Bristol Limited a licence to publish your submission in whole or in part in all editions of the magazine, including licensed editions worldwide and in any physical or digital format throughout the world. Any material you submit is sent at your risk. Although every care is taken, neither Immediate Media Company Bristol Limited nor its employees agents or subcontractors shall be liable for loss or damage.


your bonus gift!

Toucan keyring

THIS GIFT COMES WITH THE PRINT COPY OF THE MAGAZINE ONLY. ALTERNATIVE GIFT ON SOME OVERSEAS COPIES. PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: HELENA STEELE AND MATILDA SMITH

Sew bright felt and metallic faux leather to make Manuela Trani’s tropical plushie keyring

Let’s get tropical... “Meet Toko the toucan – a colourful, squishy companion sure to brighten up your day. He’s been designed to make a cute keyring, but you could use the pattern to make a very summery garland, a jungle-themed birthday cake topper or a toucan flock for a baby mobile. Toko is quick and easy to make, but you’ll need to arm yourself with some sharp embroidery scissors. A bit of extra accuracy is required, especially when cutting out the

pieces as they’re quite tiny. Pin the templates as close to the felt edges as possible and make sure you’ll have enough felt for all your pieces before cutting them out, leaving just a few millimetres between each piece.” Felt-loving Italian crafter Manuela lives with her two-year-old boy and partner in Slovenia. www.nuvolinahandmade.etsy.com Turn to page 96 for instructions on making your toucan, then share using #molliemakers.


DODODODODOD A handpicked collection of fabrics delivered to your door

For more advertising DODODODODOD opportunities, please contact: DODODODODOD Emily Williams 0117 300 8531 DODODODODOD emily.williams@immediate.co.uk DODODODODOD DODODODODOD on

email:

www.misformake.co.uk


INTRODUCING..

94

THE LATEST IN CREATIVE GOODNESS – HANDPICKED JUST FOR YOU

What do casual tailoring, La La Land yellow and lightweight cotton twill have in common? Yep, they’re all features in your new dungarees. The team at Lucy and Yak didn’t want us to go without this summer, so have introduced a new lightweight short version of their classics. Ideal for showing off those socks. www.lucyandyak.com

Subscribe at molliemakes.com

94 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 9


TOP READ New crush From upcycling guru Joanne Condon of Kyle Lane comes Furniture Crush. Crammed with tips and tricks, on-point styling and 12 colour pop projects, it’s a self-published, crowdfunded triumph. www.kylelane.ie

Dress your babe in the softest of organic cotton tees, then grab yourself the ’Mama Bird’ one to match. Twinning is always winning, especially when cute slogans are involved. www.thebeeandthefox.com

THIS MONTH’S WISHLIST

Now that mustard is a neutral (in our eyes, anyway), you have the best excuse to decorate every room with it. Start with this knitted beauty of a blanket from House of Rym and you won’t go far wrong. www.houseofrym.com

What’s better than a collab? A MoeLab. Abstract artist Leah Bartholomew has teamed up with Moe Moe Design to create a range of jewellery that doubles as wearable art – so technically an investment. www.leahbartholomew.net

You thought you had all the tote bags you’d ever need, didn’t you? Meet the Orb. Designed to fit snug on the hip, it’s digitally printed in Claire Ritchie’s new Keijo print. Fun, casual and sustainable. Hurrah! www.claireritchie.com.au 10 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 94


Pascaline designs many of the prints herself

BRAND FOCUS Pompom du Monde The story of Pompom du Monde is every bit as magical as its creator, Pascaline. Her aim is to give children the tools to turn their imaginations into real adventures, an idea that grew from Pascaline’s own childhood. Now realised in a creative play and accessories range, handdrawn prints are used alongside traditional Liberty fabrics. Sewn in the UK, this new brand has big dreams. Shop the collection at www.pompomdumonde.com. We’re convinced this forest green, velvet goddess of a bed will blend seamlessly into any scheme. If not, at least it’ll make those Sunday lie-ins feel even more decadent. www. sweetpeaandwillow.com

WEBSITE TO WATCH

Crowns and playful accessories for all

Liberty prints add a touch of tradition to the magic

Kobi & Teal Shopping for independent, handmade pieces from designers and artists? Kobi & Teal are your new go-to. Carefully curated by Nick Fraser and Polly Bell, the team show a true passion and flair for combining traditional crafts and contemporary design. Check out the constantly evolving gallery space too. www.kobiandteal.co.uk Subscribe at molliemakes.com

94 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 11


TOP READ Fierce makes

Are you a pull on your pjs as soon as you get home kind of person? Well get comfy, brew a pot and enjoy the fact these Sleepy Doe classic Breton stripe sets are back, and now they’re for all the family. www.sleepydoe.com

Paige Mitchell’s ceramics effortlessly combine simple design with playful characteristics. Freeform splatters and hand-drawn lines on a neutral palette? Tea time has never looked so exciting. www.trouva.com 12 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 94

Forget everything you think you know about craft books for little ones, and read Makes for Mini Folk. With toys, clothing and accessories for the modern nursery, you won’t be short of projects to make right now. Look out for author Lisa Stickley’s workshops based on the book this summer. www.pavilionbooks.com

Lovers of Tatty Devine, rejoice. Confine your love of crustaceans and gin to jewellery no longer, thanks to their fun homewares collection for Made. www.made.com

Show your nearest and dearest how much they mean to you – or at the very least that you remembered – with Mean Mail’s straight to the point card. Because cold sarcasm says it better than a painting of a man playing cricket in a field. www.meanmail.co


INTRODUCING trends

THIS MONTH WE’RE OBSESSING ABOUT...

HOT TROPICS Think palm fronds and summer brights, served with ice and a slice Be so laidback, your sofa’s outside – with an indoor/outdoor rug, naturally. www. anthropologie.com

14 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 94


INTRODUCING trends 01

02

01

A painterly, Peter

Pan-collared take on a Hawaiian shirt? Ooh yeah. Pass the coconuts. www.oliverbonas.com 02

Dress for the weather

you deserve. www. tattydevine.com 03

Channel island living

vibes with a playful print by Wacka. www. eastendprints.co.uk 04

Rifle Paper Co have

03

got that lush botanical thing down. www. riflepaperco.com 05

07

All about those IRL

leaves? You’re gonna need a bulb vase. www. urbanoutfitters.com 06

04

It’s not just a tote, it’s

the cool bag we’ve always dreamed of. www.bando.com 07

Balance exotic prints

with sunshine staples. www2.hm.com

06

05

MAKE IT! TURN THE PAGE TO DIY THE HOT TROPICS TREND Subscribe at molliemakes.com

94 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 15


INTRODUCING trends

MAKE IT!

STYLED PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: HELENA STEELE AND MATILDA SMITH

HOT TROPICS RING DISH

MATERIALS Q 57g polymer clay in leaf green Q Non-stick baking parchment Q Non-stick rolling pin Q Craft knife Q Grade 800 wet and dry sandpaper Q Water-based gloss varnish Q Shallow oven-proof dish Q Craft tool Q Cornflour Q Kitchen towel 01 Using the template on page 96, trace the monstera leaf

16 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 94

shape onto a sheet of non-stick baking parchment and carefully cut it out. 02 Warm the polymer clay in your hands for a minute or two so it becomes easier to use. Roll the clay out evenly until the leaf template can fit comfortably on top. Cut out the leaf design using a craft knife. 03 Smooth any rough edges with the craft tool then, using the image as a guide, mark a central vein on the leaf and smaller vein details running off it.

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04 Spoon some cornflour into the bottom of a small, shallow oven-proof dish or bowl. Place the leaf in the dish, making sure each edge of the leaf curls up the sides to give a curvy shape. 05 Once you’re completely happy with the shape, bake in the oven at 110ºC/225ºF/Gas Mark ¼ for 30 minutes, or following the manufacturer’s instructions. Remove from the oven and allow to cool. 06 Remove the leaf from the dish and wash off any cornflour

residue with cold water. Carefully dry the leaf with kitchen towel or a clean cloth. Soak some grade 800 wet and dry in cold water and sand off any remaining rough edges. Finish the leaf dish with a few coats of gloss varnish, following the manufacturer’s instructions. Leave to dry.

Emily Ashbourn likes making all kinds of things, but specialises in crochet design, pattern writing and hook making. www.makeeshop.com


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Fresh prints Sew your way to 80s vibes with Lysa Flower’s patchwork cassette purses


PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: HELENA STEELE AND MATILDA SMITH; WILD AND WOLF RETRO 2500 TELEPHONE IN FLAMINGO PINK FROM WWW.CUCKOOLAND.COM


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HOW TO MAKE… CASSETTE TAPE PURSES MATERIALS Q 3.5 x 23cm (13/8 x 91/8") Cotton + Steel Snap To Grid in Terrazzo Cream (Fabric 1) Q 13.5 x 23cm (53/8 x 91/8") Cotton + Steel Snap To Grid Little Pill Dot in Ice Lemon (Fabric 2) Q 20 x 37cm (77/8 x 15") Cotton + Steel Snap To Grid Big Pill Dot in Neon Pink (Fabric 3) Q 20 x 37cm (77/8 x 15") Cotton + Steel Snap To Grid Little Pill Dot in Ice Blue (Fabric 4) Q 3 x 22cm (1¼ x 8¾") Cotton + Steel Add It Up in Basic Mint (Fabric 5) 20 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 94

Q 3 x 22cm (1¼ x 8¾") Cotton + Steel Add It Up in Basic Glow (Fabric 6) Q 5 x 36cm (2 x 141/8") RJR Cotton Supreme Solids in Swan (Fabric 7) Q 5 x 27cm (2 x 105/8") RJR Cotton Supreme Solids in Orchid (Fabric 8) Q 5 x 36cm (2 x 141/8") RJR Cotton Supreme Solids in Robins Egg (Fabric 9) Q 6.5 x 61cm (25/8 x 24") RJR Cotton Supreme Solids in Hot Pink (Fabric 10) Q 9 x 9cm (35/8 x 35/8") RJR Cotton Supreme

Solids in Tangerine Dream (Fabric 11) Q 9 x 23cm (35/8 x 91/8") RJR Cotton Supreme Solids in Arabian Nights (Fabric 12) Q Three 13cm (5¼") zips, two in neon yellow and one in neon pink Q Matching sewing thread Q Appliqué glue (we used Roxanne’s Glue-Baste-It) Q Rotary cutter Q Cutting mat

Nostalgic much? These colour pop cassette purses are giving us all the mixtape feels, plus a chance to play with bright modern prints and get our patchwork on. Think of them less as a throwback and more of a punchy, up-to-theminute tribute. Use yours to stow earphones, sewing bits and bobs, or for coin purse purposes. Use a 0.5cm (¼") seam allowance throughout and tack each seam in place with appliqué glue before sewing together. Cutting out 01 Trace the template on page 96 and cut the pattern apart so you have 27 different pieces. You may find it helpful to colour them in at this stage, to match the fabrics. To cut out the fabric pieces, place the fabric wrong side (WS) up, use a


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small dot of glue on the back of each pattern piece to tack in place, then measure and mark 0.5cm (¼") seam allowances. 02 For the white cassette tape purse, cut two A1 and A5 pieces from Fabric 2. From Fabric 12, cut two A2 and A4 pieces and one of each of the C1, C3, C5, C8 and C10 pieces. Cut two A3 pieces from Fabric 11 and two A7 pieces from Fabric 4. Use the selvedge text from Fabric 6 to cut two A6 pieces. From Fabric 3, cut two A8, A9, A10, B2, B3, and B4 pieces. Cut two B1 pieces, two tabs and two cassette sides, plus one of each of the C2, C4, C6, C7, C9 and C11 pieces from Fabric 7. For the lining, cut two 10 x 13.5 cm (4 x 5¼") pieces from Fabric 4. 03 For the blue cassette tape purse, cut two A1, A5 and A7

pieces from Fabric 3. From Fabric 12, cut two A2 and A4 pieces, and one of each of the C1, C3, C5, C8 and C10 pieces. Cut two A3 pieces from Fabric 11. Use the selvedge text from Fabric 5 to cut two A6 pieces. From Fabric 4, cut two A8, A9, A10, B2, B3 and B4 pieces. Cut two B1 pieces, two tabs and two cassette sides and one of each of the C2, C4, C6, C7, C9 and C10 pieces from Fabric 9. For the lining, cut two 10 x 13.5 cm (4 x 5¼") pieces from Fabric 2. 04 For the pink cassette tape purse, cut two A1 and A5 pieces from Fabric 4. From Fabric 12, cut two A2 and A4 pieces and one of each of the C1, C3, C5, C8 and C10 pieces. Cut two A3 pieces from Fabric 11. Use the selvedge from Fabric 3 to cut two A6 pieces. Cut two A7 pieces from Fabric 1. From

Fabric 10, cut two A8, A9, A10, B2, B3 and B4 pieces and two cassette sides. From Fabric 8, cut two B1 pieces, two tab pieces and one of each of the C2, C4, C6, C7, C9 and C11 pieces. For the lining, cut two 10 x 13.5 cm (4 x 5¼") pieces from Fabric 3. Cassette tape pouch 05 Using the template on page 96 as a layout guide, lay the pieces out in order. Make two cassette tape fronts by placing adjacent pieces right sides (RS) together, tacking each seam with appliqué glue and sewing with a 0.5cm (¼") seam allowance. Sew the section A pieces together first, then the section B pieces. Next, sew section A to section B. Sew the section C pieces together but do not attach to the cassette tape front. 94 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 21


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HOW TO MAKE… CASSETTE TAPE PURSES 06 Press both tabs in half along the width, WS together. Starting at the bottom of the zip, place one of the folded tabs on top of the zip, RS together and aligning raw edges with the raw edge of the zip. Unfold the fabric and sew along the folded line. Be careful not to sew over the metal bottom stop. 07 Measure and cut the zip down to 13.5cm (5¼"), including the sewn tab piece, as shown. 08 Partially undo the zip and pin the top of the zip together. Place the remaining tab on the zip as in Step 4, unfold and sew along the folded line. 09 Trim away the excess zip parts at both ends, as shown. 10 Lay a lining piece RS up. Lay the zip along the top edge, RS up, then lay a cassette tape front WS up along the top long edge of the

22 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 94

lining. Before sewing all three layers together, mark 0.5cm (¼") in from each short edge. This marks where the seam will start and stop. 11 Sew all three layers together with a 0.5cm (¼") seam allowance between the two marks. 12 Fold the front and lining pieces of the cassette tape together, then press both pieces away from the zip, as shown. 13 Repeat Steps 10-12 with the remaining cassette tape front and lining pieces. 14 Next, place the lining pieces with RS together. Sew the two short edges from bottom to top, stopping 0.5cm (¼") away from the top seam. 15 Open the zip. Sew the bottom of the cassette tape on to the bottom side of each cassette front with RS together. Again, stop

0.5cm (¼") in from the edges. This creates a box with open sides. 16 Sew one cassette tape side piece to the top near the zip and to the bottom of the cassette tape, starting and stopping 0.5cm (¼") in from the edges. Be careful to move the lining out of the way. Repeat on the other side of the cassette tape. 17 Sew the sides, starting and stopping 0.5cm (¼") in from the edges. If you’re unable to get close to some of the corners with the sewing machine, finish them by hand sewing instead. 18 Turn the purse RS out. Use a knitting needle or similar to poke out the corners. 19 To finish, fold the raw edges of the lining to the WS. Press and topstitch the lining closed, then push the lining inside the completed cassette tape purse.


Lysa Flower As a child of the 80s, Lysa fell deeply, madly in love with pop culture. Her modern sewing designs are bright, graphic, optimistic and colourful, produced for creative DIY crafty types. Lysa lives in the Fraser Valley near Vancouver, Canada. www.lysaflower.com


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Talking tequila and textiles with…

THE LONDON LOOM Francesca Kletz and Brooke Dennis launched London’s first drop-in weaving studio in 2017. Francesca shares their story. Words: LOTTIE STOREY Photographs: INGRID RASMUSSEN

There aren’t many creative businesses that celebrate their second year of business and launch their first book on the same night, but the London Loom is one such success story. After closing her sewing studio in New Zealand to move to London with her family, Brooke bought her first loom and fell in love with a gentle, tactile practice that allowed her to flow with her intuition rather than following patterns. Meanwhile, Francesca discovered freestyle weaving at a beginner’s class in Japan while visiting 26 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 94

her sister, before training to teach the technique in New York. The pair met in London, bonded over bagels and looms, and decided to open their own studio (or “just a colourful place with ace tunes and good chat”, according to their website). The London Loom is modern and bright, a true creative community that’s about as far away from twee or disposable as you could get. We met the endlessly energetic pair to chat how it all began, what drives them, and why there aren’t more shades of neon green yarn.

Describe your style in three words. Awesome, colourful and hilarious. Did you have any particular ambitions when you first started out? We always wanted this to be a very open space – inclusive with classes that are unpretentious yet substantial. And we’ve always had the same goal of making our space work in our community. But overall? We really just wanted to turn what we had in our heads into reality, and feeling like it’s happening is just glorious. How did you get into weaving? Weaving just came for us! We love yarn, we love knitting and we love to sew and make garments. In a roundabout sort of way, weaving allows us to be a bit more cross curricular with our crafts. I still wouldn’t call us professional weavers, as we don’t produce cloth for sale. Instead, we’ve always been an educational business, imparting knowledge alongside our joy of fibres and making things with your hands. Tell us more about why you both love this craft so much. There are so many benefits to handweaving. There’s a long history of hand-


INTRODUCING tea & a chat

“We’ve always the same goal of making our space work in our community.”

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weaving being used as a therapy – the term basket case came from occupational therapists working on hand-weaving with veterans with PTSD. It’s extremely rhythmic, which is soothing and very simple for both beginners and children to get to grips with. Weaving – especially on our floor looms – is also really speedy. Unlike a lot of beginners’ craft classes, you can make something very substantial very quickly which is super satisfying. There is a lot of set up involved in weaving, but we do that all for our beginners so they can Subscribe at molliemakes.com

just get straight into the studio and start weaving right away. What’s your typical working day like? We have a big meeting about the week ahead and catch up on each other’s weekends. Brooke’s more practical, moving around the studio at light speed preparing everything for the week, while I’m on the computer, responding to customers and arranging meetings for various businessy plans. When there are customers in the studio, the music is on, the atmosphere

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Brooke and

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Freestyle weaving

Francesca set up

is fun and fast, and

The London Loom

the end results can

to be somewhere

be impressive.

“colourful and

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Francesca adds

bright... a place with

green pom poms to

good equipment and

a salmon-coloured

quality materials”.

weave on the loom.

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INTRODUCING tea & a chat

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is sweet and we’re mostly chatting about the wrongs we’d like to right in the world and why there aren’t more shades of neon green yarn (it’s something to do with new dye laws in the EU). Sometimes we have late night workshops, so Brooke will go home to meet her kids and bring me back a tub of dinner, then we’ll hand everyone a shot of tequila and get making. Take us through your creative process. Sometimes our creativity comes from something one of us has read about or seen somewhere, other times it’s out of necessity. We sit and throw around ideas for crafts and workshops until we’ve figured something out we’re excited by, and then we make samples. There are lots of things we’ve tried that in theory were genius but in practice didn’t work, or ideas we thought were amazing that no one cared about. Then we have to figure the business side out – how do you sell a workshop that no one seems interested in? We try lots of creative solutions to make things work, but it’s important to let things go if they aren’t working. Life’s too short for that nonsense.

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Inspiration hangs

on the walls, and rugs and cushions make for a cosy floorspace. 02

Why aren’t there

more shades of neon green? Something to do with new dye laws in the EU, apparently. 03

The studio is a

colourful place with ace tunes and chat.

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What’s the most important business lesson you’ve learnt so far? Be true to your brand. It sounds like something from an inspirational Instagram profile but it’s true. We’ve tried workshops


INTRODUCING tea & a chat

“If you love colour, texture and people, you can be inspired by anything.”

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and collaborations before when we weren’t totally convinced and it doesn’t work. It ends up compromising the integrity of what we’re trying to build. We’re always being told we have a strong identity and we think it’s funny because it’s just us. But we’ve learnt to trust our guts. And put lots of bagels in them, too. If you were starting up now, is there anything you’d do differently? No way! Every mistake we’ve made has been a huge lesson – and we’ve made heaps Subscribe at molliemakes.com

of mistakes. I can’t imagine how we’d have learnt anything other than by doing it.

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together to create

Francesca and

Brooke’s first book – Weave This – takes

Who, or what, inspires you? I think if you love colour, texture, fibres and people, then you can be inspired by anything. We get so many amazing, funny and smart people through our doors who teach us new things. We’re also inspired by the community in Hackney. From dyers like Helen from The Wool Kitchen to wool shop owners like Anna from Wild and Woolly, we’re in walking distance of women

texture. 03

Permission to

pride of place on the

play: colourful craft

studio shelving.

materials are set

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Work in progress:

different yarns come

out to entice, as if in a sweet shop.

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INTRODUCING tea & a chat

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who blow our minds with their knowledge. We feel very lucky. What’s been your proudest moment? We wrote a book that was published in February. It’s called Weave This and we’re really proud of it. It’s been a mad dream that we were able to go into our second year of business with a book launch party. There were a lot of very happy tears and garbled thank you speeches that night.

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Francesca used to

work in Special Educational Needs which required patience. “I also learnt how to use my humour to teach.” 02

They’re planning

a programme of healing arts groups and after school clubs.

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The London Loom The London Loom is the city’s first drop-in weaving studio, ofering workshops to weavers of any age, ability or taste. With over 400 yarns in the studio, anyone can make unique, handmade cloth of their own. Follow Francesca and Brooke on Instagram @thelondonloom. www.thelondonloom.com

And what’s been the biggest struggle? Just knowing what to do! We’d never run a business before. Last spring there were days when we sat in our studio not knowing what was next or if we’d made a huge mistake. Now looking back at that time (and all the times I sobbed in my boyfriend’s kitchen over bookings), I feel insanely proud of what we’ve done. Do you have plans for the future? We really want a bigger studio as it would allow us to hold creative talks and workshops. We want to be the hub of yarn crafts in the city and work alongside all the amazing people in our community. Can you share any parting wisdom? Don’t expect to be perfect first time. We can’t all be Barbra (Streisand, obviously).


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New threads Think outside the hoop and stitch Georgie K Emery’s wearable art

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PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: HELENA STEELE AND MATILDA SMITH; MODEL: ALEXANDRA FIA


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HOW TO MAKE… AN EMBROIDERED T-SHIRT MATERIALS Q Plain T-shirt Q Embroidery thread (we used DMC stranded cotton in 3847 (dark green), 3812 (green), 993 (light green), 581 (apple green), 3819 (lime green), 772 (pastel green), 951 (pale peach), 3824 (peach), 973 (yellow) and 349 (red)) Q 15cm (6") embroidery hoop Q Embroidery needle Q Erasable fabric pen

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Isn’t it time you showed off your stitches beyond the confines of their native hoops? Update a tee and let your plant lady flag fly. Use two strands of embroidery thread throughout, unless stated otherwise, and turn to page 96 to find instructions for each stitch. 01 If it’s new, wash the T-shirt before you start – the design will pucker if the fabric shrinks. 02 Position the templates on page 96 inside the T-shirt and pin in place. Use the fabric pen to trace the design onto the fabric, then carefully place the fabric in the hoop without stretching it.

03 Embroider the turquoise leaves using light green thread and fishbone stitch. Use the same thread and backstitch for the stem. 04 For the two three-leafed green sprigs, use dark green thread to outline them with backstitch, then fill the shapes with satin stitch. Use the same thread and backstitch for the stems of these sprigs. 05 For the emerald green leaves at the neck of the T-shirt, use green embroidery thread and satin stitch. Start the satin stitch across the widest point of the leaf; this helps get the angle of the stitches. Start each stitch from the outer edge and into the centre line of the leaf


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and work your way down each side. The stem is in backstitch. 06 To complete the three-leafed sprigs, using pale peach thread,

Georgie K Emery Self-taught embroidery artist Georgie specialised in printed textiles during her textiles degree, and combines this knowledge with traditional embroidery techniques to create colourful botanical embroidery designs. She draws inspiration from nature and loves to experiment. www.georgiekemery.etsy.com

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stitch up through the centre of each leaf and in a diagonal straight stitch to the inner edge of the green satin stitch. Repeat these stitches, filling the centres with diagonal straight stitches. 07 For the pink flowers, use apple green thread and split stitch for the stem, pale peach thread and satin stitch for the outer petals and peach thread and long and short stitch for the inner petals. The leaves are stitched in satin stitch, using apple green for one side and lime green for the other. 08 Work the small red and yellow flowers using red thread, yellow thread and satin stitch.

09 For the branch of leaves along the shoulder, work the stem in backstitch and lime green thread. Referring to the image as a guide for colour placement, outline each of the leaves with backstitch and either dark green, lime green or pastel green. Fill in the leaves with satin stitch and the corresponding thread colour. 10 To finish, neaten any long threads on the back and remove any visible pen markings following the manufacturer’s instructions. 11 Finally, turn the T-shirt wrong side out and gently press the back of the embroidery to release any remaining wrinkles.

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ILLUSTRATION: ESTHER CURTIS


INTRODUCING good read

SPINNING A YARN Since the dawn of time, we have told stories through craft. Holly Johnson explores how we can weave tales into our own makes… Words: HOLLY JOHNSON Illustration: ESTHER CURTIS

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ithout realising, we tell stories everyday. When we put on our favourite vintage skirt, those playful perspex earrings or a badge stamped ‘feminist’, we’re giving away clues to our personality. Likewise, the treasures we hold dear in our homes all speak their own narratives, telling others about our passions and our past. The things we make are an expression of us, too. Our choice of colours, fabrics and form come together to create a story that embodies our own personality and imagination. And there’s nothing more authentic than your own creative ideas. “When it comes to story-telling, it’s important to be yourself and let your style develop organically,” says Nikki McWilliams (www.nikkimcwilliams.com), who’s been making biscuit-inspired badges, pins and home accessories since 2009. “There are loads of amazing creatives out there, but only you can do you!” Nikki’s nostalgic, pop-art designs speak volumes about her playful personality, her love of British culture and penchant for the tea break. “I’ve always had a bit of a thing for biscuits!” she laughs. “When my mum was pregnant with me, she’d crave a whole packet of chocolate digestives almost every day. Maybe that was where it all started!” Clearly this love of sweet treats has become her niche, and every design she creates is packed full of personality. “Creating from your passions is so important when it comes to authenticity – if you’re excited about your ideas then it makes it much easier to share that with others,” she says.

TALL TALES While some projects have stories that come easily – a dress upcycled from heirloom fabric, a hand-dyed yarn inspired by a photo you took on holiday, or a mood blanket chronicling your year – others take more thought. And this is where you can really begin to let your inner author shine. Potter Amanda Banham (www.amandabanham ceramics.bigcartel.com) has created a make-believe world centred around her raku-fired rainbows and

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pastel-coloured houses, adding to their collectability. In each Instagram post she provides another chapter of the story, telling tales of faeries, maypoles and thunderstorms. “I talk about the imaginary characters who might live in the villages and sometimes whole mini serials have evolved,” she smiles. “Sometimes [the houses] contain rainbows, or factories that make things such as the crunch that goes into crisps.” If you don’t find your storytelling voice comes naturally, don’t force it. “Resist trying to be funny if you aren’t a naturally funny person,” advises Amanda. “Find your own niche interests. I try to steer clear of following too many potters except ones who are my actual friends. When I did my illustration degree, it was reiterated to us time and time again not to look at other illustrators’ styles, and to look at anything but illustration for inspiration. I feel this way very much with pottery and storytelling.”

CRAFTING FOR JOY Stories don’t always speak of magical beings or biscuity goodness, though – sometimes they have a more serious message. For Celine at Crafty CC (www. bycraftycc.wordpress.com), crochet is her way of dealing with stress and anxiety. “It gives me focus, makes me happy and has inadvertently introduced me to a community of the most kind and talented people.” Through her rainbow-bright crochet, Celine creates an escape for herself and her followers: “A happy, colourful place, even if I don’t feel like that at times.” Celine’s hearts and unicorns are a retreat from reality. “I’m not the best at expressing myself with words, so I rely on what I make to convey my thoughts,” she explains. “It can be hard to find your style, but if you keeping making things that you like, you’ll eventually see a pattern. Let your imagination run wild – if you have an idea, give it a go!” Whatever your story, however you find your voice, be true to yourself and let your passion shine. And next time you’re at a gallery or craft fair, ask yourself what stories are being told. Everything has a story and everyone has a voice that deserves to be heard.

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PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: HELENA STEELE AND MATILDA SMITH, MODEL: ALEXANDRA FIA

Up your festival game with a unicorn-worthy bumbag – Amy Ely shows you how


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HOW TO MAKE… A SEQUIN BUMBAG MATERIALS Q 50cm (19¾") rainbow gold reversible sequin fabric (ours was from www.facebook.com/ fabricazam) Q 50cm (19¾") black cotton fabric Q 50cm (19¾") black polypropylene webbing, 2.5cm (1") wide Q 20cm (77/8") brass metal tooth zip Q 25cm (97/8") black bias binding, 2.5cm (1") wide Q Black side release buckle, 2.5cm (1") wide Q Tri-glide clip, 2.5cm (1")

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Bumbags are back, and this time they’re sparkly. A rainbow and gold number is one part disco to two parts practical – exactly what you need for throwing shapes hands-free at festivals or gigs this summer, or just nipping to the pub and taking the dog out in style. 01 Using the templates on page 96, cut one lid piece, one front body piece and one back body piece from both the sequin fabric, and the cotton fabric for lining. 02 Place the lid pieces with wrong sides (WS) together and fold them in half along the width to find the middle. Align the curved edge of the sequin lid piece with the raw edge of the zip, right sides (RS) together, and pin in place starting

at the midpoint. Sew the three pieces together using a 1cm (3/8") seam allowance. 03 Fold the sequin front body piece in half along the length to find the middle, then align the long straight edge with the raw edge of the zip, RS together. Lay the lining front body piece on the sequin front body piece with WS together. Pin all the way along the length, from the middle outwards, and sew the three pieces together using a 1cm (3/8") seam allowance. 04 Place the sequin front body piece and sequin back body piece with RS together, aligning the raw curved edges. Pin in place and sew with a 1cm (3/8") seam allowance. 05 Repeat Step 4 with the front body piece and back body piece


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linings. Turn the bag WS out, with the black lining on the outside. 06 Pinch the two lid pieces and the front body pieces at either end of the zip together and pin. Sew to close the gaps. Any excess sequins can be trimmed away when you’ve finished this step. 07 Open the zip. Pin along the remaining open top edge, making sure to pin each corner together

Amy Ely Amy has a thing for fabrics. Alongside family life, she’s created her business, RockBetty, hoping that she can share the bumbag love. She knows they’re really useful and hopes you do too. www.rockbetty.co.uk

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first so they’re in the right position. You will have some sequins showing, but they can be trimmed once you’ve sewn it. Sew with a 1cm (3/8") seam allowance, trim the sequins, then conceal the edge by enclosing it inside the bias binding and sewing in place. 08 From the polypropylene webbing, cut one 30.5cm (12") length and one 76.5cm (30") length. Alternatively, cut the webbing to the desired lengths to fit around the waist. Thread one end of the side release buckle onto the shorter length of webbing, then fold the webbing in half along the length. 09 Insert the piece of webbing with the clip through the side gap at the left of the bumbag and pin

in place, aligning the raw edges. Insert one end of the longer piece of webbing through the right-hand side gap and pin in place, aligning the raw edges. 10 Sew both pinned sides to secure the straps, repeating the process a number of times using reverse stitch to strengthen the join. Once completed, turn the bag RS out, revealing the sequin fabric, and pull out the straps. 11 To finish, thread the tri-glide clip onto the longer length of webbing, then insert the end of the webbing through the other side of the side release buckle, creating the adjustable strap. To prevent the raw ends of the webbing from fraying, you can very carefully melt them over a candle flame. 94 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 41


G E T T H E L AT E S T I S S U E !

Welcome to our beautiful magazine packed with creative projects & ideas, gorgeous photography and insightful features. Discover new ways to bring the joys of mindfulness & making into your life. £9.99* ISSUE

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A colour wheel to assemble and find your perfect scheme

Two beautiful cards by textile icon, Althea McNish

Four exclusive posters from printmakers, Bold & Noble

An illustrated, nautical-style map of the ‘Mindful Isles’

Decorative door art! Try a papercutting project

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LIVING

94

INSPIRATION ALERT! SPACES, PLACES & NEW DESIGNERS TO WATCH That’s it. Now we’ve clapped eyes on this rug, there can be no other. Have you ever seen such a harmonious union of soft hues, plush 100% wool pile and neat geometric design? Our wooden floors are suddenly looking very bare. www.arrohome.com

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Add colour with prints that can hold their own solo or in a gallery wall. Dowse’s Mountain Lake print has a quiet calm about it, but we’re equally sold on Francesca Iannaccone’s Let’s Cook kitchen shelfie. www.trouva.com; www.francescaiannaccone.com

GET THE LOOK

Playful modern prints with a mid-century feel? Mix ‘em up and pile ‘em high. These cushions will happily earn their keep on the sofa, armchair or bed. www.thehambledon.com 44 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 94

RAINBOW RETRO

If minimal’s your thing, you’ll want your trinkets and doodads to be always present but never visible. This Scandi candle holder is as subtle as they come. www.housedoctor.dk

Red and yellow and pink and green… you know the drill. A little bit of coaster action can go a long way, especially when they’re rainbow-coloured hexies. www.berylune.co.uk

We like a vase that doesn’t take itself too seriously, and Swedish designer Ingela P. Arrhenius’ Senora (yep, there’s a Signor too) is at the right end of the kitsch scale. www.okla.co.uk


Carole trained in design, specialising in screen printing

BRAND FOCUS Maggie Magoo Surface pattern designer Carole is a lover of retro, and that shines through in her Maggie Magoo Designs output. She makes prints, tote bags, tea towels and enamel pins emblazoned with her joyous designs, although our personal faves are the DIY hoop art printed fabrics, ready to be stitched. www.maggie magoodesigns.etsy.com You know you’ve nailed the summer Scandi vibe when a yellow sofa becomes the norm, and an armchair next to an open window has never looked more inviting. West Elm, you’ve done it again. www.westelm.co.uk

WEBSITE TO WATCH Hilda Carr

Maggie Magoo pieces are inspired by mid-century design

The shop also sells vibrant paper goods

Croydon-based potter Hilda Carr works from her shed, creating stoneware vessels with striking glazes and hand-carved details. She’s passionate about the slow, meditative process of throwing clay on the wheel and takes time over each piece. Sign up to her mailing list for first dibs when her shop updates go live. www.hildacarrpottery.com Subscribe at molliemakes.com

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LIVING home tour

The grey feature wall in the dining area shows of Gillian’s beautiful hand-embroidered holiday diaries.

Blogger Gillian Roe shows us around her beachy home on the south coast Words: HOLLY JOHNSON Photography: KASIA FISZER

The sea has always been a part of Gillian’s life. Growing up in the 1980s, weekends were spent playing on the beach with her sisters, sailing, and relaxing at the family beach hut. Having moved away to study English Literature at Leicester University, followed by an MA in Sussex, life took her north, where she spent the next 14 years. But two years ago, the pull of the sea bought her back to her hometown near Portsmouth, and this is where we meet her

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LIVING home tour

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LIVING home tour

COLOUR HAPPY To create a cohesive look, Gillian limits her use of colour to accessories and feature walls. “My favourite way to help a room hang together is to use a simple backdrop of white or grey walls and wooden flooring and then take it from there. I like to use of colour, but in small amounts, and all my handmade things can look quite busy so I try not to over-crochet anywhere.”

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today, in the 1960s chalet-style home she shares with husband John, daughter Bella (11), son Angus (9) and Ziggy the whippet. “I was astonished by how much I could miss the sea once I lived in land-locked West Yorkshire,” she recalls. Coastal influences are evident throughout Gillian’s airy home. Whitewashed walls, sea green accessories and grey accents create a laid-back vibe. Elsewhere, there are colour-coded bookshelves, hinting at another of her passions. “I was a bookworm growing up,” she explains. “While studying, I got a job in a bookshop and loved it so much that I stayed until my daughter was born.” After a break to bring up the kids, Gillian started blogging in 2012, when her eldest had started school and her youngest was at nursery. “I felt, for the first time in years, that I had a bit of time to myself.” Gillian’s blog – Tales From a Happy House – is filled with sunny shots of her home, along 48 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 94

with seasonal craft projects and recipes. “I’ve always loved crafting, and blogging seemed like the perfect platform to share my passion and connect with like-minded crafters.” And what does she make? “I tend to make for the house; cushions, blankets, wall hangings, rugs and embroidery hoops. One of my favourite projects is my embroidered holiday diaries which hang on the dining room wall.” She also loves to upcycle, and admits some things have even been given a double makeover. “Thanks to a teething puppy that has chewed pretty much every item of furniture we own, I’ve done a lot of sanding, filling and painting over the last year!” she laughs. “I love upcycling furniture, largely because it’s such a cheap way to give something a new lease of life.” Rather than rigidly planning out her rooms, Gillian prefers a fluid approach. “I tend to buy things I like and then worry about finding a

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John Lewis dining table is the heart of the home.


A John Lewis rug pulls Gillian’s favourite colours together, while the Ercol-inspired table adds a touch of mid-century style.


LIVING home tour

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home for them later. I move objects from room to room – you can give a corner a new look by changing a picture, cushion and throw.” As she’s such a magpie, she finds it hard to pinpoint her style. “I guess it’s probably a mixture of Scandi and mid-century with a fair amount of high street and vintage thrown in!” But, the style of her new home has somewhat dictated her choices. “Scandinavian style works well in this house. I think it’s better to go with a style that’s sympathetic to the era of your house, rather than imposing one which doesn’t fit.” When it comes to big-ticket items, John Lewis is the family’s go-to. “We’ve also bought pieces from Habitat. And I am an IKEA fan, but think it needs to be in moderation with other vintage pieces.” Smaller items are often handmade or second-hand. “I find things via Instagram and Etsy, for example Hilda Carr’s pottery which I love. We’ve inherited a lot of things from my 50 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 94

grandparents. I love having things that belonged to them, and seeing them enjoyed anew.” Their retro home is an ongoing labour of love. “We’ve spent a lot of time restoring original features like the fireplace which had been covered by a massive TV unit.” As time and budget allow, they plan to extend to create a larger kitchen-diner. But finished or not, this is one very happy home, where family life and a love of craft make something truly beautiful.

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“I’m in love

with crafting and can’t ever foresee a time when this will change!”

Gillian Roe Gillian shares sewing projects, papercraft ideas and crochet on her blog, along with her own recipes. Delve further into her world on Instagram at @gillian_talesfromahappyhouse. www.talesfromahappyhouse.com


PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: HELENA STEELE AND MATILDA SMITH

y – Mandi Smethells shows you how


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HOW TO MAKE… SWIRL ART MATERIALS Q Patons Alpaca Blend, 60% acrylic/22% wool/10% nylon/8% alpaca, 142m/155yds per 100g ball, one ball each in Peony (Yarn A), Celestial (Yarn B) and Butternut (Yarn C) Q Patons Classic Wool Roving, 100% wool, 110m/120yds per 100g ball, one ball in Low Tide (Yarn D) Q Aunt Lydia’s Metallic 10 Crochet Thread, 88% cotton 12% metallic, 91m/100yd per 19g ball, one ball in Gold (Yarn E) Q Curved yarn needle

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Q Strong cotton thread Q 115cm (453/8") threestrand cotton rope, 2.5cm (1") thick Q 1m (393/8") 12-gauge metal wire Q Wire cutters Q Masking tape

This is wall art as you’ve never seen it before – a unique celebration of yarn and colour blocking in one beguiling swirl of rope. We need one ASAP. The even better news is that it’s so simple to make (no tricky stitches here, just a lot of neat wrapping), but looks seriously impressive. It’ll be beautiful as both a tactile addition for a gallery wall, or a stand-alone statement piece. Get ready to wind. 01 Tape both ends of the rope to stop it unravelling and add an additional band of masking tape 15cm (6") from each end. 02 Using the tape, attach the wire along the length of the rope, starting from the inward band of masking tape. Apply masking tape

every 15-20cm (6-77/8") to secure it to the length of the rope. 03 To start wrapping, cut a length of Yarn A. To speed up the wrapping, use three strands bundled together at an approximate length of 330cm (130"). Form a 25cm (97/8") loop with one end of the yarn and line up the looped end with the end of the rope, as shown. Start wrapping the long end around the rope, leaving a few cm of yarn free. 04 Wrap along the length of the loop, leaving just enough of the loop uncovered to insert the end of the yarn. Secure the gathering knot, then pull the end through the loop and use the other end to pull on the tail at the start. This will pull the end and loop under the wrapped section and secure it. Be


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sure not to pull too far, only enough to secure the knot. 05 Trim the remaining yarn tail so it’s level with the base of the wrapped section. 06 Continue wrapping in the same way using Yarn E. Since this yarn is very fine, use a bundle of five strands cut to approximately 3m (1181/8"), and create a slightly shorter loop of 20cm (77/8"). 07 Keep wrapping the yarns along the rope, either following our colourway, or choosing your own. After the gold section, we used 330cm (130") of Yarn C, 450cm (177¼") of Yarn D and 380cm (1495/8") of Yarn B, each in bundles of three strands, then finished up with more of Yarn E. As you wrap, gently form the coil into a swirl shape. With the final colour, ensure

the wrapping covers the wired/ taped section. We were able to complete wrapping with an 508cm (199") length of of Yarn E in a bundle of five strands. 08 Using the yarn needle, knot the end of an 88cm (345/8") length of strong cotton thread to the inside end of the swirl on the back. 09 Begin to stitch the coil together. Keep the coil tightly wound together in the swirl shape as you stitch. A curved needle makes this

job easier, but a straight yarn needle can be used. Continue stitching until you reach the other tassel end and secure with a knot. 10 Using a shorter length of the strong cotton thread, find the top centre of the swirl, and knot a hanging loop onto the back. 11 Remove the masking tape at both ends of the rope and comb out the fringe with your fingers. 12 To finish, use a pair of scissors to neatly trim the fringe.

Mandi Smethells Mandi’s a fibre artist and weaving teacher living in Minnesota, USA with her family. Her home studio allows her to be close to her two young daughters, who inspire Mandi’s colourful and playful work. www.smoothhillsweaving.com

94 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 53


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HOW TO MAKE… WOODEN TRIVETS MATERIALS Q 36 wooden beads, 2cm (¾") diameter Q Acrylic paint in white, grey, bright yellow, bright pink and pale blue Q One ball of fine natural twine Q White nylon thread Q Sewing needle Q Washi tape Q Sandpaper Q Flat paint brush

You probably didn’t wake up this morning longing for trivets. In fact, it’s more likely that the word trivet conjures up visions of those swirly cast iron thingamajigs on little legs, but that’s all about to change: enter the wooden beaded trivet. It’s the Scandi-inspired solution to those ‘where do I put down this hot thing?’ dilemmas, with smooth, half-painted beads and simple geo shapes. You can pop your trivets on the dining table or kitchen counter, underneath plant pots, or use them as fancy coasters. 01 First, sand the wooden beads to smooth the surfaces. This will make painting them much easier.

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02 Using washi tape, neatly tape halfway over 18 of the wooden beads, as shown. 03 With a flat paint brush, paint the exposed halves of the taped beads from top to bottom with white, grey, bright yellow, bright pink and pale blue paint. Leave to dry. 04 Once the beads are dry, carefully remove the washi tape. If any paint has bled under the tape, fix it with a fine paint brush. 05 Cut a 25cm (97/8") length of twine and thread on eight beads to create the first row, alternating between plain and half-painted beads. Tie a tight double knot at each end to secure. 06 Working as for Step 5, thread seven beads for Row 2, six beads


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for Row 3, five beads for Row 4, four beads for Row 5, three beads for Row 6, two beads for Row 7 and one bead for Row 8. Arrange the rows as shown to form an equilateral triangle shape. 07 Join the rows using nylon thread and a sewing needle, working clockwise. Knot one end of the thread and pass it through the last bead of Row 2, from right to left. 08 Next, pass the thread through the last two beads of Row 1, this time from left to right. 09 Then, continue to pass the thread through the last two beads of Row 2, from right to left. 10 Pull the thread tight and continue joining all along the row in the same way, working

clockwise and starting from the next bead in to the left on Row 2, and connecting the second and third beads in from the left on both rows, and so on. 11 When you reach the end of Row 2, start connecting Row 2 to Row 3 in the same way, working anti-clockwise this time. Continue

connecting all the rows like this, working clockwise if you’re going from right to left and anti-clockwise if you’re going from left to right. 12 Row 8 is the top of the triangle. Pull the thread tight and knot to finish. Check all the knots are secure and then trim away the excess twine ends.

Belçim Sarıeyyüpo lu Belçim graduated in geological engineering but wanted to move into the craft industry. Since 2015, she’s worked as a freelance editor for an interiors magazine, and on her blog she shares her DIY projects and inspiration from her travels. www.bikagitbimakas.blogspot.co.uk

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Live colourfully Hook Lindsey Newns’ neon crochet take on a modern woven classic


PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: HELENA STEELE AND MATILDA SMITH; ORIGINAL ROSE GOLD SANDALS: WWW.SALT-WATERSANDALS.COM; WHITE CONCRETE POTS AND FAUX BUSH PALM BRANCH: WWW.ROSEANDGREY.CO.UK


HOW TO MAKE… A CROCHET RUG MATERIALS We sourced our rope and twine from www. rope-source.co.uk Q 100m (109yd) pink baker’s twine, 0.2cm (1/8") thick (Twine A) (we used Solid Colour Baker’s Twine in Rose Pink) Q 300m (328yd) natural baker’s twine, 0.2cm (1/8") thick (Twine B) (we used Sold Colour Baker’s Twine in Blonde) Q 10m (11yd) pink magician’s rope, 1cm (3/8") thick (Rope A) (we used Magician’s Rope in Rose Pink) Q 40m (44yd) natural decking rope, 1cm (3/8") thick (Rope B) (we used Manila Decking Rope) Q 4mm (UK 8, US G/6) crochet hook Q Stitch marker TENSION Exact tension is not essential for this project. Keep the tension even but not too tight, as the 60 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 94

baker’s twine does not have much flex to it. If you are finding you have too much space between the rounds of the rug, tighten the tension; if your rug starts to curl upwards as you work, loosen the tension. ABBREVIATIONS (UK) st(s) stitch(es) ch chain sp(s) space(s) dc double crochet yrh yarn round hook rep repeat wst waistcoat stitch – a double crochet worked into the centre V of the st in the row/round below; when working in the round work into the centre of the V from the round below WS wrong side RS right side FINISHED SIZE Approx. 80cm (31½") diameter

We’re still crushing on braided jute rugs, but we’re ready to take the trend to the next level with a bold dollop of colour and hit of crochet. You can use any shade for the colour pop and add another round of circles for a fancier rug. Instructions The rug is worked by crocheting twine around rope, keeping the rope encased in the sts. Worked in a continuous spiral, mark the last st of each round with a st marker. Sts in brackets require all sts to be made into the same st, for example: (wst, ch2, wst, ch2) means work a wst followed by ch2 twice into the next st. A number before brackets means work the bracketed sts into that number of sts, for example 3(wst, ch2) means work a wst followed by ch2 into each of the next 3 sts. Changing twine on the last yarn over of the previous st. Centre circle Round 1 using Twine A, make a slip knot and loop it around Rope A 5cm (2") from the end of the rope, ch1, pass the hook under the rope and yrh to pull up a loop, yrh and

pull through both loops to form the first dc, ch2, (dc, ch2) 5 times more along the rope, working over the rope to encase it. Mark last dc with stitch marker [6dc and 2ch-sps] Round 2 curl the section of rope with sts on clockwise, until the first st of Round 1 is sitting underneath the hook, *(wst, ch2, wst, ch2); rep from * to last st [12wst and 2ch-sps] Round 3 *(wst, ch2, wst, ch2), (wst ch2); rep from * to last st [18wst and 2ch-sps] Round 4 *(wst, ch2, wst, ch2), 2(wst ch2); rep from * to last st [24wst and 2ch-sps] Round 5 *(wst, ch2, wst, ch2), 3(wst ch2); rep from * to last st [30wst and 2ch-sps] Round 6 *(wst, ch2, wst, ch2), 4(wst ch2); rep from * to last st [36wst and 2ch-sps] Round 7 *(wst, ch2, wst, ch2), 5(wst ch2); rep from * to last st [42wst and 2ch-sps] Round 8 *(wst, ch2, wst, ch2), 6(wst ch2); rep from * to last st [48wst and 2ch-sps] Round 9 *(wst, ch2, wst, ch2), 7(wst ch2); rep from * to last st [54wst and 2ch-sps] Round 10 *(wst, ch2, wst, ch2),


8(wst ch2); rep from * to last st [60wst and 2ch-sps] Round 11 *(wst, ch2, wst, ch2), 9(wst ch2); rep from * to last st [66wst and 2ch-sps] Round 12 *(wst, ch2, wst, ch2), 10(wst ch2); rep from * to last st [72wst and 2ch-sps] Round 13 *(wst, ch2, wst, ch2), 11(wst ch2); rep from * to last st [78wst and 2ch-sps] Round 14 *6(wst ch2), (wst, ch2, wst, ch2), 6(wst ch2); rep from * to last st [84wst and 2ch-sps] Cut Rope A 1cm (3/8") from sts and start working over Rope B (leaving 1cm (3/8")) Now working with Twine A and Rope B: Round 15 *(wst, ch2, wst, ch2), 13(wst ch2); rep from * to last st [90wst and 2ch-sps] Change to Twine B and cut Twine A

Lindsey Newns Lindsey’s a crochet designer and podcaster who moonlights as Mollie Makes’ Commissioning Editor. She loves to use unusual yarns and shares updates on Instagram as @lottieandalbert. www.lottieandalbert.blogspot.com

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Working with Twine B and Rope B: Round 16 *7(wst ch2), (wst, ch2, wst, ch2), 7(wst ch2); rep from * to last st [96wst and 2ch-sps] Round 17 *(wst, ch2, wst, ch2), 15(wst ch2); rep from * to last st [102wst and 2ch-sps] Round 18 *8(wst ch2), (wst, ch2, wst, ch2), 8(wst ch2); rep from * to last st [108wst and 2ch-sps] Round 19 *(wst, ch2, wst, ch2), 17(wst ch2); rep from * to last st [114wst and 2ch-sps] Round 20 *9(wst ch2), (wst, ch2, wst, ch2), 9(wst ch2); rep from * to last st [120wst and 2ch-sps] Round 21 *(wst, ch2, wst, ch2), 19(wst ch2); rep from * to last st [124wst and 2ch-sps] Fasten off twine and cut rope 1cm (3/8") after last st Large circles (make 10) Using Twine B and Rope B, work as for Rounds 1-4 of centre circle Fasten off leaving a 20cm (77/8") tail of twine. Cut rope 1cm (3/8") after last st Small circles (make 10) Using Twine B and Rope B, work as for Rounds 1-3 of centre circle

Fasten off leaving a 20cm (77/8") tail of twine. Cut rope 1cm (3/8") after last st Finishing After making the circles, curl the 5cm (2") tail at the beginning of the rope into the hole in the centre. Trim to fit. On the WS, you can use a hot glue gun to secure. Where Rope A and Rope B overlap on the back, trim so they sit flush. Construction Place the 20 circles around the centre circle (rug) with the cut rope aligning with the rug. Alternate the large and small circles, touching each other and the rug. One at a time, place each circle RS down on the RS of the rug, against the outside edge. Using the long tail, (dc, ch2) 2-3 times through the twine on the outside of the rug and the outside of the circle until the pieces are connected along 2-3cm (¾-1¼") of twine. Flip the circles to RS facing. Repeat with each circle. When all circles are attached, turn WS up and connect the sides of circles using Twine B in the same way. Fasten off and weave in ends. 94 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 61


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Scale up your macramé for a jumbo wall hanging – Isabella Strambio shows you how

PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: HELENA STEELE AND MATILDA SMITH

The next big thing


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HOW TO MAKE… A MACRAMÉ WALL HANGING MATERIALS Q 50m (55yd) roving yarn (we used Extremely Chunky Acrylic Mammoth in Mushroom Pink from www.woolly mahoosive.com) Q 60cm (235/8") wooden dowel, 2cm (¾") wide Q 1m (393/8") string Q Masking tape

Primed for a fresh take on macramé? Change things up by creating hefty knots with squashy roving. For extra boho points, swap your dowel for a tree branch. Refer to the guide on page 96 to familiarise yourself with the knots used before starting. Roving yarn can break easily, so take care not to pull it – you may wish to practise the knots on a different yarn first. 01 Tape the ends of the dowel to the work surface or hang it from a door frame with S-hooks. 02 Cut six 4m (157½") lengths of roving and attach them to the dowel using lark’s head knot.

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03 Starting from the left, using the image as a guide, make a row of three square knots. 04 Leave out the first two roving lengths and make a row of two square knots. 05 Make a square knot underneath, joining the previous two knots. 06 Cut two 4m (157½") lengths of roving and use lark’s head knot to attach them to the dowel, one at each side of the macramé piece. 07 Using all the strands, make a row of diagonal double half hitch knots to the halfway point, then repeat, starting from the other side. 08 Cut four 4m (157½") lengths of roving and use lark’s head knot to


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attach them to the dowel, two at each side of the macramé piece. 09 Starting at the top right, use the new strands to make a square knot. 10 Next, use two strands from the square knot just made and two strands from the double half hitch and make another square knot. Continue downwards in this way to the halfway point, then repeat the same steps from the top left down to the middle. 11 Join the two diagonal lines of square knots with one square knot below, forming a V shape. 12 Starting from the left, make a diagonal line using double half hitch knots, then repeat on the Subscribe at molliemakes.com

other side. Add one more diagonal line of double half hitch knots on each side, as shown. 13 Make a diagonal line of square knots on each side of the macramé piece, as per Steps 9-11.

14 Make three lines of double half hitch knots, as per Step 12. 15 To finish, trim the fringe into a V shape, using the main image as a guide, and tie the string to the dowel for hanging.

Isabella Strambio Isabella’s a self-taught maker and a flat white addict. She started her creative journey as a craft blogger and now teaches online courses and workshops across the UK. Currently, Isabella’s dreaming of converting her husband’s shed into a beautiful workspace. www.twome.co.uk

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PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: HELENA STEELE AND MATILDA SMITH


Party animal Reimagine a rainbow piùata with Celine Semaan’s crochet cushion


HOW TO MAKE… A PIÑATA CUSHION MATERIALS Q Paintbox Yarns Simply DK, 100% acrylic, 276m/302yd per 100g, one ball each in Bubblegum Pink (150) (Yarn A), Mandarin Orange (117) (Yarn C), Buttercup Yellow (122) (Yarn D), Pansy Purple (147) (Yarn G), Paper White (100) (Yarn H) and Pure Black (101) (Yarn I) Q Stylecraft Special DK, 100% acrylic, 295g/322yd per 100g, one ball each in Lipstick (1246) (Yarn B), Aspen (1422) (Yarn E) and Turquoise (1068) (Yarn F) Q 2.5mm (UK 12, US C/2) crochet hook Q 3.5mm (UK 9, US E/4) crochet hook Q Soft toy stuffing Q 10 x 10cm (4 x 4") piece of cardboard Q Yarn needle TENSION Tension is not overly important for this project, just ensure you keep it consistent throughout ABBREVIATIONS (UK) st(s) stitch(es) ch chain ss slip stitch dc double crochet dc2tog double crochet 2 together – (insert hook in next st, yrh and draw loop through) twice, yrh and draw through all 3 loops on hook rep repeat ls loop stitch FINISHED SIZE Approx. 40 x 35cm (15¾ x 13¾") 78 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 94

We’re all about the novelty décor right now, and what better playful statement piece than a rainbow piñata cushion? With its summery fiesta vibes and loopy crochet texture, this quirky character will instantly jazz up any sofa or kids’ room. Loop stitch The loop stitches are formed on the ‘back’ of the work, so the stitches are worked on the wrong side (WS) rows. To form a loop stitch, wrap the yarn from front to back over the index finger of your yarn hand. Insert hook into stitch and bring the yarn under the hook, keeping your finger in place. Grab the strand of yarn from behind your index finger and draw the loop through the stitch, still keeping your finger in place. You should now have two loops on your hook, and a loop of yarn wrapped around your index finger. Yarn round hook as normal, and pull through both the loops on the hook. The loop stitch is now formed. Always check the loops are the same length while working the row in case you need to pull back any stitches to correct the loops. Once you’ve worked a few stitches, you’ll begin to get the loops consistent. Instructions Use 3.5mm crochet hook unless otherwise specified. Turning chain (the ch1 at the start of a row) does not count as a stitch throughout the pattern. Each side of the donkey is made up of three parts – a body and two legs – with each leg to be sewn on after completing the body pieces. Leg one (make two) Foundation using Yarn A, ch10 Row 1 (RS) 1dc in 2nd ch from hook and in each st to end, turn [9 sts] Row 2 (WS) ch1, 1ls in each st, turn

Row 3 (RS) ch1, 2dc in next st, 1dc in each st to end, turn [10 sts] Rows 4 (WS) ch1, 1ls in each st, turn Rows 5-6 Rep Rows 3-4 [11 sts] Break Yarn A and join in Yarn B Rows 7-12 Rep Rows 3-4 3 times [14 sts] Break Yarn B and join in Yarn C Rows 13-16 Rep Rows 3-4 twice [16 sts] Break yarn and fasten off Leg two (make two) Foundation using Yarn A, ch10 Row 1 (RS) 1dc in 2nd ch from hook and in each st to end, turn [9 sts] Row 2 (WS) ch1, 1ls in each st, turn Row 3 (RS) ch1, 1dc in each st to last one, 2dc in last st, turn [10 sts] Rows 4 (WS) ch1, 1ls in each st, turn Rows 5-6 Rep Rows 3-4 [11 sts] Break Yarn A and join in Yarn B Rows 7-12 Rep Rows 3-4 3 times [14 sts] Break Yarn B and join in Yarn C Rows 13-16 Rep Rows 3-4 twice [16 sts] Break yarn and fasten off Body A Foundation using Yarn C, ch52 Row 1 (RS) 1dc in 2nd ch from hook and in each st to end, turn [51 sts] Row 2 (WS) ch1, 1ls in each st, turn Break Yarn C and join in Yarn D Row 3 (RS) ch1, 1dc in each st, turn Row 4 (WS) ch1, 1ls in each st, turn Row 5-8 rep Rows 3-4 twice Break Yarn D and join in Yarn E Row 9-14 rep Rows 3-4 3 times Break Yarn E and join in Yarn F Row 15-20 rep Rows 3-4 3 times Break Yarn F and join in Yarn G Row 21-26 rep Rows 3-4 3 times Break Yarn G and join in Yarn A Row 27 (RS) ch1, 1dc in each of next 19 sts, dc2tog, turn leaving remaining sts unworked [20 sts] Row 28 (WS) ch1, 1ls in each st, turn Row 29 (RS) ch1, 1dc in each st to last 2sts, dc2tog, turn [19 sts]

Row 30 (WS) ch1, 1ls in each st, turn Row 31-32 rep Rows 29-30 [18 sts] Break Yarn A and join in Yarn B Row 33 (RS) ch1, 2dc in next st, 1dc in each st to last 2sts, dc2tog, turn Row 34 (WS) ch1, 1ls in each st, turn Row 35 (RS) ch7, 1dc in 2nd ch from hook, 1dc in each ch and st to last 2sts, dc2tog, turn [23 sts] Row 36 (WS) ch1, 1ls in each st, turn Row 37-38 rep Rows 29-30 [22 sts] Break Yarn B and join in Yarn C Row 39-42 rep Rows 29-30 twice [20 sts] Row 43 (RS) ch1, dc2tog, 1dc in each st to last 2sts, dc2tog, turn [18 sts] Row 44 (WS) ch1, 1ls in each st, turn Break Yarn C and join in Yarn D Row 45-50 rep Rows 43-44 3 times [12 sts] Break Yarn D and join in Yarn E Row 51-54 rep Rows 43-44 twice [8 sts]


Row 55-56 rep Rows 29-30 [7 sts] Break Yarn E and join in Yarn F Row 57-62 rep Rows 29-30 3 times [4 sts] Fasten off and weave in ends Body B Foundation using Yarn C, ch52 Row 1 (RS) 1dc in 2nd ch from hook and in each st to end, turn [51 sts] Row 2 (WS) ch1, 1ls in each st, turn Break Yarn C and join in Yarn D Row 3 (RS) ch1, 1dc in each st, turn Row 4 (WS) ch1, 1ls in each st, turn Row 5-8 rep Rows 3-4 twice Break Yarn D and join in Yarn E Row 9-14 rep Rows 3-4 3 times Break Yarn E and join in Yarn F Row 15-20 rep Rows 3-4 3 times Break Yarn F and join in Yarn G Row 21-26 rep Rows 3-4 3 times Break yarn and fasten off Miss 30 sts and join Yarn A Row 27 (RS) ch1, dc2tog across, 1dc in each st to end, turn [20 sts] Work rest of body on these 20 sts only Row 28 (WS) ch1, 1ls in each st, Subscribe at molliemakes.com

turn Row 29-32 rep Rows 27-28 twice [18 sts] Break Yarn A and join in Yarn B Row 33 (RS) ch1, dc2tog, 1dc in each st to last st, 2dc in last st, turn Row 34 (WS) ch1, 1ls in each st, turn Row 35 (RS) ch1, dc2tog, 1dc in each st, ch7, 1dc in 2nd ch from hook and each of next 5ch, turn piece so RS facing once again and ss into 6dc, turn [23 sts] Row 36 (WS) ch1, 1ls in each st, turn Row 37-38 rep Rows 27-28 [22 sts] Break Yarn B and join in Yarn C Row 39-42 rep Rows 27-28 twice [20 sts] Row 43 (RS) ch1, dc2tog, 1dc in each st to last 2sts, dc2tog, turn [18 sts] Row 44 (WS) ch1, 1ls in each st, turn Break Yarn C and join in Yarn D Row 45-50 rep Rows 43-44 3 times [12 sts] Break Yarn D and join in Yarn E

Row 51-54 rep Rows 43-44 twice [8 sts] Row 55-56 rep Rows 27-28 [7 sts] Break Yarn E and join in Yarn F Row 57-62 rep Rows 27-28 3 times [4 sts] Fasten off and weave in ends Assembling With RS facing, place Leg one to the left and Leg two to the right of each body piece. Using Yarn C, sew the top of the leg (Row 16) onto the base of each body piece (Row 1) (RS facing) using whipstitch. Eye (make two) Use a 2.5mm hook. Each eye is made up of two parts, with the inner eye to be sewn on top of the outer eye. Each piece is to be worked in a continuous round. Outer eye Foundation using Yarn H, ch2 Round 1 6dc in 2nd ch from hook [6 sts] Round 2 2dc in each st [12 sts] 94 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 79


HOW TO MAKE‌ A PIÑATA CUSHION Fasten off and weave in all ends Inner eye Foundation Using Yarn I, ch2 Round 1 6dc in 2nd ch from hook Fasten off and weave in all ends. Place on top of outer eye and sew into place Gusset The gusset is made up of four panels, sewn together into a loop that will join the two sides Panel A Foundation using Yarn A, ch14 Row 1 (WS) 1dc in 2nd ch from hook and in each st to end, turn [13 sts] Row 2 (RS) ch1, 1dc in each st, turn Row 3 (WS) ch1, 1ls in each st, turn Row 4-15 rep Rows 2-3 6 times Now breaking yarn and joining new Yarn as before, work the following Rows in each colour Row 16-21 rep Rows 2-3 3 times in Yarn B Row 22-27 rep Rows 2-3 3 times in Yarn C Row 28-33 rep Rows 2-3 3 times in Yarn D Row 34-39 rep Rows 2-3 3 times in Yarn E Row 40-45 rep Rows 2-3 3 times in Yarn F Row 46-51 rep Rows 2-3 3 times in Yarn G Row 52-57 rep Rows 2-3 3 times in Yarn A Row 58-69 rep Rows 2-3 6 times in Yarn B Row 70-93 rep Rows 22-45

Celine Semaan Melbourne crocheter and colour enthusiast Celine loves to create modern, bright and fun makes. She shares her vibrant crochet projects on Instagram as @crafty_cc. www.bycraftycc.wordpress.com

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(including colour changes) Fasten off and weave in ends Panel B Foundation using Yarn A, ch14 Row 1 (RS) 1dc in 2nd ch from hook and in each st to end, turn [13 sts] Row 2 (WS) ch1, 1ls in each st, turn Row 3 (RS) ch1, 1dc in each st, turn Row 4 (WS) ch1, 1ls in each st, turn Row 5-6 Rep Rows 3-4 Now breaking yarn and joining new yarn as before, work as follows: Row 7-12 Rep Rows 3-4 3 times in Yarn B Row 13-18 Rep Rows 3-4 3 times in Yarn C Row 19-24 Rep Rows 3-4 3 times in Yarn D Row 25-30 Rep Rows 3-4 3 times in Yarn E Row 31-36 Rep Rows 3-4 3 times in Yarn F Row 37-72 Rep Rows 3-4 18 times in Yarn G Row 73-78 Rep Rows 3-4 3 times in Yarn A Row 81-92 Rep Rows 7-36 (including colour changes) Row 93-96 Rep Rows 3-4 twice in Yarn F Fasten off and weave in ends Panel C Foundation using Yarn A, ch14 Row 1 (WS) 1dc in 2nd ch from the hook and in each st to end, turn [13 sts] Row 2 (RS) ch1, 1dc in each st, turn Row 3 (WS) ch1, 1ls in each st, turn Row 4-15 Rep Rows 2-3 6 times Row 16-21 Rep Rows 2-3 3 times in Yarn B Row 22-43 Rep Rows 2-3 11 times in Yarn C Row 44 (RS) ch1, 1dc in each st Fasten off and weave in ends Panel D Foundation using Yarn A, ch14 Row 1 (RS) 1dc in 2nd ch from hook and in each st to end, turn [13 sts]

Row 2 (WS) ch1, 1ls in each st, turn Row 3 (RS) ch1, 1dc in each st, turn Row 4 (WS) ch1, 1ls in each st, turn Row 5-6 rep Rows 3-4 Row 7-12 rep Rows 3-4 3 times in Yarn B Row 13-16 rep Rows 3-4 twice in Yarn C Fasten off and weave in ends Gusset assembly With RS facing, whipstitch the gusset panels together as follows: Panel A/Row 93 to Panel B/Row 96 Panel B/Row 1 to Panel C/Row 1 Panel C/Row 44 to Panel D/Row 16 Panel D/Row 1 to Panel A/Row 1 Fasten off and weave in ends Tail Holding a strand of each, wrap Yarns A-G around the cardboard piece 10 times. Cut a long piece of Yarn G and thread it under the yarn at the top of the cardboard. Secure tightly with several knots. Slide scissors underneath the yarn on other end of cardboard and cut. Cut another long piece of Yarn G and tie a quarter of the way down from the top. Wrap yarn around the tassel a few times and secure tightly with several knots. Trim the ends of the tassel to neaten. Finishing Using the images as a guide, sew an eye to the RS of each donkey side. Place both side pieces RS together. Separate the two pieces with the gusset (matching the colours to the sides for correct placement) and pin in place. Whipstitch around each edge, leaving a small gap. Turn RS out and stuff, then sew the gap closed. Embroider the nostrils using Yarn I. Attach the tassel to the back end for tail. To define the neck and ears, sew two small stitches below the neck and ear areas, using matching yarn, to gather the fabric.


Beach, please! Bring handmade sass to the poolside with a printed towel by Lara Davies and Jess Wright


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HOW TO MAKE… A PRINTED TOWEL MATERIALS Q Stencil paper Q Screen Q Pencil Q Squeegee Q Craft knife Q Cutting board Q Masking tape Q Packing tape Q Spatula Q Printing ink in yellow, pink, blue and white Q Large cotton beach towel

Print Play This project appears in Print Play by Lara Davies and Jess Wright (£12.99), published by Hardie Grant.The book features 24 modern print projects and all the print techiques required. www.hardiegrant.com/uk/books

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Move over, doughnut inflatables, there’s a new beach VIP on the scene – a custom screen-printed towel that’s your ticket to reserving that coveted sun lounger. Memphis-style brights and bold, playful shapes are the order of the day here, so don’t be shy with your summer print design. If you’re using a towel made from terry towelling, it’s best to stick to solid, simple shapes when planning your design – it’s nearly impossible to capture fine detail on the rough texture of the towel. You’ll want to avoid printing too close to the edges of the towel as well. Familiarise yourself with the printing techniques in Steps 1-15 before tackling the towel. Making stencils 01 Plan and draw your design onto paper. Remember that when creating a stencil, you can’t have

shapes floating inside other shapes; you’ll need a separate stencil for each layer. 02 Make sure your stencil fits the size of the screen. Place the design over a light box or attach it to a window, and trace the design onto stencil paper. Only use a pencil when tracing on stencil paper – if you use a pen or marker, the ink will bleed onto the fabric. 03 Place the stencil paper on the cutting mat and use the craft knife to cut out your design. When cutting straight lines, it can be handy to use a metal ruler to keep your lines straight. The stencil is now ready to be printed. Preparing the fabric and screen 04 Iron the fabric well. Some fabrics need to be pre-washed so they become more absorbent, but most fabrics, including calico, cotton and linen, generally don’t


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need pre-washing. If printing onto wood, corkboard or paper, there’s no preparation needed; simply lay it flat on the work surface. 05 Prepare your screen by sticking packing tape to the front of the screen – the flat side – to create a border. This makes space at the top, bottom and sides of the screen and is where the ink will start and finish; this is called the ‘ink well’. You should only attach tape and stencils to the front of the screen – keep the back as smooth and uninterrupted as possible. 06 Attach the stencil to the front of the screen using two pieces of masking tape. Masking tape is easy to remove when wet, so it won’t damage the stencil. 07 Make sure the stencil overlaps the frame of tape around the screen. Hold the screen up to the light to make sure there’s no exposed mesh other than the

design and adjust the stencil or add more packing tape if needed. How to print 08 Place the screen right side (RS) down on the surface you’re printing onto. Use a spatula to spread a generous amount of ink in the ink well above the design. Hold the screen with one hand, or get a friend to hold it for you, so it doesn’t move while you’re printing. 09 Next, position the squeegee on a 45o angle above the design and pull the ink down the screen, as shown. Don’t apply too much pressure – only use the weight of the squeegee. This is called a flood stroke; it ensures the design will get sufficient ink. Now it’s time to apply pressure. Using that same 45° angle, give the squeegee three hard pulls across the screen, keeping an even pressure from top to bottom.

10 Remove the screen from the print by laying one hand flat on one side of the screen and using the other hand to lift the screen up, as shown, almost like opening a book. It’s always best to prop the screen up off the table using a block of wood or a roll of tape until you’re ready to clean it.

Cleaning up 11 Now comes the clean up. Carefully use the spatula to scrape all the excess ink back into the ink pot. Remove the stencil and wash off the ink residue. Allow the stencil to air-dry or carefully dry using a hair dryer. 12 Wash out the screen in running water, making sure you get into all the nooks and crannies. It’s important to wash out the screen reasonably quickly – if you leave it too long, the ink will dry in the screen. Once clean, allow the 94 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 83


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HOW TO MAKE… A PRINTED TOWEL screen to dry. If you use a hair dryer, take care: if the hair dryer gets too close to the screen mesh, the heat can burn a hole in it. If washing the screen between stencils, make sure the screen is completely dry before reusing. 13 Either allow the print to air-dry or, if you’re printing on fabric, wood or cork, speed up the process by using a hair dryer. It’s important you keep the hair dryer moving so nothing burns. You can check if the print is dry by lightly pressing a fingertip onto the printed area. If it’s dry, no ink will appear on your finger. Be careful not to smudge the printed area in case it’s still wet. Heat setting the print 14 Before you use the fabric you need to heat set it. This means that you need to use a heat source to cure the ink onto the fabric. The 84 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 94

easiest way to do this is with an iron (the heat from a hair dryer isn’t enough). Put the iron on the cotton setting. Don’t use steam, as the fabric can’t be exposed to water until it has been heat set. Get an old tea towel (or similar) and lay it over the print so you’re not ironing directly onto the fabric. 15 Once you’ve heat set the print, wash the fabric as usual. Iron the print for at least five minutes, but keep the iron moving – you don’t want to burn the design. Making the beach towel 16 Draw your design onto a piece of paper. You can sketch out several shapes, then choose the ones you like the best, or use the templates on page 96. Transfer the shapes onto stencil paper, then cut the stencils as per Steps 1-3. 17 Iron the beach towel and lay it out flat. Prepare the screen and

attach the first stencil to the front as per Steps 4-7. Get your squeegee and inks ready. Place the screen in position and spread a generous amount of ink above the design. Start printing with one flood stroke and then apply pressure during the three hard pulls, as per Steps 8-10. 18 Carefully lift up the screen from the fabric and repeat. You can print the same shape a few times in different spots on the towel. Following Steps 11-12, peel off the stencil and wash it, then wash the screen so it’s ready for the next print. Make sure the screen is dry before printing the next shape. Use a hair dryer to dry each print on the towel before printing the next one. 19 Repeat Steps 17-28 for each of the stencils, in different colours, until you’ve filled the towel with shapes. Heat set the towel with an iron as per Steps 14-15 to finish.


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The Handmade Fair Returns to Hampton Court

14-16 September 2018 The Green at Hampton Court Palace Visit The Handmade Fair for the ultimate creative day out, filled with hands-on craft workshops and shopping galore!

TRY SOMETHING NEW The Handmade Fair at Hampton Court is bigger and better than ever! Playing host to some of the country’s most talented makers, there are so many creative sessions to take part in. This year, when you buy your ticket, you can add on as many as you can fit in! Get your craft on with the interactive Skills Workshops sessions, where you’ll be taught techniques ranging from lino printing to needle felting by an expert in that field. Add a Grand Makes to your basket, too – you’ll join 300 like-minded crafters and learn to make a quick project with maximum impact. You’ll also want to pay a visit to the Super 86 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 94

Theatre, where you can take inspiration from creatives such as Annie Sloan, MasterChef Champion 2018 Kenny Tutt, and watch designer-makers craft head-to-head at the Mollie Makes Mash Ups!

MEET THE CELEBS Visit The Handmade Fair on Friday or Saturday and you’ll find Kirstie Allsopp hosting, and chatting on stage in the Super Theatre. Or, book your tickets for Sunday to see Max McMurdo hosting the show, and sharing the story behind his creative journey, and what it’s like to work on TV, write books, and live in an upcycled shipping container!

EXCLUSIVE TICKET OFFER! Save £3 on Entry Tickets and £10 on VIP Tickets for the Handmade Fair at Hampton Court – book now with code MOLLIE2! Discount on full price Entry Only tickets (£16) and full price VIP tickets (£95). *Booking and transaction fees apply.


OUR PICK

Super Theatre

Masterclasses

Sessions £6 each The Super Theatre is an insight into Kirstie’s world, featuring talks and demonstrations from some of the amazing people she’s worked with. Hear Tilly Walnes from Tilly and the Buttons chat dressmaking, watch Keith Brymer Jones at his potter’s wheel, discover the meaning of flowers with Shane Connolly, and more.

Sessions from £20 Take your crafting to the next level with expertled discussions and demonstrations in a slightly longer session. Lasting between 1½ and 3 hours, you’ll learn more in-depth techniques, such as machine embroidery, appliqué, and working with felt to make a needle case or bookmark you can take home.

This year, we’ll be first in the queue to watch Max McMurdo. Designer, TV presenter and upcycler Max takes everyday waste objects and turns them into amazing accessories. Book your seat and be inspired!

OUR PICK

Grand Makes

Skills Workshops

Sessions £6 each One of the best things about The Handmade Fair is the way it brings fellow crafters together. Book a Grand Makes session, crafting as part of a group alongside 300 others, and you’ll make more than pretty butterfly origami, washi tape greeting cards or retro wooden flowers to take home – you’ll make plenty of new friends, too!

Sessions £12 each If you want to learn new skills from expert tutors, make sure to book an interactive Skills Workshop session. Each one lasts an hour, and you can paint, print, sew, hand-dye, macramé, brush letter... The possibilities are endless. Plan your day and squeeze in as many of these as you can!

OUR PICK

Team Mollie can’t resist a creative flourish, so we’ll be at artist and designer Emily Dawe’s tassel-edged place mat workshop. Gorgeous coloured yarns, unique stitching and plenty of on-trend texture? Yes please!

Indulge your sweet tooth with Stacey Chapman’s freehand machine embroidered sweets. You’ll pick up all the basics of this versatile craft, then use your imagination to make your pick ‘n’ mix dreams come true.

OUR PICK

Zeena Shah, a Mollie favourite, will be sharing how to make fabric covered buttons with digitally printed Spoonflower fabric. We’ll be crafting a handful to update outfits, and for our me-made wardrobe.

BOOK YOUR TICKETS AT WWW.THEHANDMADEFAIR.COM/HAMPTON OR VIA THE TICKET HOTLINE ON 0871 230 7153* USING CODE MOLLIE2 *Calls cost 10p per minute plus network extras. Booking fees apply. VIP tickets cost £85 with offer, saving £10 on face value of £95. Entry Only tickets cost £13 with offer, saving £3 on face value of £16.


PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: HELENA STEELE AND MATILDA SMITH


L e t ’ s r o ll Sew an adventure-ready caddy for kids, designed by Emily Close

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HOW TO MAKE… AN ACTIVITY ROLL MATERIALS Q1m (393/8") Rifle Paper Co. for Cotton + Steel Menagerie in Jungle Hunter (Fabric 1) Q50cm (19¾") Robert Kaufman Kona Cotton Solids in Creamsicle (Fabric 2) Q50cm (19¾") fusible fleece Q50cm (19¾") lightweight fusible interfacing Q40cm (15¾") green zip Q15cm (6") gold elastic, 2.5cm (1") wide Q2m (78¾") white cotton webbing, 2.5cm (1") wide Q28cm (11") Velcro tape, 2cm (¾") wide QWhite sewing thread QTwo 3cm (1¼") D-rings QErasable fabric pen QFabric glue stick 90 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 94

Be it a long haul flight or a night at grandma’s, prepping little ones for a trip is no joke. Get the upper hand with an activity roll sewn in a playful print – this one’s full of pouches and pockets for toys, crayons, treasure maps and shiny pebbles, and it becomes a door hanging organiser when you unroll it. We kinda want one for all our make-up bits, and another for on-the-go crafting. 01 From Fabric 1, cut a 36 x 46cm (141/8 x 181/8") piece for the main exterior, a 13 x 31cm (5¼ x 12¼") piece for the pencil pocket, a 36 x 17.5cm (141/8 x 67/8") piece for the slip pockets and a 36 x 12cm (141/8 x 4¾") piece for the zipped pockets. From Fabric 2, cut a 36 x 46cm (141/8 x 181/8") piece for the lining and a 36 x 3cm (141/8 x 1¼") piece for the dividing strip. Cut a 36 x 46cm (141/8 x 181/8") piece from

both the fusible fleece and the fusible interfacing. 02 Fold the pencil pocket piece in half along the length, then sew 0.5cm (¼") in from the folded edge. 03 Align one edge of the zip with the bottom long edge of the slip pocket piece, right sides (RS) together. Sew using a zipper foot, then press the seam open. Sew 0.25cm (1/8") in from the seam. 04 Fold the top long edge of the slip pocket to the wrong side (WS) by 1cm (3/8") and press. Fold to the WS by 1cm (3/8") again and press. Sew 0.25cm (1/8") down from the fold. Align the other edge of the zip with the top long edge of the zipped pocket piece, RS together. Sew, press the seam open, then sew 0.25cm (1/8") in from the seam. 05 Align the raw edges of the pencil pocket with the top left edges of the lining piece, RS facing, with the folded edge of the

pocket on the right. Place one end of the elastic 7.5cm (3") in from the right-hand side of the lining piece and 13cm (5¼") down from the top, parallel to the pencil pocket. Place the dividing strip RS down along the bottom of the pocket and elastic, aligning the raw edges. Pin, then sew 0.5cm (5/8") in from the edge. Fold the raw long edge of the dividing strip to the WS by 0.5cm (¼"), press, then sew 0.25cm (1/8") in from the folded edge. 06 Sew five horizontal lines 2cm (¾") apart on the pencil pocket, measuring upwards from the dividing strip. Pin the elastic at 4cm (15/8"), 8cm (31/8"), and 12cm (4¾") up from the dividing strip. Push the elastic up as you pin to create loops, then sew. 07 From the webbing, cut two 7.5cm (3") lengths, two 22.5cm (87/8") lengths and one 45cm (17¾") length. Double fold both ends of


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the 45cm (17¾") length and sew each end over the curved side of a D-ring. Fold each 7.5cm (3") length over the straight side of the D-ring, then tack the raw edges together. Double fold and sew one end of each of the 22.5cm (87/8") lengths. Align the 22.5cm (87/8") length and the 7.5cm (3") length at the raw edges, and tack. Repeat. Cut two 14cm (5½") lengths of Velcro. Sew the two loop lengths of Velcro to WS of the two 22.5cm (87/8") lengths of webbing. 08 Match the webbing straps with the top of the lining, aligning the raw edges 5cm (2") in from each side, and tack in place. 09 Using the fabric glue stick, attach one of the remaining hook lengths of Velcro to the main exterior, 5cm (2") in from the left-hand side and 15cm (6") down from the top. Repeat with the other Velcro hook length, this time 5cm Subscribe at molliemakes.com

(2") in from the right-hand side. Sew both Velcro lengths in place. 10 Place the slip and zipped pockets on the lining, RS up, aligning the bottom and side raw edges. Place the main exterior piece WS up on top, aligning the raw edges. Pin all the way around. Sew with a 0.5cm (¼") seam allowance, leaving a 7.5cm (3") gap along the bottom edge for turning out. Make sure you use the hand wheel when sewing over the zip to avoid breaking the needle.

11 Next, trim the zip, edges and corners, then turn the roll RS out and push the corners out. Press. Top stitch along all the edges, except over the zip, using a 0.25cm (1/8") seam allowance. 12 To finish, top stitch 0.25cm (1/8") in along the top edge of the dividing strip. Sew horizontally 2cm (¾") above the zip. Sew a vertical centre line from the bottom of the zipper pockets to the top of the slip pocket, taking care not to hit the zip teeth with the needle.

Emily Close As a lover of all things creative, Emily uses her sewing skills to design and create pouches and pen rolls for artists of all ages for her company, Sew Darn Close. She lives in Radford, Virginia with her husband and three daughters aged three, six and nine years old. www.sewdarnclose.com

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HEADSHOT PHOTOGRAPHY: KAITLYN PHIPPS WWW.KAITLYNPHIPPSPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

04


LE 018 A S Y2 N O JUL TH 7 1

NEXT MONTH’S ISSUE PLANS!

R@[R @ UWQRXV d@=P\WXS PZYMWV

XWPR= @ \@=RXURTWV PZ=MR MAKE IT

make a statement ¸WX@TLWWd

¤ MONSTERA PICNIC BLANKET ¤ CROCHET BEACH TOP ¤ EMBROIDERED BEE SHOES ¤ MACRAMÉ MAGAZINE RACK ¤ TERRAZZO SHORTS SET ¤ PAINTED INLAY TABLE

PLUS NECKLACE EMBROIDERY KIT Stitch peachy summer florals!

95 COVER GIFT AND CONTENTS SUBJECT TO CHANGE.


PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: HELENA STEELE AND MATILDA SMITH; MODEL: ALEXANDRA FIA, JELLY PURSE: WWW.SUNJELLIES.COM

SummeR fun Hook up these colour-pop crochet sandals by Sherrie Yabsley for sunny days


HOW TO MAKE… CROCHET SANDALS MATERIALS Q Paintbox Yarns Cotton DK, 100% cotton, 125m/137yd per 50g ball, one ball each of Bubblegum Pink (451) (Yarn A) and Buttercup Yellow (423) (Yarn B) Q 3mm (UK 10, US D/3) crochet hook Q Embroidery needle Q Espadrille soles (we used Prym in size 5 (UK)) TENSION Approx. 7 sts and 6 rows to measure 3 x 3cm (1¼ x 1¼")

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ABBREVIATIONS (UK) st(s) stitch(es) ch chain ss slip stitch dc double crochet FINISHED SIZE The pattern fits a UK size 5, but can be adapted easily to other sizes by adjusting the length of the straps: Size 3-4: 4.5 x 15.5cm (1¾ x 6") Size 5-6: 4.5 x 18cm (1¾ x 7") Size 7-8: 4.5 x 20.5cm (1¾ x 8")

This summer, we’re making fashion choices based on our childhood tuck shop favourites. Chewy fruit salad sweets are the unlikely style icon in question here, inspiring a fresh pair of zigzag summer sandals. Instructions Each sandal is made by crocheting two straps, which cross over and are sewn to the espadrille sole using blanket stitch. The straps are crocheted with two contrasting shades of yarn using the tapestry technique. When using tapestry crochet, you’ll be using two shades of yarn on each row, and will need to carry the yarn not in use at any one time. This is done by encasing the unused yarn as you work by crocheting over it. There is a right side (RS) and a wrong side (WS). When crocheting the RS, hold the unused yarn towards the back of the sts. When

crocheting the WS, hold the unused yarn towards the front of the stitches. Try not to pull the unused yarn tight at the end of rows as it will bunch the stitches. The pattern can be adjusted to fit your shoe size. If you need to add an extra row or one less row, just follow the pattern repeat and finish where you need to. The pattern repeat is 10 rows, so just carry on repeating these rows to reach your desired length. As a guide, follow these repeats for the following sizes: Small (UK size 3-4) – 3 pattern repeats [30 rows] Medium (UK size 5-6) – 3½ pattern repeats [35 rows] Large (UK size 7-8) – 4 pattern repeats [40 rows] When changing colour, do so on the final yarn round hook of the previous stitch. Remember to work over the unused yarn by holding it against the WS of the work.


Ch1 at the start of a row does not count as a stitch throughout. Straps (make 4) Foundation using Yarn A, ch11 Row 1 (RS) 1dc in 2nd ch from hook, 8dc, change to Yarn B, 1dc in Yarn B, turn [10sts] Row 2 (WS) ch1, 2dc in Yarn B, change to Yarn A, 8dc in Yarn A, turn Row 3 ch1, 7dc in Yarn A, change to Yarn B, 3dc in Yarn B, turn Row 4 ch1, 4dc in Yarn B, change to Yarn A, 6dc in Yarn A, turn Row 5 ch1, 5dc in Yarn A, change

Sherrie Yabsley Crochet designer Sherrie lives on the coast in South Devon. She loves using colour and experimenting with contrasting shades and different stitches.You’ll find her teaching workshops at her local craft shop and running after her three children. www.ollieandbella.co.uk

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to Yarn B, 5dc Yarn B, turn Row 6 ch1, 6dc in Yarn B, change to Yarn A, 4dc in Yarn A, turn Row 7 ch1, 3dc in Yarn A, change to Yarn B, 7dc in Yarn B, turn Row 8 ch1, 8dc in Yarn B, change to Yarn A, 2dc in Yarn A, turn Row 9 ch1, 1dc in Yarn A, change to Yarn B, 9dc in Yarn B, turn Row 10 ch1, 1dc in Yarn B in each st along, change to Yarn A, turn Row 11 ch1, 9dc in Yarn A, change to Yarn B, 1dc in yarn B, turn Rows 2 to 11 set the pattern. Repeat these until you reach the desired size then break yarn and fasten off. Weave in ends Finishing Referring to the main image as a guide, hold the espadrille sole against your foot to position the straps, then pin the short edges in place as desired. Place the straps so the finished end is towards the heel of the sandal. Attach the straps to the edges of the

espadrille soles, using blanket stitch, as follows: Thread a length of yarn through the sharp tapestry needle and knot the end. Push the needle and thread down through the edge of sole securing the knot on top of the sole. Push the needle up through the corner edge of the strap, keeping close to the knot to hide it. Push the needle up through the sole and wrap the yarn around the back of the needle. Pull taut to secure the stitch and strap to the sole. Continue using blanket stitch evenly all around the sole, catching each stitch along the strap edge. Secure the last stitch, push back through the sole at an angle towards the strap, and wrap the thread around the needle and pull through. Fasten the yarn end in the underside of the strap. Secure the other edge of strap to the opposite side of the sole. Repeat this process for each strap. 94 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 95


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TEMPLATES All the shapes for this issue’s makes. Unless otherwise stated, templates are shown at 100%.You can find the full-size templates ready to download from www.molliemakes.com

YOUR BONUS GIFT BY MANUELA TRANI PAGE 7

02

03

04

05

06

07

Use two strands of thread, unless stated otherwise, and turn to page 101 for a stitch guide. 01 Using the templates on page 97, cut one body, one wing and one beak B piece from the black felt, and four legs, one cheek and one beak A piece from the pink felt. From the turquoise felt, cut one eye and one tail A piece. From the gold faux leather, cut one chest and one tail B piece.

02 Whipstitch the beak A and B pieces onto beak C. Turn and trim off the excess yellow felt from both ends. 03 Backstitch the gold chest piece onto the body, then whipstitch the eye piece on top. 04 Embroider feathers onto the wing using fly stitch and pink, yellow and turquoise thread. Backstitch the curved edge of the wing onto the toucan with turquoise thread. Whipstitch the

beak to the body and backstitch the mouth line, as shown. 05 Embroider a circle for the eye with satin stitch and three strands of black thread. Add the light detail with white thread. Backstitch the cheek on. 06 Pin tail B on the toucan, pin tail A on top and whipstitch through the layers. Using one strand of thread and blanket stitch, sew the leg pieces together to make two legs.

07 Pin the toucan onto the black felt and cut around it to create the back piece. Cut a 1 x 5cm (3/8 x 2") tab from the faux leather and fold it over the keyring. Place the two ends of the tab and the top of the feet between the front and back of the toucan, referring to the main image for placement, and sew all the way around using blanket stitch, leaving a gap. Fill the beak and body with soft toy stuffing and sew the gap closed.

Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

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YOUR BONUS GIFT Cheek Cut 1

BY MANUELA TRANI PAGE 7

Beak A Cut 1

Tail A Cut 1

Beak B Cut 1 Eye Cut 1 Body Cut 1

Beak C Cut 1

Chest Cut 1

Wing Cut 1

Tail B Cut 1

Leg Cut 4

CASSETTE TAPE PURSES BY LYSA FLOWER PAGE 18

A10

Cassette front

A1

A2

A4

A3

A5

Cut 2

A9

A7

Cassette side Cut 2

A8

A6

B2

B3

C11

B1

C10

C9

C8

C7

C1

B4

C2

C3

C4

C5

C6

Tabs Cut 2

Cassette bottom Cut 1 Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

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MAKES

RING DISH BY EMILY ASHBOURN PAGE 16

Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

98 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 94


MAKES

MACRAMÉ KNOT GUIDE USE OUR HANDY KNOT GUIDE FOR THE MACRAMÉ WALL HANGING ON PAGE 63

01

02

Lark’s head knot Fold the cord in half along the length. 02 Slip the folded string on top of the object the lark’s head knot will be tied onto. 01

01

02

03

03 Pull the cord down around the object you’re tying the knot over, without twisting the cords, then pull the other two strands through the loop, as shown.

03

Square knot You’ll need two folded cords, secured with lark’s head knots, creating four cords. The two outer cords are the working cords. 02 Move working cord 1 over cords 2 and 3, towards the right. Pass working cord 1 under working cord 4. 01

04

04

05

03 Move working cord 4 to the left, passing it under the two middle cords and over working cord 1. Pull on both working cords to tighten the knot, while holding the middle cords steady. 04 The two working cords have now switched places. Move working cord 1 to

02

01

04 To tighten the lark’s head knot, hold the two cords in one hand and the object you have them tied around in the other. Pull until the knot is fastened at the top.

the left, passing it over the middle cords and under working cord 4. 05 Move working cord 4 to the left, under the middle cords and over cord 1. 06 Tighten the square knot by pulling on both the working cords, while holding the two middle cords steady. 03

Cord 1

Guide Cord 1

Guide

04

Cord 1

Guide

05

06

Cord 1

Cord 1 Guide

Double half hitch knot 01 02

06

Pass cord 1 around the guide. Bring cord 1 over and around the guide.

Cord 1

Guide

Guide

03 Bring cord 1 back through the loop that has formed. This makes a half hitch knot. 04 Pull the knot snug and slide it up.

05 Continue taking cord 1 around the guide again to tie another half hitch knot. 06 Pull the knot snug and slide it up.

Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

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MAKES

EMBROIDERED T-SHIRT BY GEORGIE K EMERY PAGE 32 Photocopy at 125%

LEFT SHOULDER

RIGHT SHOULDER

FIND FULL SIZE TEMPLATES ON molliemakes.com

Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

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STITCH GUIDE USE OUR HANDY STITCH GUIDE FOR THE EMBROIDERY PROJECTS IN THIS ISSUE

01

02

03

04 01

02

01

02

03

02

BACKSTITCH This stitch is ideal for outlines, and it’s the one you’ll find you use the most. Come up from the back at point 1, then go down at point 2. Come up at point 3, then go back to point 1 and bring the needle through to the back.

03

01

04

02

03

01

01 04 03

SATIN STITCH When you want to fill an area with a smooth finish, this stitch is the ideal choice. It’s best worked in small areas, because if the stitches are too long, they may snag. Come up at point 1, then go down at point 2. Come up at point 3, then go down at point 4. Repeat. Always work the stitches across the area you’re filling, coming up on the opposite side where your needle went down.

04

02

FISHBONE STITCH This stitch is often used for making leaves, but also works for areas you want to fill with a line down the centre. Make a straight stitch at the point of the leaf where the centre rib would sit. Come up at point 1 on the edge of the leaf and go down at point 2, barely crossing the centre line. Come up again at point 3 on the opposite side of the line, then go down at point 4, crossing the centre line. Repeat, working from side to side, until the shape is filled.

02

SPLIT STITCH This is a great stitch for working outlines. When you make the ‘split’, try to go through the fibres of the embroidery thread, and not just in between the two strands. Come up at point 1, then go down at point 2. Come up at point 3, splitting the previous stitch, then go down at point 4. Repeat.

02 01 03

04

01

02

STRAIGHT STITCH The simplest of stitches, straight stitch can be grouped together or used alone. Come up at point 1, then go down at point 2. Repeat.

FLY STITCH This simple stitch can be worked as individual stitches or in a line. Come up at point 1, then go down at point 2, leaving the thread loose. Come up at point 3, catching the loop of thread, then gently pull it down to form a ‘V’. Go down at point 4.

03 01

BLANKET STITCH This is fun for decorative stitching or appliqué. Try to keep the spacing and stitch height consistent, or change it up to create a pattern. Come up at point 1. Go down at point 2 and come back up at point 3, keeping the needle over the working thread. Pull the thread to create a right angle. Repeat.

Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

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PRINTED TOWEL BY LARA DAVIES AND JESS WRIGHT PAGE 81

Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

102 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 94


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Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

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SEQUIN BUMBAG BY AMY ELY PAGE 39 Photocopy at 200%

Front body piece Cut 2

FIND FULL SIZE TEMPLATES ON molliemakes.com

Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

104 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 94


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SEQUIN BUMBAG BY AMY ELY PAGE 39 Photocopy at 200%

Lid Cut 2

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Back body piece Cut 2

Mollie Makes (ISSN 20460228) (USPS 20517) July 18 is published 14 times a year (monthly, with a Spring issue in March and a Christmas issue in November) by Immediate Media Company Bristol Ltd., Tower House, Fairfax St. Bristol BS1 3BN, United Kingdom. Distributed in the U.S. by NPS Media Group, 2 Corporate Dr., Suite 945, Shelton, CT 06484. Periodical Postage paid at Shelton, CT and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address change to Mollie Makes, 3330 Pacific Ave., Suite 500, Virginia Beach, VA 23451. Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

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Geometric jewellery designer Sarah Empson talks innovation

Name: Sarah Empson Occupation: Jewellery designer-maker

The geometric forms found in nature inspire Sarah’s designs

We launched Geo Heaven in November 2016 with a range of 3D printed nylon jewellery. I design the pieces on the computer using CAD software and have them printed by our 3D printing partner in the Netherlands. Making complex geometric shapes in CAD can be challenging so I use my in-house tech nerd to support me, AKA my husband Monty! To celebrate our first business birthday, we introduced a luxury range of necklaces. Customers had asked for our jewellery in metallic colours, but achieving a luxurious,

we use an innovative new process which still feels a bit like magic Sarah finishes each piece off, adding chains and fastenings

shiny finish in nylon wasn’t possible. The search was on for metallic materials that could be printed. To our delight, we discovered stainless steel could be 3D printed and gold plated using an innovative new process which still feels a bit like magic. We’re expecting our first baby later this year so we’re hoping to launch a new collection and expand the luxury range before our little one arrives!

Currents Visit www.geoheaven.co.uk to see what new geometric delights Sarah and Monty have been creating lately, and follow along on Instagram @geo_heaven.

Next issue: Bonbi Forest on sharing your process 106 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 94

Watching: Ru Paul’s Drag Race on Netflix – I’ve still got a lot of catching up to do! Eating: Everything in sight – I’m blaming bump, though. Listening to: The Fringe of It podcast – it’s a hilarious insight into millennial life.


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