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OCTOBER 2019 • stltoday.com/collegeconnection

ST. LOUIS NATIONAL COLLEGE FAIR SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY Simon Recreation Center Sunday, Oct. 20, 2019, 1-4 p.m.

Register now at gotomyncf.com

INSIDE: •

Guide to exhibitors and floor plan

How colleges boost the St. Louis economy

Push yourself in high school to see a payoff in college

Financial aid questions


READY FOR ANYTHING. “I chose SIU because here even freshmen take up positions that typically go only to juniors and seniors in other schools. For instance, I was made an anchor for the student-run television news program here in my sophomore year.”

Ryan Davis, St. Louis, TV/Digital Media/Radio major

River Region News Evening Edition anchor and producer, Chancellor’s Scholar, University Honors

THAT’S A SALUKI

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What SIU can do for you Sponsored content by SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY CARBONDALE

Southern Illinois University Carbondale students are known for their friendliness, individuality and willingness to try new things. SIU students may take courses in multiple areas—such as business and foreign language or science and communications. They may connect their own paths and build an educational foundation that is both traditional and uniquely their own. Or they may follow an approved course of study that puts them on a satisfying career path in engineering, technology, health care or other areas. Perhaps the most important reason studentscometoSIUisbecausewedeliverthe advantages of a nationally ranked research university and the personal attention and hands-on learning options of a small college. It adds up to career-enhancing experiences, research and publication opportunities and mentored creative project—as early as your very first year as a Saluki! Your SIU experience is more than just an education; it will change your life. We encourage you to personalize your education by engaging in your own research and creative projects. You can get your hands dirty at the student-run organic farms. You can help manage $1+ million of the SIU Foundation’s portfolio. You can compete against other collegiate teams in the air, on the water, with robotics, cyber security, interior design, marketing or an array of sports clubs. You can star on stage or in the orchestra, you can contribute to clean energy research, learn to fight forest fires or travel to post-hurricane disaster sites to understand and improve recovery efforts. You can even earn an Emmy for television news coverage.

why we’ve done away with out-of-state tuition—we don’t want a little thing like location to come between you and your SIU adventure! Our full-ride scholarships—the Chancellor’s Scholarship for incoming freshman and the Provost’s Scholarship for transfer students—bring top students to the university, along with our University Excellence Scholarships. You’ll want to find out what is available in your specific area. Our General Scholarship Application ensures that you automatically apply for every scholarship for which you are eligible. Find information about all of them at scholarships.siu.edu. FIND YOUR PACK Maybe you’ve heard of Living Learning Communities? At SIU, we have 16 of them! LLCs are areas of on-campus residence halls

reserved for students in similar majors or with similar interests. For example, we have a Business LLC, an Engineering LLC and an Architecture, Art & Design LLC as well as an LLC for Campus Pride. We also have more than 250 student organizations on campus. Some are the national honors societies and student chapters of professional organizations that a research university such as SIU might be expected to have. Some are affiliated with particular majors or career paths, others are Greek fraternities and sororities. Some are sports-oriented. And some are for special interests. From sustainability groups to a Quidditch team, the Southern Illinois Metalsmiths, Movie Camera Movement film makers or the Saluki Racing—Formula One SAE team, Saluki students have myriad opportunities to find their pack.

READY FOR ANYTHING Our students are ready to hit the ground running, committed to community service, learning-by-doing and participating in a supportive academic environment. Our alumni remain connected to their alma mater. They seek ways to help current students, foster interns and externs, and offer professional expertise. Our faculty members bring creative and research experience into the classroom, mentor students one on one, and encourage the best from their students. That’s Southern Illinois University Carbondale; that’s what it means to be a Saluki.

IT’S A SALUKI NATION – WE’VE ELIMINATED OUT-OF-STATE TUITION! SIU has a long history of opening doors for students, welcoming many who are the first in their families to go to college as well as those who are third- and fourth-generation college students or “Legacy Salukis.” Our students come from big cities and small towns, from nearly every state and more than 100 countries. We pride ourselves on the diversity of our student body. That’s Photo provided by Southern Illinois University-Carbondale BRAND AVE. STUDIOS

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COLLEGE

CONNECTION CONTENTS 4 10-11

Adding it up How colleges boost the St. Louis economy

Exhibitors list Help to find everything at the fair

Student to student Push yourself in high school to see a payoff in college

Financial aid Questions to ask to understand cost

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Adding It Up:

NACAC National College Fair Sponsored by the National Association for College Admission Counseling Date: Sunday, October 20, 2019 Place: St. Louis University — Simon Recreation Center, 3639 Laclede Ave., St. Louis, MO 63108 Time: 1 to 4 p.m.

This content was produced by Brand Ave. Studios. The news and editorial departments of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch had no role in its creation or display. For more information about Brand Ave. Studios, contact tgriffin@stltoday.com. SALES MANAGER Charles Mems cmems@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8033 CONTENT PRODUCTION MANAGER Sarah Gerrein sgerrein@stltoday.com 314-340-8014

CONTENT PRODUCTION Natalie Macias nmacias@stltoday.com 314-657-3310 VICE PRESIDENT BRAND AVE. STUDIOS Teresa Griffin tgriffin@stltoday.com 314-340-8909

How colleges boost the St. Louis economy

LORI ROSE

Brand Ave. Studios contributing writer

Cities like St. Louis can reap the economic benefits of being home to a diverse group of colleges and universities. For one, start-ups or employers looking to relocate can reasonably expect a metropolitan area that boasts a number of institutions of higher learning to provide a highly educated labor pool. But producing educated and skilled workers is just one of the ways a college or university supports a region and adds to the local economy.

Spending money

Like any business, colleges and universities help fuel the local economy by spending money PG 4

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on goods, services and salaries. Washington University, for example, is one of the largest employers in the St. Louis region with more than 15,500 employees — some 3,800 faculty members and many more employees working to support the faculty and students alike. All told, Washington University estimates it spent more than $289 million on goods and services in 2017 and supported thousands more jobs in the region — everything from the small businesses that supply janitorial supplies or landscaping services to the numerous local companies involved in its ongoing multi-million campus redevelopment projects. In fact, the university spent about $229 million in 2018 on payments to local construction vendors. BRAND AVE. STUDIOS


Beyond Uber rides and lattes

Then there are the thousands of students who help boost the economy by dropping dollars at area coffee shops and pizza parlors. More than 90 percent of Washington University’s roughly 14,000 students come from out of state. While they’re here in St. Louis, they spend money on everything from rent and groceries to Uber rides and entertainment — an estimated $166 million a year. Saint Louis University, with an enrollment of nearly 13,000, estimates its students spend $73 million locally each year. The sports scene tacks on even more dollars. SLU alone hosts more than 160 sporting events a year, which officials estimate translates to 10,000 overnight stays and $250 per person spent on lodging, food, souvenirs and more.

Earning power

With diploma in hand, graduates can reasonably be expected to earn more and spend more. The average bachelor’s degree holder contributes $278,000 more to local economies than the average high school graduate through direct spending over the course of his or her lifetime, according to a report from the Brookings Institution. An associate degree holder contributes $81,000 more than a high school graduate, the report found. The challenge is keeping those students and their earning power here after they graduate, said Dr. Glenn MacDonald, an economics professor at Washington University. It’s not a given that graduates land a job here — or even want to. “We’re competing everywhere for students,” he said. “They’re going to come here, and then they’re going to go get a job somewhere else. They’re going to be here for four years, and then they’re going to disappear.” It’s a different story at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, said Tom George, who recently retired as chancellor. “We buck the trend on that one,” he said. “Most of our students come from the region and so they tend to stay in the region.” At UMSL, George said, almost 75 percent of UMSL alumni stay local after graduation. In addition, a majority of UMSL’s 11,000 students — whose average age is 26 — are already contributing directly to the economy because they are working either full- or parttime while going to school, George said. They may not be spending money in more “traditional” college ways — only 1,000 live on campus, for example — but they’re paying taxes and mortgages and supporting families, too. “Their money is spread out in the economy in different ways,” he said. “They’re more ingrained in the economy than a typical student.”

Collaborating with local employers

Building partnerships with local businesses is another way universities contribute to the BRAND AVE. STUDIOS

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economy and also help entice graduates to stay in the region. George points to UMSL’s partnership with Express Scripts, which has led to hundreds of students finding jobs or internships. A partnership with Ameren in its Ameren Accelerator is aimed at creating new jobs in the energy industry. WashU, SLU and UMSL are all collaborating in the Cortex Innovation Community, the growing technology district in St. Louis that is home to hundreds of start-ups, researchers and entrepreneurs.

“It’s a kind of advertising for us,” MacDonald said. “When we have people who visit and say, you know, actually St. Louis is a pretty good place, it helps us have a better brand.” In addition, the education business tends to be counter-cyclical, MacDonald said. That means that if the economy in general is in a downturn — when workers are being laid off, for example — industries like education help fill the gap. They are often less directly affected because demand for education continues or even goes up, he said.

Improving our brand

At Maryville University, recently named the fourth fastest-growing private university by The Chronicle of Higher Education, enrollment topped 10,000 this year, with a record-breaking freshman class bringing on-campus enrollment to more than 4,000. About 40 percent of the university’s total enrollment is made up of students from the St. Louis metropolitan area. Educators at Maryville study local and

MacDonald points out that schools like WashU also attract their students’ visiting parents as well as prospective students, who in turn spend money on hotel rooms and restaurants while they’re in town. Beyond that, each time a visitor has a good experience in St. Louis it helps to improve the city’s image and counteract any negative perceptions, he said.

Staying local

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national trends in various industries with an eye toward both attracting potential students and meeting the needs of local employers. Recently, a $132,000 grant from Bayer allowed the university to double the size of its fledgling Cyber Ready St. Louis program, which sends faculty and upperclassmen into North St. Louis County high schools to help prepare underserved students for careers in this fastgrowing field. Cybersecurity experts are among the most in-demand professionals, with employment projected to grow more than 30 percent in the next 10 years. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median annual wage for information security analysts is $98,000. Maryville’s expanding online degree portfolio also contributed to its growth, which has enabled numerous adult students to achieve higher earning potential and career promotion through skill development. Specialized programs were added in such growing career fields as senior living management and data science. SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2019 I

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High school students: Push yourself now and you’ll see a payoff later ASHLYNN PEREZ

Brand Ave. Studios contributing writer

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here’s always been pressure on high school students to think about the future. Between the college posters lining the school walls or the inquisitive relatives, teenagers may encounter anxiety and apprehension about where they’re going in life. But high school is more than a requirement to complete before you tackle college; it’s a springboard for what comes next. Here’s a few ways you can use your remaining time in high school to set you up for a successful college career.

Seek out challenges

While getting the easy A is appealing at first, it won’t challenge you or benefit the skills necessary for college courses. When picking classes, it’s good to choose the ones that you can keep up in but will push beyond your comfort zone. “Taking advanced classes really helped me,” said Claire Huss, recent graduate of Francis Howell North High School. “Especially the ones I took in my major. The high school AP classes are so much like college courses and so I was familiar with a lot of the material before we started learning anything.” Honors, Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) classes are a great way to challenge yourself and prepare you for college. Alongside earning college credit, these courses teach strategies for essays and study tactics, which are invaluable for higher education. Being able to succeed in these classes can make an impression on colleges and looks great on the transcript.

Follow your interests

Picking a pathway in life can be stressful. As a high school student, it oftentimes seems too early to be choosing your college major, let alone decide on a future career path. Don’t fret—you have time. The key in high school while still in decision-mode is to choose something you like and stick with it. Take electives in whatever major you’re looking to go into; join clubs that focus on those skills. You’ll get good at it before you even step foot on campus, and even if you end up changing your mind and your major, you’ll have some valuable skills under your belt.

Get involved

High school offers a great chance to join clubs, take initiative and demonstrate leadership. Extracurricular activities show college boards your devotion and they can exhibit your abilities as a well-rounded student. Pursuing higher positions in these programs—like run-

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Photo provided by iStock ning for Student Council President or team captain—will give you an advantage, as you are showing off both loyalty to your activities and leadership strength.

Develop work ethic

Consider applying for a job. Work experience shows colleges you can be trusted, and it’ll get you a few bucks to put in your college savings account. Maintaining a job alludes good work ethic, self-discipline and time management. While these are important for high school, they are critical for college. Learning them before you graduate can be a big boost to your success rate. Another important trait that will help you through higher education is self-sufficiency.

Jobs give you the ability to identify what needs to be done and act on it, displaying impressive independence that will make you more responsible and more reliable. “Learn a lot of responsibility,” Huss said. “In college, professors don’t say what to do every day — sometimes you have to figure it out on your own. You need to be able to go out and learn for yourself.”

Fun/life balance

About the author Ashlynn Perez, 16, is a student at Francis Howell North High School and recently interned at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. She is the current copy editor for her school newspaper and volunteers at a middle school feeder journalism program. She hopes to major in journalism in the future.

Most importantly, don’t forget to live your life. While studying for the ACT, grade point averages and preparation do matter—don’t skip out on the pep rallies or football games. Paint your face, show your school spirit and spend quality time with your friends.

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Tomorrow’s Innovators:

Maryville student proves that differences can be inspiring, not limiting Sponsored content by LORI ROSE, BRAND AVE. STUDIOS CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Occupational therapists helped Madelyn Hubbs master some of the tasks of daily living—such as tying her shoes—that can be more challenging for someone who is limb different. But Madelyn says they taught her so much more. “They taught me that no matter your disability you can achieve whatever you want,” she says. Madelyn, 19, was born without her left arm. The therapists and other specialists at Shriners Hospitals for Children - St. Louis helped give her the tools and confidence she needed to learn to do some things a little differently from her peers. They also inspired her to her future career path. Today, Madelyn is studying occupational

therapy at Maryville University, where she is a recipient of the Maryville University/ St. Louis Post-Dispatch Tomorrow’s Innovators scholarship. Given annually to 30 students, the scholarship is valued at $3,000 annually and renewable for up to 10 semesters with a 3.0 Maryville University GPA. Madelyn, now in her sophomore year, wants to teach other children that their differences should not limit them. Madelyn has long been a supporter of Shriners Hospitals for Children. Years ago she started raising money for Shriners programs, organizing an annual toy drive and volunteering as a patient ambassador. She has spoken to thousands of students

and adults throughout the St. Louis area to promote disability awareness. She also works as a counselor at an annual retreat for kids who have upper limb differences and their families. In high school, she helped staff members at Shriners Hospitals for Children - St. Louis put together an anti-bullying toolkit for other patient ambassadors, as well as parents and the public to use to bring awareness to the issue. Madelyn remembered a time in elementary school when she was teased about her physical difference, and “that’s something I don’t want other kids to go through,” she says. This year, in addition to her studies and her involvement in several Maryville campus organizations, Madelyn has taken on a new role. She was named one of two National Patient Ambassadors for Shriners Hospitals for Children. She travels frequently around the country to talk about her

personal journey in the face of adversity and the difference Shriners Hospitals for Children made in her life. “And I get to say thank you to the incredible men and women who raised money for us,” she says. She also still finds time to add to a series of YouTube videos she first created when she was 14 to help others who are missing limbs. The videos show Madelyn tying her shoes, playing the ukulele, putting on nail polish, and now even driving her car. “Everyone is unique in their own unique way,” she tells others. “I can do anything you can do—I just might do it differently.”

Madelyn Hubbs showing a class how to tie her shoe. Photo provided by Madelyn Hubbs

TOMORROW’ S I NNOVATORS SCHOLARSHI P

Maryville University has partnered with the St. Louis Post Dispatch to recognize area students who have demonstrated innovation in projects, leadership, or activities. High school counselors, principals, teachers, or homeschool educators can nominate high school seniors online.

maryville.edu/stlinnovators Deadline December 1, 2019

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Maryville’s campus enhancements focused on your future Sponsored content by MARYVILLE UNIVERSITY

For the past five years, Maryville has aggressively renovated, upgraded and created new dynamic learning spaces on campus. Cutting-edge technology drives every project, ensuring you’ll have the most innovative tools available to help you learn and prepare for career success. We are also working on additional plans to grow and further enhance our classrooms, our gathering and study spaces and our sports facilities. Our new state-of-the-art learning spaces are outfitted with the latest technology, including augmented and virtual reality, among others to enhance and empower student learning. Our innovation hub will be a series of spaces designed to foster student, faculty and staff creativity, project-based learning and innovative engagement. Academics is just one aspect of your college experience, so we’ve also been busy assuring your outof-classroom experience is just as active and engaging. Students were delighted to see the addition of Starbucks to campus last year and are already enjoying the newly renovated Louie’s, one of the dining options on campus. Louie’s features freshly made, build-your-own-burgers

where you can-with a variety of toppings and sauces, build a burger as unique as you are. The new Maryville University Athletic Complex, opening this fall, will not only host competitions for our NCAA Division II lacrosse, softball and tennis teams but will greatly enhance intramural and club sports for all of our students. Our new soccer stadium seats more than 800 and includes a NCAA track for meets and field events. It also offers a covered portion for tailgating and student life events. The Maryville University Hockey Center opened in August in partnership with the Chesterfield Hockey Association. The 84,000-square-foot facility features two NHL-sized rinks and seating for approximately 2,000 spectators. The Hockey Center will be the home facility of Maryville’s men’s and women’s

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hockey teams. There are so many more exciting things to come. Visit maryville.edu/campusenhancements to see what else we’re working on and envision yourself at Maryville.

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The recently renovated Anheuser-Busch Hall. Photo provided by Maryville University

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2019 Fall St. Louis NCF Workshops

2019 St. Louis National College Fair Committee Alyssa Wedding, senior admisTodd Burrell, director of undersion counselor, Saint Louis University graduate admissions, Southern IlliMeredith Buschmann, admis- nois University Edwardsville Joanna Finch, director of undersions coordinator, St. Louis Community College at Meramec graduate admissions, Webster University PG 10

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NACAC would like to thank the following for their support of the 2019 Saint Louis National College Fair:

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HOW TO CHOOSE A COLLEGE (Multipurpose Room #1) 2:00 p.m.

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Exhibitors and Booth Numbers International Trinity College Dublin 407 Alabama Samford University 216 The University of Alabama 309 The University of Alabama in Huntsville 402 University of Alabama at Birmingham 110 Arizona Arizona State University 523 Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University 606 Grand Canyon University 522 Northern Arizona University 201 The University of Arizona 526 University of Advancing Technology 615 Arkansas University of Arkansas 613 California Santa Monica College 330 Colorado Colorado Mesa University 107 Colorado State University 307 University of Northern Colorado 417 Western Colorado University 504 District of Columbia The George Washington University 433 Florida Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University 606 Florida Institute of Technology 405 Full Sail University 105 Lynn University 210 Nova Southeastern University 315 Saint Leo University 301 The University of Tampa 501 University of South Florida 129 Georgia Covenant College 239 Savannah College of Art and Design 103 Illinois American Academy of Art 226 Augustana College 218 Bradley University 305 Columbia College Chicago 306 Concordia University Chicago 203 DePaul University 310 Dominican University 416 Eastern Illinois University 328 Elmhurst College 512 Greenville University 511 Illinois College 308 Illinois State University 123 Illinois Wesleyan University 229 Knox College 111 Lewis University 212 Lincoln College 215 Loyola University Chicago 302 MacMurray College 614 McKendree University 610 Millikin University 115 Monmouth College 617 BRAND AVE. STUDIOS

Washburn University 128 Wichita State University 401 Mobile Registration Kentucky Register today at Bellarmine University 118 www.gotomyncf.com. Brescia University 213 The benefits of online Eastern Kentucky University 311 student registration... Murray State University 320, 322 University of Kentucky 509 „ Students register for University of Louisville 112 the fair one time. Louisiana „ It eliminates the need Xavier University of Louisiana 136 for college contact cards. „ Students are easily able to elaborate on Maryland special interests, extracurricular activities United States Naval Academy 231 and accomplishments. Michigan Lawrence Technological University 101 North Central College 400 Michigan State University 209 Northern Illinois University 126 Minnesota Parkland College 408 Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota 233 Quincy University 508 St. Olaf College 117 Roosevelt University 507 University of Minnesota-Twin Cities 138 Southern Illinois University Carbondale Mississippi 135, 137, 139, 141 Mississippi State University 521 Southern Illinois University Edwardsville University of Mississippi 335 130, 132 Missouri University of Illinois at Chicago 333 Avila University 338 University of Illinois at Springfield 326 Barnes-Jewish College Goldfarb School of Nursing University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 238 334 Western Illinois University 513 Central Methodist University 412 Indiana Columbia College 435 Ball State University 106 Culver-Stockton College 618 Butler University 207 Drury University 612 DePauw University 219 Fontbonne University 241 Earlham College 318 Lindenwood University 127 Franklin College 109 Maryville University 221, 223 Indiana State University 208 Missouri Baptist University 211 Indiana University Bloomington 119 Missouri Southern State University 133 IUPUI 304 Missouri State University Marian University 204 430, 432, 434, 436, 438 Purdue University 404 Missouri University of Science and Technology University of Evansville 517 419, 421, 423 University of Indianapolis 300 Missouri Western State University 336 Valparaiso University 600 Northwest Missouri State University 131 Vincennes University 413 Rockhurst University 205 Iowa Saint Louis University 619, 621, 623, 625 Coe College 116 Southeast Missouri State University Cornell College 516 603, 605, 607 Drake University 121 Southwest Baptist University 228 Iowa State University 316 St. Louis College of Pharmacy 616 Iowa Wesleyan University 113 St. Louis Community College 530 Saint Ambrose University 222 State Technical College of Missouri 520 Simpson College 200 Stephens College 339 University of Iowa 415 Truman State University 534 University of Northern Iowa 411 University of Central Missouri 317, 319 Wartburg College 518 University of Missouri Kansas 527, 529, 531, 533, 535, 537 Benedictine College 502 University of Missouri-Kansas City 114 Kansas State University 104 University of Missouri-Saint Louis University of Kansas 313 230, 232, 234, 236 University of Saint Mary 227 Washington University in St. Louis 410 STLTODAY.COM/COLLEGECONNECTION

Webster University 120, 122 Westminster College 519 William Woods University 108 Nebraska Creighton University 332 Peru State College 506 University of Nebraska-Lincoln 536 North Carolina Campbell University 500 High Point University 437 Ohio Miami University 314 Ohio University 505 The Ohio State University 303 University of Dayton 604 Xavier University 217 Oklahoma Oklahoma State University 414 The University of Tulsa 609 University of Oklahoma 429 Oregon University of Oregon 602 Pennsylvania Penn State University 409 University of Pittsburgh 312 Villanova University 427 Rhode Island Providence College 431 South Carolina Clemson University 202 The Citadel 214 University of South Carolina 337 Tennessee Austin Peay State University 235 Belmont University 220 Fisk University 240 The University of Memphis 622 The University of Memphis 620 Union University 532 University of Tennessee-Knoxville 503 Texas Texas A&M University-College Station 514 Texas Christian University 528 Virginia Roanoke College 134 Virginia Military Institute 237 Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University 403 Wisconsin Alverno College 206 Concordia University Wisconsin 608 Marquette University 418 Mount Mary University 331 University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire 510 University of Wisconsin-Platteville 611 Wyoming University of Wyoming 515 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2019 I

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College categories CONTENT PROVIDED BY NACAC

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s you plan for college you have many options. Listed below are the college categories that describe the different types of institutions available to you.

Non-Profit

Private These Colleges and Universities: • receive funding primarily from student tuition and endowments. Some funding comes from governmental support in the form of tax breaks and student loans • follow the leadership of a board of trustees • develop own institutional plans since they operate mostly on private support • rely on private funds, which leads to a higher average cost • offer financial aid opportunities to reduce the total cost

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Tips for attending a NACAC National College Fair CONTENT PROVIDED BY NACAC

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he National College Fair is Sunday, October 20, at St. Louis University’s Simon Recreation Center. Here are some tips on attending.

Before the fair

1. Register online for the fair at gotomyncf.com to receive a barcode for easy on-site access to college representatives. 2. Print the barcode and bring it to the fair as your electronic ID. 3. So, ask yourself the following questions to help determine what kind of school would be best for you: • Do I want to attend a large, medium or small school? • What major do I wish to study? • Do I want to attend an urban, suburban PG 12

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or rural school? • Do I want to attend a two-year, four-year, single-sex or religiously-affiliated school? • Do I want to participate in athletics, clubs, fraternities, sororities or special programs such as study abroad or cooperative education? 4. Research colleges attending the fair to determine if they meet your search criteria. 5. Make a list of questions to ask college representatives.

your barcode. This will allow the representative to follow up with you directly—and quickly. 4. Ask the same questions to each college representative you visit. 5. Take notes. Write down what you find most interesting about each college. 6. Attend an information session to learn more about the college search process, financial aid and other topics.

At the fair

1. Review college websites, catalogs and viewbooks to gather more information to help narrow your choices. 2. Send a thank you note/email to the college representatives you met. This simple gesture can show admission officials you’re serious about wanting to attend their college.

1. Pick up a fair directory and bag for all of the materials you collect. 2. Visit schools that match or are the closest match to your search criteria. Be adventurous. Don’t just talk to the well-known schools. 3. Ask the college representative to scan

After the fair

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Public These Colleges and Universities: • receive a large part of funding from state or local taxes. Some funding comes from tuition and endowments • follow performance standards set by the state • (most) are state-run which lowers the tuition for in-state students • typically categorized as two-year, four-year, research, comprehensive or community colleges

For-Profit/Proprietary

These Colleges and Universities: • receive up to 90 percent of their revenue from federal student aid • operate under the demands of investors and stockholders • usually offer a non-traditional format • have come under federal scrutiny for high pressure sales/recruitment tactics A close examination of the academic, social and financial factors will lead you to a best-fit college. To read more on the differences in college categories, please visit our web site at nacacfairs.org.

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Biopsychology major prepares students for a variety of careers Sponsored content by ALEC DE YONG, SENIOR PROFESSIONAL WRITING AND RHETORIC MAJOR IN THE MCKENDREE UNIVERSITY HONORS PROGRAM

Less than four years old,McKendree University’s biopsychology program is sending graduates into the world well-equipped to succeed in their field. With approximately 60 students, “it is very popular and many have gone on to occupational or physical therapy graduate school, counseling programs and careers,” said Dr. Tami Eggleston, professor of psychology and a driving force behind the program’s creation. The program was created as Eggleston (who graduated with a biopsychology degree herself) saw she was helping students gain footing in occupational therapy, physical therapy, accelerated nursing and chiropractic — fields which required psychology as well as biology classes. “We

wanted to offer a major that truly is the best of both,” she said. Dr. Angela LaMora, assistant professor of biology, oversees the science courses required for biopsychology. “We will be further differentiating the B.S. and B.A. degrees, emphasizing the biological sciences with the B.S.,” she said. Students who are strong in biology “can concentrate on this core of classes, allowing them to maintain high GPAs while getting to take the exact courses they need.” The degree allows graduates to stand out as they take their next step after McKendree. “Gaining acceptance into graduate schools is very competitive,” noted Dr. Eggleston, who wants the program’s graduates to have

every possible advantage. Ronnie Drummond, a 2017 McKendree graduate, was in the first cohort of biopsychology students. He is now pursuing a doctor of occupational therapy degree at Washington University. Drummond’s research focus is workingwithhomelesspopulations, preparing them to gain, restore or maintain independence in their daily lives. On his first day observing at a local homeless shelter, he watched as a client, who was being housed in his own apartment, broke down and expressed his gratitude and appreciation. “I realized at that moment that I belong serving this population,” he said.

Ronnie Drummond, 2017 McKendree graduate. Photo provided by McKendree University

Continue Your Story At McKendree University, we make you a priority by offering top-notch, award-winning degree programs on-campus or online. You will learn from respected faculty in a supportive environment. Our classes balance theory with real-world application that is so valuable in the workplace today. Start your next chapter today!

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Your college checklist CONTENT AND PHOTO PROVIDED BY GREEN SHOOT MEDIA

I

t is important to not procrastinate when it comes to beginning your college career. Staying ahead of the curve will ensure you have everything in place at the right time. Keep on track by following these tips provided by the National Association for College Admission Counseling.

August – December

One of your first moves as a high school senior should be to register for the ACT/SATs if you didn’t complete it during your junior year, or you wish to retake the test and obtain a higher score. You will also benefit from sitting down with a trusted educator to ensure your college applications are being filled out correctly and you are on track to graduate. Senior year is also a great time to research as many schools as you can. Take advantage of local college fairs, representatives who visit your class and take tours of several campuses.

October

Shortly after October 1, file your Free Application for Federal Student Aid. After about four weeks, you should receive your student

aid report, which will reveal your eligibility for financial aid. If your desired college requires an essay, this is a good time to complete it, proofread it and re-proofread it. You should also research scholarship opportunities around this time; remember, NACAC says you should never pay for scholarship information.

November – January

Now is the time to get high school transcripts in order as every college you apply to will require a copy. You should also send out your early decision or early action applications during this time. It’s also important to organize your regular decision applications and financial aid forms as they are typically due in February. You may also register for a January ACT/SAT; it is considered the last one a college will consider while you’re a senior.

February – May

At this point, you’re on the downhill slope. Remain focused even after you receive an acceptance letter as your college will want to see a second-semester transcript. Most schools require a commitment or deposit no later than May 1, so make sure to get that in on time.

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PG 15


Financial Aid 101: Answering the tough questions

CONTENT AND PHOTO BY GREEN SHOOT MEDIA

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our goal should be to try to finish your degree with as little debt as possible. While at least some amount of student loans might be unavoidable for most students in the U.S., you can take steps to decrease the amount. Your financial aid office will be able to help you find programs to which you are eligible to apply. Asking the following questions will help you understand and prepare for the costs of a college education.

What is a FAFSA? FAFSA is the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. Every student should fill out one if they are interested in receiving financial aid. What is the whole cost of the university? Not just tuition and room and board, but everything it takes for a student to live, eat, sleep and attend college in one year. Costs outside of tuition can add up fast. How much have costs increased over the last five years? You can’t just be concerned about the current year. This also is likely the amount of time it will take you to finish your degree and will give you a comparable look at how the rate of costs could change during your tenure at the university.

How much debt do students have when they graduate from this university? And what percentage of students graduate without debt? This can be a good indicator of your own potential debt accumulation.

Are there any tuition payment plans? This could make the difference in whether you even take out loans. You might not be able to swing the upfront cost, but could you afford a monthly installment? What are the deadlines for applying for financial aid? It helps to know for sure. Assuming incorrectly could wreck a whole year. What academic requirements or other condition are attached to financial aid eligibility? Be clear from the beginning not only what you need to do to receive money, but what you need to do to keep it. Is there additional financial aid available? Don’t assume you know what’s available to you. You never know what you might qualify for. Also, don’t forget about the aid awarded to students who end up choosing another university. That aid could now be up for grabs. If you don’t ask, you don’t receive.

CHOOSING A MAJOR

CONTENT AND PHOTO BY GREEN SHOOT MEDIA

Choosing a major can be overwhelming because it feels as if you are deciding on the rest of your life. Remember that college is about exploring your interests, so take the pressure off yourself. Here are a few pieces of advice to help you navigate your way to your college major.

Dare to be undeclared

While you might think you need to know what you want to study as soon as you start college (or even before you get there) remember that college is the place to discover all your options. You have many required classes to take, so you are fine studying for a year or more before choosing a major. Fill your electives with classes that sound interesting. This allows you to envision many different paths for yourself.

Test it out

Before you decide you are “pre-med,” test it out. Take a few science and math classes and make sure you don’t hate it. If you do, be ready to change things up. Approximately 80 percent of college students in

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the United States change their major at least once, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. That doesn’t mean you have wasted your time. Every class adds value to your education, and you never know what might end up being useful down the road.

Know what’s important to you

They say money can’t buy happiness, but it can provide security and peace of mind. See if you can balance doing what you love with your future earning potential. If you envision a certain lifestyle for yourself, make sure your chosen major can provide it.

Your major is not the end

According to the United States Department of Labor, the average young professional switches jobs every three years and the average person changes career fields at least two or three times in their lifetime. Even most graduate programs and professional degrees are seeking applicants with diverse educational backgrounds. Just because you get a degree in one thing doesn’t mean you won’t have a profession in something else. BRAND AVE. STUDIOS


SIUE helped me every step of the way Sponsored content by ASHLEY CAMERON, APPLIED COMMUNICATION STUDIES GRADUATE STUDENT, SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY EDWARDSVILLE

When asked about my favorite part of Southern Illinois University Edwardsville (SIUE), my answer never changed. I loved my SIUE experience because there were always people and resources available when I needed them. As a freshman, I wanted to change my major but was not quite sure what program was the best fit for me. The staff and resources at the SIUE Career Development Center helped me find an area of study that I was passionate about. In my second year, I started to bloom as a leader within an international organization on campus. At SIUE, there are nearly 300 student organizations, so no matter your interest, there is something for everyone. As a junior, I had the opportunity to participate in the Disney College Program.

My academic advisor worked with me to help ensure I was able to take the right classes at the right time to make the program fit into my four-year plan. During my final year as an undergraduate student, I had the opportunity to work in a professional office as a student employee. Applying class material to real world practice in a setting dedicated to my professional development was an invaluable resource. You will not only find assistance in the offices on campus, but in the connections you make with the people of the SIUE community, as well. Creating a success network here is easy to do. Photo provided by Southern Illinois University Edwardsville Share your vision of what you want your college experience to be with your friends, will be surrounded by people and resources someone to help you accomplish goals, professors, academic advisor, student to help you succeed. defeat struggles and live out your dreams! organization connection and soon you, too, Everywhere you turn at SIUE there is

Developing Leaders to Shape a Changing World At SIUE, you can participate in meaningful, transformative learning experiences. We emphasize hands-on learning, so you’re prepared to thrive in a rapidly changing workplace. Visit SIUE at booth #130 and #132

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8 warning signs you won’t finish college RYAN LANE OF NERDWALLET

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orty percent of students who enroll in a four-year college don’t graduate within six years, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. These students miss the benefits of a degree, but they may still pay dearly for their education: According to the office of Federal Student Aid, students who don’t complete college are three times more likely to have loans default than those who earn degrees. To avoid this negative outcome and stay on track, colleges and researchers say to watch for these eight warning signs that can derail your education.

1. Not accepting help

Some colleges offer programs that spot students who need help. Georgia State University monitors 800 factors to identify at-risk students. “We brand our system ‘GPS Advising,’” says Timothy Renick, the university’s senior vice president for student success. “Students are notified the moment that they make a wrong turn, and we can advise them about what they need to do to get back on path again.” But it’s up to students to take advantage of assistance at Georgia State and elsewhere. Don’t be embarrassed to use tutoring services, writing centers and other on-campus resources; they’re there to help you.

2. Taking too few credits

The Community College Research Center found that students at four-year colleges who take 15 credits their first semester are 11 percent more likely to earn a degree than those who take 12 credits. That’s partly due to basic math. Many colleges consider 12 credits a full course load. But taking 12 credits each semester will leave you 24 credits shy of graduating after four years. To help you graduate on time, take at least 15 credits each semester or catch up with summer classes.

3. Choosing unnecessary courses

The 15 credits you take to stay on track shouldn’t be for just any courses. You want classes that count toward your major, says Bruce Vandal, senior vice president of the national nonprofit Complete College America. “The more credits you take in your major the first year, the better off you are,” says Vandal. He recommends nine as a goal. Balance the types of classes, too. Renick says Georgia State University identified “toxic combinations” of courses. For example, they found students struggle when taking calculus and physics in the same semester. PG 18

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4. Struggling in your major

Pay attention to your grades in courses related to your major. They predict your chances for success. “If you barely pass that first course, talk to a faculty member or adviser about how you can strengthen your skills before attempting upper-level and more difficult coursework in the field,” Renick says.

5. Being placed in remedial classes

Remedial classes are supposed to prepare students for college-level work. But they can make students feel like they don’t belong in college. If you need remedial classes, you’re not alone. Approximately 1 in 4 freshmen end up in remedial classes, according to the national think tank Education Reform Now. If you feel comfortable taking traditional courses, Vandal says to advocate for yourself. Tell your adviser you deserve to take regular courses and be responsible for getting the support you need.

6. Running out of money

If you’re facing a financial shortfall, talk to the financial aid office about options like completion scholarships and emergency loans. For example, Georgia State University provides micro grants to help students complete their studies. Make sure you complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, as well. The FAFSA makes you eligible for government grants, loans and other financial aid. Only 60.9 percent of high school seniors submitted a FAFSA in 2018, according to the National College Access Network.

7. Skipping class

Students who don’t attend class struggle academically. “This view is not just what faculty members claim to get you to show up,” Renick says. “The data supports the claim.” If you’re not putting in the necessary effort, ask yourself why. Regularly skipping class is

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likely symptomatic of a bigger issue. Figure out the root problem and address it before your grades suffer too much.

8. Dealing with adversity

Unforeseen life events, such as illness or the death of a loved one can force students to drop out. Long-term issues involving food insecurity and housing can prove overwhelming as well. Before withdrawing, see what emergency services your school offers, like grief counseling, food vouchers or short-term housing. “There is likely somebody on that campus who can help you navigate (your) challenges,” says Vandal. “It’s not something you have to bear alone.” This article was provided to The Associated Press by the personal finance website NerdWallet. Ryan Lane is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: rlane@ nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @ryanhlane. BRAND AVE. STUDIOS


UCM leads degree completion in state of Missouri Sponsored content by THE UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL MISSOURI

The University of Central Missouri is the state leader in degree completion of full-time equivalent (FTE) students among Missouri public universities. Statistics recently released by the Missouri Department of Higher Education (MDHE) show that between fiscal years 2015-2017, UCM’s degree completion rate per FTE was 50.5 percent. This figure is the highest among all of Missouri’s public universities. This accomplishment is not a surprise to the UCM faculty and staff who dedicate their time to ensuring every student is successful, whether they study at the flagship Warrensburg campus or at UCM - Lee’s Summit, located at the state-of-the-art Missouri Innovation Campus in the Kansas City metro area.

WHAT UCM IS DOING DIFFERENTLY THAN OTHER SCHOOLS UCM is able to achieve such high completion rates because of aggressive, student-centric initiatives put in place to support student retention and graduation. UCM students benefit from the following advantages to keep them on track: • A brand-new Success Advising Center • Academic support offered 24/7 through in-person and online resources • Commitment to affordability • State-of-the-art learning environments including an airport and nursing suite UCM GRADUATES EARN JOBS For the past 150 years, UCM has been graduating students who get employed. In fact, 97 percent of UCM students launch their career or begin graduate school within six months of graduation! From professional

Photo provided by The University of Central Missouri

pilots and cyber security hacking experts to award-winning teachers and internationally recognized artists and musicians, starting salaries from UCM’s undergraduate programs are as high as $75,000! UCM students

also benefit from the generosity of more than 100,000 living alumni – 9,000 of whom are living in St. Louis – who offer more networking and post-graduate support than other schools.

ST. LOUIS VISIT UCM AND DISCOVER OPPORTUNITY IN ACTION!

The University of Central Missouri is dedicated to your student’s success. In addition to having one of the lowest tuition rates in Missouri, we also have numerous financial aid opportunities to help your student graduate with less debt. UCM has a reputation for success, and employers know it. In fact, 97% of UCM graduates launch their careers or begin graduate school within six months of graduation! Schedule your visit today at ucmo.edu/visit.

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“I chose UCM because it’s not that far from home … I had a lot of people from my high school in St. Louis telling me about UCM, and I just loved everything about it. So I thought, ‘I have to go to this school!’” – Armonya Harris, nursing McCluer North High School

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GAME ON. STAY UP TO DATE WITH YOUR TEAM WHILE YOU ARE AWAY.

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AFFORDABLE E XCELLENCE

98% OF STUDENTS RECEIVE FINANCIAL AID YOU DON’T HAVE TO GO FAR TO GO FAR. Registration for spring classes opens Oct. 21 at SCC. Remember to ask your high school counselor 0..00about dual-enrollment options. First-time student? Visit stchas.edu/apply to get started.

Check out our spring classes!

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PG 21


Choose wisely: How to get the Y most out of your college choice

CONTENT BY GREEN SHOOT MEDIA

ou’ve applied to a list of colleges and now acceptance letters are rolling in. Congratulations! The question of “Will I get in?” has been answered, but now a whole new question has presented itself, “Where should I go?” The college you choose will have a big impact on your success in school. To choose a university that fits your needs well, you first need to figure out what is important to you. What do you want? The basic criteria you should consider are location, size and cost.

Location — geography

Size

• Are you used to a large high school or a small one? • Do you prefer it when everyone knows you and you know everyone? Or do you like having anonymity and the opportunity to meet new people every day? • Size also affects student-teacher ratio. Do you learn best with more individualized attention? • Large universities tend to have more of everything — more classes, more activities and more student services.

Cost

• Are you ready to live in a part of the country that is completely different from where you live now? • Is it important for you to go to school within a day’s drive of home so you don’t have to incur the cost of a flight in case of an emergency? • Is year-round sunshine important for your mental health?

• Cost can be a weighty determining factor in choosing a college. Did you receive any scholarships? • What is the yearly tuition without factoring in scholarships or grants? • What are the financial aid options available to you? • How much student debt are you comfortable taking on?

Location — setting

Additional considerations

• Is it important for you to have cultural experiences outside of university life? Are you always eager to see the latest live show or enjoy great nightlife? (Think city!) • Do you love the outdoors and want access to outdoor sports and trails? (Think rural areas!)

Think about how you will move (and what you will want to move) when choosing a location. Also think about how different it would be from your current atmosphere. Striking a balance between new and familiar is ideal — otherwise you might find yourself homesick a lot quicker than you think.

High Quality Education. Best Value Education. Total College Experience.

With more than 140 academic programs and nearly 180 student organizations, Racers will discover a special living and learning community — and a life-changing college experience. We’ll get you where you want to go — within three months of graduation, 69% of our graduates are employed and 23% continue their education based on our most recent reports.

Visit admissions.murraystate.edu to learn more, schedule a campus visit or apply for admission.

Equal education and employment opportunities M/F/D, AA employer. Murray State University supports a clean and healthy campus. Please refrain from personal tobacco use. PG 22

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The college experience: It’s more than just a degree

Five must-have skills

CONTENT AND PHOTO BY GREEN SHOOT MEDIA

College is about much more than earning a degree. You will be learning skills that are essential to your success past college and making lifelong memories. College is a time to learn, but it is also a time of growth. Here are five must-have experiences you should enjoy and five musthave skills you should develop before graduation day. These experiences will not only enrich your college experience, but will serve as lessons you will take with you, helping you long after you’ve graduated.

Five must-have experiences

1. Reading as much as possible Anything. All the time. 2. Volunteering Volunteer experience does look good on a resume, but it also is about being a part of something that is bigger than yourself. Find a cause you care about and give back. 3. Getting work experience Jobs teach responsibility. They provide us with an income and show us that we can collaborate with people of all different backgrounds and personalities. 4. Taking at least one class just because Because you’ve always been interested in

modern architecture, because you wouldn’t mind knowing a bit more about drawing, because the astronomy class takes a field trip into the desert in November and it sounds awesome. Just because.

5. Studying abroad (if possible) It combines travel with studying. And there is almost always a way to obtain at least a few course credits for it, if not an entire semester.

No matter what you majored in, some skills are universal. 1. Strong people skills No matter what your profession, you will need to network to be successful. 2. Understanding how you work best This allows you to create an effective routine so you can easily set and achieve your goals. 3. Learning how to make your money work for you Know how to set up and stick to a budget. This might seem like an easy task, but it will help you understand financial language, as well as the options available to you later on when you want to buy a car or a home. 4. Figuring out what your personal brand is Companies are constantly screening prospective employees. How do you want to look? Google yourself and see what pops up. This is what companies see. 5. Incidental technical skills Photo editing might not be particularly relevant to your career field, but it comes in handy in many jobs. You’ll appreciate it in your personal life as well. Soak up the opportunity to diversify.

Southeast Missouri State addresses college cost in a big way Sponsored content by SOUTHEAST MISSOURI STATE UNIVERSITY

Southeast Missouri State University is working to help students plan for their futures and address the cost of college with several new programs. Southeast unveiled the Will To Do Award offering $0 tuition and general fees to eligible Pell students. The needbased scholarship fills the gap in eligible Pell students’ unmet tuition and general feels beginning in fall 2020. Students must have a minimum 2.75 high school GPA, be a Missouri resident, and have a FAFSA on file by March 1, 2020. “We want families’ discussions to be about when the students go to college and not if the students go,” says Director of Southeast’s Student Financial Services Dr. Matthew Kearney. “A college education can be life-changing, not only for the student walking across the graduation stage, but for their families and their communities.” Southeast definitely wants to be a BRAND AVE. STUDIOS

partner in those life-changing events. The University named a new director of college planning to work with students in the St. Louis metropolitan area. Tameka Herrion, a Southeast alumna, will provide assistance to students and families with college-readiness, admissions, financial aid and scholarship processes. “This position has the potential to make a tremendous impact in the St. Louis region, and I’m proud to have been given the opportunity to lead this initiative,” says Herrion. As one of Missouri’s most accredited and most affordable institutions, Southeast is a smart investment. New programs like these are just a few of the ways we’re helping students transform their futures. See more at semo.edu/willtodoaward. Tameka Herrion, director of college planning. Photo provided by Southeast Missouri State University STLTODAY.COM/COLLEGECONNECTION

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TUIT ION $0 & GENERAL FEES

for Eligible Pell Students

LEARN HOW

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