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ONE OF EVERY SPECIES A hunter sets a personal goal to extend the hunting season. ZACK JOHNSON

Brand Ave. Studios contributing writer

s a boy, I quickly developed a desire to experience the outdoors. My first hunt was at the age of 6 and I got to experience nature in deep isolation as a fly on the wall. It was so pure, so exhilarating — from then on I wanted to challenge myself and become closer with and further immerse myself in nature. When I was hardly pulling back the state- required 45 pound draw weight of my PSE Spyder compound bow, I dreamed of harvesting a bull moose in the bush of Alaska. Of course, I hadn’t the slightest idea of what that dream entailed. The knowledge, experience — and not to mention the money — it would take to reach that goal would take awhile to accumulate. I’ve grown up and learned a bit since then, but the ultimate dream persists. For the majority of my years, I’ve spent my time harassing whitetail deer in southern and central Illinois. I’ve had my share of shutouts and also days where the deer won’t get far enough away for me to itch my nose. I’ve been dripping sweat in the heat of early October and I’ve been frozen to the core with boots full of needles in late December trying to hold out “just a little bit longer” for the slim chance at a monster buck. In recent years I’ve gotten myself into waterfowl and just like my early days with whitetail I quickly became obsessed. The joy of success and learning overshadowed the sorrows of my mistakes tenfold and I couldn’t shake the itch to get back out in the blind. When planning my season these days it usually looks something like this: Oct. 1-23: Deer Oct. 23- Nov. 15: Ducks Nov.16- Dec. 10: Both Dec. 11- 24: Ducks

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PHOTO PROVIDED BY ZACK JOHNSON Please see JOHNSON, Page 4

Zack Johnson and his hunting dog SHR Doc.

This content was produced by Brand Ave. Studios. The news and editorial departments of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch had no role in its creation or display. For more information about Brand Ave. Studios, contact tgriffin@stltoday.com.

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Sarah Gerrein / Brand Ave. Studios content pro- Donna Bischoff / vice president of advertising 314-340-8529, dbischoff@post-dispatch.com duction manager 314-340-8014, sgerrein@stltoday.com Teresa Griffin / vice president Brand Ave. Studios 314-340-8909, tgriffin@stltoday.com Bob Rose / Vice president, digital content and strategy 314-340-8333, brose@post-dispatch.com

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Celebrate 50 Years of Urban FIshing! There’s plenty of opportunity to pursue fishing in St. Louis thanks to the St. Louis Urban Fishing Program. Plus, you can find places to fish in the city with the new, free

mobile app – MO Outdoors. So make plans to cast a line close to home for your next fishing adventure today. Visit mdc.mo.gov/urbanfishing. Download for

Android

Discover

bowties with smoked trout and spring vegetables Serves 2

½ pound bowtie or penne pasta ½ pound smoked trout ¼ cup Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, freshly grated

Nature

1 small lemon, zest and juice 2 tablespoons hickory nuts or pecans, toasted briefly (optional, but recommended) ½ pound asparagus, cut into 2-inch pieces ¼ cup freshly shelled peas 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil 1 heaping teaspoon capers, drained Salt Coarsely ground black pepper

While pasta boils, break trout into largish bite-sized pieces and prep other ingredients (grate cheese, zest and juice lemon, toast nuts). Two or 3 minutes before pasta is ready, steam the asparagus briefly in a covered pan with a small amount of water; throw the peas into the pan with the asparagus during the last minute of cooking. Be sure to keep a close watch on the vegetables. The asparagus and the peas need to retain their bright green color and still offer a nice firm bite when ready to add to the pasta. Drain well before adding to pasta. Drain pasta, retaining a tablespoon or so of the water in which it was cooked. Place pasta, and the retained cooking water, into a serving bowl. Toss with the olive oil, capers, salt, pepper and the remaining ingredients. Serve with a Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc or any dry white wine.

Find more wild recipes in Cooking Wild in Missouri. Order yours at mdcnatureshop.com.

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WEEK OF JULY 22, 2019

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Johnson

A 9-month hunting plan

From 2

Zack Johnson lays out his personal plan for hunting this season.

This schedule makes for a long few months but I love every second of it. Using saved-up vacation days, coordinating hunts with family and friends, making new friends, waking up before the sun, first cups of coffee, telling stories and making memories are all a part of the grinding joy- filled endeavor we call hunting. Every year when my season comes to a close, and before I even have a chance to catch up on sleep, I miss it. I’m filled with regret when I think of all the buddies who couldn’t make it out for a hunt, peak rut days I missed or when my friends hit a six-man limit before noon without me. It always seems like more could have been done. The real bummer is that deer and waterfowl seasons only take up about four months of the year and when it ends you’re stuck twiddling your thumbs and planning for next season — and it always seems like the off-season lasts forever.

August: Squirrels Sept. 1-7: Doves Sept. 7-15: Early Canada Geese Sept. 15-22: Early Teal Sept. 22-30: Snipe, Rail Oct. 1-23: Deer Oct. 24-November 15: ducks Nov. 15-22: Woodcock Nov. 22-Dec 7: Deer (rut) Dec. 8-24: Ducks Dec. 25-Jan. 31: Canada Geese, rabbits, crows Jan. 1-15: Pheasant, quail Feb. 1-March 31: Snow geese April: Turkey

Going after one of every species Inspired by my off-season blues and desire to connect more with nature it hit me — just hunt more. In my lifetime I’ve hunted most game in our region but have never made it a priority. I may have picked up a squirrel or pheasant hunt every now and then, but I’ve never committed myself to learning how to hunt a variety of game. I figured, “If I can’t moose hunt right now, why not learn how to hunt all of the game that’s readily available to me?” I then devised a plan to satisfy my itch for outdoor adventure that would extend my season from four months to nine. I decided, to the best of my ability, I would try to hunt, harvest and eat at least one of every species of animal in season in Illinois this year. From squirrels in the August heat all the way to the brisk sun-draped mornings of conservation snow geese and spring turkey — I will hunt. This means, if everything goes as planned, I will hunt, harvest and eat: Squirrel, dove, Canada geese, snipe, rail, deer, turkey, ducks, light geese, white-fronted geese, crow, woodcock, rabbit, pheasant and quail. As I glance at the Illinois Department of Natural Resources’ (IDNR) hunting and trapping digest to see what I’m up against, I read down the list of available game seasons and think, “I’ve never even seen a snipe or woodcock...what is a rail? How am I going to do this when just writing that list was exhausting?” By no means am I a master outdoorsman, but I wouldn’t call myself a novice, either. Regardless of my skill level, reaching this goal will take a good deal of effort. Not only will it require time and energy, but it will force me to learn where and how to hunt game I’ve never even heard of. On top of that, I’ll have PG 4

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to make a meal using what I harvest — which can be an extremely difficult and fragile task. It is also important to remember in hunting there are no guarantees of success! There are countless factors that could get in the way of reaching this goal. What if it’s a bad birth year for a certain species? What if I blow my one chance to harvest an elusive critter? What if I overcook the meat and don’t get the chance to harvest another? What if I can’t even find the critter? What if life gets in the way?

Starting with a plan I’ve set a measurable goal for myself (see the accompanying schedule) but when it comes down to it, success is not the sole driver of my happiness. No matter the outcome of this adventure it will be worth it because, in the words of bow hunting Hall of Famer and outdoors philosopher Fred Bear, “If you consider an unsuccessful hunt to be a waste of time, then the true meaning of the chase eludes you altogether.” So far I’ve knocked out squirrels and as I vigorously knock on wood, I’ll anticipate — by the time this article runs — a successful harvest of doves and Canada Geese. My success with squirrels has come from finding a location with a good number of hardwood trees, entering the area slowly and patiently, sitting down for about 10 ten minutes to listen, and following my ears. I typically listen for the sound of dropping objects — more specifically, things dropping from the treetops I can hear rip through layers of leaves before hitting the ground. I hear this sound and slowly work my way that direction and usually find a large hardwood tree surrounded by fresh broken nuts. I’ll back about

PHOTO PROVIDED BY ZACK JOHNSON

Zack Johnson does some teal hunting in early September. 20 yards away from this tree and sit and wait for activity. Once harvested, I made my best attempt to make a dish closely resembling buffalo wings — which I, as I feared, I dramatically overcooked. As I took my first bite along with my sister and cousin there was a moment of silence in which I was trying to let my pride override my taste buds and they were obviously just doing their best to be polite — a true test of friendship. They were quick to follow suit when I broke, spit the meat back on my plate, and vocalized my disgust. Luckily I’ve

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learned from my mistake and have since recovered and set myself back on course to reach my goals.

About the author Zack Johnson, 25, is an Illinois native hunter/trapper/fisher who has spent the majority of his life chasing waterfowl and whitetail across the state. He loves the camaraderie of duck hunting and craves the isolation deer hunting provides. When he is not seeking a connection with nature, he can be found sharing his love of the outdoors with others. BRAND AVE. STUDIOS


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MNP

800-442-1488 | ILLINOISouth.org SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2019

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MISSOURI SEASONS DEER Archery: Sept. 15-Nov. 15 and Nov. 27-Jan. 15 Firearms, Antlerless: Dec. 6-8 Firearms: Nov. 16-26 Firearms, alternative methods: Dec. 28-Jan. 7 Youth Firearms Hunt: Nov. 2-3 and Nov. 29-Dec. 1 TURKEY AND WATERFOWL Greater white-fronted geese: Nov. 11-Feb. 6 Light geese: Nov. 11-Feb. 6 Canada geese/Brant geese: Oct. 5-13, Nov. 11-Feb. 6 Ducks and geese, youth: Nov. 2-Dec. 31 (north), Nov. 9-Nov. 15, Nov. 21-Jan. 12 (middle) Nov. 28-Dec. 1, Dec. 7-Jan. 31 (south) Ducks and geese, youth: Oct. 26-27 (north and middle), Nov. 23-24 (south) Crow: Nov. 1-March 3 Dove: Sept. 1- Nov. 29 Quail: Nov. 1-Jan. 15 (Youth Oct. 26-27) Turkey (firearms): Oct. 1-Oct. 31 Turkey (archery): Sept. 15-Nov. 15, Nov. 27-Jan. 15 Virginia rails: Sept. 1-Nov. 9 Woodcock: Oct. 15-Nov. 28 SMALL GAME SEASONS Beaver: Nov. 15-March 31 Bobcat: Nov 15-Jan. 31 Coyote: Nov. 15-Jan. 31 (trapping); hunting is year-round Frog: June 30-Oct. 31 Fox: Nov. 15-Jan. 31 Groundhog: May 6-Dec. 15 Mink: Nov. 15-Jan. 31 Muskrat: Nov. 15-Feb. 20 Otter: Nov. 15-Feb. 20 Opossum: Nov. 15-Jan. 31 Badger: Nov. 15-Jan. 31 Squirrel: May 25-Feb. 15 Rabbit: Nov.15-Jan. 31 (trapping) Oct. 1-Feb. 15 (hunting) Raccoon: Nov. 15-Jan. 31 Striped Skunk: Nov. 15-Jan. 31

ILLINOIS SEASONS SCOTT DALTON, AP IMAGES

Practice those duck calls before you are out in the field.

Start now to plan the perfect hunting trip Planning in the late summer avoids the haste of sorting gear and packing the night before your big hunt. GREG WAGNER

Outdoor Writer

n late summer, there is more to do in hunting than just daydreaming about active game animals and birds. This is the time to sweat, literally and otherwise. It is time to sweat the small stuff of your upcoming fall hunts. Planning ahead avoids the haste of sorting gear and packing the night before your big hunt. It’s those little things that have a way of piling up quickly and being forgotten in the days just prior to your major hunting season

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openers. So, here’s my checklist to make certain that we are fully prepared: • Visit the landowner where you plan to hunt. Make certain that you still have permission to hunt and that that part of the land hasn’t been sold or leased. Bring a gift or offer to assist with some chores or the fall harvest. • Arrange time off work for crucial dates such as opening days, weekends, weeks or the peak of the deer rut. • Purchase required permits and stamps and acquire other mandatory items for your hunt when obtainable, such as a Harvest Information Program number. • Check hunter education requirements for youths and other young folks, and then make plans for yourself and them to successfully complete a firearm or bow hunter education course together. • Study the laws and regulations that apply to the game animals or birds you plan to hunt. Put your area conservation officer’s phone

number in your phone. • Book lodging and camping reservations. • Scout your hunting land repetitively at periodic intervals as we progress into fall. • Make the necessary repairs to tree stands, box blinds, trailer blinds, etc. and clean/touch up decoys and patch waders. • Practice shooting as much as possible. Remember, our duty as a hunter is to make an effective shot for a quick, humane kill through regular target-shooting sessions. • Practice calling. From ducks to bucks, if you are going to use a call, practice sounding like the game bird or animal you want to draw within shooting range before getting in the field. • Touch base with local butcher shops that have processed deer to find out if they are still doing that. Greg Wagner is an outdoor writer and Public Information Officer with Nebraska Game and Parks Commission. Check out his blog, In The Wild.

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DEER SEASONS Archery: Oct. 1-Nov. 21, Nov. 25-Dec. 4, Dec. 9-Jan. 19 Muzzleloader: Dec. 5-8 and Dec. 13-15 Firearms: Nov. 22-24, Dec. 5-8 Late Winter & Special CWD Season: Dec. 26-29 and Jan. 17-19 Youth Firearms Hunt: Oct. 12-14, Nov. 22-24 TURKEY AND WATERFOWL Turkey Fall Firearms: Oct. 19-27 Turkey Fall Archery: Oct. 1-Jan. 19 Turkey Fall archery season is closed during deer firearms season for hunter safety. Teal Sep. 7-22 Rail: Sept. 7-Nov.15 Ducks, Mergansers, Coots: North, Oct. 10-Dec. 17; Central, Oct. 26-Dec. 24; South Central, Nov.9- Jan. 7, South Nov.28-Jan. 26 Canada Geese: North, Oct. 19-Jan. 16; Central, Oct. 26Nov. 3, Nov. 12-Jan. 31; South Central, Nov.9- Jan. 31, South Nov.28-Jan. 31 SMALL GAME SEASONS Coyote, Striped Skunk: Year round, except Nov. 22-24, Dec. 5-8. Woodchuck: Through March, except Nov. 22-24, Dec. 5-8 Squirrels: Through Feb. 15, except Nov. 22-24, Dec. 5-8 Common Snipe: Sept. 7-Dec. 22 Crow: Oct. 28-Feb. 29 Woodcock: Oct. 19-Feb. 29 Rabbits: Nov. 2-Feb. 15 Pheasant, Quail, Partridge: Nov. 2-Jan. 8 Bobcat, Foxes, Opossum, Raccoon: Nov.10- Feb. 15, except Nov. 22-24, Dec. 5-8. Trapping: Badger, Bobcat, Coyote, Foxes, Mink, Muskrat, Opossum, Raccoon, Striped Skunk, Weasels: Nov. 10-Feb. 15 Trapping: Beaver, River Otter: Nov. 10- March 31 BRAND AVE. STUDIOS


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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2019

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What’s new for 2019? The latest regulations CONTENT PROVIDED BY MISSOURI DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION

issouri deer and turkey hunters can get the most current information on fall hunting from the Missouri Department of Conservation’s “2019 Fall Deer and Turkey Hunting & Regulations Information” booklet, available where permits are sold and online at huntfish.mdc.mo.gov/fall-deer-and-turkeyhunting-regulations-and-information. The Illinois changes are available at dnr.illinois. gov/hunting/Documents/HuntTrapDigest. pdf. These booklets have detailed information on fall deer and turkey hunting seasons, limits, permits, managed hunts, regulations, conservation areas to hunt, post-harvest instructions and more. Changes for 2019 include: • New counties have been added to the CWD Management Zone. Other counties have been removed. • During Nov. 16–17, hunters who harvest a deer in the Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Management Zone must take their deer on the day of harvest to a designated CWD sampling station. • An antler point restriction has been reinstated in Benton, Boone, Callaway, Carroll, Cole, Cooper, Grundy, Livingston, Miller, Moniteau, Morgan, Osage, Randolph, Schuyler, Scotland and Shelby counties. • Adults no longer need a permit to assist properly licensed youth hunters during the youth portions of firearms deer season. • Lessees are no longer eligible for no-cost resident landowner permits. • Hunters may now fill two firearms antlerless permits in Audrain, Christian, Clark, Dallas, Lewis, Marion, Monroe, Pike and Ralls counties. • Qualifying landowners in Andrew, Atchison, Holt and Nodaway counties may now receive only one no-cost firearms antlerless permit. • Qualifying landowners in Christian, Lawrence, Pulaski, Ripley, Shannon and Webster counties may now receive two no-cost firearms antlerless permits. • Barton, Christian, Dent, Douglas, Jasper, Lawrence, Maries, Newton, Oregon, Phelps, Pulaski, Ripley, Shannon, Texas, Webster and Wright counties are now open during the antlerless portion of firearms deer season. • New managed deer hunts have been added, and others have been removed or modified. • Deer hunting regulations have changed for some conservation areas. • Nontoxic shot is now required on several conservation areas that did not require it in

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STOCK IMAGE PROVIDED

the past. • In Illinois, only antlered deer may be harvested during the 1–15 October period of archery season in the following counties: Champaign, Douglas, Macon, Moultrie,

Piatt. After October 15, archery regulations are the same as the rest of the state. Firearm deer permits have already been decreased considerably in these counties and archery harvest, which accounts for half or more of

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deer harvest, must be managed to allow deer to increase. • Also in Illinois, turkeys harvested during the spring hunting season must be checked in by 10 p.m. the day of harvest. BRAND AVE. STUDIOS


Serving the Metro East Area Since 1946

PHOTO PROVIDED BY GREEN SHOOT MEDIA

Is it worth the weight? How to pack for success Packing appropriately can lessen the exhaustion you feel throughout your trek and ensure you’re alert when game is in your sights. CONTENT PROVIDED BY GREEN SHOOT MEDIA

hile you may do most of your hunting from the same general location, how you get there can sometimes be a challenge when carrying gear. You don’t want to alert nearby wildlife with a loud UTV or ATV, so walking is usually your best bet. Packing appropriately can lessen the exhaustion you feel throughout your trek and ensure you’re alert when game is in your sights. Keeping your gear’s weight manageable isn’t the only factor you should consider. Here are some other beneficial tips to remember when preparing for a hunting excursion, from the experts at Field and Stream.

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Safety First: Make sure you save room in your bag for the crucial safety equipment every hunter requires. Pack a first-aid kit with gauzes, bandages and ointments to help protect yourself from cuts or scrapes. You should also remember to bring a properly fitted harness and safety belt if you will be scaling heights to reach your stand. Navigation Tools: Whether you prefer an old-fashioned compass or a state-of-theart GPS system, knowing where you are and how to get back to camp is crucial. It’s easy to lose your sense of direction when tracking a wounded animal. Always tell a hunting partner before you venture off alone, so they know which way you are going. Pack with Care: You don’t want to find yourself rooting around in your bag when the adrenaline is pumping as you prepare yourself to take a shot or track your target. Instead, pack your most important items in the most accessible areas of your bag. Make use of extra pockets to dedicate to special tools you know will be used. You should know exactly where to look when these items are required as it can be the difference in a bountiful hunting trip or going home emptyhanded.

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Flooding brings new challenges to waterfowl hunters Hunters should anticipate a concentrated migration window and capitalize on it by monitoring weather in the northern states. ZACK JOHNSON

Brand Ave. Studios contributing writer

he flood of 2019 may not have broken any records but its impact will not soon be forgotten to hunters. With areas on both sides of the river still inaccessible, many public and private land hunters will be putting in extra work for a successful season. The most affected hunters will be waterfowlers.

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Migration impacted The Mississippi Flyway, one of the most notoriously productive migration routes, has taken a hit this year thanks to near-record flood damage. Although hatch reports from Delta Waterfowl’s breeding population survey show mallard populations continuing to rise, these ducks may be taking different routes to the south because the flood waters have left behind little food and cover. In bottomlands near the river, public and private lands have been left largely uncultivated because the height and duration of flood waters this spring. Numerous levee breaks along the Mississippi have left previously controlled areas forcefully flooded and covered in sediment and debris. The result is thousands of yards of dirt between the river and the nearest food source which will cause migrators to move through the affected area rapidly, if they stop at all. With the flyway impacted, birds could detour as far as Carlyle Lake to find food. Hunters should anticipate a concentrated migration window and capitalize on it by monitoring weather in the northern states. When it’s time for the ducks to move south, there is a good chance they are going to come hard and fast then pass through before you can get your waders on.

Hunting grounds impacted The ducks may have trouble finding food, but hunters may have trouble finding their blinds! The washout may have completely washed away or destroyed blinds beyond repair and much of the natural brush cover could be gone as well. Many public hunting locations have suffered extensive damage due to

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AP PHOTO

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers worker Ron Allen uses a GPS tool to survey the extent of damage where a levee failed along the Missouri River near Saline City, Mo. Numerous levee breaks along the Mississippi have left previously controlled areas forcefully flooded and covered in sediment and debris. exterior levee breaks and because of this, the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) was forced to remove their pumps in certain locations, leaving water levels in the hands of Mother Nature. As a result, the MDC is considering opening up areas that were previously reserved or morning draw locations. Gary Calvert, MDC wildlife management biologist for the Elsberry District of the St. Louis Region says, “It’s not going to be a normal waterfowl season, that’s for sure. Infrastructure has been destroyed, as well as natural habitat and cover, so there are a lot of unknowns.” Hunters will have to work

much harder to find success this season. But don’t give up hope! Hunters/conservationists have made some last-ditch efforts for vegetation by planting millet wherever possible. With reports of lush growth, this could spur some great early season duck hunts. Another early season bonus could be goose hunting. The region has large numbers of resident geese hanging around for opening day which could make it possible for hunters to hit those early season Canada Goose limits. The 2019 waterfowl season will be what you make of it. Here are a few tips for a successful hunt:

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• If you’re lucky enough to get corn planted in time and are able to control water, you may be in for a hot season. • Prepare to deviate from your normal spots and be willing to hunt in new areas. • Call ahead to outfitters, bait shops, hotels and outdoor stores located near public land and ask if duck hunters are coming in, buying shells or seeing ducks. The majority of the time, they will give out insider information. • Find a public spot or knock on doors and ask for permission to access private property. This season may be more work but that’s why they call it huntin’ and not shootin’.

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gs n li p m a s a o t r , Chariton, e r e a d e C , y r r a B , ir a Bring your d counties are: Ad Knox,

fferson, sampling Je D , W ll C e y w r o o H t , a y d r n o a k m ic The 29 , St. Clair, asconade, H s G , le r n a li h k C n . t ra S F , , d m r a n fo t Christian, Craw r, Oregon, Ozark, Perry, Polk, Pu ren, and Washington. e ar Linn, Macon, Merc nevieve, Stone, Sullivan, Taney, W Ge St. Francois, Ste.

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Get information on chronic wasting disease and sampling locations at MDC.MO.GOV/CWD

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2019

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From fish gigging to deer carcasses, a few of the new Missouri rules you’ll need to know about No one wants to see prices go up, but if you want to play, you’ve got to pay. THE JOPLIN GLOBE

Distributed by Tribune News Service

ext year, the cost of a daily trout tag to fish at Roaring River, Bennett Spring and Montauk state parks will go from $3 to $4 for adults and from $2 to $3 for those ages 15 and younger. And the cost of an annual trout permit in Missouri will go from $7 to $10 for anglers ages 16 and older, and from $3.50 to $5 for anglers ages 15 and younger. These are just some of the changes to hunting and fishing costs and regulations in Missouri approved Aug. 23 by the Missouri Conservation Commission. The Missouri Department of Conservation notes that the state has not raised permit prices in about two decades. Yet, according to MDC, in 2003 the cost to raise a trout in the state’s hatcheries and then stock them in streams was about $1 per fish; by 2017, it was twice that just for the food and labor. That does not include maintaining hatchery infrastructure. The state has spent more than $11 million in recent years repairing and improving its hatcheries. Last fall, it broke ground on a $1.9 million renovation at Roaring River that involves a number of improvements. No one wants to see prices go up, but if you want to play, you’ve got to pay. The effective date for these changes, by the way, will be Feb. 29, 2020. (Opening Day is March 1, a Sunday, so it will be busy.) Here is a look at some of what else will be changing as a result of that Aug. 23 meeting:

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Fish gigging The season will be extended by 15 days beginning with this one, which will now run Sept. 15 to Feb. 15, 2020. Gigging is popular on many Ozark rivers. According to the state wildlife code, only fish described as “other fish” may be gigged (speared). Common fish for gigging are the northern hogsucker and a species of redhorse known as “yellow suckers.”

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POST-DISPATCH FILE PHOTO

Fishing at Rockbridge Trout and Game Ranch, Rockbridge, Mo.

Deer carcasses

Landowner permits

Nonresident permits

Beginning next year, deer hunters will need to follow a series of new rules when handling, transporting and disposing of deer and elk carcasses. They will also be restricted from transporting whole carcasses into the state, but heads with capes will be allowed if they are taken to a licensed taxidermist. The new rules are part of the state’s ongoing campaign to restrict the spread of chronic wasting disease, which is likely to continue advancing in Southwest Missouri as a result of the hundreds of CWD cases in northern Arkansas. (There have been 76 cases in Carroll County so far.) “Most states with CWD have similar restrictions on carcass movement and disposal,” MDC Resource Science Division chief and deer biologist Jason Sumners said in a statement. “CWD remains a rare disease in our state, and we want to keep it that way.”

Next year, the minimum acreage requirement will go from 5 to 20 acres for resident landowners and members of their immediate households to receive free permits for deer and turkey hunting. Resident landowners with 5 or more acres and members of their immediate households will still be allowed to hunt small game, fish and trap on their properties without the need of a permit. Alsostartingin2020,MDCwillofferdiscounted deer and turkey hunting permits for nonresident landowners with 75 acres or more in a contiguous tract. According to MDC, many nonresident landowners provide wildlife habitat and work on their properties and those efforts help improve all wildlife resources.The discounted permits for nonresident landowners will be: • Spring turkey season: $165. • Fall turkey season: $96. • Archery: $195. • Firearm deer: $265.

The prices for some nonresident hunting and fishing permits starting in 2020 also will go up effective Feb. 29, 2020. • Daily fishing (one day), $7 to $8. • Daily fishing (three days), $21 to $24. • Annual fishing permit, $42 to $49. • Furbearer hunting/trapping permit, $130 to $192. • Annual small game hunting permit, $80 to $94. • Daily small game (one day), $11 to $14. • Daily small game (three days), $33 to $42. • Spring turkey hunting, $190 to $224. • Fall turkey hunting, $110 to $130. • Firearm deer hunting, $225 to $265. • Archery hunting, $225 to $265. • Managed deer hunting, $225 to $265. For a complete list of rules governing hunting and fishing, and other changes, go to mdc.mo.gov.

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Missouri ups the ante on poaching

FourTrax* Foreman* Rubicon

2020

CONTENT PROVIDED BY MISSOURI DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION

Poaching penalties

he Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) and the Missouri legislature and governor have taken actions to increase penalties for those caught poaching Missouri game animals and other native wildlife species. Missouri Governor Michael Parson signed HB260 into law July 11. Called the Poaching Bill, it significantly raises fines for those convicted of illegally taking Missouri game species and other native wildlife. HB260 was sponsored by Representative Jered Taylor (Republic) and Senator Mike Bernskoetter (Jefferson City). New fine amounts include $1,000-$5,000 for each black bear, elk or whitetailed buck killed illegally, $500-$1,000 for each wild turkey, and $500-$1,000 for each paddlefish. The fines are considered restitution payments for poaching game animals and are ordered by a judge. Monies from the fines go to the state’s school fund. The restitution payments are in addition to other fines and penalties for violating the Wildlife Code of Missouri. The new fines went into effect Aug. 28. Supporters of the bill said that previous fines for poaching were too low in Missouri. The bill also gained support in part from five Missouri elk that were illegally killed by poachers in the past few years. None of the cases has yet been solved. Earlier this year, MDC and the Missouri Conservation Commission increased the penalty points they give to individuals convicted of violating the Wildlife Code of Missouri for illegal activities, including poaching. According to MDC records, 547 wild turkeys, 58 paddlefish, and 4,731 deer were illegally taken, or poached, in 2017 and 2018. MDC is also investigating the poaching of five elk over the past several years. Black bear poaching incidents are a growing concern as well. “In addition to doing what we can by increasing penalty points for Wildlife Code violations, conservation agents are also working with county prosecutors and judges to help reduce incidents of poaching and other violations by increasing penalties such as fines and jail time,” said MDC Protection Division Chief Randy Doman. Doman explained how penalties are determined. “The state legislature has the authority to establish penalty classifications related to poaching and other wildlife violations,” Doman said. “MDC and the Missouri Conservation Com-

Here’s a look at the fines for animals killed illegally:

T

BRAND AVE. STUDIOS

BIGGER. STRONGER. AND BETTER THAN EVER.

„ $10,000-$15,000 for each elk or black bear „ $1,000-$5,000 for each whitetailed buck „ $500-$1,000 for each wild turkey or paddlefish

mission set the regulations of the Wildlife Code of Missouri and conservation agents issue tickets for violations, such as for poaching. Agents then submit those tickets to the appropriate county courts. County prosecutors then determine how to proceed with the violations. If the person is convicted of the violations by the county court, the judge then determines fines, jail time, and/or other penalties. Monies from fines are kept in the county and do not go to MDC.” Doman added that depending on the violation, MDC staff can then assign persons convicted of Code violations anywhere from zero to 16 points per violation. “Once a person accumulates 16 points, MDC staff will review the circumstances surrounding the violations and may recommend that the Conservation Commission consider revoking or suspending the person’s permit privileges for up to one year,” Doman explained. “If a person accumulates more than 16 points, the recommendation to the Commission may be for a suspension of more than one year. Staff consider the person’s accumulated points for the past five years in making recommendations to the Commission.” Examples of recent MDC penalty-point increases are: • Illegal baiting of wildlife from 4 to 8 points • Buying, selling, having or releasing prohibited invasive species from 4 to 16 points • Violations related to paddlefish from 4 to 12 points • Taking over the legal limit of deer and turkeys from 8 to 12 points • Doubling points for other violations related to illegal taking of wildlife from 4 to 8 points • Releasing feral hogs into the wild from 0 to 16 points Learn more about MDC’s point system for wildlife violations at mdc.mo.gov/about-us/ about-regulations/point-system-wildlifecode-violations. MDC asks that anyone with information on poaching cases call Operation Game Thief at 1-800-392-1111.

MUNGENAST MOTORSPORTS 5935 South Lindbergh Blvd. St. Louis MO 63123

www.mungenastmotorsports.com 314-649-1200 powersports.honda.com UTILITY ATV ARE RECOMMENDED FOR RIDERS 16 YEARS AND OLDER. ATVs CAN BE HAZARDOUS TO OPERATE FOR YOUR SAFETY, BE RESPONSIBLE, READ THE OWNERS MANUAL. ALWAYS WEAR A HELMET, EYE PROTECT AND PROTECTIVE CLOTHING BE CAREFUL ON DIFFICULT TERRAIN. ALL ATV RIDERS SHOULD TAKE A TRAINING COURSE* (FREE FOR NEW BUYERS. ASK YOUR DEALER OR CALL ASI AT 800-887-2887. NEVER RIDE AFTER CONSUMING DRUGS OR ALCOHOL ON PAVED SURFACES, ON PUBLIC ROADS WITH PASSENGERS, OR AT EXCESSIVE SPEEDS. NO STUNT RIDING. RESPECT THE ENVIRONMENT WHEN RIDING. FOUR TRAX® AND FOREMAN® ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF HONDA MOTOR CO. Ltg 02019 American Honda Motor Co., Inc. (7/19)

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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2019

I

PG 13


PHOTO PROVIDED BY PECK RANCH

Bull and cow elk at Peck Ranch Conservation Area.

AMY SANCETTA

A mature white-tailed deer buck stands alertly.

Could an elk hunt be in Missouri’s future?

Hunting has huge impact on economy E

FROM WIRE REPORTS

CONTENT PROVIDED BY GREEN SHOOT MEDIA

he sport of hunting is a pastime Americans enjoy to get in touch with nature and stock their freezers with healthy protein. What you may not realize about a hunter’s efforts is the significance their presence has on the local economy. To support the hunting industry and doing so legally, make sure your licenses and tags are up to date and don’t forget to stock up on the latest and greatest gear. Take a look at some of the positive effects hunters have on the economy and conservation of majestic wildlife.

T

Hunting and angling by the numbers Economic impact

Jobs supported

Local taxes

Federal taxes

Hunting

$86.9 million

680,937

$5.4 billion

$6.4 billion

Fishing

$114.5 billion

828,000

$6.7 billion

$8.2 billion

Total

$201.4 billion

1,508,937

$12.billion

$14.6 billion

Source: National Wildlife Federation

billion each year. There is no question that honest hunting plays a big role in the development of local communities and federal funding to ensure Economy growth: By the numbers The National Wildlife Federation offers some wildlife and their habitats are maintained. encouraging statistics that sportsman can feel proud to be a contributor of and newcomers to Conservation efforts the sport can enhance. A recent study from the United States Fish Its economic impact accounts to $86.9 bil- and Wildlife Service shows hunting is declinlion, annually. ing. Each year, hunting supports 680,937 jobs. According to the data, only about 5 percent State and local tax revenue generates about of the country, 16 years and older actually hunt. $5.4 billion per year. This statistic is half of what it was 50 years ago, On a federal level, taxes generate about $6.4 and the decline is expected to increase over the PG 14

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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2019

next decade. A large percentage of conservation efforts are paid with the taxes that hunters pay for the sport. The NWF says in the last 70 years, sportsmen have paid over $6.4 billion to directly support wildlife restoration, habitats and hunter education. Vital streams and wetlands are also crucial to supporting wildlife and their homes. In recent years, the Supreme Court has deemed over twenty million acres of wetland as being unqualified for Clean Water Act protections. You can do your part by raising awareness to bring federal funding back to your area.

STLTODAY.COM/OUTDOORS

lk hunting could return to Missouri next year but on a very limited scale. The Missouri Department of Conservation suggests in a draft set of rules drawn up this summer that it may initially only award five elk hunting permits through a lottery system. Elk once were common in the state but were eradicated by the end of the Civil War. There were reintroduced in 2011, and the herd now totals around 175 animals. Officials say the small number of permits eventually could grow to as many as 30 if current reproduction rates push the number of elk in the state to more than 400. The plan has received initial approval from the Missouri Conservation Commission and is now in the public comment stage. This winter, the department is hosting open houses in areas around the elk management zone: Missouri Department of Conservation is hosting open houses in communities around the elk management zone. • December 3 – Van Buren High School Cafeteria, 202 W. College. • December 4 – Ellington City Hall, 100 Tubbs Ave. • December 6 – Eminence High School Cafeteria, 17829 South Sixth St. BRAND AVE. STUDIOS


BECOME HUNTER EDUCATION CERTIFIED ONLINE TODAY! Missouri adults 16 and older can complete hunter education training all online. _ Flexibility to learn at your own pace

_ Access 24/7

_ No in-person skills session required

The all-online course includes engaging video and animation on hunter safety, firearm safety, ethics, regulations, and wildlife management.

LEaRN MORE ABOuT MDC’s huNTER EduCaTION pROgRaM AT MDC.MO.gOv/huNTEREDUCATION BRAND AVE. STUDIOS

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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2019

I

PG 15


Kenrick’s MEATS

4324 Weber Rd. St. Louis, MO 63123

314-631-2440 Known for our variety of Fresh and Smoked Sausages

Whole Deer Processed

only $89 Skinning only $30 Save Skin & Antlers Only Full Cap Shoulder Head Mount $10 Extra

Standard Saw Cut • Round Steaks • Backstraps Boneless Whole • Backstraps Boneless Cut Into Butterfly Steaks • Tenderloins • Roasts • Ribs • Chops Bone-In Back Straps • Stew • Boneless Venison for Grinding • Ground Venison Mixed with Pork $2.75 lb. Mixed with Beef $2.75 lb.

SHOT GUN SEASON DEER PROCESSING HOURS PG 16

I

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2019

• Deer Processed by Union Local 88 Meatcutters • $50.00 DEPOSIT REQUIRED FOR ALL DEER PROCESSED

Kenrick’s Specialty Venison Sausages 3 lb. Stick Hickory Smoked Summer Salami ...........................................$4.29 lb ............................................. $12.87 per stick 3 lb. Sticks Jalapeno & Cheddar Salami ......................$4.99 lb ..............................................$14.97 per stick 3 lb. Sticks Polish Krackow Sausage ...........................$4.99 lb ..............................................$14.97 per stick 3 lb. Sticks Bologna Venison .........................................$4.99 lb ..............................................$14.97 per stick 3 lb. Sticks Habanero Summer Sausage......................$4.99 lb ..............................................$14.97 per stick with Hot Pepper Cheese Snack Stick Landejager...................................................3 lbs. for $14.97 ............................................ $4.99 lb. Snack Stick Pepperoni.....................................................3 lbs. for $14.97 ............................................ $4.99 lb. Deer Jerky....................................................3 lbs. for $14.97 ............................................ $4.99 lb.

Great for the Grill Fresh Venison Bratwurst .....................................................3 lbs. for $11.97............................................. $3.99 lb. Fresh Venison Saziza ...........................................................3 lbs. for $11.97............................................. $3.99 lb. Fresh Venison Country Sausage ........................................3 lbs. for $11.97............................................. $3.99 lb. Fresh Venison Jalapeno & Cheddar Brats.........................3 lbs. for $13.47 ............................................ $4.49 lb. Fresh Venison Bacon & Cheddar Brats .............................3 lbs. for $13.47 ............................................ $4.49 lb.

Deer Burgers 1/3 lb. Plain (mixed w/beef) .....................................3 lbs. for $8.97 .............................................. $2.99 lb. Jalapeno & Cheddar ...................................3 lbs. for $9.87 .............................................. $3.99 lb. Bacon & Cheddar........................................3 lbs. for $9.87 .............................................. $3.99 lb.

Mon.-Fri. 7:00 to 6:00 Sat. 8:00 to 5:00 • Sun. 9:00 to 8:00 STLTODAY.COM/OUTDOORS

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Hours: Mon. - Fri. 8-7 Sat. 7-5; Sun. 9-4

Good thru October 6, 2019

$

5.00 OFF

MEATS & CATERING PREPARED FOOD

Any one of these meat packages!

CALL 1 DAY IN ADVANCE TO PLACE ORDER

STOCK UP YOUR FREEZER AND SAVE!

HIT A E EY S L L U B WITH EAT SM ’ K C I KENR KAGES! PAC

Not valid with any other offer. Must present coupon when placing order. Expires 10/6/19

Spend $200 or more and get 10 lbs. of Chicken Cut Up for FREE (only 2 substitutions per pkg.) BRATS-BURGERS-DOGS ............................... $33

VARIETY PACK......................................... $150

6-Kenrick’s Original Bratwursts 6-BBQ Pork Steak Burgers 6-Beer Bratwursts

3 lbs. Boneless Chuck Roast 3 lbs. Boneless Sirloin Tip Roast 3 lbs. Center Cut Pork Steaks 3 lbs. Sirloin Pork Chops 2-8oz. Boneless New York Strip Steaks 2-8oz. Bacon Wrapped filet Mignons

8-4 to 1lb New York Hot Dogs 6-All Beef Grilling Burgers Hot Dogs

MAIN ENTREE PACK .................................... $33 2 lbs. Meat Loaf 2 lbs. Roast Beef in Au Jus 1/2 Smoked Chicken in BBQ Sauce 2 lbs. Roasted Pork & Gravy 2 lbs. BBQ Pulled Pork in BBQ Sauce Fully Cooked-Just Heat and Eat

ECONOMY PACK...................................... 2½ lbs. Country Style Pork Ribs 2 lbs. (Approx. 4) Pork Cutlets 2½ lbs. (Approx. 5) Sirloin Pork Chops 2 lbs. (1 lb. Pkgs.) Lean Ground Chuck 2 lbs. (1 lb. Pkgs.) Lean Beef Stew Meat 3 lbs. Boneless Chuck Roast

JUMBO fAMILY PACK ...............................

$105

1 lb. Sliced Country Slab Bacon 3½ lbs. Cut Up Chicken (8 pcs.) 3 lbs. Select Arm Roast 3 lbs. (Approx. 4) Center Cut Pork Steaks 1 lb. Pkg. Wieners 3 lbs. Bone-In Chicken Breasts

BALANCED DIET PACK ............................... $135 3 lbs. Boneless Chuck Roast 2 lbs. (1 lb. Units) Lean Beef Stew Meat 5 lbs. (1 lb. Units) Lean Ground Chuck 3½ lbs. Cut Up Chicken (8 pcs.) 2 lbs. (Approx. 4) Pork Cutlets

2 lbs. (Approx. 5) Center Cut Pork Chops 2 lbs. (Approx. 4) Cube Steaks 3 lbs. (Approx. 4) Center Cut Pork Steaks 4-8oz. Avg. New York Strip Steaks 2 lb. Boneless Skinless Chicken Breast

ALL BEEf ROAST........................................ $90 3 lbs. Boneless Chuck Roast 3 lbs. Boneless Rump Roast 3 lbs. Boneless Sirloin Tip Roast

2-8oz. Boneless Rib Eye Steaks 7 lbs. (Approx. 2) Cut Up Chicken 1 lb. Sliced Country Slab Bacon 2 lbs. Center Cut Round Steak 5 lbs. (1 lb. Pkgs.) Lean Ground Chuck 2 lbs. (Approx. 4) Pork Cutlets

3 lbs. Boneless Top Round Roast 3 lbs. Boneless Eye of Round Roast

4 lbs. Pork Cutlets 4 lbs. Stew Meat 8 - 1 lb. Packages Ground Chuck 4 lbs. Center Cut Rib Chops 4 lbs. Lean Cube Steak 2 lbs. Round Steak 3 lbs. Sirloin Steaks

$265

7 lbs. Cut Up Chicken (16 pcs.) 4 lbs. Slab Bacon 4 lbs. Bulk Pork Sausage 3 lbs. Boneless Chuck Roast 3 lbs. Boneless Pork Loin Roast 4 lbs. Center Cut Pork Steaks 3 lbs. fresh Meatloaf Mix

BIG “5” PACK.......................................... $145 5 lbs. All Beef Grilling Burgers 5 lbs. Center Cut Pork Steaks 5 lbs. Pork Cutlets 5 lbs. Rib Pork Chops

5 lbs. Cube Steak 5 lbs. Bavarian Bratwursts 5 lbs. Chicken Wings 5 lbs. Cut Up Chicken

SMOKEHOUSE PACK.................................... $45 4 Pcs. Smoked Pork Chops 4 Pcs. Smoked Cheddar Bratwurst 4 Pcs. Smoked Polish Sausage 4 Pcs. Smoked Apple Maple Bratwurst 4 Pcs. Smoked Spicy Louisiana Sausage

4 Pcs. Smoked Jalapeno & Cheddar Bratwurst 1/2 lb. Kenrick’s Landjaeger 12 oz. Stick Summer Sausage 12 oz. Stick Jalapeno & Cheddar Summer Sausage

www.kenricks.com • 4324 Weber Rd., St. Louis, MO 63123 • 314-631-2440 BRAND AVE. STUDIOS

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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2019

I

PG 17


Feral hogs have become a menacing force in Missouri

CONTENT PROVIDED BY HILARY MEYER, EATINGWELL.COM

The region faces a growing threat from this invasive species. These animals thrive in southern Missouri and leave incredible damage in their wake. ERIC BOHL

M

PG 18

I

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2019

ish can be one of the most intimidating foods to grill. Fish tends to be delicate and difficult to maneuver without mishap. Luckily, it’s easy to master once you know the tricks of the trade. Here are a few tips to help you achieve perfectly grilled fish every time. 1. Keep the skin on the fish. Plenty of recipes call for fish with “skin removed.” This is fine if you’re baking it and don’t have to fuss with it much. But grilling is an “action” cooking method where you often need to move or flip your food to get it cooked just right. To prevent fillets from falling apart, consider leaving the skin on (if it comes that way). Fish like trout or mackerel have thin skin that gets delightfully crispy, while tougherskinned fish like salmon and halibut are best eaten without skin — simply remove the skin after grilling and before serving. 2. Use a fish basket. Another way to keep fish from flaking apart is by using a fish basket. Instead of flipping the fish directly, you’ll flip the basket that holds it, which can help the fish stay in one piece. 3. Cook it in a packet. You wouldn’t steam a steak, but steaming fish in foil packets is a great way to keep it moist. Simply stack two 20-inch sheets of foil. Coat the center of the top layer with oil or cooking spray. Layer your fish on the foil, adding ingredients such as thinly sliced veggies or lemon, if desired. Bring the short ends of the foil together, leaving enough room in the packet for steam to gather. Fold the foil over and pinch to seal, and then pinch the seams together along the sides. Place the packets on a gas grill over medium heat or on a charcoal grill 4 to 6 inches from medium coals. Cover the grill and cook about 8 to 10 minutes for a fish fillet. Handle the hot packets with a large spatula or oven mitts. Carefully open both ends of the packet and allow the hot steam to escape. 4. Try using a plank. It may sound fancy, but grilling fish on a plank is much easier than grilling directly on the grates. Soak the plank in water for at least 2 hours before grilling. Then, simply place your fillets on the pre-soaked plank and cover your grill — no flipping required. You may have to reposition the plank over lower heat if your grill is extra hot and the fish is not quite done cooking. You’ll enjoy the subtle smoky flavor the wood gives your food.

F

Missouri Farm Bureau

issouri faces a growing threat from an invasive species – feral hogs. These animals thrive in southern Missouri and leave incredible damage in their wake. Many feral hogs have arrived through northward migration. However, some is due to intentional release or transport of hogs for hunting. Knowingly or recklessly releasing hogs into the wild is illegal in Missouri and punishable by up to one year in jail, a fine of up to $2,000 or both. Each released hog constitutes a separate instance of the crime. A feral hog is defined as any hog, including Russian and European wild boar, that is not conspicuously identified by ear tags or other identification and is roaming freely on public or private land without the land manager’s or landowner’s permission. The hogs’ reproductive rate is a huge part of the problem. One feral sow can produce two litters per year, with each litter averaging six piglets. The resulting annual population growth rate of up to 166 percent is astonishing. It must be aggressively fought against to keep the population from exploding. Missouri Farm Bureau’s (MOFB) member-led policy supports complete eradication of feral hogs from the state of Missouri. All those pigs do some serious damage. A sounder, or group of hogs can destroy 10 to 20 acres of crops, pasture or other land overnight. Hogs use their tusks to root in the ground for acorns, earthworms and roots, plowing the soil up to eight inches deep. This can lead to crop loss, soil erosion, reduced water quality and damage to sensitive natural areas. Disease is also a threat with feral hogs.

How to grill fish perfectly every time

MISSOURI DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION PHOTO

One feral sow can produce two litters per year, with each litter averaging six piglets. Missouri feral hogs have been diagnosed with swine brucellosis and pseudorabies. These can affect humans and domesticated animals, including our livestock herd. The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, or PRRS, was recently confirmed in a Missouri feral hog. If this highly-contagious disease got into our livestock herd, it could devastate our pork industry. Thirty-eight states currently have feral hog populations. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) estimates they cause approximately $2.4 billion in damages and control costs each year. At least $800 million is direct agricultural damage. MOFB is working with state and federal officials and local landowners in all affected areas.

Through our network of county leaders, MOFB convened a working group to discuss possible solutions for eradication. The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) encourages citizens to report feral hog sightings to 573-522-4115, extension 3296, or online at mdc.mo.gov/feralhog. They also strongly discourage shooting hogs, as this can scatter the rest of the sounder and create new populations in other areas. Through trapping measures, MDC and its partners eliminated 9,365 feral hogs from Missouri in 2018, up 42 percent from 2017. Eric Bohl, of Columbia, Missouri, is director of public affairs for Missouri Farm Bureau, the state’s largest farm organization.

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J

BOLLINGER AND MADISON COUNTIES 1632 ACRES ee k

928

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midon Memorial Conservation Area is a 1,630-acre area located on the upper reaches of the Castor River in Bollinger and Madison counties. Evelyn and Ellsworth Amidon donated a portion of the area to the Conservation Department; other tracts were acquired from private landowners and the U.S. Forest Service. The forest’s timber species range from mixed hardwoods to shortleaf pine to cedar glades. A granite shut-ins on the Castor River adds an interesting geologic feature. During your visit, you may see various forest improvement practices designed to improve wildlife habitat and maintain watershed quality. Any physical disturbance is only temporary and normal aesthetic appearance will return soon. The Conservation Department has created watering ponds and planted food plots and agricultural crops within the forest to provide additional food sources for wildlife. Timber harvests are also an important part of habitat management; they produce forage and cover for forest wildlife. Boundaries are marked from tree to tree with blue paint, and/or signs. State forest signs also are posted where boundaries intersect state and county roads or private lands. Please respect the rights of adjacent landowners. Amidon Memorial Conservation Area is located south of Route J, approximately eight miles east of Fredericktown. County Road 208 fords the Castor River on the area. • Glass containers are prohibited on the area. • GPS Coordinates N 37Deg 34.132’, W 090Deg 09.310’

AMIDON MEMORIAL CONSERVATION AREA

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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2019 I

PG 19


Welcome to

Springfield, Missouri Good times happen in the great outdoors. Whether it’s kayaking on Lake Springfield or hiking an Ozarks Greenways trail, you’ll find plenty of adventure in the heart and soul of the Ozarks.

Plan your trip at

SpringfieldMo.org PG 20

I

WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22, 2019

STLTODAY.COM/BOSWIL

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WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22, 2019 I

PG 21


Bismarck Conservation Area B

Bismarck CA Conservation Commission of the State of Missouri © Last Updated - 4/8/2019

Si

ismarck Conservation Area is a 1,188-acre tract of land in St. Francois, Iron, and Washington counties. The area surrounds 210-acre DiSalvo Lake, which was constructed in 1944 by the Hanna Mining Co. to serve as a water reservoir for nearby lead mining operations. The Department of Conservation purchased the property from Hanna in 1981. In addition to its upland forested areas, Bismarck features an igneous glade and savanna complex, which is currently being restored, and 50 acres of wet-mesic bottomland forest. The glades and savannas support little bluestem grass, post oak, blackjack oak, fragrant sumac, pineweed and prickly pear cactus. The wet-mesic bottomland forest is one of the best such examples in the St. Francois Mountain region. It supports the rare oval ladies’ tresses orchid, has an understory of pawpaw, spicebush and musclewood and a canopy dominated by pin oak and swamp white oak. A large stand of witch hazel grows near the dam of the lake. The geology of Bismarck Conservation Area is among the oldest in Missouri; it includes precambrian igneous rock and lava-formed Cambrian-age LaMotte sandstone and Cambrian-age dolomites. DiSalvo Lake, which serves as the headwaters of the St. Francis River, contains good numbers of bass, bluegill, channel catfish and crappies. The Department provides a boat ramp, parking areas and disabled accessible facilities, including a fishing dock. Hunting is available for deer, turkey, squirrel, rabbit and waterfowl. • GPS Coordinates N3743.790’,W09038.609’

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MAP DISCLAIMER: Although all data in this map have been compiled by the Missouri Department of Conservation, no warranty, expressed or implied, is made by the department as to the accuracy of the data and related materials. The act of distribution shall not constitute any such warranty, and no responsibility is assumed by the department in the use of these data or related materials.

PG 22

I

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2019

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Buford Mountain CA Field

Conservation Commission of the State of Missouri © Last Updated - 4/8/2019

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10 80

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12 00

HUGHES MOUNTAIN NATURAL AREA

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20 13

10 80

CR 539

20 13

40 14

60 15

12 00 10 80

15 60

14 40

13 20

120 0 10 80

40 14

15 60

13 20

00 12

VICINITY MAP

O Potosi

8

Legend

8

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00 12

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13 20

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Elevation Contour, 40' Forest

21 S T

96

0

0.25

0.5

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Buford Mountain Conservation Area

B

BRAND AVE. STUDIOS

ughes Mountain Natural Area in southern Washington County, is a combination of igneous glades and three types of forest. The area was designated a natural area in 1982 to protect its unique geology and natural communities. The igneous knob is named for John Hughes, the first European settler in the area, who arrived in 1810. The land stayed in the Hughes family until purchased by the Conservation Department. The precambrian rock outcrops on Hughes Mountain are among the oldest (approximately 1.5 billion years) exposed rocks in the United States. The rocks were once liquefied by ancient volcanoes associated with the St. Francois Mountains. Some of the molten rock contracted and cracked as it cooled to create multi-sided columns. A rhyolite formation, known locally as the Devil’s Honeycomb, is one of Missouri’s geologic wonders, and is the highest point on Hughes Mountain. Two-thirds of the area is wooded. The forest is dominated by post and white oaks with areas of stunted specimens of blackjack oak and black hickory.

H

MAP DISCLAIMER: Although all data in this map have been compiled by the Missouri Department of Conservation, no warranty, expressed or implied, is made by the department as to the accuracy of the data and related materials. The act of distribution shall not constitute any such warranty, and no responsibility is assumed by the department in the use of these data or related materials.

uford Mountain Conservation Area, located east of beautiful Belleview Valley, was purchased by the Missouri Department of Conservation from the Nature Conservancy in 1979. The area was named after its settlement in 1812 by William Buford, who acquired the land through a Spanish Land Grant. Today, Buford Mountain covers 3,823 acres. In the mid- to late-1800s, the charcoal industry flourished in the Belleview-Arcadia Valley. Old charcoal kilns still remain over the entire mountain. The highest peak of the mountain is 1,740 feet above sea level. With most of the mountain hardened by granite known as Rhyolite, the area yields little permanent

Conservation Commission of the State of Missouri © 12/08

Hughes Mountain Conservation Area

Waterbody Stream

U

Site

C

1200

MDC Improved Road

WASHINGTON COUNTY 462 ACRES

U 21 Irondale

County

O

HUGHES MOUNTAIN NATURAL AREA

47

21

13 20

185 168 0

water. Limestone stream beds mark the base of the mountain. Several wet weather springs can be found over the area; these are usually dry, however, during summer. The area’s most outstanding feature is its glades, ranging in size from less than one acre to over 10 acres. These glades provide many scenic views and excellent opportunities to observe glade plants and animals. Because of the sensitive nature of the plant and animal communities and very thin soils common to the glades, activity on the glades is restricted to walking only. Buford Mountain is home to wildlife species common to Missouri. This is a favored hunting area for turkey hunters, and some deer hunting occurs as well.

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The area’s glades are natural openings on western or southern slopes and are dominated by native grasses and a variety of wildflowers. Glades occur where the soils are extremely thin and usually include areas of exposed bedrock. The thin soils, combined with the south and west exposure create a uniquely harsh habitat. Glade plants include little bluestem, broomsedge, poverty grass, the small but colorful flame flower, prickly pear cactus, yellow star grass, spiderwort and wild hyacinth. Animals often found on these glades include several species of lizards, lichen grasshoppers and prairie warblers. Exposed rocks within glades are often covered with a variety of lichens. During your visit to Hughes Mountain you may view cedar cutting and prescribed burning. Historically the glades would have been much more open and would have been dominated by grasses and wildflowers. In the absence of fire, cedars have encroached onto the glades and have suppressed the herbaceous vegetation. These management activities are intended to keep the glades open and to promote the growth of grasses and wildflowers.

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2019 I

PG 23


HUZZAH CONSERVATION AREA

Onondaga State Ononadaga StatePark Park

CRAWFORD COUNTY 6,225 ACRES 50

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0

Creek

900 850

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800

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Conservation Commission of the State of Missouri Š 05/16

Huzzah Conservation Area uzzah Conservation Area is located in Crawford County. The area consists of 6,225 acres. Rugged forest terrain, the Meramec River and Huzzah and Courtois Creeks draw many visitors to this area. The Ozark Hiking Trail transects most of the area and allows hikers access to many of

H PG 24

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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2019

its unique features. The Narrows, located in the extreme southwest portion of the area, is a narrow hogback ridge divided between Huzzah and Courtois Creeks that features extremely steep topography and rapidly changing vegetation from ridge to creek bottom.

The remains of the Scotia Furnace and Iron Works are located on the property.The Scotia Furnace,built by John G.Scott,Robert Anderson, Thomas Howard and Anvil James,produced pig iron from 1870 to 1880.Much of the forest in the vicinity of the furnace remains was clearcut during that period to produce charcoal to ďŹ re the furnace.

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The area is managed for a variety of game and non-game wildlife species. Timber harvests have been used to produce forage and cover for wildlife. Watering ponds and permanent food plots have been established for the benefit of wildlife.

BRAND AVE. STUDIOS


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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2019

I

PG 25


MAGNOLIA HOLLOW CONSERVATION AREA

T 185

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Conservation Commission of the State of Missouri © 12/09

Locked Gate No Public Access

700

Metcalf School

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600

500

700

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500 500

600

LEGEND Boundary Gravel Road Drainage Hiking Trail Disabled Accessible Trail Area Access Trail Parking Lot Wildlife Water Hole Archery Range Clay Pigeon Range Woodland Food Plot Viewing Platform Primitive Camping Area Picnic Area Disabled Accessible Forest Topography Brickey Hills Natural Area

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in glade areas, and bottomland hardwoods are found along streams. The main tract includes a fen, four springs, a sinkhole, a dolomite cliff, 10 dolomite glades and over three miles of Indian Creek, an Ozark headwater stream. Moisture-loving plants, such as hydrangea, common fragile fern, pawpaw, basswood and wild ginger, grow at the base of the dolomite cliff. Drought-tolerant plants, such as little bluestem, side oats grama grass, Missouri black-eyed Susan and pale purple coneflower, grow on the dolomite glades. Visitors to the main area will find several primitive camping areas, six parking lots and five access roads. The Hi Pointe unit has a camping spot, three parking lots and a two-acre fish pond. Management of the area includes establishing and maintaining water holes, old growth forest areas, riparian corridors, fields, savannas, glades and forest.

STLTODAY.COM/OUTDOORS

BRAND AVE. STUDIOS

1 Mile

Conservation Commission of the State of Missouri © 01/17

Magnolia Hollow Conservation Area agnolia Hollow Conservation Area is in Ste. Genevieve County, 10 miles north of Ste. Genevieve along the Mississippi River. This rugged 1,740-acre area is bordered by Establishment Creek and Schmidt’s Island, alongside the Mississippi River. The area features steep bluffs and scenic river views. Eagles are commonly sighted along the river. The forest at Magnolia Hollow Conservation Area is diverse, ranging from mixed hardwoods to cedar glades. Magnolia Hollow, itself, is a deep draw, containing a wide variety of trees, shrubs, herbs and wildflowers, including begonia orchids. Wildlife management practices in forest include creating watering ponds, planting

M

PG 26

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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2019

fields to serve as food sources for animals, and harvesting timber, which provides improved forage and cover for wildlife. Management of Magnolia Hollow and Establishment Creek corridors is minimal and is designed to protect the steep and sensitive watersheds. A disabled accessible viewing platform is available for observing the Mississippi River and Establishment Creek bottoms. • Open the Upper Mississippi Basin site and check levels on the St. Louis gauge. At 35 feet water is on the White Sands Road. At 28 feet, water is up in Magnolia Hollow itself. • GPS Coordinates N3802.365’, W09008.743’

ea Ridge Conservation Area is in Washington County. The area consists of four tracts of land, the largest of which straddles Highway 185, midway between Sullivan and Potosi. The 1,058-acre Hi Pointe tract is bisected by Pelican Ridge Road off of Route T. The 1,045-acre Route F Unit is accessed from Route F and Sugar Loaf Road, and the 720-acre Metcalf School Unit is accessed from Lodge Road off of Route W. The Conservation Department began purchasing land for the Pea Ridge Conservation Area in 1946 with the bulk of the main tract acquired in the 1970s. Pittman-Robertson funds allowed the purchase of 265 acres in 1978. At one time, the Jefferson City Trail ran through the main tract. The Rock Springs General Store and Post Office were once located on the trail. The forest is composed of oak, hickory, pine and associated species. Cedar is found


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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2019

I

PG 27


Meramec Conservation Area and Arthur G. Heyne Memorial Annex Conservation Commission of the State of Missouri © Last Updated - 10/17/2018 4,045 Acres - Franklin County

600

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700

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0 700

0 800

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800

Hiking Trail 800

Hiking/Biking/Equestrian Trail Waterbody Stream

600

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700

Forested Area

800 0

Elevation Contour

0

0.5

S T

0 70

1

800

185

Miles 2

MAP DISCLAIMER Although all data in this map have been compiled by the Missouri Department of Conservation, no warranty, expressed or implied, is made by the department as to the accuracy of the data and related materials. The act of distribution shall not constitute any such warranty, and no responsibility is assumed by the department in the use of these data or related materials.

Meramec Conservation Area eramec Conservation Area is in Franklin County. Much of the land for the forest was purchased by the state between 1925 and 1930. In 1980, 166 additional acres were donated by Dorothy Hill in memory of Arthur Heyne. Sheer cliffs along the Meramec River form the western border of the area, affording a scenic view of the river

M PG 28

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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2019

valley and surrounding hills. The area contains six caves, a great blue heron rookery, abundant wildlife and varying forest types, including plantations established on the site by the first state nursery. Other interesting attractions include the Reedville town site, a former CCC camp, Lone Hill Lookout Tower

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site and old mines. The Conservation Department manages the area for a variety of uses and has implemented a number of different management techniques to create and improve habitat. During your visit to Meramec Conservation Area you may view timber stand improvement, timber harvest, glade restoration, prescribed burning and tree planting.

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Find information and processors at mdc.mo.gov www.confedmo.org BRAND AVE. STUDIOS

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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2019

I

PG 29


Jim Edgar Panther Creek LOCATION: Jim Edgar Panther Creek State Fish and Wildlife Area (JEPC) is located between Ashland and Chandlerville, Illinois, 25 miles Northwest of Springfield, Illinois, in Cass County. Total Acres: 16,550 Huntable Acres: 16,400 Open Acres: 10,050 Timbered Acres 6,500 JEPC is characterized by rolling to steeply rolling uplands; 3,615 acres of crop land; 6,500 acres of timberland; with the balance of acres in native grass, food plots or idled farmland. SEASONS: Squirrel, deer, turkey, dove, upland game, waterfowl, furbearers (trapping) • Antlered deer must have at least four (4) points on one side to harvest. Parking allowed in designated parking areas only; no road side parking allowed. FOR MORE INFORMATION: (217) 452-7741.

MAP COURTESY OF IDNR

PG 30

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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2019

STLTODAY.COM/OUTDOORS

BRAND AVE. STUDIOS


Illinois Route 146

H

Cache River State Natural Area 45

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24



37

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Marshall Ridge Access

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State Champion Bald Cypress

*

BU T TO N L A Cache River Normandy Road

West Route 37 Access P

SW

AM

Boardwalk Access

*

Section 8 Woods Nature Preserve State Champion Water Tupelo

ND

Porter House Road

k

Cree Lower Cache River Access

BarkhausenCache River Wetlands Center

Heron Pond Access

Forman

North Main Access

Belknap Access

Site Access Restricted Area (no hunting)

Hiking Trail

d oa

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Natural Area Boundary Dedicated Nature Preserve

rna

Ka

(no hunting)

The Nature Conservancy Property

East Karnak Access

Private Property

Karnak

To U.S. 45

Illinois Route 169

Belknap Road

Headquarters

Belknap

West Karnak Access Urbana Road

Cave Creek Access

Legend

Sunflower Lane

Big Cypress Access Flatwoods Access

Route 45 North Access

East Bluff Access

Heron Pond Boardwalk

Northwest Belknap Access

nR

West Eden Road

Perks Road

Wildcat Bluff Access Lookout Point

Forman Access

Ede

Ballowe Church Road

*

Boss Island

South Cypress Access

White Hill Perks Road Access

Hawkins Road

State Champion Cherrybark Oak

Little Black Slough Nature Preserve

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Perks

Wildcat Bluff Road

Tunnel Hill State Trail

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Post Creek Cutoff

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State Champion Tree Tunnel Hill State Trail

MAP COURTESY OF IDNR

Cache River State Natural Area LOCATION : 3 miles south of Vienna, Illinois; lying roughly between Illinois Route 37 and U.S. Route 45, Johnson County, Illinois. 14,960 acres 12,417 huntable acres Little Black Slough Hunting Area 6,873 huntable acres This area is primarily composed of upland and bottomland timber with permanent sloughs and some brushy areas. There are approximately 900 acres in open areas that have been reforested.

permanent ponds, sloughs and some brushy areas. There are approximately 1,145 acres in open areas that have been reforested. SPECIES: Deer, dove, furbearers, rabbit, squirrel, wild turkey, waterfowl Regulations for all huntable species will coincide with statewide season dates, hunting hours and limits. Also note local restrictions and guidelines. No camping is permitted on these areas. Camping is available within a 20-mile radius at Ferne Clyffe State Park, Dixon Springs Lower Cache River Hunting Area State Park, Fort Massac State Park and Shawnee National Forest LOCATION: Generally, from Perks to Karnak along the Cache campgrounds. River in Johnson and Pulaski counties. Hunting is on a first-come, first-served basis. No quotas or 5,544 huntable acres drawings, etc. This area is primarily composed of bottomland timber with There are 10 hunter accesses at the LOWER CACHE RIVER BRAND AVE. STUDIOS

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HUNTING AREA: Big Cypress, North Main, Flatwoods, East and West Karnak, Porterhouse, Perks Road, Lower Cache River, West Rt. 37 and Rt. 45 South. There are 14 hunter accesses at the LITTLE BLACK SLOUGH HUNTING AREA: Marshall Ridge, North Cypress, North Belknap, Belknap, Forman, East Bluff, North Rt. 45, Cave Creek, Little Black Slough, Northwest Belknap, South Cypress, Glass Hill and Snakehole. For additional information: Contact the Site Superintendent, Cache River State Natural Area, 930 Sunflower Lane, Belknap, IL 62908, phone (618)634-9678. For further information on hunting opportunities on other Cache River Wetlands joint venture property, contact the Nature Conservancy at (618) 634-2524 and Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge at (618) 634-2231. SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2019 I

PG 31


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www.bigstcharlesmotorsports.com ©2019 Bombardier Recreational Products Inc. (BRP). All rights reserved. ®, ™ and the BRP logo are trademarks of BRP or its affiliates. In the U.S.A., products are distributed by BRP US Inc. Offers valid in U.S.A. only from September 1, 2019 to September 30, 2019. The terms and conditions may vary depending on your state and these offers are subject to termination or change at any time without notice. See an authorized BRP dealer for details. Get up to $1,250 rebate on select 2019 Maverick Trail models: † Eligible units are select new and unused 2019 Can-Am Maverick Trail models. The buyer of an eligible 2019 model will receive up to $1,250 rebate. While quantities last. BRP reserves the right, at any time, to discontinue or change specifications, prices, designs, features, models or equipment without incurring obligation. Some models depicted may include optional equipment. Carefully read the vehicle’s operator’s guide. Follow all instructional and safety material and observe applicable laws and regulations. Ride responsibly and safely. Riding and alcohol/drugs don’t mix. For complete details, see your authorized BRP dealer and visit can-am.brp.com.

PG 32

I

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2019

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636.946.6487 THE #1 MOTORCYCLE DEALER IN THE MIDWEST www.bigstcharlesmotorsports.com ©2019 Bombardier Recreational Products Inc. (BRP). All rights reserved. ®, ™ and the BRP logo are trademarks of BRP or its affiliates. In the U.S.A., products are distributed by BRP US Inc. Offers valid in U.S.A. only from September 1, 2019 to September 30, 2019. The terms and conditions may vary depending on your state and these offers are subject to termination or change at any time without notice. See an authorized BRP dealer for details. Get up to $3,000 off on select 2019 models: REBATE UP TO $3,000 ON SELECT 2019 MODELS: † Eligible units are select new and unused 2019 Can-Am ATVs and Can-Am SSVs vehicles. The buyer of an eligible 2019 model will receive up to $3,000 rebate. Rebate amount depends on the model purchased. While quantities last. BRP reserves the right, at any time, to discontinue or change specifications, prices, designs, features, models or equipment without incurring obligation. Some models depicted may include optional equipment. CAN-AM OFF-ROAD VEHICLE: BRP highly recommends that all ATV drivers take a training course. For safety and training information, see your dealer or call the ATV Safety Institute at 1-800-887-2887. ATVs can be hazardous to operate. Never carry passengers on any ATV not specifically designed by the manufacturer for such use. All adult model Can-Am ATVs are Category G ATVs (General Use Models) intended for recreational and/or utility use by an operator age 16 or older. For side-by-side vehicles (SSV): Carefully read the vehicle’s operator’s guide. Follow all instructional and safety material and observe applicable laws and regulations. ATVs and SSV are for off-road use only; never ride on paved surfaces or public roads. For your safety reason, the operator and passenger must wear a helmet, eye protection and other protective clothing. Always remember that riding and alcohol/drugs don’t mix. Never engage in stunt driving. Avoid excessive speed and be particularly careful on difficult terrain. Always ride responsibly and safely.

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I

PG 33


Giant City State Park LOCATION: 10 miles south of Carbondale and 1 mile southeast of Makanda, Illinois in Jackson and Union counties. Total Acres: 4,052 Huntable Acres: 2,891 Forest Cover: 3,700 Open, Cultivated or Fallow Fields: 180 Located in the Shawnee Hills of Southern Illinois, with topography that is considered rugged. Many sandstone bluffs and steep ravines exist. Some of the most striking examples of stream erosion in sandstone are found in this area. SPECIES: Deer, rabbit, squirrel, turkey, dove, crow More about location: Sixteen ponds are

PG 34

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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2019

Sand Ridge State Forest

located within the park, with 13 holding ďŹ shable populations of bluegill and largemouth bass. Eight hiking trails, totaling approximately 17 miles in length, offer spectacular views. State regulations and limits apply. All hunters must SIGN IN and OUT and report harvest each day at the registration boxes before leaving the site. Sign in sheets are located at the Wildlife Biologist office and at the front area of the class A campground. No waterfowl hunting is allowed on park property. Trapping by permit only. For further information: Site Superintendent, Giant City State Park, 235 Giant City Rd., Makanda, IL 62958, Phone: (618) 457-4836.

LOCATION: The Sand Ridge State Forest (SRSF) office is located approximately 1.5 miles northwest of Forest City in Mason County. Total acres: 7,500 Huntable acres: 6,600 Open acres: 300 Timbered acres: 6,000 Sand Ridge State Forest is characterized by a flat to gently rolling terrain. Forest consists

of approximately 3,500 acres of hardwoods and 2,500 acres of pine. Open acres are prairie and wildlife management fields. SEASONS: Deer, turkey, game birds, waterfowl, squirrel, coyote For more information: Visit the Sand Ridge Sportsman Digest at: dnr.illinois.gov/ Parks/Pages/SandRidge.

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Kaskaskia River MAP COURTESY OF IDNR

LOCATION: Both sides of the Kaskaskia River from the Mississippi River to Fayetteville. Site office — 4 miles north of Baldwin (Illinois Hwy 154); 6 miles south of New Athens (Illinois Hwy 13). Total acres: 18,000 Water acres: 3,500 Timbered acres: 10,000 Huntable acres: 14,000 Open acres: 4,000 The area is a complex of channelized river, oxbows, sloughs, backwater lakes, bottomland timber, cultivated fields, native grass patches, brushy areas and fallow fields. The site also contains Illinois Power Company’s 2000-acre “Baldwin Lake” and surrounding area which is managed as a waterfowl refuge and public fishing area. A public waterfowl hunting area, “Doza Creek Waterfowl Management Area” (DCWMA), consists of the lands and waters south of Doza Creek on the east side of the channelized river. SEASONS: Deer, turkey, squirrel, dove, upland game, waterfowl, coyote, fox, raccoon. • Handicapped hunting facilities available. Picnic areas and boat ramps. FOR MORE INFORMATION: Site Superintendent, 10981 Conservation Road, Baldwin, IL 62217, (618) 785-2555.

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PG 35


Kinkaid Lake MAP COURTESY OF IDNR

Food plot: 100 LOCATION:Thissiteislocated7milesnorth- interspersed with small fields which are managed Lake: 2,750 west of Murphysboro in Jackson County, Illinois, for food plots, cool/native warm season grasses and 100 miles southeast of St. Louis. Boat launch and legumes. SPECIES: Deer, dove, furbearers, turkey, Total Acres: 5,850 and marina facilities are located 5 miles west of quail, waterfowl, squirrel, rabbit, woodcock. Huntable Acres: 3,100 Murphysboro adjacent to Route 149 and 2 miles Statewide regulations apply, unless otherwise Timber: 2,740 south of Ava on Route 151 (boat launch only). specified Old field: 260 The area is dominated by oak-hickory forest For further information: Kinkaid Lake

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Fish & Wildlife Area — Lake Murphysboro State Park — 52 Cinder Hill Drive, Murphysboro, IL 62966 (618/684-2867); US Forest Service — District Ranger 2221 Walnut St., Murphysboro, IL 62966 (618/687-1731); Kinkaid-Reed’s Creek Conservancy District — 1763 Waterplant Road Murphysboro, IL 62966 (618/687-2951).

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*All participants who attend an estimated 60-90-minute in-home product consultation will receive a $100 gift certificate. Visit https://www.restaurant. com/about/terms for complete terms and conditions and https://www.restaurant.comfor participating restaurants. Retail value is $100. Offer sponsored by LeafGuard Holdings Inc. Limit one per household. Company procures, sells, and installs seamless gutter protection. This offer is valid for homeowners over 18 years of age. If married or involved with a life partner, both cohabitating persons must attend and complete presentation together. Participants must have a photo ID, be able to understand English, and be legally able to enter into a contract. The following persons are not eligible for this offer: employees of Company or affiliated companies or entities, their immediate family members, previous participants in a Company in-home consultation within the past 12 months and all current and former Company customers. Gift may not be extended, transferred, or substituted except that Company may substitute a gift of equal or greater value if it deems it necessary. Gift card will be mailed to the participant via first class United States Mail within 21 days of receipt of the promotion form. Not valid in conjunction with any other promotion or discount of any kind. Offer is subject to change without notice prior to reservation. Expires 9/30/19.

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PG 37


Pyramid State Park LOCATION: This site is located 6 miles south of Pinckneyville off state Highway 127, then 2 miles west on Pyatts Blacktop in Perry County, Illinois. The expansion of Pyramid State Park consisted of four land acquisitions totaling 16,245 acres from Ark Land Company on October 1, 2001. This acquisition was the largest ever made by the Department of Natural Resources and resulted in the largest state park in Illinois totaling 19,015 acres. Pyramid State Park consists of five separate management units. They are: Pyramid State Park (3,181 acres), Captain Unit (6,105 acres), Denmark Unit (4,385 acres), East Conant Unit (2,824 acres) and Galum Unit (2,520 acres). Pyramid State Park consists of heavily forested hills interspersed with numerous lakes and ponds. The majority of the area was previously strip mined for a shallow vein of coal.

Approximately 400 acres of water form lakes varying in size from 0.1 acres to 24 acres. All of the strip mined area has been replanted to hardwoods and pines with small fields planted to food plots. Fishing and boating are allowed on lakes with a 10 h.p. maximum limit. A small campground with gravel pads, tables, fire grills, dump station and picnic shelter is available. Total Acres: 3,181 Huntable Acres: 2,754. Habitat Type Acres: Timber 2,217; Cropland/Old Field 564; Lakes 400. SPECIES: Deer, dove, woodcock, turkey, rabbit, furbearers, squirrel, quail, waterfowl Statewide regulations apply, unless otherwise specified See site specific regulations No waterfowl hunting in park For further information: Pyramid State Park — 1562 Pyramid Park Road, Pinckneyville, IL 62274 (618/357-2574).

Ten Mile Creek State Fish and Wildlife Area Ten-Mile Creek SFWA is located in Hamilton and Jefferson counties. Four separate units are managed for public hunting. The two Jefferson county tracts were mined prior to acquisition. The Belle Rive unit (1460 acres) contains a Waterfowl Rest Area. It is approximately 56% mined land with new mine law reclamation completed. The Eads unit (1550 acres) was approximately 83% mined and reclaimed under pre-law standards. The two Hamilton county tracts remain unmined. The Dahlgren unit (1120 acres) contains a good mix of farm fields and forest habitats typical to this part of Illinois. It ranges from high and dry, to low and wet. Much of the wetland had been prior converted to cropland in the Big Creek watershed. The Goshen Trail unit is the southernmost unit (1690 acres) and is mostly upland. A very good mix of cropland,

woodland and open fields makes this area very attractive to a wide variety of wildlife. In addition to the strip pit lakes, numerous ponds dot the landscape of this Site. Many are stocked with bass, bluegill, channel catfish and some of the strip lakes contain crappie as well. Species: Deer, dove, furbearers, quail, rabbit, squirrel, turkey, waterfowl, crow Other Facilities Available: Fishing, boating (10 hp maximum), hiking trails, firearms range, archery range and hand trap range. State laws and regulations apply, as well as local regulations For more information: See Site Superintendent, Ten Mile Creek FWA, 4283 State Route 14, McLeansboro, IL 62859, phone 618/643-2862; or, District Wildlife Biologist, 13999 E. GameFarm Rd., Mt. Vernon, IL 62864, 618-242-2062.

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PG 39


Fall Spectacular Sale! #1 Gravois, Fenton, MO 636-343-9447 www.dennydennis.com

Tuesday - Friday 8:00am - 8:00pm Saturday: 8:00am - 6:00pm

DENNYDENNIS.COM NOW HAS DROP SHIP TO YOUR DOOR STEP OPTICS, AMMO AND MORE IN STORE SPECIALS SEPT. 22 - OCT. 5 BA TACTICAL

MRR REG. $212999

SAVE $20000 99

308 WIN. & 6.5 CREEDMOOR

SALE $2000

SALE $2299

MESA T/C THOMPSON CENTER COMPASS RIFLE

SALE RIGHT HAND ONLY 99

REG. $249999

SAVE $12999 00

CALIBERS 6.5 CREEDMOOR 308 WINCHESTER

RIDGELINE REG. $1799

6.5 CREEDMOOR, 26 NOSLER, 7MM REMINGTON MAG. & 300 WIN. MAG.

SAVE $10000 99

SALE $1699

REG. $126991

6.5 CREEDMOOR, 7MM-08 RIGHT HAND ONLY

SALE $109999 NEW

AMERICAN EAGLE

AMERICAN EAGLE

357 MAG

44 REM. MAG

45 ACP SUBSONIC

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REG. $2599 SALE $19 99

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REG. $2199 SALE $1899

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243 WINCHESTER

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129 GR. X651

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REG. $1699 SALE $1499

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$29 REG. $34 SALE $2999 $3099 300 WSM 99 REG. $45 SALE $39 270 WSM 99 REG. $45 SALE $39 300 WIN. MAG. 99 7MM WSM 99 REG. $45 SALE $36 REG. $45 SALE $39 375 RUGER 7MM REM MAG 99 99 REG. $45 SALE $39 REG. $69 SALE $56 99

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HUNTER 42 REG. $18999 SALE $14999

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SALE $27999 350 ROUND 9MM BUCKETS REG. $6999 99

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9MM 115 GR. 50 ROUND BOX

$999 REG. $1699 SALE $1299

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6.5 CREEDMOOR REG. $3499 SALE

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GEN 3 TALL TRI-POD

PG 40

150 GR. X3085 180 GR. X3086

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308 WINCHESTER

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243 WIN. 308 WIN. 30/06

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ALL PRICES GOOD 9/22-10/5/2019 Limited to store stock. All Firearms are sold in strict compliance with all state and federal laws. Not Responsible for misprints. No trade ins for sale firearms

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