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SNITCH SCANDAL SMOKING GUN? | LOCAL PLAYWRIGHTS GET TOGETHER TO PLAY RIGHT | COLOMBIAN BOOZE IN A BOX? AUGUST 18-24, 2017 | VOLUME 22 | NUMBER 51

HE JUST WANTED TO MAKE SOUP | OCWEEKLY.COM

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The County

06 | MOXLEY CONFIDENTIAL |

Sheriff Sandra Hutchens says her department has no files on a star informant—but a deputy email says otherwise. By R. Scott Moxley 07 | ¡ASK A MEXICAN! | How should a young Latina feel about her identity? By Gustavo Arellano 07 | HEY, YOU! | Missing a fellow dog walker. By Anonymous

Feature

09 | NEWS | San Juan Capistrano’s Tree of Life Nursery is saving our ecosystem, one seed at a time. By Mary Carreon

in back

Calendar

15 | EVENTS | Things to do while

hating on White Walkers.

Food

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18 | REVIEW | The Water Brewery

41

sells designer water and serves great vegetarian fare. By Edwin Goei 18 | HOLE IN THE WALL | The India Cafe in Costa Mesa. By Gustavo Arellano 19 | EAT THIS NOW | Dandan noodles at Noodle St. By Cynthia Rebolledo 19 | DRINK OF THE WEEK |

Aguardiente Nectar Juice Box. By Gustavo Arellano

20 | LONG BEACH LUNCH | 4th &

Olive is a Franco-German restaurant ahead of its time. By Sarah Bennett

Film

21 | REVIEW | Five Steps of Love steps in it. By Matt Coker

Culture

24 | THEATER | OC-Centric New Play

Festival returns to showcase local productions. By Joel Beers 24 | TRENDZILLA | Feed the Gude’. By Aimee Murillo

Music

25 | ESSAY | For Grateful Dead tribute bands, the love for their favorite group never dies. By Scott Feinblatt 26 | PROFILE | Lucy & La Mer’s breezy sound helps us navigate the rough waters of love. By Nate Jackson 27 | LOCALS ONLY | YAAWN definitely doesn’t trigger them. By Nate Jackson

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28 | CONCERT GUIDE 29 | SAVAGE LOVE | By Dan Savage 35 | TOKE OF THE WEEK | Bloom

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ADMINISTRATION

PRESIDENT & CEO Duncan McIntosh VICE PRESIDENT & GENERAL MANAGER Jeff Fleming AR COORDINATOR Daniela Ortigoza

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EDITOR Gustavo Arellano MANAGING EDITOR Nick Schou ASSOCIATE EDITOR Patrice Marsters SENIOR EDITOR, NEWS & INVESTIGATIONS R. Scott Moxley STAFF WRITERS Mary Carreon, Matt Coker, Gabriel San Román MUSIC EDITOR Nate Jackson WEB EDITOR Taylor Hamby CALENDAR EDITOR Aimee Murillo EDITORIAL ASSISTANT/ PROOFREADER Lisa Black CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Reyan Ali, Dave Barton, Joel Beers, Sarah Bennett, Lilledeshan Bose, Kyle Cavaness, Josh Chesler, Heidi Darby, Alex Distefano, Edwin Goei, Michael Goldstein, LP Hastings, Daniel Kohn, Dave Lieberman, Adam Lovinus, Todd Mathews, Patrick Montes, Katrina Nattress, Nick Nuk’em, Anne Marie Panoringan, Amanda Parsons, Cynthia Rebolledo, Ryan Ritchie, Andrew Tonkovich, Chris Ziegler EDITORIAL INTERNS Rick Piñon Delgado, Armaan Maharaj, Armando Sanchez

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the county»news|issues|commentary

Snitch Scandal Smoking Gun Sheriff Hutchens says her department has no files on a star informant—but a deputy email says otherwise

O

range County court records long ago established that Tony Rackauckas’ district attorney’s office and Sandra Hutchens’ sheriff’s department took a slam-dunk death-penalty case in People v. Scott Dekraai and unnecessarily cheated behind-the-scenes in hopes of robbing the defendant of a fair penalty phase and guaranteeing confidential a state execution. After all, there’s no question that in October 2011 Dekraai, unhinged over a child-custody dispute, killed r scott eight innocent people and severely moxley wounded another at a Seal Beach salon where his former wife worked. There’s also no question local juries have supported capital punishment for far less carnage. As Weekly readers know, the government’s rush to put Dekraai on death row resulted in unintended consequences. Investigations into law enforcement’s conduct in the case have produced four-and-a-half years’ worth of ugly revelations demonstrating the eagerness of officials to rig the criminal-justice system when they believe no one would ever discover their misdeeds. At week’s end, Superior Court Judge Thomas M. Goethals plans to announce a historic decision in Dekraai. Will Goethals side with Deputy Attorney General Michael T. Murphy, who insists the government stopped cheating and that prior abuses won’t trample the defendant’s constitutional fair-trial rights at a future penalty phase? Or will the judge support Assistant Public Defender Scott Sanders’ contention that the prosecution team has proven its unsavory inclinations and continues to act unethically by hiding documents, a fact he says should result in the removal of the death-penalty option in exchange for eight consecutive life-inprison sentences without the possibility of parole? To sway Goethals, Murphy argued on Aug. 10 that Hutchens’ Orange County Sheriff’s Department (OCSD) has finally complied with his 2013 discovery orders to surrender all evidence and that, even if the agency hasn’t, it’s absurd to think the sheriff would be hiding records that could benefit Dekraai at the penalty stage. “There is not a bit of evidence that suggests this sheriff’s department or any sheriff’s department maintains records of

moxley

» .

good behavior of capital inmates for use at a penalty phase trial,” the deputy AG said. Murphy’s spin is disingenuous, at best, and Sanders is right about his mantra from the outset of what has become nationally known as the Orange County jailhouse-informant scandal. Jail deputies consistently turn over evidence that helps Rackauckas’ prosecutors win trials and, abandoning their sworn ethical oaths, hide or destroy records helpful to defendants. For example, despite Goethals literally shaking his head in amazement, OCSD is still withholding six years of jail records at the Theo Lacy Facility, where Dekraai has been housed with government informants seeking perks for collecting negative stories on the high-profile inmate. Even if the deputy AG is clueless about the implications of what such buried evidence could contain, its potency is exposed in yet another slam-dunk-butscrewed-up death-penalty case: People v. Richard Raymond Ramirez. In 2008, U.S. District Court Judge Consuelo Marshall vacated Ramirez’s capitalpunishment verdict for the 1983 rape and murder of 22-year-old Kim Gonzalez in Garden Grove. Marshall ruled that the jury foreman hid a personal bias by failing to disclose he was seeking FBI employment during the trial. The DA’s office won a second guilty verdict in May 2013, but the jury deadlocked 7-5 on the deathpenalty question. Prosecutors blamed their loss on a prison guard who reported Ramirez had been “a model prisoner” for years. Instead of accepting the validity of the testimony, government officials decided to sabotage it so that a third jury would believe Ramirez just “hadn’t been caught” committing crimes in prison rather than he’d “chosen to behave well.” As court records show, they implemented a devious, twopronged plan. “The prosecution chose to have OCSD test Ramirez’s propensity and character for wrongdoing, believing—falsely—that either the information would bolster their case or simply be irrelevant [and, thus, hidden from the defense],” Senior Deputy Public Defender Seth Bank wrote in a 2013 brief. Pretending to be carrying out normal inspections and not desperately trying to find evidence helpful to prosecutors, jail deputies began conducting a series of raids on Ramirez’s cell just days after the jury deadlocked. They found nada, so Alexander Frosio, a jailhouse informant for the government, entered the scene. Deputies placed Frosio (a.k.a. “Scarface”) in Ramirez’s jail module, supplied the

JUDGE GOETHALS HAS UNCOVERED SYSTEMIC LAWENFORCEMENT CORRUPTION

BRIAN FEINZIMER | OC WEEKLY

snitch with extra food, and told him to “keep an eye” on their target because they wanted to “know everything he’s doing,” according to court records. Gordon Bridges, another Orange County Jail (OCJ) inmate in the same module, confirmed the story. Bridges told defense investigators that Frosio, a violent gangster with five arrests—the first at age 11—bragged he was working for deputies and that he’d tried to “set up” Ramirez on their behalf by getting him to possess contraband in his cell. “Not only has Ramirez maintained a clean record for 30 years, but when the prosecution subjected him to a covert investigation, testing his resolve for good behavior, his good character proved resolute, as he rebuffed efforts to corrupt him,” Bank wrote. “The failed efforts of an experienced informant—one who had the incentive of believing that he would get consideration in his pending case and possibly be closer to going home if he succeeded—to persuade Ramirez to engage in wrongdoing, makes for a compelling case about his commitment to good behavior.” Compounding the mess, Frosio wrote extensive notes of his activities for OCSD. But deputies, who concocted misleading reports to confuse any future inquisitors about their maneuvers, claimed ignorance of their existence when requested for defense inspection. Adamantly denying any government hanky-panky, the DA’s office finally secured the death penalty for Ramirez in February 2015. Given Ramirez, it’s not just that Murphy is wrongly alleging Hutchens’ department could never collect information allowing a capital-case defendant to argue mitigating factors, but he’s also choosing

to play dumb about that case’s undeniable ties to Dekraai. Deputies placed Sanders’ client with Frosio in the Theo Lacy Facility, but, as with Ramirez, they claim they don’t have a single record of his work. Might this be another example of OCSD hiding evidence that could hurt the government’s position? The obvious answer, considering all the revelations from Goethals’ special evidentiary hearings, is yes, and there’s a smoking-gun piece of evidence Hutchens, her deputies and Murphy refuse to explain. Lieutenant Mike McHenry, whom the sheriff assigned to supposedly figure out which files hadn’t been given to the judge after years of stonewalling his discovery orders, recently wrote an internal memo that referenced a computerized Special Handling Unit file folder for Frosio. If the sheriff is being honest that she possesses no Frosio files, why would deputies, who manage jail informants, have such a folder, and why hasn’t it been surrendered? Sanders has an answer: The prosecution team is still angling to tilt Dekraai’s penalty phase in their favor, a stance the deputy AG calls laughable. “[Sanders’] argument is that ‘Well, we are certain they are hiding something,’” said Murphy. “He seems to believe that there are records either from confidential informants or about confidential informants by deputies that document good behavior by his client that would be relevant to a mitigating case. . . . I think that’s just preposterous.” RSCOTTMOXLEY@OCWEEKLY.COM

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Special Best Of Edicíon DEAR MEXICAN: I’m a 23-year-old Latina attending a Texas university and taking a class that is centered on Latino culture and history. I’m a first-generation Tex-Mex kid, and lately, all of the documentaries and other coursework have been making me feel some type of way—angry, sad and overall confused—for lack of better phrasing. I don’t know how to handle these feelings, and it is making me more introspective about the Latino/Mexican part of my identity, as if I didn’t already have enough issues there. I don’t want to overthink it, and I don’t want to always wonder how people perceive me because of my background. But I don’t know how to feel about what I am learning and if what I am feeling is okay. Did you ever go through something like this type of identity crisis? Any advice on how to feel/handle it? Down In Denton

Heyyou!

» anonymous Dog’s Best Friend

Y

DEAR GABACHO: Parasitic moochers riding coattails? Olla, meet hervidor. Or, in English: Can’t wait for your beautiful brown grandchildren to take Chicano Studies 101! ASK THE MEXICAN at themexican@askamexican.net, be his fan on Facebook, follow him on Twitter, or ask him a video question at youtube.com/askamexicano!

about your recent hospitalization, and then your life story—how you lost your entire retirement savings because your wife’s company went belly-up, but that you were going to keep working in your job as a pastor until death stopped you. You disappeared again a few months back, and yesterday, another dog walker finally told me your time had come. You’ll be missed, and not just by my dog.

HEY, YOU! Send anonymous thanks, confessions or accusations—changing or deleting the names of the guilty and innocent—to “Hey, You!” c/o OC Weekly, 18475 Bandilier Circle, Fountain Valley, CA 92708, or email us at letters@ocweekly.com.

ocweekly.com | | | | OCWEEKLY.COM

ou were the heavy-set older guy in the navy cap who always used to walk your lion-sized canine around the block and would give my puppy free treats, so he’d squeal as soon as he saw you coming. For an elderly guy, you seemed full of life—and wisdom. You disappeared for a few months last year and when you returned, at half your previous weight, your voice was weak as you told me

DEAR MEXICAN: Does your cesspool homeland of Mexico allow illegals to break the law and sneak in? Hell, no—but I guess it’s okay for the USA to allow it for you and your deadbeat wetback cousins. Go fuck yourself—and I am sure this is not the first time you’ve heard that from a fed-up USA taxpayer who is sick of you parasite moochers from down south. Clean up your land if you want a good life. Don’t ride our coattails, you damn losers. Klein In Van Nuys

mo n th1 8-24, x x–x x , 217014 AUGUST 20

DEAR MUJER: Was I ever confused about my ethnic identity? Absolutely—tell your Chicano Studies professor to assign Orange County: A Personal History to ustedes, and you’ll get the carne asada of the matter. But your situation deserves a more insightful perspective than mine, so I turn the columna over to one of my bosses: Alexandro José Gradilla, former chairman of the Department of Chicana and Chicano Studies at Cal State Fullerton, where I used to be an adjunct-at-large. “Dear Iztaccíhuat: You are experiencing ‘Chicano Studies Rage 101,’” Gradilla writes. “Here is a synopsis of why you are feeling the way you do. After more than a decade in a K-12 school system that never really broached or addressed issues of institutional racism, most students of color coming out of high school would probably answer ‘no’ if asked whether they ever experienced racism. Here is the double problem: Most students have not learned anything about ‘their’ group. More important, they have not been taught about institutional racism. So when taking a college-level history or sociology course or, as you experienced, an

ethnic-studies class in which systemic or structural racism analyses is par for the course, they get what happened to you. A sudden flood of cold, hard facts connected with theories of racism—then BAM! You are forever aware of the nature of social inequality in the United States. “You ‘see’ how unfair and obscene racism is. Racism—not individual prejudice or bigotry, but an embedded system of exclusion and denigration—is a profoundly ridiculous and irrational system. Whether you are learning about the Mendez, et al. v. Westminster case or the Felix Longoria affair and all within the short confines of a quarter or semester—even the most complacent coconuts are overwhelmed and bothered! The rage is famously captured by the quintessential Chicano movement poem ‘I am/Yo soy Joaquin’ written by Rodolfo ‘Corky’ Gonzales. “So, my little brown Aztec volcano, your pending explosion within the classroom is nothing new. Just remember: Use your new knowledge to heal, not to hate.”

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Garden by Mary Carreon

“T

h e su m m e r is t h e mo s t u n favor a bl e t i m e t o pl a n t , ” a you ng mom w r i t e s dow n i n a sm a l l no t e bo ok a s h e r pig ta i l e d t oddl e r s t om ps on t h e g r av e l be t w e e n t h e w h i t e C a n yon Snow I r ise s a n d t h e A s c l e pi a s spe c io s a . T h e l at t e r is be t t e r k now n a s “ Show y M i l k w e e d ” — a c om mon ho s t pl a n t f or t h e e n d a ng e r e d Mona rc h B u t t e r f ly, a n d a s ou rc e of f o od , f i be r a n d m e dic i n e r e g u l a r ly use d b y t h e Nat i v e A m e r ic a ns .

CONTINUED ON PAGE 10

PHOTOGRAPHS BY WEDNESDAY AJA


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Southern California’S SeCret Garden » FROM PAGE 9

“The soil gets too warm because of hot temperatures, and more often than not, the plants don’t survive after being transplanted into the ground at their new home,” says her friend who just finished speaking to an employee of the Tree of Life Nursery (TOLN), where the two women are shopping. “Apparently, planting in the fall is the best time for increased chances of germination if you’re growing from a seed. There’s also a better chance for survival after transplanting into soil during fall, too. Spring is the next best time to plant.” A young couple walks past Casa La Paz, a gift shop loaded with literature by naturalist authors such as John Muir and Henry David Thoreau, other educational books on California mushrooms and how to cook with honey, and open-air style paintings of California landscapes done by local artists. They walk along a dirt path and wander over a small bridge past a sign warning of the possible presence of rattlesnakes. The path leads to a remote area of the nursery, where a giant, deep-green leafy bush is sculpted into an arch. On the other side of the green gateway is a small sitting area with a garden bench. The perimeter of the nook is outlined with electric purple Monardella villosa, or Coyote Mint. Hundreds of bees buzz and crawl around the magenta petals, then fly to the next flower center, dropping off pollen, helping plants reproduce. A hawk flies above the nook, scouring for prey along the outskirts of Caspers Wilderness Park, which lies directly to the east. Tucked in the hills of Ortega Highway, TOLN is a 40-acre oasis of California native plants. It’s more of a botanical garden/nursery hybrid than simply a place to purchase Golden State flora. Home to 500 different plant species, its gardens are specifically designed for customers to experience bees, butterflies and other pollinators as they fulfill their daily tasks. A trip to TOLN is like traveling to an Orange County before Europeans came to Southern California, when the Acjachemen used whatever nature grew to establish villages and live with the land, instead of against it. The drive up Ortega takes visitors away from suburbia and plops them in stark, gorgeous wilderness (although developments keep creeping up every couple of years). It’s become a refuge for insects and animals driven away from city life—indeed, while swallows are now a rarity in San Juan Capistrano come springtime, they gleefully construct mud nests from TOLN’s rafters every year. “This is like a little heaven,” says one longtime customer, who has transformed his house in Santa Ana into an all-natives showcase with plants from TOLN. “If everyone just ripped out their lawn and planted Tree of Life’s plants, we’d all just live a better life.”

P

rior to becoming a location teeming with yellow Sun Drops, red Dragon Snappers, purple Cleveland Sage and tall grasses, TOLN was a place where thoroughbred horses were bred, according to Mike Evans, the owner, whose brown- and blackhaired Australian shepherd, Dakota, shad-

evans and his dog dakota stand among the sundrops ows him everywhere he goes. Born in Arcadia in 1954, Evans grew up tromping around Newport Beach’s Back Bay and adventuring into the mud at low tide. “I’d get really muddy—my hands, arms, feet, everything,” he says with a nostalgic smile while picking apart dried seed pods at his desk. “I’d get down on my hands and knees and try and catch the critters so I could inspect them closely. I’d look at the mud. I’d look at the plants. I was outdoors all the time.” Always in touch with the ocean, Evans started surfing in his early teens, which became his passion throughout his four years at Corona Del Mar High School. Graduating in 1972, a semester before his peers, he started his own company making surfboards. “It was a little high school company,” he says, laughing. “I pretty much only made the boards for my friends and me. But it was great. We all had boards and surfed our brains out together.” Seventeen and restless, Evans yearned to see the world and experience freedom. His parents wanted him to go to college, but his heart and mind were set on barreling waves. “It’s not that I was a bad student,” Evans says, “I was just

not in the mood for more school.” When Evans came back to Newport after a four-month trip to Mexico’s Pacific Coast, everything looked different, he recalls. It wasn’t the same. The urge to surf real waves and soak in authentic Latin culture was overwhelming. He took off to Mexico again, fished, chased waves and lived on the beach.

He was living the life many adults compounded with family and work responsibilities wished they were living. “I was pretty much a bum,” he explains. “But a young bum. I had to get it out of my system.” While driving through the jungle one day, he recalls seeing a group of men who looked to be 19 or 20—the same age as he was. They were working on the side of the road with machetes. He saw a lot of young men responsibly working and engaged every day, either in the fields or tending animals. “They were busy working, while I was bumming around, not doing anything of real significance,” he says. “That’s when I had the epiphany that I couldn’t stay down there doing that anymore. I had to do something with my life.” Back in Newport Beach, Evans rode his bike all over town on a quest to find a job that he could pursue with passion. He began applying to local nurseries—all of which told him they weren’t hiring. “In retrospect, I probably looked like a no-work type guy wearing shorts, sandals and a T-shirt,” he admits. “Which I still wear. But I had bleached hair then, and who knows if I was stoned when I’d go to ask for a job—I might’ve been. Looking back I can kind of see why they didn’t hire me without really asking me any questions.”

After pestering the staff for work, Amling’s Nursery—now the Armstrong Garden on PCH near Fashion Island—finally hired Evans to water the plants. “Ever since then I never looked back,” he says. “I started learning all the plant names and found out that it’s a whole language; it’s a whole world.” Two older workers mentored Evans and recommended books that allowed him to fast-track his horticultural education. “They were old, wise sages who wore overalls [and] who helped me find my dedication. I was doing plant research on my own and working long hours. I was really, really into it.” His love for plants made him want to explore the ecosystems and tropical plant species of Mexico—the country in which he left his heart. Mexico beckoned, but instead of chasing waves, he hoped to gather unique seeds that were native to the culture he loved. Evans started justifying short trips—three weeks, rather than six months— south of the border, returning with stashes of seeds and cuttings to plant and grow. Amling’s Nursery could tolerate Evans’ frequent trips only to a point; it wasn’t long until they separated ways. Evans bounced around to other nurseries after that and landed a couple of growing gigs. He decided to go to college to get his teaching credential, which eventually got him a job teaching a gardening, nursery and horticulture Regional Occupational Program (ROP) class for high schoolers. “I wasn’t much older than the students I was teaching,” Evans recalls. “In the program I started to notice the old guy who taught diesel mechanics class was this old crusty [man]. The woman who taught banking was a seasoned banker. The carpentry guy was an old-fart carpenter. I realized I didn’t have that kind of experience and needed to go get it. I decided to hang up that hat and maybe come back to it again in 50 years.” Evans spent time up in the local mountains collecting seeds and cuttings of native plants and decided to start a business out of it. In 1978, Evans opened Tree of Life Nursery-Landscaping—a much smaller version of what the nursery is today. But his nursery started from clippings and seeds—not native plants that he purchased or took from another garden—no small feat considering TOLN’s 500 separate plant species. By 1981, Evans brought on co-owner Jeff Bohn, the nursery’s plant grower, who has helped TOLN evolve into the oasis it is today. Bohn’s first tasks involved landscaping and sub-contracting under Evans. He had experience growing and using native plants in Ventura for slope stabilization and water conservation, so he was well versed in their benefits. As he’s watched the company blossom, Bohn has also witnessed a growth in interest for native plants. When he first started, however, homeowners and landscapers—TOLN’s core customers—didn’t understand their expansive utility. “Natives are taking on even more significance because they provide a habitat to so many of the animals that Orange County and Southern California’s excessive development has taken away,” says Bohn. “They’re water conserving, meant to live


Schizophrenia?

Bohn praises TOLN’s clientele for grasping the importance of native plants and thrive here, and there are so many benefits to using them. We’re really excited about how engaged the public is now. It used to be that we really had to convince the public to use them, but people really want to use them now. . . . The retail side of our nursery has really taken off.”

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ccording to the California Native Plant Society (CNPS), a nonprofit that works closely with TOLN, the advantages of gardening with native plants go much deeper than just saving water—the benefit that most commonly sparks people’s interest, especially during drought years. The reason California native plants are ideal for water conservation, though, is because once they’re established—which takes three months after transplanting from flat or pot into soil— many native plants need almost no irrigation beyond normal rainfall, whereas most nonnative plant gardens require watering every day. “Although we’re not in a drought anymore,” TOLN employee Sarah Bryant says, gesturing dubiously with hand quotations, “California still gets its water from other places. Water conservation is something we should always be concerned with here.” Evans points out that water districts are still telling homeowners that they need to cut back on water use. “The first thing people realize is that they need to cut back on watering their gardens, which means that if they don’t use native plants, it’s going to be difficult to keep their plants alive. That’s usually when they come to us. Native plants create a lot of options for water conservation.” Every Saturday morning at 9:30 TOLN hosts workshops designed to help people make the most of their gardens and bring the community together. The theme of August’s classes revolve around water conservation. Two weekends ago local watershed gardening specialist Jodie Cook led a workshop on how to use native plants to keep water in the garden, instead of letting it stream into gutters, and, thus, into the ocean. Watershed gardening not only utilizes water conservation tactics but also keeps toxins and harmful runoff from flowing into our waters.

Bohn explains that much of our natural landscape has been demolished by housing and business development, thus destroying native habitats. Using native plants gives these indigenous species a place to live, and thus thrive. “Our customers go deeper than just wanting a pretty or cheap plant,” he says. “They’re interested in more than just saving money through water conservation, too. They’re very conscious of how important they are to attracting butterflies, bees and birds. They’re conscious of the connection humans have to these critters and nature overall.” Laura Camp, TOLN’s general manager, is the former president of CNPS on the state level. She explains that the mission of both TOLN and CNPS is the same. “The goal is to help people appreciate native plants because it’s a gateway for them to become interested in the nature that surrounds us,” she says. “It’s the ‘zoo effect’: When you see the elephant at the zoo, you become interested in Africa and the protection of elephants. When you have a native plant growing in your yard, you begin to see it from a new perspective. Before the plant was just on a hillside. But when it’s yours to take care of, it’s different. You cross the threshold of observation into interaction.” California’s flora contains hidden medicinal benefits, too. For example, Milkweed, usually found in dry and moist soils all over California, can be made into a tea and used as an antiseptic wash. Modern herbalists commonly use the roots of Milkweed as a respiratory expectorant. Native American women also used the plant to make a decoction, or concentrated essence, through boiling in water to produce milk flow while nursing. Topically, Milkweed’s milk sap can help sores, and it’s strong enough to remove warts and corns. Prickly Pear Cactus can be made into a poultice, or a moist mass of plant material that when applied to the body with a cloth and kept in place, can relieve soreness and inflammation. Late last year, National Geographic published an article titled “This Is Your Brain On Nature” by Florence Williams, an examination of how our brains are affected when we’re immersed in nature. Although EEG tests showed substantial reductions in cortisol (our stress hormone) and increased

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Are you living with

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12 12

Southern California’S SeCret Garden From The Inside Out

n Prove to Work

» FROM PAGE 11

levels of dopamine, endorphins and serotonin, what’s amazing is that connecting with nature has scientifically proven to help people lift from their depressions and anxieties and has even proved to enhance the healing process of those with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This concept of “healing” also applies to gardening: 2,500 years ago, Cyrus the Great built gardens for relaxation in the busy capital of Persia. As Evans gives a tour of his beloved nurs-

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in keeping your garden and plants happy and healthy, which is an activity that we’re almost losing from our society.”

R

emnants of the old horse stables and racetrack that occupied the grounds prior to TOLN still exist. The barn has been transformed into a kitchen equipped with a large wooden table, a microwave, toaster oven and coffee maker. A rustic five-arm chandelier hangs from the ceiling, above the beams, while a wooden set of stairs leads to a storage area. A painting of a California mission hangs next to a framed picture of a floral pattern. While eating lunch at the kitchen table, the floral picture begins to move, as if one of Ortega Highway’s legendary road-ghosts had taken a detour into the barn. A choir of highpitched click-squeaks sounds from seemingly nowhere. Within seconds a Little Brown Bat (yes, that’s actually the name) slimes down from behind the floral picture and bolts to the center of the barn, doing air-laps at panic speed. After completing three large circles, it swoops over the table, wings brushing the food, before it zooms back up behind the

Camp: “When you have a native plant growing in your yard, you begin to see it from a new perspective.” ery, Dakota by his side, he expounds on his natural-plant philosophy. “It’s important to us to spread messages about habitats and hummingbirds, bees, pollinators, lizards, the seasons and smells and usefulness in the plants so kids can learn,” he says. “They’re the most important ones.” Evans leads the way to an organic peach orchard on the far side of the nursery. As he cuts a peach in half with his Swiss Army knife, his gaze scans the horizon. “In Japan they use Japanese native plants to design gardens that look like nature,” he says. “The whole thing of the Japanese garden is the experience. It’s not about looking at it, it’s about experiencing it—interacting with it. You walk on the little paths and you sit on the benches. You look at the reflecting pool, you go to the zen garden and see the raked gravel. They build them for people to be in, not just stand back and look at. We need to do this again in California and get this into our culture.” In Williams’ National Geographic story, she notes that the entire country of Singapore aims to be a “city in a garden,” where indigenous green plants cascade from luxury hotels and high-rise buildings. Singapore’s foreign Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew once said, “A concrete jungle destroys the human spirit.” It’s upsetting to think about what that means for the people of Orange County, considering we, too, live in a vast concrete jungle—with hardly any cascading greenery at all. “A garden is there for people to engage with and understand that it’s breathing life, just like us,” says Evans. “It’s a wonderful healing experience. There’s enjoyment

Bryant starting going to the nursery with her dad was she was a child picture. “Don’t worry, the bats are harmless,” Evans says, laughing. “We don’t even notice them anymore. They live behind the pictures and we let them stay there because they come out at night, usually when we’re gone and eat bugs. They’re great.” Along with providing a habitat to Little Brown Bats, the barn is where the TOLN’s seed sowing and propagation happens. Tables covered with mounds of lush, fertile soil sit toward the outskirts of the barn, a woman waters a rack of small sprouted plants ready to be transferred onto the grounds for people to purchase. Haydee (pronounced I-day) Rodriguez, who’s related to Evans’ wife of over 40 years, leads a group of women in the barn in planting cuttings and seeds, and nurturing them until they’ve germinated. Rodriguez, who’s worked at TOLN in the propagation barn for nearly 20 years, can almost predict whether flats of seeds are going to take sooner or later. “It’s from the experience of working so intimately with the plants,” she explains as she packs a black plastic flat with soil and sprinkles Sambucus seeds over the soil. “Sambucus is the Spanish botanical name for


Haydee’s intuitive understanding of plants borders on psychic

presents

Lemonade Berry and Sugar Bush are so hard that in order for them to grow they need to be exposed to alcohol, or acid, to break through the seed. “Those seeds only germinate after a coyote or deer eats them and it’s broken down through their digestive systems, so I have to simulate that environment in order for those seeds to grow,” she explains, covering the Sambucus seeds with a light layer of fluffy soil. The soil that Rodriguez uses in plant propagation comes from a different area of the nursery, where a man named Ramiro Rodriguez (no relation to Haydee), oversees the soil mixture. Ramiro, known as “Ramo” by the TOLN employees, has worked for the nursery for 36 years. He’s become such a part of the TOLN family that when his wife was pregnant with his son, Evans threw a baby shower in the barn. When Ramo’s son grew up, he started working at the nursery and now has a career in soil work at another nursery in Texas. The soil used at TOLN is a mixture of wash plaster sand (sand taken from deep in the ground), Redwood and White Fur shavings from a mill in Cloverdale—a Marin County city north of San Francisco. According to Ramo, they prefer to get their premium soil ingredients from Northern California because they want to avoid local plant diseases. “There are people who sell the materials around here, but we don’t know what’s on it,” he says. “If we use soil with disease in it, it will ruin the plants because we might get a disease into our soil mix. The place we get our ingredients from for the soil is very good and clean.”

The shavings are double- and tripleground in order to obtain the proper fluffy texture. The Redwood grounds sit in a mound for four weeks (at minimum) getting watered—a method of being broken down— before it’s picked up by a tractor and blended with the White Fur and sand. The final product feels spongy, and looks light ashy brown. From there the soil’s taken in massive heaps to the barn where Rodriguez and her team of seed sowers begin their intuitive planting process. Once the seeds or cuttings have taken to the soil, they’re then taken out into the sun for the public to purchase.

E

vans and Dakota lead the tour to an off-road area of TOLN. Passing bushes and a bit of other chaparral, he stops at an area he calls “Redwood Camp.” A huge

Ramiro grew up in the garden in his village in Mexico wooden table that Evans built sits underneath two massive, lush-looking Redwoods—trees that aren’t native to Southern California. But Evans has cared for them in such a way that they’re somehow thriving. “I planted these Redwood seeds 30 years ago,” says Evans, staring up at the skyscrapers he’s grown. “This is my favorite area of the nursery.” A hammock hangs between the Redwoods, giving the nook a genuine Central Coast feel. “You have to tell a story with your garden,” Evans says, looking around the Redwood garden he’s created. “That’s how you’re able to build an experience out of it. Once you do that, it’s become an extension of who you are because you are the garden and the garden is in you.” MCARREON@OCWEEKLY.COM

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the Xceptional tribute to

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Elderberry. These seeds need to be closer to the surface rather than planted in deeper soil. But that doesn’t mean it’ll grow. Just because something works this year doesn’t mean it will work again next year—even if it’s the standard process. It’s a different experience every time. It’s like raising a baby—they’re all different. Some things work and some things don’t and you have to figure it out.” Rodriguez explains that certain seeds like

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Wrigley Stage, On the Waterfront Beer Garden 7-10pm

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Aug. 26 8 to 10

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Saturday

This issue will be your year-long guide to the best Orange County and Long Beach have to offer. The OC Weekly team has scoured the area for those businesses that deserve your attention! Have your own opinions on who rolls the best burritos, shakes the best martini or inks the best tattoos? Make sure to enter your nominations for over 100 Best Of categories. Then vote on the finalists and see who wins in the October 19th issue!

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TONIGHT


sat/08/19

[DANCE]

[FESTIVALS]

Dancerpalooza

Flapper-gasted!

10th Annual Gala of the Stars

Brimming with an epic roster of talent, the 10th Annual Gala of the Stars includes American Ballet Theatre’s Misty Copeland and Alexandre Hammoudi, the Royal Ballet’s Eric Underwood and Ryoichi Hirano, San Francisco Ballet’s Yuan Yuan Tan and Vitor Luiz, and New York City Ballet’s Ashley Bouder and Gonzalo Garcia. Festival Ballet Theatre will also be premiering their new show, Gravel, and evening festivities will open with a performance by this year’s “Inspired Young Dancers” on the rise. emceed by Antiques Roadshow host Mark Walberg, dance enthusiasts shouldn’t miss this! 10th Annual Gala of the Stars at Segerstrom Concert Hall, 615 Town Center Dr., Costa Mesa, (714) 556-2787; www.scfta.org. 6 p.m. $65-$95. —AIMEE MURILLO [FOOD & DRINK]

Take the Heat

Long Beach BBQ Festival

—AIMEE MURILLO

Art Deco Festival

Raise your coupe glass to the 13th Annual Art Deco Festival. Board the grand ocean liner Queen Mary for a weekend of dancing, shopping the bazaar full of collectibles and vintage goods, a swingin’ tea party, and lectures that open a window into the past with presentations by authors and historians on topics like art deco’s use of line, simplicity and geometric patterning in fashion designs of MGM costume designer Adrian. Get ready to flaunt your best drop-waisted dress and seersucker suit for a roaring party with classic cocktails, fine fare and live music from the famous Dean Mora Orchestra. 13th Annual Art Deco Festival at Queen Mary, 1126 Queens Highway, Long Beach, (877) 342-0738; www.queenmary.com. 10 a.m.; also Sun. $25; Art Deco Grand Pass, $229. —CYNTHIA REBOLLEDO

*

[FESTIVALS]

BYO-Zine! OC Zine Fest

The zine, or independently produced handmade magazine, finds its local celebrants acknowledged, boostered and even curated at the Anaheim Central Library, which welcomes the fourth-annual OC Zine Fest, a nexus for artists, writers, illustrators, punks, feminists, radical politicos and other chroniclers and creators of DIY culture. Panels and talks—including by maverick librarians building a permanent circulating collection of archived zines, how-to workshops, and keynote talk by Ewa Wojciak of the notorious pioneering old-school punk zine NO MAG make for a full day of indie publisher fun, with a chance to support the work of artist vendors. OC Zine Fest at Anaheim Central Library, 500 W. Broadway, Anaheim, (714) 7651880; www.facebook.com/oczinefest. 11 a.m. Free. —ANDREW TONKOVICH

monday›

SITTING PRETTY—FOR NOW

AUG U ST 18 - 24 , 2 017

Summer’s pretty much over (nooooo!) so let’s give one last goodbye with a barbecue. This weekend’s Long Beach BBQ features a main event competition between awardwinning national pitmasters and local grillers vying for the titles of Best BBQ and People’s Choice. Beyond that, bring your empty stomach to try the food court’s amazing treats (VIP guests can slam down ribs at the All You Can Eat Rib Village), cantinas, whiskey tasting with Forty Creek Whiskey and kid friendly fun with a magic show, balloon tricks, live reptile exhibit, arts and crafts table, music stage and sports tent. Long Beach BBQ Festival at Rainbow Lagoon, 400 Shoreline Village Dr., Long Beach, (562) 570-6555; www. longbeachbbqfestival.com. 5 p.m.; also Sat.-Sun., 10 a.m. $5-$12; VIP, $18-$99.

*calendar

| CONTENTS | THE COUNTY | FEATURE | CALENDAR | FOOD | FILM | CULTURE | MUSIC | CLASSIFIEDS |

fri/08/18

| OCWEEKLY.COM | 15


| CLASSIFIEDS | MUSIC | CULTURE | FILM | FOOD | CALENDAR | FEATURE | THE COUNTY | CONTENTS | A UGU S T 18 - 24 , 2 017

| OCWEEKLY.COM | 16

sun/08/20 [CONCERT]

Diva Domination Ha*Ash, Yuridia

Latin pop star Yuridia is one of Mexico’s next generation of dreamy chanteuses, belting out dramatic love ballads like “Como Yo Nadie Te Ha Amado” (“This Ain’t a Love Song”) and “Ya Te Olvide,” played in heavy rotation on local Spanish language radio stations. With her powerful vocal talents, Yuridia estab-

lished herself as an emerging artist at the age of 19, and hasn’t shown signs of losing popularity or fans since. She’s joined onstage by Mexican pop duo Ha*Ash, who have released their own chart-topping hits to a legion of fans. As these two groups mark the beginning of a new age of Latin divas, this is one bill not to miss. Ha*Ash, Yuridia at Pacific Amphitheatre, 100 Fair Dr., Costa Mesa, (714) 708-1500; www.pacamp.com. 7:30 p.m. $30-$75. —AIMEE MURILLO

[THEATER]

Look on Every Exit

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead

Actor Daniel Radcliffe has been making some stellar plunges into numerous projects including television shows, indie films and experimental plays. His next role is alongside Four Weddings and a Funeral actor David Haig in a 50th anniversary produc-

tion of Tom Stoppard’s comedy. Spinning off Shakespeare’s classic Hamlet, these two bumbling characters take center stage as we see the situations unfold through their eyes. This performance takes place in London’s prestigious Old Vic theater, presented locally to audiences through National Theatre Live’s broadcast. NTL Screening: Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead at Irvine Barclay Theatre, 4242 Campus Dr., Irvine, (949) 8544646; www.thebarclay.org. 2 p.m. $17-$22. —AIMEE MURILLO

mon/08/21 [FAMILY EVENTS]

Slimy Survivors ‘Frogs: Dazzling and Disappearing’

Frogs and other amphibians have adapted over millions of years to survive and thrive in their ecosystems—but many are now in peril. Through this massive exhibit of close to two dozen species in thematic displays, visitors can learn about our slippery friends through educational graphics and interactive exhibits. Hear their croaks in “Frog Sounds,” learn about their reproduction in “Lifecycle,” and experience a visual journey through the world of frogs and amphibians in the Great Hall, where images of these striking creatures are projected across eight screens. “Frogs: Dazzling and Disappearing” at Aquarium of the Pacific, 100 Aquarium Way, Long Beach, (562) 590-3100; www. aquariumofpacific.org. 9 a.m. Through March 2018. $18-$30. —SR DAVIES

tue/08/22 [LECTURE]

That’s Ancient History

“Julian the Great or Apostate?” Fancy yourself an ancient history scholar? Then you won’t want to miss this free lecture at Goth retailer Ipso Facto, where you can learn all about Greco-Roman emperor Julian the Great, who tried to reinstate the Pagan State Religion during his reign from 363 to 361 BC. During this brief time, Julian established himself as a competent military leader (who believed himself to be the reincarnation of Alexander the Great). Join Dr. James Reitveld’s lecture tonight and hear more about this fascinating, forgotten figure. “Julian the Great or Apostate?” at Ipso Facto, 517 N. Harbor Blvd., Fullerton, (714) 525-7865; www.ipsofacto.com. 8 p.m. Free. —AIMEE MURILLO


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Moon Honey

Moon Honey are a maximalist duo that takes a little inspiration from Sparks and Kate Bush and a lot from Amanda Palmer, more  and then rocketonline launches their OCWEEKLY.COM own orchestral prog-baroque through rainbow after rainbow until they hit escape velocity and end up on . . . well, at least Mars? (This is definitely the kind of band that considers the next planet out merely a rest stop.) They’ll be playing with Burger stalwarts Summer Twins, who add welcome character and even melancholy to their garage pop, and Wyatt Blair, whose recent Broken Hearts project is some truly magical Dwight Twilley-esque power pop. (And yes, like Twilley, they DO sing enthusiastically about magic.) Also on deck is Lucy & La Mer, some extremely sweet ukelele-anddrum-machine indie pop. Moon Honey with Summer Twins, Wyatt Blair and Lucy & La Mer at the Constellation Room at the Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; www.observatoryoc.com. 8 p.m. $10.

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thu/08/24 Stay Natural

Modern Day Drifter

Time was when Californians were mocked for their obsession with clean eating and health consciousness, but now in the 21st century it’s a global movement. If you’re set on joining the nutrition train and don’t know where to start, or just want to know the new advances in organic and wholesome diets, check out this all-day expo that assembles vendors shilling natural products, fitness expertise and more. More than 50 exhibitors will offer free samples, complimentary beer and alcohol, fitness classes throughout the day, meal-prep demos, health screenings, informational tours, activities for kids, raffle prizes, food trucks, and more. It’s never too late to incorporate greener, nourishing eating and living habits. Ninth Annual Green and Health Expo at Garden Grove Community Center, 11300 Stanford Ave., Garden Grove; greenhealthexpo.faccoc.org. 2 p.m. Free.

Singer/songwriter Dierks Bentley may be following in the footsteps of the countless country music legends before him, but he’s crafting a legacy all his own. The superstar signed on to Capitol Nashville early on in his career back in 2003 and has released hit after hit album, winning CMAs and landing a performance at Grand Ole Opry (to date, he’s the thirdyoungest artist to do so). Bentley’s current headlining tour lands him at the Honda Center tonight where he’s joined by Cole Swindell and Jon Pardi, making for a stacked lineup of country music stars under one roof. For fans of contemporary country and bluegrass music, a Dierks Bentley show is an experience you need for yourself. Dierks Bentley with Cole Swindell, Jon Pardi at Honda Center, 2695 E. Katella Ave., Anaheim, (714) 704-2500; www. hondacenter.com. 7 p.m. $29.75-$65.

—AIMEE MURILLO

—AIMEE MURILLO

Green and Health Expo

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E KARAOK HURS. EVERY T 9PM

[CONCERT]

If you’re not yet privy to the sounds of ESSO Afrojam Funkbeat, then prepare your eardrums for this rhythmic musical explosion.The energetic ensemble brings a heavenly fusion of danceable funk tunes inspired by the Afro jazz rhythms of North, Central and South America, as well as the Caribbean. Formed in 2013 in Chicago, the group have earned rave reviews from all over the music blogosphere (Latin and otherwise) and SXSW audiences, and they’re fixing for a North American takeover with their latest tour, which includes a one-night engagement in Orange County. It’s time to see what these Windy City kids have in store. ESSO Afrojam Funkbeat at Casa Costa Mesa, 820 W. 19th St., Costa Mesa, (949) 877-0075; www.casacostamesa. com. 8 p.m. Free. 21+. —AIMEE MURILLO

NEW MUSIC

TUESDAYS

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The Water Brewery sells designer water and serves great vegetarian fare

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Nice Nepalese THE INDIA CAFE 528 W. 19th St., Costa Mesa, (949) 2009365; www.theindiacafeca.com.

A BUNCH OF DROPS TO DRINK

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BRIAN FEINZIMER

The handmade corn and chia tortillas are so supple, soft and faintly sweet they could be eaten on their own. For a breakfast melt, the chefs take sourdough from Dean Kim’s OC Baking Co. and griddle it to seal in a fried duck egg, jack cheese and heirloom tomatoes. After biting into the crisp, buttery thing, I realized I’ve never had a breakfast sandwich so satisfying that didn’t involve bacon or sausage. A lunch version has jackfruit, havarti cheese, pickles and a Dijon mustard aioli that attempts to approximate the flavor profile of a Cuban sandwich—and it does. The best side order for the sandwiches is the Seabroth, a soup that’s also an answer to the bone broth craze. It’s created by simmering shiitake mushrooms, onions, garlic and wild sea vegetables for 12 hours to produce a liquid that’s somehow twice as umami-rich as any meatbased broth I’ve ever tasted. If Savedra and Belna decide to one day drop a few ramen noodles into it, they’d give Santouka a run for its money. Other soups are exemplary. The zucchini bisque is creamy and vibrant—a distillation of summer with olive oil swirled over the top of its bright green hue. The summer chili—a bean-rich stew softly sweetened by tomatoes, caramel-

ized onions, garlic and crisp-tender zucchini—comes served with torn pieces of cornbread and puddles of herb yogurt. It fills you up but doesn’t weigh you down. But that goes for everything here, even if you try the enormous Bodhi Bowl, which is basically a bean-based vegetarian bibimbap. It’s the most expensive thing on the menu, but also one of the prettiest. Decorated with sautéed eggplant, corn, mushrooms, zucchini, tomatoes and a fried duck egg, it’s arranged with edible flowers for maximum visual impact—a Technicolor burst that begs to be Instagrammed. There are salads, of course, including a refreshing cabbage with a coconut dressing that might be mistaken for coleslaw if it didn’t also have spiced cashews and orange segments. And I love the chimichurri-covered roasted fingerlings that smacks a garlicky wallop. Did I mention eating here means you get to drink as much of that AQUAE A.M.O.R.E.® as you want for free? And yes, I did end up buying a gallon of it to take home before I left. THE WATER BREWERY #2 1125 Victoria St., Ste. A, Costa Mesa, (714) 499-9977; www.thewaterbrewery.com. Kitchen open Wed.-Sun., 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m.; store open daily, 8:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Meal for two, $20-$40.

eware of stereotyping! The last time I visited the India Cafe, I did just that when a table of middle-aged gabachos excitedly called the owner over to chat. I figured them tourists or aunts from Iowa, but definitely not people who knew their vindaloos from an aloo gobi. I dug into my lunch special extra-hard to keep my mouth and eyes occupied lest I wince at the horror show that I assumed was to come. The India Cafe is a delicious contradiction. The owners are Nepalese, as hinted at by the multiple photos of the Himalayas on the walls. But the only true regional specialties offered are momos, the gigantic dumplings you can order steamed or fried but will come out delicious either way. That said, the India Cafe doesn’t serve them with blindingly hot chutney or puckeringly sour yogurt the way they do in the Queens, New York, neighborhood of Jackson Heights, which has one of the largest Nepalese communities in the United States. Then again, the Indian dishes on the menu are spiced more as they are in Nepal— milder, a tad sweeter, and in love with the tandoor or grill. Take the chicken choila, which comes out on a sizzling platter that would make fajitas jealous. Other Indians and Nepalese happily gobbled in the booths of the narrow restaurant as I waited for the owner to approach his white customers. I finished off the last flakes of my crispy poori bread, dragging it in the mint chutney. What happened next embarrassed me: The gabachos knew their stuff. Apparently, a few of them had been missionaries in Northern India in the 1970s and still visited. They and the Nepalese owner delighted in quizzing one another about cities and regions around the Himalayas, with each knowing what the other spoke of. So it was especially poignant and telling when a woman who looked as if she had just closed escrow on a spot in Laguna Woods said, “This fish curry is the best I’ve had in 35 years.” The table continued to rave about the food to themselves for the next half an hour. I asked for the bill, took my leftovers home—and vowed to STFU for the rest of the day. GARELLANO@OCWEEKLY.COM

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f you’re thinking the Water Brewery is just a clever name, that it couldn’t possibly mean what you think it means, you’d be surprised. The Water Brewery does exactly what it says: It “brews” water. Think of those water stores you see everywhere, but beamed down from Berkeley. This is a shop for those who want water that not only is clean or drinkable or sourced from an idyllic mountain spring, but also cures whatever ails them and with a customizable pH balance. The Water Brewery’s signature product is called AQUAE A.M.O.R.E.®, an acronym that stands for the “Alkalized, Mineralized, Oxygenated, Restructured, Energized” water it sells for $2 per gallon. If you want to spend an afternoon doing some light reading, there are reams of info on its website that explain each of those attributes, utilizing phrases such as “love-infused,” “high potency” and “peak ripeness.” And when you purchase some, the shop owner will begin the process by rinsing your water jug, then filling it to the top from a spigot connected to a room full of tubes and complicated machinery. After that, he adds some kind of additive with a medicine dropper. There are now two locations of the Water Brewery in Costa Mesa. But even if you’re the type who thinks the water provided by your municipality is good enough, there’s still a reason to visit. At its newest store, the owners have installed a dining room and hired chefs Carli Savedra and Raya Belna to cook what’s currently one of the best vegetarian menus in Orange County. Savedra, who was previously at Old Vine, and Belna, one-third of the Great Food Truck Race’s Seabirds team, make meals that even prompted Break of Dawn’s Dee Nguyen—one of the most respected chefs in OC and an avowed carnivore—to profess on Facebook, “I actually don’t like to eat vegetables but somehow keep finding myself very satisfied after every meal.” Nguyen has also hailed their flavor profiles as “well-balanced.” He’s right. But the best compliment I can bestow is that Savedra and Belna have managed to make vegetarian food that makes you forget it’s vegetarian. Instead, you focus on the care and effort they’ve taken to make something that’s simply, well, good. There are no attempts at soy-food fakery here; just vegetables cooked as they’re meant to be cooked. Take the bánh mì tacos topped with braised jackfruit, pickled carrots, cucumber and cilantro. It would be a very good taco even if Savedra and Belna chose to settle on store-bought tortillas, but it becomes a great taco because they didn’t.

By EdWin GoEi

» gustavo arellano

mo n th x x–x x , 2 014

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CYNTHIA REBOLLEDO

Din-Din Damn Good

Dandan noodles at Noodle St.

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ullertonians recently got a new restaurant: Noodle St., an Asian fusion noodle house combining Chinese, Korean and Japanese flavors—think tasty cumin-dusted lamb skewers, crispy beef roll pancakes and steaming noodle soups. The food isn’t overwhelmingly spicy (you can self-inflict with the mala chile oil provided on the table), but what it lacks in numbing Sichuan peppercorn spiciness it excels in delicious, textured, hand-pulled noodles. In the dining room, you can watch the dough get pulled, pounded and stretched behind a glass window in the open kitchen. And you can order them four ways: round, flat, triangle and knife-shredded. For your first bowl, we recommend pair-

EatthisNow

» cynthia rebolledo ing the knife-shredded noodles with the dandan mian: toasted-red-chile oil, savory minced pork, and mustard greens with a generous pile of made-to-order chewy noods. Mix it all together with aromatic ginger, garlic and scallions. It’s a piquant, soup-like take on the traditional, incendiary dish that you can crush without your mouth feeling as if it got a shot of tasty Novocaine. NOODLE ST. 2323 E. Chapman Ave., Ste. B, Fullerton, (657) 217-5664.

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THE DRINK

I was able to get a couple of boxes gracias to a fan. Nectar is true to its name, saccharine and strong on the anise—you think it’s more of a digestif than a proper drink. But just one little caja gets you lit; two, and you’ll be rumbling like a paisa. Best of all is the box, which looks like those little apple juices your mom used to put in your lunch box during elementary school. I snuck one into the Orange County Press Club awards, and no one noticed. But some of my writers did see the warning on the box in Spanish in huge, skinny letters: “EXCESSIVE ALCOHOL IS DANGEROUS TO HEALTH.” Don’t read Spanish? Don’t worry about it! GARELLANO@OCWEEKLY.COM

www.lighthousenb.com 1600 West Balboa Blvd. Newport Beach, CA 92663

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ow that the OC consumer has assimilated tequila, knows its mezcal, is getting into pisco and can even name-check cachaça, it’s time someone introduces us to Colombian aguardiente. It’s anise-flavored molasses liquor that usually hovers around 60 proof—that’s light, right? But aguardiente is infamous for lulling you into nonstop drinking until you’re either crying or laughing uncontrollably or fighting with that cousin who bullied you in your teen years—or so my Colombian friends say. Amazingly, Mr. Hi-Time doesn’t stock any Colombian aguardiente, and Total Wine only offers the mainstream Antioqueño. One of them should step up and sell Nectar, a lowershelf brand that I prefer to Antioqueño and Cristal, the other big Colombian label. And not just any bottle of Nectar, but rather the 250-milliliter juice boxes. WHOA . . .

AUGUST 1 8-24, 20 17

Aguardiente Nectar Juice Box

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food» SAUSAGE FIESTA

Five-Star Alsatian

BRIAN FEINZIMER

4th & Olive is a Franco-German restaurant ahead of its time

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he opening of 4th & Olive late last year sent my eyes rolling so far back into my head I feared they’d come out the other side. Inside the same building that once housed one of the seediest marijuana dispensaries in Long Beach—less than one block from my first slumlord apartment in the city (where a coroner’s van was parked outside the day I rented it)—someone was putting out white tablecloths and serving pricey food from an obscure region of eastern France. It sent my hater-brain reeling. Can anyone who lives within walking distance even afford a $9 pretzel? Do people know where Alsace-Lorraine is? Even if they did know, would they want to try Alsatian food? Why Alsace? Was it the only cuisine left untouched by restaurants catering to rabid foodies who crave authentic experiences? Why here? Why now? Why? Why? Why?! At first glance, 4th & Olive appeared to be a lost LA concept plopped onto an unlikely corner in Long Beach, a city that’s never been known for its fine-dining scene and is only now getting used to supporting chefs who support our growing number of urban farms. But in the last eight months, 4th & Olive has grown on me (and others in the city), thanks to its thoughtful presentation of the subtle grace of Franco-German fare along with owner Daniel Tapia’s heartwarming vision for a place that provides employment for disabled veterans like himself. It also helps that there’s a happy hour that puts meaty handmade bratwursts and seasonal-vegetable small plates within financial reach (which is when you’ll also want to traverse the restaurant’s well-curated taplist of fruity, funky, food-ready local and European beers at a fraction of the price). No doubt while you’re sitting there— crunching on a sparse bacon-and-leek Alsatian flatbread with a Brouwerij West Moneyhorse in hand—Tapia himself will come by and introduce himself. The Navy vet

LongBeachLunch » sarah bennett

started the restaurant, he says, because his use of a cane made him a target for discrimination elsewhere and he never wanted his fellow vets to feel un-employable like he did. He chose Alsace, which has been toggled between French and German ownership for centuries, because its cuisine is filled with simple food that’s not so simple to make. Chef Alex McGroarty, an alum of West Hollywood meat heaven Salt’s Cure, developed the menu and runs the kitchen (he’s also the subject of this week’s On the Line!). Return after happy hour to try more McGroarty-crafted examples of Alsace’s unique food identity, from house duck-liver mousse to tangy yellow sauerkraut to slabs of cured bacon so perfect it’s worth splurging on the signature choucroute garnie sampler platter ($44) just for a taste. Though meat is a focus, vegetables are always in rotation, too. In the spring, a hearty, flavor-packed white bean cassoulet made me feel like I was slurping the season. This summer, McGroarty added a small plate of roasted squash, fist-sized green and yellow balls atop an herb-y French cream sauce. Even a year-round plate of pickled vegetables and assorted house-ground mustards satisfies. As 4th & Olive settles into the neighborhood (and casual Long Beach diners like me learn to accept how much it truly costs to make food from scratch in a kitchen that lacks a can opener or a microwave), it’s become clear that instead of being misplaced, Tapia’s idea makes sense in Long Beach, but is merely ahead of its time. 4TH & OLIVE 743 E. Fourth St., Long Beach; (562) 2690731; 4thandolive.com.


BURDEN ON GLASS

Beast of Burden

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Art doc rocks, Five Steps of Love steps in it By MATT COKER LACMA, where the installation is powered by the sun to illuminate at dusk. Knight claims this “temple of light” is second only to the Hollywood sign in being the city’s most photographed attraction. You don’t get a sense in Burden that the artist particularly cared about the adulation he received in either half of his career. He seemed shy and stoic, letting his art do the talking, even while indulging the same media his early work criticized. (Check out the plaid jacket and oversized polka-dot tie a bewildered Regis Philbin rocks during a post-Shoot interview. Talk about performance art.) It is as if Shoot was Burden’s lifelong, well, burden, although Jonathan Gold, the LA Times food critic, pops up to say that while he was the then-professor’s art assistant at UCLA, Burden flirted with shooting Gold in the arm to mark the 10th anniversary of the notorious stunt. “That wasn’t my jam,” Gold reports. I’ll report that Burden is mine.

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f you would have bet me $5 five minutes into Five Steps of Love that I would make it to the end credits, my wallet would still be full. The English-language subtitles fly off the screen way too fast in the Vietnamese rom-com, cornball music and sound effects are grating and, despite matinee idol looks, male lead B Tran’s Huy is a douche. And yet, I could not keep my eyes off the train wreck.

The thin sitcom premise of a story centers on whether young adult couples can truly bond despite astrological signs that dictate they should not be together, although that never plays a part in the steps to winning over a girl that narrator Huy illustrates as movie interstitials. He is a playboy unwittingly two-timing with roommates. His girlfriend Chi (Quynh Chi Nguyen) is a drop-dead gorgeous, shallow career climber who, as a Leo, matches with Huy, or so the stars tell us. But the love-’em-and-leave-’em lug falls harder for mellow Pisces art student My (Jun Vu), who has eyes for someone else. Check please, right? Well, Five Steps of Love director Ngoc Phuong Vu and cowriter Kimmie Vu peel the onion slowly enough that you simply must see whether Huy is found out. After the magic moment arrives, the filmmakers thankfully resist the urge to wrap things up in a nice bow. MCOKER@OCWEEKLY.COM BURDEN was directed by Timothy Marrinan and Richard Dewey. Now available on iTunes, Amazon and Video on Demand. FIVE STEPS OF LOVE was directed by Ngoc Phuong Vu; written by Ngoc Phuong Vu and Kimmie Vu; and stars B Tran, Jun Vu and Quynh Chi Nguyen. Now playing at Regal Garden Grove and Edwards Irvine Spectrum.

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Burden was convinced he made art that reflected a sick society while the motorcycle stuntman was simply a “trickster.” What is amazing over the course of the engrossing 90-minute documentary is how the view of Burden evolved to the point where another critic, Christopher Knight of the Los Angeles Times, appears on screen to hail the artist as one of the most beloved and important in the city. This is due to Burden having walked away from performance art in the late 1970s to crank out large art pieces from his cluttered Topanga Canyon studio. His work has been installed and exhibited in galleries and museums all over the world—one major retrospective was at Newport Harbor Art Museum (now Orange County Museum of Art) in 1988—but despite his OC beginnings, we must acknowledge that Chris Burden is a Los Angeles treasure. This is due to late career works such as: Ode to Santos Dumont (2015), a working dirigible that flies in perfect circles to honor the pioneering Brazilian aviator, which was unveiled at a private event five days after Burden’s death and later installed as a tribute at the LA County Museum of Art (LACMA); Metropolis II (2011), a kinetic sculpture that took four years to complete and I’d liken to a Hot Wheels track on steroids, which also took up residence at LACMA; and especially Urban Light (2008), an arrangement of 202 antique street lamps on view outside

m on t h1 8-24, xx–x x, August 202170 14

ritics, historians and fellow artists agree in the documentary Burden that Chris Burden represented a seismic shift in the art world of the 1970s, although they differ on whether that was for better or worse. The divergent views are based on Burden’s early use not of paint, clay, film, metal or found material but of his own body, which he had: stuffed into a 2-foot-by-2-foot-by2-foot locker for his master’s thesis at UC Irvine (Five Day Locker Piece, 1971); a bullet shot through while in Santa Ana’s F Space Gallery (Shoot, also ’71); electrocuted in his Venice gallery (Doorway to Heaven, ’73); cut up by holding his arms behind his back as he snaked over broken glass wearing only briefs on Main Street in Los Angeles (Through the Night Softly, ’73); and nailed like Jesus to a VW Bug in a Speedway Avenue garage in Venice (Trans-fixed, ’74). In co-directors Timothy Marrinan and Richard Dewey’s film that is now available on home video, the talking head representing the traditional art world of the day was the late British critic Brian Sewell, who at one point snorts of a provocative Burden performance, “That’s not art. . . . It’s just a silly thing people go to see.” Burden, who also passed before the documentary was in the can, is shown in the archival footage Marrinan and Dewey meticulously curated displaying real disappointment in being labeled the “Evel Knievel of the art world.”

PHOTO COURTESY OF MAGNOLIA PICTURES | © CHARLES HILL

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BRAND STORY

OC3 is Orange County's Premiere Cannabis Dispensary BY ANGEL GRADY

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hen Santa Ana held its first-ever medical marijuana lottery back in 2015, city officials essentially plucked names from a hat, deciding who would be the first five licensed dispensaries legally allowed to operate in Orange County. When OC3’s name was called, so began their journey to make the best dispensary in Orange County. “Our main goal was to bring the community together and make it a healthy and friendly environment,” says OC3 General Manager Maggie Carothers. Carothers received her A.A. for Pharmaceutical Science from Carrington College in 2007 and her B.A. from the University of Washington in 2010 for Environmental Science. She spent six years in pharmaceuticals and outpatient services before realizing she wanted to be more involved with the medical marijuana industry. Carothers is responsible for the day-to-day operations as well as most of the product and flower that rest on the shelves.

Ever wonder how dispensaries decide what to carry? For OC3, Carothers bases all her decisions on the clientele, the new regulations, and keeping prices low. The main idea is to treat patients with compassion so they receive the best bang for their buck. The last thing we would ever want do is overcharge patients for their meds. “We want cater to all price ranges, all parties and all ages,” she says. “We have prices as low as $10 or $5 for product, and as high as $60. There are some specialty products that range as high as $110, but we always strive to keep our prices low.” According to Carothers, Santa Ana City officials frequently visit the dispensary and have rated them one of the top five best dispensaries in Orange County in regards to compliance, protocol and safe access for patients. As a precaution, all budtenders are required to pass a thorough background check and have a Live Scan done at the police department. But empathy for patients is the most important trait Carothers looks for in her staff.


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“Communication with the patient is most important because that way you know exactly what they need,” confirms OC3 budtender Stevie Speakman. “It’s really important to me to get the patient what they need, not just whatever to get them high. I want to specifically give them the exact medication that they need for their problems.” In Jan. 2018, recreational marijuana will be legal throughout California. While the transition will have its share of uncertainty for those in the medical marijuana industry, OC3 is well-positioned to handle whatever challenges come into play. “I think the people and the management are very adaptable and we’re gonna do really well,” says budtender Becca Medina. “Everyone here really cares about the product we’re selling and the people we’re helping, so whether we expand for recreational or do both side-by-side, I think the patients are the focus and the people coming in are the focus and the store will do well with it.” The space adjacent to the sleek and modern dispensary is currently a studio, however, the hope is that in the near future OC3 will buy that space and expand. If the expansion does take place one side will be completely dedicated to medicinal products and will also allow for more one-on-one patient counseling. Meanwhile, OC3 offers

a wide array of daily deals, tons of texts blasts and a buy-two-get-onefree section with a rotation of edibles, flower, oil and other meds. Since the primary focus is treatment, there’s no way they can leave out our veterans and seniors with their own special discounts, as they start to explore canna options. On average there are 50 different strains on hand to choose from. OC3 stocks a variety of high class oils, vapes, extracts and concentrates, including Archive Seed Back, Holy Water Extracts, Rove Brands, Heavy Hitters and Kiva Confections. They also have a prestigious selection of glass pieces, some reaching up to $100,000, as well as their own OC3 clothing line. The dispensary will continue to strive to offer premium products, exceptional, personal and professional customer service, and competitive prices with continue to gain—and keep—their patients’ loyalty. “When you have a relationship with a customer you really get to see the other side of their life,” Carothers says. “You have a chance to listen to their stories of struggle to find cures or treatment. We do everything in our power to educate our patients for a better and healthier solution to the alternatives that have been unsuccessful.”


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| classifieds | music | culture | film | food | calendar | feature | the county | contents August 18 -24, 2 017

All Is Write

» AIMEE MURILLO

OC-Centric New Play Festival returns to showcase local productions BY JOEL BEERS

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FOUNDERS WASHINGTON (LEFT) AND EBERWEIN

STEPHEN RACK

in OC or grew up here. “I was surprised when we started getting submissions and realized these [people’s work] had been around, not just in Southern California, but also Chicago, New York, Seattle, around the country,” Washington says. “But here in Orange County, no one knows them.” Both Washington, who is primarily a director and teacher, and Eberwein, an award-winning playwright, are passionate about new work. While each realizes it’s a tough sell at the box office, particularly for smaller theaters, they also realize theater withers without it. “Theater ossifies without the new,” Eberwein says. “It becomes a museum unless you have plays that speak to our time.” “Why are we always bound by what has been produced and published before us?” asks Washington. “And I think some people believe the best plays have already been written. And we all get stuck. Higher education gets stuck. Community theater gets stuck. Professional theater gets stuck in this idea of what you should be doing. There are so many other options out there but I don’t think people realize they can tell different types of different stories about different issues.” New plays can also deliver a refreshing kick in the ass to actors and audiences. Most people know the character of The Crucible’s John Proctor, Eberwein says,

but a new character in a new play forces actors to dig for something raw and new, rather than relying on an archetype. The same holds true for not working continually with the same group of people, which invariably happens with most theater companies, but which is part of OC-Centric’s creative aesthetic. “You grow innovatively and remain relevant to the time in which you live by working with new people and not consistently relying on the same people in a small group,” Washington says. “[It’s about] not becoming complacent and thinking these are the only people to work with. That is why one of the first things we discussed when we started this is that we wanted to hire new faces every year.” New faces, new plays. But it’s the same old battle: getting audiences to care about something unfamiliar, a battle OC-Centric seems determined to wage against a most intractable mindset: “I just wish more people in Orange County cared about new plays,” Eberwein says. OC-CENTRIC NEW PLAY FESTIVAL at Moulton Hall Studio Theatre, 300 E. Palm Ave., Orange; www.oc-centric.com or www. brownpapertickets.com. Opens Thurs., Aug. 17. Dates and show times differ for the one full-length production and two one-acts. Through Aug. 27. $12-20.

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f you’ve kept up to date with the Sanrioverse in the last couple of years, you’re aware that a) it has been fully established that Hello Kitty is NOT a cat, she’s a human girl! and b) the latest character to emerge is literally a lazy yellow egg yolk named Gudetama. Gudetama engages in activities like hanging outside of its freshly cracked shell, lounging in a plate of food, or resting under a strip of bacon, but always with the same pained expression of malaise and lethargy on its face. You can find plenty of Gudetamathemed products on the market including backpacks, dolls, key chains, slippers, toys and accessories. Devoted fans have embraced the Gude’ as a spirit animal, channeling the joy of being idle (or for some, a representation of millennial laziness or depression). But collectors now have more reason to rejoice: the arrival of Gudetama’s latest collaboration with Korean beauty line Holika Holika. The Holika Holika Gudetama “Lazy & Easy” makeup and skincare collection just launched a week ago, carrying a wide assortment of helpful products for lazy types who don’t want the time-consuming effort of skincare. It includes the Jelly Dough Blusher (a blush compact that comes in light pink or coral colors); Egg Peeling Gel, Character Sheet Mask, Nail Kit, All-In-One Oil to Foam Cleanser; All-In-One Master Essence face moisturizer; Melting Lip Button (a lipstick that comes in red or orange shades); Cushion BB Cream set; dry shampoo, and much more. This expansive collection is just one of the many new Korean skincare lines available at CVS’s new K-Beauty HQ, which aims to bring Korean products closer to stateside consumers. The “Lazy & Easy” collection should prove immediately popular for Gudetama fans but also for avid consumers of Korean beauty products. It boasts a wide infusion of natural ingredients including citrus peel, collagen proteins, olive, almond, egg and jojoba oils, and seaweed. If you can read Korean, check out the full collection online at www.holikaholika.co.kr. Otherwise, head to your nearest CVS—and let your skin feel Gude’. AMURILLO@OCWEEKLY.COM

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es, the stars of the seventh OC-Centric New Play Festival, Orange County’s only foray into full productions of new plays by local writers, are the three playwrights: La Habra’s Karen Fix Curry, Brea’s Sara Saenz and San Juan Capistrano’s Karly Thomas. And, of course, there’d be no festival without the actors, designers and running crew of the two-weekend festival, which opens Thursday at Chapman University. Nor would it exist without the work of its founders and co-artistic directors: Chapman theater professor Tamiko Washington and Eric Eberwein, whose day job is providing content for financial advisors, but who has also written, worked and wailed in the relative playwriting wilderness of Orange County for more than 20 years. Relative is the key word here. What has most surprised the two-headed brain trust that started the festival in hopes of filling a void in local theater is the scope, and quality, of local playwrights. “I was saying to myself, ‘No one really gives new playwrights a chance,’” says Washington, who met Eberwein in 2008 while directing a staged reading of his in Laguna Beach. “There were all kinds of staged readings all over the place, but no one was fully looking at new plays and saying ‘We’re going to take submissions, and read them and then think of them being stage-ready to fully produce.’ That’s where my idea came from.” For Eberwein—who founded the Orange County Playwrights Alliance (OCPA) in the early 1990s—Washington’s offer was “too good to refuse.” “At that time, the local theater scene was coming out of the Great Recession, and it seemed like a lot of the programming was very conservative and seemed to be about risk-management rather than taking artistic risks,” he says. “So it seemed like the time was ideal to have a new play festival.” While there have been a handful of companies since the 1990s, when the county’s storefront theater emerged, that included new works by local writers in their seasons, (such as Stages, which opened new one-acts by David Macaray Aug. 19), shepherding has been for the most part by playwriting groups like OCPA and New Voices, and, most recently, Breath of Fire Latina Theater Ensemble, which takes a more community-based approach to creating new work. So that first year, Eberwein and Washington didn’t know if they’d receive enough work even deserving of a full production. That hasn’t been the case. Each year, OC-Centric receives between 40 and 50 submissions from writers who either live

Feel the Gude’

MO N TH X X–X X , 2 014

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TRENDZILLA

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The Dead Have Risen

For Grateful Dead tribute bands, the love for their favorite group never dies By Sco TT FeinBlaTT

PLAY “CASEY JONES” AGAIN

I

explains. “[Cryptical Development] always approach the music to allow it to go in whatever direction it goes. . . . So sometimes we’re just creating music, sometimes actually creating songs within songs.” Marcus Rezak, a Los Angeles-based guitarist who performed at Skull & Roses with his band Shred Is Dead, recalls the profound effect the Grateful Dead’s style had on him when he was younger. “Once I discovered the freedom in improvisation uniquely found in the Dead’s music, I was hooked for life,” he says. “I’ll never forget the airy, open, vast feeling of hearing ‘Jack Straw’ off Europe ’72, which inspired me uncontrollably to play their gorgeous music with as many people who were truly immersed in it as possible.” Rezak adds that the music has a magical effect on him. “When I play or even hear their music,” he says, “I feel right at home and want to keep playing it forever.” The relationship between the musicians and the fans that was a hallmark of the Grateful Dead also continues. Not only is there a palpable artist/audience synergy that can be witnessed at the shows, but there are also friendships that develop. “Each local band usually has a regular spot to play, weekly or monthly, and has a following that is truly family,” Kasle says, adding that these families are open to newcomers. “Someone new to a community can always find a safe space and instant new friends if they find the Dead cover band, which has happened to me time and time again, moving all over the country.” That sense of acceptance is also evident among the various Dead tribute bands. “Cryptical Development looks at itself more as a family than as a band,” Roth says. “We’re a network of musicians. . . .

Sometimes, for example, we’ll rent a studio just to jam, and some of the members of our current band might have paid gigs elsewhere . . . so we draw upon this family to fill those blanks.” Roth has played with Larry and Tom Ryan, who went on to join Cubensis, the pre-eminent SoCal Grateful Dead tribute band. And Shawn Cunnane, who performed at Skull & Roses with Rich Sheldon as Sheldon & Cunnane, has performed with both Cryptical Development and Cubensis. The bands even make an effort to not book gigs on the same evenings, creating a situation in which everybody wins—especially the fans, who, Roth says, “will come see me on a Thursday night in Burbank, and then they’ll go down to see Cubensis [in Long Beach] on Friday night.” Another interesting facet of the Dead tribute community is its diversity in interpretation. This mix of styles can even be complementary, explains vocalist/bassist “Jeff Wears Birkenstocks” Abarta, whose band, Punk Is Dead, perform in a punkrock style and “have played a couple of gigs with Cubensis.” For some musicians, paying tribute to the Dead is a part-time gig. Reggae band Urban Dread performed at Skull & Roses as Urban Dead; Roth, Rezak and Abarta all play in other SoCal bands. Regardless of the incarnation, the appeal of the Dead’s music continues to have a profound effect on people, and the growing number of fans have plenty of options to whet their appetites. “The music will never stop being what it has always meant to us,” Rezak says, “but bringing a fresh perspective to it is what will keep it thriving instead of just existing.” LETTERS@OCWEEKLY.COM

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that while pockets of Dead tribute bands have existed in a more-or-less underground fashion for some time, “something about [the Fare Thee Well shows] reignited the Dead world . . . and now these bands are blossoming.” Andy Roth—lead guitarist/vocalist of Cryptical Development, one of the bands that performed at Skull & Roses—agrees there’s a new wave of Dead fever. “In the past several years, it has become very, very active again, and the fanbase seems to have an unquenchable thirst for the music,” he says, adding that fans form deep connections within the tribute scene. “A lot of the people build friendships with the people in these bands. . . . It’s an amazing community in terms of the depth and enthusiasm of the people who love this music.” One of those enthusiastic music-lovers, Sydne Kasle of Fresno, explains there’s a national network of Dead tribute bands. “Compass Rose on Facebook keeps us informed of pretty much the full list of active Dead cover bands throughout the country,” she says. Some of the bands within that network would stress that cover bands more or less play the music of other bands note-for-note, while tribute bands take other people’s songs and perform them in an original fashion. This is essential for Dead tribute bands, as they were the original jam band. “The Grateful Dead was one of the very first bands whose music was based on extended jams—in other words, soloing for long periods of time as opposed to just playing the song in the traditional way, and then playing a guitar solo or a keyboard solo, and then moving on,” Roth

Au gu st 18 - 24 , 2 0 17

t has been 22 years since Jerry Garcia’s death. The passing of the Grateful Dead’s iconic figurehead also meant the end of the band all those years ago. However, given the monumental and legendary following of the Grateful Dead, as well as the dedication of the surviving musicians, it should not be surprising that the fans and musicians keep the spirit of the Dead alive in various incarnations. That same ethos of peace and love and jam-based playing style continues to be cultivated by new generations of devotees. Through an examination of Southern California’s Grateful Dead tribute scene, it is clear that an awakening is upon us. In early April, SoCal native Chris Mitrovich, owner/general manager of DELUXE Presents, founded and organized the Skull & Roses Festival at the Ventura County Fairgrounds. The weekend-long event promised 48 Grateful Dead tribute bands in 48 hours, and 1,500 people heeded the call for this gathering of diverse tribes. With performances by former members of the Grateful Dead and their various side projects, including headliners Melvin Seals & JGB (Jerry Garcia Band), this festival proved there are not many degrees of separation between the tribute bands and the original. Currently, three of the Dead’s founding members—singer/guitarist Bob Weir and drummers Mickey Hart and Bill Kreutzmann—tour as Dead & Co. with John Mayer. The 2015 Fare Thee Well concert series, which celebrated 50 years of Grateful Dead music with the aforementioned original members and bassist Phil Lesh, seems to have generated a new swell of devotees. Mitrovich points out

PHOTOS BY SCOTT FEINBLATT

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music» BEYOND THE SEA

Seafaring Folk Pop

MYKE WILKEN

Lucy & La Mer’s breezy sound helps us navigate the rough waters of love

A

nyone who’s ever sailed on the open sea can tell you that no matter how calm the waters seem, things can turn choppy and treacherous at any time. But with some solid skills and a good head on your shoulders you have a better than average chance of making it through the storm. In the case of singer/songwriter Lucy LaForge, she can take a few licks from the ocean and keep on singing sweet melodies without so much as rustling the large bow in her hair. Of course in the sea of love and relationships, it’s never quite as easy as LaForge’s breathy and effervescent vocals make it seem. Even on heavy songs about past breakups like “Honey, Put Your Weapons Down,” a fan favorite at her shows with her band Lucy & La Mer, her voice offers as much comfort as it does catharsis. “[That song] has been really rewarding and built a really nice community after shows,” LaForge says. “There’s always someone who comes up and wants to know the name of that song because they’re going through a breakup. . . . It’s a really nice camaraderie after the show [when] people have a place where they feel like they can share their problems.” Despite being raised in the city of Winchester, a super small town outside of Temecula, the vibe of her baritone ukulele acoustic sound was forged on the sea— hence the band’s name. While writing her band’s debut EP, Little Spoon, LaForge was in the wake of a breakup. She found solace in her family’s small sail boat where she’d camp out and strum through emotions. “I would just go and crash on my family’s boat, it’s like a small little sailboat out in the [Long Beach] harbor and I would hang out there and write songs,” she says. LaForge also sailed around the world in a ship as part of a study-abroad college program, enjoying a once-in-a-lifetime adventure. Even braving rough waters felt like a privilege.

By Nate JacksoN “We hit a pretty big storm between Mexico and Japan, the Pacific Ocean is so brutal but it was fun, it only lasted a few days,” she says very nonchalantly. “I really loved South Africa, I did some shark cage diving there, it was probably the scariest thing I’ve ever done.” Back on dry land, her sound has earned her some respectable cred in the LA indie scene. LaForge has shared the stage with Moby, Cat Power, Jamestown Revival, Chuck Ragan (Hot Water Music), and White Buffalo to name a few. Little Spoon charted on College Radio in 2015, followed by three bi-coastal tours that year as well as two semi-finalist spots in the International Songwriter Contest. They’ve also worked closely with women’s rights organizations, including “More Than No” and the Cabaret Con-sensual, as well as the LGBT activist group AmBi. Recently, Lucy & La Mer—including drummer Sheldon Reed, bassist John Keenan and guitarist Liv Slingerland— were tapped to play Echo Park Rising for a third time. With plenty of music coming out of them these days, LaForge says she’s steered her music toward sunny songs that will get the crowd sailing home satisfied. Songs like “Oak Tree” and “Just Friends” are folksy love anthems that you can tap your toe and whistle along to; they even make some pretty sweet sailing music. “We’re kind of playing with the idea of doing more danceable stuff,” LaForge says. “The last record was mostly ballads but we wanna have something fun people can dance to. That’s what we’ve been doing in our live shows, playing more upbeat stuff.” NJACKSON@OCWEEKLY.COM LUCY & LA MER perform at the Constellation Room with Moon Honey, Summer Twins and Wyatt Blair, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 9570600; www.observatoryoc.com.Wed., 8 p.m. $10. All ages.


GO, CANDACE AND PALS!

NICK THOMAS

Jailbreak From the Norm

F

» NATE JACKSON

NJACKSON@OCWEEKLY.COM Hey, Orange County/Long Beach musicians & bands! Mail your music, contact info, high-res photos & impending show dates for possible review to: Locals Only, OC Weekly, 18475 Bandilier Circle, Fountain Valley, CA 92708. Or email your link to: localsonly@ocweekly.com.

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with some grinding metal guitar and gratuitous amounts of head banging (which the rest of the band agrees makes for a mighty effective metronome onstage). “Josh filled in a lot of our sound, he was the thread that kinda tied us together,” Gonzales says. “When he came in he gave us the metal influence that we wanted but didn’t know we wanted.” Recently the band self-released the debut album Big House via Bandcamp, the culmination of several singles and a couple of EPs they’ve recorded since the beginning of the band. “Sometimes people who record you don’t always know what you want when you sound different,” Gonzales says. “So I think that’s what our progression was, coming into our own and being able to explain it more and how to achieve it.” True to the tone of the band since they started, the album’s title track uses every ounce of its two minutes and nine seconds to inject your ears with audible insanity. Gonzales says the song was inspired by the trope of women getting killed in horror movies. Though the LGBT community and its musicians have made huge strides in recent years, the members of YAAWN are constantly reminded that it will always be a struggle for bands outside the norm to be heard and respected. It’s a battle they embody every time they’re onstage. “Every show more and more people liked us and understood what we were doing, which we never thought would happen because we were such a caustic band and wanted to remain so,” Gonzales says. “So it has changed in terms of people respecting what we do but that tension is completely still there.”

AU GU ST 18 - 2 4, 20 17

or bands on the fringes of the OC music scene, surviving in sunny suburbia can feel less like a paradise and more like a prison. And though this area is notorious for churning out plenty of pissed-off punks, the majority of our local bands—straight, white, all-male—haven’t felt what it’s like to be marginalized beyond the scope of their music. In that regard, queer musicians definitely have a reason to turn on an amp and scream at the top of their lungs. Enter YAAWN: a local trio of post hardcore thrashers. But as they can attest, even being loud enough to get everyone’s attention isn’t enough for a scrappy band from the LGBT scene to get noticed by those in the mainstream. “A lot of people won’t book queer artists,” says drummer Candace Hansen, who also writes about local queer punk bands for the Weekly in her spare time. “It’s not a homophobic thing, but it’s very difficult for us to get booked for shows unless we had an in with anything else outside of queer bands and women. If you’re trying to get outside your circle it can be challenging.” That’s not to say they don’t get around. Barreling their way into the local bars and DIY music venues became one of their many fortes over their three years together. They’ve become one of the more visible bands from the LGBT scene that’s helped kick down the doors for a host of other bands looking for equality in OC’s music space. However, YAAWN weren’t just fueled by a crusade for equality. As their name suggests, boredom also inspired Hansen and vocalist/ bassist Jessica Gonzales to get together and start jamming in the garage. “We just decided that we were tired of the music that was out there and how queer people and especially women were given pigeonholed roles as far as the type of visibility they get in places like Orange County, and we wanted to do something different,” Hansen says. In the beginning, their sound relied on Hansen’s intense, technical drumming and Gonzales’ far out bass lines and shrieking vocals. Things evolved quickly when guitarist Josh Santellen joined the band and infused their sound

LOCALSONLY

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concert guide»

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THIS WEEK

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FRIDAY

FREQUENCY FRIDAYS: 10:30 p.m., free. Brussels

Bistro, 222 Forest Ave., Laguna Beach, (949) 376-7955; brusselsbistro.com. FRIDAY NIGHT LIVE MUSIC AT THE DEN: 9 p.m., free. The Gypsy Den, 125 N. Broadway Ave., Santa Ana, (714) 835-8840; gypsyden.com. KEVIN WOOD: 8 p.m., free. The Library, 3418 E. Broadway, Long Beach, (562) 433-2393; thelibraryacoffeehouse.com. MACEO PARKER; THE FAMILY STONE: part of the Bank of the West Summer Concert Series, 6-10 p.m., $65-$110; series.hyattconcerts.com. Hyatt Regency Newport Beach, 1107 Jamboree Rd., Newport Beach, (949) 729-1234; newportbeach.hyatt.com. PRETZEL LOGIC: 7:30 p.m., $15-$30. Spaghettini Rotisserie & Grill, 3005 Old Ranch Pkwy., Seal Beach, (562) 596-2199; spaghettini.com. PROOF BAR RESIDENT DJS: 9 p.m., free. Proof Bar, 215 N. Broadway, Santa Ana, (714) 953-2660; proofbar.com. RITUAL: EDM DJs, 9 p.m., free. Kitsch Bar, 891 Baker St., Ste. A10, Costa Mesa, (714) 546-8580; kitschbar.com. RON KOBAYASHI: 10 p.m., free. Bayside Restaurant, 900 Bayside Dr., Newport Beach, (949) 721-1222; baysiderestaurant.com. SEGA GENECIDE: 10 p.m., free. La Cave, 1695 Irvine Ave., Costa Mesa, (949) 646-7944; lacaverestaurant.com. THE SWEET: 8 p.m., $20. The Coach House, 33157 Camino Capistrano, Ste. C, San Juan Capistrano, (949) 496-8930; thecoachhouse.com.

SATURDAY

BOOTS & BIKINIS COUNTRY MUSIC BEACH PARTY: 4 p.m., free before 10 p.m.; bootsandbikinisoc.

com. Baja Beach Cafe, 2332 W. Coast Hwy., Newport Beach, (949) 673-8444; bajabeachcafe.com. BUMP ‘N GRIND: 9 p.m., $5. Que Sera, 1923 E. Seventh St., Long Beach, (562) 599-6170; queseralb.wix.com. EPIC SATURDAYS: 9:30 p.m., free. The Continental Room, 115 W. Santa Fe Ave., Fullerton, (714) 469-1879; facebook.com/ContinentalRoom. HIP-HOP HOORAY: 9 p.m., free. Kitsch Bar, 891 Baker St., Ste. A10, Costa Mesa, (714) 546-8580; kitschbar.com. HONK; VENICE: 8 p.m., $30. The Coach House, 33157 Camino Capistrano, Ste. C, San Juan Capistrano, (949) 496-8930; thecoachhouse.com. ORANGE COUNTY GUITAR CIRCLE FEATURED ARTIST RECITAL: 8 p.m., $15. Bertea Hall,

Chapman University, 1 University Dr., Orange.

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August 18 -24, 2 017 mo n th x x–x x , 20 14

PROOF BAR RESIDENT DJS: 9 p.m., free. Proof Bar,

281

215 N. Broadway, Santa Ana, (714) 953-2660; proofbar.com. STEREO SATURDAYS: 10:30 p.m., free. Brussels Bistro, 222 Forest Ave., Laguna Beach, (949) 376-7955; brusselsbistro.com.

SUNDAY

APOLLO BEBOP BOTTOMLESS BRUNCH: 8 a.m.,

free. The Gypsy Den, 125 N. Broadway Ave., Santa Ana, (714) 835-8840; gypsyden.com. FULLY FULLWOOD REGGAE SUNDAYS: 3 p.m., $5. Don the Beachcomber, 16278 Pacific Coast Hwy., Huntington Beach, (562) 592-1321; donthebeachcomber.com. MANIFEST PRESENTS: 6:30 p.m., $12. Chain Reaction, 1652 W. Lincoln Ave., Anaheim, (714) 6356067; allages.com. 94.7 THE WAVE BRUNCH: 11 a.m., $25. Spaghettini Rotisserie & Grill, 3005 Old Ranch Pkwy., Seal Beach, (562) 596-2199; spaghettini.com. SUNDAY BLUES: 4 p.m., free. Malarkey’s Grill & Irish Pub, 168 N. Marina Dr., Long Beach, (562) 598-9431. WORLD FAMOUS GOSPEL BRUNCH: 10:30 a.m., $45. House of Blues at Anaheim GardenWalk, 400 W. Disney Way, Ste. 337, Anaheim, (714) 778-2583; houseofblues.com/anaheim. YURIDIA & HA*ASH: 7:30 p.m., $30-$75. Pacific Amphitheatre, 100 Fair Dr., Costa Mesa, (800) 745-3000; ticketmaster.com.

MONDAY

COUNTRY DANCIN’ WITH DJ PATRICK: 6:30 p.m.,

free. The Swallow’s Inn, 31786 Camino Capistrano, San Juan Capistrano, (949) 493-3188; swallowsinn.com. DJ FLACO: 9 p.m., free. Kitsch Bar, 891 Baker St., Ste. A10, Costa Mesa, (714) 546-8580; kitschbar.com. DOUG LACY: 6 p.m., free. Ralph Brennan’s Jazz Kitchen, 1590 S. Disneyland Dr., Anaheim, (714) 7765200; rbjazzkitchen.com. JIDENNA: 8 p.m., $18. Constellation Room at the Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; constellationroom.com.

TUESDAY

MIC DANGEROUSLY: 8 p.m., free. Gallagher’s Pub &

Grill, 2751 E. Broadway, Long Beach, (562) 856-8000; gallagherslongbeach.com. RISING STARS MUSIC SERIES: 5:30 p.m., free with festival admission ($8). Laguna Beach Festival of Arts, 650 Laguna Canyon Rd., Laguna Beach, (949) 494-1145; foapom.com.

WEDNESDAY

BACK CATALOG: 9 p.m., free. Kitsch Bar, 891 Baker

St., Ste. A10, Costa Mesa, (714) 546-8580; kitschbar.com. BLUES WEDNESDAYS: 8 p.m., $5. Mozambique, 1740 S. Coast Hwy., Laguna Beach, (949) 715-7777; mozambiqueoc.com. DEREK BORDEAUX BAND: 7 p.m., free. Original Mike’s, 100 S. Main St., Santa Ana, (714) 550-7764; originalmikes.com. ENCORE: presented by Manifest Recordings, 8 p.m., $5. Que Sera, 1923 E. Seventh St., Long Beach, (562) 5996170; queseralb.wix.com. EXPANDING OC HIP-HOP: 8 p.m., free. Doll Hut, 107 S. Adams St., Anaheim, (714) 533-1286. MODERN DISCO AMBASSADORS: 10 p.m., $5. La Cave, 1695 Irvine Ave., Costa Mesa, (949) 646-7944; lacaverestaurant.com.

THURSDAY, AUG. 24

ANDREW BLOOM: 7:30 p.m., $5. Mozambique,

1740 S. Coast Hwy., Laguna Beach, (949) 715-7777; mozambiqueoc.com. DIERKS BENTLEY: 7 p.m., $51-$329. Honda Center, 2695 E. Katella Ave., Anaheim, (714) 704-2400; hondacenter.com. DIVE CLUB: 9 p.m., free. Kitsch Bar, 891 Baker St., Ste. A10, Costa Mesa, (714) 546-8580; kitschbar.com. DOUG LACY: 6 p.m., free. Ralph Brennan’s Jazz Kitchen, 1590 S. Disneyland Dr., Anaheim, (714) 7765200; rbjazzkitchen.com. FAMILY STYLE; TIJUANA DOGS: part of the OC Parks Summer Concert Series, 6 p.m., free. Salt Creek Beach, 33333 S. Pacific Coast Hwy., Dana Point, (949) 923-2283. REGGAE THURSDAYS: 9 p.m., $5. Que Sera, 1923 E. Seventh St., Long Beach, (562) 599-6170; queseralb.wix.com. STRICTLY COUNTRY THURSDAYS: 6 p.m., free before 8 p.m.; $5 after. Gaslamp Restaurant & Bar, 6251 E. Pacific Coast Hwy., Long Beach, (562) 5964718; thegaslamprestaurant.com.

UPCOMING DAVID LINDLEY: Aug. 25. The Coach House. KALEO: Aug. 25. House of Blues at

Anaheim GardenWalk.

MEW: Aug. 25. The Observatory. AUGUST ALSINA: Aug. 26. House of Blues at

Anaheim GardenWalk.

THE IRON MAIDENS; DAMAGE INC.: Aug. 27.

Gaslamp Restaurant & Bar.

WORLD FAMOUS GOSPEL BRUNCH: Aug. 27.

House of Blues at Anaheim GardenWalk.

THE TOM KUBIS BIG BAND: Aug. 28. Don

the Beachcomber.

MARK LANEGAN BAND: Aug. 29. The Observatory. ORANGE EMPIRE CHORUS: Aug. 31. Muckenthaler

Cultural Center.

BARRINGTON LEVY: Sept. 1. The Observatory. LARRY CARLTON: Sept. 1. The Coach House.


Quickies

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I’ve been wondering: Since there are lesbians out there who occasionally crave cock, does the reverse also happen? Are there gay men who occasionally crave pussy? This Possible?

turn-on and even fantasized I was doing it to you. Hope that doesn’t offend you. Loving Life

There are gay men who watch football—hell, I have it on good authority that some gay men play football, TP. So anything is possible. (Also, there are lots of lesbian-identified bisexual women out there, a smaller number of gay-identified bisexual men, and a tiny handful of bisexual-identified football fans.) I’ve been seeing a lot of articles in the media about men “dropping out of the dating-andmarriage game,” and the conclusions always point to porn as the culprit. This seems like a simplistic explanation. Do you have an opinion on the effect of porn on men? Pondering Porn I dropped out of the forming-opinions-about-porn game—far too busy consuming porn these days, PP. It’s the only way to keep myself sane here in Trumpsylvania. I’m a 26-year-old woman. I started dating a fantastic guy a month ago, blah blah blah, we’ve already talked about marriage. The problem is that his dick isn’t up to par size-wise or stayinghard-wise. He was aware of this before I came along, and it made him an enthusiastic and skilled oral performer to make up for it. So for now everything’s great, plenty of orgasms, and we’re lovey-dovey. But eventually I’ll need that filled-up feeling and I’ll have to ask for some dildo/extender/strap-on action. The question is when to ask. He’s a secure guy, and we’ve both been honest about our flaws. If I wait too long to ask, it might make him think I’ve been faking the whole time. And if I ask too soon, I could scare him off or make his performance anxiety worse! How do I know when the right time is? Half Full

Two friends can hook up with a girl or two girls from a bar and have a threesome or a foursome. But can two brothers—with opposite sexual preferences—hook up with a girl and a guy from a bar? Would this be considered wrong? No touching between siblings would occur. Basic Bros

I am a bisexual man and recently divorced my wife of 30 years. I am currently seeing a very beautiful lady. I satisfy my bisexual desires by going to sex clubs and I always practice safe. I don’t have an issue, I just wanted to tell you I remember one time when you had a column about two guys performing fellatio on another man at the same time. I found it to be such a

I’m having an extremely difficult time getting intimate with my boyfriend of four years. I’m in recovery for an eating disorder, and part of my treatment is Prozac. It’s working great and helping me make healthier choices. However, the Prozac is severely affecting my sex drive. I have little to no desire to have sex. And when we do have sex, I rarely orgasm. This is frustrating and, frankly, harmful to my recovery process. I’m already dealing with my shitty eating disorder telling me that I’m fat, ugly, and not good enough for anyone, anything, or even a decent meal. Now it’s taking sex away from me, too? I also feel terrible for my boyfriend, who is endlessly patient and understanding but wants to have sex. I’ve suggested opening up the relationship for his sake, but he doesn’t want to do that. I feel guilty and sad and frustrated. Any thoughts? Prozac Lover/Healer

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If the benefits of Prozac (helping you make better choices and aiding your recovery process) are canceled out by the side effects (leaving you so sexually frustrated, it’s harming your recovery process), PLH, you should talk to your doctor about other options— other drugs you could try or a lower dose of Prozac. If your doctor dismisses your concerns about the sexual side effects of the drug they’ve got you on, get a new doctor. I have only one concern about Donald Trump getting impeached: Do we get Mike Pence? Is he not just as bad? Or worse? On a more personal note: I don’t think I’ve gotten a good night’s sleep since Trump got elected. I wake up every morning next to an avid, Fox News–watching Trump supporter. I’m married long-term (35 years!) to a man who pulled a political one-eighty. This is about to make me crazy. Really. I’m not kidding. Do you have any suggestions for me? I don’t want to DTMFA. Although after a most nauseating discussion over dinner, I did actually give it some thought. Liberal Grandma

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Mike Pence, as awful as he is, oscillates within a predictable band of Republican awfulness. The reason no one is getting any sleep these days—not even folks who don’t wake up next to Trump supporters—is because no one can predict what Trump will do next. Not even Trump. That’s what makes his presidency such an existential nightmare. As for your husband, LG, your choices are binary and rather stark: Either you divorce his ass and spare yourself the grief of listening to his bullshit, or you stay put, learn to tune out his bullshit, and cancel out his vote in 2018 and 2020.

In this workshop we will focus on anal play for both men and women. Anal play can be extremely pleasurable when done correctly. But, there are many common mistakes people make when trying anal play at home that can cause pain or discomfort instead of pleasure. We will learn how to have the best experiences focusing on the pleasure of both partners. We will cover anal sex as well as anal toys and prostate play. Open to women and couples. Tickets are $15 each or $25 per couple when prepaid by 8/16/17. $25 per person at the door.

What’s the best dating site for a slightly cynical, tattooed, fortysomething woman looking for a guy? Tattooed Lady

THURS. SEPT. 7TH @ 7:15PM HOW TO GIVE A WORLD CL ASS BLOWJOB

It depends on the kind of guy you want. Closet case? ChristianMingle. Fuck boy? Tinder. Trump voter? Farmers Only. Compulsive masturbator? Craigslist. Unfuckable loser who is now and will always be a socially maladapted virgin? Return of Kings. On the Lovecast (savagelovecast.com), Dr. Samantha Joel on the psychology of ending relationships. Contact Dan via email at mail@savagelove.net, follow him on Twitter (@fakedansavage), and visit ITMFA.org.

THURS. AUG. 17TH @ 7:15PM BUTT BASICS: PLEASURABLE ANAL PL AY

In this workshop you will learn tips and techniques for amazing handjobs and blowjobs! Open to women only. This is our most popular workshop and always sells out, so register early!! Tickets are $20 each or bring a friend, 2 for $30 when prepaid by 9/5/17. IF space is available, $25 per person at the door.

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| ocweekly.com |

It would be considered wrong by some—but those people aren’t you, your brother, or the girl and guy you hope to pick up together. Personally, BB, I can barely get an erection if one of my siblings is in the same zip code; I can’t imagine getting one with a sibling in the same room. But if you’re comfortable doing opposite-sexual-preferencey things in close proximity to your brother, go for it.

Um, thanks for sharing?

August 1 8-24, 20 17

If you were talking about marriage after a month, HF, odds are good this relationship is doomed anyway. So go ahead and ask for dildo/extender/ strap-on action now. Don’t say, “Circling back to your subpar dick, darling, I’m gonna need some compensatory dildo action soon.” Instead say, “I’m into penetration toys, and I’m looking forward to getting into them with you—getting them into me, getting them into you. Anything you want to put on the menu, darling?”

» dan savage

SPECIALIZING IN ALL THINGS

| contents | the county | feature | calendar | food | film | culture | music | classifieds |

sex»

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| | contents

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» robert flores Bloom Disposable Vape Pen

hile vaping is not the first choice of most users of medical marijuana, the convenience of getting high W discreetly can’t be beat. I vape on my day off while running

around doing chores, a few hits here and there. This is where the Bloom disposable vape pen with Green Crack works perfectly. Green Crack is high-grade sativa and a direct descendant of the Skunk 1 strain, so you can either vape heavily to get stoned or just take it easy during the day, not get too high, but just enough to make the drudgery of washing clothes, grocery shopping or random housework fun, and hopefully you won’t forget to buy real food and not just junk! Ha! The vape pen itself is the second generation disposable made by Bloom, so they have improved the design and function. The pen is perfectly small and sleek, the THC is measured at about 70 percent, and each puff will deliver about 2.3 mg, giving you about 90 puffs per pen. Take about four to six puffs and you’ll develop a great buzz; keep puffing and you’ll end up eating that whole pizza and a pint of Ben & Jerry’s. I also use the Bloom pen before bedtime to help myself get to sleep; sativa doesn’t affect me like most, so I get very relaxed and slightly buzzed. I sleep well but wake up with the munchies! The Bloom disposable vape pen is a high-quality product inside and out. Available at 10 Spot Collective, 3242 S. Halladay St., Santa Ana, (800) 836-7768.

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German Shepard Rescues Looking For Homes! German Shepard Rescue of Orange County Visit CSROC.org or Donate Today

CASH DEAL- Panama Property for Sale Santa Catalina area of Panama. $200K 2.3 acres (10,000 ht). Under Market Value. #1 Surf Spot. 1/2 mile from the beach. Call Randall at 714-220-9100 for information

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The World Famous Body Electric Tattoo bodyelectrictattoo.com 323-95404 7274 1/2 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles

Free Meal! Buy One Meal Get 2nd Free! 99 Cent Tacos All Day Cancun Fresh 1801 Newport St. Fountain Valley | 714.427.0008

AMERICAʼS HOTTEST GAY CHATLINE!

Paciÿ c Wine & Food Classic August 19 & 20 100 Chef, Wine, Beer & Cocktail stations Newport Dunes, tix at PacificWineandFood.com

Costa Mesa Bead & Design Show - Aug 18-20 This show is for both makers and seekers of fine craft. It is open to the public -everyone welcome. Eliminate the middleman, buy direct from artisans and tradespeople who offer a diversity of products at excellent prices -including handcrafted jewelry, beads, gems, jewelry & craft supplies, art clothing, accessories and more. 275 artisan boutiques, galleries, and displays under one roof as well as 75 workshops offered daily. Hilton Costa Mesa / Orange County, 3050 Bristol St, Costa Mesa, CA, August 18-20, 10am to 6pm. www.beadanddesign.com

2017 California-Paciÿ c Triennial Exhibit OCMA - 25 Hours, 11 Countries Through Sept 3, Tix at OCMA.net

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| OCWEEKLY.COM |

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Free Code: OC Weekly

| CONTENTS | THE COUNTY | FEATURE | CALENDAR | FOOD | FILM | CULTURE | MUSIC | CLASSIFIEDS |

Utopia Massage

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| | contents county

| classifieds | music | culture | film | food | calendar | feature | the 18 - 24 , 2 017 A ugu st

| ocweekly.com | 38

o classifieds

2975 Red18475 Hill Avenue, Suite 150CIR, | Costa Mesa, CAVALLEY, 92626 | CA 714.550.5940 free online ads & |photos at oc.backpage.com BANDILIER FOUNTAIN 92708 | | 714-550-5941 OCWEEKLY.COM

CONDITIONS: All advertisements are published upon the representation by the advertiser and/or agency that the agency and advertiser are authorized to publish the entire contents and subject matter thereof, that the contents are not unlawful, and do not infringe on the rights of any person or entity and that the agency and advertiser have obtained all necessary permission and releases. Upon the OC Weekly’s request, the agent or advertiser will produce all necessary permission and releases. In consideration of the publication of advertisements, the advertiser and agency will indemnify and save the OC Weekly harmless from and against any loss or expenses arising out of publication of such advertisements. The publisher reserves the right to revise, reject or omit without notice any advertisement at any time. The OC Weekly accepts no liability for it’s failure, for any cause, to insert an advertisement. Publication and placement of advertisements are not guaranteed. Liability for any error appearing in an advertisement is limited to the cost of the space actually occupied. No allowance, however, will be granted for an error that does not materially affect the value of an advertisement. To qualify for an adjustment, any error must be reported within 15 days of publication date. Credit for errors is limited to first insertion. Drawings, artwork and articles for reproduction are accepted only at the advertiser’s risk and should be clearly marked to facilitate their return. The OC Weekly reserves the right to revise its advertising rates at any time. Announcements of an increase shall be made four weeks in advance to contract advertisers. No verbal agreement altering the rates and/or the terms of this rate card shall be recognized.

Employment

Employment

Employment

195 Position Wanted

195 Position Wanted

MSA Worldwide LLC, General Monitors Division, Lake Forest, CA seeks Software Engineer II to be responsible for dsgn & dvlpmt of algorithms & firmware for computer based & embedded prototypes that will be used in research & dsgn of microcontroller based fire & gas detection systm. Specific job duties incl: (i) dsgn’g & dvlp’g signal processing & algorithms in conjunction w/ hardware prototype dvlp’g for microcontroller based fire & gas detection systm; (ii) creating scientific dsgn concepts & implmnt’g them in firmware; (iii) creating firmware specifications & test plans; (iv) dvlp’g & maintaining accurate algorithm test plans; (v) collaborating w/scientists & engineers on algorithm & firmware dvlpmt; (vi) performing hardware/firmware integration; & (vii) ensuring that technical firmware documentation is developed per internal (MSA) & external (agencies, customers, etc.) requirements. Must hold a Master’s degree in Electrical, Software or Computer Engineering. Must know (through academic training or work experience) Digital Signal Processing & microprocessors; mathematical algorithms, signal processing & embedded systm dsgn; Matlab, C; fuzzy logic, wavelets, & artificial neural network modeling. 40 hrs/wk. Submit resume by mail to MSA Worldwide LLC, Talent Management, 26776 Simpatica Circle, Lake Forest, CA 92630. Refer to “Software Engineer II”

IT Project Manager (Tustin, CA) Plan, initiate, and manage information technology projects. Bachelor's in Computer/Electronics Engineering related. Resume to: Woongjin, Inc. 335 Centennial Way #200, Tustin, CA 92780

Microchip Technology seeks a Sftwr Engr (Code:SE-MO) in Lakeforest, CA: Dvlp Microchip’s proprietary wireless technologies & solutions. Reqs BS+2 yrs rltd exp. Mail resume to Silicon Valley HR, 450 Holger Way, San Jose, CA 95134. Reference job title & code.

Acupuncturist (Anaheim, CA) Diagnose patient's condition based on symptoms & medical history to formulate effective oriental medicine treat plans; Insert very fine needles into acupuncture points on body surface and maintain related care; Apply herbal treatment, acupressure & other therapy for patient's specific needs such as back, neck, shoulder, knee pains, headaches, etc. 40hrs/wk. Master's in Acupuncture or Oriental Medicine, Acupuncturist License in CA Reqd. Resume to Unity Acupuncture Health Clinic Attn: In Chul Song, 5557 E Santa Ana Canyon Rd, Anaheim, CA 92807

Cook, and Cashier/Waitress Wanted - Cancun Fresh Mexican Grill in Fountain Valley, is seeking to fill several positions, including cooks, and cashier/waitress. Restaurant experience is preferred. Please call (714) 427-0008 and ask for Javier or send any inquiries to CancunFresh@gmail.com 18010 Newhope St., Suite C Fountain Valley Ca, 92708

Part Time Drivers wanted for Cochella Valley. Commission + tips with guarantee of $12.00 per hour minimum. Must use your own vehicle Please send contact information, with Picture of Drivers License to Wes@Pureandnaturaltherapy.com

SAP Business Analyst CAFM, RE-FX sought by Applied Medical Resources Corporation, a medical device dvlpr & mftr for new CAFM, RE-FX initiatives & enhancements (dsgn prototype, implmtn, test, post go-live support). Bach's deg in MIS, Engr Mgmt, Industrial Eng, BIS or related w/ 3 yrs exp. Job loc: Rancho Santa Margarita, CA. E-mail resume to SAPCAREER @appliedmedical.com.

National Sales Director in Newport Beach, CA. Occasional travel within U.S. 1 or 2 times per mo. Please apply in writing to: Black & Peach Retail, LLC Attn: Luis Sandoval (#NSD8117) 500 Newport Center Drive, Suite 920 Newport Beach, CA 92660

SALES National Sales Director in Newport Beach, CA. Occasional travel within U.S. 1 or 2 times per mo. Please apply in writing to: Black & Peach Retail, LLC Attn: Luis Sandoval (#NSD8117) 500 Newport Center Drive, Suite 920 Newport Beach, CA 92660

Religious Education Director (Anaheim, CA) Plan, direct and coordinate church education programs and activities. Master's in Education req'd. Resume to: Purely Evangelical Church. 2101 W Crescent Ave #F, Anaheim, CA 92801

RF Engineer Costa Mesa CA Mobilitie Mgmt, LLC; RF design & optimization of LTE Macro, Small Cells, CDMA & LTE networks; requires MA in Elec Eng, familiarity w/RF design, Wind Catcher, Actix Analyzer and TEMS. Send resume to lara@mobilitie.com

195 Position Wanted

Sales Engineer: Oversee product dev’t process & perform final product inspec to identify tech issues b/f product launch; prepare sales eng reports, etc. Req: BS in Polymer Science & Eng; must have taken “Polymerization Chemistry” & “Polymerization Reaction Engineering” courses. Send resume to:MMD Int’l, Inc. Attn: Woo Suh. 2500 W. Orangethorpe Ave. # 122 Fullerton, CA 92833

PCB Design Engr (Job code: PDE-SB) Design & layout complex, multi-layer PCBs using Altium 16. Reqs BS+2yrs exp. Mail resumes to Boundary Devices, Attn: HR, 21072 Bake Pkwy, Ste 100, Lake Forest, CA 92630. Must ref job title & code

Sr. SAP MM Consultant, MS deg. in CIS, IT, MIS or related & 1 yr exp. Exp. in Supply Chain Optimization. Skills: SAP MM, Tableau Reporting & Analysis ,VBA, SQL, MS Visio, Six Sigma Methodology. Travel &/or reloc. throughout the US req'd. Mail resume to Morris & Willner Partners, Inc., 201 Sandpointe Ave, Ste. 200, Santa Ana, CA, 92707 Restaurant General Mgr: Responsible for managing overall day-to-day operation & supervision of entire staff, ensure high level of customer satisfaction, etc. Req:BS in Hospitality Mgmt; must have taken “Hospitality Mktg Mgmt” and “Hospitality Industry Managerial Accounting” courses. Send resume to:Two Two Fried Chicken, Inc.Attn: James Ha 1707 E. Del Amo Blvd. Carson, CA 90746

Employment

Employment

195 Position Wanted

195 Position Wanted

MVP Technologies, LLC seeks SAP BW/BI Consultant (MVPSAP17) with Master’s 1yr/ Bachelor’s +5yrs exp/equiv. SAP BW/BI, ABAP, BEX, HANA. Mail resumes to: HR, 9277 Research Drive, Irvine, CA 92618. Travel to unanticipated work sites throughout U.S. Foreign equiv. accepted.

Application Engineer for Rohde & Schwarz in Irvine, CA. Using your experience with Linux, TCL/Expect, Python, SIP,RTP, IMS, LTE, UMTS, GSM, GPRS, VoLTE, GTPCv2, DIAMETER, TCP, UDP, OFDMA, QXDM tool & with end-to-end system testing & development of automation framework for system & protocol stack, will support customer issues ; review standards 3GPP docs for tech issue resolution; develop VoLTE/WIFI test cases in TTCN-3 language & provide pre/post-sales support & customer demonstrations. Bachelor’s in Electrical & Electronics Engineering & 5 yrs of experience req’d. Resume to Melissa.Goldman @rsa.rohde-schwarz.com. No Calls.

Systems Analyst: Apply by mail only to More2hr, Inc., 111 Oasis, Irvine, CA 92620, attn. President.

Simulation Engineer: 3 yrs wk exp req’d. Send resumes to: Eon Reality, Inc., 39 Parker, Irvine, CA 92618, Attn: M. Johansson.

MULTI-CHANNEL ADVERTISING, MARKET RESEARCH ANALYST: Research market conditions in online multi-channel ad services. Establish methodology, design format for data gathering. Gather, analyze data in the industry. Study effectiveness of ad services using pay-per-click, keywords, lead acquisition, search engine optimization, Web analytic tools. Forecast marketing trends, develop marketing methods, strategies. Mail resume to President, DoCircle, Inc. 2544 W. Woodland Drive, Anaheim, CA 92801.

DIGITAL SURVEILLANCE DEVICES, MARKET RESEARCH ANALYST: Determine method, gather data to forecast demand & trends. Examine, analyze data to develop sales & marketing strategies. Present findings using computers. Mail resume to President, Topnos, Inc. 29762 Vista Terrance, Lake Forest, CA 92630.

Mechanical Engineer: F/T. Masters Degree in Mechanical Engineering, Resume to: Bi-Search International, Inc. 17750 Gillette Ave. Irvine, CA 92614.

Sr. Auditor: conduct audit, review & prepare reports; BA/BS in accounting; 40hrs/ wk; Apply to Hall & Company CPAs and Consultants, Inc. Attn: HR, 111 Pacifica, Ste. 300, Irvine, CA 92618.

Computer Systems Engineer (Tustin, CA) Design and develop operational support systems for computer systems. Bachelor's in Computer/Software Engineering related. Resume to: WoongjinInc. 335 Centennial Way #200, Tustin, CA 92780

Group Delta Consultants, Inc. in Irvine, CA seeks a Staff Engr. to communicate w/clients re: plans & changes in designs /parameters of projects. Mail resumes referencing job title to: GDC HR, 32 Mauchly, Irvine, CA 92618 Principals only. EOE.

Market Research Analyst: Apply by mail to Uniti Insurance Services LLC, 8942 Garden Grove Bl., #216, Garden Grove, CA 92844, attn. President

Marine Engineer (Anaheim, CA) Perform marine engineering services for ships and vessels. Bachelor's in Industrial/Marine Engineering. Resume to: Kormarine Services, LLC. 312 W. Summerfield Cir. Anaheim, CA 92802

Acupuncturist, Bonwellness Clinic Inc, M.S. & CA Acupuncture license req’d. Send resume to 7212 Orangethorpe Ave. #6, Buena Park, CA 90621

Employment 195 Position Wanted Student Advisor: Prvd. full range of student services e.g. academic advisement & admin. services. Req’d: MBA or MA/MS in Organizational Leadership, or related. Mail resume: Stanton University 9618 Garden Grove Blvd. #201 Garden Grove, CA 92844

Accountant M.S. in Accountancy & 1 yr wk exp req’d. Send resumes to: Quon & Associates, Inc., 1432 Edinger Ave. Ste. 120, Tustin, CA 92780, Attn: W. Quon.

Assistant Manager (Buena Park, CA) Maintain databases of logistics information; Provide ongoing analyses in areas such as transportation costs, parts procurement, back orders, and delivery processes; Prepare reports on logistics performance measures. 40hrs/wk, Bachelor in Administration or related req’d. Resume to Sureung America Inc. Attn: Dong H KO, 6281 Beach Blvd Ste 318, Buena Park, CA 90621

Mechanical Engineer (Fountain Valley, CA) Apply engg skills to dsgn, fabricate, & test aircraft components. Implmt structure analysis & perform reverse engg. Dvlp cost effective mechanical dsgns & dvlp, evaluate & improve processes to ensure manufacturing specifications. Analyze processing methods to test efficacy of existing or new processes, & improve the process by applying Lean Manufacturing, Six Sigma & Project Mgmt tools. Work with CAD, Mastercam prgmg software, Catia, & Solidworks software. Reqmts are: Master's Deg in Mechanical Engg, Manufacturing Engg, Manufacturing & Systems Engg Mgmt, Aerospace Engg, or closely related plus 24 mos of exp in job offd, or as Manufacturing Engr, Process & Method Engr, Aerospace Engr or closely related. Mail resume to: Falcon Aerospace, Inc., Attn: S. Yilmaz, President, 11609 Martens River Circle, Fountain Valley, CA 92708.

Develop IT solutions for bus. sys.; MS in CIS or equiv., or BS or equiv. + 5 yrs exp. in CIS reqíd; Send resume to Solomon America, Inc. 17151 Newhope St., # 201, Fountain Valley, CA 92708

Stew Miller Painting: Painter Specialize in quality painting projects; interior and exterior painting. Apply coats of paint, enamel, varnish, or lacquer to residential and commercial structures. Must read painting order from supervisor and choose previously mixed paints. Usage of scraper, blowtorch, wire brush, paint remover, putty knife, caulking and spray gun, paint rollers and brushes is necessary. 2yrs experience required. Submit resumes to: 27102 Huerta, Mission Viejo Ca 92692

530 Misc. Services WANTS TO purchase minerals and other oil & gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557, Denver, Co 80201

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DELIVERY Organic OC: FREE WEED!! FTP - DOGO 1/8's of flower or Gram of Concentrate. Delivery for the Conscious Connoissuer! All Organic, Lab Tested Flowers! 60 Minutes or Less 949-705-6853 OrganicOC.org

Part Time Drivers wanted for Cochella Valley: Commission + tips with guarantee of $12.00 per hour minimum. Must use your own vehicle Please send contact information, with Picture of Drivers License to Wes@Pureandnaturaltherapy.com

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VERITY HOLISTICS CENTER: Renewals $25 / New Patient - $35 657.251.8032 / 1540 E Edinger Ste. D Santa Ana CA 92705 6833 Indiana Ste. #102, Riverside CA 92506

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August 18, 2017 – OC Weekly