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THEY TAUGHT DISNEY HOW TO HULA | THE BEST NEW KOREAN FRIED CHICKEN | MOXLEY ON THE BEAT, PART XXXIV MARCH 24-30, 2017 | VOLUME 22 | NUMBER 30

IS THIS ENOUGH PROOF OF RESIDENCY? | OCWEEKLY.COM

The Battle to

Save Ferris

vived the ban d that made e r s a h l l e w o P e u Moniq _ r e y v o e n t e o n is happy t u b s u o m a f her


COUNTY COUNTY | CLASSIFIEDS | MUSIC | CULTURE | FILM | FOOD | CALENDAR | FEATURE | THE | CONTENTS | | | CLASSIFIEDS | MUSIC | CULTURE | FILM | FOOD | CALENDAR | FEATURE | THE | CONTENTS

inside » 03/24-03/30 » 2017 VOLUME 22 | NUMBER 30 » OCWEEKLY.COM

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up front

The County

06 | MOXLEY CONFIDENTIAL |

Federal judge Andrew Guilford wants an important First Amendment media case settled in a trial. By R. Scott Moxley 08 | ¡ASK A MEXICAN! | What’s harder to learn: English or Spanish? By Gustavo Arellano 08 | HEY, YOU! | Dear 51/50 roommate . . . By Anonymous

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Calendar

17 | EVENTS | Things to do while

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Food

20 | REVIEW | OC welcomes the newest batch of Korean fried-chicken restaurants. By Edwin Goei 20 | HOLE IN THE WALL | A call to action on SanTana’s war on taco trucks. By Gustavo Arellano 21 | EAT THIS NOW | Chorizo omelet at Cafe Cup. By Gustavo Arellano 21 | DRINK OF THE WEEK |

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Music

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31 | CONCERT GUIDE 32 | SAVAGE LOVE | By Dan Savage 38 | TOKE OF THE WEEK | The

Aficionado Box by Aventura Organics. By Mary Carreon

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The Questioner Federal judge Andrew Guilford wants an important First Amendment media case settled at a trial

F

or folks who appreciate real-life legal dramas, an underrated theater sits, fittingly, on Orange County’s highest manmade perch: the Ronald Reagan Federal Courthouse. The edifice cost more than $123 million to build 18 years ago in Santa Ana, but it’s free to enter for weekday events after passing security scrutiny. It offers sweeping Pacific Ocean views, wood fixtures that will remain elegant for the next century, confidential and—at the insistence of political conservatives, who launched the congressionally backed project— marble imported at taxpayer expense r scott from Tivoli, Italy, moxley quarries prized by Roman emperors. And in 10C—the building’s top, easterncorner courtroom—U.S. District Court Judge Andrew J. Guilford presides over an assortment of civil and criminal cases ranging from explosive to amusing to insane or mundane. More than his four, presidentially appointed colleagues in this courthouse, Guilford relishes probing the legal acumen of those who appear before him with a bar card. Feel free to call him the Questioner. When lawyers engage Guilford in legal minutia by pondering a case from all angles, he doesn’t hide his delight. When he hears ineffective arguments, he’ll play judicial chess master by suggesting fresh alternatives. In short, he loves the mental back-and-forth that’s present when the legal system functions properly. What Guilford doesn’t appreciate is disrespect. I’ve observed his displeasure in past years after lawyers challenged his impartiality. He’s a UCLA sports enthusiast, and fans aren’t typically meek. Just ask Rachel E. Matteo-Boehm, a San Francisco-based attorney. At a March 20 hearing, Matteo-Boehm grew visibly tired of fielding a steady stream of the judge’s probing questions about her client’s activities and made a quip that he’d already taken sides. “No, no, no,” a thundering Guilford interrupted. “I resent that. I’m coming to this with an open mind.” Though she quickly apologized and knows she’s perhaps in the underdog role, Matteo-Boehm wants the judge to grant her client, Courthouse News Service (CNS), a temporary injunction against David Yamasaki, executive officer/clerk

moxley

» .

of the Orange County Superior Court. The dispute, festering for years, centers on court bureaucrats routinely blocking the news outlet’s inspection of newly filed major litigation briefs for as long as weeks. CNS contends the delays are not only administratively unnecessary, but they also violate the First Amendment right to timely access to legal complaints. Its January lawsuit reported that during the last three months of 2016, for example, nearly half of 3,225 civil unlimited filings were “withheld from the press and public for at least one and up to nine days after the court received them.” Matteo-Boehm cited three examples of how the public is needlessly left in dark about important allegations contained in lawsuits: • A former NFL player complained about vulnerabilities in a mental-health clinic’s online computer files on patients; one-week delay. • Consumers confronted a national manufacturer of wet wipes for using ingredients potentially harmful to infants; four-day delay. • San Juan Capistrano residents alleged that city officials ran a crooked water billing operation; three-day delay. While other jurisdictions—including ones in California, New York and Texas—reformed practices to end the delays, OC officials strenuously resist. They don’t believe First Amendment law requires any policy change. In fact, Yamasaki and Deborah T. Kruse, deputy court operations manager, deny the premise of CNS’s lawsuit. Kruse informed Guilford under penalty of perjury that her records show that on March 1 and 2—a month and a half into the lawsuit—the office “received, reviewed and made available to the public” 98.2 of all electronically filed civil unlimited complaints within eight business hours. “CNS once again attempts to manipulate these statistics in order to make delays seem worse than they are,” Kruse wrote. From her side, Matteo-Boehm insists her investigation of Kruse’s numbers proves they were doctored and, left unchallenged, “may leave [Guilford] with the wrong impression.” Whatever the truth, court officials aren’t taking any chances, especially given CNS’s three victories in similar cases elsewhere. They hired Robert A. Naeve at the expensive Jones Day law firm that unsuccessfully represented sheriff-turnedconvicted-felon Mike Carona, a lawman Guilford sent to prison for 66 months. Naeve told the judge that records-room

RONALD REAGAN FEDERAL COURTHOUSE

R. SCOTT MOXLEY

employees shouldn’t have “to drop everything to handle an access request,” are doing a “more than adequate” disclosure job and that CNS has “fundamentally misunderstood” the government’s right to keep records temporarily sealed. According to him, the constitutionally protected imperative for journalists is “to monitor what a court does” administratively rather than inform the public about the launch of “newsworthy” legal complaints. “It’s a critical point,” Naeve said about a notion that’s news to me—and I’ve covered courthouses in multiple jurisdictions for a quarter of a century. If Yamasaki is right, the delays in disclosure aren’t due to bureaucratic whim, but rather the need for his staff to redact confidential information—the names of children and the identities of sex-crimes victims, for example—from filings. On behalf of the Orange County Bar Association, Family Violence Appellate Project, Legal Aid Society of Orange County and Veterans Legal Institute, Haynes and Boone attorney Mary-Christine Sungaila this month filed a supportive amicus curiae brief. “If [court clerks are] not allowed

to ensure compliance with confidentiality statutes and rules of court before releasing complaints to the public, then legally protected private information might be released to the public,” Sungaila opined. “Such revelations would be particularly serious if the private information is then electronically published by the media to a large audience.” Guilford acknowledged his appreciation for the input, announced his obligation to apply appropriate “balancing tests” of competing interests and suggested his preferred method of ultimately resolving the dispute. “Why not quickly get to a trial?” he asked. “The Fourth Estate is extremely important to the country, and newspapers are under attack.” Given that neither attorney appeared anxious for a speedy trial, we’ll wait for developments as the judge contemplates an injunction. RSCOTTMOXLEY@OCWEEKLY.COM

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From The Inside Out

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¡ask a mexican!»

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» gustavo arellano DEAR MEXICAN: The sentiment among most U.S. citizens is that new Mexican arrivals in the USA should immediately learn to speak English (the least that they could do). How easy would that be for the Mexicans? Would it be easier for us to learn to speak Spanish? Are there more Spanish words than English words? Is it fair to even ask that question? Tongue-Tied Gringo DEAR GABACHO: All’s fair in love and etymology, son! Gabachos don’t realize how pinche hard it is to learn how to speak English. The Oxford English Dictionary currently has 171,476 words in its Second Edition that it categorizes as “current use” (and this is not including tenses and obsolete words), while the Real Academia Española estimates about 100,000. That said, Mexicans do learn how to speak English, if slowly: A 2016 study by the Migration Policy Institute (MPI) showed 69 percent of Mexican immigrants “reported limited English proficiency [LEP], compared to 50 percent of all immigrants.” That might seem high, but compare that to another immigrant group that came from similar poverty: Vietnamese. The MPI showed 67 percent of Vietnamese report LEP, but I don’t hear people freaking out about them. Maybe because they historically voted Republican? DEAR MEXICAN: The other day, I witnessed a young gordita retrieve a bag of Fritos, open it, then walk over to the chili station and pump in two steaming piles of 7-Eleven chili into the bag. At that point, the Frita Bandita then shook the bag and started comer those nasty, now-hot, chili-soaked Fritos. Needless to say, I was appalled. And enfermo. Why not just buy a bag of Chili Cheese Fritos? Do most Mexicans shamelessly mangle foodstuffs like this? What other foul comida are Mexicans shoving past their mustaches? Señor Roast

Heyyou!

» anonymous

DEAR GABACHO: You mean chili billies? The first time I had chili ladled over Fritos or tortilla chips was at Sage Park in Anaheim during my time riding the bench for the La Palma Little League Senior Minor division. Gabachos went crazy for the dish; we Mexicans shrugged, bought a bag of Fritos and drowned it in Tapatío. Twenty-five years later, we pour Tapatío on Tapatío-flavored Doritos—and? Spare me your mock shock: The most famous dishes buried under chili, the Coney Island dog and Cincinatti chili five-way (spaghetti, chili, cheese, onions and beans), are favorites of poor gabachos in the South and Midwest. They’re great dishes and fulfill the working-class dream of filling your gut for cheap and offending precious pendejos such as yourself. DEAR MEXICAN: Years ago, in response to some political bullshit heaved by Shrubya and his ignoble Cabal of Curs, I remember seeing long lines of people outside Mexican consular offices waiting to get a Matricula Consular card. I know matricula means “enrollment,” but what exactly was the purpose of the cards? And why was it so important that people would stand in line all day to get one? P.S. #fucktrump. Gringo Wants to Play Bingo DEAR GABACHO: All those cards do is serve as a form of ID for undocumented folks that allow them to do everything from open bank accounts to buy alcohol at clubs to apply for a driver’s license in certain states. Know Nothings, of course, take the document as further proof Mexico is trying to Reconquista the United States, which is kinda like realizing you’re on fire only when the flames expose your ulna. ASK THE MEXICAN at themexican@askamexican.net, be his fan on Facebook, follow him on Twitter, or ask him a video question at youtube.com/askamexicano!

BOB AUL

Get Out!

Y

ou are the underhanded, backstabbing, bottom-dwelling bitch who I used to think was my friend. When you first came to my apartment with your bags in tow, I was already living with a man—not one I was in love with, but nonetheless, I was sharing his bed. I told you point-blank, “I hope you’re not doing anything to jeopardize our friendship.” You replied, “Like what?” Well, after almost a year with him, I’ve moved, been gone three weeks after your 51/50 ass moved in, and you have the nerve to still be there. GET OUT, BITCH. That is, while you still can. You never know what the future holds for you if you don’t. But here’s a newsflash, I do. And soon you will, too!

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The Battle to Save F _ but not everyone is happy s famou her made that band the d revive has l l Powe Monique By Daniel Kohn


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ve Ferris

| the county

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» CONTINUED ON PAGE 12

|

JOHN GILHOOLEY

erative spinal condition, left untreated because of a lack of health insurance, wrecked her body. Although three doctors advised against it (“You could sing, or you could walk, and you may not be walking in six years,” they told her), she finally underwent risky surgery in 2013, then dramatically announced to the world that Save Ferris was returning. “If I came out of it alive and able to walk and able to sing, I was going to bring Save Ferris back,” Powell says defiantly. “I relearned how to walk and literally had to learn how to hold my head up again. It’s still work every day, but that was why I brought it back.” Kind of. A much-ballyhooed, sold-out show at the Pacific Amphitheatre during the Orange County Fair billed as a reunion only included Powell. She claims she contacted former members in advance; they say she didn’t. They sued her over the right to use the name; she responded with a countersuit. Litigation kept Powell and her estranged band mates in limbo over who owned Save Ferris—not just the music or name, but the future of the group itself. “It wasn’t my intention to ever move forward without the guys,” she says. “Unfortunately, that’s how it ended up. I had no control over that. But it’s in the past now, and I don’t think about it anymore.” After more than two years of legal hell—which became fodder for gossip sites such as TMZ and Perez Hilton— Powell won the rights to the band’s name, brand and social-media pages, and she also saw her name credited on some of the older songs. But to this day, she remains loathed by many in the ska community, from former friends and fans to a new generation who wasn’t even born when Save Ferris was ripping through Side By Side in Huntington Beach, the Barn in Riverside, the Glass House in Pomona and anywhere where two-tones could hop. They’ve deemed her a Judas, a Jezebel—and worse. There were even Tumblr pages such as Fake Ferris created to troll as nastily as possible. Powell is past that, she says, and is instead focusing her energies on the new album, Checkered Past, and a March 26

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sn’t the view great?!” Monique Powell quips, her pogo stick-esque persona masking fatigue. It’s late in the afternoon, and the Save Ferris singer sits at an outdoor table at Encino’s Lakeside Restaurant & Lounge along with her bassist, Gordon Bash, and manager, Chris Trovero. Ducks squawk just a few feet away, angrily demanding snacks from a family of tourists. Clad in an all-black ensemble, Powell has sat shiva for about a week following her father’s Jan. 9 death. She cuts a much more diminutive character these days than during Save Ferris’ late-1990s reign, when the big-voiced gal dominated stages in Southern California with the verve of a Shag princess and the elegance of a chanteuse. The band members are in the middle of promoting their first new EP in more than a decade. In a few days, the video for “New Sound,” shot at her house, would get shared online. Powell shares that she’s nervous about the release when loud string music suddenly screeches through the restaurant. What was normal chitchat turns into a shoutfest better-suited to the Doll Hut. “It’s like the world doesn’t want us all to talk,” Powell slyly remarks. Many ska fans wholeheartedly endorse that thought. Save Ferris was never the biggest combo, but they remain one of the most beloved. From selling their fivesong 1996 EP, Introducing Save Ferris, out of car trunks after magnetic live shows to getting signed to Epic Records, they epitomized the giddy heyday of the 1990s Orange County sound. Their remake of Dexys Midnight Runners’ “Come On Eileen” cemented the pink-haired, zaftig Powell as the Next Big Thing; they scored a cameo in 10 Things I Hate About You and had songs licensed for everything from Mark Wahlberg’s The Big Hit to 7th Heaven. But the years of kinetic performances, grueling tours and band in-fighting wore Save Ferris out. In 2003, guitarist/lead writer Brian Mashburn, saxophonist Eric Zamora and bassist Bill Uechi left to form their own group, and Powell wandered from project to project while a degen-

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show at the new House of Blues in Anaheim. But the memory of the battle to bring back Save Ferris still stings. Terms of the agreement (signed by Mashburn, Zamora, Uechi, trombonist Brian Williams and drummer Evan Kilbourne) prevent Powell from commenting beyond what’s publicly known. Multiple emails and Facebook messages to Starpool (the current band of Mashburn, Zamora and Uechi), Starpool’s management and Mashburn weren’t returned. “They were my best friends,” Powell quietly says about the former Save 11:36 PM Ferris lineup. After a brief pause, she continues, “Touring with the old band members was so much fucking fun. It was a blast. But it was a dysfunctional relationship.”

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t wasn’t supposed to be this way. Save Ferris was peppy, positive and immediately nostalgic, and their songs still stick. “Come On Eileen” is what they’ll play at 20-year high-school reunions across Orange County this fall to get everyone on the dance floor instead of “Just a Girl” or “Pretty Fly (For a White Guy).” Their music wasn’t as ska/punk as third-wave peers Reel Big Fish and the Aquabats, instead fusing genres including jazz in a straightforward fashion that leaned more toward melodic rock. And the anchor was Powell. If Gwen Stefani was cool and calculated, Powell was unabashed glee, from her leopardprint tops to her go-go hair. After Kat Corbett played “New Sound” on JOHN GILHOOLEY

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The Battle to Save Ferris » FROM PAGE 11

KROQ’s Locals Only program last month, Kevin and Bean remarked how it was great to have them back. In December, Bean named Save Ferris’ “Christmas Wrapping” as one of his favorite Christmas songs, adding, “I miss this band! Come back, Monique!” Orange County outgrew third-wave ska, though, and Save Ferris split long after the fad was over. But Powell forged on, selffinancing one final tour titled “For the Fans” in 2003, which culminated with an appearance at Ska Summit in Las Vegas that the band’s press release says inspired a “thunderously positive response” from concertgoers. Powell went on to cameo on records by the Used, Hilary Duff and Goldfinger and formed the Mojo Wire with guitarist Patrick Ferguson in 2007, which lasted less than a year. She also took music classes and performed in small musical-theater productions that she says “was nothing to write home about. “All the years I took off from Save Ferris, I never forgot the band,” she says. “I always felt like there was something unfinished, like our fans deserved something more. I never forgot about them. So bringing the band back was [something] I naturally felt like I needed to do.” The new lineup started thanks to a 2012 wedding attended by Powell and Bash. She was handling the music for the reception and asked a keyboardist she knew, Alex Burke, to join her. He recommended Bash to help fill out the lineup. The bassist so impressed her that she told him about a project she was working on: reviving Save Ferris. “I knew who Save Ferris were from growing up in LA,” says Ferguson, whom Powell also asked to audition. “I’ve always been a punk rocker, and when the third wave of ska thing came out, I was into all those bands also. It was hard, with punk and

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The Battle to Save Ferris » FROM PAGE 12 those ska bands being on the same bill, not to get into that music.” He isn’t worried about any fan backlash. “I wasn’t looking to come in and fill Brian [Mashburn]’s shoes. It’s tough when there’s controversy, and it’s tough when there are people out there who are actively trying to throw shade on it. Mo is my friend, and even if I was just a hired gun, I wouldn’t really care too much. At the end of the day, I get up there and listen to her just belt.” Ferguson, Burke, Bash and others joined Powell at the 2013 Pacific Ampitheatre show to rave reviews. But even before the performance, Save Ferris fans hit them hard. Ska Joe wrote on Facebook, “I really hope this knock off [sic] band looses [sic] the court case and gets sued by the actual Save Ferris.” Another wrote, “Monique is a crazy bitch . . . That is all.” Things got so heated that Save Ferris had 15 people overseeing its Facebook page, with Powell serving as the overall administrator and sometimes joining in the fracas. “I was involved at the time in it,” she admits. “But most important to me at that time was writing songs because I really don’t like social media because of the level of narcissism that you have [to] embody on it. It’s not fun for me. “The problem is, as a musician, this is my business,” Powell adds. “My Facebook, Instagram and web page is my place of business, and people were disparaging my business. I reserve the right to refuse anyone. Since everyone has a right to their opinion, we left those comments up for a week or two and took them down.” She tried to rebuild the band, but the lawsuit put Powell in a cash crunch. To help jumpstart the effort, Powell organized a Pledge Music campaign in November 2015 to raise funds for an EP in August 2016. The effort reminded her of the early years with Save Ferris, when she managed and booked shows, days she describes as the “happiest of my life.” Doing it all again proved more arduous this time. “Being back at this and restarting and trying to find a manager again at almost 40 years old—and find people who would take me seriously—wasn’t easy,” she says. “Everything finally changed when we got management. I was like, ‘Now we could finally do this.’” But even the Pledge Music campaign became a battleground. Fan Pascal De Maria questioned the structure and legitimacy of the band. “How do we know if the music is worth any money?” he asked in a comment. “We’ve never heard this band before; we’ve only heard Monique’s voice when she was in another band by the same name.” “We see that you’re from Orange County and a complete misogynist, that’s why,” someone with access to the Save Ferris Pledge Music account replied. “Why don’t you ask the same of Reel Big Fish (one of your favs) or any other male

front [sic] bands without the same, exact bands as the beginning? Hope you’ll donate now, since your question has been answered, dick.” De Maria says he has no regrets about his critique. “If she said, ‘Monique Powell is back, and Monique Powell is playing Save Ferris songs,’ no one would care,” he explains. “But it’s not really Save Ferris. To bill it as Save Ferris is disingenuous.”

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he rancor on the band’s social-media platforms has simmered down. Fans had to decide whether to support Powell’s new version of Save Ferris or move on with Starpool. “It’s almost like it’s James Bond,” Bash says. “The Bond brand is still James Bond. You’ll still go to see that movie. Save Ferris is still Save Ferris. You might change the actor, but it’s still Bond. Sure, the music is still nostalgic, but it still moves into the future.” Powell was terrified no one would support the Pledge Music campaign; instead, it surpassed its original $10,000 goal by 176 percent. “It’s hard enough to start a business, let alone a band with no capital,” she says. Funding solved, she moved on to another problem: The lengthy lawsuit sapped Powell’s mental energy. Writing didn’t flow as naturally as it did during her younger years. Having previously written from a performance perspective rather than honing a studio-crafted sound, she couldn’t quite replicate those old bursts of energy into new material. “When I first started writing for this album, I felt so depleted emotionally and creatively,” she recalls. “I was so lost, had no idea where to start and had no fucking idea if I’d bounce back from all this. I felt so insecure on many levels. I was in a victim’s place at the time. I felt like I had been beat down completely, and all of that changed over the next two years because of my band mates.” Powell and former saxophone player Joe Berry began writing new songs once a week over lunch. The new Save Ferris then took a retreat near Lake Arrowhead for 10 days to write and work on song ideas. “I like collaborating with people when we write,” Powell says. “I loved writing with Brian, because he’s a great writer. Besides sussing out material, highlights also included Bash noodling around with a ukulele with his foot and a run-in with a pesky raccoon that almost sabotaged everything. “It was running around outside at 2 in the morning,” Powell says with a wry grin. “We were all up drinking and thought someone was trying to break in. We peeked through the blinds, and the raccoon went up to the window and made a face like [the gopher in] Caddyshack. We made sure not to open the door at night again.” Bash remembers sessions in the rustic house for a different reason. “My car made it up the mountain. I got out, they opened the door, I walked over and said,


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if Powell is the only remaining member from the glory years. In 2016, the band played a sold-out show at the Echo in Los Angeles, headlined at the Santa Monica Pier, performed at ska festivals in Mexico City and Indonesia, and even opened for Stefani (“We joked how we never managed to meet each other after all these

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PHOTO COURTESY OF #SKAPARADE

ris legacy while moving it forward. “There was a lot of preparation that went into [the album] and education, and you’re just trying to figure out the direction I wanted to go in and I thought the fans would like,” she explains as she takes another sip of coffee. “And also what’s going to be relevant, if that’s even possi-

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SAVE FERRIS LIVE, NOVEMBER 1996

years,” Powell quipped) at the final Irvine Meadows shows. “I saw that line at the Echo that went around the corner, and it was like, ‘Are they here to see us?’” she says. “It was a really nice way to get started again.” “It’s so different playing there versus Mexico City and Indonesia,” Bash adds. “It’s hot and sweaty, and you can see every face there. Playing those huge shows to more than 30,000 people was incredible. But we’re just excited to get to do these more intimate shows to start things out.” The band’s first extensive tour as a unit has met with mixed reviews. The Sun-Sentinel wrote, “The band seemed genuinely happy to be back on the stage. It’s clear that Save Ferris still has what it takes.” PopMatters disagreed, stating, “The pop was lacking” at the band’s New York City gig. But Powell is happy. She’s moved on from the naysayers and negativity, preferring to look at what she’s accomplished since reviving Save Ferris. And coming home to where it all began is validation for everything. “A year ago, I was doing this all by myself,” she says. “I was managing the band, doing the road managing, everything. All I give a shit about is this band. I spent the darkest years of my life fighting for this band, and there’s nothing that can fucking happen in my life right now that’s going to stop me because I’m not afraid of anybody.”

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ble. I was really scared in the beginning. It was a bundle of fear and hesitation since it’s been so long since I’ve written a Save Ferris song.” Save Ferris 2.0’s first shows proved the majority of casual fans couldn’t care less

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airly or not, this Save Ferris know they’re being judged against the earlier incarnation’s success. Powell and Bash discuss their recently shot video for “New Sound,” pulling up the just-final version on Powell’s iPhone. They have transitioned from raw, peppy and youthful to brassy, spunky and polished.

Her goals for the aptly titled Checkered Past were to honor her favorite material from Introducing Save Ferris. “I love the young, raw nature of it,” she says of that maiden effort. She and her band mates strive to ensure they respect the Save Fer-

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‘Hey, guys!’” he recalls. “Then Patrick said, ‘Dude your car is on fire!’ and there was smoke under the hood. It was toast. It was, like, I got up there in time before it was cooked, almost like getting to the house when I did made things meant to be.” Car trouble aside, the retreat succeeded. Powell’s aim was for each song to have an individual personality. Eventually, three new songs—a deep blend of ska and dub on “New Sound” (which features the Specials’ Neville Staple), the rapidfire ’90s, punkinfused “Do I Even Like You?” and “Golden Silence” emerged from that period. And her father even sang on the tender, reggaeinfused “Goodbye Brother.” “It was his last best day,” Powell says. His health rapidly deteriorated from prostate cancer. The tunes gave the band the confidence that it could forge forward without being saddled by the earlier lineup’s legacy. “It became really fun and free,” Powell says. “As time went on, it became easier and easier. I started feeling like myself again. By the time we went into the studio with [producer/Oingo Boingo bassist John Avila], I was ready.”

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[FILM]

Out of This World Fantastic Planet

For years, surrealist animated film Fantastic Planet quietly existed as a forgotten classic except for film aficionados and art-house junkies. In a world ruled by the blue Draags who enslave and slaughter humans (here called Oms), a young female Draag named Tiwa takes in a child Om as a pet, whom she calls Terr. But as soon as Tiwa and Terr grow up, Terr runs away and finds a hidden tribe of Oms escaping persecution and death. Now they must try to find a means to escape to Fantastic Planet for their salvation. Tonight, this trippy ’70s sci-fi film will surely find a new audience who can appreciate its allegorical narrative and striking imagery. Fantastic Planet at the Frida Cinema, 305 E. Fourth St., Santa Ana, (714) 285-9422; www.thefridacinema.org. 11 p.m. $7-$10. —AIMEE MURILLO [COMEDY]

Need a Laugh?

Laugh Chance Six-Year Anniversary These days, there’s nothing like a cathartic burst of laughter to close out another week. So for your source of crack-ups, get thee to the Chance Theater for a biweekly installment of Laugh Chance. The Fullerton-based improv-comedy troupe has been splitting sides for years, finally finding a permanent home at the Anaheim theater. For its big anniversary celebration, the group is treating fans with a big party and doing what it does best. Expect this crew of talented comedians to bring their inflatable dice to shake up the chances of each performer’s fate, supply doses of good energy and of course, offer much-needed comic relief. Laugh Chance Six-Year Anniversary at the Chance Theater, 5522 E. La Palma Ave., Anaheim, (888) 455-4212; www.laughchance.com. 10:30 p.m. $9-$12. —AIMEE MURILLO

sat/03/25 [LITERARY EVENTS]

Rad Books!

sat/03/25

OC Anarchist Bookfair

Fresh Toast

Brunching season is officially here, and you already know no one does it better than the crew here at OC Weekly.The brunch event of the year is going down today at Newport Dunes, and whether you’ve ever been to one of our annual FreshToast events before, it’ll be a brunch like no other.The three-hour event features fare from more than 35 restaurants, plus drinks, entertainment and the second-annual Bloody Mary competition. As we all know, brunch is the most important meal of the day (and far better than lunner), so come cure your weekly hangover and start working on a new one at the same time. Plus, it’s all for a good cause, so there’s really no reason to not go. FreshToast at Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort, 1131 Back Bay Dr., Newport Beach, (949) 729-3863; www.ocweekly.com/freshtoast. 11 a.m. $35-$60. —JOSH CHESLER

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IT’S BRUNCH O’CLOCK O CWE EKLY. COM

—GABRIEL SAN ROMÁN

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[FOOD & DRINK]

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Are you anarcho-curious? No, that’s not a cheesy pickup line, but rather an invitation to come to the annual installment of the OC Anarchist Bookfair! The roaming event (organized, in part, by yours truly) lands in Anaheim this time with a daylong schedule of workshops, panel discussions and speakers to get woke on a weekend. Zoe Samudzi will give a keynote talk on Black Feminist Anarchism (see, they aren’t all gabachos). Alexander Reid Ross is also coming down from Portland to chop it up about his new book, Against the Fascist Creep. And speaking of books, there will be plenty of inflammatory literature on hand from your friends AK Press and PM Press. Remember, kids: There’s no government like no government! Third-Annual OC Anarchist Bookfair at Unitarian Universalist Church, 511 S. Harbor Blvd., Anaheim; facebook.com/ocanarchistbookfair. 10 a.m. Free.

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sun/03/26 [FOOD & DRINK]

Got Crabs? Crab Fest

There’s nothing in the world quite like crabs boiled and served up with drawn butter. Cracking those shells and forking out that tender meat makes the mouth water and the heart go pitter-pat. Now, imagine that an allyou-can-eat festival opportunity featuring the tantalizing bonus of unlimited bread, salad and chowder was coupled with a no-host bar

mon/03/27 and was located right in your back yard. How could you resist? You couldn’t possibly! Lions Club Crab Fest at Old World Beer Garden, 7561 Center Ave., Huntington Beach, (657) 229-2529; www.hblionscrabfest. 4 p.m. $70. —AMANDA PARSONS [CRUISES]

Enjoy the Sunset

Depeche Boat Sunday Cruise This sounds awesome: a giant riverboat

(with two bars) setting sail just in time for sunset, with a cover band of one of the coolest groups of the ’80s and ’90s, plus a “massive dance floor.” This is the Depeche Boat Sunday Sunset Cruise, and if you feel like breaking it down on the high seas, then make your way to Long Beach before 7:30 p.m.—sharp! Headlining is Blasphemous Rumors, but also on deck is DJ Hi-C. Depeche Boat Sunday Cruise aboard Grand Romance, 100 Aquarium Way, Dock 4, Long Beach; www.facebook.com/DepecheBoat. 2:30 & 7:30 p.m. $25-$30. 21+. —ERIN DEWITT

PICK BAND VOTE NOW! TO HELP CHOOSE WHO WILL BE THE OPENING BAND AT SUMMER FEST 2017 VOTING ENDS 3/30

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[MUSEUMS]

Viva La Tiki!

‘Tiki In Orange County’ If ever there were an exotic land of imagination in which grown-ups could lose themselves, it’s that of tiki culture. While much of post-World War II American art was Norman Rockwell paintings, there was an escapist movement based on the idyllic sights and sounds of the Polynesian Islands. This wave of exotica receded in the late 20th century but has been returning over the past dozen or so years. Currently, OC Historical Society president/tiki aficionado Chris Jepsen curates an exhibit of artifacts, photos, documents and music that examines SoCal’s connection with the culture. “Tiki In Orange County” at Leatherby Libraries, Chapman University, 1 University Dr., Orange, (714) 532-6027; events. chapman.edu. 10 a.m. Through Aug. 25. Free. —SCOTT FEINBLATT

tue/03/28 [ART]

Color Your World ‘The Haiga Portfolio’

Modern American artist Stanton Macdonald-Wright founded the obscure art style of synchromism, which is characterized by shapes in movement similar to the way musical notes represent sound. While this style defines Macdonald-Wright, his series of paintings capturing his love for Japanese Haiga paintings is also important. Infusing his signature color palette in playful movement, “The Haiga Portfolio” collection of works showcase his vibrant exploration of traditional Japanese woodblock techniques and haiku. On view now at Laguna Art Museum, this series of 20 works is a gorgeous look at a forgotten legend of the avant-garde. “Stanton Macdonald-Wright: The Haiga Portfolio” at Laguna Art Museum, 307 Cliff Dr., Laguna Beach, (949) 494-8971; www. lagunaartmuseum.org. 11 a.m. Through May 29. $5-$7. —AIMEE MURILLO


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[ART]

The Blue Rider Wassily Kandinsky

SLEIGH BELLS

You could enroll in a class or pay for a luxury cruise with lectures on fine art, or just show up at the Newport Beach Library for another Beyond the Canvas art talk by scholar and professional appreciator Jacqueline Hahn. This month’s subject is Wassily Kandinsky, the painter credited with (or blamed for) modern abstract art. He wasn’t shy, arguing that painting required a “heightened sensitivity for composition and colors” and that the painter be a “true poet.” Hahn will likely explore absolute subjectivity, abstract expressionism, color, music and spirituality, with some German language instruction, too. For example, Der Blaue Reiter was the name of Kandinsky’s most famous painting, of a horseback rider and of the movement he started. Beyond the Canvas: Wassily Kandinsky at Newport Beach Public Library, 1000 Avocado Ave., Newport Beach, (949) 7173800; www.newportbeachlibrary.org. 7 p.m. Free. —ANDREW TONKOVICH

Riot Rhythm Sleigh Bells

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BaSque BaBeS

4/1 MATT COSTA

Crystal Fighters

Crystal Fighters perfectly blend indie folk with electronic dance music, producing an unlikely yet ear-pleasing mix that is especially highlighted by the innovative band’s reputation for energetic performances.Their shows are known to include fast-paced dance rhythms synced with Basque instruments, synthesizers, feel-good melodies and colorful outfits. Originally from Navarre, Spain, the London based five-piece bring their international genre-blending experience to the Observatory tonight, where they’ll appear with the indie-pop trio Machineheart. Crystal Fighters with Machineheart at the Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; www.observatoryoc. com. 8 p.m. $20. —DENISE DE LA CRUZ

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[HEALTH & FITNESS]

Dance Your Butt Off Zumbathon Fundraiser

The most fun, effective form of exercise since roller blading and swimming, zumba is characterized by aerobic dance movements and stretches. It’s low-key and energizing while inviting enough for beginners to try. This afternoon, bring your favorite workout buddies for an extended zumba session for charity at the Newport-Mesa Family YMCA; adults and children are welcome to participate, burn calories and maybe learn some new dance moves. Proceeds go toward after-school programs, scholarships and youth camps. No need to be a member; preregister at the front desk, then spend your evening feeling good about making a difference. Zumbathon Fundraiser at NewportMesa Family YMCA, 2300 University Dr., Newport Beach, (949) 642-9990; www. ymcaoc.org. 6 p.m. $10-$30. —AIMEE MURILLO

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4/14 JEFF BRIDGES “Getting Doug with High”

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Following a three-year layoff, noise-pop duo Sleigh Bells returned in a big way. The Brooklyn outfit’s fourth studio album, Jessica Rabbit, continues their experiment with an already-combustible sound.Their metallic guitars, snazzy synths and confident lyrics build on the foundation that fans have expected from them. Releasing the record on their ownTorn Clean label allowed them to do as they please, including taking their sound places they may not have expected.There are plenty of bands that have tried to replicate the duo’s scattergun songs, but no outfit are able to do it as well and as coherently as Alexis Krauss and Derek Miller. Sleigh Bells at the House of Blues, 400 Disney Way, Ste. 337, Anaheim, (714) 7782583; www.houseofblues.com. 7:30 p.m. $29. —DANIEL KOHN

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OC welcomes the newest batch of Korean fried-chicken restaurants By Edwin GoEi

F

FURAI

Save SanTana’s Taco Trucks!

F

or the first time since I started this column 14 years ago, I’m not going to tell ustedes where to eat. Instead, a call to action: The Santa Ana City Council wants to pass regulations that will legislate nearly all of the taco trucks in town out of existence. Reason? Because loser NIMBYers and politicians deem them a “special danger” to residents. Fuck that. The loncheros are mulling their legal options. In the meanwhile, here are photos from three amazing taco trucks I recently discovered, all of which would be illegal under SanTana’s new ordinance. Patronize your favorite lonchera this week to support their cause, and remember: Carne asada is not a crime. GARELLANO@OCWEEKLY.COM

PHOTOS BY BRIAN FEINZIMER

faster than you can decide on what to order. And if you stare at his LCD-screen menus looking even halfway indecisive, he’ll tell you that the best sellers are the Nos. 1 and 2, which are definitely what you want. This is Korean fried chicken stripped down to its essentials—all the pieces battered, thrown into the gurgling gut of a Fryolator, then served plain for the No. 1, or finished with a liberal dousing of the sweet and spicy sauce for the No. 2. You could opt for the side sauces such as the lemon garlic, or even a flurry

of seasoning powders such as Tapatío and lime. There’s even a spicy stew and braised chicken on the menu, but no one who goes here will want anything other than what he suggests. His counter is all about placing your order, strolling into the supermarket to pick up some supplies, then coming back 15 to 20 minutes later to find your fried chicken packed up and ready to be eaten at home in front of the TV—with plenty of napkins. 4800 Irvine Blvd., Irvine, (714) 508-3988.

The menu at Holdaak in Fullerton is so short you can count all the dishes with two hands and still be left with unused fingers. Its signature item is a spicy chicken sandwich, with a battered patty that’s unbelievably crunchy despite being covered in two kinds of sauce. That patty is then stuffed into a glossy bun and a slaw made of bell peppers, onions and shredded pickled daikon is piled on top, which adds to the crunch factor. Holdaak’s second-most popular item is the three wings for $8, which would sound expensive if you didn’t know that each piece is an entire wing—tip, drum and flat— and so humongous they look as if they came from a turkey. You can ask for each of the wings to be sauced with a different flavor, including a savory garlic-soy and an addictive sweet-and-spicy glaze. If you’re the chicken-strip type, there’s a twopiece combo made with a gigantic slab of breast covered in a light batter that’s served with excellent fries. Neither the chicken nor the fries need any additional saucing, but there’s a self-serve counter with squirt bottles containing a Bloody Mary ketchup and Holdaak’s version of Sriracha—and what’s any restaurant these days without something involving Sriracha? 1201 Euclid St., Ste. B, Fullerton, (714) 519-3433.

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orget the Nashville hot-chicken craze that has LA in its vice grip. Here in OC, we’re experiencing a Korean fried-chicken boom, and the newest purveyors have now far surpassed Bonchon and Kyochon and the fad they ushered in nearly a decade ago. Not only are these new players offering flavors far more nuanced than what’s coming out of Tennessee, but they’re also creating updates and variations that are ready for a mass audience raised on the Colonel. If there were a how-to-start-a-chickenchain playbook, Jumping Dak in Buena Park would have checked off every box. It has a cool chicken logo and a catchy name reminiscent of El Pollo Loco. But most of all, it has a finger-licking product that isn’t that much different from KFC, Raising Cane’s and Chick-fil-A—except where it matters most. These are boneless, skinless pieces of deep-fried hen somewhere between a nugget and a strip, cocooned in a coral-like crust not unlike the Colonel’s Extra Tasty Crispy. But as soon as you dig in, you discover that half the pieces are actually dark meat. The base model comes out unsauced, but the best way to have it is pre-lacquered, especially in the Spicy glaze, which has bits of garlic and actual chiles in it. Since Jumping Dak is operating under the assumption that serving fried chicken in this country requires a biscuit, coleslaw, corn HOLDAAK and fries, those are included. The corn tastes as though it came straight from the can, the coleslaw is boilerplate, and the fries are crinkle cut. But as far as sides go, all of these options work better than Jumping Dak’s basmati rice. The dry, sand-like grains are miscast for the fried chicken-supporting role that should’ve gone to plain and sticky Calrose. 7550 Orangethorpe Ave., Ste. E100, Buena Park, (714) 739-1999; jumpingdak.com. Furai Chicken also has a catchy name, though it may or may not be a play on how someone with a Korean accent might pronounce “fried chicken.” The charming man who expedites orders at this takeout counter inside Zion Market in Irvine certainly doesn’t say it that way. He switches from flawless English to Korean

» gustavo arellano

m ont h x x–xx , 20 14

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Fried Chicken for the Seoul

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Surf City Super Salsa Chorizo omelet at Cafe Cup

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reakfast is the main course in Huntington Beach, and one of my go-to Surf City morning spots is Cafe Cup, a slender restaurant in a shopping plaza where the service is almost as fast as a hot rod blazing down Beach Boulevard. Everything is good at this sister spot to Long Beach’s iconic diner, but let’s give a special shoutout to the chorizo omelet. Not only are the eggs silky and the potatoes crunchy, but the chorizo is also properly oily and spicy, just as they do it in SanTana. Better yet, an order comes with three syrup containers filled with house salsas: mild, spicy and green. While the latter two are fine, the mild salsa is down-

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» gustavo arellano right miraculous: more savory than fiery, but with an herbaceous taste that satisfies like few mild salsas can. It reminds me of the legendary El Pato Tomato Sauce, one of my favorite condiments of all time—and if I’m comparing your product to the stuff I’ve stocked in my house since childhood, you know you’ve pleased this Mexican.

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anna tiki, but can’t tell your Bali Hai from your Corpse Reviver? Then head to 320 Main in Seal Beach. Too far? Hitch a ride. Don’t like strangers? Buy a bottle of RumHaven. Coconut water ain’t my favorite beverage— too thick, with a sweetness too muddled by savoriness. But it becomes a wonderful elixir in rum, and RumHaven ups the ante with its coconut liqueur. The drink is paradise in a shot glass: refreshing, sweet, easy as-is and even easier mixed in a cocktail. RumHaven’s worth is such that Mr. Hi-Time carries it, but

$5 YOU CALL IT! let’s give some love today to Grape Press Liquor, a delightful little shop fighting the good fight in Anaheim Hills, an area whose contribution to OC liquor culture was the late, great Foxfire. Bruh, get some RumHaven, and those lonely MILFs will be on you like Ginger on the Professor. Find RumHaven at Grape Press Liquor, 464 S. Anaheim Hills Rd., Anaheim, (714) 998-2222.

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Bodega Beach?

SARAH BENNETT

Honeybee’s ups Long Beach’s corner-store game

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etting lunch from the corner convenience store usually means grabbing a bag of Takis, a pack of beef jerky and a Gatorade. If I’m lucky, I’ll take a Starbucks Double Shot or Rockstar can from the refrigerator. When I’m trying to buy a dessert-y drink in the afternoon or evening? I’ve been settling for an Arizona’s Sweet Tea or a bottle of soda. In Long Beach, where dusty liquor stores live peacefully on every other block, the espresso pulls are left to the coffee shops, the sandwiches happen at the few delis that have dedicated their entire existences to serving them, and you can head to one of the city’s boba spots for a wide selection of sweet drinks any time of the day. But Honeybee’s in Belmont Heights is a new kind of convenience store. Breaking with the West Coast tradition of the snacks-and-soda-driven corner store, the 10-month-old spot is more like a newschool New York bodega, part Roasting Water, part coffee shop, part breakfastand-lunch counter, and part craft-beerbottle shop that also sells Lotto tickets, chips, cigarettes and energy drinks. In the wood-shingled corner unit that once housed Henry Market, new owners Jackson and Mareni Khem removed the crowded shelves and racks, built a service counter and food-prep area along one wall and opened up a small seating area where customers can bask in the natural light from the tall front windows while eating salads, sandwiches and paninis. I’ve tried nearly everything on the extensive foodand-drink menu, which is handwritten on an apartment-sized chalkboard hang-

LongBeachLunch » sarah bennett

ing on the wall behind the register. I’ve ordered Italian and turkey sandwiches, served on crusty French baguettes, to go during the lunch rush. The deli meats are definitely coming straight from Sysco. I’ve also curled up on the black-leather couch with a book for an hour while downing a tuna melt and a cup of tomato-basil soup. My latest obsession is its selection of fruit slushies, icy frappes, creamy smoothies and milk teas, which are on par with what you’d find at any good teahouse in Garden Grove and include the option to add bobas, jellies, mochi and lots of assorted fruit bits. There’s also a killer house Vietnamese iced coffee, which, coupled with a month-old breakfast menu that includes a build-your-own $5 breakfast sandwich, is quickly luring me away from my usual morning haunts. Why settle for unfulfilling convenience store rations of Red Bull, Takis and beef jerky when you can buy a pesto chicken panini, a strawberry and Nutella croissant, or a boba drink of your choice at Honeybee’s? While you’re there, try your luck with a Lotto ticket; you can grab a bottle of Beachwood beer to drink off the loss later. HONEYBEE’S 301 Loma Ave., Long Beach, (562) 433-2830; honeybeeslongbeach.com.


Ooey Gooey Great

Elbows Mac n Cheese

Ten great mac-and-cheese dishes in OC anne marie panoringan

M

acaroni and cheese is about as iconic in American comfort cuisine as hamburgers and apple pie. Its versatility surpasses most dishes, with its seemingly endless pasta and dairy options. We think beyond the blue box to provide you with 10 melty varieties that can be considered entire meals on their own.

BEACHWOOD BBQ

Beer may be the best beverage pairing for a dish of cheesy mac. The right brew will cut through the creamy texture, plus be refreshing at the same time. The OC outpost of Beachwood BBQ provides fine specimens of both. Gruyère-beer sauce is the creamy base for hot pasta, plus smoked chiles, green onions and bacon. 131 Main St., Seal Beach, (562) 493-4500; beachwoodbbq.com.

NO BONES ABOUT IT

BRIAN FEINZIMER

pull with its abundance of tried-and-true combinations. Elbows is exactly as it touts: quick, comforting and delicious! 215 W. Birch St., Brea, (714) 784-6613; www. elbowsmacncheese.com. PIG PEN DELICACY

How do you take mac and cheese a step further? Turn it into burger buns! Gooey on the inside, crusty on the outside—don’t deny yourself such brilliance. The MacAttack Burger knows no boundaries, housing an all-beef patty as well as candied bacon. Various locations; pigpendelicacy.com.

CHAPTER ONE: THE MODERN LOCAL STEAKHOUSE 55

EAT CHOW

THE BLIND RABBIT

You could go crazy and order Eat Chow’s extreme loaded order of truffle mac. Or you can appreciate a five-cheese blend of Tillamook, muenster, Spanish manchego, Emmentaler Swiss and French goat cheese. The kitchen deviates just a bit with the use of penne, but a Parmesan-andpanko crust more than makes up for it. Various locations; www.eatchownow.com.

If you’re able to gain access to this Anaheim speakeasy, you’ll be greatly rewarded with many of the better bartenders and beverage selections around. Blind Rabbit’s modest menu is noteworthy for a shredded duck confit in three-cheese bechamel sauce. Factor in some truffle essence, and you’ve got a luxe pairing to everything you plan to imbibe. 440 S. Anaheim Blvd., Anaheim; theblindrabbit.com.

For this indulgent side option, Cheddar and black truffle coat the pasta. A toasted blend of herbs and shaving of Parm finishes the dish. More than enough to share, it should accompany any proper steak. 1150 W. Magic Way, Anaheim, (714) 778-6600.

COMFORTING & DELICIOUS

ECCO PIZZA

ELBOWS MAC N CHEESE

While there are a bunch of other things to choose from on an Elbows menu, why would you? Aim for the highest cheese

THE RECESS ROOM

For those who think an oozing skillet of mac is no big deal, we double dare you to go the distance and get your bone marrow on. Chucked into a trio of jalapeño mozzarella, pepperjack and Cheddar, it’s so wrong it’s definitely right. 18380 Brookhurst St., Fountain Valley, (714) 3770398; therecessroom.com. THE WHARF

This homemade version of a tuna mac casserole is as cheesy as can be. Served in a cast-iron skillet, every forkful contains sizable chunks of seafood. 12941 Main St., Garden Grove, (714) 530-1388; www.thewharfoc.com.

E

LBOWS MAC N’ CHEESE BRINGS A new twist to an American comfort food classic. Creatively executed macaroni and cheese dishes dominate the extensive menu full of salads, soups and cheese melts. Love bacon? Go for the Swiss Mac— the applewood smoked bacon combines with their classic mac n’ cheese to elevate it to a level that satisfies even the most discerning of bacon palates. Carnivores flock to The Wingin’ It, a mac n’ cheese dish topped with boneless buffalo chicken wings, crumbled bleu cheese and scallions. Vegetarian

options include the Easy Cheesy Caprese, topped with roasted tomatoes, fresh garlic, basil and a creamy mozzarella sauce. Even vegans have an opportunity to enjoy this classic dish with the I Can’t Believe It’s Not Cheese option. Elbow noodles are baked in cashew cheese, green chili, onion and topped with fresh veggies. This vegan option is, of course, absent the cheese that defines a traditional mac n’ cheese—but it’s cooked and seasoned so perfectly, that you’d be hard pressed to differentiate between the two.

215 WEST BIRCH STREET, BREA | 714.784.6613 11405 SOUTH ST, CERRITOS | 562.865.9999 | ELBOWSMACNCHEESE.COM

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As our Shuji Sakai pointed out about the fontina, gorgonzola and pancetta mac and cheese, “The ear-shaped orecchiette pasta scoops and holds the smooth, creamy sauce made with the easy-melting thickness of fontina cheese and the sharp tang of a gorgonzola blue cheese. Mated with the salty, mildly sweet umami of a cured pancetta, this ranks as one of the best adult mac and cheeses in the county.” 2937 Bristol St., Ste. A103, Costa Mesa, (714) 4443226; www.eccopizza.com.

Ma rc h 24 -3 0 , 2 0 17

What else can you say to a glop of love featuring white Cheddar and fontina cheese, with bacon chunks that explode like chicharrones, finished off with caramelized-onion relish, toasted panko and truffle oil? 227 N. Broadway, Santa Ana, (714) 352-2225; chapteronetml.com.

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STILLS FROM SALT OF THE EARTH

Lights, Camera . . . (Direct) Action!

An OC film class for workers captures the union movement on camera

“T

ness. “The film was made right after the Triangle Shirtwaist Fire [where 145 workers died in New York City] and its purpose was for employers to sidestep their responsibility for it in trying to put the blame on the workers,” Hart says. On the other hand, Charlie Chaplin’s Great Depression-era silent film Modern Times critiques industrialism’s effect on workers with wit and satire. The talkies take it from there, with John Steinbeck’s novels-turned-films Of Mice and Men and The Grapes of Wrath offering students a regional look into the Great Depression. Salt of the Earth brings the class to the “Hollywood Ten” Red Scare era. “You had a film industry that actively tried to stop production,” Hart says of Salt of the Earth. Blacklisted director Herbert Biberman used union actors with the full support of local miners, but Hollywood wanted nothing to do with it. “And when the film actually debuted, there was only a handful of locations where it was shown, La Habra being one of them. We can’t teach this class without looking at that film.” Working Class In Cinema then jumps around the decades to tackle how racism and sexism have played out in the labor movement before ending on contemporary films such as 2000’s Bread and Roses, about SEIU’s Justice for Janitors strike in LA. “We challenge our students to question everything, and if they don’t, we do,” says Adinolfi. “This is not a propaganda class. We’re going to challenge ourselves about things that we do wrong, what we can improve on and talk about things we do right.” The “Matt and Chuck Show,” as the teachers have become affectionately known, not only dabbles in self-examination, but also pulls apart how cinema injects negative stereotypes into public opinions about unions. “When you think

of a labor film, right off the top, you think Hoffa,” Hart says. The 1992 Danny DeVito-directed biopic of disappeared Teamsters leader Jimmy Hoffa helped to popularize the idea of union leaders being Mafia-connected and on the take. “That’s the stereotype that sells movie tickets,” Adinolfi adds. By the end of the class, students learn another invaluable lesson. “They develop a community of solidarity, [with] people from various unions interacting and engaging with one another,” Hart says. And the timing of that couldn’t be any more urgent, thanks to President Donald Trump making overtures to the “white working class” while poised to deliver near-fatal blows to unions. A scene from Matewan (1987) dramatically illustrates the threats of redrawn lines of division. In the West Virginia coal-country film set in the 1920s, Joe Kenehan (played by Chris Cooper) gives a speech to a group of miners. “Every man that walks out on his own steam, we take

him to the union,” Kenehan says while looking at “Few Clothes” Johnson (James Earl Jones). “Even the dagos and the coloreds?” asks a miner. “That’s what a union is, fellas,” Kenehan says. The scene replays in Adinolfi’s mind in one organizing campaign after another, including a recent one in which friction arose between mostly white mechanics and Latino warehouse-freezer workers at Americold Logistics in Fullerton. “They voted against each other because their interests are different,” Adinolfi says. “It’s not just some historical moment in time that we’ve gone beyond.” Even though Fullerton is far removed from early 20th-century coal country, Matewan resonates in and out of the classroom. “One of the questions that we ask with these films is ‘How is this relevant today?’” Hart says. “If they aren’t, then it doesn’t mean anything.” GSROMAN@OCWEEKLY.COM

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he Anglo bosses look down on you, and you hate them for it,” Esperanza says to her husband, Ramon, in a poignant exchange during 1954’s Salt of the Earth. “‘Stay in your place, you dirty Mexican’—that’s what they tell you. But why must you say to me, ‘Stay in your place’?” The scene from the blacklisted film dramatizing the 1951 strike against the Empire Zinc Co. in Silver City, New Mexico, never fails to spark discussions during the Working Class In Cinema course being taught at the United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW) Local 329 in Buena Park. Chuck Adinolfi, field director for UFCW 324, and Matt Hart, a union representative with the same local, teach the three-hour, threeunit Los Angeles Trade Technical College class every Tuesday night. “I like the class discussions because you understand different people’s perspectives,” says Raquel Avila, a student in the class, rank-and-file worker, and Teamsters Local 630 shop steward. Salt of the Earth is one of her favorite labor films, especially with its feminist union themes. “As a woman in the Teamsters, it’s maledominated—let’s just be honest.” The LA Trade Tech adjunct professors count 35 students, including Avila, for the current spring semester. “Most of the folks who are in the class are part of the labor community,” Hart says. It’s a mini-federation with Teamsters, UFCW, Service Employees International Union (SEIU), building trade and Wal-Mart workers joining students interested in getting transferrable units while learning more about the labor movement through film. The course begins with lessons on how silent films waged class war on the silver screen at the turn of the 20th century, including 1912’s The Crime of Careless-

By GABrieL SAn román

m on th x x–x x , 2014

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SCENES FROM SALT OF THE EARTH

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Muy Fast and Mucho Furious SMOKE ‘EM IF YOU GOT ‘EM

VAL ART LTD.

2002 N. Main St., Santa Ana, (714) 5673677. Sun., 1:30 p.m. Members or with museum admission, $20; otherwise, $30. Sleight. It’s a free, prerelease screening of the film followed by an audience Q&A with the writers, producers and distributors. A young street magician (Jacob Latimore) is left to care for his little sister after their parents’ passing and turns to illegal activities to keep a roof over their heads. When he gets in too deep, his sister is kidnapped, and he is forced to use his magic and brilliant mind to save her. Chapman University’s Dodge College of Film and Media Arts, Folino Theater, 283 N. Cypress St., Orange; chapman.edu/ dodge/. Mon., 7 p.m. Free, but firstcome, first-served seating. Monty Python’s Life of Brian. You know that Jesus Christ dude from the black-light posters? Well, what if he had a brother named Brian, born in the stable right next to him? And what if Brian is just a little off when it comes to the moments that define his brother, like when the gift-bearing wise men come, or the Messiah-followers show up or the Romans start acting like real dickwads? That’s the comedy Terry Jones’ movie mines. Brilliantly. Regency Directors Cut Cinema at Rancho Niguel, 25471 Rancho Niguel Rd., Laguna Niguel, (949) 831-0446. Tues. Call for show time. $8. MindGamers: One Thousand Minds Connected Live. This oneof-a-kind movie-going experiment from Fathom Events and Terra Mater Film Studios has audience members around the country wearing special

cognition headbands to “think as ONE” as they watch what’s dubbed as the first action-adventure film for the mind. Headlined by Sam Neill (Jurassic Park) and Tom Payne (The Walking Dead), the movie follows a group of brilliant young students who create a wireless neural network with the potential to link every mind on Earth via a quantum computer. Capable of transferring skills from one brain to another, they have brought into existence the first shareware for human motor skills. They freely spread this technology, believing it to be a first step toward a new equality and intellectual freedom, but they soon discover that they themselves are part of a much greater and more sinister experiment. AMC Orange 30 at the Outlets, (714) 769-4288; AMC Tustin Legacy at the District, (714) 258-7036; Cinemark Century Stadium 25, (714) 532-9558; Cinemark at the Pike Theaters, (800) 967-1932; Edwards Aliso Viejo Stadium 20, (844) 462-7342; Edwards Irvine Spectrum 21, (844) 462-7342; Edwards Long Beach Stadium 26, (844) 462-7342; fathomevents.com. Tues., 6 p.m. $18. Cinema Twain. Val Kilmer has reached the age where he plays Mark Twain in one-man shows—and so I am officially old. The writer/director/ star appears in person to present this 90-minute screening compiled from several sold-out stage Citizen Twain productions in Los Angeles. Based on the life and writings of Samuel Clemens, everything from family, faith and

politics is covered in witty, comedic and moving fashion. Kilmer sticks around after the screening to take audience questions, and those with VIP tickets can meet and snap selfies with him. Irvine Improv, 527 Fortune Dr., Irvine, (949) 854-5455. Wed., 8 p.m. $29. Mrs. Doubtfire. Funny movie starring the late, great Robin Williams as an estranged husband posing as an English nanny to get close to his kids, start a children’s TV career and confound the suitor (Pierce Brosnan) of the cross-dresser’s ex (Sally Field). Regency South Coast Village, 1561 W. Sunflower Ave., Santa Ana, (714) 5575701. Wed., 7:30 p.m. $9. Facing Darkness. Fathom Events and Samaritan’s Purse International present “a story about faith and Ebola.” As the Ebola pandemic swept across West Africa in the spring of 2014, a Christian organization committed its people and resources to provide comfort, compassion and care to the hurting people of Africa. But the crisis literally hit home when the deadly virus infected Samaritan’s Purse International’s own medical personnel. AMC Orange 30 at the Outlets, (714) 769-4288; AMC Tustin Legacy at The District, (714) 258-7036; Cinemark Century Stadium 25, (714) 532-9558; Cinemark Century 20 Huntington Beach, (714) 373-4573; Edwards Aliso Viejo Stadium 20, (844) 462-7342; Edwards Irvine Spectrum 21, (844) 4627342; Edwards Long Beach Stadium 26, (844) 462-7342; fathomevents.com. Thurs., March 30, 7 p.m. $12.50. MCOKER@OCWEEKLY.COM

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violence. And then the ’shrooms kick in. . . . The Frida Cinema; thefridacinema. org. Fri., 11 p.m. $7-$10. Idomeneo. The Met: Live In HD presents Jean-Pierre Ponnelle’s classic production, which has its first Metropolitan Opera revival in more than a decade this season. Matthew Polenzani stars in the title role; the cast also includes Elza van den Heever as Elettra, Nadine Sierra as Ilia, Alice Coote as Idamante and Alan Opie as Arbace. AMC Marina Pacifica, 6346 E. Pacific Coast Hwy., Long Beach, (562) 430-8790; AMC Orange 30 at the Outlets, 20 City Blvd. W., Orange, (714) 769-4288; AMC Tustin Legacy at the District, 2457 Park Ave., Tustin, (714) 258-7036; Cinemark Century Stadium 25, 1701 W. Katella Ave., Orange, (714) 5329558; Cinemark Century 20 Huntington Beach, 7777 Edinger Ave., Huntington Beach, (714) 373-4573; Cinemark at the Pike Theaters, 99 S. Pine Ave., Long Beach, (800) 967-1932; Edwards Aliso Viejo Stadium 20, 26701 Aliso Creek Rd., Aliso Viejo, (844) 462-7342; Edwards Irvine Spectrum 21, 65 Fortune Dr., Irvine, (844) 462-7342; Edwards Long Beach Stadium 26, 7501 E. Carson, Long Beach, (844) 462-7342; fathomevents. com. Live showing, Sat., 9:55 a.m.; taped showing, Wed., 6:30 p.m. $18-$24. El Automovil Gris (The Grey Automobile). The Frida Cinema and Santa Ana Sites join forces to present this 1919 classic Mexican silent film with a live score performed by the eclectic Jalisco/Guadalajara group Troker. An early action film—and one of the most important in cinematic history—The Grey Automobile tells a story involving police and outlaws, a.k.a. the muy fast and mucho furious. The Frida Cinema; thefridacinema.org. Sat., 8 p.m. $12-$23. The Rocky Horror Picture Show. Midnight Insanity, the longtime Rocky shadowcast troupe and freaky movie presenter in both Orange County and Long Beach, once again uses props, costumes and audience participation to enliven the story about newlyweds whose car breaks down in the woods before they arrive at a mad scientist’s bizarre castle. Art Theatre, 2025 E. Fourth St., Long Beach, (562) 438-5435; longbeachrockyhorror.com. Sat., 11:55 p.m. $8.50-$11.50. Georgio Luke—Frida Kahlo. Author, lecturer, and Mexican art and culture specialist Georgio Luke gives an illustrated portrait of Frida Kahlo using more than 300 slides of her paintings, documentary photographs and rare film footage. Bowers Museum of Cultural Art, Norma Kershaw Auditorium,

Ma rc h 24-30, 20 17

The Warplands. The exhibition of recent work by Cauleen Smith includes a short film drawn from her current research on the influence of Alice Coltrane, the American jazz pianist, organist, harpist, singer, composer, swamini and second wife of John Coltrane. UC Irvine Contemporary Arts Center, 4000 Mesa Rd., Irvine; www.arts.uci.edu/events. Open daily through Saturday. Free. Blazing Saddles. Mel Brooks’ comedy, among the funniest movies of all time, has the new black sheriff of Rock Ridge (Cleavon Little), his gunslinger-turneddrunk sidekick (Gene Wilder) and the “salt of the earth . . . morons” of the frontier town battling baddies bent on clearing everyone out for a new railroad—and a classic pie fight. Regency San Juan Capistrano, 26762 Verdugo St., San Juan Capistrano, (949) 6613456. Thurs., March 23, 7 p.m. $10-$13. Rammstein: Paris. Fingers crossed that the Frida Cinema walls can take the banging of heads, as the organization and Picturehouse present renowned Swedish director Jonas Åkerlund’s concert film. Said to employ a radical new approach to capturing the emotion and thrill of guitar god Rammstein’s one-of-a-kind live performance, the film was shot in Paris and includes a dark and spectacular fairy tale laced with controversy, don’t-try-this-at-home theatrics and the all-consuming aroma of Benzin (gasoline). So careful raising those lighters! The Frida Cinema, 305 E. Fourth St., Santa Ana; thefridacinema. org. Thurs., March 23, 8 p.m. $7-$10. Man In the Middle. Filmmaker Phillip Rodriguez explores the life and death of Mexican-American journalist Ruben Salazar. A reporter for both the LA Times and KMEX, Salazar brought attention to the burgeoning Chicano movement of the 1960s. Killed during the historical Chicano Moratorium of 1970, Salazar became an icon of the movement in the U.S. and in Mexico. Museum of Latin American Art, 638 Alamitos Ave., Long Beach, (562) 4371689; molaa.org. Fri., 7 p.m. Free, but first-come, first-served seating. Fantastic Planet. René Laloux’s legendarily trippy 1973 animated classic is this week’s OC Weekly Friday Night Freakout. Enslaved humans (Oms) are the playthings of giant blue native inhabitants (Draags) of the distant planet Ygam. After Terr, kept as a pet since infancy, escapes from his gigantic-child captor, he is swept up by a band of radical fellow Oms who are resisting the Draags’ oppression and

By Matt Coker

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TrendZilla » aimee murillo

Mineralize Yourself

A

MAVERICK THEATER

Puppets of the Stage, Unite!

Les Miz and Friends! A Puppet Parody is exactly what it sounds like—and more!

I

“Originally, we just liked the novelty of them,” Makaryk says. “Puppets can get away with things [onstage] that humans can’t, especially when it comes to comedy. When a human assaults another human, it’s one thing, but when a puppet does it, it’s funny. . . . And I loved the idea of puppets trying to do good theater, but they’re still puppets, and if something goes wrong, they just rip it apart. That’s a formula we found worked with Hamlet, so now we’re doing it to this.” The conceit of this show, which is more like Avenue Q, in which 14 live actors interact and control 24 puppets, is that it begins as a faithful and reverent production of the tale, which is based on the French musical (based on Victor Hugo’s novel) that opened in 1980 and spawned Buddha knows how many productions, as well as a 2012 star-studded film that somehow actually topped the stage musical in terms of bombast and dumbness. But because puppets tend to be puppets, they begin questioning the complexity of the plot and the very reason why they’re onstage in the first place; once the second act rolls around, all Hades breaks loose. “The human actors are the straight men, trying to do a good show,” Makaryk explains. “And the first act is mainly humans and a few puppets. But in the second act, the puppets take over, and we just keep amping up the chaos, and you really have no idea what’s coming next. . . . The good thing about puppets is that when something goes wrong, they can jump on it and improv. . . . So the script is really a

skeleton, and everything else that happens depends on the whim of the puppets.” One of Makaryk’s biggest issues with the classic Les Miz is that it shoves a 655,000word novel into a three-hour musical (the running time for his show is about 2:25). “It’s far too much story,” he says. “It’s one of the longest novels in history, and to have that much story in three hours is nonsense.” Another flaw, he says, is that the first 45 minutes are “normal story, but it’s all prologue, and then skips 30 years later, and you’re thrown into this new world. You never get to define who is fighting who, what they’re angry about or who the characters are. All the details get condensed, and it makes the plot unbearable.” That said, Makaryk thinks his puppet massacre works for those who don’t like Les Miz, those who both truly love it and those who like it because they think they’re supposed to like one of the most iconic musical-theater works. “Even though we destroy it, at the same time, we do enough of the show to do it justice,” he says. “We’re not saying the whole show is crap. The parts that work and the songs that make sense are still there, but we get to cut out all the extraneous fat. . . . I will say I like the show much more than when we started the project.” LES MIZ AND FRIENDS! A PUPPET PARODY at the Maverick Theater, 110 E. Walnut Ave., Fullerton, (714) 526-7070; www. mavericktheater.com. Fri.-Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 6 p.m. Through April 22. $10-$20.

AMURILLO@OCWEEKLY.COM

online » amore ocweekly.com

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f imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, then what do you call a show in which ornery, foul-mouthed puppets invade a well-known play and slice, skewer and cannibalize it? Ask Nathan Makaryk, the co-creator of the R-rated Les Miz and Friends! A Puppet Parody, and you won’t get the stock reply of “Well, we’re just having a lot of fun satirizing a show that we all really love and blah, blah.” No, ask him about the ridiculously popular musical set among the poor and oppressed in early 19th-century France, and you get the idea he’d just as soon flush the script down the toilet. “I’m not a fan of the musical, which is where all this started,” says Makaryk, a multitalented performer, writer and director who has in the past helped to unleash puppets on such iconic pieces of literature as Hamlet and Frankenstein. “When we were thinking of doing another show that puppets could destroy, this one was at the top of my list. There are certain elements that just drive me crazy about it. It’s overrated for certain reasons, and I really relished the idea of attacking it with puppets.” While Makaryk—who co-created the show with Genevieve Flati and is working with Danny Mantooth, a puppeteer for Disney—has adapted his share of straight plays over the years, such as The Hobbit and Robin Hood, after working with Sean McNamara’s All Puppet Players at the Maverick several years ago, he realized there is something about the surreal world of puppets that serves as a useful counterpoint to real-life actors.

By Joel BeerS

s a gal who enjoys putting on a full face of makeup almost every day, I’m always psyched to find new makeup products that don’t pump my pores full of parabens, silicone or other harmful chemicals that will make me age faster. Mineral Fusion’s line of 100 percent vegan products enriched with aloe vera, sea kelp, licorice root, avocado oil, coconut oil and other natural ingredients is not only good for your skin, but it also doesn’t leave your face feeling heavy and oily at the end of the day. Boasting simplicity in makeup without phthalates or artificial colors, Mineral Fusion includes everything from mascara to nail polish. But of all its products, I’m most attracted to its collection of mineral-based primers. Not many mineral primers on the market today can boast the same extent of natural as Mineral Fusion’s. The company offers a basic face primer enriched with antioxidants such as pomegranate, red tea, white tea and sea kelp, but there’s also a collection of specialized primers. The green one is a color corrector, which hides redness and blemishes on the skin; the gold illuminates the skin and adds flecks of glitter on the face (great for a nighttime look); the white is a hydrating primer that keeps the skin fresh and, well, hydrated. And finally, the clear primer absorbs oil and helps maintain a matte look for those with super-shiny, oily skin—great for the acne-prone! These vegan, gluten-free, hypoallergenic products can be found in the makeup aisle at your local Whole Foods or at www.mineralfusion.com. As a bonus, Mineral Fusion donates proceeds of their profits to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence—a win-win for your skin and a greater cause!

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HE DIDN’T DREAM THIS DREAM

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music»artists|sounds|shows

Island Rhythm Revival

Nonosina Polynesia has taught the world how to hula (and more) for more than 50 years By Scott FeInBlatt

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alf a century ago, in a mostly white neighborhood in Buena Park, there lived a woman who had brown skin and didn’t speak any English. One day, her daughter’s high-school talent-show committee invited parents to participate, so she signed up. During a rehearsal, the principal saw her practicing her act and informed her that it was a bit too sensual and inappropriate for a high school. She wound up performing anyway. It was a hula dance. Shortly thereafter, all of the neighborhood moms started knocking on her door, begging for instruction. Estella “Nonosina” Reid gave these women, her first students, dance lessons in her garage in exchange for English tutoring. The women then asked if Reid would teach their children, and they paid for a tiny space in Buena Park. Thus was born the Nonosina Polynesia Dance studio. Today, the dance company thrives in a larger space in Anaheim. The studio’s reputation has grown so much that students now come from as far away as Tijuana, San Luis Obispo and neighboring states to attend classes two to three times per week. And while Reid still attends the classes regularly to watch over her flock and keep everyone in check, her granddaughter Tiana Nonosina Liufau now instructs the classes—that is, when she is not traveling the world with her dancers. Liufau was born and raised in Anaheim, attended UCLA (where she studied World Arts and Culture/Dance), and she very much considers herself a Southern California girl. Still, she strives to maintain a connection with her family’s traditions. “I am constantly back in the islands to just help me stay rooted and guided,” Liufau says. The music and dance traditions of her Samoan and Hawaiian ancestors are the products of the Polynesian philosophy, and Liufau feels that her calling in Orange County is to impart that way of life to her students. “A lot of my dancers are not in touch with their heritage, and Polynesia is very much ‘come one, come all’; when you eat with us, when you sing with us, when you dance with us, you’re part of our family,” she says. At the studio, the dancing does not come first. Liufau explained that the physical aspect of dancing is a means by which spirituality is achieved through the art of storytelling. “The poetry comes first,” she says. “That is far more important than the dance. . . . The music is inspired after that, and then the movement is inspired.” While many of the Nonosina company’s Ori Tahiti dance movements are slow and delicate, some appear quite frenetic

LIUFAU (CENTER): ISLAND GIRL BY W AY OF SOCAL

SCOTT FEINBLATT

and have even been compared to twerking. When Westerners first came to the islands, about 250 years ago, Liufau points out, “our dance was banned immediately because it was [considered] erotic, savage and not Christian-like.” Taken out of its cultural context, the dance form appeared vulgar to the Christians; however, its true function is nothing short of divine. “Most of our movements mimic nature and the way it moves,” Liufau says. “We are celebrating living harmoniously with Mother Nature.” Sensuality permeates all aspects of the culture, from language to colors—even lovemaking, itself, is nothing short of a traditional artform. “The ancient Polynesian belief system is when you are procreating, you are keeping tradition and bloodline lineage,” Liufau explains. “The dance keeps going, the drum keeps playing—it’s all intertwined.” The Polynesian bass drum, the pahu, represents the human heart, and “as long as that pahu is still beating, as long as we are still teaching a little song, a dance, hand movement, then the heartbeat of our Polynesian people will never die.” The philosophy and spirituality of the Polynesian people’s arts are fairly secular. Liufau says it is really all about showing love, gratitude and respect to one’s ancestors, wherever they are from. “The majority of my dancers are not Polynesian, and I don’t ever want them to think they have to be Polynesian to feel this,” she says. “We have that sense of connectivity to our roots

in every single culture. . . . So I always tell them, ‘I want you guys to connect. [Use the Polynesian song] as a vehicle to connect to the ancestors or the ones that came before you, or even your loved ones that are still alive but are maybe far away or back in the homeland.’” The Nonosina Polynesia Dance company has had an ongoing business relationship with Disney for almost as long as the Nonosina studio has been around. As one of the first Polynesian dance studios, and with its Anaheim location, Disney reached out to Estella Reid to produce its Tahitian Terrace Luau show. The studio provided a convenient source to supply Disney with the dancers and musicians it required for the show. The Tahitian Terrace was replaced by Aladdin’s Oasis in 1993, but, Liufau says, “Once you’re in with Disney, they’ll always reference you or keep you in mind.” Other collaborations include a California Adventure tie-in with Lilo & Stitch, for which the troupe helped with casting musicians; a referral to the TV series Survivor, which the troupe performed music for. Plus, for two and a half years, Liufau has been involved with the hit animated feature Moana, for which are provided choreography and more. A recent experience brought her family full-circle with Disney, she says: “An older gentleman that was in charge of one of the first events I did [for Moana] looked at me and asked, ‘What dance group do you choreograph for?’ and I said, ‘Nonosina,’ and then he started cry-

ing and told me, ‘Do you know that I’m the exact gentleman that hired your grandma for the Tahitian Terrace?’” In addition to these more well-known experiences, Liufau says that many of her dancers, as well as the troupe as a whole, have done well in various Polynesian dance circuits, including those of Northern California, Southern California and the Hawaiian island of Kauai. She also proudly reveals that the Tahitian government recognized the group’s contribution to the culture. In 2001, the Nonosina Polynesia Dance studio was asked to perform an award-winning dance piece in Tahiti, after which, Liufau says, beaming, “The [French Polynesian] president at the time wrote us an official letter asking us to do a cultural exchange.” Currently, she judges an annual international competition there. Liufau balances her troupe’s ongoing performances and workshops in Hawaii, Mexico and Japan (evidently, Tokyo is the biggest hub for Polynesian dance) with teaching her regular classes at the studio; most of the touring occurs between semesters and during various Western holidays, such as Easter and Thanksgiving. Such a schedule seems overwhelming, but Liufau says the rewards are inherent in the tradition, adding, “What drives me is the satisfaction I get in seeing how much the students grow spiritually.” NONOSINA POLY NESIA DA NCE 3070 Lincoln Ave., Anaheim, (714) 527-7003; nonosinadance.com.


READY FOR THE NEXT WAVE

OC’s Own Low End Theory

CATAPULT

Catapult launches a night of art-music madness By Josh Chesler

“W

CATAPULT featuring Curtiss King, Cameo Adele and Eddie Cole, at an as yet undisclosed location, Anaheim; www.catapultlive.com. Sat., 8 p.m. RSVP for location and ticket price. 21+.

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er’s attendance at major genre-spanning festivals such as FYF. “My band mate and I realized that no one really knew each other,” Brown says. “You could play in a venue on a Tuesday, and the very next night, there could be a show with completely different fans who would never turn up for your show and vice versa. . . . We wanted to find a way to bridge all of these people and do something different.” Most of Brown’s previous events were much more intimate, with him having to work within the bounds of what’s feasible in a small room. While Catapult is not quite festival-sized, this marks the first time Brown will explore what he can do when organizing a night all his own. From the music and art to the food and drinks to the sound and lighting, Catapult will be entirely created by Brown and his team. “I put my own shows together for my band, so this is kind of the same feeling as when you put together a really cool lineup for one of those shows,” Brown says. “For that, you talk to the promoter, and they let you do a lot of different things your way, but with this, you’re also choosing what alcohol you serve, the food trucks, what people you’re trying to attract, the logos, and all of that. It’s a whole different level of involvement you get to have that makes it even more satisfying if and when it goes well.”

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hen’s the last time you saw something for the first time?” asks Donovan Brown. “This is going to be completely different than anything else you’ve ever seen before.” Brown is referring to the new project he and his creative team are working on, a recurring night of music and art called Catapult. According to the musician, the warehouse events will be a slightly more geographically diverse version of LA’s darling of a series Low End Theory, with artists from Los Angeles, Long Beach and Orange County on every bill, with the intent to make them “an eclectic amalgamation of the aural and visual arts, with interactive installations, immersive sounds and electrifying live performances. “We’re trying to incorporate a live art element into it,” Brown explains. “For the first one, there’s going to be an artist doing a full-sized mural during the event, and there are going to be other people doing artwork as well. We’ve been looking at cool ways to do art installations around the space because the people who own the warehouse do props for festivals like Coachella and stuff like that, so we may have these giant props lying around.” As half of Long Beach’s soulful musical duo the Black Noise, Brown has had plenty of experience putting together his own shows, and the first “janky” predecessor to Catapult actually already went down in Fullerton. The event series was heavily inspired by the artist and organiz-

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HALF THE ANIMAL perform with Saint James and Felix at the Wayfarer, 843 W. 19th St., Costa Mesa, (949) 764-0039; www.wayfarercm.com. Wed., 8 p.m. Free. 21+.

W

hile Half the Animal have only been around for just more than a year, the poppy foursome have made quite a splash with their catchy brand of alternative rock. Plenty of groups spend their first couple of years trying to work their way out of the garage, but Half the Animal were born out of a shift in the musical stylings of Open Air Stereo, a band you might remember from MTV’s venture into OC-based programming, Laguna Beach: The Real Orange County. Even before front man Chase Johnson and drummer Nick Gross were getting caught up in the televised high-school drama of the rich and obnoxious, the two were musical soulmates. It was their chemistry that made Open Air Stereo a success for several years, and—with their new shift in songwriting and the additions of bassist Evan Smith (who’s toured with bands such as Silversun Pickups and Chromeo) and guitarist Dan Graham—it has also been the backbone of Half the Animal. “Nick and I were in catechism class together when we were, like, 13 or 14, and we started getting kicked out on purpose to go talk about music and stuff,” Johnson says. “I needed a drummer, he told me he played drums, and since the first time we started playing together, we haven’t spent much time away from each other. It’s like a musical marriage.” Johnson and Gross have always been Laguna Beach residents, and surfing and beautiful women are the two most important things outside of music, according to the vocalist. Although he may not be writing romantic seaside ballads for too many Half the Animal tracks, he’d still rather spend time on the beach than in the studio most days. “I don’t think it correlates into lyrics all the time, but [the beach] is a big part of the

HALF THE ANIMAL

LocaLsonLy » josh chesler

feel of how we make our music,” Johnson says. “Growing up by the ocean, it’s a really spiritual, medicinal aspect to what we do. The ocean means a lot to us, and we’re very blessed to have been able to wake up every morning and see it.” In addition to releasing their debut EP, Shapes, Half the Animal are also offering a behind-thescenes web series to give fans a more intimate look into the band. Considering that Johnson and company know more than their fair share of documentarians and camera crews, it seemed like the perfect opportunity. “When we were kids, we all wanted to know certain things about our favorite bands like Incubus and Blink-182,” Johnson says. “We wanted to know what they ate and drank, what kind of clothes they wore, to just see them in their natural habitat. To see all of that, we had to wait for their DVDs with extra bonus footage to come out. Now, with YouTube and Vimeo, we’re able to show people how we live our lives. We really want the fans to feel connected and be connected.” For those who want to connect in-person, Wednesday is the last opportunity for fans to catch Half the Animal’s residency at the Wayfarer in Costa Mesa. Not only has it been a great way for the relatively new band to get some extra shows under their belt, but it’s also been a way to expose more potential fans to their music. “The first show was just kind of a warmup, but the last one was great and really packed,” Johnson says. “As with any residency, it’s a really good live rehearsal for upcoming tours. It’s cool to play to fans and old friends that never get to see you.” Hey, Orange County/Long Beach musicians & bands! Mail your music, contact info, high-res photos & impending show dates for possible review to: Locals Only, OC Weekly, 18475 Bandilier Circle, Fountain Valley, CA 92708. Or email your link to: localsonly@ocweekly.com.


THIS WEEK FRIDAY

AGENT ORANGE: 7 p.m., $15. The Parish at House of

Blues, 400 W. Disney Way, Ste. 337, Anaheim; houseofblues.com/anaheim. THE EXPANDERS: 8 p.m., free. The Slidebar RockN-Roll Kitchen, 122 E. Commonwealth Ave., Fullerton, (714) 871-7469; slidebarfullerton.com. THE MAIN SQUEEZE: 8 p.m., $12-$14. The Wayfarer, 843 W. 19th St., Costa Mesa, (949) 764-0039; wayfarercm.com. OCEAN INSTITUTE 2017 JAZZ FESTIVAL: 5:30 p.m., $95-$500. Ocean Institute, 24200 Dana Point Harbor Dr., Dana Point, (949) 496-2274; ocean-institute.org. THE ORWELLS: 8 p.m. The Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; observatoryoc.com. PETTY VS. EAGLES: 8 p.m., $20. The Coach House, 33157 Camino Capistrano, Ste. C, San Juan Capistrano, (949) 496-8930; thecoachhouse.com. PMA WITH HBH & TRI-STATE UNION: 9 p.m., free. Baja Beach Cafe, 2332 W. Coast Hwy., Newport Beach, (949) 673-8444; bajabeachcafe.com. POTTYMOUTH: 7 p.m., $7. Blacklight District Lounge, 2500 E. Anaheim St., Long Beach. REBEL SOULJAHZ WITH ELI MAC: 9 p.m., $20. Constellation Room at the Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; constellationroom.com. RELEASE THE BATS: 9 p.m., $5. Que Sera, 1923 E. Seventh St., Long Beach, (562) 599-6170; queseralb.wix.com.

SATURDAY

BOOTS & BIKINIS COUNTRY MUSIC BEACH PARTY: 4 p.m., free before 10 p.m.; bootsandbikinisoc.

com. Baja Beach Cafe, 2332 W. Coast Hwy., Newport Beach, (949) 673-8444; bajabeachcafe.com. GONE AVERY: 7 p.m., $10. Tiki Bar, 1700 Placentia Ave., Costa Mesa, (949) 270-6262; tikibaroc.com. HIATUS: 8 p.m., $15-$20. Gaslamp Restaurant & Bar, 6251 E. Pacific Coast Hwy., Long Beach, (562) 5964718; thegaslamprestaurant.com.

KREATOR; OBITUARY; MIDNIGHT; HORRENDOUS:

6:30 p.m. The Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; observatoryoc.com. LA LUZ: 8 p.m., $10. Alex’s Bar, 2913 E. Anaheim St., Long Beach, (562) 434-8292; alexsbar.com. LA VIDA BOHEME: 7 p.m., $22.50. The Parish at House of Blues, 400 W. Disney Way, Ste. 337, Anaheim; houseofblues.com/anaheim. MERITAGE VOCAL ARTS ENSEMBLE: 7 p.m., $20. Anaheim United Methodist Church, 1000 S. State College Blvd., Anaheim. OCEAN INSTITUTE 2017 JAZZ FESTIVAL:

BIG SEAN: 8 & 11 p.m., $59.50-$65. The Observatory,

3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; observatoryoc.com. EXPANDING OC HIP-HOP: 8 p.m., free. Doll Hut, 107 S. Adams St., Anaheim, (714) 533-1286. FULLY FULLWOOD REGGAE SUNDAYS: 3 p.m., $5. Don the Beachcomber, 16278 Pacific Coast Hwy., Huntington Beach, (562) 592-1321; donthebeachcomber.com. JOSH ABBOTT BAND: 7 p.m., $15. The Parish at House of Blues, 400 W. Disney Way, Ste. 337, Anaheim; houseofblues.com/anaheim.

MONDAY

COLONY HOUSE: 9 p.m. Constellation Room at the

Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; constellationroom.com. COUNTRY DANCIN’ WITH DJ PATRICK: 6:30 p.m., free. The Swallow’s Inn, 31786 Camino Capistrano, San Juan Capistrano, (949) 493-3188; swallowsinn.com. IN THE MOOD—A 1940S BIG BAND MUSIC REVUE: 2 p.m., $44. Irvine Barclay Theatre, 4242 Campus

Dr., Irvine, (949) 854-4646; thebarclay.org.

KABOOM DRAG SHOW: 9 p.m., free. Que Sera,

1923 E. Seventh St., Long Beach, (562) 599-6170; queseralb.wix.com. SINATRA & DINO DINNER SHOW: 6 p.m. La Cave, 1695 Irvine Ave., Costa Mesa, (949) 646-7944; lacaverestaurant.com. THE STONING; ACIDWEED: 8 p.m., free. Blacklight District Lounge, 2500 E. Anaheim St., Long Beach. VICTORIA BAILEY: 9 p.m., free. The Wayfarer, 843 W. 19th St., Costa Mesa, (949) 764-0039; wayfarercm.com.

TUESDAY

CUMBIA TUESDAYS: 8 p.m., free. Roxanne’s Lounge,

1115 E. Wardlow Rd., Long Beach, (562) 426-4777; roxanneslounge.com. EMERSON STRING QUARTET: 8 p.m., $29. Samueli Theater, 600 Town Center Dr., Costa Mesa, (714) 5562122; scfta.org. ISAIAH RASHAD: 8 p.m. The Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; observatoryoc.com. LAGUNA VOICE, OC’S BIGGEST SINGING CONTEST: 8 p.m., $5. Mozambique, 1740 S. Coast

Hwy., Laguna Beach, (949) 715-7777; mozambiqueoc.com.

OLD-SCHOOL HIP-HOP/R&B NIGHT: 7 p.m., free.

Pie Society, 353 E. 17th St., Costa Mesa, (949) 313-6335; piesocietybar.com. UGBK BAND: 8 p.m., free. Original Mike’s, 100 S. Main St., Santa Ana, (714) 550-7764; originalmikes.com.

WEDNESDAY

BATTLE AT THE BEACH: 8 p.m., free. Hurricanes Bar

& Grill, 200 Main St., Huntington Beach, (714) 374-0500; hurricanesbargrill.com. BIG WILD: 8 p.m. The Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; observatoryoc.com. EISLEY: 7 p.m., $15. The Parish at House of Blues, 400 W. Disney Way, Ste. 337, Anaheim; houseofblues.com/anaheim. HALF THE ANIMAL: 8 p.m., free. The Wayfarer, 843 W. 19th St., Costa Mesa, (949) 764-0039; wayfarercm.com. HUEY MACK: 9 p.m., $15. Constellation Room at the Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; constellationroom.com. MODERN DISCO AMBASSADORS: 10 p.m. La Cave, 1695 Irvine Ave., Costa Mesa, (949) 646-7944; lacaverestaurant.com. SLEIGH BELLS: 7:30 p.m., $29.50. House of Blues, 400 W. Disney Way, Ste. 337, Anaheim, (714) 778-2583; houseofblues.com/anaheim.

THURSDAY, MARCH 30

ANDREW BLOOM: 7:30 p.m., $5. Mozambique,

1740 S. Coast Hwy., Laguna Beach, (949) 715-7777; mozambiqueoc.com. ANGELINA’S SOUND: 8 p.m., free. Angelina’s Pizzeria, 8573 Irvine Center Dr., Irvine, (949) 536-5200. ARIANA GRANDE: 7:30 p.m., $29.95-$199.95. Honda Center, 2695 E. Katella Ave., Anaheim, (714) 704-2400; hondacenter.com. CRYSTAL FIGHTERS: 8 p.m. The Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; observatoryoc.com. EXCISION: 8 p.m., $45. House of Blues, 400 W. Disney Way, Ste. 337, Anaheim, (714) 778-2583; houseofblues.com/anaheim. G JONES: 9:30 p.m. The Yost Theater, 307 N. Spurgeon St., Santa Ana, (888) 862-9573; yosttheater.com. KR: 9 p.m., $12. Constellation Room at the Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; constellationroom.com.

| ocweekly.com |

SUNDAY

Disney Way, Ste. 337, Anaheim, (714) 778-2583; houseofblues.com/anaheim.

Ma rc h 24-30, 20 17

5:30 p.m., $95-$500. Ocean Institute, 24200 Dana Point Harbor Dr., Dana Point, (949) 496-2274; ocean-institute.org. PACIFIC DUB WITH TUNNEL VISION: 8 p.m. Constellation Room at the Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; constellationroom.com. THEM EVILS: 8 p.m., $5-$7. The Wayfarer, 843 W. 19th St., Costa Mesa, (949) 764-0039; wayfarercm.com. WALTER TROUT: 8 p.m. The Coach House, 33157 Camino Capistrano, Ste. C, San Juan Capistrano, (949) 496-8930; thecoachhouse.com. YELLOWCARD: 7 p.m., $35. House of Blues, 400 W. Disney Way, Ste. 337, Anaheim, (714) 778-2583; houseofblues.com/anaheim.

SAVE FERRIS: 7 p.m., $25. House of Blues, 400 W.

| contents | the county | feature | calendar | food | film | culture | music | classifieds |

concert guide»

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Curious Minds I recently spoke at Curious Minds Weekend in Toronto at the Hot Docs Ted Rogers Cinema. Audience members submitted questions on cards before the show—anonymously—but the moderator, Lisan Jutras of the Globe and Mail, and I were having so much fun talking with each other that we didn’t get to many cards. So I’m going to quickly answer as many of the questions from the audience at Curious Minds as I can this week. My husband and I have been seeking a third for a threesome. After a very palpable night of flirtation, I asked a mutual friend (as we shared a cab) if he would be down for a threesome. He said yes, but I was not about to spring him on my husband that night. So I texted him later about it, and he has ignored me. What should I take from this? The hint. A friend’s BF won’t go down on her no matter how much she asks. She still won’t break up with him, even though she told me that oral is the only way she has ever had an orgasm. How do I get her to realize her sexual pleasure is a priority?

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SPECIALIZING IN ALL THINGS

sex»

If your friend’s BF doesn’t know oral is the only way she can orgasm, she should tell him. If she told him and he doesn’t care, she should dump him. If she told him and he doesn’t care and she won’t dump him, you’re not obligated to listen to her complain about the orgasms she’s not having.

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| ocweekly.com |

» dan savage

Happy birthday. And, yes, it’s normal for a man to slow down as he ages—it’s not her—and there are younger men who take a long time to come. But such men need to take their partners’ physical limitations into consideration. To avoid wearing out their partners’ jaws, fingers, etc., they need to take matters into their own hands. They should enjoy that blowjob, handjob, twatjob or assjob; take breaks to stroke their own dicks; eventually bring themselves to the point of orgasmic inevitability; and end by plunging back into that mouth, fist, twat or ass to blow their load. I have been reading your column since the early 1990s. Since that time, what has struck you in the kind of problems people write you about? People don’t ask me about butt plugs anymore. I used to get a letter once or twice a week from someone who needed to have butt plugs explained to them. But butt plugs have their own Wiki page now, so no one needs me to explain them anymore. But for old times’ sake: They look like lava lamps, they go in your butt, they feel awesome, and they typically don’t induce gay panic in butt-play-curious straight boys. Would you share your thoughts on our prime minister, Justin Trudeau? I think Justin needs to stop fucking around and legalize weed already, like he promised. When are you going to move to Canada already? See above. Polyamory after marriage—is it okay?

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I’m a bisexual 42-year-old female with an extremely high sex drive who squirts with every orgasm. How do I deal with friends—even people at a sex club—who think you’re a freak because “women aren’t supposed to be horny all the time.” If your friends—presumably people you aren’t fucking— complain that you’re horny all the time, maybe it’s because you don’t talk about anything other than the sex you just had or the sex you hope to have soon. If people at sex clubs (!) are complaining about how horny you are . . . either you’ve accidentally wandered into a yacht club or even people at a sex club wanna talk about something other than sex every once in a while. My very Christian friend is about to get married. Though she is socially very liberal, she is pretty sexually repressed. I want to do something to encourage her to explore her sexuality a bit before she takes a try at partnered sex. How weird would it be to buy her a vibrator as a shower present? Don’t give your friend a vibrator at her shower—gifts are opened in front of guests at showers—but go ahead and send her one. Tell her it’s a pre-bachelorette-party gift.

For some. I’m a submissive gay boy. I saw you walk into the theater tonight wearing combat boots. Is there any way I could lick your boots clean after the show? Sadly, I didn’t see your question until after I got back to my hotel. Straight male here. My best male friend of 20 years transitioned to female. I’ve been super-supportive since day one, but her transitioning is all she ever talks about, and it’s getting tiresome. I miss our discussions of bicycle repair and Swedish pop music. How can I tell her to give it a rest while remaining supportive? If she began transitioning last week, then of course it’s all she can talk about. If she transitioned five years ago, and it’s still all she ever talks about, then you’ll need to (gently) be the change you want to see in the conversation. Listen supportively when she discusses trans issues and seize opportunities (when they arise) to change the subject (“So how do you think Sweden will do in Eurovision this year?”). Why are so many lesbians into astrology?

Two guys divorced in order to bring a third man into their relationship on equal terms, and they now plan to start a family with their sisters acting as surrogates. Thoughts?

All the lesbians I know are strict empiricists. So the more pertinent question would be this: Whose sample is skewed— mine or yours?

Mazel tov?

My male partner never masturbates, and we have sex only once a week. We’ve been together four years. I’m a woman. I would like to have sex just a little more, but he isn’t into it. Is there something weird about me masturbating a bunch during the week and just having weekend sex?

I am 31. My husband (newly married) is 46, almost 47. He takes FOREVER to come, no matter what I do. How do we speed up this process? My jaw, fingers, etc. are all very sore.

Nope. Your husband speeds up the process by incorporating self-stimulation breaks into the blowjobs, handjobs, etc, you’re giving him. He strokes himself while you take a quick breather and/or an Advil, he gets himself closer, you get back to work. I’m 47, and my wife is 31. I take a lot longer to come and recover than she would like. Could you please explain to her that it’s normal for a man my age to “slow down” and it’s not her?

Dude? Trump? WTF? ITMFA (ITMFA.org). On the Lovecast (savagelovecast.com), Dan chats with Brian Whitney, co-author of a book about the “Cannibal Cop.” Contact Dan via email at mail@savagelove.net, and follow him on Twitter: @fakedansavage.


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TokeofTheWeek » mary carreon

The Aficionado Box by Aventura Organics ne of the biggest—if not the biggest— problems in California’s cannabis indusO try is pesticide use. Although pesticides

have been used in the process of growing marijuana forever, smoking nugs loaded with pesticides is perhaps the worst form of toxin exposure. The chemicals are heated, then inhaled into our lungs and spread throughout our bodies. The only way to avoid this is to either grow your own weed (which isn’t easy) or know your grower. That’s what makes Aventura Organics so special: Its master grower is old-school and takes growing organic, medical marijuana extremely seriously. Thus, the quality of its product is pure and grown locally. Aventura Organics (www. aventuraorganics.com) is the cannabis version of a monthly wine-delivery subscription— exclusively available to Orange

County residents. There are three levels to choose from: the Enthusiast Box, which includes 7 grams of one strain; the Connoisseur Box, which comes with 7 grams of two different strains; and the Aficionado Box, loaded with a total of 21 grams of herb split into equal amounts of three different strains. My Aficionado Box ($350) arrived with a hand-written letter informing me of its contents. Inside the striped pine box was Neville’s Haze, a sativa that’s a beautiful expression of old-school genetics; Wedding Cake, a 70/30 hybrid; and Platinum OG, a heavy-hitting indica. After smoking Aventura Organics’ clean weed, I now can tell the difference between pesticide-treated cannabis and non. There’s no going back.

MCARREON@OCWEEKLY.COM


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103 Auditions/Show Biz

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195 Position Wanted

195 Position Wanted

Statistician: perform statistical programming & data analysis; MS in statistics w/1.5 yrs exp. as statistician; 40hrs/wk; Send resume to Mumao, Inc., 9 MacArthur Pl,#1101, Santa Ana, CA 92707

Administrative Assistant: Perform admin. assistant functions, answer calls, provide info to clients, process mails/emails, draft letters/invoices, record info into database. Req’d: Bachelor’s in Business Admin. or related. Mail Resume: M+D PROPERTIES, 6940 Beach Blvd. #D-501, Buena Park, CA 90621

Accountant (Anaheim, CA) Perform financial and managerial accounting duties. Master's in Accounting or related req'd. Resume to: Interlog Corp. 1295 N Knollwood Cir, Anaheim, CA 92801

Market Research Analyst (La Palma, CA) Perform market research/analysis for logistics services. Master's in communication/marketing related. Resume to: Korchina Logistics USA, Inc. 4 Centerpointe Dr. #120, La Palma, CA 90623

195 Position Wanted Audio/Speech Processing Algorithm Engineers Certified Public Accountant (Irvine, CA) Perform financial statement audits for CPA firm clients. California CPA license req'd. Resume to: PK LLP, 2100 Main St., #200, Irvine, CA 92614. Audio/Speech Processing Algorithm Engineers Software Engineer (Irvine, CA) Develop, create/modify general computer applications software&specialized utility programs; Design software/customize software for client use with the aim of optimizing operational efficiency; Analyze/ design databases within an application area, working individually or coordinating database development as part of a team. 40hrs/wk, Bachelor’s in Computer Engineering or related Reqd. Resume to Kakao Games USA, Inc. Attn: Jeonghee Jin. 7 Corporate Park #150, Irvine, CA 92606queenie@ ggec.com

Computer Programmer (Irvine, CA) Comprehend client's management challenges & develop computer program functional requirements to facilitate & support management decisions; Perform / direct revision, repair, or expansion of existing programs to increase operating efficiency / adapt to new requirements; Design & write well designed, efficient code on time & with high quality in C++, Python, C, SQL (MySQL), or other programming languages. 40hrs/wk, Bachelor’s in Computer Science or related reqd. Resume to Kayuga Solution, Inc. Attn. Colin Chung, 9641 Irvine Center Dr, Irvine, CA 92618

JUNK REMOVAL WE PICK UP: Trash, Furniture, Jacuzzi, Appliances, Metal/ Wood Sheds, yard/storage/garage, vacacies, patio, Construction Debris and Concrete removal/demolition. ALL unwanted items.

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714-296-8281 or 714-987-8495 www.perezhauling1.com | Lic. #BUS2015-01820

421 Used Auto CARS FOR CASH I’LL BUY YOUR CAR, TRUCK, RV OR VAN! Paying Cash $100-$5000 Running or Not 714-514-0886 949-375-5178

525 Legal Services Notice of the Initiation of the Section 106 Process: Public Participation AT&T Mobility LLC plans to install a new telecommunications facility at: 680 California Avenue Irvine, CA 92617 The project consists of the removal and installation of a new 91’-6” tall replacement light pole with nine 8’-0” tall panel antennas mounted at tip heights of 56’-0”, 67’-0”, and 78’-0”. Associated equipment will be installed in a new lease area. No alternatives to the project were identified. Public Comments for this project should be forwarded to: Joyce McDonnell Bechtel Infrastructure and Power Corporation 16808 Armstrong Avenue, Suite 225 Irvine, CA 92606 jwlau@bechtel.com (949) 372-4469

Real Estate For Sale 215 Open House 11315 Dewdrop Avenue Fountain Valley Saturday, March 25th 1:00pm - 4:00pm Sunday, March 26th 1:00pm - 4:00pm Home Size: 2,194 sq ft Lot Size: 6,364 sq ft Year Built: 1971 4 Bedrooms/ 3 Bathrooms Lily Campbell (714) 717-5095 LilyCampbellTeam.com 8661 Kent Circle Huntington Beach Saturday, March 25th 1:00pm - 4:00pm Sunday, March 26th 1:00pm - 4:00pm Home Size: 2,499 sq ft Lot Size: 7,452 sq ft Year Built: 1960 6 Bedrooms/ 2 Bathrooms Lily Campbell (714) 717-5095 LilyCampbellTeam.com 17292 Poplar Street Fountain Valley Sunday, March 26th 1:30pm - 4:30pm Home Size: 1,765 sq ft Lot Size: 7,139 sq ft Year Built: 1965 4 Bedrooms/ 2 Bathrooms Lily Campbell (714) 717-5095 LilyCampbellTeam.com 2981 Player Lane, #6 Tustin Saturday, March 25th 1:00pm - 4:00pm Sunday, March 26th 1:00pm - 4:00pm Home Size: 1,865 sq ft Year Built: 1999 3 Bedrooms/ 2.5 Bathrooms Lily Campbell (714) 717-5095 LilyCampbellTeam.com

Top Shelf Anaheim: $35 CAP | FTP: 4.5 Gram 8th OR $10 OFF Concentrates | Free DABS with Any Donation DOGO Deals & oz Specials 3124 W. Lincoln Ave. Anaheim | 714.385.7814 Ease Canna: FTP- All 8th will be weighed out to 5GRAMS!! | 2435 E. Orangethorpe Ave., Fullerton, CA 92831 | 714-309-7772 RE-UP: FTP Specials: 3G's Private Reserve $30 | 3G's Gold Crumble | 7G's Top Shelf | FREE PreRoll w/ $10 Donation 8851 Garden Grove Blvd, Ste 105 Garden Grove, CA 92844 | 714.586.1565 From The Earth: We are the largest dispensary in Orange County! 3023 South Orange Avenue, Santa Ana, CA 92707 Tel (657) 44-GREEN (47336) | www.FTEOC.com Club Meds : FTP 5g 1/8th (All Strains) / $10 off any concentrate (Per Gram) / FTP $225 Top Shelf OZ (All Strains) Hand N Hand: FREE Joint w/ any purchase | 20% OFF Any Edible (limit 1) | 20% OFF Wax Product 2400 Pullman St., Suite B, Santa Ana | 657.229.4464 SHOWGROW: Voted BEST DISPENSARY in OC 2016! 1625 E. St. Gertrude Pl. Santa Ana CA 92705 | 949.565.4769 | ShowGrow.com LA MIRADA HEALING CENTER: $35 CAP | FREE DAB WITH EVERY DONATION FTP'S: 4.5 G 1/8 | $10 OFF CONCENTRATES | $3 OFF EDIBLES 15902 IMPERIAL HIGHWAY LA MIRADA, CA, 90638 | 562-245-2083 Green Mile Collective: First Time Patients Receive a FREE Private Reserve 1/8th with order. The Only Superstore Delivery Service | Call 1-866-DELIVERY or Order Online at DeliveryGreens.com

DELIVERY Rite Greens Delivery: OC's Most Trusted Cannabis Source 9AM10PM Daily | 714.418.4877 | ritegreensdelivery.com PURE & NATURAL THERAPY: DELIVERING QUALITY PRODUCT TO LB, HB, SEAL BEACH & SURROUNDING CITIES | 7 GRAMS FOR $50 ON SELECT STRAINS | 3 FREE PRE-ROLLS WITH EVERY ORDER* | 714.330.0513

DR. EVALUATIONS Releaf Wellness: Renewals $25 / New Patient - $35 657.251.8032 / 1540 E Edinger Ste. D Santa Ana CA 92705 6833 Indiana Ste. #102, Riverside CA 92506 OC 420 Evaluations: New Patients - $29 | Renewals - $19 1490 E. Lincoln Ave., Anaheim 92805 - 714.215.0190 1671 W. Katella Ave, Suite #130 Anaheim - 855.665.3825 4th St Medical: Renewals $29 | New Patients $34 with ad. 2112 E. 4th St., #111, Santa Ana | 714-599-7970 | 4thStreetMedical.com Cali 420 Rx: PLEASE CALL FOR LATEST SPECIALS! Sundays Appointment only | 714-723-6769 | 2601 W Ball Road, unit 209, Anaheim CA 92804 | Hours: Monday - Saturday 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM

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Bioinformatics Associate, Irvine, CA. Designing analysis strategies, algorithms, and tools for genome-wide DNA methylation and next-generation sequencing. MS in Bioinformatics & 1 yr experience. Mail resume to Angela Kim, HR Mgr, Zymo Research Corporation, 17062 Murphy Ave., Irvine, CA 92614.

Trimble Inc. has openings in Newport Beach, CA for: Software Engineer (6083.395) The Trimble Water professional svcs. and support team are resp. for the delivery and integration of the Trimble Water products and solutions portfolio to our customers. Travel req. less than 50% of work time. Graphic User Interface Designer (6083.664) Generate design concepts and expand them into a detailed design. Travel req. less than 50% of time. Send resume to TNLJobs_US@trimble.com. Ref. job code above when applying. EOE

ASTROLOGERS, PSYCHICS, TAROT READERS NEEDED! P/T F/T $12-$36 per hour. tambien en Espanol. 954-524-9029

Business Development Specialist: Conduct market research to identify potential market sales for insurance company. Req’d: Bachelor’s in Mktng., Bus. Econ., or related. Mail Resume: Golden Bells Insurance Agency, Inc. 1151 N. Magnolia Ave. #101, Anaheim, CA 92801

HANDS ON EXPERIENCE Private upscale ocean location Swedish , Deep Tissue, Shiatsu, Reflexology Thai , Tantra For a most memorable session call Gina (562) 342-0619

South Coast Safe Access: FTP: Buy an 1/8, Get a FREE 1/8 | 1900 Warner Ave Ste. A, Santa Ana 92705 | 949.474.7272 | MonSat 10am-8pm Sun 11am-7pm

2 4- 3 0, 2 017

Market Research Analyst Analyze statistical data to forecast future market trends & FPD industry, gather info. re: company customers/competitors, analyze conditions that may impact sales by researching market conditions, changes in industry. Must be able to perform job duties. Bachelor's degree in Economics req'd. Resume: Signet FPD, Inc. 75 Columbia, Aliso Viejo CA 92656.

Computer Network Support Specialist (Irvine, CA). Analyze network data to improve website functionality, define network usage and server function. Bachelor’s or higher degree in computer science. 1 year experience. Experience may be completed before or after university degree. Resume to Allen Anthonysamy, SOLO Business Systems, Inc., 15041-A Bake Parkway, Irvine, CA 92618.

Software Engineer Jobsite Newport Beach, CA, apply to HR at Phunware, Inc., tnolazco@phunware. com.

141 USED SURF BOARDS ALL SIZES, CHEAP MARK: 949-232-2603

Gram Kings: DAILY DEALS | Discounts for Military, Veterans, Disabled | 10189 Westminster Ave. Suite #217, Garden Grove 714.209.8187 | Hours: Monday-Sunday 10am-10pm

Ma r ch

Chemical Engineer Recon Engineering & Construction, Inc. is hiring in Los Alamitos. Must have at least 2 years of progressive experience as a Chemical Engineer. Assess chemical equipment and processes to improve performance while ensuring compliance with safety and environmental regulations. Fulltime. Mail Resume to P.O. Box 93120, Long Beach, CA 90809

Certified Public Accountant (Irvine, CA) Perform financial statement audits for CPA firm clients. California CPA license req'd. Resume to: PK LLP, 2100 Main St., #200, Irvine, CA 92614.

Software Engineer (Irvine, CA) Develop, create/modify general computer applications software&specialized utility programs; Design software/customize software for client use with the aim of optimizing operational efficiency; Analyze/ design databases within an application area, working individually or coordinating database development as part of a team. 40hrs/wk, Bachelor’s in Computer Engineering or related Reqd. Resume to Kakao Games USA, Inc. Attn: Jeonghee Jin. 7 Corporate Park #150, Irvine, CA 92606

Market Research Analyst: Apply by mail only to Pacmet International, Inc., 26040 Acero, #214, Mission Viejo, CA 92691, attn. President.

530 Misc. Services

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Accountant (Buena Park, CA) Perform accounting duties for food service business. Associate’s in Accounting/Business related. Resume to: D&J Ko Ko Inc. 8532 Commonwealth Ave, Buena Park, CA 90621

Accountant (Buena Park, CA) Prepare asset, liability, and capital account entries by compiling and analyzing account information. Documents financial transactions by entering account information; Report to management regarding the finances of company. 40hrs/ wk, Bachelor in Economics or related req’d. Resume to Sureung America Inc Attn: Dong H KO, 6281 Beach Blvd #318, Buena Park, CA 90621

Education Reporter (Fullerton, CA) Collect & analyze educational facts about newsworthy events by interviewing educational figures, investigation, or observation of background info related to educational stories & functions. Report & write educational stories for TV; 1yr exp. & bachelor in education reqd., 40hrs/wk; Resume to CTS America, Inc. 1025 S. Placentia Ave., Fullerton, CA 92831

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CONDITIONS: All advertisements are published upon the representation by the advertiser and/or agency that the agency and advertiser are authorized to publish the entire contents and subject matter thereof, that the contents are not unlawful, and do not infringe on the rights of any person or entity and that the agency and advertiser have obtained all necessary permission and releases. Upon the OC Weekly’s request, the agent or advertiser will produce all necessary permission and releases. In consideration of the publication of advertisements, the advertiser and agency will indemnify and save the OC Weekly harmless from and against any loss or expenses arising out of publication of such advertisements. The publisher reserves the right to revise, reject or omit without notice any advertisement at any time. The OC Weekly accepts no liability for it’s failure, for any cause, to insert an advertisement. Publication and placement of advertisements are not guaranteed. Liability for any error appearing in an advertisement is limited to the cost of the space actually occupied. No allowance, however, will be granted for an error that does not materially affect the value of an advertisement. To qualify for an adjustment, any error must be reported within 15 days of publication date. Credit for errors is limited to first insertion. Drawings, artwork and articles for reproduction are accepted only at the advertiser’s risk and should be clearly marked to facilitate their return. The OC Weekly reserves the right to revise its advertising rates at any time. Announcements of an increase shall be made four weeks in advance to contract advertisers. No verbal agreement altering the rates and/or the terms of this rate card shall be recognized.

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March 23, 2017 – OC Weekly  
March 23, 2017 – OC Weekly