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MARCH 17-23, 2017 | VOLUME 22 | NUMBER 29

SAME TIME NEXT YEAR? | OCWEEKLY.COM

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Michael Puglisi Butcher


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The County

By Lisa Black 66 | SAMA WAREH |

14 | SHARON QUIRK-SILVA |

By Gabriel San Román

By Joel Beers

68 | JEFF GARVIN | By Dave Barton 70 | RYAN SMITH AND JEREMY HANNA | By Josh Chesler 72 | NIKKI MARVIN |

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13 | AN INTRODUCTION |

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Food

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Music

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52 | RYAN GARLITOS |

55 | SPECIAL SCREENINGS |

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Get off the couch and go to a local theater. By Matt Coker

Film

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Culture

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on the cover

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OC Weekly is located at 18475 Bandilier Circle, Fountain Valley, CA 92708. (714) 550-5900. Display Advertising, (714) 550-5900; Classified Adver tising, (714) 550-5900; National Advertis ing, (888) 278-9866, voicemediagroup.com; Fax, (714) 550-5908; Advertising Fax, (714) 550-5905; Classified Fax, (714) 550-5905; Circu la tion, (888) 732-7323; Website: www.ocweekly.com. The publication is free, one per reader. Removal of more than one paper from any distribution point constitutes theft, and violators are subject to prosecution. Please address all correspondence to OC Weekly, 18475 Bandilier Circle, Fountain Valley, CA 92708; email: letters@ocweekly. com. Published weekly (Thursday). OC Weekly is wholly owned and operated by OC Weekly News, Inc., a California corporation. Subscription price: $30 for six months; $52 per year. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to OC Weekly at P.O. Box 25859, Santa Ana, CA 92799. Submissions of all kinds are welcome. Address them to the editor and include a self-addressed, stamped envelope. Copyright ©2017, OC Weekly News, Inc. All rights reserved. OC Weekly® is a trademark of OC Weekly News, Inc.

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I

n 1954, legendary broadcaster Edward R. Murrow interviewed the poet Carl Sandburg for his CBS program See It Now, in which Murrow sat down with public intellectuals for lengthy conversations (yes, kiddies, there was a time when the public saw talks longer than a NowThis clip). It was the height of the Red Scare, and Murrow had just delivered a blistering attack on Senator Joseph McCarthy and his nasty politicking—but McCarthy kept ruining people’s lives on Capitol Hill. The American Dream seemed on the ropes, so Murrow asked Sandburg if the country was ‘‘in danger of tearing ourselves apart.’’ No, said the poet. ‘‘Over and over again, it has looked as though we were sunk as a nation,’’ he replied. ‘‘And always . . . always, there has been a saving remnant. Always, there has been enough of a small, faithful minority—faithful to the death.’’

OC PEOPLE 2017:

The Better Angels of Our County In these strange days, we present to you our faithful minority: 31 OC people who make us great, from food to academia, arts to yoga. Muslim, Christian, atheist. Mexican, Syrian, Vietnamese. These are our better angels, the people who inspire us, who teach us how to live in a time when your Facebook feed has turned into one nasty morass and the CIA has hacked into your smartphone to hear you poop. Read these profiles, get inspired, and remember: Be like the faithful minority.

—GUSTAVO ARELLANO

Photography by Nicholas Iverson http://www.nicholasiverson.com/


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s a UCLA sociology major in the mid-1980s, Sharon Quirk-Silva didn’t know what she wanted to do long-term. But short-term, she wanted to join the Peace Corps. Until the naturally shy young woman attended an introductory meeting. “Right away, they told us we had to raise money and get a sponsor, and in those days, the last thing I would have done was ask someone to sponsor me for anything,” she says. “So I didn’t do it. And the irony now is, almost 35 years later, in many ways, I have to raise money to get people to sponsor me.” And how. In 2004, when Quirk-Silva (known as Quirk then) ran for Fullerton City Council, she raised about $50,000. Last year, in her ultimately successful attempt to wrest back the 65th Assembly

District seat she lost in 2014, more than $4.1 million was donated to her campaign, according to the California Secretary of State website. But that’s the price for running in one of the most contested legislative districts in the state, covering much of northwest Orange County. Nearly evenly split between Democrats and Republicans, as well as one of the most ethnically diverse districts in the country, it’s an invaluable chess piece. Both of Quirk-Silva’s wins, in 2012 and 2016, were critical in giving Democrats a two-thirds supermajority in the Assembly. But though her district has given her a statewide profile and she’s back in Sacramento, Quirk-Silva remains a Fullerton girl through and through. Born Sharon Howard, she and her family (which

included nine siblings) moved from East Los Angeles to the then-mushrooming bedroom community of Fullerton when she was 2. They moved into a house on Richman Avenue when all the houses, and most of the people, were new. As fate would have it, the elementary school she attended, Richman Elementary, is where she has spent the bulk of her teaching career. She says hers was one of the first Latino families to move to the community, but she has nothing but fond memories of growing up there. She and her siblings (all named after members of the Mickey Mouse Club—how OC is that?) played sports, with swimming being her particular passion. “I rode my skateboard five blocks to get to the [Janet Jones] swim center, and I swam competitively for Ful-

lerton [High School] for four years,” she says. “I never won a race. But one thing [swimming] taught me was to be very disciplined. Swimming is one of those sports where you have to get up at 5 a.m. every day to take lessons, and my dad would take us in his work truck every morning.” But it was education that Quirk-Silva is most grateful for in terms of Fullerton, as well as what she has spent most of her adult life doing in that city, as a publicschool teacher in the Fullerton School District. “I was the first in my family to go to college, and I think moving to Fullerton and going to Fullerton College” was a major reason for that, she says. After her Peace Corps dream fizzled, Quirk-Silva, realizing that California was facing a teacher shortage, went that route, moving back to her home city. Being a


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wanted answers and wanted to make sure that the public knew we were going to try to get to the bottom of it. I think I looked at it more holistically than maybe my male counterparts, other than Bruce Whitaker.” Much of the city seethed for nearly a year, but after surveillance video of the brutal pummeling was released to the public in May 2012, Quirk-Silva truly feared for her city. “There were maybe 300 people [in the council chambers] the meeting after the video was released, and it was very emotional,” she says, “and I felt it could very well erupt in a riot or something.” The city weathered the storm, thanks in some part to Quirk-Silva’s steady and empathetic leadership. But has it completely healed? “I think Fullerton has improved dramatically as a police department, but there will always be stories, and I think when you have something like that happen, you’re always going to be on alert,” she says. “I know there are still people who would like to see a citizen’s advisory committee, but I think there have been good steps made.” After eight years on the council, QuirkSilva felt she had accomplished as much as she could in Fullerton. But the city was still enmeshed in the Thomas aftermath, so she wrestled with the decision to face Chris Norby in the primary for the newly created 65th in June 2012. Finally, after realizing he faced no opposition, she entered the race a week before the filing deadline, pulling off an upset win in the November general election. In her first term, she says, she was most proud of sponsoring a fee-waiver bill that allows homeless people to receive an ID and a copy of their birth certificate without paying for them, as well as pushing for a veterans’ cemetery to be built in Irvine, something she plans on accelerating in her second term. She also wants to preserve more open space in Coyote Hills, as well as create an assembly office/service center in Fullerton. But whether dealing with statewide issues or ones that directly affect her constituents, she says she will always view things through the perspective of a teacher. “I’m always going to work through the lens of the working families of the 32 faces I see in a classroom,” says QuirkSilva, happily married to Jesus Silva, a junior high teacher in the same district who won election to the Fullerton City Council last year. “They’re not the same faces, but over the years, they’re the same stories. Some of them are from very stable families, but in the same classroom two years in a row, I had [kids] living in transitional living centers. “So even in the same neighborhoods and communities, there are not only different cultures and ethnicities, but income levels,” Quirk-Silva continues. “So whether it’s jobs or housing or education, we always have to be looking for upward mobility for everyone, from the lowest in poverty but also the middle class.”

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young teacher, newly married and in the process of raising a family (she has four children), thoughts of a political career weren’t in her plans. But she got her first taste of politics in the early 2000s, when she and a handful of other teachers helped their elementary-school principal get elected to the school board. She learned the nuts and bolts of campaigning, from knocking on doors to making signs. That same year, she helped to start a small group to raise money to find candidates for school board and City Council elections, meeting at Café Hidalgo in downtown Fullerton. “It was nonpartisan,” Quirk-Silva says. “We just wanted candidates to have balance—good parks and libraries, smart development. My job was to go out and encourage people to run, and most people said no, but then people started asking me why I didn’t run. And I was, ‘No, I’m teaching and have four kids.’ But, lo and behold, a year and a half later, I did run.” Her plan was to run nonpartisan, as an educator wanting to make a difference. But she had no idea how entrenched the GOP was, even at the local level, in Orange County. “I really had no idea what was against me,” she says. “People didn’t take us seriously for months. Then, people would walk up to me saying I had no chance to win.” And then there were the mailers, such as one that equated her with Hillary Clinton as the “kind of liberals we don’t need around here.” Yet, she finished second in the voting, winning a seat in 2004. But her youth (40) and gender were a stark contrast to the good-ol’-boy culture of a city then dominated by councilmen Don Bankhead and Dick Jones. “I think it was very difficult for my male colleagues to accept me,” she says. “They used to call Pam [Keller, another teacher elected to the council in 2006] and I the ‘kindergarten teachers.’ And I don’t think they thought our voice had the weight theirs did, so, no, it wasn’t easy.” Quirk-Silva gained more than her voice during her first term. Though overlooked and mocked during her first election, she was the leading vote-getter in the 2008 election. But things would become a lot rougher in her second term. On July 5, 2011, Kelly Thomas, a mentally ill homeless man, died as a result of injuries sustained after Fullerton cops beat him. The resulting saga—roiling protests, charges of second-degree murder, a gruesome photo and video, three-fifths of the City Council recalled (including Jones and Bankhead), national media coverage—strained the city as never before. And Quirk-Silva, as mayor presiding over the council meetings, was in the thick of it. She was the first to call for the officers to be put on administrative leave, first to call for the then-police chief to resign, and feels as if she took the lead among council members in demanding answers and accountability. “My initial reaction was as saddened and horrified as anyone else who had seen the photo,” she says. “Like everyone else, I

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MAN OF THE SEA

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aving graduated from Newport Harbor High School five days earlier, 17-year-old Brad Avery deferred college to visit distant, exotic places on the planet. He flew from LAX to Mexico City, and then to Panama, where he began a three-year trip sailing as a crew member on wealthy people’s boats in the Caribbean Sea and Atlantic Ocean. “I had a passionate, passionate interest in sailing,” he recalls. When Avery wasn’t boating, he backpacked across Europe. This period in the early 1970s transformed him from wideeyed, middle-class kid—who washed comedy legend Joey Bishop’s yacht, Son of a Gun, and drank coffee with John Wayne on his 130-foot boat, Wild Goose—into a savvy young adult. He learned how to fend for himself, partied for the first time, honed his already-keen boating skills and saw his love of nature intensify. Awed by Ernest Hemingway, he entered the University of Southern California’s journalism program, hoping to master the art of storytelling. We’re lucky his stint as a reporter, a gig writing for

The Orange County Register’s outdoor sports page, lasted less than two years before he found his true calling. Nowadays, Avery serves as director of Orange Coast College’s School of Sailing and Seamanship, based near Restaurant Row on Pacific Coast Highway in Newport Beach. Some might dismiss the job as a lightweight task allowing three-hour lunches followed by idle gazing at the water as yachts parade back and forth with palm trees as a backdrop. After all, there’s no denying this scenery is spectacular, even hypnotic. But Avery hasn’t let the atmosphere lull him. During a recent interview from an office perch overlooking the bay, he could easily name the owners of passing boats. Such familiarity makes him, along with councilman Duffy Duffield—another longterm nautical enthusiast—guardians of local boaters and waterways. “To me, [our waters are] like a huge public park with whales and Catalina Island,” he says. “It’s important to protect [them].” Avery took over a boating program decades ago that could have easily been

scrapped as inconsequential during state budget crises and built it into one of California’s best examples of an efficient, public-private cooperation. County officials provide the land for offices, parking and classrooms. The community-college district handles human-resource issues and accounting, and wealthy area residents, such as the Disney family, offset expenses with generous cash contributions as well as donations of an array of sail- and power boats. The project couldn’t succeed, however, without Avery and his staff bringing daily enthusiasm. They attract students also by offering affordable rates of, in one particular session, a cost of only $155 for 20 hours of expert, hands-on training—most of it on a boat. More than 1,500 folks—including people from as far away as Big Bear and San Diego—enroll annually. While sipping a margarita with a friend on a beach in Cabo San Lucas last May, Avery received a text message from Duffield: An incumbent council member had unexpectedly decided not to seek re-election. Duffield encouraged him

to run for the seat. An amused Avery handed his phone to his pal, who saw the communication and, without permission, jokingly sent a response: Okay! In a life loaded with twists, this nonpolitician ultimately accepted the challenge. Hardcore conservatives weren’t elated by his refusal to kowtow to their ideological doctrine on national hotbutton topics. At a 2016 GOP candidates’ forum, they demanded he regurgitate their views on killing abortion rights and Obamacare with no replacement plan, or risk losing. On another aggressive front, anti-commercial-development activists sought his unyielding allegiance to nogrowth sentiments. Veteran boat captains who’ve navigated oceans and kept crews both thrilled and safe aren’t easily rattled. Avery let the advocates know he was open to consider arguments, but he refused to become a pawn for either camp. In November, this 63-year-old lover of the sea, wildlife and the city that has been home for nearly five decades won the election. —R. SCOTT MOXLEY


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n 1980, Ray Hiemstra had no idea he’d be one of the leading environmental activists in Orange County, let alone working as the associate director of programs at Orange County Coastkeeper. Working in a solid union job at a Jerseymaid milk plant with full benefits and a pension, Hiemstra had a stable career to support his family. But as a natural outdoorsman and a former Boy Scout, his childhood dream was to work in nature, a dream Hiemstra thought he left behind. Fullerton-born and North OC-raised, Hiemstra graduated from Savanna High School in 1978 and attended Cal State Long Beach, where he pursued a degree in geography and environmental studies. “If I don’t hold the record, I’m definitely a contender for taking the longest time

to get my degree,” Hiemstra says with a laugh. “I mean, I graduated high school in ’78 and graduated from Long Beach in 1999. I almost went to college continuously part-time, but I had a career that I stayed with for 25 years and got married.” But had his college career been different, it’s likely he wouldn’t be where he is now. As he was finishing up his last bit of school in April ’99, one of his teachers assigned a project requiring students to focus locally on one of the four elements: fire, water, earth or air. “I picked water because some of my previous school projects involved water, and it really caught my interest,” Hiemstra says. “For the project, we had to volunteer with a local group involved with our element, and I’d seen several articles on this group named Coastkeeper, so I

thought I’d volunteer for them. But they didn’t return my calls—it took calling four or five times before I heard back from anyone!” He laughs. “But I worked on the big Irvine Coast project where Coastkeeper sued the Irvine Co. I was doing waterquality monitoring to develop data for the lawsuit, so I was working with top-notch attorneys and water-quality experts. It was a dream situation for volunteering and developing skills.” Hiemstra was a star volunteer. By 2000, Coastkeeper hired him as a part-time employee. In 2005, he retired from the milk plant and joined the Coastkeeper team full-time—just a year before Poseidon Water began pushing for a desalination plant in Huntington Beach. “Poseidon started making noise in 2006, but then

went away for a while,” Hiemstra says. “But since 2010, it has been a constant effort and has become such a regular part of my life. It’s funny because there’s a whole group of us who work on this project that I never would have met or hung out with if it weren’t for Poseidon, and they’re great people. So while we’re fighting this giant, I’ve really made some wonderful friends.” While Coastkeeper has been a dreamfulfilling second career for Hiemstra, he’s not taking any of it lightly. “We’re in for some interesting times ahead,” says Hiemstra. “Right now is crucial to be active in the community. If you’re frustrated with what’s going on—get involved. You can do something about it.” —MARY CARREON


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THE DON

“I

have always been lucky enough to be in the right place at the right time,” says Terry Bales. He began his career at Whittier High School as a journalism and history teacher, as well as the baseball coach, before moving to Santa Ana College (SAC) in 1971. For the next 45 years, he built one of the most prestigious community-college journalism programs in the country, watching news media evolve from morning-afternoon dailies and four television networks to today’s era of fake news and Facebook Live. The recently retired Bales estimates he taught around 40,000 students throughout his career. But his lasting legacy is the powerhouse student-media organization he left behind: The newspaper El Don

regularly racks up national awards, and he created the first college-student cableTV newscast in OC, Around And About Orange County News. In 1995, Bales created the Spanish-language news show Noticiero Latino Del Condado de Orange (Orange County Latino News Program), the first college or university show of its kind in the United States. In a sign of the ever-evolving times, his contributions continue on Facebook and YouTube. “I am pleased that I got to see diversity in action with students from many different ethnic and income-level groups,” he says. “I was happy to be of what I hope was service to all.” At 15, he started his path in journalism as the sports editor for his high school’s newspaper, The Upland Highlanders,

and a reporter for The Ontario Daily Report. Those clips got him a full ride to USC, where he received a BA in journalism and a master’s in U.S. history. Bales always admired his teachers and enjoyed researching and talking about media and history subjects, so he decided he would be a college professor. “I feel I really had the best of both worlds since I could teach full-time and moonlight covering all major games and sporting events,” he says. “Doing both jobs concurrently allowed me to use my practical experience to make it easier for my students to experience the real world through my war stories to go along with media theory and history.” Over the years, Bales had the opportunity to jump to four-year universities (including USC), but, he says, “I felt very

satisfied at SAC and felt that the department I helped create was like the child I never had—or, more correctly, like the 40,000 children I had a small part in helping to raise.” Ever the journalist, Bales is spending his retirement betting on fantasy sports. “I always told Tommy Lasorda that I could manage or coach as good as them, so now I get to make out daily lineups in various sports to see how I do,” he jokes. For future students, he offers this advice: “Hard work always pays off, and today, you have to be prepared with all the rapid pace of technology change to re-invent yourself every few years. And education and homework don’t just end because you are out of school.” —JEANETTE DURAN


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Vicki Ruiz LA PROFESORA

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hen UC Irvine professor Vicki Ruiz received a National Humanities Medal from Barack Obama at the White House in 2015, her children had a bet on whether their mom would cry. As Obama put the medal around her neck in the East Room, the first for an Anteater, emotions swelled through the scholar. Ruiz is a giant in American history for doing something academia never bothered with until she came along: show that Mexican-American women in the past had lives outside of making babies and cooking. Her two books—1987’s Cannery Women, Cannery Lives: Mexican Women, Unionization, and the California Food Processing Industry, 1930-1950 and

From Out of the Shadows: Mexican Women in Twentieth-Century America (1998)— brought to life mujeres who organized their communities, danced liked flappers, worked in factories and protested injustice. And 2006’s three-volume Latinas In the United States: A Historical Encyclopedia, which she co-edited, created a comprehensive who’s-who of Chicanas, salvadoreñas, boricuas, and so many other ladies long left out of both mainstream and alternative histories. “I thought about my mother,” she now says, remembering what went through her mind as Obama congratulated her to applause and camera flashes. “I thought of my grandmother. All the women I’ve interviewed, about my students. It was a

recognition of my field. I didn’t see it as a recognition of me, personally.” And that’s why she didn’t cry—there’s still work to do.

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uiz talks fast, enthusiastically, with a good smile and a knack for also listening. It’s a talent she learned from her mother and grandmother,” who “had incredible gifts of narrative,” the 61-year-old says. The daughter of a Kansas farmboy and a Hispana who worked at the Lockheed plant in Long Beach during World War II and whose family has lived in the American Southwest “since time immemorial,” Ruiz’s childhood was atypical of the usual Mexican-American narrative. She grew up between the Florida

Keys and Panhandle during the 1960s because her father followed the fishing and tourism seasons. “It was interesting being a MexicanAmerican girl in Florida,” she says charitably of that era, recalling one instance of bigotry that proved crucial to her life. “My junior year in high school, Mrs. Epps encouraged me to apply to honors English [for] my senior year. I did a test and writing sample. But the senior teacher, Ms. Fey, was not going to admit me—wouldn’t give a reason. My dad asked for a meeting, and she told him, ‘Vicki needs to know her limitations—she’s not as smart as she thinks she is.’ After that, my dad threatened to sue the school, so I got to be front and center of Ms. Fey’s sour face my senior year.


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—GUSTAVO ARELLANO

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D

uring her 16 years at UC Irvine, she has served as chairwoman of the History Department and of Chicano/ Latino Studies, and she was dean of the Humanities for four years, one of the few Latinos ever to hold that position in American academia. Ruiz is especially proud of helping to grow UCI’s Department of Chicano/Latino Studies from a tiny group of professors to one with 12 faculty members that includes everyone from legendary novelist Alejandro Morales to Santa Ana native Glenda M. Flores. “I knew her as an undergrad,” Ruiz says, beaming. “I wrote a letter for [Flores] to go to USC for graduate school, and she’s now my colleague. I want students to be able to discover their dream. To watch students who don’t know how smart they are, and helping them recognize that they can do whatever they want to do—I learn so much from my students.” It’s not just idle talk. One of the most powerful scholastic memories she has happened at her first job at the University of Texas, El Paso in 1982. She was lecturing about the Farah strike, a 1972 labor struggle in which more than 4,000 garment workers—the vast majority of them Mexican-American women—fought for the right to unionize. “I had all my academic work and research in line,” Ruiz says, “but two older women were sitting in the class. Every time I’d say something, they’d elbow each other and whisper and were winking and giggling. Finally, one of them raised her hand. ‘I’m sorry, Dr. Ruiz,’ she said, ‘but we were there.’ I just turned the class over to them. It was wonderful!” She was only 26 back then, “with two kids in diapers and trying to finish my dissertation. How incredibly young and energetic I must have been!” Though she is older and wiser now, Ruiz isn’t done. She’s still working on her magnum opus: a biography of Moreno. “She grew up in an extremely wealthy household in Guatemala and gave up that life of privilege—an extraordinary woman who reinvented herself,” Ruiz says. “I want to write a historical narrative. I want people to read it.” In her spare time, Ruiz loves to try new restaurants; she especially loves Old Vine Café and Taco Maria in Costa Mesa. She’s such a fan of Old Vine chef Mark McDonald that she took her husband on one of McDonald’s annual culinary tours of Italy for their 20th wedding anniversary. And she praises Taco Maria chef Carlos Salgado for “provid[ing] an education about Mexican food to the typical OC fine-dining customer,” she says. “He just elevates and shows that Mexican food can be haute cuisine.” Highlighting the works of others—this, more than personal glory, remains Ruiz’s passion. Even when asked about her legacy, she returns to her eternal muse. “I showed that Latinas have made history,” she says. “And that was important for me to show. Women have built their communities. We need to know more about them. In all the different spheres—in the arts, as academics, as writers, as public-health advocates, as veterans. The quiet courage.”

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“It was good,” Ruiz adds. “I learned then what baile folklorico pioneer Rosie Guerrero said years later: ‘You gotta learn you’re not born for people to like you.’” By then, Ruiz was already bothered by what was being taught and not taught in her history class. “When it came to Latinos, all they taught us in Florida was Ponce de Leon and the Alamo,” she says. “And since it was the 1960s, they also said the Wobblies [the nickname for the radical union Industrial Workers of the World (IWW)] were Communists.” But Ruiz had heard a different version of the group at home: her maternal grandfather, a Mexican immigrant from Guanajuato, was a Wobblie who took his young daughter to meetings in Colorado mining camps. “The IWW was for working people, and all kinds of languages and immigrants were accepted,” she says. “I wanted to bridge the narratives that I learned at home with what I learned at school.” She enrolled in community college, then transferred to Florida State with the intention of becoming a high-school history teacher. But courses taught by women historians and sociologists made her realize she could aim for more than merely becoming the first person in her family to graduate from a university. Ruiz was accepted into Stanford University’s doctoral program in history, where she learned under Albert Camarillo, a pioneer in Chicano studies. He had done interviews with Luisa Moreno, a legendary labor activist who organized women in Southern California’s canneries during the 1930s and 1940s, work for which the United States eventually deported her. Camarillo asked Ruiz if she wanted to continue his research. “I went down to Guadalajara,” she says, still relishing the memory. “[Moreno] looked at me and figured I was harmless enough.” Ruiz stayed with Moreno for a month and a half. Near the end of their talks, Ruiz told Moreno that she wanted to do her dissertation on her. “‘No,’” Ruiz recalls Moreno telling her, in an anecdote the professor has often repeated, “‘go find these cannery workers. Talk to them.’” The result was Cannery Women. “The literature at that point was that Mexican women tended the home and hearth,” Ruiz says. “But that was a lie. In women’s history back then, there was the idea of public sphere and the private sphere, and they never met. But that never held up in Latina history.” Cannery Women has gone through eight printings, and remains a classic of women’s labor and Chicano studies (Ruiz’s only regret: not spending more pages on the former Hunt-Wesson tomato cannery in Fullerton, where Moreno led a strike in 1942, back when it was called Val-Vita). “It’s important that people see themselves,” she says of her works. “When I finally saw myself in a book, it was so powerful for me, and I know it’s the same for others. Latinos are not people who came to the U.S. the day before yesterday.”

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T E C H T E E N T I TA N

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eckman High School junior Sara Du doesn’t look like a tech phenom. The soft-spoken 16-yearold admits she never got the best grades growing up. And UC Irvine’s app-development camp for high schoolers rejected her when she applied in 2015. “After I got rejected, I was like, ‘I might as well try on my own,’” Du says. Two years later, Du went from not knowing how to permanently delete files on a computer to earning a Young Innovators to Watch award—part of the Mobile Apps Showdown at the Consumer Electronics Show, the largest tech trade show in the world. The self-taught techie won the award for Bluejay, its name a play on the word Bluetooth and the bird breed.

Bluejay helps emergency responders find people stranded in natural-disaster areas by collecting data from victim’s phones via drone. The data is then used to create a map. She got the inspiration after getting stranded one night at Irvine Regional Park in an area with no wireless signal. “It was scary,” the teen says. “I remember it was getting dark, lights were turning on, and it was quiet.” She worked on the app nearly every day for two months before stumbling upon the Young Innovators to Watch contest. Du submitted Bluejay minutes before the deadline, without even testing its software and hardware components. To Du’s surprise, she won. Prior to her victory, Du’s background

in tech consisted of studying Beginning iPhone Development With Swift, spending an hour or two every day learning to write code for a year, then launching her first app, Flappy Nation, a spin on Angry Birds with birds depicting presidential candidates. Soon after Flappy Nation, Du joined Meetup groups such as OC iOS, where she noticed a low female representation in tech and age discrimination, the latter of which she says she encounters far more often than that of gender. “Once I can prove to people who are older that I’m capable of doing things, then they have a lot of respect,” she says. “But at first it’s like, ‘I’m just a kid.’” Du has proven herself quickly. OC iOS’ youngest member is already an assistant

organizer; she speaks at panels, recruits student members and is even contracted by her peers to help with projects. “I think I’m less of a black sheep now,” Du says, laughing as she explains that her parents, who are originally from China, initially didn’t like her tech hobby because it distracted her from doing homework. After winning the award, Du’s parents are now more encouraging of her interests. “I’m actually not as intense as people think I am,” she says, adding that she also dabbles in film and photography. “I think you should let kids relax while they’re young . . . figure out what you’re interested in.” —DENISE DE LA CRUZ


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A v a Le v i n e JEDI YOGINI

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hen I was really young, a Native American psychic told me that my mother speaks to me through crystals and is in the crystals,” says Ava Levine of Ritual Yoga in Laguna Beach. She had lost her mother to addiction when she was 3. “They’ve always been a part of who I am and what I do. Using them with other healing modalities, like essential oils and singing-bowls, make for a really powerful experience, especially with the yoga I do now, which is why I like working with people who are going through rehabilitation.” Levine is a healing solutionary, someone who uses crystals, sound-healing singing-bowls and essential oils in her yoga classes. She got into yoga in middle school, when her best friend’s mom worked at the Bikram Yoga in Encino and

guided Levine and her friend through the Hatha postures. “We used to practice in her living room,” recalls Levine. “I loved it. It was such a beautiful introduction. It was really transformative and detoxifying for me as a young adult, which sparked my interest to explore the healing arts and doing a lot of the things I do now.” Many moons later, she relocated to San Diego, where she began leading guided meditations for people detoxing from drugs. Her success as a meditation guide led Levine to explore massage therapy, seeing as many as eight clients per day. After a particularly long time of manually healing bodies, her arm got stuck in the socket, keeping her from being able to massage. “Yoga was the only thing that worked,” Levine says. “It actually healed me, which I took as a sign to deepen my practice.” Since then, she has completed nearly

500 hours of cumulative yoga training and is certified in various areas, including Reiki, healing touch and sacred space designing. “I’ve broken down and faced my wounds while getting my certifications,” says Levine. “But I had to in order to find my own healing so I could be a better, more empathic healer, rather than someone who just goes through the motions, and then leads other people through the motions.” Levine’s gift lies in the way she’s able to guide her students to deep meditative states. Whether a yoga or meditation class, she activates multiple senses by projecting stars onto the studio-room ceiling, spraying essential oils and playing singing-bowls while walking around the room, focusing on each student. “My classes are a lot like playpens for adults,” says Levine with a laugh. “But the most important thing about what I do is

provide scientific knowledge, like the fact that frankincense pulls 70 percent to 80 percent more oxygen into the brain, creates a meditative state, helps cure cancer and is an anti-inflammatory. Because of its healing properties, it was once more expensive than gold. It’s so healthy for us, which is why I use that modality in class. . . . The science adds another layer of understanding and makes it so much fun.” Between the sound healings, yoga, fire spinning and other certifications, Levine is also an ordained minister, once officiating a wedding in the dust at Burning Man. “It was really great,” Levine says, giggling. “But the more you call yourself a minister, prophet or master, I feel like people are looking at you for perfection, and I’m the furthest from that. I’m just a reflection, and sometimes that’s more powerful than anything else.” —MARY CARREON


Eve G a r row

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CANARY IN THE HOMELESS COAL MINE

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ack when Eve Garrow was growing up in San Clemente in the 1960s, Orange County was a sleepy swath of suburbia comfortably isolated from Los Angeles and all its scary urban problems. There were plenty of vagrants or runaway kids randomly begging for handouts or sleeping on the beach, but homelessness as a concept didn’t exist. Starting in the 1970s and over the next few decades, Orange County became one of the most affluent areas in the United States—ostentatiously so—and with it, the county experienced an explosion of homelessness driven by the simultaneous rise of income inequality and lack of affordable housing. Garrow, a homelessness-policy analyst and advocate for the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Southern California, left Orange County years ago for college at UCLA and graduate studies in Santa Barbara. But she has returned home

with a mission: to force the county’s feckless conservative political leadership to fix a problem that it has allowed to spiral out of control. Although the county recently opened an emergency homeless shelter at a former bus depot in Santa Ana, there are still several thousand people sleeping on the streets on any given night, many in makeshift encampments in the Santa Ana riverbed. “Orange County is more and more unequal, and the disparities are so striking,” Garrow says. “I think we need an awakening. We need more people to view homelessness as an issue of social justice and as a humanitarian crisis. Too many people see it as an issue of broken people, but it’s really a broken system.” Part of that broken system is the fact that, although the county approved a 2010 plan to end homelessness by investing in affordable housing, the Board of Supervisors has so far refused to implement

it, choosing instead to spend its budget on public safety. “In the absence of this policy failure—the failure to provide a humane solution to homelessness in the county—most of the cities and the county itself have taken a law-enforcement approach,” Garrow explains. “So the response has been to enforce ordinances that prohibit sleeping and camping in public, and that gets people into the criminal-justice system. People end up doing jail time, and they get pushed to more and more remote places in an effort to avoid law enforcement.” Last year, Garrow wrote a report for the ACLU estimating that solving Orange County’s ongoing homelessness crisis would cost only $55 million in terms of affordable housing units. As Garrow argues, that may sound like a lot of cash, but it’s small change compared to the cost of dealing with the public safety and health hazards posed by the problem.

“The longer you leave people on the street, the more acute their health and mentalhealth problems become,” she says. “They end up costing the county far more in terms of emergency-room care and psychiatric-inpatient treatement and jail.” Sadly, there’s only so much the ACLU can do. “It would be great in this country if we had a legal right to housing, but we don’t,” says Garrow. “But one of the things that the ACLU does is try to prevent local governments from using policy tools that unlawfully violate people’s rights, such as citing people for sleeping in public when there is no place to go.” The organization recently filed a lawsuit in Laguna Beach based on that very theory. “The people living on the riverbed are the canary in a coal mine of a broken system, and as long as we continue to see the people as the problem, the longer it will take to build a movement to solve it.” —NICK SCHOU


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Jason Cook

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T H E R E V E R E N D S TO R Y T E L L E R

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ason Cook retrieves a navy-blue stole from a couch in his office. The reverend of the Unitarian Universalist Congregation in Fullerton regards a patch sewn on the stole that marks his 2014 ordination: “We need not think alike to love alike.” When Cook sought to lead the church last summer, the very same quote greeted him from behind the pulpit, a sign that his seemingly unlikely path from gay Midwestern teen to a preacher in Trump times proved providential. “People want to make a difference in the world, especially right now, but they don’t know how,” says the 42-year-old. “Our work is going to be even bigger than what we’re seeing right now.” Born and raised in Indianapolis, Cook grew up in a Christian family. He knew he was gay by the time he reached adolescence, but the Gospels didn’t inflict a theological rift within his soul. “Christianity gave me a sense

that I was of value and worthwhile,” Cook says. Only fundamentalism made him feel an outcast, something that birthed an atheistic, dismissive view of organized religion. When Cook turned 18, he enrolled at USC as a student of Creative Writing and Film and Television Criticism. “Strangely enough, I use all of those skills for my ministry,” he says. But Cook never gave a second thought to becoming a reverend at that time. He took freelance writing jobs and sought acting roles in between assignments. “I thought of myself as some sort of storyteller; I just didn’t know what kind.” Cook got involved in marriage-equality activism, but he craved the sense of community found at his Midwestern church. The faith-based folks he met standing in solidarity with LGBTQ rights hinted that those two worlds need not be mutually exclusive. He tried out different congregations before attending Orange Coast Uni-

tarian Universalist Church in Costa Mesa, where he crossed paths with the Reverend Karen Stoyanoff, his future mentor. “People were talking publicly in a church service about issues like marriage equality,” Cook says. “That was a big, big difference for me.” After two Sunday services, he looked into what the path to the pulpit entailed and found a vigorous one requiring a master’s degree in divinity, a lengthy psychological evaluation and chaplain service, with a series of interviews and internships along the way—all before a board in Boston makes a final decision. Cook began his journey at Meadville Lombard Theological School in Chicago, one of two such Unitarian institutions in the nation. “I returned to the place I ran away from,” he says of the Midwest. Cook eventually interned with Stoyanoff in Anaheim before becoming an admission director at Meadville and an assistant minister

in Walnut Creek up in the Bay Area. When the Unitarian Universalist Congregation in Fullerton sought a new reverend, Cook was ecstatic. “I wanted to stay, and I felt like something could be accomplished,” he says. Since taking the pulpit last August, the reverend has accomplished a number of feats: Fullerton is now the largest Unitarian church in OC and the second fastest growing midsized Unitarian church in the nation. Cook’s dynamic Martin Luther King Jr. Day sermon this year gave spirit to an active congregation that responded to Donald Trump’s inauguration by joining the OC Women’s March and protesting the president’s policies at LAX. “These are complicated times,” Cook says. “I hope we’re able to hold on to our understanding of our common humanity across these lines of difference and division.” —GABRIEL SAN ROMÁN


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J e n n i fe r M c G ra t h

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I

f it wasn’t for a bad landing on a parachute platform during an ROTC exercise, Jennifer McGrath would likely be a retired military lawyer by now. What McGrath does now is something she would have never contemplated back in college, much less just a few years ago: the onetime Orange County Republican Party-backed city attorney for Huntington Beach is now in private practice, using her considerable legal skills to help end the county’s war on medical cannabis. “My life took a completely unexpected turn,” she says. “But I’m good with that.” Born in the Bay Area city of Fremont, McGrath spent much of her childhood traveling the country as the child of a professional bowler before the age of 7, when she arrived in Huntington Beach, where she’s lived ever since. In 1994, a year before graduating from McGeorge School of Law in Sacramento, McGrath got an internship at the Huntington Beach

city attorney’s office. That led directly to a full-time job, and she gradually worked her way up the chain of command. The city is one of less than a dozen in California that have an elected city attorney, so in 2002, she raised $80,000, put her name on the ballot—and won. Although she consistently received plaudits for her work to reduce outsourcing and save the city money, McGrath’s tenure as chief lawyer proved to be a difficult one. When she moved to settle legitimate legal claims stemming from incidents of police brutality by Huntington Beach police officers, some of her Republican colleagues began to grumble, unfairly nicknaming Surf City “Settlement City.” The mother of two autistic children also went through a difficult divorce and bankruptcy filing as a result of her husband’s failed telecommunications business. But it was McGrath’s refusal to change her opinion about a controversial bal-

lot proposal on infrastructure spending that ultimately ended McGrath’s career at City Hall. “I was told if I didn’t change my legal opinion, I would never get the support of the Republican party, and they were true to their word,” McGrath claims. “I know I lost my job [in the 2014 election] because I didn’t obey them, but I would do the same thing today.” One thing McGrath doesn’t miss about her work for the city was having to enforce Surf City’s prohibition on medical-cannabis collectives. When activist (and former Weekly People Issue profile subject) Marla James attempted to open the Surf City Collective in Sunset Beach, it fell on McGrath to do everything in her power to prevent that from happening. (Among other tactics, the city once parked an unoccupied police cruiser in front of the collective to intimidate people from entering the dispensary.) “When we shut down Sunset Beach, and all was said and done, I looked

at Marla and said, ‘I really don’t want to put you in jail.’ And we stayed connected.” McGrath also kept in touch with James’ attorney, Matthew Pappas; after a brief stint as a city attorney in Northern California, she immediately gave him a call upon her return to Orange County. She now works with Pappas to help cannabis collectives follow the law. “That’s my part of the practice, getting us all compliant on every level, code to payroll taxes—all of it,” she says. McGrath has already helped activists in Stanton gather enough signatures to put an initiative on the ballot to overturn the city’s ban on medical-marijuana collectives. “What we’re fighting for is to make medical cannabis legal, city by city,” she explains. “The people of California have already decided that recreational cannabis is legal, so how can medical use even be a question? People who need it should get it, and there shouldn’t be an obstacle.” —NICK SCHOU


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ST. PATRICK’S DAY

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tuesday›

CAN YOU READ THESE ALT-FACTS TONIGHT, MOMMY? CAROL ROSEGG

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[CONCERT]

Cash still Rules . . .

Wu-tang Clan

[TALKS]

[MIND & BODY]

[THEATER]

Crass Politics

Stretching as Self-Care

Born In Flames

Chris Crass

—GABRIEL SAN ROMÁN

Yoga Benefit

The Trump administration seems to have unrivaled talent when it comes to raising stress levels for everyday Americans. How better to calm those nerves than with some relaxing yoga for a good cause. Each month, the OC Yogis Care Project hosts a Saturday-evening class, with 100 percent of the donations going toward the group’s charity of choice, and this month’s recipient is Planned Parenthood. One in five American women have visited a Planned Parenthood at least once in their lives to receive free or discounted health services. So if you don’t have an STD, chances are you have them to thank for that, given your questionable life choices. Vinyasa flow will be led by Aileen Pham, and yin yoga by Melissa Christensen, with music spun by DJ Zack. Yoga Benefit for Planned Parenthood at Spectra Yoga, 2701 Harbor Blvd., Ste. E-1, Costa Mesa, (714) 436-0576; ocyogiscareproject.org. 6 p.m. Suggested donation, $25-$100. —AMANDA PARSONS

‘Fueling the Fire’

As part of the Chance Theater’s annual 24-Hour Chance-A-Thon, Breath of Fire Latina Theater Ensemble presents a showcase of badass women playwrights reading from their latest works. In the fittingly titled “Fueling the Fire: New Works by Chingonas” show, these creative voices diligently display their individual stories through the ensemble’s lab space, sharing short scripts that deal with such dramatic subject matters as nationalism, love, relationships, immigration, identity and more. Theater-lovers, as well as fans of Chicano storytelling, should flock to this stimulating, entertaining benefit. “Fueling the Fire: New Works by Chingonas” at Chance Theater, 5522 E. La Palma Ave., Anaheim, (888) 455-4212; www.chancetheater.com. 2 p.m. $15-$20. —AIMEE MURILLO

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You’re not dreaming this: President Agent Orange really is in the White House, and he’s preying on vulnerable communities with every executive order. But the hate regime is also churning out many firsttime activists (even in OC), and those are just the kind of folks who could learn from a seasoned veteran such as Chris Crass. The Whittier-raised, Kentuckybased author has spent decades in the trenches organizing against racism and sexism. That’s probably why the OC chapter of Together, We Will is hosting Crass for a speaking event in Costa Mesa. And yes, all this work is possible in OC—just ask Crass himself. Back in the early ’90s, he helped to organize a multiracial coalition to stand against student-fee hikes and for ethnic studies at Fullerton College! Chris Crass at Orange Coast Unitarian Universalist Church, 2845 Mesa Verde Dr. E., Costa Mesa; www.risestronger. org. 7 p.m. $5-$10 donation.

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What better way to lose your shit on St. Patrick’s Day than getting down with theTao of Wu? Hip-hop’s baddest bunch of legends are currently on what’s billed as the Return to the 36 Chambers tour, with tonight starting a quick West Coast run. Since their formation and subsequent rise to fame in the early ’90s, the Staten Island natives have built a mainstream following, but it’s their cult status that has allowed them to flourish beyond their music career. Unlike other rap collectives, Wu-Tang is the sum of their parts, and their live show remains one of the best in the game. As the Clan powers toward their 25th year, they ain’t nothin’ to fuck with. Wu-Tang Clan at the House of Blues, 400 Disney Way, Ste. 337, Anaheim, (714) 778-2583; www.houseofblues. com. 8 p.m. $65. —DANIEL KOHN

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[FESTIVALS]

Can’t Hold Them Down

Women’s Day Festival The annual Women’s Day Fest not only celebrates the tenacity of women, but honors their spiritual, healing powers, too. In addition to DJs Bien Buena and Bombonsito (from the excellent Santa Ana chapter of the femme-empowering Chulita Vinyl

Club) spinning tunes and bands such as ¡Aparato! and San Jarocho Mujeres taking the Plaza Calle Cuatro stage, there’ll be workshops on herbalism and feminist liberation, plus a ceremony by Omecihuatl Woman’s Circle. Expect plenty of art, jewelry and clothing vendors, as well as activities for children to make this an immersive, family-friendly event. Seventh Annual Women’s Day Fest at Plaza Calle Cuatro, Fourth and French streets, Santa Ana; www.facebook.com/ SantaAnaArtists. 1 p.m. Free. —AIMEE MURILLO

[FILM]

Up On the Roof

Guardians of the Galaxy After three years of screening artsy, independent cinema behind its doors (as well as throughout various outdoor spaces for its Calle Cuatro community film series), the Frida Cinema is going where no film theater has gone before: atop the Fifth Street parking lot’s roof. In what is hopefully the first of many screenings for its DTSA Rooftop Cin-

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mon/03/20 Guilty Pleasure

BRIAN WILSON

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[THEATER]

Do You Believe in Fairies? Finding Neverland

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Dana Point group Vaguess sound like something out of the past, in the best way possible. Every song off their debut album, Guilty Rings, is an explosion of potent garage-punk energy, slyly transitioning from one song to the next after two minutes or less. Imprinted with a surf-y, lo-fi sound and playful poppiness that recalls early Ramones-era punk, rock & roll, and New Wave, there’s a certain joy in their selfdeprecating (albeit humorous) lyrics that’s relatable to other disenfranchised slackers— we’ve all been one, at one point. Whether you prefer to bop or mosh at your punk shows, Vaguess provide such a fun atmosphere it’s just too hard to resist dancing. Vaguess at the Continental Room, 115 W. Santa Fe Ave., Fullerton, (714) 526-4529; www.continentalroomoc.com. 9 p.m. Free. 21+. —AIMEE MURILLO

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ema series, today’s presentation of Guardians of the Galaxy brings the outdoor-film experience to a whole other level. Bring your own low-backed chairs, blanket and towel, and picnic under the stars for some appropriately intergalactic sci-fi escapism. Guardians of the Galaxy at the Frida Cinema, 305 E. Fourth St., Santa Ana, (714) 285-9422; thefridacinema.org. 7:30 p.m. Free. —AIMEE MURILLO

[CONCERT]

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Suspension of disbelief is a powerful thing; it entertains people, launches religions and creates sunshine on a cloudy day. Finding Neverland adapts the fictionalized accounts of the film of the same name and the play The Man Who Was Peter Pan to show how author J.M. Barrie turned his cloudy life around and found the light through his relationship with a widow and her four children. This musical Peter Pan origin story is critically acclaimed, has an impressive cast of Broadway performers, features mesmerizing production design and is directed by Tony Award winner Diane Paulus. Finding Neverland at Segerstrom Hall, 600 Town Center Dr., Costa Mesa, (714) 556-2787; www.scfta.org. 7:30 p.m. Through April 2. $29-$89. —SCOTT FEINBL ATT


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[FOOD & DRINK]

Say Cheese

Beer & Cheese Pairing While we continue to purposely ignore the coming bathing-suit season, you can find us blissfully imbibing at events such as this week’s Cheese & Beer Pairing at Anaheim’s Bruery Terreux. The brewery, which specializes in wild beers (fermented with “wild yeast,” resulting in a funky, fruity thing) and sour beers (such as boysenberry, “yumberry” and “gypsy tart” flavors), teams up with Vagabond Cheese Co. for an unapologetically flavorful evening of sips and bites. Kale juice and hot yoga can wait until next week. Beer & Cheese Pairing at the Bruery Terreux tasting room, 1174 N. Grove St., Anaheim, (714) 996-6258; www.brueryterreux. com. 5:30 p.m. Free admission; beer and cheese priced separately. 21+. —ERIN DEWITT

COURTESY LA LUZ

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PinkieS Out! afternoon teas

Take a break from what’s trendy and go get your fancy on at the Muzeo Afternoon Teas. While you may not be able to literally trek back in time, you’ll get the next best thing when you enter the Historic Carnegie Gallery, built in 1908, and sip tasty teas, enjoy elegant sandwiches, and devour fresh-baked scones with Devonshire cream, lemon curd, strawberry jam and other varieties of sweets.There are even gluten-free and vegetarian options available for your difficult friends! It’s usually a sell-out event, reservations are required, and you will most likely be seated at a table shared by others. But, as the Victorians used to say, the more the merrier—unless you’re the Earl of Sandwich, a notorious gambler who invented the thing merely because he refused to leave the card table to eat.You’re welcome. AfternoonTeas at Muzeo, 241 S. Anaheim Blvd., Anaheim, (714) 956-8936; muzeo.org. 11:30 a.m.Through May 7. $25-$45. —SR DAVIES

[CONCERT]

Stay Weird La Luz

Tales of Interest

Folklore & Fairy Tales

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We may be far removed from the days when stories of Paul Bunyan, ghosts or haunted treasure captured the imagination of impressionable minds, but folk stories, tall tales and other informally told narratives remain a part of our society’s cultural fabric. Writers Chris Carmona and Sarah Rafael García will demonstrate this at today’s Folklore & Fairy Tales reading and workshop event, at which the exemplary scribes will read from their respective books The Road to Llorona Park and SanTana Fairy Tales. The readings are bookended by a workshop based on creative writing (moderated by Carmona and García) and a Q&A, book sale and signing. Folklore & Fairy Tales: “From La Llorona to SanTana” at Grand Central Art Center, 125 N. Broadway, Santa Ana, (714) 567-7233; www.libromobile.com. 6:30 p.m. Free; RSVP required. —AIMEE MURILLO

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La Luz take surf guitar and the slow, sad Shangri-Las songs and transport them through that specific and potent kind of U.K. post-punk channel that sounded so alien (and alienated) as the 1970s turned into the ’80s.This is more outer-space guitar than underwater guitar—all distance and dissonance—and the punk part is less the pedal-down energy (though they’ve got plenty of energy, as you know if you’ve seen them live) than the same spirit of total reinvention that lit up hundreds of glorious outsider DIY 45s.Their 2015 Weirdo Shrine is a concept album tied to Charles Burns’ gory literalization of teenage freakitude, with all the high highs and low lows (and weird weirdnesses) that would indicate—see closer “True Love Knows” for all that happening at once.This is fearlessly strange stuff—and all the better for it. La Luz with Veiny Hands and Brain Story at the Glass House, 200 W. Second St., Pomona, (909) 865-3802; www.theglasshouse.us. 7 p.m. $13-$15. —CHRIS ZIEGLER

[LITERARY EVENTS]

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SHUTTERSTOCK

[FOOD & DRINK]

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The AmericAn

Dream

Lives On Study proves that a high quality college education is within reach for Orange County residents

S

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2017 EDUCATION GUIDE

tudent loans and high interest debt has morphed the American Dream of a college education into America’s nightmare for some. However, studies show that community colleges provide an alternative to loans and debt that keep the dream of a college education within reach. In pre-World War II America, a college education seemed attainable for the wealthy and elite only. Then, the GI Bill of Rights and subsequent programs opened higher education to people who didn’t think past high school. Within a few decades, a college degree replaced a high school diploma as the golden ticket for a lifetime of higher wages. Fast-forward to the economic realities of 2017, however, and most parents and students say that the cost of college tuition is more and more prohibitive. Yet a new economic value study commissioned by Coast Community College District (CCCD) tells a different story: for every $1 students invest in CCCD in the form of out-of-pocket expenses and forgone time and money, they receive a cumulative of $3.30 in higher future wages. Researchers discovered the average annual rate of return for students was 13.3 percent – compared to the 10-year, 7.2 percent average return of the U.S. stock market. With the California economy as the backdrop for the analysis, the study conducted by Economic Modeling Specialists International concluded that CCCD is a high-performing investment. EMSI culled data about students, taxpayers, and the local community to develop its investment analysis, plus measured gross regional product (GRP) to develop an economic impact analysis. Data analyzed spanned CCCD’s 2013-14 fiscal year and projections for the 2015-2016 fiscal year. “The district plays an incomparable role in helping students increase their employability and achieve their potential,” said chancellor of CCCD, John Wesipfenning, Ph.D. “This study quantifies what administers, educators, and students have known all along: CCCD provides students with the skills they need to have a fulfilling and prosperous career. Plus, we offer them an environment to meet people, increase their self-confidence, and promote their overall health and well-being.” Even by EMSI’s conservative estimates, CCCD influences the Orange County economy positively. The results of this landmark study demonstrate that CCCD creates value from multiple perspectives by tracking the benefits to students, taxpayers, and society. StudentS Data indicated that CCCD enriches the lives of students by raising their lifetime incomes and achieving a lifetime potential probably unattainable without education from the multi-college district, which includes Coastline Community College, Golden West College, and Orange Coast College.


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• The total investment made by CCCD’s 58,929 credit students and 1,439 noncredit students in fiscal year 2013-14 amounted to $440.5 million, equal to $62.7 million in out-of-pocket expenses plus $377.8 million in forgone time and money. EMSI factored costs for tuition, fees, books and supplies as students’ expenses. Researchers also considered the income students would have earned by working instead of attending college. • EMSI estimates that CCCD’s students will receive a stream of higher future wages that will continue to grow through their working lives in return for their investment. “For example, the average associate degree completer will see an increase in earnings of $12,300 each year compared to someone with a high school diploma or equivalent,” Weispfenning pointed out. “Over a working lifetime, this increase in earnings puts an additional income of approximately $492,000 into students’ pockets. This figure can be life-changing.”

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Taxpayers: EMSI determined that for every $1 of public money invested in CCCD, taxpayers receive a cumulative value of $3.90 over the course of students’ working lives. The average annual rate of return is 14.5 percent, an investment that compares favorably with other long-term assets in private and public sectors. All of these benefits will generate a present value of $43.8 million in savings to state and local taxpayers.

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socieTy: California also gains because CCCD helps to create a more prosperous economy and generates a variety of savings through the improved lifestyles of students, according to study authors. For as long as students from the fiscal year studied remain in the state workforce, for every dollar that the public invests, California receives a cumulative value of $14.50 in benefits, EMSI found. cccD promoTes economic GrowTh in oranGe counTy The overall impact of CCCD on the local business community during the analysis year amounted to $2.2 billion in GRP, a measurement of the market value of all final goods and services produced within a metropolitan area in a given period of time. EMSI notes that by comparison, the GRP contribution the District provides is as large as the entire utilities industry in the county. To develop its economic growth analysis, EMSI measured the impact of operations spending, student spending and alumni. Here is a sampling of key findings: Graduates with a two-year college degree earn more: • Higher education means higher earnings. Most CCCD graduates with an associate degree will earn $492,000 more in lifetime income than a high school graduate. Orange County gets an economic boost, too: • CCCD payroll topped $179.5 million – largely spent on groceries, rent, eating out, clothing, and other household expenses in Orange County. • $313.3 million was added to the Orange County economy by CCCD students in 2013-2014. Plus, taxpayers see more than a threefold payback. For every $1 of public money invested in CCCD, taxpayers reap $3.90 over the course of students’ working lives. The economic value of a degree from CCCD stacks up against a degree from one of the state universities, too. For example, the cost of attendance (COA) at Coastline Community College – or the total amount it would cost a student to attend the college full time for one year while living at home – is $12,128. In comparison, the COA at California State University, Sacramento would be $15,932 or $29,500 within the University of California system. In light of this information, perhaps the smartest investment a student can make is to consider a twoyear college as a first step toward achieving their higher education goals.


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POSTGRADUATE PLUSES

THE MYRIAD REWARDS OF MASTER’S AND DOCTORAL DEGREES By Paul Rogers

W

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e’ve all had that friend who seems to have been “working on their master’s” or “doing their doctorate” forever. However mysterious their endeavors might be, it’s clear that these are something worth devoting a chunk of their life (and a chunk of change) to – and usually while also juggling work and family commitments. American universities award around 750,000 master’s degrees and 175,000 doctorates each year. So just what are these advanced qualifications, what do they entail - and what should scholars expect at the end of years of study? Two types of post-graduate degrees are offered in America. Master’s degrees, which usually take two to three years to complete, exist to demonstrate advanced mastery of a specific field of study or area of professional practice. A doctorate (also called a doctor’s or doctoral degree) qualifies holders to teach at the university level or to work in a specific profession, such as law, psychology, medicine (physicians, surgeons and doctors), or science (for example, medical scientists or marine biologists). Divided into “research degrees” and “professional degrees”, doctorates will require three to seven years of further study after earning a master’s. “At the master’s level, it invites you to explore pretty thoroughly a topic of your desire,” said Dr. Craig Calquist, Associate Provost of Pacifica Graduate Institute, which offers master’s and doctoral degrees in several areas of study at two campuses near Santa Barbara. “At the doctoral level, you’re expected to become an academic and applied expert in that field.” In order to thrive at a graduate level, an individual will require not just ambition for career advancement (and a bigger pay check), but also a true passion for learning, highly-developed reading and writing skills, advanced analytical thinking abilities, a love of inquiry, and mental flexibility when encountering diverse approaches to problem solving. “At the undergraduate level, you’re just sort of watching movies … At the master’s level, you’re moving on to critiquing movies,” said Dr. Michael Berger, dean of the College of Doctoral Studies at Grand Canyon University (GCU), by way of metaphor. “And then at the doctoral level, we’re finally moving on to directing and creating your own movie.” GCU is a private Christian university comprising a state-of-the-art online education platform and 17,500 students on its Phoenix, Ariz. campus. The academic arc from a bachelor’s degree through a master’s and then on to a doctoral degree is about evolving from being a student to becoming a specialist scholar. “When you’re in a bachelor’s program, you’re learning the fundamental building blocks of knowledge in a field,” Berger continued. “When you move on to a master’s … you’re not just stacking those blocks – you’re re-arranging them; you’re learning what they’re made of.” While a master’s degree teaches the research skills and study techniques to analyze and evaluate other peoples’ work, a doctorate involves the synthesis


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POSTGRADUATE PLUSES and very creation of new knowledge. “You’re no longer reading research – you’re writing research,” said Berger. “And it’s this sort of complex transition … which is one of the reasons that doctoral education can be so hard: it’s not about learning new things – you need to learn new ways of thinking.” As well as holding a bachelor’s degree, most institutions will expect further demonstration that a grad school candidate has both the academic track record and personal attributes indicative of the ability to successfully tackle the demands of a master’s or doctoral program. “We do look at have you gotten your degree from another regionallyaccredited institution – we feel that’s important,” said Berger. “GPA is a broad measure that’s been around a long time, but it’s still a good indicator of overall student success.”

2017 EDUCATION GUIDE

Many programs will also consider letters of recommendation – from professors, someone who has earned the degree which a prospective student seeking, and/or an advanced degree holder who has been their supervisor in a professional setting – and an applicant’s work history. “The ability to write is necessary, and in fact people, for most programs, submit a writing sample,” said Calquist. “So that we can see that prospective students can organize their thoughts on paper pretty well.” The time commitment required of grad students is considerable (around 20 hours per week for doctoral programs, a little less for master’s, according to Berger), especially when considered alongside job and familial obligations. Plus, at this level of study, substantial periods of uninterrupted study are recommended, rather than just an hour or two at a time.

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Most grad students simultaneously work at least part-time, but other sources of funding for tuition are available. Some programs offer teaching assistantships, wherein a grad student teaches undergrads attending the same university in return for a certain amount of tuition being waived. Some companies offer tuition assistance to their employees. Scholarships, especially for science and technology programs, and Federal Student Aid are also available to grad students. “Most standard net-prices calculators only show the first year of school costs,” said Nikki Mancuso, Senior Vice President, Online Operations for the College of Doctoral Studies at GCU. “We have a custom-developed GCU net-price calculator that will show the full length of the program, which clearly spells out all the costs … along with a very important educational component on responsible borrowing.” After their years of arduous study, research, and examination, plus many thousands of dollars spent, holders of graduate degrees can expect admission to certain (well-paid) career fields, or swifter ascent of the promotional ladder in their existing profession or workplace. The sheer prestige and credibility attached to doctorates can also prove invaluable, especially, for example, for authors. But there are less tangible rewards, too. “Usually folks who come into our doctoral programs want to make a change,” said Berger. “They’ve seen something; they have a passion for some topic [wherein] they want something to happen that’s different, whether it’s their work community, their ministry community [or] a non-profit that they’re involved in.” Certain programs, such as psychology, can also have an acute personal impact on graduate-level scholars – even before their studies are complete. “Sometimes such profound self-understanding that it actually changes the course of one’s life,” Chalquist revealed. “I’ve often heard older students, in class, say ‘y’know, I’ve been doing the same pattern of behavior all my life and I never understood until this moment why I do that and how it affects me’.”


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or the past two years, Southern California’s most celebrated taco . . . has been a burrito. Huh? But that’s the magic of Albert and Lauren Bañuelos, the husband-and-wife team behind Burritos La Palma. They make a miraculous thing, really: just a little longer than a man’s palm, it’s filled with birria de res, a Zacatecan beef take on the classic goat stew. But it’s on that simplicity that the Bañueloses have started a mini-empire, with a restaurant in El Monte, a food truck and a new SanTana location. The savory flour tortillas are the same that Albert’s family in Jerez has sold for more than 30 years at the original Burritos La Palma; the birria de res is sumptuous and slightly spicy. One burrito won’t fill you, not two or even five—they’re like a box of Thin Mints. The accolades are impressive. It won

Tacolandia’s Best Traditional Taco in 2016, as well as Best in Show. Jonathan Gold named La Palma’s speciality one of his top five burritos in Southern California. Food legend Nancy Silverton is a fan, as well as legions of Instagrammers, Yelpers and tens of thousands of jerezanos in Southern California, including yours truly and all 200-plus of his cousins. “Shocking,” says Albert of their success. “It’s such a niche food. I’m just humbled that people from outside Jerez enjoy us.” Lauren, a kindergarten teacher in Santa Ana by day, is more philosophical. “Our challenge is to get people to taste the burritos,” she says. “After that, comes the best part . . . that second bite. When I can see someone, anyone, light up from that taste, my day is made.” Lake Forest residents for 23 years, the two represent the Reconquista at its finest.

Lauren is originally from what she calls “John Hughes Land,” the suburbs of Chicago; Albert was born in Baldwin Park but moved to Mexico when he was 13. “You ever hear older Mexicans say they want to move back to Mexico?” he asks with a laugh. “Well, my dad did it!” Albert returned to the U.S. in his 20s and helped to open Wolfgang Puck restaurants in Orange County. That’s where he met Güera—what he lovingly calls Lauren. And that’s where she first got a clue about the power of his heritage. “Everywhere we went, Albert knew someone—and that person was always from Jerez,” she says. “I told him, ‘No way can you know all these people!’ But he did!” Albert worked in the restaurant industry while Lauren taught, and the two raised three boys together. But in 2012,

Albert decided to start selling his family’s tortillas at the Lake Forest farmers’ market. The sales were strong enough that he opened Burritos La Palma in the city—“halfway point between the IE, San Fernando Valley and OC,” he explains. Quick word of mouth allowed him to expand to a taco truck and now the brickand-mortar SanTana spot, which he plans to use primarily as a tortilla factory while also selling burritos and more. The La Palma craze is such that even other restaurants, from loncheras to highend restaurants, have put birria de res on their menus, which Albert finds “awesome. That just means someone’s thinking, ‘Hey, this dish is good, and I’m going to make it with my twist,’” he says with a hearty laugh. “What’s the sincerest form of flattery?” —GUSTAVO ARELLANO


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Michael Puglisi

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“I

think people need to change the way they look at our food system and everything we consume,” says Michael Puglisi, owner and head of Electric City Butcher in Santa Ana. “Our guests are not just coming in to buy a piece of meat. They’re actually supporting a way of life—a rooted concept of how we originally came to eat and harvest these animals.” When customers walk into Puglisi’s small, chilly shop, they see how food production should be. Puglisi’s workers are constantly breaking down whole pigs or slabs of beef and grinding sausage into natural casing. The day’s offerings are written on the window; a small freezer stocks everything from preserved yolks to heritage lard. There are no backrooms, no closed doors, no walls separating

the public from the butchers. “We want people to see the entire operation and be comfortable with what they’re buying,” Puglisi says. Prior to Electric City Butcher, the New York native spent years cooking and butchering everywhere from the Fontainebleau Resort in Miami to Thomas Keller’s Bouchon Beverly Hills. But it was a visit to Puglisi’s cousin and his wife in Sicily that inspired the butcher shop. “My cousin and his wife are the farmer and the butcher in a town of 4,500 people,” he says. His cousin raises his own meats, processes them, then sells them to the community. “That really resonated with me after I came back to the States. I wanted to have a better source of quality meats for me and my family and replicate what I experienced in a very small, artisanal way.”

Finding resources in California wasn’t difficult because of the abundance of farmers, but establishing the necessary relationships proved difficult. “Everybody really has their guard up when you’re talking about small farms and small processors and direct sourcing,” Puglisi says. “They want to make sure you’re keeping the integrity of their product and not bastardizing their hard work. It takes two years to raise a good cow—these farmers take a lot of pride in what they do and want to make sure that we’re able to do the same.” Apart from the shop, Puglisi offers workshops that give hands-on overviews identifying different parts of the animal, the basics of breaking it down, and how to prepare your favorite cuts. But his most gratifying community outreach is working with MaxLove, a nonprofit dedicated

to supporting families with kids fighting cancer through healing foods, whole-body wellness and integrative medicine. “When we met Audra [Wilford] from MaxLove and she told us the organization used bone broth for medicinal purposes, our connection was obvious,” he says. The animals from Electric City Butcher are all natural, grass-fed, pasture-raised and everything the ketogenic diet requires. “We provide them all their broth for their broth bank and set up pop-ups with them, teaching bone broth classes,” Puglisi explains. Electric City Butcher has even developed a mixed-bone broth recipe, a two-day process in which the bones are slowly simmered so all the connective tissue and nutritional properties emulsify into liquid—culinary medicine. —CYNTHIA REBOLLEDO


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an array of homemade creams, fl avored cold-brew coffees, delicious ice cream or traditional milk. Another signature product they offer is cookie butter. Made from spreadable baked dough, it’s perfect for spreading on waffl es, pancakes, or eating it straight out of the jar! Whatever your taste might be, The Dirty Cookie offers a little bit of everything to satisfy your sweet spot.

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yan Garlitos of Irenia Restaurant dreamed of opening his own place someday. He just didn’t expect it to happen so soon. He and his girlfriend, Sarah Mosqueda, had been doing itinerant supper clubs, starting on a whim. “I was making dinner for some friends one night in my buddy’s loft,” he recalls. “At one point in the evening, someone joked that we should do this again for other people—and charge them to eat.” About two months later, his first popup served Filipino food to about 20 guests. It snowballed from there. The events went from Mosqueda’s back yard to people’s houses to a rented space when their guest list ballooned to 100. “We didn’t try to push it or market it,” says Garlitos, who’s still in awe. “It was word of mouth.”

When the North Left in Santa Ana closed, Garlitos and Mosqueda knew they had to strike. “At the time, it felt right,” he says. The main motivating factor was that he knew mainstream attention around Filipino food was growing rapidly, and the two didn’t want to do it after the buzz died down. More important, they wanted to set the standard. “We wanted to be the one that everybody who came after would be compared to.” When Irenia opened in May of last year, it was to instant and critical acclaim. Jonathan Gold wrote in the Los Angeles Times that it “cares as much about feeding the appetites of its grandmothers and uncles as it does about making the scene.” For Garlitos—who was born in 1984 in Anaheim, grew up in Fullerton, and came

of age in Yorba Linda—cooking started out as just a hobby, something he picked up while helping his grandmother Irenia prepare Filipino meals. He never thought of it as a career choice. Since most of his family was in the medical field, he followed the biology track at UC Irvine. But it wasn’t clicking for him after two years. On the eve of applying to business school, a conversation with his sister made him realize it’d be cool to open a restaurant. “Well, maybe you should learn how to cook, then,” she told him. He enrolled in the Art Institute of California the next day. After a year at the culinary school, he went on to become Slapfish’s first employee. Then, when Carlos Salgado needed a new cook for his then-food truck Taco Maria, Garlitos answered the ad. He

knew he could learn a lot from Salgado, and Garlitos feels he crammed at least double the amount of years of on-the-job training under the James Beard-nominated chef. To this day, he credits Taco Maria—where Garlitos spent four years and became the sous chef—as the most important part of his culinary education. It’s also where he met Mosqueda, who was a server. Now at their own restaurant, they say they’re still learning new things every day—not just coming up with recipes, but figuring out all aspects of running a restaurant. The couple’s working mantra is “Everything has a solution.” Garlitos feels blessed about everything. “All these things fell into place,” he says, “and it became a little leap of faith.” —EDWIN GOEI


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I za b e l l a A l va rez

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YOUNG OLD SOUL

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ressed in a retro Rolling Stones T-shirt, her braided hair topped with a black fedora, Izabella Alvarez resembles the average 13-year-old. The Irvine teen is bubbly and relaxed as she talks about shopping with her friends, doing Musical.lys and going bowling with her family (mom, dad and brother Nick). But when you start talking about her passions, she gets serious, transforming into what some, including her father and her co-stars, would call an old soul. At about age 6, Alvarez decided to pursue an acting career. “I would always point at the TV and say, ‘I want to be in there. I want to be in there,’” she recalls. “And my parents were like, ‘Okay, let’s see what we can do.’” Her first job, a retail commercial with her family, was all it took. “I was like, ‘This is what I want to do; this is what I want to do for the rest of my life.’”

Since that commercial, she has scored recurring roles on TV shows as varied as Showtime’s Shameless, HBO’s Westworld and Disney’s Walk the Prank, as well as a regular spot on the upcoming ABC comedy Raised By Wolves. “I read the script before I take the offer or the project . . . and make sure it’s not inappropriate because, you know, I am still really young,” she says. “I try to choose my projects wisely and [take] nothing, like, inappropriate because I do have a young audience.” Even when posting to social media, she feels a sense of responsibility to fans her own age and younger. “I’m very careful what I post. . . . I need to watch [what I do] and even what I say,” she says. “They look up to that, which is awesome.” She’s also watching to see what her young fans will take from her leap to the big screen, with Disney’s Magic Camp and the independent Collisions both set to

premiere this year. The latter, directed by Richard Levien, centers on what happens to a family when mom Yoana is taken in an immigration raid. Itan (played by Alvarez) and her brother are released by Child Protective Services into the custody of their uncle, a truck driver with seemingly little regard for his young charges; the trio embark on a quest to find Yoana before she is deported. “I’m very excited to present it,” Alvarez says. “It’s the perfect time to do it because of everything that’s going on.” Less heavy is Magic Camp, which focuses on a summer camp for young magicians. “When I heard Walt Disney Pictures, I was like, ‘YES, I want to do it!’ And then I heard our director [was] Mark Waters—he directed one of my favorite movies, Mean Girls. I was like, ‘Um, yes, I’m going to take this,’” she says. For the role, Alvarez got a crash course in magic, though, she says, you’ll have to watch the

film to see what she can do. With each production, Alvarez has been fortunate to work alongside some of the industry’s greats, including William H. Macy, Jeffrey Tambor and Ed Harris. “I feel like you can take something from anyone you work with, and that’s been a thing I’ve learned from every project I’ve worked on— that I can take something from every person, and it might be the smallest thing, but I can use it in my style of acting,” she says. “From every character I’ve played, I’ve took that you can be whoever you want to be, and you can show who you want to be,” Alvarez continues. “You don’t have to hide inside, which I feel some teens do, you know, where I can’t be this person or I have to be someone else to be cool, or I have to act a certain way so everyone will like me. Be you, you know?” Sage advice from a 13-year-old. —PATRICE MARSTERS


Why Does It Have to Be Snakes?

NOTHING IS WRITTEN

LUCASFILM

stealing a mysterious orb coveted by Ronan (Lee Pace), a powerful villain with ambitions that threaten the entire universe. To evade the ever-persistent Ronan, Quill is forced into an uneasy truce with a quartet of disparate misfits—Rocket (the voice of Bradley Cooper), a gun-toting raccoon; Groot (the voice of Vin Diesel), a tree-like humanoid; the deadly and enigmatic Gamora (Zoe Saldana); and the revenge-driven Drax the Destroyer (Dave Bautista). The movie is screened on the rooftop of the parking structure behind the Frida Cinema, with the Santa Ana Business Council picking up the tabs for admission and parking. Bring low-backed chairs and whatever else you need for comfortable viewing, but please pick up snacks, beverages and meals from surrounding downtown Santa Ana businesses. Parking structure, Fifth and Spurgeon streets, Santa Ana; thefridacinema. org. Sun., 7:30 p.m. Free. The Breakfast Club. Parts will make you wince, especially when the Brat Packers attempt to get deep, but overall, this is middling as far as John Hughes flicks go. Regency Directors

Cut Cinema at Rancho Niguel, 25471 Rancho Niguel Rd., Laguna Niguel, (949) 831-0446. Tues. Call for show time. $8. Raiders of the Lost Ark. Reacquaint yourself with the first flick in the Spielberg/Lucas popcorn franchise before Harrison Ford returns in 2019 with what’s tentatively titled Indiana Jones 5. Regency South Coast Village, Santa Ana, (714) 557-5701. Wed., 7:30 p.m. $9. Rammstein: Paris. Fingers crossed that the Frida Cinema walls can take the banging of heads, as the organization and Picturehouse present renowned Swedish director Jonas Åkerlund’s concert film. Said to employ a radical new approach to capturing the emotion and thrill of guitar god Rammstein’s one-of-a-kind live performance, the film was shot in Paris and includes a dark and spectacular fairy tale laced with controversy, don’t-try-this-at-home theatrics and the all-consuming aroma of Benzin (gasoline). Careful raising those lighters! The Frida Cinema, Santa Ana; thefridacinema.org. Thurs., March 23, 8 p.m. $7-$10. MCOKER@OCWEEKLY.COM

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A Contemporary Evening. Russia’s Bolshoi Ballet brings together the best dancers in the world and masters of contemporary choreography for The Cage (Jerome Robbins), Études (Harald Lander) and Russian Seasons (Alexei Ratmansky). AMC Orange 30 at the Outlets, 20 City Blvd. W., Orange, (714) 769-4288; Cinemark Century Stadium 25, 1701 W. Katella Ave., Orange, (714) 532-9558; Cinemark Century 20 Huntington Beach, 7777 Edinger Ave., Huntington Beach, (714) 373-4573; Edwards Irvine Spectrum 21, 65 Fortune Dr., Irvine, (844) 462-7342; Edwards Aliso Viejo Stadium 20, 26701 Aliso Creek Rd., Aliso Viejo, (844) 462-7342; Edwards Long Beach Stadium 26, 7501 E. Carson, Long Beach, (844) 462-7342; www.regmovies.com. Also at Regency South Coast Village, 1561 W. Sunflower Ave., Santa Ana, (714) 557-5701. Sun., 12:55 p.m.; Tues., 7 p.m. (Regency South Coast Village only). $14-$18. Guardians of the Galaxy. Some have cited James Gunn’s smash hit as the best movie from the Marvel film universe. Brash adventurer Peter Quill (Chris Pratt) finds himself the object of an unrelenting bounty hunt after

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Carman has taken Chapman students to the festival, where more than 500 movies are shown in six different theaters and on a giant outdoor screen in Bologna’s Piazza Maggiore. Guy Borlée, the festival coordinator, will present the film in Orange, discuss the restoration and take questions from the audience. Chapman University, Dodge College of Film and Media Arts, Digital Media Arts Center, Cloobeck Screening Room, 283 N. Cypress St., Orange; festival.ilcinemaritrovato.it/ en/. Thurs., March 16, 7 p.m. Free. Wall Writers: Graffiti In Its Innocence. Roger Gastman’s documentary, which is narrated by John Waters, looks at those who pioneered graffiti art long before Banksy and Shepard Fairey became household names. Speaking on its birth from Philadelphia and New York City during 1967-’73 to its reputation as the largest art movement of the 20th century are originators Cornbread, Taki 183, LSD Om, journalists, historians and politicians. The Frida Cinema, 305 E. Fourth St., Santa Ana; thefridacinema.org. Thurs., March 16, 8 p.m. $7-$10. Hate.com: Extremists On the Internet. The Orange County Chapter of Americans United for Separation of Church and State screens the documentary that examines how hate groups disseminate their violent messages and reach new converts around the world via the internet. Keep in mind the Irvine Ranch Water District neither supports nor endorses the messages of the movie and the group presenting it; the water boyz merely book the space as a community service. Irvine Ranch Water District, Community Room, 15500 Sand Canyon Ave., Irvine, (714) 299-4551; www. au-oc.org. Sat. Snacks and socializing, 1:15 p.m.; screening, 1:45 p.m. Free, but seating is first-come, first-seated. Deconstructing the Beatles: Revolver. Scott Freiman, the composer/producer who has previously been featured onscreen in this corner of Long Beach deconstructing The White Album and Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, now takes on the 1966 studio album that marked the end of the Beatles touring and the beginning of their experimental phase. In addition to such Revolver songs as “Eleanor Rigby,” “Yellow Submarine” and “Good Day Sunshine,” Freiman examines tunes recorded during the same period such as “Paperback Writer” and “Rain.” Art Theatre, 2025 E. Fourth St., Long Beach, (562) 4385435. Sat.-Sun., 11 a.m. $8.50-$9.

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The Warplands. Exhibition of recent work by Cauleen Smith includes a short film drawn from her current research on the influence of Alice Coltrane, the American jazz pianist, organist, harpist, singer, composer, swamini and second wife of John Coltrane. UC Irvine Contemporary Arts Center, 4000 Mesa Rd., Irvine; www.arts.uci.edu/events. Open daily through March 25. Free. Being Mortal. PBS Frontline film follows Dr. Atul Gawande as he meets people facing terminal illnesses and the physicians treating them. El Toro Library, 24672 Raymond Way, Lake Forest, (949) 757-3776; alzoc.org/ family-education. Thurs., March 16, 6 p.m. Free. Beyond Measure. From the makers of Race to Nowhere, the 2009 documentary that called for reforming the U.S. education system, comes this follow-up demand for public schools that value personal growth over test scores, inquiry over mimicry and passion over rankings. You’ll be introduced to some of the schools reimagining education at this film’s South County premiere. Vicki Abeles, the author and director/producer of Beyond Measure, conducts an audience Q&A after the screening. St. Mary’s School, 7 Pursuit, Aliso Viejo, (949) 448-9027. Thurs., March 16, 6:30 p.m. Free, but seating is limited. Edward Scissorhands. Producer Denise Di Novi introduces Tim Burton’s romantic dark fantasy from 1990 about the titular hilltop recluse (Johnny Depp) finding love with a flatlander (Winona Ryder) despite his really sharp fingertips. This is part of Laguna Art Museum’s 2017 Film Night program of screenings introduced by special guests. Laguna Art Museum, 307 Cliff Dr., Laguna Beach, (949) 4948971. Thurs., March 16, 7 p.m. Free with museum admission. Rapsodia Satanica. Dodge College’s Film Studies program and Wilkinson College’s Italian Studies program, in collaboration with Cineteca di Bologna and Cinema Ritrovato, present this 1917 Italian silent Faustian tale about an old woman who makes a pact with Mephisto to regain her youth. In return, she must stay away from love, but after the deal, she meets two brothers who fall in love with her. The film was plucked from the Cineteca di Bologna, one of Europe’s most renowned archives for film restoration and preservation and organizer of the Il Cinema Ritrovato festival. For more than five years, professor Emily

By Matt Coker

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film»special screenings

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Chip Yost

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or Chip Yost, the decision to enter the news business wasn’t always obvious. “I wish the lightbulb had gone off earlier that I wanted to be a reporter,” recalls Yost, KTLA-TV’s award-winning Orange County reporter. “I’d been a news junkie since middle school. My mom would bring newspapers home knowing I’d read all of them. Even as a kid, 60 Minutes was my favorite show. But it never clicked to me that, hey, maybe I should try to get paid for my passion.” Instead, Yost, an Ohio native, earned a business degree and took a well-paying AirTouch sales job in the pager industry. “One day, at lunchtime, I had three newspapers, and I read one after the other, and it just dawned on me [to pursue a career in journalism],” he says. “So, I started

looking into how to do it. My first thought was doing documentaries, and then I thought I should get into news.” He applied to Los Angeles TV stations for menial jobs that could eventually lead to reporting. “I never got a call back,” says a laughing Yost, who decided at the age of 27 to improve his chances. He got a $40,000 loan and won acceptance to Columbia University’s School of Journalism in New York City. He took print reporting classes, but he majored in documentary filmmaking. “The program was so intense.” The station manager at KYMA in Yuma, Arizona, saw clips he had produced at Columbia and gave him his first journalism job as an on-air reporter in 1998. “I loved it,” Yost says before describing how he covered a wild drug-cartel shootout

near the border, dirty cops, narcotics trafficking and a pedophile-priest scandal predating the mess that resulted in the Academy Award-winning Spotlight, based on the work of Boston Globe reporters. After stints at stations in Tucson and Denver, he landed at KTLA, in the nation’s second-largest media market, where he was eventually named the station’s Orange County bureau chief. “Yes,” he jokes, “I’m the chief of myself.” It’s not just his sense of humor that sets him apart. While print journalists can get a story with only a pen and a napkin, Yost’s tasks are significantly more complicated. Each day, to appear live on three segments of the news, he seamlessly performs five jobs: reporter, cameraman, audio technician, Final Cut Pro film editor, as well as driver of a mobile newsroom

inside a converted, blue Ford van carrying a Channel 5 logo. In early March, the Cypress resident arrived at UC Irvine to interview professor David Neumark for the evening news broadcast. Neumark advised him he could spare only 15 minutes because he needed to get to John Wayne Airport. Yost didn’t panic. While chatting with the professor, he calmly unloaded more than 40 pounds of equipment, set up a tripod, adjusted his Sony camera’s focus, fine-tuned lighting and placed a microphone on the professor. He then asked good questions from memory on a complicated subject (economics), received the necessary quotes, took four different camera-angle shots, packed up and, stunningly, was out the door in 16 minutes. Yost is a pro. —R. SCOTT MOXLEY


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B r i a n Kes i n ge r

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ne of the first things artist Brian Kesinger did as a freshly minted 18-year-old just hired by Walt Disney Animation Studios was buy an AT-AT walker figurine from Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back. It may sound like the frivolous impulse of a teenage boy suddenly flush with Mickey Mouse money, but to Kesinger and his brother, the toy was so much more than that. Growing up “everywhere between Yorba Linda and Buena Park” in the 1980s and 1990s as the sons of musicians, Brian and his brother desperately wanted the coveted Imperial All Terrain Armored Transport toy as a present. But as each Christmas and birthday went, the pricey toy never came. Kesinger worked his OC childhood experience into the 2009 ABC-TV Christmas short, Prep & Landing, with brother

elves coveting a sled instead of high-end Star Wars toys. And though Kesinger has worked on far bigger Disney properties since (Zootopia and Moana, and he just illustrated Marvel’s Groot comic book, a part of the wildly popular Guardians of the Galaxy franchise), the tribute was touching to his brother and parents, who spent numerous hours after school at Disneyland. (The young Kesinger would have no idea at that time his drawings would inspire parts of Tarzan’s Tree House or that he would have his own art shows at the Disney Gallery.) In fact, much of Kesinger’s portfolio when he applied to Disney Animation Studios as a high-school senior was made up of sketches he made while at Disneyland after school with his childhood best friend. Kesinger admits he only applied to

Disney as a means for feedback while he was applying to colleges anyway. Disney actually got back to him before any college. He wasn’t expecting to get accepted, and the Mouse wasn’t expecting him to be so young. In fact, he had to wait a few months to turn 18 before he could start. “It’s certainly a dream job, right?” Kesinger says. He began in the layout department, fixing leaves and other details in the background of Tarzan. He then worked on Atlantis, a movie that eventually launched his own career as an artist in his own right. “I was on Atlantis for about a year and a half, drawing rivets, gears, pressure valves,” he explains. “I wasn’t doing a lot of character work. So when it came time to drawing characters for [the Story Department], I was a bit self-conscious because I didn’t have much practice. So I started drawing these characters with

gears and rivets over the hard parts to draw, and it turns out that ‘Oh, that’s steampunk!’” He has made his name in the genre since with an art series called Tea Girls, a more feminine and wispy take on an often industrial genre, using tea (it’s a steampunk thing) to color in the stylish Gibson Girls. And his Star Wars: The Force Awakens and Calvin and Hobbes mashups, in which he portrays Kylo Ren as Calvin, were an instant hit. Kesinger’s Disney training has served him well; he has a line of merchandise, including a plush toy and a parasol, with more in the works, such as a traveling marionette show. Eventually, he’d like to take a page out of Uncle Walt’s book and make a fulllength film. “Luckily,” he says, “I’m in the right industry.” —TAYLOR HAMBY


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or seven years, Dino Perez has humbly peddled his artwork at the downtown Santa Ana’s monthly art walk, becoming one of the most recognized faces in the city’s vibrant creative scene. The tall, pompadoured 32-year-old hawks paintings, prints and T-shirts adorned with such recurring characters as skull boys, Mexican women, cartoony birds and lotería card iconography (hands, hearts, moons, etc.). A “graphic designer who likes to paint,” Perez’s style has inflections of Mexican folk art filtered through dark linework and a toned-down color palette. But Perez is more than just a kind face making monthly appearances by the Gypsy Den; his presence lingers through-

out the downtown area even when he’s not there. His paintings hang in restaurants, and his murals adorn walls and utility boxes. He’s also an active member of the Community Engagement project, which helps families get together for monthly coloring-book events. Coming of age in 1990s SanTana, Perez recalls being into ’80s subcultures, music, TV, graffiti writing and pop culture. The Smiths and Morrissey are a huge influence in his life (Perez beams every time he points out the Morrissey concert poster he designed for Goldenvoice), and music influences his paintings from time to time, either by using song lyrics as a title for a painting or guiding the mood of the piece. By day, Perez works as a graphic designer;

by night, he leaves his fiancée to work for a few hours in his studio, located in Cal State Fullerton’s Grand Central Art Center (GCAC) basement. While music, street art and cartoons clearly inform his work, what really drives Perez to create is the desire to relate to his cultural upbringing. “A lot of art I make is from art I grew up with,” Perez says. “I’m definitely always keeping in mind where I came from, my roots and staying true to myself and what I’m about.” Last year, Perez saw a call for proposals through the GCAC website for community-centered art projects. He submitted his vision of designing coloring books for families to color together, and Community Engagement, a nonprofit partnered with

GCAC, approved the idea. He now colors with families in the Lacy neighborhood once a month. “I grew up coloring with my parents and family,” he says. “I wish there had been events where I could color with my neighbors.” Perez will bring Coloring With the Community to OC Fair’s Imaginology event in April. Besides the effect of uniting families and keeping kids out of trouble, what Perez didn’t count on was how his coloring-book participants would inspire him. “Sometimes, you’ll see someone pick a color palette, and you think, ‘Oh, cool, I never would have thought of using those colors together,’” Perez says. “It becomes a collaborative work now.” —AIMEE MURILLO


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Do n a ld M c Kay le

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DANCE MAKER

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othing will stop Donald McKayle from choreographing dance. Not even the wheelchair parked at the front of a dance studio at UC Irvine. The 86-years-strong, American modern dance legend watches rehearsal intently, ready to instruct his troop of dancers. “When I got very involved in choreography, I just stopped dancing, more or less,” McKayle says. “I just figured, ‘Well, I guess it’s time to do this other thing that I love to do.’ I think, for most dancers, if you took dance away from them, you would cut out a piece of their heart, but I’m not that way.” Professional dancers and companies have taught and performed his works throughout the United States for more than half a century. McKayle’s oeuvre is rooted in the histories and struggles of oppressed minorities, especially the

African-American diaspora, and political troubles in Argentina (inspired by his time there decades ago, which he describes as vibrant). He finds these stories tender, humane and honest—qualities he incorporates into movement for the stage. In February, McKayle debuted Crossing the Rubicon: Passing the Point of No Return, which portrays Syrian refugees escaping via water. Born in New York City, McKayle grew up in East Harlem in the 1930s. The second child of Jamaican activist parents, McKayle experienced racism and segregation firsthand from the African-American, Puerto Rican and Jewish immigrants in his neighborhood. His mother arranged for him to attend public schools outside Harlem, exposing him to other parts of society that awakened and heightened his sense of injustice and inequality. Despite having no formal dance train-

ing, McKayle earned a scholarship for the New Dance Group when he was 17. He trained in ballet, tap, modern, Afro-Caribbean, Hindu and Haitian dance styles; his work ethic led him to learn directly from Martha Graham, Merce Cunningham, Sophie Maslow and other dance titans. From there, he worked in Broadway, television and film. Highlights of his career include choreography for Disney’s Bedknobs and Broomsticks; a 1974 Tony Award for direction and choreography of the Broadway version of A Raisin In the Sun; and a PBS documentary about his life, Heartbeats of a Dance Maker. Currently, McKayle works with his hand-selected Etude Ensemble at UCI. McKayle likes to create pieces that last up to 30 minutes, every second filled with movement by multiple bodies. His répétiteur, Bret Yamanaka, assists with formations, production and teaching cho-

reography, but McKayle is fully in charge. “You become his instrument; you become his body,” Yamanaka explains. Back in the studio, everything and everyone moves around McKayle. Rehearsals are spent running choreography, exchanging feedback and trying it again. It’s up to the dancers to make it happen. “Sometimes I think I can get up when I can’t,” McKayle confesses. “It’s frustrating when I think I can do something that I can’t. But I’m old enough to take everything that comes to me and say, ‘Okay.’ There’s a time for everything.” After rehearsal is over, dancers cluster in front of him, taking their turn to say, “Thank you, Mr. McKayle!” He smiles and nods in acknowledgement of each one until the space is empty, but movement is still running through his mind. “I have no reason to stop.” —JAZLEY FAITH


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erforming more than 80 roles since 1980 on Orange County’s community-theater stages has done absolutely nothing to diminish Harriet Whitmyer’s exuberance. “I’ve come to realize how important this level of theater is. It’s a training ground for a lot of people,” says the retired MBA. “I think we old-timers have a responsibility to make sure [newbies] realize the team they are becoming a part of.” The red-haired dynamo has made herself indispensable at theaters from San Clemente to Long Beach, both behindthe-scenes and onstage. Her acting chops range from the musical, murderous stage business of Mrs. Lovett in Sweeney Todd to the quiet strength of Linda Loman in Death of a Salesman. Laughter erupts from her entire being as she sits on her character’s couch for a photo shoot at Newport Theater Arts

Center (NTAC), where she has served on the board for the past 10 years. Costumed in garish florals come curtain time, she reins in her boisterousness and pins up her titian hair to play Lettie in A Murder Is Announced, a McGuffin-filled Agatha Christie tale. The bun stays put while her characterization unfolds in subtle layers, fueled by quicksilver impulses and a keen attention to her fellow players. “We have a young man in our show—it’s the first show he’s ever done—and he has a teeny-weeny part, but he’s so committed, so excited”—words that describe Whitmyer perfectly. “I’ve always—and I don’t know if this is printable—looked at theater as my drug of choice,” she says. “Okay?” Her laughter fills the theater when reminded just about everything is printable in the Weekly. “It just puts me in another world, ever since I was a peanut.” Her parents began taking her to live theater when she was 3 or 4.

“I used to be the person in the neighborhood who organized plays, fairy tales, and we charged money. We made enough, this little club—I think it was all girls at the time—that we all got to pay for our admittance to the zoo,“ says the California native, who moved to OC to attend graduate school at UC Irvine. Her creativity and organizational leadership came together professionally afterward, as managing director from 1981 to 1985 at then-community theater Laguna Moulton Playhouse. Artistic director Doug Rowe brought Alex Golson out from New York to direct an original play. “And then we met, and he decided to stay,” she says of her husband. The play was about an acting school—but it’s just a coincidence the two went on to run an acting academy at Laguna Moulton. “Doug kind of just let us do our own thing, for about three years. It was extremely successful.” Golson went on to teach at Orange

Coast College. “I have to be very honest,” Whitmyer says, “I think I got my real serious, straight acting training from working with Alex. It really opened my eyes as to what acting really was: listening.” Whitmyer retired in 2012 after 15 years as human-resources director for UCI Extension and devotes herself to theater and travel. “I pretty much split my time, as far as doing shows, between here [NTAC] and Long Beach [Playhouse],” where she also volunteers, maintaining the production archive. “I think theater in general has a big role in this time of total insanity—that’s the only way I can describe it,” she says, hope in her voice. “Doing our art is so important because it keeps us in a community where we can continue to explore our beliefs. I suspect in the near future someone will write a play about this whole debacle, and I hope we get to do it.” —LISA BLACK


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Explore 2.5 miles of open road, where pedestrians and cyclists can experience Garden Grove, car-free! Loaner bikes and pedicabs will be available, so come out and hit the streets from 3 - 6 pm. Historic Main Street will host an After Party from 6 - 10 pm.

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ama Wareh wears many hats in life—humanitarian, artist, traveler, nature educator, documentarian, author—but none as noticeably as the Indiana Jones-like felt ranger atop her head. The Syrian-American’s style is intentional, with the green scarves wrapped around her shoulders and into a hijab, accentuating the hazel tint of her eyes. But the hat? “A hawk tried to mate with my head,” Wareh says bluntly. She taught children in Los Angeles about the bird of prey one day when it got a little frisky. Wareh decided it best to don the hat to avoid his dangerous

talons in future lessons, and she has kept it on ever since, adding only a self-woven band around it. Wareh grew up in OC to Syrianimmigrant parents. Her father studied to become a pilot, and her mom became a fashion designer, opening up her own store in Garden Grove. She attended Orange Crescent School at the Islamic Center of Orange County (where her mom designed the school uniforms). “It made it okay to be different,” she says of her elementary days. When Wareh decided to wear the hijab and go to a public junior high school, being different wasn’t okay.

“If people tried to pull my hijab off, I would just chase them down.” Her family saved up to travel back to Syria every few years. As a kid, Wareh took a particular liking to her eccentric Uncle Ahmad in Damascus. “He was a homeopathic healer, and I was fascinated with him,” she says. And her uncle had a way with animals. “He could go out into a balcony, whistle, and all these birds would come. It was like watching a magician.” On one vacation, Uncle Ahmad further revealed his wisdom to her. When doctors couldn’t cure a horrible eye infection and cyst she suffered, he stepped in, albeit

upset that his family consulted doctors first. “He took some white sage and steeped it in water,” she says. After an eye rinse, the cyst disappeared. Those formative years instilled a passion for nature in Wareh. Instead of a trip to Disneyland to celebrate turning 10, she asked her mom to go to the park where she could sneak up on lizards before catching them. A young Wareh also began filling up sketchbooks with artwork inspired by National Geographic magazines. Admittedly not the best biology student, she later enrolled at Cal State Fullerton to study film and art, hoping to


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students’ drawings slowly turn from gory images to innocent imagination. But that’s as far as Wareh could go. She didn’t dare cross the Syrian border, having been chased by the Mukhabarat, Assad’s intelligence agency, during her documentarian days. When Wareh traveled to Lebanon later that same year for refugee work, she witnessed the healing power of art again. The humanitarian landed in Beirut ready to help establish Birds of Hope, an education and arts-therapy school near Tripoli. There was only one problem: In Lebanon, refugees aren’t allowed to have bank accounts, leaving them at the mercy of organizations that can have less than their best intentions financially. The principal told Wareh there’d be no school because of corruption, but she quickly found an alternate site that opened to 350 refugee students within two weeks. “Every day, the kids would come and hand me art pieces, and a lot of them were extremely violent,” Wareh says. She was seeing the same thing she had in Turkey. The most dramatic transformation came from a child who drew a rose drenched with dripping blood. But, “on the last day, he handed me a rose with a sun around it.” For all the heartfelt moments amid the horror, nothing could prepare Wareh for the refugee crisis she came across when traveling to Greece in January. “It’s the biggest mess I’ve ever seen,” she says. By then, the Assad regime had overtaken Aleppo, fueling a mass exodus from the ancient city. She raised money, bought winter boots, built a cabin for refugees and helped any boats incoming from Turkey to Lesbos. “One day, a boat came in, and we helped them get out of wet clothes into dry ones,” Wareh says. “The saddest thing is that when they get there, they think there’s a plane waiting to take them to Europe.” She plays a video from her Instagram account panning the vastness of “life-jacket mountain” in Lesbos, where discarded floatation vests are piled by the hundreds of thousands. She has no time line to go back to help war-torn refugees, but she fondly remembers the children in Greece who saw her hat and called out, “Cowboy! Cowboy!” Wherever she travels, the memory of her Uncle Ahmad and her own humanitarian spirit are never far behind. When Wareh returned from Greece, she sat next to a Lakota medicine woman who told her she had a black aura. Wareh initially thought it a bad thing. “No, no, a black aura is an aura of a shaman,” the woman said. “You’re going to be a healer someday.” But first, there’s a society at home in need of healing. Wareh landed at John Wayne Airport the same day spontaneous protests took to LAX against President Donald Trump’s Jan. 27 “Muslim Ban,” which targeted refugees, especially Syrians. “All these people that are fleeing are not ISIS, they are not terrorists,” Wareh says from experience. “They’ve been victimized by war.”

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work with wildlife as a camerawoman for her beloved National Geographic. Around that time, Uncle Ahmad offered another course of study in folk healing. “I have this big regret in my heart because he asked me to stay with him for a year and learn everything,” Wareh says. She promised to do so the following year, but he passed away before that could happen. Not knowing what to do with her life after graduation, Wareh came across an ad looking for an animal caretaker for the Orange County Department of Education. When she called, the department offered her a naturalist position instead. “My first day on the job was at Irvine Regional Park, and there was a field trip of kids coming,” she recalls. A co-worker directed her to a white sage plant use station to put up an info card—one that signaled to Wareh that she found her calling. It read that indigenous Tongva and Acjachemen tribes used white sage as eye medicine, just as Uncle Ahmad did. Wareh returned to Syria as an Environmental Studies graduate student at Cal State Fullerton. She wanted to incorporate what she learned in film to investigate the country’s water crisis, where 12-hour shut-offs became commonplace in Damascus. Her thesis turned into the award-winning documentary Dwindling Drops In the Sand. Wareh proposed using the Orange County Sanitation District’s heralded recycled-water system as a solution for Syria, an idea that quickly traveled to the Syrian embassy in D.C. But then all interest suddenly dropped. She learned years later that the regime opted for a desalination plant instead, a costly and ineffective move propelled by financial gain. A troubled ecosystem in Syria presaged a dire political one. Peaceful protests demanding President Bashar al-Assad’s ouster during 2011’s Damascus Spring spiraled into civil war. Wareh wasted little time in organizing an art exhibit in Laguna Beach featuring her own Native American and Bedouin-influenced pieces to raise funds for the United Nations Central Emergency Relief Fund. But following the art show, she learned that supplies into Syria were being stolen and sold on the black market. So Wareh decided to head to Turkey in search of refugees herself. “Everyone thought it was crazy,” she says of her 2012 trip. Backpacking through South America gave her confidence to go it alone, plus she had the perfect cover: “I told people I traveled as an art student.” Carrying two suitcases of medicine meant for Aleppo, Wareh worked her way closer to the southern border. She made connections with refugee families in Turkey during her three-week stay and attended to their most pressing needs. But the farther south she traveled, the more harrowing the journey became. “I was shaken by everything I saw,” Wareh says. In desperation, refugees climbed over barbed-wire fences. She witnessed the human ravages of war in the form of gashed babies and men with missing limbs. In Gaziantep, Wareh taught art classes to refugee children, watching her

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eff Garvin turned in the manuscript for his second novel recently. Now he’s going through the inevitable aftermath of a sustained burst of creative energy: He’s elated and depressed. Pressing through that means keeping busy. He already has ideas of what he’s going to do for his next book, and he’s making a list of things he needs to do between now and the next round of edits. One of those things is activism for LGBTQ causes, among them the Trump administration’s rescinding President Barack Obama’s guidelines for trans students’ bathroom use. “It’s going to activate all this political rhetoric,” says Garvin, “and it’s not a political thing.” What’s a straight, married father of two doing fighting for the rights of trans kids? Why is he waiving speaker’s fees to talk via Skype with fans as a fundraiser for the Trevor Project? It all makes sense after

reading Garvin’s first published young adult novel, Symptoms of Being Human. It’s the sympathetic portrait of a genderfluid teenager from OC battling dysphoria at the same time they’re also fending off bullies and schoolyard bigots. The book came about during a discussion with friends about a trans girl suing the school system to be able to use the bathroom of the gender she identifies with. The freefor-all argument that followed left Garvin so upset and disillusioned by his friend’s lack of empathy that he sat down and wrote the first line of the novel. Garvin was doing the opposite of what many people advise first-time writers to do. Writing about something he didn’t know much about, he wanted to get it right, talking with friends and meeting with leaders in the trans community. “You launch a rocket, and it’s out of your hands, and you’re wondering if you’ve hit the tar-

get,” Garvin says. “Open your heart, and you’ll nail it.” Bullied in high school more than 20 years ago, the author still remembers how it felt, using it to his book’s advantage: “I was drawing on a primordial teenage rage and unhealed teenage hurt.” Garvin graduated with a BFA in film from Chapman University in 1998; a short career as an actor in television, indie films and theater followed. He was also lead singer for the alternative band 7K, with which he recorded three albums. Novelist feels like another step in his artistic evolution. “Talent is overrated,” he says. “Being an author was logistical for me—I did a spreadsheet.” The Google Sheets algorithm showed him that he had 16 hours of free time per week outside of family obligations and his job, with its two-hour commute, where he could get up early and knock out enough pages to be productive and not be a zombie when he arrived at work.

Making writing a habit taught him discipline, and the handful of failed manuscripts taught him what worked and what didn’t. When he went pro, he quit the commuter gig, taking a significant pay cut. “It’s like having a job, just one where I get paid very erratically,” he says with a laugh, but life is good. “I have a very wonderful, middle-class existence.” As he moves into the editing stage on the next book—another YA novel, this time about underrepresented mentalhealth issues affecting young people—he offers some practical advice worthy of a book all its own: “The rewards are absolutely there, but they have a price. Thirty percent of all of the awesome stuff that you imagine is there, but the remaining 70 percent is all admin. Enjoy the shadow side of that career if you want to be happy.” —DAVE BARTON


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hat’s now an art collective that promotes many of the most famous tattoo artists alive was once just a couple of broke guys wanting to sling T-shirts. “Coming from no money, we were forced to get creative in the early years,” says Sullen Art Collective co-founder Jeremy Hanna. “We made stickers and were putting them on stop signs and freeway signs up and down the coast before we even had shirts or hats. People thought we were crazy for it, and there were a lot of people who didn’t think we were going to make it.” About 15 years ago, Hanna and veteran inkster Ryan Smith were trying to re-brand an action-sports clothing line using tattoo-themed shirts. They were so successful that Sullen went from being

headquartered in Hanna’s living room to appearing in tattoo shops and conventions globally, as well as spawning numerous imitators. Nowadays, its iconic skull-andcrossbrushes logo stands as not only the company’s symbol, but also a way of life. “When we made the decision to go after tattooing, a lot of that was based on the fact that we knew tattooing as an art form was global,” Smith says. “We knew that with tattoo artists traveling internationally, it would set us up for international exposure. A lot of the guys we worked with early on were still making names for themselves, so they were traveling a lot. It was the perfect partnership of them needing more stuff to sell while they were traveling and us needing more art and exposure.”

Among its roster is a Dream Team of artists, including Freddy Negrete, Carlos Torres and Bob Tyrrell. But what makes so many tattooers work with the Seal Beach-based brand is how well it treats the artists. From the obsessive attention to detail in making sure the artwork, comfort and function of each product is flawless to the familial support the company gives its artists at conventions, Sullen is committed to going about its business the right way. Its biggest contribution to the industry doesn’t come in T-shirts or travel bags, but in the worldwide network of artists it has created. “We’ve always liked to collaborate with people, and Jeremy’s always had this innate ability to have a lot of friends,” Smith says. “When we started reaching

out to artists, half the time, it was us finding artists we were inspired by, and then the other half was friends of friends who wanted to work with us. We still look for new artists who inspire us whenever we do new lines, and a lot of those times, those people will become friends and mesh with the other artists we’ve been working with for a long time. We’re like the glue that gets everyone together and gets everyone talking.” “When times were tough, our Sullen family was always there,” Hanna adds. “We’ve always had a large network and a lot of good people surrounding us. These days, our tattoo artists are our brand ambassadors, and they’re telling our story whether we’re there with them or not. It’s amazing.” —JOSH CHESLER


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Nikki Marvin

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CHERRY BOMB!

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ikki Marvin’s beginnings as a dancer are not unlike that of Dita Von Teese: a relatively smalltown girl grows up watching Turner Classic Movies with her parents and develops an early love of vintage life, moves to Orange County, begins dancing here, and creates an onstage burlesque persona. Heather Sweet would go on to become Von Teese; Marvin would become Moxie Gold. Both would dance their way around the world. Marvin wouldn’t go on to marry any celebrities, though; she tied the knot with her dance instructor, Shesha Marvin, instead. But together, the couple run one of the premier dance studios and venues in Orange County: Atomic Ballroom in Irvine, purchasing it after the original owners retired in 2008.

But let’s step-ball-change back for a second. When Marvin began dancing seriously in 2003, a week after moving to Orange County from Victorville, it was the culmination of a dream. “For some reason I was always attracted to vintage everything,” Marvin says. “I saw [the 1937 Marx Brothers classic] A Day At the Races, and that’s when I put together there’s a dance to the music I loved. I love big band; I remember stealing my mom’s Glenn Miller CDs, and then my grandpa found out I liked swing music and gave me his whole collection.” From there, she started studying swing with Shesha, whom she began dating a month later. They married three years after that and now have two children together: 8-year-old daughter Anjali and 4-year-old son Arjuna. They usually travel

separately, so one parent is home with the kids at any given time. Dancing has taken the Marvins all around the world, from Korea to Paris to Argentina to Vegas. When Marvin isn’t swinging or Lindy Hopping her way around the globe, she’s performing burlesque locally. “Moxie is much more confident than Nikki. [She’s] outgoing. Moxie’s willing to take her clothes off—I think [that’s] the big difference,” Marvin says with a laugh. She began an all-girl burlesque troupe called the Atomic Cherry Bombs in 2009. “After several years of doing Cherry Bombs and doing burlesque shows, [performing solo routines] seemed like a natural progression,” she recalls. Marvin co-produced a Valentine’s Day burlesque night and debuted her solo act to “La Petite Fleur” at her own show. After that

de-flowering, she continued in the burlesque world by teaming up with Yadi Hurtado, who’s known for her vibrant, themed burlesque nights at the Yost Theater in Santa Ana, where Marvin and the Atomic Cherry Bombs regularly perform. The Cherry Bomb girls and other people of the dance world have since become some of Marvin’s closest friends. “I have very few friends who aren’t dancers,” Marvin says. “[Dancing] gives you a social scene so you’re meeting people all the time. It helps to mix people of all different backgrounds and ages. I feel like dance is a really, really open and accepting world. Especially with the current state in this world, it’s a place we can all come together and agree—we can all be happy there and get along.” —TAYLOR HAMBY


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Pamelina H.

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hirty years ago, Pamelina H. snuck into the National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM) Expo with a mission. Fender was about to debut a custom-built guitar line for artists, and she wanted in. Her idea: splash them with paintings. At the time, she was working for a guitar maker who encouraged her to visit NAMM and pitch the idea. She grabbed a gorgeous, baby-blue guitar painted with an image of a lady with wings and showed it to John Page, a master luthier charged with helping to start the Fender Custom Shop. Impressed, the two began collaborating—and she quickly became one of the

most acclaimed guitar painters in the music world. “It’s a challenging canvas, but the jobs came so fast and furious . . . and nobody else was doing it,” says Pamelina. “It didn’t just hang on the wall; it made music. I mean, how perfect is that?” Painting was encouraged from age 2, as it was a family tradition. Her artwork was first published in Vampirella Magazine when she was only 10, and she was already selling embroidery to shops in her hometown of Carmel by 13. Pamelina went to Europe upon turning 22 and worked the art scene in the Netherlands; when she returned to the States, she jumped into the music industry. In

addition to painting on instruments, she created artwork for albums and tours and worked on merchandise for MTV, Lollapalooza and the Scorpions, among others. She got into painting on guitars after a member of the Persuaders requested a simple white design, airbrushed over with black-and-red highlights. Her designs favor realism aesthetics, though with unreal landscapes: a bear chomping on frets, a Marilyn Monroe series, even one featuring the monsters of Universal Studios. Pamelina’s skills were such that she quickly built a celebrity client base who wanted her work on other items, too; she’s done a gong

for Mick Fleetwood and a drum kit for Sheila E., a motorcycle for Justin Timberlake, even a mobile home for Shaquille O’Neal. “Me falling into guitars was a very happy accident,” she says. “I think what I’m most proud of is that I stuck to what was important to me.” Pamelina donates her work to everyone from the Los Angeles Lakers Youth Foundation to MusicCares. “I had an unstable life growing up through early childhood,” she says. “But I had art, and it saved me. My job is to bring beauty into the world and something positive, you know?” —BRIDGET ARIAS


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Patti McGee H E R O W N S K AT E R

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atti McGee has always happily skated to her own tune. “I was always more inclined in making up my own job,” she says from her perch at the Teal Press, a screenprinting shop in Fullerton she runs with her daughter, Hailey Villa. “My mother wanted me to go to San Diego State and join her sorority, from her days,” says McGee. “But I was a surfer and a skateboarder; I wasn’t a sorority girl. And I don’t know what would’ve gotten me further!” McGee is a living legend: the first female skateboarding champion; the first skateboarder to grace the cover of

a major mainstream magazine (LIFE in 1965 at age 19) and Skateboarder; and a pioneering demo girl for Hobie Skateboards, showing off tricks that proved to an entire generation of girls that they could grind as well as the boys. She had her own car at 16, making coastal trips to Malibu from San Diego. “I picked my seat in school in my classes,” she says, “so that I could always see the beach, check the surf.” After she won her skateboarding title, she went on to mine turquoise in Nevada. And with her love of plants, her dream job, McGee says, is to be a volunteer at

the local botanical garden: “I don’t know about running the wheelbarrow, but I’d like to be a tour guide.” After being laid off from a radio job in Arizona, Villa took up screenprinting, and now she and McGee make apparel for Pink Widow Distribution, a skateboarding company founded to “house and distribute various female-focused skateboarding and apparel brands.” McGee is the brand ambassador and runs “the computer.” She was impressed by Pink Widow head Matt Gaudio’s intent to make a space for women in a male-dominated sport. Mother and

daughter have done community engagement at Fullerton’s Independence Park and even designed nylon backpacks for a local Girl Scouts troop, as well as the logo for the group’s skate jam last year. “They’re considering making a skating patch!” says Villa happily. The two hope to expand and open more Teal Press shops in the future. Though she was often photographed barefoot and without a helmet, McGee offers the following life advice: “Wear a helmet, so you can live to skate another day!” —JACQUELINE LINARES


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E s t h e r Ka n g

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ong Beach not only saved Esther Kang’s life, but it also gave her a life she never knew she wanted. Three years ago, the 27-yearold lead singer for local buzz band King Kang never would’ve believed that a shy, repressed girl from a Korean Christian community in Orange County would shed her skin and transform into the person she is today—an openly gay activist, a music journalist and a local rock star who plays the hell out of a guitar. “I feel like Long Beach has blasted my mind open,” Kang says with quiet confidence. “The exposure to music that I’ve gotten, local music . . . It’s kind of embarrassing, but I hadn’t even heard of the Velvet Underground until two years ago. I’ve just been learning a lot.” Teeming with psychedelic and ambling grooves, the four-piece band she named

after herself sweeps audiences up in a riptide of swirling atmospheric rock that takes a bite out of sounds perfected by Silver Apples and the lyrical poetry of Joni Mitchell. The unifying force is Kang’s delayed, spacey vocals that scream out to space on songs on their recently released EP, Summer of Fire. Despite its dopeness, this isn’t the voice that she’s spent the most time crafting. Prior to getting into music, she began her career path as a journalist, graduating from USC and landing a gig as a Manhattan Beach beat reporter at the Easy Reader. But music was never too far behind—her skill for learning cover tunes is part of what got her the job. After looking over her clips in an online portfolio, her editor noticed she also posted some recorded songs, including Smokey Robinson’s “You

Really Got a Hold on Me.” “He said he also liked my writing, but it was my cover that really won him over,” Kang says. She wrote for them for two years, during which her editor also encouraged her to play open mics, which is how she honed her chops. When she moved to Long Beach two years later, she was amazed at the city’s vibrant music and open-mic scene. Going out every night and performing for tips proved lucrative in money and connections, which included her future band mates in King Kang. It’s also where she finally felt comfortable expressing her sexuality after being raised by religious, conservative grandparents—the word gay was never in her vocabulary. “I feel Long Beach has really helped me grow into myself,” she says. “I still have a lot of growing up to do, but I feel no

shame in being myself, being out with my girlfriend. I never feel scared to kiss her in public. In OC, maybe I might, but I kinda don’t give a fuck no more.” Her journalism career also continues to thrive, now as a columnist for the Long Beach Post, where she has the task of writing about the same music scene that redefined her identity and gave her the freedom she’s always wanted. To her, the marriage between writing and music is the sweetest one there is. “I don’t really see them as two separate entities; it’s just one big form of expression,” Kang says. “This girl asked me once, ‘I write poems; do you think I could write songs?’ I’m like, ‘It’s the same fucking thing. Why you tripping?’ The whole idea is just not having labels and just creating. That’s what Long Beach has taught me.” —NATE JACKSON


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inDJnous TU R N TA B L E T I TA N

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t’s 1989, and 5-year-old Richard Rodriguez bobs his head as he rides in his dad’s tricked-out 1983 Nissan pickup through the streets of Anaheim. As the music switches from Run D.M.C. to Young M.C. to N.W.A, he begins to fall in love with hip-hop. Two years later, as he hears Eazy-E’s “Boyz-N-The-Hood (Remix),” with its turntable zips, Rodriguez starts becoming obsessed with deejaying. But he won’t be able to practice his passion until his 18th birthday, when his parents buy him a set of turntables as a gift. With a fresh pair of Technics 1200s that he uses to this day, Rodriguez began prac-

ticing in his room with only the occasional “TURN IT DOWN!” from his parents. He chose the name inDJnous as a way to pay homage to his Mexican, Guatemalan and indigenous roots. House parties led to gigs at small venues to a big break at the 2007 Paid Dues Festival, where he worked the VIP room. Today, the 33-year-old deejays almost every hip-hop show at the Observatory in SanTana. He spins for Ras Kass, Concrete Saints and Cookbook from L.A. Symphony and has worked with KRS One, Apollo Brown, Blu, Rakaa from Dilated Peoples and many local artists. “I love that I’m able to express myself through my selection of songs, through

the things that I do, through the crowd’s energy, me feeling them and me giving back that type of energy,” he says. “I love that connection that there is between us at that moment because it’s just euphoric, man, and it’s addicting.” The DJ cuts records with the precision of a LASIK doc while working the crossfader like a conductor barreling through Bach’s Brandenburg Concertos scribbling the page. His skills are such that when Big Daddy Kane played at the Observatory last year, the rapper/actor yelled, “Oh, shit!” at inDJnous’ scratches. Rodriguez plans to keep up the turntables, but he also wants to branch out

as a producer and focus on collaborating more with artists. “At the same time that I feel proud,” he says, “I also feel humble because not everybody gets the chance and not everybody has that type of position, and I know it can still go further.” Though most people he works with think he’s from LA, he says, inDJnous always reps Juice County; he makes a point of wearing Angels and Ducks gear whenever he performs. “Without Orange County, it’s just not me; there is no me,” he says. “Everywhere that I go, and everywhere I’m doing my thing, I’m always representing Orange County—it’s within me.” —FRANK JOHN TRISTAN


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Jimmy Hua Y E R B LU E

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ith his slight, 5-foot-10 frame tucked into a plaid shirt and jean jacket, dark-rimmed glasses on his face, Jimmy Hua could easily go undetected in any crowded bar, even though he’s holding a glass of water instead of whiskey. But the minute he straps on his guitar and steps up to the mic, everything changes. Armed with the electricity pulsing from the wires of his amp to the vibrations in his vocal chords, Hua jolts OC’s rock scene into attention. Picture a young, Vietnamese Jack White raised on a diet of sunny-weather suburbia and Beatles, and you’ve got an idea of why Hua matters. He still remembers the first time he heard “I Wanna Hold Your Hand,”

spinning it repeatedly on the family record player. His mom, a Vietnamese singer, would play plenty of Motown and old rock & roll in the house, but this record spoke to him in a way nothing else could. “I kept playing it over and over until my siblings got mad at me and were like, ‘Why are you still listening to old people’s music?’” the head of Big Monsta says. To this day, his nasally growl carries a hint of that inspiration. The band’s budding discography—including a full-length, two EPs and two singles recorded at his drummer Mike Willson’s MAPS recording studio—is a testament to the endurance of rock in OC, where the scene has gone through its ebbs and flows competing for fans with ska and punk.

At Huntington Beach High School, Hua met Willson and bassist Adrian Sanchez in a music class. They played showcases together, learning full Beatles songs to play for hundreds of people. It was here where Hua’s chops and love for bluesy, stripped-down rock & roll became his calling. Over the past five years, he has spearheaded Big Monsta’s growth, winning over fans in OC, even a few bigots who didn’t understand the concept of an Asian guy singing in a rock band. “I’ve come into instances where I play shows and a white guy comes up to me and goes, ‘What the hell is this chink doing here?’” Hua says. “But after my set, I come back out, and the same guy comes up to me and says, ‘Dude, you

play fucking well.’ And I’m like, ‘Cool, all you had to do is listen to the goddamn music.’ I’m not accepting it, but I’m trying to deal with it in my own way as positively as I can.” Though Hua is proud to be an OC musician, he’s even more excited to embark on the band’s first national tour, bringing their blues/rock blend to areas such as Austin during South By Southwest. “I don’t think we’ve discovered our own true potential yet, as far as our audience,” Hua says. “My brother said to me once, ‘Dude, your fans aren’t even born yet.’ But that got me thinking, ‘Man, what if our biggest fan base is in South America?’ We just have to go down there and try it a couple of times to see what happens.” —NATE JACKSON


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Kevi n S toc kda le

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KING KUCI

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very inch of wall, shelf and ceiling space in KUCI-FM 88.9 general manager Kevin Stockdale’s office inside a trailer on the UC Irvine campus is covered with pop culture. No, seriously: You’ll find (in varying degrees of volume and in no particular order) stuff from The Simpsons, Family Guy, ABC’s Lost, Metallica, King of the Hill, The Tick, H.R. Pufnstuf (and its Sigmund and the Sea Monsters spin-off ), Mr. T, The Office, 30 Rock and, in places of particular honor, Star Trek. You’ll also find KUCI’s original controls and a carved wooden sign from the station’s days on the other side of the campus. These artifacts are more in tune with his role of maintaining varying types of equipment, managing disc jockey email accounts, keeping in compliance with changing Federal Communications Commission rules and regulations, ensuring undergrads are receiving an education,

maintaining the Emergency Alert System, applying discipline when needed to radio personnel who are actually volunteers, setting (and hopefully achieving) goals, and making what began as a loose operation when he started as a student volunteer in the 1980s more structured, formal and consistent. “It’s challenging being the only paid person,” he says. “I can’t say, ‘Go talk to this other person’ [in human resources or above the general manager position]. I keep my superiors in the loop, but all the legwork is on my end.” To give an idea of how precise Stockdale is about details, when he is asked how long he has been married to his wife, Laura, he answers without a pause, “Nineteen years, four months and 10 days.” Kevin, Laura, 7-year-old Olivia and 3-year-old Henry reside on Costa Mesa’s Westside, but the dad hails from across the border in Huntington Beach, where he

lived in the same house until his college years at UCI. As Stockdale remarks, “You see a theme here: limited change.” He got a biology degree, but “I decided three years in I was not going to pursue anything in biology. I was not sure what I was going to do,” he says. “I’m still not sure what I’m going to do.” But in 1988, during his fifth year at UCI, changes in FCC rules allowed the campus radio station to improve its signal, and thus reach a larger audience. The student government council, which oversaw KUCI, decided it then needed a paid, part-time employee to deal with increasingly frequent programming issues. Stockdale became that employee, stopped taking classes and got a second part-time job with Domino’s Pizza to make ends meet. Fortunately, his general manager position was made full-time in 1990, and he was able to quit making pies. Fast-forward to today, and Stockdale says of his

job, “It’s always changing. I deal a lot with technology [KUCI was one of the first radio stations anywhere to webcast]. I like to tell people I feel old. I did not touch a computer until after I left college. I simply used a phone and notepad. There was no email, which to this day is the curse of my existence.” Dealing with clashing personalities and college know-it-alls, it’s no surprise when Stockdale remarks, “A den mother is what I feel like sometimes.” That was before he pointed to a monitor in his office with live video from several angles inside and outside KUCI. “I also feel like a prison warden.” Save for the wish list—“more power, more funding”—Stockdale wouldn’t have it any other way. “I feel real fortunate to still have a job here after three decades,” he says. “The university is a fantastic place to work. I’m a lucky guy.” —MATT COKER


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concert guide» THIS WEEK

ROD PIAZZA & THE MIGHTY FLYERS: 7 p.m. The

ERNESTO & ERNESTO ROMAN VEGA; ROBERT SCHEMBRE: 6 p.m., free. El Torito, 22699 Oakcrest

Coach House, 33157 Camino Capistrano, Ste. C, San Juan Capistrano, (949) 496-8930; thecoachhouse.com. SHOHREH NOROUZ BASH: 9:30 p.m., $40. The Yost Theater, 307 N. Spurgeon St., Santa Ana, (888) 8629573; yosttheater.com. WE THE KINGS: 9 p.m. Constellation Room at the Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; constellationroom.com. WU-TANG CLAN: 8 p.m. The Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; observatoryoc.com. ZODIAC TRIO: 3:30 p.m., free. Sunny Hills Performing Arts Center, 1801 Warburton Way, Fullerton; sunnyhills.net.

THE FENIANS: 8 p.m. The Coach House, 33157 Camino

MONDAY

FRIDAY

ALEX COLE: 8 p.m., $10. Tiki Bar, 1700 Placentia Ave.,

Costa Mesa, (949) 270-6262; tikibaroc.com.

DIANNE REEVES: 7:30 p.m., $30-$80. Musco Center

for the Arts, 1 University Dr., Orange, (844) 626-8726; muscocenter.org.

ELVIS DEPRESSEDLY, WITH ERIK PHILLIPS:

8 p.m., $13. Constellation Room at the Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; constellationroom.com.

Circle, Yorba Linda, (714) 921-2335; eltorito.com.

Capistrano, Ste. C, San Juan Capistrano, (949) 4968930; thecoachhouse.com. GAMBLERS MARK; VIERNES 13: 7 p.m., $10. The Yost Theater, 307 N. Spurgeon St., Santa Ana, (888) 862-9573; yosttheater.com. THE GOOD FOOT: 9 p.m., $7. Alex’s Bar, 2913 E. Anaheim St., Long Beach, (562) 434-8292; alexsbar.com. THE MIGHTY MYSTIC: 8 p.m., free. The Slidebar Rock-N-Roll Kitchen, 122 E. Commonwealth Ave., Fullerton, (714) 871-7469; slidebarfullerton.com. SEGA GENECIDE: 10 p.m. La Cave, 1695 Irvine Ave., Costa Mesa, (949) 646-7944; lacaverestaurant.com. UCI SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA—NATURE’S SIXTH: 8 p.m., $7-$17. Irvine Barclay Theatre,

4242 Campus Dr., Irvine, (949) 854-4646; thebarclay.org.

WU-TANG CLAN—RETURN TO THE 36 CHAMBERS: 8 p.m., $65. House of Blues, 400 W.

Disney Way, Ste. 337, Anaheim, (714) 778-2583; houseofblues.com/anaheim. YELLOWCARD: 8 p.m. The Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; observatoryoc.com.

SATURDAY

BLACK MOUNTAIN: 8 p.m., $15. Alex’s Bar, 2913 E.

SUNDAY

DEATH CAB FOR CUTIE: 7 p.m., $35. House of Blues,

400 W. Disney Way, Ste. 337, Anaheim, (714) 778-2583; houseofblues.com/anaheim. FULLY FULLWOOD REGGAE SUNDAYS: 3 p.m., $5. Don the Beachcomber, 16278 Pacific Coast Hwy., Huntington Beach, (562) 592-1321; donthebeachcomber.com. JOE ROBINSON: 3 p.m., $30. LCA Wine, 315 Hyland Ave., Costa Mesa, (657) 232-0920; lcawine.com.

ARCHSPIRE: 8 p.m., free. The Slidebar Rock-N-Roll

Kitchen, 122 E. Commonwealth Ave., Fullerton, (714) 871-7469; slidebarfullerton.com. BIG SEAN: 7 p.m., $49.50. House of Blues, 400 W. Disney Way, Ste. 337, Anaheim, (714) 778-2583; houseofblues.com/anaheim. CUMBIA TUESDAYS: 8 p.m., free. Roxanne’s Lounge, 1115 E. Wardlow Rd., Long Beach, (562) 426-4777; roxanneslounge.com. JAIN: 9 p.m. Constellation Room at the Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; constellationroom.com. MIC DANGEROUSLY: 8 p.m., free. Gallagher’s Pub & Grill, 2751 E. Broadway, Long Beach, (562) 856-8000; gallagherslongbeach.com. MØ: 8 p.m. The Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; observatoryoc.com.

WEDNESDAY

BATTLE AT THE BEACH: 8 p.m., free. Hurricanes Bar

& Grill, 200 Main St., Huntington Beach, (714) 374-0500; hurricanesbargrill.com. HALF THE ANIMAL: 8 p.m., free. The Wayfarer, 843 W. 19th St., Costa Mesa, (949) 764-0039; wayfarercm.com. KATE TEMPEST: 9 p.m., $15. Constellation Room at the Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; constellationroom.com. THROUGH THE ROOTS: 9 p.m., $12. The Federal Bar, 102 Pine Ave., Long Beach, (562) 435-2000; lb.thefederalbar.com.

THURSDAY, MARCH 23

ADRIAN BELEW POWER TRIO: 8 p.m. The Coach

House, 33157 Camino Capistrano, Ste. C, San Juan Capistrano, (949) 496-8930; thecoachhouse.com. ANDREW BLOOM: 7:30 p.m., $5. Mozambique, 1740 S. Coast Hwy., Laguna Beach, (949) 715-7777; mozambiqueoc.com. COMMON: 7 p.m., $40. House of Blues, 400 W. Disney Way, Ste. 337, Anaheim, (714) 778-2583; houseofblues.com/anaheim. GANJA WHITE NIGHT: 9 p.m. Constellation Room at the Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; constellationroom.com. JAKE MILLER; MAX AND SPENCER SUTHERLAND: 8 p.m. The Observatory, 3503 S.

Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; observatoryoc.com. LNY TNZ: 9:30 p.m., $15. The Yost Theater, 307 N. Spurgeon St., Santa Ana, (888) 862-9573; yosttheater.com.

7

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Center for the Arts, 1 University Dr., Orange, (844) 6268726; muscocenter.org. RADIO MOSCOW: 8 p.m., $10. The Wayfarer, 843 W. 19th St., Costa Mesa, (949) 764-0039; wayfarercm.com. RAVEN FELIX; SALMA SLIMS: 9 p.m. Constellation Room at the Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; constellationroom.com. 311: 7:30 p.m., $49.50. House of Blues, 400 W. Disney Way, Ste. 337, Anaheim, (714) 778-2583; houseofblues. com/anaheim. WRABEL: 7 p.m., $12. The Parish at House of Blues, 400 W. Disney Way, Ste. 337, Anaheim; houseofblues.com/anaheim.

TUESDAY

Ma rc h 17-23, 20 17

PACIFIC CHORALE AND PACIFIC SYMPHONY— MOZART REQUIEM: 7:30 p.m., $20-$45. Musco

Constellation Room at the Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; constellationroom.com. COUNTRY DANCIN’ WITH DJ PATRICK: 6:30 p.m., free. The Swallow’s Inn, 31786 Camino Capistrano, San Juan Capistrano, (949) 493-3188; swallowsinn.com. GRAVEWITCH: 8 p.m., $7. Blacklight District Lounge, 2500 E. Anaheim St., Long Beach. THE KILLS: 7 p.m., $30-$35. House of Blues, 400 W. Disney Way, Ste. 337, Anaheim, (714) 778-2583; houseofblues.com/anaheim. SINATRA & DINO DINNER SHOW: 6 p.m. La Cave, 1695 Irvine Ave., Costa Mesa, (949) 646-7944; lacaverestaurant.com. VICTORIA BAILEY: 9 p.m., free. The Wayfarer, 843 W. 19th St., Costa Mesa, (949) 764-0039; wayfarercm.com.

P EO P L E 2 0 17

Anaheim St., Long Beach, (562) 434-8292; alexsbar.com. DANCE GAVIN DANCE; CHON: 8 p.m. The Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; observatoryoc.com. FIVE FOR FIGHTING: 8 p.m. The Coach House, 33157 Camino Capistrano, Ste. C, San Juan Capistrano, (949) 496-8930; thecoachhouse.com. THE IRON MAIDENS: 8 p.m. Gaslamp Restaurant & Bar, 6251 E. Pacific Coast Hwy., Long Beach, (562) 5964718; thegaslamprestaurant.com. MADISON GROVE: 9 p.m., free. The Marlin Bar and Grill, 5874 Edinger Ave., Huntington Beach, (714) 8611465; marlinbar.com. 1 AMVRKA: 8 p.m., $8. Constellation Room at the Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; constellationroom.com.

ANDY SHAUF WITH ALDOUS HARDING: 8:30 p.m.

85


culture the county county || contents contents || | food | calendar feature | | the |film | film | food | |calendar

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Wishful Kinking I went to Dark Odyssey Winter Fire, the big kink hotel-takeover event in Washington, D.C., in February. There was one thing I saw there that is messing with my head, and I hope you can set me straight. There was this lovely little sixperson orgy going on with two cute-as-could-be hippie girls and four older dudes. Then these four people came along. They sat and watched—a guy and three women in hijabs and dresses that went wrist to ankle, fully covered. After a while, one of the hippie girls turned to them and said, “I’d be happy to flog you later, if you’d like.” The three women in hijab giggled. The whole scene was really sweet, but I just couldn’t get over these three women. I saw them walking around all night, taking it all in. Intellectually, I know there is no reason to think that conservative Islam is incompatible with kink. But my cultural biases make me feel that it is. Or is it possible that covering is their kink? What would you make of that? Washington Kinkster Wondering “With all the hateful anti-Muslim rhetoric out there these days, it is tempting to romanticize Islam,” said Eiynah, a Pakistani-Canadian children’s book author who also hosts a podcast that focuses on sex, Islam and apostasy. “The impulse is understandable, but Islam is another one of the blatantly sex-negative Abrahamic faiths.” The other blatantly sex-negative Abrahamic faiths, for those of you keeping score out there, are Judaism and Christianity. “Nothing outside of ultra-vanilla, plain-ol’ twoperson hetero sex within the confines of marriage is permissible,” said Eiynah. “So as much as I’d love to agree with WKW that conservative Islam isn’t incompatible with kink, there’s every reason to say that it is. It’s even incompatible with a woman being slightly ‘immodest’ in front of men. Modesty codes are pretty rigid in Islam, and in non-Muslim-majority countries, modesty garments tend to stick out rather than blend in. Which achieves the exact opposite purpose—attracting more attention, not less.” And when sex-negativity, modesty and religion mix it up, WKW, the part of our brain that grinds out kinks—precise location yet to be determined— kicks into high gear. That’s why there is Mormonundergarment porn out there and nun porn and hot-priest calendars for sale on sidewalks just outside Vatican City. “Islamic modesty has become fetishized for some—quite literally,” said Eiynah. “There’s hijabi porn and hijabi Lolitas. So the people WKW saw could be into some form of hijab kink.” I’ve seen a few people dressed up as Catholic nuns at fetish parties, WKW, and I didn’t think, “Hey, what are nuns doing here?!?” I thought, “That person has a nun kink.” (Related point: The nuns you see at queer pride parades? Not really nuns. #TheMoreYouKnow) “Finally, it’s possible they could be a more ‘openminded’ polygynous Muslim family that ventured into the hotel in a moment of adventurousness,” said Eiynah. “We are all human, after all, with urges, kinks, curiosities and desires that surface, no matter what ancient morality code we try to follow.” Amen. Eiynah tweets @NiceMangos; her terrific podcast, Polite Conversations, is available on all the usual platforms; and her children’s book, My Chacha Is Gay, can be ordered at chachaisgay.com. I’m a 30-year-old woman in a long-term polyamorous relationship with a stellar guy. Our relationship began as extremely Dom/sub, with me being the sub. My boyfriend and I began

SavageLove » dan savage

super-casually but quickly became serious partners. Now, six years later, I find having kinky sex with him challenging. We have a very deep, loving relationship, so my feelings get hurt when we engage in bondage and kink play. This is especially problematic because I still enjoy BDSM with folks I’m not dating. Basically, if I’m not in love with someone, it doesn’t hurt my feelings when they beat me and humiliate me. My boyfriend feels slighted, but I just don’t know what to do. Every time we play rough—the same way we had played for years—my feelings get hurt. Any thoughts? She’s Hurting His Heart It’s not uncommon to meet people in BDSM spaces/ circles who have passionate, intimate, solid and regular vanilla sex with their long-term partner(s) and intense BDSM play and/or sex with more casual partners. For some submissives, intimacy and a long-term connection can interfere with their ability to enter into and enjoy their roles, and the same is true for some Doms. If this is just how you’re wired, SHHH, you may need to write a new erotic script for your primary relationship—or make a conscious decision to have new and different and satisfying sexual adventures with your boyfriend. I cannot find a woman who will accept my panty fetish. Please advise. Trembling Man Inquires Keep looking, TMI. There are women out there who think men can be sexy in panties—and anyone who thinks men can’t be sexy in panties needs to check out all the hunky panty-wearing models at xdress.com. I am a sissy husband. My problem is I am not attracted to women at all. I have asked my wife to cuckold me. My penis is less than 2 inches long, and the only way for me to have sex with her is by using my strap-on on her. When I do that, all I can think of is my best friend Roberto, who I am very attracted to. I shared a queen-size bed with him for two years. While we lived together, I did all of the “women’s work.” Roberto always told me how small and soft and feminine my hands were. He drank a lot, and then would pass out in our bed. I would put on one of my sexy pink nighties and sleep next to him. Now I have a wife, and I am so jealous that Roberto might find a girlfriend. I have begged my wife to cuckold me with Roberto. She said, “Roberto is a very sexy man, but I don’t know.” How can I tell her that I am totally feminine and turned off by women and totally turned on by men? How do I tell her that she is married to a sissy man lover? I want her to have a boyfriend. Then when she is out with her boyfriend, I would get dressed up like a sissy and be locked out of the house dressed as a woman and have to wait for her to let me back in after her boyfriend left. Please help. Lust In South America Thanks for sharing. Not sure I believe a word you wrote, LISA, but it was an entertaining read. (Okay, okay, some advice: Tell your wife the truth, i.e., you are not and have never been attracted to women, suggest redefining your marriage as a loving-butcompanionate one, propose cuckolding as a way for you two to maintain a sexual connection, albeit one mediated through a third party. Good luck.) On the Lovecast (savagelovecast.com), “The Epidemic of Gay Loneliness” and a takedown of Beauty and the Beast. Contact Dan via email at mail@savagelove.net, and follow him on Twitter: @fakedansavage. Visit ITMFA.org.


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TokeofTheWeek » robert flores

Bob Marley Cheese ob Marley reportedly smoked up to a pound of weed per week—not for recB reational use, but for religious purposes, to meditate and discover the artist within the person. Bob Marley Cheese is a cross between Bob Marley OG and Cheese Tease strains. I purchased the Bob Marley Cheese at one of the newest dispensaries in SanTana, Strain Station. It has one of the largest selections of flower in town and carries a wide variety of edibles, vape cartridges, ointments and tinctures. I originally went to the dispensary looking for a strong indica, but I was intrigued by the Parmesan-like smell of this strain of sativa, so I chose the Bob Marley, which costs $45 per eighth. I got home and cleaned my pipe of all resin so I could see if it actually tasted like cheese. I didn’t get any cheese flavor, but it was one of the smooth-

est strains I have ever smoked. By the time I finished the second bowl I had a heavyduty buzz going. It’s a creeper: After about 15 or 20 minutes, you will be totally relaxed and ready for a deep meditation session or maybe even some hot yoga. I’d recommend this strain for anxiety, pain or if you are going through chemotherapy. As Bob says, “Love the Life you live; live the life you love.”

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103 Auditions/Show Biz

195 Position Wanted

195 Position Wanted

Statistician: perform statistical programming & data analysis; MS in statistics w/1.5 yrs exp. as statistician; 40hrs/wk; Send resume to Mumao, Inc., 9 MacArthur Pl,#1101, Santa Ana, CA 92707

Accountant (Buena Park, CA) Prepare asset, liability, and capital account entries by compiling and analyzing account information. Documents financial transactions by entering account information; Report to management regarding the finances of company. 40hrs/ wk, Bachelor in Economics or related req’d. Resume to Sureung America Inc Attn: Dong H KO, 6281 Beach Blvd #318, Buena Park, CA 90621

Education Reporter (Fullerton, CA) Collect & analyze educational facts about newsworthy events by interviewing educational figures, investigation, or observation of background info related to educational stories & functions. Report & write educational stories for TV; 1yr exp. & bachelor in education reqd., 40hrs/wk; Resume to CTS America, Inc. 1025 S. Placentia Ave., Fullerton, CA 92831

195 Position Wanted Administrative Assistant: Perform admin. assistant functions, answer calls, provide info to clients, process mails/emails, draft letters/invoices, record info into database. Req’d: Bachelor’s in Business Admin. or related. Mail Resume: M+D PROPERTIES, 6940 Beach Blvd. #D-501, Buena Park, CA 90621

ASTROLOGERS, PSYCHICS, TAROT READERS NEEDED! P/T F/T $12-$36 per hour. tambien en Espanol. 954-524-9029 Dentist: Examine, diagnose, and treat teeth. Req’d: DDS and Dentist Lic. from CA Dent. Board. Mail resume: SOUNG HOON CHO DDS INC. 2700 Alton Pkwy Ste 225 Irvine, CA 92606

JUNK REMOVAL WE PICK UP: Trash, Furniture, Jacuzzi, Appliances, Metal/ Wood Sheds, yard/storage/garage, vacacies, patio, Construction Debris and Concrete removal/demolition. ALL unwanted items.

THE OCEAN Corp. 10840 Rockley Road, Houston, Texas 77099. Train for a new career. *Underwater Welder. Commercial Diver. *NDT/Weld Inspector. Job Placement Assistance. Financial Aid avail for those who qualify 1.800.321.0298

421 Used Auto CARS FOR CASH I’LL BUY YOUR CAR, TRUCK, RV OR VAN! Paying Cash $100-$5000 Running or Not 714-514-0886 949-375-5178

530 Misc. Services 141 USED SURF BOARDS ALL SIZES, CHEAP MARK: 949-232-2607

Robbed by your Employer? Working overtime & called salaried? Told to clock out but continue to work? Called an independent contractor/1099 employee? Speak w/attorney Diane Mancinelli at no cost to you. (714)734-8999

Ease Canna: FTP- All 8th will be weighed out to 5GRAMS!! | 2435 E. Orangethorpe Ave., Fullerton, CA 92831 | 714-309-7772 RE-UP: FTP Specials: 3G's Private Reserve $30 | 3G's Gold Crumble | 7G's Top Shelf | FREE PreRoll w/ $10 Donation 8851 Garden Grove Blvd, Ste 105 Garden Grove, CA 92844 | 714.586.1565 From The Earth: We are the largest dispensary in Orange County! 3023 South Orange Avenue, Santa Ana, CA 92707 Tel (657) 44-GREEN (47336) | www.FTEOC.com Club Meds : FTP 5g 1/8th (All Strains) / $10 off any concentrate (Per Gram) / FTP $225 Top Shelf OZ (All Strains) Hand N Hand: FREE Joint w/ any purchase | 20% OFF Any Edible (limit 1) | 20% OFF Wax Product 2400 Pullman St., Suite B, Santa Ana | 657.229.4464 SHOWGROW: Voted BEST DISPENSARY in OC 2016! 1625 E. St. Gertrude Pl. Santa Ana CA 92705 | 949.565.4769 | ShowGrow.com LA MIRADA HEALING CENTER: $35 CAP | FREE DAB WITH EVERY DONATION FTP'S: 4.5 G 1/8 | $10 OFF CONCENTRATES | $3 OFF EDIBLES 15902 IMPERIAL HIGHWAY LA MIRADA, CA, 90638 | 562-245-2083 Green Mile Collective: First Time Patients Receive a FREE Private Reserve 1/8th with order. The Only Superstore Delivery Service | Call 1-866-DELIVERY or Order Online at DeliveryGreens.com

Costa Mesa Bead & Design Show This show is for both makers and seekers of fine craft. It is open to the public -everyone welcome. Eliminate the middleman, buy direct from artisans and tradespeople who offer a diversity of products at excellent prices -including handcrafted jewelry, beads, gems, jewelry & craft supplies, art clothing, accessories and more. 275 artisan boutiques, galleries, and displays under one roof as well as 100 workshops offered daily. Hilton Costa Mesa / Orange County, 3050 Bristol St, Costa Mesa, CA, March 17-19, 10am to 6pm. www.beadanddesign.com

Post your FREE Classified listings http://thepotdot.com/classifieds Housing, For Sale, Jobs, Personals, Services

EVICTION? / SHERIFF LOCKOUT? 714-265-7648 from $99 www.StayPutForMonths.com PAIN CLINIC (714) 375-0691

DELIVERY Rite Greens Delivery: OC's Most Trusted Cannabis Source 9AM10PM Daily | 714.418.4877 | ritegreensdelivery.com PURE & NATURAL THERAPY: DELIVERING QUALITY PRODUCT TO LB, HB, SEAL BEACH & SURROUNDING CITIES | 7 GRAMS FOR $50 ON SELECT STRAINS | 3 FREE PRE-ROLLS WITH EVERY ORDER* | 714.330.0513

DR. EVALUATIONS Releaf Wellness: Renewals $25 / New Patient - $35 657.251.8032 / 1540 E Edinger Ste. D Santa Ana CA 92705 6833 Indiana Ste. #102, Riverside CA 92506 OC 420 Evaluations: New Patients - $29 | Renewals - $19 1490 E. Lincoln Ave., Anaheim 92805 - 714.215.0190 1671 W. Katella Ave, Suite #130 Anaheim - 855.665.3825

FREE ESTIMATES • SAME-DAY SERVICE

4th St Medical: Renewals $29 | New Patients $34 with ad. 2112 E. 4th St., #111, Santa Ana | 714-599-7970 | 4thStreetMedical.com

714-296-8281 or 714-987-8495 www.perezhauling1.com | Lic. #BUS2015-01820

Cali 420 Rx: PLEASE CALL FOR LATEST SPECIALS! Sundays Appointment only | 714-723-6769 | 2601 W Ball Road, unit 209, Anaheim CA 92804 | Hours: Monday - Saturday 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM

Small Jobs welcome.• All Estimates incl. labor & Dump fees.

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Bioinformatics Associate, Irvine, CA. Designing analysis strategies, algorithms, and tools for genome-wide DNA methylation and next-generation sequencing. MS in Bioinformatics & 1 yr experience. Mail resume to Angela Kim, HR Mgr, Zymo Research Corporation, 17062 Murphy Ave., Irvine, CA 92614.

Software Engineer Jobsite Newport Beach, CA, apply to HR at Phunware, Inc., tnolazco@phunware. com.

106 Misc. Education

Notice of the Initiation of the Section 106 Process: Public Participation AT&T Mobility LLC plans to install a new telecommunications facility at: 680 California Avenue Irvine, CA 92617 The project consists of the removal and installation of a new 91’-6” tall replacement light pole with nine 8’-0” tall panel antennas mounted at tip heights of 56’-0”, 67’-0”, and 78’-0”. Associated equipment will be installed in a new lease area. No alternatives to the project were identified. Public Comments for this project should be forwarded to: Joyce McDonnell Bechtel Infrastructure and Power Corporation 16808 Armstrong Avenue, Suite 225 Irvine, CA 92606 jwlau@bechtel.com (949) 372-4469

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Market Research Analyst Analyze statistical data to forecast future market trends & FPD industry, gather info. re: company customers/competitors, analyze conditions that may impact sales by researching market conditions, changes in industry. Must be able to perform job duties. Bachelor's degree in Economics req'd. Resume: Signet FPD, Inc. 75 Columbia, Aliso Viejo CA 92656.

Trimble Inc. has openings in Newport Beach, CA for: Software Engineer (6083.395) The Trimble Water professional svcs. and support team are resp. for the delivery and integration of the Trimble Water products and solutions portfolio to our customers. Travel req. less than 50% of work time. Graphic User Interface Designer (6083.664) Generate design concepts and expand them into a detailed design. Travel req. less than 50% of time. Send resume to TNLJobs_US@trimble.com. Ref. job code above when applying. EOE

Market Research Analyst (La Palma, CA) Perform market research/analysis for logistics services. Master's in communication/marketing related. Resume to: Korchina Logistics USA, Inc. 4 Centerpointe Dr. #120, La Palma, CA 90623

Top Shelf Anaheim: $35 CAP | FTP: 4.5 Gram 8th OR $10 OFF Concentrates | Free DABS with Any Donation DOGO Deals & oz Specials 3124 W. Lincoln Ave. Anaheim | 714.385.7814

Ma r ch

Accountant (Anaheim, CA) Perform financial and managerial accounting duties. Master's in Accounting or related req'd. Resume to: Interlog Corp. 1295 N Knollwood Cir, Anaheim, CA 92801

Market Research Analyst Apply by mail only to Cargozone Logistics, Inc., 6101 Ball Rd., #212, Cypress, CA 90630, attn. President.

Audio/Speech Processing Algorithm Engineers 5 Positions. Will develop array signal processing, noise suppression, speech recognition and echo cancellation algorithms and corresponding fix- point C program libraries for audio and voice applications. Must have PhD in EE and three years experience performing said duties. GGEC Inc. in Irvine,CA. Send to resume to queenie@ggec.com

525 Legal Services

South Coast Safe Access: FTP: Buy an 1/8, Get a FREE 1/8 | 1900 Warner Ave Ste. A, Santa Ana 92705 | 949.474.7272 | MonSat 10am-8pm Sun 11am-7pm

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Chemical Engineer Recon Engineering & Construction, Inc. is hiring in Los Alamitos. Must have at least 2 years of progressive experience as a Chemical Engineer. Assess chemical equipment and processes to improve performance while ensuring compliance with safety and environmental regulations. Fulltime. Mail Resume to P.O. Box 93120, Long Beach, CA 90809

Computer Network Support Specialist (Irvine, CA). Analyze network data to improve website functionality, define network usage and server function. Bachelor’s or higher degree in computer science. 1 year experience. Experience may be completed before or after university degree. Resume to Allen Anthonysamy, SOLO Business Systems, Inc., 15041-A Bake Parkway, Irvine, CA 92618.

Core SW Team Leader (Code: CSTL-CA) in Lake Forest, CA: Prvd SW dsgn & sclbl archit for Atmel cutting edge wrlss SoCs. MS+2 yrs rltd exp/BS+5 yrs rltd exp. Email resume to #AllSiliconValleyHR@Microchip.com. Reference job title & code in subject line.

195 Position Wanted

Gram Kings: DAILY DEALS | Discounts for Military, Veterans, Disabled | 10189 Westminster Ave. Suite #217, Garden Grove 714.209.8187 | Hours: Monday-Sunday 10am-10pm

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Accountant (Buena Park, CA) Perform accounting duties for food service business. Associate’s in Accounting/Business related. Resume to: D&J Ko Ko Inc. 8532 Commonwealth Ave, Buena Park, CA 90621

Accountant (Buena Park, CA) Perform accounting duties for food service business. Associate's in Accounting/ Business related. Resume to: D&J Ko Ko Inc. 8532 Commonwealth Ave, Buena Park, CA 90621

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2975 RedBANDILIER Hill Avenue, CIR, Suite FOUNTAIN 150 | Costa Mesa, CA 92626 | 714.550.5940 | free online ads & photos at oc.backpage.com 18475 VALLEY, CA 92708 | 714.550.5947 | OCWEEKLY.COM

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SAFE ACCESS DIRECTORY

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1 ST LICENSED MEDICAL MARIJUANA DISPENSARY IN ORANGE COUNTY

SCSA

SOUTH COAST SAFE ACCESS

Largest Showroom & Biggest Selection in OC

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25% VETERANS DISCOUNT 21 Years and Over 10% DISABILITY DISCOUNT All Products 10% SENIOR DISCOUNT Lab Tested

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1900 Warner Ave. Ste. A, Santa Ana 92705 (Conveniently Located Off the 55 Freeway) 949.474.7272 • Hours: Mon-Sat 10am-8pm Sun 11am-7pm


March 17, 2017 – OC Weekly