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CHP MAKES WOMAN DOODY HER PANTS | SANTA ANA THINKS CARNE ASADA IS A CRIME | SAVAGE: A SAVAGE FEBRUARY 17-23, 2017 | VOLUME 22 | NUMBER 25

SO LONG, AND THANKS FOR ALL THE CHIPS | OCWEEKLY.COM

SOURCE OF PRIDE, SOURCE OF RAGE WILL BUENA PARK’S NEW MEGA RETAILER PUT THE CITY ON THE MAP—OR BE ITS BIGGEST BOONDOGGLE?


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up front

The County

06 | MOXLEY CONFIDENTIAL |

Federal judge says law enforcement can force you to crap your pants. By R. Scott Moxley 07 | ¡ASK A MEXICAN! | Do Mexicans like shopping at Walmart? By Gustavo Arellano 07 | HEY, YOU! | Drunk, Jew-hating homophobe, step right up! By Anonymous

Feature

09 | NEWS | Buena Park swings for the retail fences with the Source. By Gabriel San Román

in back

Calendar

15 | EVENTS | Things to do while

getting cars crashed.

Food

18 | REVIEW | Eight Korean BBQ

proves that Korean meat innovators are still hard at work. By Edwin Goei 18 | HOLE IN THE WALL | La Carreta in SanTana. By Gustavo Arellano 20 | EAT THIS NOW | Build-yourown grain bowl at Cava. By Cynthia Rebolledo

that’s worth it. By Sarah Bennett

Film

22 | REVIEW | You’re Killing Me

Susana: More Amores Perros or Instructions Not Included? By Aimee Murillo 23 | SPECIAL SCREENINGS |

Screw Netflix, and go see something locally! By Matt Coker

Culture

24 | THEATER | The Mario and Luigi story finally gets the unauthorized parody it deserves. By Joel Beers 24 | TRENDZILLA | Cool nail trends. By Aimee Murillo

Music

26 | PROFILE | Casey Lagos’ rare

disorder drove him to record music every day for a year. By Josh Chesler 29 | OBITUARY | John Carrillo, OC’s premier open-mic host, passes away. By Joel Beers 30 | LOCALS ONLY | Steve Maggiora is a keyboard lady killer. By Nate Jackson

also

31 | CONCERT GUIDE 32 | SAVAGE LOVE | By Dan Savage 38 | TOKE OF THE WEEK | Dark

Chocolate Covered Sea Salt Caramels by Lord Jones. By Mary Carreon

20 | DRINK OF THE WEEK |

Homicidal Maniac Stout at Dos Desperados Brewery. By Matt Coker 21 | LONG BEACH LUNCH | Dine Out Long Beach is a restaurant week

on the cover

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the county»news|issues|commentary

Po-Po Poo-Poo Caca Lawsuit Federal judge: Cops have power to make you crap in your pants

D

id a California Highway Patrol (CHP) officer violate a female motorist’s constitutional rights by repeatedly blocking her access to an Orange County bathroom while she fought a losing battle against a rapid onslaught of diarrhea? For Toni confidential Antonellis, a respected San Diego restaurant entrepreneur, and Aaron Rothberg, a CHP officer who once worked on r scott Governor moxley Arnold Schwarzenegger’s protection detail, that question isn’t hypothetical. Fate placed Antonellis and Rothberg together before noon on the southbound 5 freeway near El Toro Road on June 18, 2014. Earlier that day, Antonellis had attended a food vendors’ event in Ventura County, then while driving through Costa Mesa, she began to feel severe gastric pain. “I started having stomach cramps and thought something was off,” she recalled in court proceedings. “I had eaten some food that I don’t typically eat, as a courtesy to my fellow vendors, and I started breaking out in a sweat. I knew that I needed to use the bathroom.” However, traffic not only was moving below the speed limit, but also had formed a wall across lanes, blocking her from speeding ahead. Desperate to bypass the obstruction, she illegally entered the HOV lane, accomplished her plan, crossed over double yellow lines and re-entered normal traffic so she could exit at Alicia Parkway. That’s when Rothberg, who’d been at an event teaching grade-school kids to respect law-enforcement officers, stopped her on the off-ramp after activating his vehicle’s lights and siren. Antonellis said she was in an emergency situation and needed to immediately visit a nearby Wendy’s restroom. According to a video recording of the encounter, she told the officer, “I’m going to shit my pants if you don’t let me get into a bathroom right now.” Rothberg refused to believe her, though, in a later deposition, he conceded Antonellis had appeared frantic. CHP officers routinely hear half-baked stories designed to avoid citations and none tops a bathroom excuse for violating California’s vehicle code, he testified. So, he treated her as a liar.

moxley

» .

“I’m really sick,” she reiterated. “I just need to go to the bathroom.” Though it obviously doesn’t take paramedic assistance to empty one’s bowels, the cop sarcastically asked Antonellis if he should summon an ambulance, a delay that would put her in additional misery. He then demanded to inspect her driver’s license, registration and insurance paperwork. After she complied, the officer returned to his vehicle. “Antonellis waited and waited and waited, silently suffering with an increase of cramping and intestinal distress,” Keith H. Rutman, her attorney, told U.S. District Court Judge James V. Selna. “Relief in the

soiled herself. Rothberg then locked her in the back of his patrol car, where she experienced a second round of diarrhea. Her cries for help were ignored, she claims. She also says the officer mocked her distress. After nine minutes, Rothberg removed the handcuffs, handed her two $500 citations and told her to “have a nice day.” The feces-stained back seat of his cruiser cost taxpayers $150 to clean. Driving back to San Diego wearing a towel, Antonellis—the co-owner of Green Bellies, a nutrition company specializing in providing healthy food for children, as well as a café at a San Diego museum—called a CHP supervisor to threaten legal action.

form of a nearby, clearly visible bathroom made matters worse. After she overheard dispatch verify that her license was valid and she was not subject to any warrants, she leaned her head out the window and told Rothberg, who still had all her documents, that she could not wait any longer without losing her bowels on the spot, that she was going to drive her car to the restroom and he could meet her there, where she would sign the citation and retrieve her documents.” On the verge of disaster, Antonellis drove toward Wendy’s. The officer gave chase, ordered her out of her Lexus and, again, ignored her pleas. He claims he had to consider potential possibilities: Was this wealthy, attractive, middle-aged woman with a valid ID a dangerous killer fleeing a bloody crime scene? Or was she a Mexican-drug-cartel mule hauling weapons and cocaine? Allegedly fearing for his life, he placed her in handcuffs. Now restrained and weeping, Antonellis’ willpower gave way to a messy reality. She

Rothberg appeared at the Harbor Courthouse in Newport Beach 16 days later to dismiss both citations, but not as an act of kindness. He elevated the case to criminal, seeking charges that she’d resisted arrest and obstructed him from performing his duties. A judge issued an arrest warrant after a CHP internal investigation asserted that the agency was “unable to substantiate” the allegation that the officer “exhibited poor judgment.” According to Rutman, the tardy charge was brought “for the sole purpose of dissuading Antonellis from filing a civil lawsuit against officer Rothberg and retaliating against her for indicating an intent to do so, as CHP was on notice that was her intended course of action. . . . Rothberg fabricated a version of events to support his plan. The allegations in the reports he prepared and presented are false and untrue.” Tony Rackauckas’ Orange County district attorney’s office (OCDA) sided with the officer and took the case to trial,

hoping to put the defendant in jail over the bathroom fiasco. The jury was not impressed by the government’s arguments. Eight of the 12 jurors voted for acquittal. Antonellis then filed a civilrights lawsuit inside the Ronald Reagan Federal Courthouse in Santa Ana in early 2015. She claimed she’d been humiliated, subjected to unreasonable seizure, denied due process and was a victim of excessive force. In response, then-Attorney General Kamala Harris—now a U.S. Senator— defended Rothberg’s conduct and claimed he deserved immunity for his conduct because he is a cop. “There is no body of clearly established law that would inform a law-enforcement official that he was violating a driver’s constitutional rights if he did not release a driver who had committed a traffic violation simply because she said she needed to go to a bathroom,” Harris’ agency argued in November 2016 to support its contention the case should end before a jury could consider its merits. Late last month, Selna—a 2003 President George W. Bush lifetime appointee to the federal bench— agreed with the AG’s office, granting summary judgment in favor of the cop. “A jury could not find that officer Rothberg’s actions, viewed in the light most favorable to Ms. Antonellis [my emphasis], were objectively unreasonable,” Selna opined. This judge isn’t alone in his outlook. In 2011, North Carolina police officer William Wright refused bathroom access to a detainee and encouraged her to “pee on herself,” which she was forced to do twice. U.S. District Court Judge Graham C. Mullen, who won his judicial appointment thanks to the backing of Senator Jesse Helms, declined to see the incident as “egregious, arbitrary government conduct” because the nation’s Founding Fathers didn’t proclaim a specific constitutional right to use a bathroom while in police custody. “While officer Wright certainly may be guilty of breaching the unwritten standards of human compassion and common decency,” Mullen asserted, “he cannot be said to have breached a recognizable duty of care.” Ponder the implications of public servants not bound by even the lowest thresholds of honorable conduct. RSCOTTMOXLEY@OCWEEKLY.COM

aread more»online WWW.OCWEEKLY.COM/NEWS


» gustavo arellano DEAR MEXICAN: My parents were born in Mexico. I was born in Dallas, Texas. This makes me a first-generation American, right? So, if my best friend’s dad was born in Mexico, and her mother is a Chicana, does this make her a first-generation American or a secondgeneration American? Just Curious DEAR POCHA: In the eyes of the current attorney general, both you and your friend are Mexicans. ¡Trucha! DEAR MEXICAN: When do you think Baja California and other locations in the madre-land with lots of American expatriates will become U.S. territories or, better yet, states? I would be very eager to live in a beautiful coastal area surrounded by people with nice cars and the world’s most powerful military to back them up. I think the Mexicans would, too. Americano-Mexicano DEAR GABACHO: Be careful what you wish for. If the United States and Mexico ever went to war, snowbirds such as yourself would be the first people targeted by Mexicans. Don’t believe me? Ask the Chinese during the Mexican Revolution. Better make plans to move to Costa Rica, Nicaragua or whatever other Latin American country gabachos retirees like to set up colonies in nowadays where they refuse to learn Spanish besides “gringo,” “cerveza” and “Soy chavala.” DEAR MEXICAN: Why do Mexican women, who are basically good drivers, turn into morons when they turn into the Walmart parking lot? Also, here in New Mexico, you get the guys who sneer at you, pull into traffic in front of you at the last possible second, then slow down to 15 miles per hour. I’ve

never seen this anywhere else. Are they Mexicans or just those “I am Espanish!” assholes showing off their inferiority complex? Califa Motorhead DEAR POCHO: With all due respect, EVERYONE turns into morons at the Walmart parking lot—hell, at Walmart, period. But what I was surprised by in researching your pregunta is how relatively few Mexis shop there. A 2014 study by Kantar Retail found only about 10 percent of Walmart shoppers were Latinos (read: mostly Mexican), with raza by far preferring Dollar General and Family Dollar stores. I guess it makes sense: Mexicans prefer swap meets and yard sales when looking for low prices. But the stats are incomplete: In a graphic, Kantar excluded New Mexico. They gave no reason, but I know the answer, which also answers your queja about slow-driving men: The Land of Enchantment is where all preconceived notions about Mexicans go to claim they’re pure-blooded Spaniards going back to Cabeza de Vaca—but definitely not related to Estevanico! DEAR MEXICAN: What is the deal with Mexicans and their fear of U.S. banks? A recent home invasion netted the robbers $2,000 that the Mexicans who lived there were using for their next house payment. When I mentioned this to a Mexicana friend, she told me she was once robbed of $15,000 that she was keeping at her apartment for a house payment. Doesn’t word reach the wabs from their relatives in El Norte that USA bank accounts are insured up to $100,000? Huero In the Barrio

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DEAR GABACHO: Ask Washington Mutual. ASK THE MEXICAN at themexican@askamexican.net, be his fan on Facebook, follow him on Twitter, or ask him a video question at youtube.com/askamexicano!

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» anonymous Slurred Slurs

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ou came to our show ready to have some fun. You looked like a boxer in a rented tux; your date was dressed to the nines in a black dress with silver sparkles. You were the last to leave the dining room, after filling out our fun questionnaire, signing Al Capone as your name. You were both pretty drunk at the end, slurring your goodbyes. We checked out what you wrote: “The Jew-hating fag did it. The girl was a Jew.” Our Jewish cast members entertained and joked with you all night. I hope all that ugliness inside you eats you alive.

Feb ruary 3 , , 20 m ont h x17-2 x–xx 2017 14

Do Mexicans Like Shopping at Walmart?

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RENDERING: M+D PROPERTIES

SOURCE OF PRIDE, SOURCE OF RAGE WILL BUENA PARK’S NEW MEGA RETAILER PUT THE CITY ON THE MAP—OR BE ITS BIGGEST BOONDOGGLE?

E

very morning, Joe Gruppie makes himself a cup of coffee at his Buena Park home of five years before heading out to work. And when he opens the front door, he’s greeted by a drab wall with four stories of exposed steel beams rising from it. “It’s pretty ugly and just gets uglier with time,” he says of what one day will be a 172room Hilton anchoring the Source, a $400 million mega retail center being built next to Gruppie’s neighborhood. But right now, it’s an empty shell that’s too perfect a metaphor for the Source’s costly, problematic saga. “It was seismic!” Gruppie recalls of the structure’s initial drilling. “Things were fall-

ing off the shelves and breaking in our home.” All the racket unleashed a swarm of insects, forcing Gruppie to hire a bug man. Overgrown vegetation in vacant lots slated for development attracted opossums, raccoons, skunks and stray cats who spilled over into back yards. These wild animals clawed away at Gruppie’s cats, one of whom has endured five surgeries costing thousands of dollars. “The developers said back in 2008 that they would provide us with tarps because of the dirt, pay half of our electricity bill because we couldn’t open our windows, and powerwash homes,” says resident Ray Rodriguez. He doesn’t have the promises in writing, but

he insists on holding the developers to them. He does have a 2014 letter from the Source’s attorney, Michael Black, reacting hostilely to his “threat” to sue if the project didn’t give $5,000 to affected homes in the neighborhood for dust and structural damage. Such headaches have been common since 2012, when M+D Properties broke ground on the Source and vowed to finish the retail phase by 2014. But promised big-box retailers such as Macy’s and Forever 21, restaurants including the Yard House, luxury-apparel outlets such as Diesel, and entertainment such as Regal Cinemas and Lucky Strike bowling lanes never came.

by Gabriel San Román

›› CONTINUED ON PAGE 10


M+D secured $80 million in foreign funding by way of the EB-5 Immigrant Investor Program, which promises visas in exchange for foreigners who invest $500,000 to $1,000,000 in a U.S. commercial enterprise or create 10 jobs in the economy. Thanks to those investors, nearly all businesses scheduled to open later this year are geared toward Koreans. M+D has also signed an agreement with YG Entertainment, a South Korean company that lists Psy of “Gangnam Style” fame on its roster, with plans for a 4,000-seat venue that may serve as a K-pop hub in Buena Park. “We were lucky to stumble upon the program,” says Katie Wanamaker, M+D’s vice president of property management and government relations, with a chuckle. They were also lucky to stumble upon a city desperate to upgrade its fading attractions on Beach Boulevard. Spread over 12.5 acres, the project is the biggest money move the city has made since Knott’s Berry Farm. Officials hope it ushers in a new era for the city as a destination for tourists and millennial shoppers alike. “The Source opens up additional growth for other areas and will attract new investors,” according to Mayor Pro Tem Virginia Vaughn. “It will bring in additional tourists and jobs.” M+D vow the Source will live up to Buena Park’s lofty slogan: the Center of the Southland. “We would consider ourselves an international project,” says Wanamaker. “We’ve got Mexican restaurants, we’ve got Italian restaurants, we’ve got Popeyes Chicken, and we’ve got Bar Louie— a martini bar. This is just for everybody.” Except the nearby residents. “I think we’ve been very fortunate with those residents,” Wanamaker replies. “We try to keep them updated with construction briefs, and I’ve rarely gotten complaints. We’ve made them a more than reasonable offer on their homes—fantastic, actually.” Gruppie doesn’t agree. “All this time before its opening has been a nightmare,” he says. “It makes you feel like you’re just in the way of progress.”

S

ince its announcement, the Source has carried a sense of mystery. Huge walls shield it from view at the intersection of Beach Boulevard and Orangethorpe Avenue. A few potted plants rest on the outer rings of the main plaza that serves as its center; three levels of future retail, entertainment and fine-dining destinations swirl upward from this vortex. There has been no grand-opening announcement or disclosure of all the tenants. But the Source hopes to gradually introduce itself to Southern California, starting in 2017 with the third-floor plaza. An international food court is fully built out, ready to serve up the best of Gong Cha, Qrious Palate, Poki Yo, Sung Sim Dang and, last but not least, Popeyes Chicken. “This is the first Popeyes in a food court since 1991,” says Kenny Liu, lease manager for M+D Properties. Wearing a blue long-sleeved

THE VIEW FROM RODRIGUEZ’S FRONT PORCH

JOHN GILHOOLEY

shirt neatly rolled to the elbows, he’s leading a tour of the plaza. The Source’s finer dining destinations are still under construction. As Liu walks and talks, a painter sprays the interior walls of what will be La Huasteca, a Mexican restaurant owned by the Source developers Min and Donald Chae, brothers who also developed the Plaza Mexico shopping center in Lynwood. Banners are draped over future storefronts that promise dining experiences from South Korea’s Gangnam House, China’s Ooak Vegetarian Fusion Kitchen, Samgeori Butchers and a hot-pot restaurant. In the backdrop of the unfinished Hilton hotel is CGV Cinemas. The steampunkstyled brick building takes its inspiration from Germany’s Hamburg-Altona rail station, but the theaters are the real attraction. “They’re actually in the top five theater chains in the world,” Liu says of CGV, a South Korean company seeking a niche market in the States. “They own all the technological rights and licenses for futuristic cinematic experiences.” On the second floor, luxury boutique shops and more affordable dining options await. Only Yoshiharu Ramen and You & Me Jewelry are ready to go; thin boards cover much of the curvaceous floor plan designed by the architects behind LA’s Staples Center. Down giant concrete steps and back to the main plaza, murals cover walls that will eventually be glass storefronts. Pegs on square spaces await LED video screens that will complete the Source’s aesthetic. “It’s going to be full video-commercial advertising,” Liu boasts. “Think L.A. Live, Las Vegas and New York’s Times Square!” After the tour, on the fifth floor of the Source’s seven-story office building, M+D Properties employees chat in office meetings and cubicles. Wanamaker sits at a pentagon-shaped table in a large conference room; a white, plastic model of the Source

rests in the middle. This office building is Buena Park’s tallest, with a required helipad; it easily dwarfs the city’s previous, non-roller-coaster summit, the steeple at St. Pius V Catholic Church across the street. “As a developer, I’ve worked in numerous other cities,” Wanamaker says, “but Buena Park is very business-friendly.” M+D knows. For a decade, the company has tried to build something on Beach and beseeched the city to help out. In 2007, the company sponsored a project called the “Beach and Orangethorpe Mixed Use Development.” The following year, an M+D representative promised the planning commission its potential was that of “South Coast Plaza, Rodeo Drive and the Beverly Center” during public hearings and would attract six-figure-income homes within a 10-mile radius of Buena Park. By 2010, M+D called the project the Source, and then-Assistant Economic Development Director Ruben Lopez pitched a redevelopment deal to the City Council that gifted M+D nearly an acre of land that the city previously bought from a former motel and car wash for $5.3 million. Built-in subsidies also tacked on 100 percent property-tax rebates through 2030, as well as 55 percent sales-tax rebates over a 30-year period, amounting to $50 million. The council unanimously approved. The Source easily dominated campaign contributions that year—around the same time Donald Chae admitted to laundering money in a Los Angeles City Council race, earning him a $27,500 fine in 2015 from the city’s Ethics Commission—in hopes of maintaining a supportive council. All current members, save for Mayor Elizabeth Swift, have enjoyed thousands of dollars in Source-related contributions throughout their political careers. The project has poured in at least $44,240 through council races between 2008 and 2016. Councilman Fred Smith is easily the biggest benefactor, with Min Chae dropping $10,000 in one

2011 contribution alone. Nearly $15,000 in related airfare and accommodations through Korea Travel International also appear on Smith’s campaign-disclosure forms from 2010 to 2012, all for trips to China with developers to court prospective investors. (Developers deferred to department heads for interviews. Smith ignored requests for comment.) The Source will be worth all the effort, its political boosters claim. “Both the Chaes are very much visionaries,” says Mayor Pro Tem Vaughn, who received $3,000 from the Source in 2014. She admits nearby residents haven’t had the best situation on their hands, though. “I know I wouldn’t want to live there, but they made a choice to stay,” she says. “If there’s a problem, and if it’s not being addressed, I want the Source held accountable.”

A

giant exclamation point marks Buena Park’s northern city limits from the median along the main stretch of Beach Boulevard. The former Highway 39 has been the bedroom community’s lifeblood since Walter

JOHN GILHOOLEY

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hen the Source didn’t have anything finished by fall 2014, the city negotiated to extend the deadline to the following September in exchange for a $1.85 million loss of subsidies over five years. “Failure to complete the project,” the resolution states, “will substantially increase the costs of developing the subject site with any project of any sort due to costs related to

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what we wanted,” Lopez says. It hasn’t hurt that the city subsidized $32 million in land sales for new developments. Most recently, the city found a taker for the 8.7-acre Movieland Wax Museum site in developer Rubin Stahl, who paid just $2.5 million for the property on which he plans to open Butterfly Palladium this year. Lopez expects the atrium to attract an additional million people per year.

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JOHN GILHOOLEY

and Cordelia Knott arrived in 1920 and transformed their roadside berry stand into America’s first theme park. Multiple tourist traps have come and gone over the decades, from the Japanese Village and Deer Park to Movieland Wax Museum and Ripley’s Believe It or Not! to Medieval Times and Pirate’s Dinner Adventure. But for the past decade, Buena Park decided to court food and lifestyle concepts that tourists, residents and people from across Orange County and Southern California could regularly visit. The strategy started in 2005 with the successful opening of Portillo’s, a Chicago hot dog chain. Rock icons Gene Simmons and Paul Stanley of KISS opened Rock & Brews in late 2015. More new arrivals are slated to come, including this month’s highly anticipated opening of the first OC location of ultra-popular Cuban chain Porto’s Bakery & Café. “Porto’s by itself generates 2.5 million people in Downey; that’s a lot of people,” says Lopez, now the city’s Economic Development Administrator, from his meeting office, which is decorated with a wall-sized map of the city. “Buena Park has always been looked at as a second option for tourists, the first being Disneyland.” Lopez doesn’t seek to change that fact, but he wants to give Beach Boulevard a face-lift. “We got rid of six motels. The council gave us direction to go after some of the older motels, and we started buying them off.” When California Governor Jerry Brown dissolved redevelopment agencies in 2012, Lopez says, it left Buena Park with heavy revenue losses. The city had to quickly unload its parcels to avoid financial catastrophe. “We have been more successful than others in attracting

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Source of Pride, Source of Rage » FROM PAGE 11

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JOHN GILHOOLEY

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SONNE: KEEPING TABS ON CITY HALL

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FEBRUARY 17TH

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OC Weekly is your source for all

demolition and renewed site preparation.” Last year, the City Council approved plans to build the Aloft and Stanford hotels to join the Source Hilton Hotel on Beach, but without bed-tax giveaways that have been standard incentives in rival Anaheim. Stanford, a boutique chain owned by the same Seoul-based company behind the H-Mart farther north on Beach, is the latest Korean business to arrive in Buena Park. Koreans comprise around 10,000 of Buena Park’s residents, large enough to host an annual Arirang multicultural festival at City Hall, with parking provided by the Source’s 1,700-stall lot. “I look at the Source as a signature development that will be a hub of the Korean-American community of North OC,” says Buena Park resident and prominent community member Dr. Jinha Park. “Korean-Americans are very business-orientated, and a development like the Source will enhance the quality of life for all the citizens of Buena Park.” It’s a view shared by Lopez. When asked if an OC Koreatown is forming in the city, he responds, “I don’t know that the Koreans are looking to separate themselves. I think they want to be a part of the fabric of Buena Park.” “As a result of the Source going up, you see Porto’s, the Butterfly Palladium, the Aloft and Stanford hotel coming,” says Wanamaker. “It’s a ripple effect for development.” And it’s a concept that’s looking to expand in future years. “What you’ll probably end up seeing down the road, if it’s extremely successful, as we think it’s going

to be,” Lopez says, “is the Source expanding all the way to Stanton Avenue and north all the way to where City Hall is.” The only problem is the dozens of homes in the way.

S

outh of Knott’s, half a dozen Buena Park residents gather in Susan Sonne’s living room to discuss how to hold City Hall accountable. “We all found each other during the [2016 general] election,” Sonne says. The progressive challenged Fred Smith on the November ballot, finishing a distant second in the 3rd District, which lies just outside the Source. On whether big money influenced the outcome, she remarks, “I raised $7,000, and Smith raised over $60,000, so you tell me.” Before deciding on a late run for council, the Source came up in casual conversations Sonne had with neighbors. She joined Nextdoor Buena Park, an online communuty on which people posted comments asking when the center would open and chiding it for being “really ugly.” The activist started attending council meetings. “I remember being at a meeting when Vaughn said, ‘I want to light up Beach Boulevard from the 5 freeway to Crescent Avenue,’” Sonne says. “The image I got in my mind was of a little Las Vegas, although I think it’s more correct to say a little Anaheim.” Sonne’s new group, Buena Park United, didn’t form specifically in response to the Source, but it’s hard to ignore the big player in town. While members come from all districts in Buena Park, none yet is from the Melrose-Brenner neighborhood next to the Source that the city and M+D want gone. The developer planned to buy out all homes around its project before starting construction, but it was only suc-

BRENNER HOMES VS. HILTON HOTEL

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home at which 16 neighbors listed grievances: a fenced one-way street, homeless squatting in a boarded-up home, rodent infestations, eminent-domain fears. The following day, Swift and two of her neighbors spoke out at City Hall. Councilman Art Brown, a longtime Democrat whose biggest political accomplishment is his impressive Santa Claus beard, promised to withhold approval of future requests from the Source if it didn’t properly address resident concerns. The Source cleaned up its act a bit, but headaches remain. Even if the Source is a good neighbor, Sonne says, city officials need to answer questions about traffic impact, air quality, noise pollution and the kinds of jobs rapid development along Beach Boulevard will bring. She plans to livestream study sessions at which council moves discussions on important civic matters such as the Source to another room, ones that aren’t video archived. To awaken residents from their smalltown slumber, Sonne’s multiethnic, multigenerational Buena Park United also wants to start a blog that keeps tabs on City Hall. “It’s possible that more voters in Buena Park will become active, especially as we work to make information more accessible,” Sonne says. “Changes will start coming. That’s what we’re here for.”

I

n late January, businessmen toasted champagne glasses in the lobby of CGV Cinemas. After five long years, the movie theater is the first business at the Source to host a grand opening. When

WANAMAKER, SMITH, ET AL. CUT THE RIBBON JOHN GILHOOLEY

casual conversations died down, the VIP guests slowly filed into a theater, leaving no seat empty for the ceremony that ran behind schedule. Buena Park City Council members, M+D employees and elected official staffers claimed the front rows; Hollywood film-industry types and other invitees, mostly Korean, filled up the rest. The program began with Swift saying a few words before presenting M+D with a certificate on behalf of the city. “We’re just thrilled to have a new business in Buena Park,” she said. “As you invite the community here to your theaters, we want to invite you to enjoy Buena Park. Meet our neighbors; actually, if you walk outside of this theater about 50 feet, you’ll run into my house.” The crowd laughed. A short presentation on CGV followed, promising a “revolution in cinema.” The chain’s futuristic technology wants to transform moviegoing into a multisensory experience. Its 4DX theater (one of only five in the United States, according to the company) infuses motion, vibration, fog,

scents and wind to accentuate action films. CGV Cinemas has hundreds of locations around the world, but its newly opened theaters at the Source serve as the flagship in America. “I think audiences in the U.S. will embrace it,” Paul Richardson, CJ CGV America CEO, told the crowd. Wanamaker, council members and CGV representatives wore white gloves and red roses on their lapels as they prepared for the ribbon cutting. Each took a golden pair of scissors on a count of three, then cut through the fabric to applause. With the festivities finished, people returned to the lobby, plucking treats off trays and enjoying another round of drinks. Everyone received gift bags filled with a DVD, a microwavable dish of bibimbap, a CGV gift card and two 4DX-movie vouchers. More ribbon-cutting ceremonies are scheduled for this year. “The Source will put us right on the map, like Downtown Disney,” Vaughn said. “We will shine as the ‘Jewel of the Southland.’” GSANROMAN@OCWEEKLY.COM

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cessful in fully clearing out the west side of Brenner Avenue. “I requested a meeting back in 2008 because the residents wanted to know what was going on,” says Rodriguez, who moved into his home in 1998. M+D gave a presentation and offered a question-and-answer session afterward. The developers made a formal offer on Rodriguez’s home that year for $100,000 above its appraisal value. He found a new home, signed the paperwork, but he says the deal fell apart when investors pulled their funding from the Source. Since then, Rodriguez’s home value has veered from $525,000 all the way down to $290,000 before settling at just less than $400,000. Most residents are resigned to the fact the neighborhood will fade away, but they want the Source to do right by them during construction until agreeable offers on their homes are made. “I’ve never thought of moving,” says Raymundo Rivera, one of Rodriguez’s neighbors. “When I moved into this house, I planned to stay here for the rest of my life.” He’s apprehensive about the city stepping in with eminent domain and forcing him to sell his duplex at an unfavorable price—a tool Buena Park has yet to use. “I don’t want to leave here for a worse situation.” Stuck in the middle of the mess is Buena Park Mayor Elizabeth Swift. She recuses herself whenever the Source comes up for council discussions or votes because of how close her home is to it. In May 2016, Swift hosted a meeting at her

| Feb ruary 17 m on th x 17-2 x–x3x,, 20 2014

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calendar * thursday› WALK THIS WAY

fri/02/17

sat/02/18 Relevant Cinema

As we’re finding out more and more these days, monsters come in many forms. But for as many faces as monsters have, there are as many ways to fight them. In Qui Nguyen’s dramatic comedy She Kills Monsters, young Agnes enters a fantasy Dungeons & Dragons realm to combat the evil fairies and foul ogres that she discovers in the notebook of her recently deceased sister, Tilly. Agnes’ journey of self-discovery incorporates combat, dance forms and 1990s pop-culture references. Will the demons of Agnes’ broken heart defeat her, or will her inner warrior triumph? She Kills Monsters at Cal State Long Beach Studio Theatre, 1250 N. Bellflower Blvd., Long Beach, (562) 985-5526; www. calrep.org. 8 p.m. Through Feb. 26. $14-$17.

Larissa Lam and Baldwin Chiu’s awardwinning documentary Finding Cleveland comes to Bowers Museum at an appropriate time, when the ongoing debate on immigration is at the forefront of many minds. The film focuses on the history and experiences of Chinese immigrants in the South, their forgotten contributions, and the perseverance of the first Chinese settlers in the late 1800s to overcome racism and segregation. Although highly specific to the perspectives of one group from a bygone era, there’s still plenty of comparable issues from Finding Cleveland that apply to immigrants today. Before the film, Bowers presents a dimsum meal; a musical performance and a Q&A discussion with Lam and Chiu follows the screening. Finding Cleveland at Bowers Museum, 2002 Main St., Santa Ana, (714) 567-3600; www.bowers.org. Dim-sum meal, 6:30 p.m.; screening, 7 p.m. $9-$12. —AIMEE MURILLO

She Kills Monsters

—SCOTT FEINBLATT

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Finding Cleveland

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SOUL ONSTAGE Soulquarius

In the past few years, the Observatory has been the location for not only some of the biggest independent music festivals and concerts in OC, but also some of the most innovative in the country. With a bill featuring R&B and soul icons such as Erykah Badu and The-Dream, plus rappers such as DMX, Ja Rule and Ashanti, the brand-new Soulquarius pays respect to artists old enough for fans to have wellintended nostalgic feelings toward. However, the new generation—Jhene Aiko, the Internet, Pretty Ricky and BJ the Chicago Kid—prove the kids are all right, too. Once again, the booking of a fantastic and unexpected lineup in the office park that music built is the unofficial launch of the 2017 festival season. It’s off to a promising start. Soulquarius at the Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 9570600; www.observatoryoc.com. 11 a.m. $115. —DANIEL KOHN

[SPECIAL EVENT]

Getting Animated Ground Zero Animation Expo

In what appears to be the largest underground animation festival you’ve never heard of, this two-day event grants fans and ambitious young animation hopefuls the opportunity to hang with industry professionals and established freelancers from the gaming, stop-motion and studio worlds. Ground Zero Animation Expo promises a weekend’s worth of educational and insightful offerings, including workshops, panels, 2D-animation discussions, portfolio reviews, artist meet-and-greets, a vendor fair, networking mixers, and more! If your dream to finally be the next Hayao Miyazaki or Pendleton Ward hasn’t been realized yet, this event is a good place to start. Ground Zero Animation Expo at Odd Fellows Lodge, 721 S. Anaheim Blvd., Anaheim; www.shopfanalley.com. 11 a.m.; also Sun. $13.58-$34.56 (workshop tickets not included). —AIMEE MURILLO

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| CLASSIFIEDS | MUSIC | CULTURE | FILM | FOOD | CALENDAR | FEATURE | THE COUNTY | CONTENTS |

sun/02/19 [CONCERT]

Davila’s In Town AJ Davila

AJ Davila knocked ’em dead as part of relentless Puerto Rican garage-punk outfit Davila 666, but he really comes to life when he’s out on his own. His new solo album, El Futuro, is about to hit, and the teaser single “Beautiful” is slick and gritty at the same time, with Davila’s beyondfluent Ramones-ery now in command of so

FEB RU AR Y 1 7- 23 , 2 0 17

| OCWEEKLY.COM |

[THEATER]

People Are Funny The Awkward Party

Just as that one time your friend walked through the party without realizing her pants were on inside-out, one person’s painfully embarrassing stories are highly entertaining to the rest of us. Enter The Awkward Party, running now through March at STAGEStheatre. Presented by the talented comedians of Spectacles Improv Engine, this production

takes all those cringe-worthy party moments and spins them into a wildly humorous, unscripted, original show. That office Christmas party incident that you only bring up in therapy? It’s actually comedy gold. The Awkward Party at STAGEStheatre, 400 E. Commonwealth Ave., Fullerton, (714) 525-4484; www.stagesoc.org. 5:30 p.m. Through March 4. $20-$22. —ERIN DEWITT

mon/02/20 [ART]

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much more: Phil Spector’s wall-of-sound maximalism, Jesus and Mary Chain’s camouflaged pop, Psychedelic Furs’ flourish for the romantic, and a pinpoint-precise sense for production sophistication, too. (This makes a nice match for openers Crocodiles.) In a world with too many rock & roll copycats, this guy’s a proud, powerful lone wolf—so if you go, be ready for anything. AJ Davila with Crocodiles and Dustin Lovelis at Alex’s Bar, 2913 E. Anaheim Blvd., Long Beach, (562) 434-8292; www. alexsbar.com. 8 p.m. $8. 21+. —CHRIS ZIEGLER

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The iconic, black-and-white, post-war Robert Hollingsworth portrait of a sexy lounge singer featured among photographs from the California School of Fine Arts exemplifies the emergence of American photography as fine art. No accident, as Hollingsworth was one of dozens of students of Ansel Adams, Dorothea Lange, Imogen Cunningham and Minor White, teachers at the legendary Photography Department at the school (now the San Francisco Art Institute). From 1945 to 1955, it was a laboratory of artful avant-garde experimentation and documentation, much of it shown at Laguna Art Museum’s “The Golden Decade” and included in a book of work by 32 photographers encouraged by amazing mentors at just the right time and place. “The Golden Decade: Photography at the California School of Fine Arts 1945-55” at Laguna Art Museum, 307 Cliff Dr., Laguna Beach, (949) 494-8971; lagunaartmuseum.org. 11 a.m. Through May 29. $5-$7. —ANDREW TONKOVICH

2/14/17 10:28 AM

With four bands crafting some of the grooviest tunes around, Funk Me All Night Long will once again be rocking the walls of Beatnik Bandito Music Emporium. The ongoing musical series offers an eclectic variety of bands and their funkadelic twists on multiple music genres such as prog rock, soul, soft rock, hip-hop, and more, sending crowds into dancing frenzies of epic proportions. On tonight’s roster are local mainstays Time and Energy, Diners, the Stereo Soul Movement, and Slice, all ready to get you feeling yourself. This heavy session of sensual funk rock is gonna be a smooth one! Funk Me All Night Long 7 at Beatnik Bandito, 417 N. Broadway, Santa Ana, (714) 835-3313; www.facebook.com/ pacificnature. 8 p.m. $5. —AIMEE MURILLO


thu/02/23

[FILM]

Rosebuuuuuud! Citizen Kane

Director Orson Welles’ thinly disguised takedown of newspaper magnate William Randolph Hearst flopped at the box office in 1941 and was so despised that during the Oscar ceremony, guests booed each time a nomination was read for the film. That must have pleased Hearst, who had Welles labeled a Communist for the celluloid attack—but after French critics praised the film in the 1950s, Citizen Kane was quickly hailed as the greatest motion picture ever made. Welles was only 25 when he made the film, and his pioneering use of deep focus (in which all objects remain in focus no matter their distance) was the first for an American filmmaker. Go see this classic on the big screen and understand what all the hubbub was about. Citizen Kane at Regency South Coast Village, 1561 W. Sunflower Ave., Santa Ana, (714) 557-5701; www.regencymovies.com. 7:30 p.m. $8. —SR DAVIE S

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[ART]

if thEsE walls Could talk

‘dreamland’

OCWEEKLY.COM

Dance Visions

The annual extravaganza Dance Visions at UC Irvine’s Barclay Theatre typically brings together a wide pool of talented choreographers with inspired new perspectives on where the art of dance is going in the years to come.This time around, however, instead of only featuring upand-coming choreographers and their unique arrangements, this year’s edition honors master choreographers of both the 20th and 21st centuries. Figuratively raise a glass (or pointed foot) to such legends as George Balanchine, Lar Lubovitch and Donald McKayle as you watch performances of some of their best work. Backed by the UCI Symphony Orchestra, it’s the biggest celebration of both past and present generations of dance. Dance Visions at IrvineBarclayTheatre, 4000 Mesa Rd., Irvine, (949) 824-6646; www.arts.uci.edu. 8 p.m.Through Feb. 25. $12-$22. —AIMEE MURILLO

[COMEDY]

We Like Mike Mike Birbiglia

Actor, writer, director, comedian, frequent This American Life contributor and allaround hipster favorite Mike Birbiglia clearly has a talent for telling stories that are as relatable as they are humorous. Fresh off the success of his film Don’t Think Twice and his off-Broadway comedy special Thank God for Jokes—due for release on Netflix this year—Birbiglia will perform his latest hour-long show Working It Out at Irvine Improv tonight. Featuring new material that will likely remind fans of their admiration, this critically acclaimed comic’s set will be another in a series of hit performances and definitely not to be missed. Mike Birbiglia at Irvine Improv, 527 Spectrum Center Dr., Irvine, (949) 8545455; www.improv.com. 8 p.m.; also Feb. 24-25. $25. —AIMEE MURILLO

| OCWEEKLY.COM |

amore » online

En PointE

FEB RU AR Y 1 7- 23 , 2 0 17

Among Chicano art circles, Frank Romero is a living legend. An original member of ’70s Latino art group Los Four, Romero brought new weight to muralism by adding political undercurrents to his visual representations of Latino life in Los Angeles, such as Death of Ruben Salazar, the iconic mural memorializing the death of the LA Times journalist during the Chicano civilrights movement. So the Museum of Latin American Art is right to host a retrospective of the Boyle Heights-born artist’s work, which will feature a comprehensive look at his 50-year career. Not only did Romero dive into painting, but sculpture, printmaking and ceramics as well, as shown in this exquisite solo exhibit. “Dreamland: A Frank Romero Retrospective” at the Museum of Latin American Art, 628 Los Alamitos Ave., Long Beach, (562) 437-1689; www.molaa.org. 11 a.m. Through May 21. $7-$10. —AIMEE MURILLO

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[DANCE]

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wed/02/22

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| classifieds | music | culture | film | food | calendar | feature | the county | contents | Feb ruary 17-2 3 , 2017

» gustavo arellano

Carne Asada Is Not a Crime LA CARRETA 1155 W. Central Ave., Santa Ana, (714) 605-5575.

T

BRIAN FEINZIMER

Belly Up!

Eight Korean BBQ in Buena Park proves Korean meat innovators are still hard at work By Edwin GoEi

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spaced out on a specially designed wooden paddle—and includes a big bowl of salad, infinitely refillable side dishes, a huge seafood stew with crab, and kimchi fried rice that’s cooked tableside. One Combo A can and will easily feed three people. I saw this combo being ordered at table after table, all equipped with not one, but two gas burners—something else that distinguishes Eight from single-stove Korean barbecues. One burner heats a flat, rectangular griddle set with the same tilt as a George Foreman; the other burner simmers the stew pot. It’s one of many innovations in a restaurant that clearly has its design completely thought through. That griddle, for instance, is that particular shape because pork belly is nothing if not long and slender. And the stools? They turned out to be not only seats, but also storage areas, with the top coming off to reveal space in which to put away purses and jackets. And when I asked for chopsticks, spoons and napkins, our server told us they were all in a drawer hidden underneath our table. How convenient! But perhaps the most endearing thing about Eight is that it’s a full-service Korean barbecue. This meant we didn’t actually do our own cooking. Our assigned server was there from the beginning and stuck with us to the end. She started by greasing the griddle with a white cube of fat, then grilling pieces of tofu. When the tofu blocks took on some color, she piled them on top of a mountain of kimchi and sprouts that she strategically placed earlier at the lower end of the tilted surface. Later, since they were essentially being fried

from the hot pork-fat run-off, the kimchi and sprouts turned crisp and sweet. Our server also refilled the three panchan dishes as much as we wanted, which included a canary-yellow potato salad that again proves no one does potato salad better than Koreans. Most important of all, she handled all aspects of the pork belly preparation. She unfurled them four at a time onto the searing surface. She checked on them constantly until they rendered to just slightly crisp. And when they did, she snipped them with scissors into bite-sized pieces and invited us to eat them while they were still rippling hot. As for the eight different pork belly marinades, some—such as the red wine and black sesame—contributed sweetness and earthiness. But the truth is nothing can really improve upon a just-grilled piece of fat-gushing pork wrapped inside thinly sliced daikon and dipped in salt. The kimchi fried rice that our server tossed together in the second burner with what remained of our seafood stew came close. After she stir-fried the rice, she flattened the mound to develop a bottom crust. She then finished it with a sprinkle of grated mozzarella. The cheese melted to create a gooey pizza-fried-rice hybrid that I’ve not seen anywhere but here, which tells me that when it comes to Korean-barbecue innovations, we are still in its Golden Age.

GARELLANO@OCWEEKLY.COM EIGHT KOREAN BBQ 6681 Beach Blvd., Buena Park, (714) 5220888; 8koreanbbq.com. Open daily, 11:30 a.m.-11 p.m. Dinner for two, $25-$60, food only. Beer, wine and soju.

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thought I had Korean barbecues all figured out, that I’ve seen it all. Last year, as I ate at Kang Ho-Dong Baekjeong in Buena Park, I discovered a new type of cooking surface, on which the melting fat could dribble into a well of beaten egg and turn into the greatest breakfast scramble on Earth. It had me convinced I’d witnessed the best and possibly the last Korean-barbecue innovation I’ll ever see. “What more could there be?” I thought at the time. “There couldn’t possibly be anything that’s better than that.” But after eating at Eight Korean BBQ, I realized that Korean barbecue is still a vast frontier with unlimited opportunities for the new. I say this because the meal I had was nothing like I’d ever experienced before. First of all, the restaurant takes its name from its main attraction: a set meal that comes with eight different flavors of pork belly. This is the “Combo A.” Though there was a myriad of other options on the menu, including premium cuts of beef and pork belly meticulously sliced and preened into a flower, everyone I saw ordered the Combo A. Also, this month, amid news that bacon supplies are dwindling and prices are climbing, Eight Korean BBQ is doing the opposite of what you’d expect: It’s offering a discount on its pork belly feast. Until the end of February, the restaurant is actually slashing its regular price for the meal by 10 percent. This makes it even more of a bargain since its original price of $54.99 (as of this writing) is already a reasonable rate for Korean barbecue. The meal features eight thick pork belly slices—each one coiled and

here are stupid politicians, and then there are the pendejos who make up the Santa Ana City Council. Last week, they heard a proposed ordnance that would effectively destroy the city’s famous taco truck scene, declaring street food a threat to public safety and a bane to children. Did I mention the council is all Latino and Democrat? To outlaw loncheras in SanTana is like banning firepits from the coast: NIMBYism at its worst, government meddling at its best, and something all Orange Countians, regardless of political affiliation, can rally against. So for the next month, as the SanTana council-chavalas deliberate what to do, I urge all of ustedes gentle readers to patronize the Golden City’s taco trucks. Go to the classics: Alebrije’s, Ruben’s Mulitas, Mariscos Los Corales. Hang out with the new wave: Tacos Ayutla Oaxaca, Los Reyes del Elote Asado, El Zaga. And stop by La Carreta to enjoy one of the best aguas frescas in town—barley water?! Sí, señor. It’s nutty, creamy and a great way to wash down any item on the eclectic menu. There is no fealty to a particular region: La Carreta nails specialties from Cuernavaca (expansive picaditas, cheesy beso de monja), Mexico City (giant quesadillas stuffed with huitlacoche or flor de calabaza), even Jalisco (the flautas de pollo are prepared fresh and have a crunch and golden shine like peanut brittle). Even the taco list sneaks in some specialties: choriqueso (greasy chorizo bound together by quesillo), trompa (pig snout—think pork belly meets Jell-O) and a taco de nopal that every vegan in OC should eat, if only so they can finally shut up about how there’s no local vegan Mexican food. La Carreta is good, honest food—but if the SanTana City Council has its way, it’d have to lose its scrolling marquee, park somewhere else, and not be able to restock while in business. Taco lovers of Orange County, unite! Order and order again at La Carreta and its peers. And remember what activists in Los Angeles (which recently legalized street vending) said a decade ago: Carne asada is not a crime.

m ont h x x–xx , 20 14

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One Love Tea n Eats OUR TEA SERVICE GIVES YOUR CELEBRATION

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Build-your-own grain bowl at Cava

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o the list of national brands opening up shop in OC we can now add CAVA, a Mediterranean-esque full-service chain originally from Washington, D.C. The best starting point to diving into its mezze eats is this build-your-own grain bowl. It begins with a base of fluffy basmati rice or earthy black lentils. From there, the combination of layers are a Rubik’s Cube of possibilities, all featuring locally sourced vegetables, produce and protein from California farmers. Whatever the results, the end is always filling yet light, with each ingredient

PRESENTS

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» cynthia rebolledo maintaining its flavor against the others. Pro tip: Be sure to order the chef-inspired seasonal vegetables and Crazy Feta, offered as part of its product line of smallbatch dips and spreads, which can also be found at Whole Foods. CAVA MEZZE GRILL 3972 Barranca Pkwy., Irvine, (949) 200-7998; www.cava.com.

DriNkofthEwEEk » matt coker

Homicidal Maniac Stout at Dos Desperados Brewery

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fter you walk into an unfamiliar tap room with a Latino guy behind the bar filling pint glasses and, as it just so happens at the hour of this visit, Latino folks filling seats, it’s a welcome sight seeing a poster on the wall proclaiming, “I Want You, Gringo!” However, it’s not directed at this particular Dos Desperados Brewery customer, but rather it’s a re-creation of Pancho Villa’s recruitment poster for soldiers of fortune to join him in the Mexican Revolution. My real welcome at this joint that appears to have spilled out of a spaghetti western set came from a Homicidal Maniac. That’s the name of a seasonal American double/imperial stout brewed right there in San Marcos. THE DRINK

The black beer with a beige head, along with

DOS DESPERADOS

its menacing name, puts your taste buds on high alert for a sneak assault. But the flavor—an expertly crafted mix of coffee, licorice and roasted chocolate with a hint of caramel—is much subtler and more pleasing and ultimately refreshing than advertised. DOS DESPERADOS BREWERY 1241 Linda Vista Dr., San Marcos; www.dosdesperadosbrew.com.


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Dine Out Long Beach is a restaurant week that’s worth it

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Punk-rock bar the Pike offers a $35 dinner-for-two option that includes your choice of an appetizer (go with the ceviche!), two mains (make one of them the fish and chips!) and the underrated housemade cheesecake for dessert. Sweet Dixie Kitchen in the East Village is expanding its Southern-fried menu for Dine Out, cooking up chicken and waffles (part of its $15 brunch) and shrimp and grits ($20 lunch), while downtown newcomers Great Society Cider and Mead and Beer Belly are participating with one-off menus that will disappear Feb. 25. Beer Belly’s is themed “Fried & Fancy” and includes braised rabbit croquettes (fried) and duck confit ravioli with foie gras cream (fancy, natch). Great Society has gluten-free and vegan options for all three courses, as well as an option to select from a few rare ciders hand-delivered by the cidermasters at Wandering Aengus and EZ Orchards. I’m also excited to try Louisiana Charlie’s, a Creole restaurant hiding inside Shoreline Village (fried alligator legs!); Ocean Market Grill, a casual fish spot down by the marina that cooks everything over an open flame; and Belmont Heights’ Taste Wine-Beer-Kitchen, which is cooking up a Belgian beef carbonnade for the occasion. On Dine Out Long Beach’s easily searchable website, you’ll find everything from burgers and beer to Italian fine dining. Whatever you do, learn from my mistakes. It’s time to take advantage of Long Beach’s restaurant weeks!

FEB RU AR Y 1 7- 23 , 20 17

ince it began in 2014, I’ve avoided Long Beach’s version of a restaurant week, Eat LBC. Not because it wasn’t a wellintentioned effort on behalf of a few local publicists to promote the local food scene (because it totally was!), but because whenever I looked up the list of participating restaurants, I always saw places I’ve already been to hawking the same food I’ve already eaten. As a perpetual food explorer in this city, the chance to enjoy a three-course dinner at L’Opera or Open Sesame or Lucille’s Smokehouse BBQ—regardless of the price point—just never was enough of a draw. But when the two founders of Eat LBC split off to organize their own competing restaurant weeks, things started getting interesting. Last year was the debut of Dine LBC and Dine Out Long Beach, Restaurant Week 2.0, held within a few months of each other. This year, Dine LBC is moving to the end of summer, leaving Dine Out Long Beach to usher in a new foodie year. Dine Out Long Beach kicks off Saturday with a free afternoon of cooking demos and tastings at Friedman’s Appliance Center. Meal deals are available by dining in (no tickets or reservations necessary) starting Sunday and continuing through Feb. 25. What really caught my attention are the $10 and $15 lunchtime deals, as well as the impressive amount of exclusive dishes from restaurants that don’t need to participate in such marketing strategies. At Chianina, for example, it’s hard to go in for a meal and spend less than $50 per person, especially if you’re trying one of their high-end steaks, but during Dine Out Long Beach, the $50 prix fixe dinner includes never-before-served items such as Dungeness crab pasta, a pesto-topped prime strip loin and, for dessert, a raspberry, white chocolate and lemon fennel cake.

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Cherchez la Mujer

HOLA MEXICO DISTRIBUTION

You’re Killing Me Susana is much more than just another rom-com By Aimee murillo

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pier”—he discovers that Susana has gone to Middlebrook University in Iowa for a prestigious writer’s program. Eligio books it to the Hawkeye state to bring her home, but what he thought was going to be a simple reunion to recover his wife turns out to be a sobering look at the reality of his marriage; for Susana, it’s a struggle to assert her independence and be seen as an equal to her husband. Fresh off the success of his critically acclaimed Amazon series Mozart In the Jungle, Bernal is extraordinary here, amply diving into Eligio’s archetypal macho Mexican male like a hand in glove. He makes this role his own by imbuing the quintessential charm and likeability that made him a heartthrob in Michel Gondry’s 2006 film The Science of Sleep. Even when he’s at his worst, you still can’t totally hate him. Echegui is equally amazing as the meditative Susana, who is revealed to be a talented and visionary writer. While her character is deep and headstrong, she suffers from Eligio’s abuse and neglect, at times to an unrealistic degree. It’s almost as if screenwriters Luis Cámara and

Roberto Sneider (who also directed) don’t want to allow Susana to assert herself fully, to the detriment of the final product. Compromising Susana of power ultimately compromises the film’s power. You’re Killing Me Susana is based on Mexican author José Agustín’s novel Deserted Cities; as in the book, the desolate location where Susana and Eligio settle their marital strife is a metaphor for their relationship in general. Time and time again, Susana deserts Eligio when she’s had enough of him, leaving him in the cold winter snow of foreign middle America. The film’s rough, non-steady camera work and toned-down color palette additionally drive home the point of the couple’s tension-riddled relationship, thanks to cinematographer Antonio Calvache, who has worked on such dramas as Little Children, In the Bedroom and The Words. On the other end of the spectrum, there’s plenty of comedy in this film, as well as some relevant commentary on the U.S.-Mexico divide. Eligio’s easygoing manner is repeatedly tested by white Americans: at first in a scene in which he’s

being grilled by TSA agents who think he’s smuggling drugs (well, he is carrying thousands of dollars in cash in his duffel bag), then by a native Iowan who says Mexican food is “dirty.” Eligio casually deflects the insult, retorting, “Well, American food is so bland. Sometimes you need a little salmonella in your food for extra flavor!” Touché. You’re Killing Me Susana may not perfectly align with any definable cinematic genre, but formulaic films are best left to Hollywood. Here, Sneider strives for a more soulful and gritty—albeit imperfect— love story. Whether or not the specificities of problematic Mexican machismo would resonate to a global audience doesn’t matter; the film’s main themes will. And Bernal and Echegui’s performances are so undeniably magnetic, it’s hard to not fall in love with them, too. AMURILLO@OCWEEKLY.COM YOU’RE KILLING ME SUSANA was directed by Roberto Sneider; written by Luis Cámara and Roberto Sneider, based on the novel by José Agustín; and stars Gael García Bernal and Verónica Echegui. Opens Feb. 24.

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exican comedy You’re Killing Me Susana is already drumming up interest and press in the United States as a “romantic comedy,” a frustratingly shallow description of this complex film. While Gael García Bernal and Verónica Echegui shine as an alternately combative and loving couple and provide the right balance of romantic chemistry, humor and conflict, 27 Dresses it’s not. You’re Killing Me Susana is a more compelling and engrossing study of a marriage on the rocks, the search for individual identity, race relations between the U.S. and Mexico, and toxic masculinity. It’s beyond any Katherine Heigl vehicle. Bernal plays Eligio, an actor playing bit parts in daytime soap operas to pay the bills and support his writer wife, Susana (Echegui). While he takes his role as provider seriously, Eligio consistently disappoints Susana with his philandering, late-night drinking and partying. Then, one morning, he wakes to find Susana gone. After a monthlong search—all the while assuring friends and family that his marriage is still “great, never been hap-

m on th x x–x x , 2014

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TRY TO NOT GET LOST IN BERNAL’S EYES

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Never Let Go of That Promise

“ARE YOU SURE YOU CAN’T MAKE ROOM FOR ME ON THE ‘RAFT’?”

20TH CENTURY FOX

Zhainich Koreans, the students who are educated in ethnic schools and students’ daily lives in North Korea. UC Irvine, Humanities Gateway Room 1010, Campus and West Peltason drives, Irvine, (949) 824-6117. Tues., 3 p.m. Free. Citizen Kane. Charles Foster Kane is a super-rich sombitch who acquires massive power and influence but not the one thing he desperately requires: love. Is that “Rosebud” I hear coming from Trump Tower? Regency South Coast Village, 1561 W. Sunflower Ave., Santa Ana, (714) 557-5701. Wed., 7:30 p.m. $9. Being Mortal. The PBS Frontline film follows Dr. Atul Gawande, who explores the hopes of people facing terminal illness and the doctors who treat them. Cal State Fullerton, 800 N. State College Blvd., Fullerton, (657) 278-2011. Thurs., Feb. 23, 4:30 p.m. Free. New World. In this Park Hoon-Jeong crime drama, the death of a mob boss ignites a power struggle in which an undercover cop caught in the middle must choose: death or loyalty? UC Irvine, Humanities Gateway Room 1010; humanities.uci.edu. Thurs., Feb. 23, 5:30 p.m. Free. Far From Vietnam. Six revolutionary filmmakers from France’s New Wave era—including Jean-Luc Godard and Agnès Varda—came together to document their collective contempt for the Vietnam War in this 1967 release. UC Irvine, McCormick Screening Room, Humanities Gateway Room 1070, Irvine, (949) 824-6117. Thurs., Feb. 23, 6:30 p.m.; also Feb. 27. Free. A Night at the Oscars. Robert Kline

and Stephanie Heredia present a preAcademy Awards party that includes scenes from this year’s nominated films. Regency San Juan Capistrano, 26762 Verdugo St., San Juan Capistrano, (949) 661-3456. Thurs., Feb. 23, 6:30 p.m. $16. Is Genesis History? Is the Book of Genesis—which posits the universe was created in six days, God made man in his image and a global flood destroyed the world—an accurate record or Old Testament myths? AMC Orange 30, (714) 769-4288; AMC Tustin Legacy at the District, (714) 258-7036; Cinemark Century Stadium, (714) 5329558; Edwards Aliso Viejo Stadium 20, (844) 462-7342; Edwards Brea Stadium East 12, 155 W. Birch St., Brea, (844) 4627342; Edwards Irvine Spectrum 21, (844) 462-7342; Edwards Long Beach Stadium 26, (844) 462-7342; www.FathomEvents. com. Thurs., Feb. 23, 7 p.m. $12.50. Truth & Beauty. Bradford J. Salamon and Stan Yan’s short documentary examines the art and artistic process

of Tom Dowling. Orange Coast College, 2701 Fairview Rd., Costa Mesa, (714) 432-5072. Thurs., Feb. 23, 7 p.m. Free. Salaam Mumbai (Hello, Mumbai). Ali is a medical exchange student from Iran doing his cardio residency in Mumbai. He saves the life of his classmate Karishma, a rich Indian who attempted suicide. Can love be far off for these crazy kids? Mohammad Reza Golzar, Benyamin Bahadori and Dia Mirza star for director Ghorban Mohammadpour. Regency South Coast Village; www.sheedfilm.com.Thurs., Feb. 23, 8 p.m. $8-$13. Blade. Wesley Snipes plays the titular Marvel Comics vampire hunter who uncovers an underworld plot to raise blood for the god La Magra, something Blade must stop at all cost. Art Theatre, (562) 438-5435; www.facebook.com/ events/154099525095272/. Thurs., Feb. 23, 8:30 p.m. $8 (cash only; visit the Facebook page for pre-order). MCOKER@OCWEEKLY.COM

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son, finds herself six years later struggling to discipline her troubled boy Samuel, whose dreams are plagued by a monster he believes is coming to kill both of them. The Frida Cinema, 305 E. Fourth St., Santa Ana; thefridacinema. org. Fri., 11 p.m. $7-$10. Deconstructing the Beatles: Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club. Composer/producer Scott Freiman explores the history behind the music and the creative process that was employed during the recording sessions. Art Theatre, 2025 E. Fourth St., Long Beach, (562) 438-5435. Fri., 11 p.m.; Sat., 11 a.m. $8.50-$11.50. The Birth of Motion Pictures: An Illustrated History of Silent Film 19101929. This retrospective exhibition kicks off Brea’s centennial celebrations with exquisite, never-before-shown silentmovie posters, an actual “silent Oscar,” original posters from Brea’s centennial year (1917, duh!), posters from Academy Award-winning films, and movie memorabilia. Brea Gallery, 1 Civic Center Circle, Brea; www.breagallery.com. Sat., 6-10 p.m. $3. Allegiance. This musical, which is inspired by the true-life experiences of Star Trek’s George Takei, is about a family whose life is upended by the shameful internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. AMC Orange 30, (714) 769-4288; AMC Tustin Legacy at the District, (714) 258-7036; Cinemark Century Stadium, (714) 5329558; Edwards Aliso Viejo Stadium 20, (844) 462-7342; Edwards Irvine Spectrum 21, (844) 462-7342; Edwards Long Beach Stadium 26, (844) 4627342; www.FathomEvents.com. Sun., 12:55 p.m. $18. Spartacus. Stanley Kubrick’s 1960 drama is about a rebellious slave (Kirk Douglas) who leads a revolt with 78 fellow gladiators against his owner (Peter Ustinov) and a corrupt Roman senator (Laurence Olivier) to save a female companion (Jean Simmons). Art Theatre, (562) 438-5435. Sun., 1 p.m. $8.50-$11.50. Titanic. I never saw this 1997 blockbuster, but I did see the really wide VHS box holding it on a shelf for years. Here is a rare opportunity to see it somewhere other than in your home theater, on your laptop or on your smartphone. Regency Directors Cut Cinema at Rancho Niguel, 25471 Rancho Niguel Rd., Laguna Niguel, (949) 831-0446. Tues. Call for show time. $8. The Sky Blue Symphony: The Story of the Korean Schools in Japan. Park Yeong-I’s documentary about the long history of discrimination against

Feb ruary 17-2 3 , 20 17

Newsies: The Broadway Musical. Proving that Broadway can mine gold out of even the worst Disney movie musicals, Fathom Events and Disney Theatrical Productions once again beam into theaters nationwide the Tony-winning musical as captured live at the Pantages Theatre in Hollywood last September. AMC Downtown Disney, 1565 Disneyland Dr., Anaheim, (714) 776-2355; AMC Fullerton 20, 1001 S. Lemon St., Fullerton, (714) 992-6962; AMC Marina Pacifica, 6346 E. Pacific Coast Hwy., Long Beach, (562) 430-8790; AMC Orange 30, 20 City Blvd. W., Orange, (714) 769-4288; AMC Tustin Legacy at the District, 2457 Park Ave., Tustin, (714) 258-7036; Cinemark Century Stadium 25, 1701 W. Katella Ave., Orange, (714) 532-9558; Cinemark Century 20 Huntington Beach, 7777 Edinger Ave., Huntington Beach, (714) 373-4573; Edwards Aliso Viejo Stadium 20, 26701 Aliso Creek Rd., Aliso Viejo, (844) 462-7342; Edwards Foothill Towne Center Stadium 22, 26602 Towne Center Dr., Foothill Ranch, (949) 588-9402; Edwards Irvine Spectrum 21, 65 Fortune Dr., Irvine, (844) 462-7342; Edwards Long Beach Stadium 26, 7501 E. Carson, Long Beach, (844) 462-7342; Edwards Metro Pointe Stadium 12, 901 South Coast Dr., Costa Mesa, (714) 428-0962; Regal Garden Grove Stadium 16, 9741 Chapman Ave., Garden Grove, (844) 462-7342; www.FathomEvents.com. Thurs., Feb. 16, & Wed., 7 p.m.; Sat., 12:55 p.m. $20. Finding Cleveland. The award-winning documentary, which explores the littleknown immigration of Chinese Americans in the deep South, is just one part of what the sponsoring Chinese Cultural Arts Council bills as the “Finding Cleveland Experience.” There is also music, an audience Q&A with filmmakers Larissa Lam and Baldwin “Only Won” Chiu, and hot, fresh dim sum! Bowers Museum of Cultural Art, 2002 N. Main St., Santa Ana, (714) 567-3600. Fri. Dim sum, 6:30 p.m.; program, 7 p.m. $9-$12. A Charlie Chaplin Valentine! Three great Charlie Chaplin short comedies are presented back-to-back: The Floorwalker (1916), The Immigrant (1917) and Behind the Screen (1916). These silents are accompanied by live, completely improvised music from awardwinning composer Michael D. Mortilla. Muckenthaler Cultural Center, 1201 W. Malvern Ave., Fullerton, (714) 738-6595; themuck.org. Thurs., Feb. 16, 7:30 p.m. $12.50-$25. The Babadook. Widow Amelia (Essie Davis), whose husband was tragically killed in a car crash while rushing her to the hospital to deliver their newborn

BY MATT COKER

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Claudio Quest parodies Nintendo’s Mario games to rollicking, silly results By Joel BeerS

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MUSHROOM OR FEATHER?

CHANCE THEATER

batter their foes away, and one in which 8-bit characters grapple with existential crises. It makes for a fun, if ultimately unsatisfying, ride, one hampered by prerecorded music that occasionally dwarfs the actual singing and the sneaking suspicion that what you’re watching is a less fully fleshed-out show than a goofy idea brought to shaky, if bouncy, fun by two very creative people whose talents may have been put to better use. However, in defense of the creators, there is one fascinating moment late in the first act, a Long, Dark Night of the Soul in which Claudio questions his place in the universe and whether any such thing as free will exists. It’s an existential moment of self-awareness (or the sense of a lack thereof ) that channels the android angst of HBO’s Westworld and the more scientific postulations proffered by Neil Degrasse Tyson and his smarty-pants ilk who speculate that the universe, as we comprehend it, is really nothing more than an elaborate computer simulation designed by an omnipotent being (compared to us idiots, anyway). But that’s about where the smart begins and ends in this show. That’s not to say there aren’t a lot of chuckles to be had or several strong performances. Monika Pena is a scream as the piss-and-vinegar Princess Fish, whether rebelling against the conceits of a patriarchal video-game

culture in which female characters are relegated to hapless bystanders or displaying her savage high kicks; Miguel Cardenas overcomes a ridiculous costume and character (a fire-breathing platypus) to deliver a rocking performance, particularly in the second act; and Andrew Puente’s Luis is a suitably recalcitrant support character thrust into the limelight. While fans of the franchise and perhaps the first generation wave of home-console gaming might get a big kick out of this, it’s difficult to think this show will make much of an impression outside of some cultish fringe-festival type of deal. But the creators’ attempt at Disnify-ing the ending, with a predictably lightweight Hero’s Journey and a song featuring two quite different princesses finding common ground, works against that. So what we get is a show that nods at edgy and snarky, but also embraces pedestrian tropes. After seeing two previous musicals from the highly talented Pailet, including the raucous Triassic Parq: The Musical and the more conventional (sort of ) Loch Ness, the advice from this quarter is to ditch the family-friendly stuff and go for the jugular. CLAUDIO QUEST at Chance Theater, 5522 E. La Palma Ave., Anaheim, (888) 455-4212; www. chancetheater.com. Fri., 8 p.m.; Sat, 3 & 8 p.m.; Sun., 3 p.m. Through Feb. 26. $31-$45.

Nail These Nails

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he levels of artistry and innovation coming out of nail art—and I’m not just talking nail decals and basic acrylics—have gotten more and more amazing. Logos, 3D paintings, new foils and gels, even furry nails are claiming popularity these days, making your dainty fingertips the center of attention. While my own nails could never reach that height of opulence and glamour (I’ll just stick to plain nail polish and my French manis, thank you), here’s a five-finger salute to the most outrageous nail trends that continue to be hype-worthy:

Aquarium Nails. A double-paneled acrylic nail is injected with watery gel and glitter to give an aquarium effect that’s made even more dazzling with glued-on gems and beads. Whether you want to decorate one or all 10 nails this way, it’s an epic, otherworldly look. Scorpion Nails. Mexicans from Durango have a deep, abiding fascination with scorpions, inspiring nail-salon tech Lupita Garcia to embed tiny dead arachnids under acrylic—yup, actual scorpions—into customers’ manis. The trend became so popular it inspired narco wives, wannabes and American women to fly over to get them. Only danger is the scorpions carry poisonous venom in them—but they’re still less dangerous than a soplón. Unicorn Nails. This look is achieved by painting thin lines of 3D sculpting gel onto a pointy acrylic nail, creating the shape of a unicorn horn. Colorful chrome powder is painted over it, with the excess rubbed off. And voila! You’re ready for a bunch of woo from bronies. Whichever trend you go with, just make sure to tip your manicurist very well. AMURILLO@OCWEEKLY.COM

Unicorn Nails, Scorpion Nails and Other Trends for You to Nail

DECO NAILS BY MARI INSTAGRAM: @DCNBM

online » amore ocweekly.com

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as anyone or anything done comparatively so little and become so iconic as the brothers Mario and Luigi? Okay, lots of things have (hello, Kardashian World Order and all other shitbirds who have no talent or spark other than cultivating the cult of personality). But be that as it may, Mario, the mustachioed, red-capped, blue-overall-clad character who debuted in the 1981 arcade game Donkey Kong with one weapon in his arsenal—jumping—and his second-fiddle brother, Luigi, who debuted in 1983’s Mario Brothers, have proven a most ubiquitous brand, from scores of video games on multiple consoles to TV, film, comics and nearly every kind of merchandise you can think of. Not bad for a couple of nondescript Italian-American plumbers who got their start by spending more time in the New York City sewers than Killer Croc does in Gotham City’s. The latest iteration is the musical Claudio Quest, receiving its West Coast premiere at the Chance Theater. For obvious reasons (COPYRIGHT!), creators Drew Fornarola and Marshall Pailet have had to fudge everything from the brothers’ names (Claudio and Luis) to the setting (Mushroom Land is now Eggplant Land) to the villain (Bowser to Bruiser). Even our hapless Princess Toadstool is now Princess Poinsettia. But make no mistake, this is 1985’s Super Mario Brothers, albeit a song-and-dance parody that is lighthearted most of the time, introspective a small degree of the time, and cheesy and rollicking silly fun all of the time. It’s also a show that never seems to know just what it wants to be. Most of the first half is ridiculously over-the-top, filled with goofy songs and hijinks as the denizens of Eggplant Land rally around the glorious Claudio (Beau Brians), as he triumphantly rescues the princess. Yet again. But several subplots—including Poinsettia’s sister Princess Fish, frustrated at always being left behind in the castle, emerging as a kick-ass martial-arts heroine determined to join the latest quest and Luis’ wrestling with always being the No. 2 player— attempt to inject some genuine drama or depth to the production. Then there’s our villain Bruiser, who bares his soul to a therapist and doesn’t understand why his deep love of a princess isn’t reciprocated since his constant abductions of her stem solely from his complete devotion. The result is a show that runs on two tracks: one in which garishly costumed characters wielding simplistic arcade-like monsters either root for or attempt to kill the brothers as they jump, kick and

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Super-duper Smash Bros.

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music»artists|sounds|shows LAGOS FILLS A BLANKCANVAS YEAR WITH SOUND

The Sound of Dedication

CASEY LAGOS

Casey Lagos’ rare disorder drove him to record music every day for a year By JoSh CheSler

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t wasn’t that long ago that Casey Lagos was drumming at giant European music festivals and singing on tour with established hardcore bands, and, most recently, playing with indie-pop wunderkids Hawai. But for the multi-instrumentalist, it all seems like a lifetime ago. In late 2015, Lagos was diagnosed with an inner-ear vestibular disorder, which left him incredibly dizzy and weak almost all the time, along with sporadic uncontrollable shaking. His symptoms were triggered by loud noises, bright lights and fast movements—all of which he experienced on a regular basis while playing live music. “I went through several months of testing with doctors,” Lagos says. “[My primarycare physician] kept sending me to specialists, but they never found anything. She started thinking it was all in my head and that there was nothing physically wrong with me. Then finally getting diagnosed was such a blow to me because it meant that I had to change my lifestyle.” With his passion, career and livelihood stripped away in a single moment, life seemed pretty bleak for the young musician. “I got to the point where it wasn’t like, ‘I hate my life so much that I want to

kill myself,’ but I was so miserable with this illness that it might be the only way to make it stop,” Lagos says. “I really got close to wanting to end my life, but then I had this vision of my family—particularly my little cousin whom I love so much—walking toward my casket and crying. That was a super-sobering thought for me, and I realized I couldn’t even entertain that.” So at the beginning of 2016, the former Stick to Your Guns drummer decided to give himself a musical challenge rather than wallow in self-pity. Every day for a full year (including Leap Day), Lagos would create and share a new original song. He called the project, 366 DOOM (Days of Original Music). “I wanted to put forth an effort every day to make something positive, and sometimes I’d write five or six songs and wouldn’t be happy with any of them,” Lagos says. While in such a low point in his life, Lagos says, he wanted to honor God daily with his music. “I felt so thankful that I could still write and produce music,” the 28-year-old says. “I built up these big libraries of different songs, and now it’s really cool to have this huge library of songs. For the first few months, I was more or less bedridden, but it gave me a reason to get

out of bed every day. Then there were days like Christmas, when everyone else is eating food and watching Christmas movies and spending time with their families, and I still had to come up with a song before I could do any of that.” Ultimately, 366 DOOM was an Instagram hit and led him to something bigger than he intended. Lagos decided to take the final song he’d crafted for his year-long project and turn it into the debut track for the rebirth of his solo career, under his longdormant handle Sealakes. For “Let It Go,” Lagos handled everything from the vocals and drums to guitar and bass. “I recorded the drums in my living room after my house flooded,” he says. “Then I went and recorded bass and guitar over that. Then, once the music was done, it was really just writing lyrics and trying to scream. [After 366 days of making music,] I couldn’t scream anymore. My voice just hadn’t been exercised because I hadn’t screamed like that in a long time.” As Lagos sees it, doing everything himself is actually easier than working with a full band, as he didn’t have to pick and negotiate between what four or five different musical minds want. Instead, he was able to focus on making the song a per-

sonal look into his life and the lessons he’s learned since his diagnosis. “I really wanted to talk about what I’d been through in the past year,” Lagos says. “I wanted to capture the moment of my doctor not caring at all to the point of being diagnosed and feeling so down. Then I had the moment where I knew I just had to let all of these feelings go and just accept what I’m going through.” Lagos is looking to making his own music, as well as continuing to produce and collaborate with other musicians in all genres, including pop and R&B. Though his chronic illness may keep him off the stage, the songwriter is perfectly fine with that—for now. “After having played all of those big shows and festivals, I don’t feel like I have that hunger where I need to play an arena or play to X amount of people to just be happy,” Lagos says. “I feel very grateful that I could accomplish that before because I know I for sure had the hunger. I do miss the feeling of playing music live, but I feel fulfilled in my goals on that side of live music. I don’t think I’ll be playing any time soon, but as my condition stabilizes, playing a show doesn’t seem as scary. It still seems kind of scary, but not as scary as it used to be.” LETTERS@OCWEEKLY.COM


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HEADLINING THE GREAT BIG GIG IN THE SKY

Strumming the Pain Away

AARON HUNIU

A fitting memorial is planned for OC’s premier open-mic host By Joel Beers

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MEMORIAL FOR JOHN CARRILLO at the Shannon Family Mortuary, 137 E. Maple, Orange, (714) 771-1000; www. shannonfamilymortuary.com. Thurs., Feb. 16, 4-8 p.m.

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Carrillo was a songwriter with some 60 songs recorded on multiple albums and EPs and whose latest was produced by Mike Viola, a Grammy-nominated producer, musician, songwriter and singer. But he was also someone who relished the opportunity to bring other songwriters together, giving many of them the support and encouragement they needed to take to a stage for the first time. There are few open-mic regulars in Orange County and LA who hadn’t run across him at some point. Kaye, a legendary bassist who has worked with just about everybody in her illustrious career, from Ray Charles and the Beach Boys to Henry Mancini and Frank Zappa, also had high praise for Carrillo’s talent and professionalism. “I’ve recorded for some of the heaviest in the business, so I’m particular with [whom] I record these days,” Kaye said in a quote posted on Carrillo’s website. “Takes a lot to knock me out, but he did it.” Carrillo, who was born in the Philippines, grew up in Walnut; he attended UC Irvine and was a die-hard Dodgers fan and an avid tennis player, photographer and actor. But more than anything, it was his gift for writing and playing music, as well as his encyclopedic knowledge of it, that so many will remember him for. “He was like a savant,” his wife says. “Name the genre, and he seemed to know everything about it. . . . Lately, he and I had joined a trivia team, and sometimes when he’d answer a question, I was like, ‘How do you know that?’”

FEB RU AR Y 1 7- 23 , 20 17

n Jan. 16, John Carrillo, a longtime fixture on Orange County’s singer/songwriter circuit, asked a friend if he wanted to go to the Grammy Museum in Los Angeles. A huge fan of the Beatles, Frank Sinatra, the Who and a myriad of other artists, he had never been. But his friend was busy, so Carrillo would have to wait for another day. But five days later, the 48-year-old suffered a massive heart attack and landed in a coma. He then passed away Feb. 9. It was a startlingly abrupt end to the life of someone who was a constant presence at open mics and anywhere musicians gathered in the county during the past 25 years. Carrillo had recorded with such luminaries as legendary bass player Carol Kaye and appeared at bars and clubs and hosted open mics from the Gypsy Den and Alta Coffee to the Pint House and the now-defunct Pepperland Music. He leaves behind three recorded albums; a wife, BJ Carrillo; and a flood of memories for not only those who knew him well, but also for those with whom he was just acquainted. A memorial will be held for Carrillo on Thursday, Feb. 16 at the Shannon Family Mortuary Home in Orange. In the best possible tribute for the man, it will be set up like an open mic. People are invited to bring their guitars and play and sing. Those who were familiar with his open mics know the drill: “Two songs or eight minutes!” “When I was at the funeral home planning the viewing, which is always so somber, they said, ‘You should do something fun,’” recalls BJ Carrillo. “They had just done superhero and beach-party viewings, and when I saw they had a piano and a mic, I asked if we could have an open mic. And they said yes. It just seemed perfect.”

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HELLO, LADIES!

PICK BAND

SAM WESTRE

Keyboard Lady Killer STEVE MAGGIORA performs at Hennessey’s Tavern, 31761 Camino Capistrano, San Juan Capistrano, (949) 441-4777; hennesseystavern.com/ san_juan_capistrano.html. Thursday, Feb. 16, 9 p.m. Free.

SUBMIT YOUR BAND FOR THE CHANCE TO OPEN AT SUMMER FEST 2017! OPEN TO ALL AGES AND TYPES OF MUSIC! MUST SUBMIT TO MARKETING@OCWEEKLY.COM BY 2/19/17 OCWEEKLY.COM/PICKTHEBAND2017

T

he life of a working musician means being a talented chameleon. Staring from the stage at half a dozen different crowds every week probably means you’re booking gigs for more than one band and playing more than one style on any given day. But if you’re Steve Maggiora, that’s really only the beginning. At one point, the keyboardist and singer/songwriter known best for his whiskey-soaked antics and fiery licks in Robert Jon and the Wreck had 12 different musical projects going at once. And finding even the most ordinary gigs, from dive-bar cover bands to playing piano for a troupe of dancers in ballet class, means there’s always a chance to slide in some practice and mess around with your music. “Sometimes [for the ballet class], I just like throwing in pop tunes and fucking with them,” Maggiora says, sipping an iced tea outside a Coffee Bean during a sunny afternoon off in Huntington Beach. “You’re playing and singing, and then all of a sudden, you start playing a Creed song as a waltz.” While being a full-time musician doesn’t always allow much time to play your own music, for the past year or so, Maggiora has taken center-stage with his own material, a smooth blend of 1970s and ’80s R&B-inspired pop with shades of Ed Sheeran, Billy Joel and, yes, even some Michael McDonald. Maggiora kicked off his solo stint last year with a debut album, When I Get You Alone, weaving together songs that might feel at home on VH1 Classic and adding his own raw sense of ladies’ man humor and bravado to the mix. “I stopped trying to write songs where I was trying to actually say something with music. [Now], I just try to make people dance and

LOCALSONLY » NATE JACKSON

groove it out,” Maggiora says. “I do covers in that style and writing more in that style, and I think it’s a good thing we got going now.” Covering the world’s greatest writers in a multitude of Orange County bars and clubs obviously has an effect on Maggiora’s own songwriting. Look no further than his latest track, “What’s Love Got to Do With You,” released on Valentine’s Day (natch). Veering past the obvious homage to Tina Turner, this track’s rich slather of comfortable keyboard grooves, strutting pop drumbeat, tasty saxophone and guitar leads melds well with Maggiora’s old-school vocals. You can almost hear the disco strobes flashing and drunk bar patrons hugging up, locking lips and shaking hips while cheering the end of the track with a slightly winded and resounding, “Woooo!” “You never know when you write a new song—usually, the first time out is the best judge of whether it’s gonna work out,” Maggiora says. “People were dancing and singing along by the second chorus and shit.” The fact that his originals are being well-received alongside the covers is a good sign for Maggiora, who says no matter where his own music takes him, he’s always going to be a fan of giving tightly produced classics a chance to loosen up. “I change some of the lyrics and make ’em dirty,” Maggiora says. “We do ‘Say Something’ by Great Big World, and I changed it. Instead of the lyric being ‘saw something, I’m giving up on you’ I say ‘say something, I’m going down on you,’ and it just gets really ambiguously gay, and it’s fun, and everyone’s having a good time.” Hey, Orange County/Long Beach musicians & bands! Mail your music, contact info, high-res photos & impending show dates for possible review to: Locals Only, OC Weekly, 18475 Bandilier Circle, Fountain Valley, CA 92708. Or email your link to: localsonly@ocweekly.com.


THIS WEEK FRIDAY, FEB. 17

ADAM ANT: 8 p.m., $30. The Observatory, 3503 S.

Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; observatoryoc.com. CLIPPING. WITH BASECK: 11:30 p.m., $15. Constellation Room at the Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; constellationroom.com. THE HATERS: 8 p.m., free. Blacklight District Lounge, 2500 E. Anaheim St., Long Beach. HOLLYWOOD BIGSHOTS: 7 p.m., free. Ralph Brennan’s Jazz Kitchen, 1590 S. Disneyland Dr., Anaheim, (714) 776-5200; rbjazzkitchen.com. JUMPING JACK FLASH: 8 p.m., $20. The Coach House, 33157 Camino Capistrano, Ste. C, San Juan Capistrano, (949) 496-8930; thecoachhouse.com. THE OI! SCOUTS; BLANKS 77; CORRUPTED YOUTH; INFESTED: 8 p.m., $20. Constellation

Room at the Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; constellationroom.com.

SCOTT BRADLEE’S POSTMODERN JUKEBOX:

8 p.m., $39-$99. Renee and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall, 615 Town Center Dr., Costa Mesa, (714) 556-2787; scfta.org. SEGA GENECIDE: 10 p.m. La Cave, 1695 Irvine Ave., Costa Mesa, (949) 646-7944; lacaverestaurant.com. TRIO CÉLESTE PRESENTS FROM RUSSIA, WITH LOVE: 8 p.m., $6-$16. UC Irvine Winifred Smith

Hall, 4000 Mesa Rd., Irvine, (949) 494-8971.

Capistrano, (949) 496-8930; thecoachhouse.com.

CILLIAN’S BRIDGE: 2 p.m., free. Muldoon’s Irish Pub,

202 Newport Center Dr., Newport Beach, (949) 6404110; muldoonspub.com. DIOTIMA QUARTET: 3:30 p.m., free. Sunny Hills Performing Arts Center, 1801 Warburton Way, Fullerton; sunnyhills.net.

EVERY TIME I DIE; KNOCKED LOOSE; HARMS WAY; ETERNAL SLEEP: 8 p.m. The Observatory,

3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; observatoryoc.com. FULLY FULLWOOD REGGAE SUNDAYS: 3 p.m., $5. Don the Beachcomber, 16278 Pacific Coast Hwy., Huntington Beach, (562) 592-1321; donthebeachcomber.com. KIRK WILSON ON THE PIANO: 6 p.m., free. Ralph Brennan’s Jazz Kitchen, 1590 S. Disneyland Dr., Anaheim, (714) 776-5200; rbjazzkitchen.com. LEON: 9 p.m., $13. Constellation Room at the Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; constellationroom.com. TIM GILL TRIO: 10:30 a.m., free. Ralph Brennan’s Jazz Kitchen, 1590 S. Disneyland Dr., Anaheim, (714) 7765200; rbjazzkitchen.com.

MONDAY, FEB. 20

ELHAE: 9 p.m., $12. Constellation Room at the

Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; constellationroom.com. SINATRA & DINO DINNER SHOW: 6 p.m. La Cave, 1695 Irvine Ave., Costa Mesa, (949) 646-7944; lacaverestaurant.com.

SATURDAY, FEB. 18

TUESDAY, FEB. 21

Brennan’s Jazz Kitchen, 1590 S. Disneyland Dr., Anaheim, (714) 776-5200; rbjazzkitchen.com. CHEETAH CHROME OF THE DEAD BOYS: 8 p.m., $13-$15. Alex’s Bar, 2913 E. Anaheim St., Long Beach, (562) 434-8292; alexsbar.com. DADA: 8 p.m., $30. The Coach House, 33157 Camino Capistrano, Ste. C, San Juan Capistrano, (949) 4968930; thecoachhouse.com. DIANE & THE DEDUCTIBLES: 7 p.m., $29-$75. Huntington Beach Library and Cultural Center, 7111 Talbert Ave., Huntington Beach, (714) 842-4481. THE GLADIATORS: 2 p.m., $15-$20. The Federal Bar, 102 Pine Ave., Long Beach, (562) 435-2000; lb.thefederalbar.com.

Bar, 102 Pine Ave., Long Beach, (562) 435-2000; lb.thefederalbar.com. CUMBIA TUESDAYS: 8 p.m., free. Roxanne’s Lounge, 1115 E. Wardlow Rd., Long Beach, (562) 426-4777; roxanneslounge.com. JAZZ NIGHT: 8:30 p.m., free. Envy Lounge, 4647 MacArthur Blvd., Newport Beach, (949) 287-8270; envyloungeoc.com. MIC DANGEROUSLY: 8 p.m., free. Gallagher’s Pub & Grill, 2751 E. Broadway, Long Beach, (562) 856-8000; gallagherslongbeach.com.

AMANDA CASTRO BAND: 7 p.m., free. Ralph

HANDBELL INVITATIONAL CONCERT NO. 1:

THE WINEHOUSE EXPERIENCE, FEATURING MIA KARTER: 8 p.m. Gaslamp Restaurant & Bar,

SUNDAY, FEB. 19

ALICE BAG & THE SISSY BEARS: $10-$12.

Programme Skate & Sound, 2495 E. Chapman Ave., Fullerton, (714) 798-7565; programmehq.com.

BARBRA & FRANK, THE CONCERT THAT NEVER WAS: 7 p.m., $20. The Coach House,

33157 Camino Capistrano, Ste. C, San Juan

BATTLE AT THE BEACH: 8 p.m., free. Hurricanes Bar

& Grill, 200 Main St., Huntington Beach, (714) 374-0500; hurricanesbargrill.com. BLUES WEDNESDAYS: 8 p.m., $5. Mozambique, 1740 S. Coast Hwy., Laguna Beach, (949) 715-7777; mozambiqueoc.com. EXPANDING OC HIP-HOP: 8 p.m., free. Doll Hut, 107 S. Adams St., Anaheim, (714) 533-1286. HIP-HOP WEDNESDAY: 9 p.m., free. The Karman Bar, 26022 Cape Dr., Laguna Niguel, (949) 582-5909; thekarmanbar.com. KEVIN ABSTRACT: 9 p.m. Constellation Room at the Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; constellationroom.com. MODERN DISCO AMBASSADORS: 10 p.m. La Cave, 1695 Irvine Ave., Costa Mesa, (949) 646-7944; lacaverestaurant.com. SUICIDAL TENDENCIES; CROWBAR & HAVOK:

8 p.m., $25. The Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; observatoryoc.com.

THURSDAY, FEB. 23

COONE; RIOT TEN: 9:30 p.m., $15-$18. The Yost

Theater, 307 N. Spurgeon St., Santa Ana, (888) 8629573; yosttheater.com. JOJO: 8 p.m., $20. The Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; observatoryoc.com. MOZART’S SISTER & TEEN DAZE: 9 p.m., $8. Constellation Room at the Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; constellationroom.com. REGGAE THURSDAYS: 9 p.m. Que Sera, 1923 E. Seventh St., Long Beach, (562) 599-6170; queseralb.wix.com. THRASHER THURSDAY: 8 p.m., free. The Karman Bar, 26022 Cape Dr., Laguna Niguel, (949) 582-5909; thekarmanbar.com.

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6251 E. Pacific Coast Hwy., Long Beach, (562) 5964718; thegaslamprestaurant.com. WEYES BLOOD: 9 p.m., $12-$14. The Wayfarer, 843 W. 19th St., Costa Mesa, (949) 764-0039; wayfarercm.com.

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 22

Feb ruary 17-2 3 , 20 17

4:30 p.m., free. Concordia University, 1530 Concordia W., Irvine, (949) 854-8002. LIL MO & THE DYNAFLOS: 7 p.m., $15-$45. Don the Beachcomber, 16278 Pacific Coast Hwy., Huntington Beach, (562) 592-1321; donthebeachcomber.com. LONG BEACH PUNK FEST 2017: 7 p.m., $7. Regal Inn, 6763 Carson St., Lakewood, (562) 425-9038. MADISON GROVE: 9 p.m., free. The Marlin Bar and Grill, 5874 Edinger Ave., Huntington Beach, (714) 8611465; marlinbar.com. THE NIGHT IS BLACK: 9:30 p.m., $30. The Yost Theater, 307 N. Spurgeon St., Santa Ana, (888) 8629573; yosttheater.com. 6LACK: 11 p.m., $25. The Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; observatoryoc.com. SOULQUARIUS—AN R&B JAM: noon, $115. The Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; observatoryoc.com. STEVE MAGGIORA: 8 p.m., free. Casa Costa Mesa, 820 W. 19th St., Costa Mesa, (949) 877-4011; casacostamesa.com.

ALEJANDRO ESCOVEDO: 9 p.m. The Federal

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ANY PURCHASE OVER $25 *Present this ad for discount. Exp. 3/2/17 Not valid on sale items, previously purchased items or with any other discount or promotion. Not valid on Lelo or We-Vibe products. Only one coupon may be redeemed per person.

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SPECIALIZING IN ALL THINGS

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Pair of Aces I’ve been reading your advice column in the Coast in Halifax for a while, and it seems that most solutions to relationship problems revolve around sex. Everyone wants it or needs it, we should fuck before dinner, or we can spice up our sex life in this certain way to be happy. What about someone who doesn’t want to have sex, ever? I’ve asked other people for advice, and the answer is usually “Take one for the team,” have sex to keep them happy. Is that the only way I could find happiness in a relationship? It’s not something I want to do—but at this point, I don’t see any other options. All Alone Ace I’m a sex-advice columnist. Consequently, AAA, people tend to write me when sex (needing it, wanting it, getting it but not the kind you want, etc.) is the problem, and sex (in some new and improved form) is often, but not always, the solution. I also get and respond to questions from asexuals, and I’ve urged sexuals not to regard asexuals as defective—or, for that matter, to view committed-but-sexless relationships as defective. So long as both people in the relationship are content and happy, it’s a good and healthy and functional relationship, whether the sex is vanilla or spicy or nonexistent. Strictly companionate marriages can be good marriages. As for “taking one for the team,” that’s not advice given only to asexuals. A woman who’s married to a foot fetishist, for instance, may be advised to “take one for the team” and let her husband perv on her feet. A vanilla guy married to a woman corrupted by Fifty Shades of Grey (it’s baaaaaack) may be advised to “take one for the team” and tie the wife up once in a while. And while there are certainly lots of asexuals out there taking one for the team—having sex to please/keep/shut up their partners (or allowing their partners to seek sex elsewhere)— you know who doesn’t have to take one for the team, ever? Asexuals with other asexuals. Dating another asexual is the other option, the obvious option, and it may be the best option for you, AAA. (Don’t want to take one for the team, ever? Don’t draft anyone onto your team who wants one, ever.) A quick Google search brings up several asexual dating sites: Asexualitic.com, AsexualMatch. com, Ace-Book.net, AsexualPals.com. You can also choose to identify as asexual—and search for other asexuals—on mainstream dating sites such as OkCupid and Match. I can already hear you composing your response, AAA: Asexuals are just 1 percent of the population. There are 400,000 people in Halifax, which means there are 3,999 other asexuals. Sounds like a lot, but most will be too young, too old, or unappealing for political or personal reasons (loves Kevin O’Leary, hasn’t seen Moonlight, picks their nose with an oyster fork). And a significant chunk of that number may not be aware—yet—that they’re asexual. So realistically, AAA, your local dating pool is much smaller than 3,999. But! Good news! There are 7.5 billion people on the planet! And 75 million of them are asexual! I have a good friend with a unique array of kinks—a crazy, specific and rare constellation of kinks—and he cast a wide net on kink dating apps. After he met someone on the other side of the world with all the same kinks and they hit it off via Skype and the guy provided my friend with references (put my friend in touch with friends who could vouch for him), my friend flew to the other side of the world to go on a first date. Two months later, he went back, stayed for a few months, and then moved abroad to be with Mr. Kink Match On the Other Side of the World. My friend did things people are typically advised against—who gets on a 12-hour flight to go

SavageLove » dan savage

on a first date?—because he knew there weren’t many lids out there for his particular pot. Asexuality isn’t a kink, I realize, but you can and should cast a wide net, AAA, like my kinky expat friend. Don’t let geography limit you in your search. You may not be able to afford to do what my friend did—fly halfway around the world for a first date— but you can get your ass to the next province over if you hit it off with an asexual in New Brunswick or Quebec. Good luck. I’m a 22-year-old lesbian living in Utah. I’m finally going back to college this fall. I have autism (high functioning), and I couldn’t handle going to school full-time while working. Thus I will be stuck living at my parents’ house, as I couldn’t afford rent and living expenses on my own. The problem is, my parents are super-Republican and religious. While I live at home, I can’t date (they are against me being gay), I can’t drink, and I can’t watch movies with swears. They also force me to participate in daily scripture study, which I hate. I don’t know what to do. I can’t be myself or have any fun while I live at home because I’m afraid my parents will kick me out. But I can’t afford to move out, either. I’m shy and socially nervous, so I don’t have any friends who could help me out, and I can’t see living with roommates who are strangers. I’ll be 29 by the time I graduate, and I don’t want to live like this for that long. Any advice? Maybe I could work something out with my parents, but they are set in their ways and I don’t want to hurt them. Under Their Authoritarian Homophobia If they were just enforcing “their rules” about booze in their house, that would be one thing. But requiring your adult daughter not to date anyone or not to be a lesbian at all is just mean. (A lot of insane religious people believe homosexuality is an act, not an identity, so someone who isn’t currently having gay or lesbian sex isn’t actually gay or lesbian. By that standard, I haven’t been gay for hours.) And leveraging their daughter’s autism and social isolation and economic dependence against her in order to control her? Meaner still. You say you don’t want to hurt your parents— you’re a good daughter—but it’s clear your shitty parents don’t care if they hurt you. Typically, my advice would be to tell your mean and shitty parents what they want to hear—to feel free to lie to them under duress—and then lean on your friends, do your own thing outside of the house, and be careful to not get caught. But that’s not an option for you. So you’ll have to ask yourself what you value more: freedom now or getting your degree sooner rather than later. If it’s your freedom, move out, get a job, go to community college and take your time getting that degree. If it’s getting your degree before turning 30, knuckle under, spend a lot of late nights “studying in the library,” and go to the student resource center on your campus and ask if there are any campus services/support groups for students with autism or Asperger’s syndrome. Who knows? You might meet some people who you could see yourself living with as roommates and friends, and you might be able to get out of your parents’ house sooner rather than later. P.S. You’re in Utah—UTAH. If there’s an LGBT student group on your campus, go to the meetings and share your story. You might meet a gay Mormon boy with parents like yours—shitty and mean—who could use a fake girlfriend until he graduates, and you could use a fake boyfriend until you move out of mom and dad’s. On the Lovecast (savagelovecast.com): two tricky pregnancies. Contact Dan via email at mail@savagelove. net, and follow him on Twitter: @fakedansavage.


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TokeofTheWeek » mary carreon

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1 7- 23 , 2 0 17

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South Coast Safe Access: FTP: Buy an 1/8, Get a FREE 1/8 | 1900 Warner Ave Ste. A, Santa Ana 92705 | 949.474.7272 | MonSat 10am-8pm Sun 11am-7pm

Fe br ua r y

Software Engineer Jobsite Newport Beach, CA, apply to HR at Phunware, Inc., tnolazco@phunware. com.

Trimble Inc. has openings in Newport Beach, CA for: Software Engineer (6083.395) The Trimble Water professional svcs. and support team are resp. for the delivery and integration of the Trimble Water products and solutions portfolio to our customers. Travel req. less than 50% of work time. Graphic User Interface Designer (6083.664) Generate design concepts and expand them into a detailed design. Travel req. less than 50% of time. Send resume to TNLJobs_US@trimble.com. Ref. job code above when applying. EOE

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Gram Kings: DAILY DEALS | Discounts for Military, Veterans, Disabled | 10189 Westminster Ave. Suite #217, Garden Grove 714.209.8187 | Hours: Monday-Sunday 10am-10pm

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Market Research Analyst Analyze statistical data to forecast future market trends & FPD industry, gather info. re: company customers/competitors, analyze conditions that may impact sales by researching market conditions, changes in industry. Must be able to perform job duties. Bachelor's degree in Economics req'd. Resume: Signet FPD, Inc. 75 Columbia, Aliso Viejo CA 92656.

Education Reporter (Fullerton, CA) Collect & analyze educational facts about newsworthy events by interviewing educational figures, investigation, or observation of background info related to educational stories & functions. Report & write educational stories for TV; 1yr exp. & bachelor in education reqd., 40hrs/wk; Resume to CTS America, Inc. 1025 S. Placentia Ave., Fullerton, CA 92831

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2975 RedBANDILIER Hill Avenue, CIR, Suite FOUNTAIN 150 | Costa Mesa, CA 92626 | 714.550.5940 | free online ads & photos at oc.backpage.com 18475 VALLEY, CA 92708 | 714.550.5947 | OCWEEKLY.COM

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SAFE ACCESS DIRECTORY

41


1 ST LICENSED MEDICAL MARIJUANA DISPENSARY IN ORANGE COUNTY

SCSA

SOUTH COAST SAFE ACCESS

Largest Showroom & Biggest Selection in OC

FTP: Buy an 1/8, Get a FREE 1/8

Physician’s Recommendation Required for Treatment of: Anxiety | Chronic Pain | Diabetes | Insomnia | Arthritis | Glaucoma

25% VETERANS DISCOUNT 21 Years and Over 10% DISABILITY DISCOUNT All Products 10% SENIOR DISCOUNT Lab Tested

25% Veterans Discount

NEW

$35.00 1/8’s 10% Disability Discount CAP SHELF 10% Senior Discount see store for details

FTP 7 Gram 1/8th

HOURS: Monday-Saturday 10am-8pm • Sunday 11am-7pm *Physician's Recommendation Required for Treatment of: Anxiety | Chronic Pain | Diabetes | Insomnia | Arthritis | Glaucoma

1900 Warner Ave. Ste. A, Santa Ana 92705 (Conveniently Located Off the 55 Freeway) 949.474.7272 • Hours: Mon-Sat 10am-8pm Sun 11am-7pm


VOTED

Christopher Glew

BEST LAWYER

2016

Christopher Glew

DEFENSE ATTORNEY IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA Winning groundbreaking trials in the field of medical marijuana in the state of California. Called “The hottest criminal defense attorney in Orange County,” he has been recognized as one of the 2015 Top Lawyers in California by American Lawyer Media, and one of the Top 100 Criminal Trial Lawyers Southern California by the National Trial Lawyers Association.

Best Of winner • 2016 •

CANNABIS BUSINESS LICENSING CANNABIS REGULATORY PRACTICE CRIMINAL LAW All Drug Offenses, DUI, Felonies, Misdemeanors

LAW OFFICES OF GLEW & KIM MEMBERS: OC NORML

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February 16, 2017 – OC Weekly