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WOBBLIES MARCH ON SAN PEDRO ANEW | JACK GRISHAM RETURNS WITH NEW, SPOOKY ALBUM | WHERE TO EAT RAMEN IN LONG BEACH FEBRUARY 03-09, 2017 | VOLUME 22 | NUMBER 23

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Carl’s Jr. was great until Andrew Puzder arrived. Now, he’s Trump’s choice for Labor Secretary

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Working-Class Hero

Legendary labor singer/organizer Joe Hill gets immortalized in San Pedro By GaBriel San román

T

he suspense didn’t last long for about 100 union workers, folksingers and fellow travelers who gathered on a recent Saturday morning at Liberty Hill Plaza in San Pedro to celebrate a hero of America’s class wars. A green, crumpled tarp covered a shimmering bronze tribute to labor’s troubadour: Joe Hill, an Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) organizer and singer/poet who walked the city’s streets more than a century ago. After a lifting tribute to Hill by longshoreman laureate Jerry Brady, the tarp came down to unveil the 8-foot-wide, 3.5-foothigh plaque. Based on an original drawing by Suzanne Matsumiya, the graphic designer for the city’s Random Length News alt-weekly, it features Hill holding a guitar, with the logo of the “Wobblies,” as IWW members are popularly known, over his head as if a halo. His gaze is fixed on a sea of San Pedro workers confronted by policemen, their batons raised. On the other side of the plaque is an image of the old city jail filled with incarcerated workers. Completing the tribute are class-conscious couplets from Hill’s “Workers of the World, Awaken” anthem extolling their latent power, one that can bring a nation to a standstill if the labor force ever “take a notion.” Founded in 1905, IWW preached a gospel of anti-capitalism and anti-racism, proclaiming “the working class and employing class have nothing in common.” The group prescribed taking over factories and mills as a cure for workingclass ills. The Wobblies built a counterculture anchored in song to further the cause, with Hill serving as the movement’s most militant musician—and most prominent martyr. Born Joel Emmanuel Hägglund in Gävle, Sweden, Hill immigrated to the United States in 1902, then hoboed his way from New York to San Francisco before coming to the docks of San Pedro in 1910. By then, Hill was already a selftaught musician. “It was here in San Pedro that he joined the IWW,” said Frank Anderson, president emeritus of the San Pedro Bay Historical Society, at the dedication. “He sang songs and made them simple so the workers could learn them.” Hill lived on Beacon Street, across from the waterfront where he worked as a dock-walloper or longshoreman. He spent much of his free time writing tunes at the old Sailors’ Rest Mission down the street; there, Hill penned two of his classics, “The Preacher and the Slave” (which introduced the term “pie in the sky” to the American lexicon) and “Casey Jones the Union Scab.” He later helped to organize a

DON’T MOURN; ORGANIZE!

IRENE ARELLANO

strike in 1913 when San Pedro authorities jailed him for vagrancy. Nobody recalls whether Hill ever brought his organizing efforts to Orange County, but IWW members unsuccessfully tried to disrupt work on a natural-gas pipeline from Placentia to Brea in 1914. An airplane flew over Huntington Beach on May Day, 1923, and dropped cards issued by the San Pedro Wobblies that urged their oil-worker brothers to strike in solidarity. The Wobblies’ 280-member-strong Huntington Beach branch claimed 100 workers walked off the job accordingly. By that time, Hill had left San Pedro; he moved on after his 30-day stint in jail for the vagrancy charge. He first hoboed to Utah, finding work in a mine outside Salt Lake City in 1913. Authorities arrested Hill for the Jan. 10, 1914, murder of a grocery-store owner and his son. The trial and conviction launched an international campaign decrying it all as frame-up at the behest of the mining bosses in town, and even President Woodrow Wilson asked Hill be spared. But on Nov. 19, 1915, a firing squad ended Hill’s life. The Wobbly famously wrote to labor leader Big Bill Haywood days before his death, “Don’t

waste any time mourning. Organize!” Hill’s musical legacy was preserved in the IWW’s Little Red Songbook, and the late Swede became popularly known as “the man who never died” in plays and books. In 1936, an Alfred Hayes poem was set to music by Earl Robinson and titled “Joe Hill”; it reached its largest audience when Joan Baez sang it in her wondrous vibrato at Woodstock in 1969. And it was that ballad that local folk musicians crooned at the San Pedro memorial dedication. Arthur Almeida, a harbor historian and Wobbly who helped make the plaque happen, pulled an original copy of the Little Red Songbook from his wallet during the program, holding it high to applause. Back in the days of the California Criminal Syndicalism Act in 1919, just having the bound collection was grounds enough for arrest. Dr. Vivian Price, the labor studies chair holder at Cal State Dominguez Hills, offered a brief history on the labor movement in the Golden State, ending her speech by pressing the plaque’s timeliness. “Now we have an administration that’s trying to stop the right to organize,” she said. “We have to know the past. We have to celebrate our heroes, and then

find the heroes among us who are courageous and willing to speak up today.” The International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU) played a big role in honoring Hill, with donations for the memorial happily coming from its Pensioners Group. The ILWU was booted from the Congress of Industrial Organizations during the height of McCarthyism for being “too red”; it voluntarily left the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) in 2013 after blasting its moderation during President Barack Obama’s administration. “The democracy of the ILWU came from the Wobblies,” past ILWU Local 13 president David Arian said with pride. The union even adopted the IWW’s “An Injury to One is an Injury to All,” solidarity slogan. “This plaque now becomes part of that progressive history that we can remind America of over and over again. This is who we are; this is the real America, not Trump’s America.” GSANROMAN@OCWEEKLY.COM

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» gustavo arellano DEAR MEXICAN: I’m a wetback myself; actually, in the eyes of a gringo, we are all wetbacks. I’m sick and tired of the political caca about illegal immigration. The gringo government knows and very well understands the pluses and minuses of our vatos’ economic effect to the U.S. economy. The ones who don’t get it are the blind people who don’t like our drunk culos. It seems as if a lot of people email you about Mexicans “coming over here and ruining our system” or “putting a burden on our health care” and a whole host of other stuff like that. Then they follow up with some (pardon my language) stupid, dumb shit like “The wall will keep them out.” It seems to me that they really don’t understand the real problem—or solution—here. Peeved in Plano DEAR POCHO: Ya think? As I’ve been saying in this columna for more than a decade, the only thing that will stop Mexican immigration to this country is a fundamental economic change for both sides of la frontera: the end of the free economy in el Norte and the end of crony socialism in Mexico. Trump and his Trumpbros know this but don’t dare attack either system because they’re all in the same swamp—that’s why we’re now getting the wall, which will prove as effective in stopping Mexicans from coming over as tissue paper is in stopping the flow of the Rio Grande. But you know what? Let Trump build his wall. It’s going to fail and embarrass him. And even if it succeeds, it’ll create a revolution in Mexico, which means millions of refugees will easily tear down that wall and settle in Aztlán

once and for all. Be careful what you wish for, Trumpbros; it just might marry your daughter. DEAR MEXICAN: Quisiera saber si las Americas eran gluten-free before 1492. No soy un foodie, solo un campesino/cocinero curioso. Viva El Corn DEAR PAISA: You want to know whether the Americas were gluten-free before 1492, and the answer is ahuevo. Wheat came—along with beef, pork and pestilence—with the wasichus; before that, Mexicans mostly ate, fruit, vegetables and whatever game meat they caught, something that most gabachos and even Mexicans don’t realize as they scarf down a carnitas burrito washed down with Bohemia (what—you thought that lager was named after Cuauhtémoc’s son?). That’s why I’m all for gluten-free hipsters and Mexicans alike to go beyond what they consider “Mexican” food and embrace an all-raza diet of nopales, frijoles, squash, corn, purslane and so much more. And lest the primos think anyone who wants to forsake chicharrones and chorizo in favor of a vegetarian lifestyle is a Prius-driving chavala, get yourself a copy of Decolonize Your Diet: Plant-Based MexicanAmerican Recipes for Health and Healing. Written by professors Luz Calvo and Catrióna Rueda Esquibel after profe Calvo was diagnosed with breast cancer, it’s part cookbook, part history, and a magnificent toma, güey to any gabacho who thinks Mexican food’s default setting is Montezuma’s Revenge. ASK THE MEXICAN at themexican@askamexican.net, be his fan on Facebook, follow him on Twitter, or ask him a video question at youtube.com/askamexicano!

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ou were at the nail salon on New Year’s Eve getting your janky toes done. Everything that came out of your mouth was rude. “I don’t think you painted the toe next to my pinkie toe well. Can you redo it?” you asked with straight sass. The nail lady did as you asked, but then you asked her to redo it again because you didn’t like the way it looked. On top of that, when you went to pay, you were pissed at the amount they charged and made a huge scene. BOB AUL You threw your wallet on the ground like a 5-year-old and told the woman who did your toes that you couldn’t understand her because she spoke “bad English.” I honestly hope mushrooms and mold grow on your feet and people make you feel bad about it. You deserve it.

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Requiem Hap St FOR THE

Carl’s Jr. was great until Andrew Puzder arrived. Now, he’s Trump’s choice for Labor Secretary by GUSTAVO ARELLANO

M

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is a wrecker ready to march on Washington. The Carl’s of today is best known for tawdry commercials featuring D-listers or double-D-ers orgasmically swallowing engorged burgers. The attitude flows from the philosophy of current CEO Andrew Puzder, who told Entrepreneur in 2015, “I like our ads. I like beautiful women eating burgers in bikinis. I think it’s very American.” His CKE Restaurants (which owns Carl’s Jr., Hardee’s, Green Burrito and Red Burrito) has attracted multiple lawsuits, workplace-discrimination and sexual-harassment claims, and wage-theft investigations under his watch. Nevertheless, he’s Donald Trump’s choice to head the U.S. Department of Labor, and he’s scheduled to sit through Senate confirmation hearings on Feb. 7. Workers’ rights groups across the country have organized against Puzder’s nomination since it was announced in December. They paint the 66-year-old as emblematic of the problem-plagued fast-food industry, and they fear his profits-above-all philosophy will threaten American labor. “The Labor Secretary serves as the chief advocate and protector of our nation’s workforce,” National Employment Law Project executive director Christine Owens told the Los Angeles Times in December. “But based on Mr. Puzder’s own comments, it’s hard to think of anyone less suited for the job of lifting up America’s forgotten workers—as Trump had campaigned on—than Puzder.” Even more criminal is Puzder’s cheapening of Carl’s Jr., memorably mocked in 2006’s prophetic film Idiocracy in which a future kiosk advertised “EXTRA BIG ASS FRIES” before it called soldiers to arrest a desperate mother who couldn’t afford them. (Years later, Puzder would tell Business Insider he was interested in automated tellers because “They’re always polite, they always upsell, they never take a vacation, they never show up late, there’s never a slip-and-fall, or an age-, sex- or race-discrimination case.”) How do I know Carl’s Jr. was once great? We in Orange County remember when the chain meant quality because it was a reflection of Karcher, who cared mightily about us. Then Puzder came along and remade Carl’s into his own. The move paid off handsomely for CKE’s owners: What was once a regional chain with 648 locations in 1993, when Karcher lost control and Puzder made moves that eventually brought him to power, is now a worldwide phenomenon boasting 3,750 branches, with more than 100,000 employees and more than $4.3 billion in revenue. But Carl’s Jr.’s lost its soul in the process. And it still breaks my hangry heart.

| |

arcel Proust had his madeleine, the simple French sponge cake that famously unlocked a torrent of childhood memories in his Remembrance of Things Past after the Narrator dunked one in tea and took a sip. My yummy time machine was the Junior Cheeseburger from Carl’s Jr. I hadn’t tried one in years when I recently ordered it at the fast-food giant’s location on Harbor Boulevard and Broadway in Anaheim. It’s a glorified junior-high cafeteria burger, really: a thin patty, two pickles (if you’re lucky), a floppy slice of American cheese, mustard, ketchup and buns so threadbare that I left a thumb imprint after unwrapping it. But the combo of tart condiments, charbroiled beef, rubbery cheese and the pickle’s slight snap triggered anecdote after anecdote, all centered on this Carl’s and this exact meal. With the first bite, I’m suddenly 4 again, waiting in line with my parents and 1-yearold sister as we prepare to dine for the first time at an American restaurant. I become 8 in the second chomp, playing hooky with my cousins from a summer camp across the street at the Anaheim Central Library. I’m then a teenager, throwing fries at my pals from Anaheim High School over the tall dining booths and getting scolded by the store manager. In my mid-20s, I buy three to go for old time’s sake before heading down to City Hall—and now, the Junior Cheeseburger is done in four bites. It was everything I remembered—small and not much, but joyous and just perfect. But as I took the last nibble, the present returned. A radical revamp had turned the Carl’s of my youth into a Ruby’s ripoff. Photos from the company’s past decorated the restaurant, along with tiled floors and brushed-steel accents to create a sense of nostalgia. Instead of smiling teens, though, harried-looking Latino immigrants manned the front counter. And the marquee behind them, bright with photos of gargantuan burgers I had never tasted—the 1/2 Pound Original Six Dollar Thickburger®, the Single All Natural Burger, the Big Carl™—crowded out longtime Carl’s classics such as the Western Bacon Cheeseburger, the Famous Star . . . and my Junior Cheeseburger, which didn’t merit a mention on the menu anymore. Next to the counter hung a plaque commemorating Carl’s Jr.’s founders, Carl and Margaret Karcher. It hangs in each restaurant, telling curious customers how this multinational started with just a hot-dog cart in Los Angeles bought with $311 borrowed against a Plymouth Super Deluxe. “The American Dream is alive and well in this country of ours,” reads a quote by Carl at the bottom. “I know. I lived it.” Wholesome, fuddy-duddy and eternally sunny—that was Carl’s Jr. because that was Karcher, a burly, gravel-voiced man who relished being the hometown hero gone big and whose impish grin became immortalized thanks to the company’s Happy Star logo. But that corporate spirit, much like the Carl’s of my youth, is long gone—and in its place

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 10

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CYNTHIA REBOLLEDO

Requiem for the Happy Star » FROM PAGE 9

T

he Carl’s in Fountain Valley off Harbor Boulevard and Edinger Avenue is busy for lunch. The line goes fast, though, and I’m next in less than a minute. Before me is a prominent photo for a California Classic Double Cheeseburger. Two beef patties, cheese, grilled onions, Thousand Island dressing, lettuce and tomato—sounds like a Double Double to me. I’m trying to like Carl’s again for this story, so I order it. No, I don’t want a combo, I tell the cashier. No, I don’t want the Budweiser Beer Cheese Bacon Fries. I just want the California Classic. The waitress delivers it to my table within minutes—far faster than In-N-Out. Promising. But its execution is all wrong. There’s too much dressing, which is too chalky, and the Thousand Island flavor drowns out the grilled onions. The lettuce and tomato are soft instead of crispy; the bun rips apart too easily. I make it halfway through the Classic before giving up. This

10 10

burger isn’t bad, but it’s unoriginal and a mockery of the Happy Star way. Eric Schlosser began his seminal 2001 book, Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal, with the story of Carl’s Jr., describing it as a “fast-food parable about how the industry started and where it can lead.” Carl Karcher’s saga was truly the American dream: son of a sharecropper, grandson of German immigrants, eighth-grade dropout, an Ohio farmboy who went West in 1937 as a 20-year-old to work at his uncle’s feed store in then-rural Anaheim. In 1945, he started his first restaurant, Carl’s Drive-in Barbecue, after running successful hotdog stands in South Central Los Angeles. He opened it off what’s now Harbor Boulevard and La Palma Parkway, on land across the street from the orange groves of his wife’s family. Eleven years later, the first Carl’s Jr. popped up off Lincoln Boulevard, on land now part of St. Boniface Church, the Karchers’ home parish where Carl and Margaret attended morning Mass daily for decades. Through innovations (America’s first CALIFORNIA CLASSIC DOUBLE CHEESEBURGER: MEH

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CYNTHIA REBOLLEDO

salad bar and fill-yourself soda fountain, among others) and simple, flame-licked burgers, Karcher’s empire grew into one of the largest privately owned restaurant chains in the United States. His personal fortune topped $100 million, but Karcher never lost his humility: a large statue of St. Francis Assisi stood in the lobby at CKE’s corporate headquarters, and Karcher began all board meetings with a prayer. Schlosser did a great job of telling this tale, as well as the troubles that eventually befell Karcher. The only thing the author missed was contextualizing how the mogul loomed over Anaheim life for decades. He was one of us, one of the most approachable multimillionaires in Orange County history. Although he had homes on the coast, the Karcher compound was in the middle of residential Anaheim, a 6,500-square-foot house just a 15-minute walk from corporate headquarters. Kids from across the city descended on the Karcher home every Halloween, knowing they’d either get a full-sized candy bar or a Carl’s Jr. gift certificate—or both. If you couldn’t go that night, you knew that the reward for good grades at Anaheim elementary schools from the 1970s through the 1990s was a Happy Star meal certificate signed by Karcher himself. And if you worked up the nerve to approach him whenever he was around town, he’d give you a coupon for a free hamburger. Yes, it was genius—maybe even cynical— marketing, but Karcher also had a sense of noblesse oblige: money was important, but community mattered, especially in a working-class town such as Anaheim. Carl’s ranked just below Disneyland and the Angels as city institutions residents were not only proud of, but also patronized. How could you not? Its offerings were cheap but delicious. Dozens of my friends or their older siblings got their first job at Carl’s Jr., serving friends and family and regulars who knew them by name. Carl’s son Jerome became a well-known priest and is currently pastor at St. Vincent de Paul Church in Huntington Beach.

Carl even partnered with a developer on a $29 million residential project called Park Vista to remodel 394 apartment units in the notorious Chevy Chase barrio, leaving aside nearly 100 units for affordable housing. “It’s great, isn’t it?” he asked the Orange County Register on the day of his development’s debut. “As I was saying this morning, what’s made me so happy in my 47 years of business is to help people.” Just a couple of weeks later, my family moved into a house just down the street from Park Vista. No one in the city ever gave much thought to Karcher’s darker side: the CEO who was fined hundreds of thousands of dollars by the SEC for insider trading in the late 1980s; the Lincoln Club cofounder who once told the Los Angeles Times he thought some of Joseph McCarthy’s “points were valid” and that Richard Nixon got a “bum rap”; the fool who not only gave money to support the anti-gay 1978 Briggs Initiative, but who also played the role of ignoramus for decades afterward about it—he once told the Orange County Register that the Briggs Initiative was meant to prohibit teachers from “indoctrinat[ing] your child into becoming a homosexual” and therefore not “about being anti-gay.” He chaired the re-election committee of John Schmitz, the notorious congressman so crazy-conservative that Nixon—Karcher’s good friend—worked to successfully defeat him. None of that mattered, even as students tried to get Carl’s Jr. kicked out of Southern California colleges because of Karcher’s arch-conservative politics, and pro-choice and LGBT activists staged boycotts outside various locations in OC during the late 1980s and early 1990s. Karcher was our guy; Carl’s was our company. To paraphrase the U.S. government’s apocryphal assertion about Nicaraguan dictator Anastasio Somoza, Karcher might’ve been a conservative loon, but he was our conservative loon. But his star lost its shine in 1993, when CKE’s board of directors ousted the then-


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he Western Bacon Cheeseburger is a Puzder favorite, and it’s what I choose to give Carl’s one more shot. I’m in the drive-thru lane at the outpost on Harbor and Carl Karcher Way. It’s down the street from where I grew up, and my family would eat here at least twice a week. This one stands in the shadow of CKE’s former headquarters, which now houses a diploma mill. The community room at this Carl’s is gone, replaced with more seats for customers. Homeless people wander around the parking lot. I place my order (no, I don’t want a combo or the Classic, but I will take some CrissCut Fries), and I’m told to pay at the second window because there’s no one to man the first. The transaction takes seconds—I pay, they hand over a bag with the burger and fries, and I park to eat. The Western Bacon Cheeseburger looks as big and saucy as I remember it, and the onion rings and bacon strips hang off the patty as they should. The CrissCut Fries smell of crunchy, greasy bliss. But something terrible happens as I munch on the burger: It’s bitter. They messed up the

sauce, the last link to Karcher’s original restaurant. Maybe the CrissCut Fries are better—nope. Acrid. Disgusting. I give up. I stopped eating regularly at Carl’s in the late 1990s, after a vomiting episode at the one off Adams Avenue and Harbor Boulevard near Orange Coast College. Over the years, my friends who grew up in Anaheim did the same, all repeating the same refrain: Carl’s now sucks. As it went national, then worldwide, we loyal fans were left with crap. The devolution of Carl’s Jr. happened under Puzder, whom Trump said “has created and boosted the careers of thousands of Americans” in a press release heralding his nomination to lead the Department of Labor. “Andy will fight to make American workers safer and more prosperous by enforcing fair occupational safety standards and ensuring workers receive the benefits they deserve, and he will save small businesses from the crushing burdens of unnecessary regulations that are stunting job growth and suppressing wages.” The same press release quoted Puzder: “I look forward to the opportunity to help President-elect Trump restore America’s global economic leadership. . . . The right government policies can result in more jobs and better wages for the American worker.” He and his wife contributed $626,300 to various candidates and causes during the 2016 presidential cycle, including $75,000 to the Trump Victory PAC, which a policy paper against his nomination described as “by far the largest direct contribution to Trump’s campaign of any fast-food CEO.” Puzder is the wayward son Karcher never had. A fellow blue-collar Ohio native and devout Catholic, he helped to author a Missouri bill that declared life began at conception. That law was upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1989, thereby allowing states to further restrict abortion rights, and put Puzder on the national conservative map. By then, he was already helping Karcher. In 1986, Puzder’s law firm assigned him to help Karcher fight off an investor’s lawsuit filed in Kansas City. He received the case on the day of his second

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76-year-old as chairman after years of declining sales, bad business decisions and mounting debt that broke out into the public. The move made international headlines and embarrassed Karcher—and us. “I feel I’ve been stripped of my office by a bunch of turncoats,” he announced in a press statement. He was soon reinstated as chairman emeritus, but that meant he was essentially a prop of goodwill, much like the Angels used Gene Autry in his waning days. When Schlosser interviewed him around 1999, he had just lost $100 million in CKE stock after holding on to it for too long and owed friends $8 million in loans. Nevertheless, Karcher remained positive and knew he had created something worth taking pride in. “Life is beautiful, life is fantastic, and that is how I feel about every day of my life,” he told Schlosser, who described him as looking “like a stylish figure from the big-band era.” “I believe in progress,” Karcher told Schlosser. But Puzder was ready to progress Carl’s in a different direction.

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wedding and met with Karcher before going on his honeymoon. “We just hit it off right from the beginning,” Puzder told an interviewer for a 2009 oral history on file at Cal State Fullerton’s Center for Oral and Public History (COPH). Puzder became Karcher’s personal attorney in 1990, moving to Orange County at Karcher’s request to help him in the looming struggle for CKE. He helped Karcher return to the board in 1993 by helping another of his clients, Fidelity National Financial CEO William Foley, become CKE’s majority shareholder. The move led to Puzder becoming the company’s general counsel—but he didn’t take all the credit. “God had an eye on Carl Karcher,” Puzder told COPH interviewer Allison Varzally. “That was kind of a big help as we went through the process.” Karcher had previously tried and failed to open new restaurant concepts and grow Carl’s in states outside the American Southwest. But CKE spread rapidly with Puzder on board, acquiring Green Burrito, La Salsa and the Southern chain Hardee’s. With Karcher’s mentorship and Puzder’s own aggressive style (two weeks after becoming the Hardee’s CEO in 1997, he flew to the company’s North Carolina headquarters and began, as a 2009 Franchise Times profile put it, “firing people”), he became CKE’s CEO in 2000. All along, Puzder and Karcher grew closer. “We were best friends. [My family was] treated like part of the family,” Puzder told Varzally. He began attending morning Mass with Karcher, who initiated him into the Knights of Malta. But as CKE expanded and Puzder ascended, Carl’s lost its special relationship with Anaheim and Orange County. The company moved its headquarters to Carpinteria in 2000; Puzder, who never bothered to ingratiate himself with Anaheim residents à la Karcher, decamped to the ultra-exclusive community of Montecito. The new CEO launched the chain’s sex-fueled commercials, perhaps the most direct repudiation of the old ways. Karcher had starred in many of the Carl’s television ads during the 1980s and 1990s, most mem-

orably in a series of watercolor animated spots with him and an anthropomorphic, arrogant Happy Star plugging a series of new hamburgers, none of which exist today. “As cute as they were, it was not effective,’” Puzder’s then-marketing manager told the Register in 2003, as Carl’s shrugged off a flurry of complaints about the clip that started the T&A trend: a blonde straddling a mechanical burger while eating a Western Bacon Six Dollar Burger, with Foghat’s “Slow Ride” as the soundtrack. “You have to be attentiongetting. It’s a very competitive business.” Karcher didn’t like the racy ads, but it didn’t matter—Puzder saved CKE, and profits made Karcher rich again. As Puzder consolidated control, however, Carl’s became something it never used to be: a bad place to work. CKE Restaurants settled three class-action lawsuits in 2004 for $9 million, related to the improper classification of employees as exempt under California’s wage and hour laws—and that was just the beginning. A multipart investigation released this month by the nonprofit news agency Capital & Main found Carl’s and Hardee’s had more federal employment-discrimination lawsuits against it than any American hamburger chain, stating that the claims “read like stories from the 1940s or ’50s, before civil rights laws were ever enacted.” They found a dozen wrongfultermination suits filed by former Carl’s managers in California alleging age and sex discrimination or retaliation for medical leave or whistleblowing. The Restaurant Opportunities Centers United, a nonprofit representing restaurant workers, anonymously surveyed 564 Carl’s and Hardee’s workers and declared “sexual harassment is uniquely pervasive at CKE Restaurants” in the fast-food world, disclosing that its analysis found the chain has 1.5 times the rate of sexual harassment of its competitors. Bloomberg BNA revealed in September that nearly 60 percent of Department of Labor investigations of CKE locations under the Federal Labor Standards Act showed at least one violation. A study released earlier this month by the National Employment Law Project estimated that CKE’s employees use about $247 million in food stamps, health programs and other


ment to Karcher’s legacy. “When Carl Karcher was alive and in charge, we felt like someone in the company at least cared about the workers,” she said. “Since Mr. Karcher passed away [in 2008], CKE has tightened its budgets in a way that makes it impossible to do the job without working off the clock. Worse, the company just seemed not to care about the employees anymore. I think Carl Karcher would be ashamed of what CKE has done to its employees.”

CARL KARCHER: FOUNDING STAR

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here’s one other Carl’s item I like: the Steak & Egg Burrito. Twothirds of a pound of scrambled eggs, steak, CKE RESTAURANTS, INC. three cheeses and pico de gallo for breakfast, it’s surprisingly moist and filling. “When Puzder took it over, he But there’s no reason to visit Carl’s Jr. brought a much tougher and more ruthagain. Puzder is taking CKE’s corporate less spirit to CKE,” wrote Schlosser via offices to Nashville, laying off 51 workers email. Despite his epic takedown of the in the process. He won’t miss California, fast-food industry, Schlosser neverthewhich he derided as a “socialist state” in less appreciated Karcher and Carl’s Jr., his Cal State Fullerton oral history. He describing him as “a lovely man with an wrecked Carl’s, my boyhood delight, so eighth-grade education who built a fastwhy support his company? food empire from scratch. I had great

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respect for him, his patriotism and his optimism about America.” Puzder, on the other hand, represents “one more sign of the Trump administration’s contempt for workers” for Schlosser. “For many years, the fast-food industry has led the opposition to increasing the minimum wage, keeping their workforce in poverty,” he wrote. “Appointing Puzder—a strong critic of workers’ rights and the minimum wage—to head the Department of Labor is a disgrace.” At the end of his oral history, Puzder bizarrely brought up the fact that no country with a Carl’s Jr. had ever attacked the United States. “I think the idea of getting the American image out there and letting people know that, you know, America’s a great place. And—uh, it can be a lot of fun,” he said. “One burger at a time.” Thickburger® diplomacy—he’ll do great in Trump’s White House. But Puzder can never take away my Junior Cheeseburger, so I return to Proust’s madeleine as consolation for the Carl’s Jr. I— and so many in Orange County—lost. “But when from a long-distant past nothing subsists, after the people are dead, after the things are broken and scattered,” Proust wrote, “still, alone, more fragile, but with more vitality, more unsubstantial, more persistent, more faithful, the smell and taste of things remain poised a long time, like souls, ready to remind us, waiting and hoping for their moment, amid the ruins of all the rest.” GARELLANO@OCWEEKLY.COM

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safety-net programs “to offset poverty wages and keep its low-wage front-line workers and their families from economic disaster.” And 33 complaints alleging all sorts of mistreatment were filed just last week against CKE franchisees with state departments of labor, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and the National Labor Relations Board; a Puzder spokesperson dismissed them all to Nation’s Restaurant News as “fake outrage from the unions and special interests which will stop at nothing in order to push their own self-serving agenda.” Puzder isn’t fazed by legal claims. “Lawyers support state politicians out of profits from class-action lawsuits,” he told a Chapman University School of Law audience during a 2014 speech. “And once they’re elected, [they] lobby those politicians to pass more restrictive laws that they can use in their next raid on the California business community.” Nor does he have much regard for employees. He described CKE’s general managers to Varzally as “not people with, uh, you know degrees from Wharton [School of Business]. . . . These are people that you’re lucky they’ve got high school educations, although I think most of them do.” One of those general managers is Laura McDonald, who headed a Tucson Carl’s for more than 20 years. She’s now part of a classaction lawsuit alleging unpaid overtime. At a recent forum moderated by Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-Massachusetts), McDonald called Puzder an embarras-

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fri/02/03 [FILM]

Long Live Meryl! Death Becomes Her

Throughout her illustrious career, Meryl Streep has been known as an actresses’ actress. In perhaps her most meta film, Death Becomes Her, Streep goes against type to play an actress obsessed with aging. She and co-star Goldie Hawn battle for the affections of Bruce Willis and the eternal fountain of youth in this black comedy. Now a cult hit, the movie remains one of the unsung chapters of Streep’s filmography. Between her and Hawn’s antics, along with several plot twists so ridiculous it’s campy, the almost-25year-old film remains a rip-roarin’ good time that still mocks those staples of pop culture: celebrity and its obsession with youthful appearances. Death Becomes Her at the Frida Cinema, 305 E. Fourth St., Santa Ana, (714) 285-9422; thefridacinema.org. 11 p.m. $8-$10. —DANIEL KOHN [CONCERT]

We Still Have Faith . . . Shattered Faith

You won’t find too many OC punk bands more O.G. than Shattered Faith. As one of the pioneering groups to emerge from the local scene back in the late 1970s, this Fountain Valley-based band created noise steeped in artistry and abandon, with a touch of gloomy melodic riffs that made them stand out among the other noted bands at the time. Thirty-five years later, they’ve put the pieces back together and recorded new material and are resuming their wrecking spree of the local scene at Diego’s in Santa Ana. Shattered Faith with Just Because, Unit F and the Thingz at Diego’s Rock-N’-Roll Bar & Eats, 220 E. Third St., Santa Ana, (855) 946-3472; www. diegosbarsa.com. 9 p.m. $8. 21+. —NATE JACKSON

sat/02/04 [ART]

Stay Gritty

Gritty Arts Shindig

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[FILM]

THE LANGE AND SHORT OF IT Dorothea Lange: A Visual Life

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“The good photograph is not the object.The consequences of the photograph are the object.” If legendary photographer Dorothea Lange sounds a bit like Gertrude Stein here, it’s because her social-justice and artistic philosophies and practices blend so obviously in her famous Depression-era, black-and-white work, including the iconic portrait of a migrant farmworker mother worrying on behalf of an entire nation. She later covered the internment of Japanese Americans at Manzanar and contributed to the landmark exhibition and book The Family of Man. Lange is the subject of a talk after a screening of Dorothea Lange: A Visual Life, documentarian Meg Partridge’s 1994 film and companion to her sister Elizabeth Partridge’s biography. Both women knew and esteemed Lange, her enduring work a big part of the canon. Dorothea Lange: A Visual Life at Bowers Museum, 2002 N. Main St., Santa Ana, (714) 567-3600; www.bowers.org. 1:30 p.m. $9-$12. —ANDREW TONKOVICH

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If you’re looking to spend your Saturday evening embracing skate and surf culture while also supporting a good cause, then you should be at the Gritty Arts Shindig at San Clemente’s Hobie Surf Shop. The official release party for veteran surfand-skate artist Steven Lombardi’s collaboration with local sock powerhouse Stance offers live music from bands including the Bent Duo Band, candy, soda and all the lowbrow art you can handle—as well as a chance to support the San Clemente Skatepark Coalition in building parks throughout South County. Plus, there will be giveaways from Lombardi’s Gritty Arts. It’s sure to be fun for the whole family. Gritty Arts Shindig at Hobie Surf Shop, 167 Avenida Del Mar, San Clemente, (949) 542-3355; www. facebook.com/grittyart. 5 p.m. Free. —JOSH CHESLER

sat/02/04

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sun/02/05 [THEATER]

Humor In a Digital Vein Claudio Quest

Pop-cultural references, 8-bit video-game quirks, superheroes, super-princesses, killer eggplants and more—you’d think this was a storyline in Brian O’Malley’s brilliant Scott Pilgrim comic series, but you’d be wrong! In musical comedy Claudio Quest, Drew Fornarola and Marshall Pailet bring all these factors together for a hilarious and exciting

production. Directed here by Pailet, title character Claudio, younger brother Luis and Princess Fish are out to save Princess Poinsettia from the evil Bruiser, the malevolent platypus holding her captive. Arrive early for today’s Sunday Salon edition, during which audiences can go behind the scenes with the creative team before the show. Claudio Quest at Chance Theater, 5522 La Palma Ave., Anaheim, (888) 455-4212; chancetheater.com. Sunday Salon, 2:15 p.m.; show, 3 p.m. Through Feb. 26. $41-$45. —AIMEE MURILLO

[ART]

Fresh Ink

‘Pages of Memories’ Since 2008, the Mukrim Brush Painting Club has taught and inspired artists of varying skill levels the art and patience of Asian brush painting. Students learn traditional concepts and techniques and apply them to their own styles and have gone on to be successful artists in their own right. “Pages of Memories” is the club’s fourth mem-

bership exhibition and includes work by current members, as well as “The Rose of Sharon,” made by all 32 artists and depicting the national flower of South Korea. This centerpiece encapsulates the biggest lesson of all: that art can be a unifying force creating bonds of friendship for years to come. “Pages of Memories” at Muzeo’s Carnegie Gallery, 241 S. Anaheim Blvd., Anaheim, (714) 956-8936; muzeo.org. 10 a.m. Through Feb. 19. Free. —AIMEE MURILLO

mon/02/06 [SCIENCE]

Chug n’ Learn

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Now, perhaps more than ever, it’s important to support scientific research and heed the warning signs and findings about the environment from some of the top scientific minds. For Provisions Market’s ongoing Science On Tap series, Chapman University professor Jennifer Funk leads a discussion titled “Why We Should Conserve California’s Ecosystems.” Refreshing IPAs and snacks are available for purchase. Drink up as you feel more empowered and enlightened about the future of our home state’s condition. Science On Tap presents: Conserving California’s Ecosystems at Provisions Market, 143 N. Glassell St., Orange, (714) 997-2337; events.chapman.edu. 6 p.m. Free. —AIMEE MURILLO

tue/02/07 [LECTURES]

Happy Love Day!

Origins of Valentines Day Long before Valentine’s Day was a consumer bonanza—kicking the already-bleeding broken hearts, and allowing dumpsterfire couples to fake it big in public—it was one of those old pagan events celebrating getting knocked-up by sacrificing goats and slapping women with bloodied goat hides to help them with getting knocked-up. But, there’s oh, so much more, and you can hear it all at Ipso Facto’s free lecture. In fact, why not dress up as your favorite pagan god or goddess? Eros, Venus, Cupid, or even the she-wolf who cared for Rome’s founders, Romulus and Remus, are all sure to be hits. Then head over to See’s because you’re still on the hook for a $30 box of chocolates. Origins of Valentines Day at Ipso Facto, 517 N. Harbor Blvd., Fullerton, (714) 5257865; www.ipso-facto.com. 8 p.m. Free. —SR DAVIES

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[FILM]

Future worlds

Ghost In the Shell Besides Akira and Neon Genesis Evangelion, one of the most popular and iconic dystopian science-fiction anime films ever made is Ghost In the Shell. While a live-action remake is slated for release this April, Mamoru Oshii’s 1995 film screens in a dubbed version tonight at the Frida Cinema. Based on the popular manga series by Masamune Shirow, this film follows cyborg federal agent Major Motoko Kusanagi and her partner Batou to find the evil Puppet Master, a hacker who can “ghost hack” and morph the identities of other people. Watch this classic, darkly atmospheric tale grace the big screen once more. Ghost In the Shell at the Frida Cinema, 305 E. Fourth St., Santa Ana, (714) 285-9422; thefridacinema.org. 7:30 p.m. $8-$10. —AIMEE MURILLO

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[CONCERT]

GrowlinG Guitars

the Molochs

The Molochs came out of Long Beach a few years back with Forgetter Blues, an LP of lean-and-mean Modern Lovers subway guitar and flattened-affect Lou Reed vocals—the good stuff, and that was just the start. Now their new America’s Velvet Glory album (recorded at Crystal Antlers’ front man Jonny Bell’s Jazz Cats Studio and released by local powerhouse indie Innovative Leisure, with a title that seems lifted from an Ed Sanders poem) is out, and it’s a burner, matching acid Dylan wit to acid Syd Barrett style and the kind of back-to-basics ’66 rock that just refuses to die, thanks to resurrectors such as Lenny Kaye, Jonathan Richman and Nikki Sudden. It’s not simple; it’s fundamental— an important difference. The Molochs with the Relationship and Deep Fields at Constellation Room, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 9570600; www.observatoryoc.com. 9 p.m. $10. —CHRIS ZIEGLER [ART]

Jailhouse Art Just You ’n’ theM

Chicago

—AMANDA PARSONS

With its simple yet effective title, you think you know what you’re in for when you visit Orange County Center for Contemporary Art’s latest exhibition. For “Incarceration,” curators Gregg Stone, Pat Sparkuhl and Leslie Davis recruited more than 50 artists to present work studying the brutal socioeconomic effects of the U.S. justice system on its imprisoned, their communities and the country itself. Participating artists include Stone, Davis, Hiroko, Gabriel Sosa and Molly Crabapple—an internationally known illustrator with a hefty portfolio of reportage work from the Syrian war, Lebanon, Abu Dhabi and Guantanamo Bay. Consider this a creative gateway to a riveting and underscrutinized topic. “Incarceration” at Orange County Center for Contemporary Art, 117 N. Sycamore St., Santa Ana, (714) 667-1517; occca.org. Noon. Through March 11. Free. —AIMEE MURILLO

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While the 1970s rock & roll band with a standard horn section Chicago may hail from the Windy City, they’ll be blowing minds in Long Beach when they perform at theTerraceTheater downtown. With 47 gold and platinum records and dozens of charting songs, your dad’s favorite band has transcended time, creating hit after hit over their 50-year career.The band members may have changed throughout the years, but the hits have stayed the same: constant, steady, and classic rock & roll for the ages. Get ready to relive some of your favorite memories growing up alongside this dynamic and prolific team of musicians. Chicago atTerraceTheater, 300 E. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach, (562) 436-3661; www.longbeachcc.com. 8 p.m. $51-$86.

‘Incarceration’

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Costa Mesa THE HUB KITCHEN & TAPS

JEANIE’S DIRTY MARTINI 714.826.0570 4360 Lincoln Ave., Cypress Big game party! Annual chili cook-off & pot luck! 1st, 2nd & 3rd place prizes for best chili & giveaways! $2.50 Pints and Other Drink Specials – 9 Big Screen TV’s!

Huntington Beach BAJA SHARKEEZ 714.960.5282 Sharkeez.net/Huntingtonbeach 211 Main St., Huntington Beach Over 50 HD TV’s & Crystal Clear Surround Sound 22oz Drafts - $5, 220z Double Shot Cocktails -$7.25 Hail Mary Happy Hour Menu, Super Raffle and More!

714.374.8226 Fredsmexicancafe.com 300 Pacific Coast Hwy. #201, Huntington Beach Super Bowl Fiesta! Fred’s is taking reservations for the big game!

SURF DOGS SPORTS GRILL 714.840.5700 5932 Warner Ave., Huntington Beach Make us your NFL Home! Sunday – Monday – Thursday

THE BUNGALOW Thebungalow.com 21058 Pacific Coast Hwy., Huntington Beach (Located in Pacific City) The game will be shown in all of our rooms w/ surround sound & additional 6 big screens on the patio overlooking PCH. Food by Bear Flag Fish Co. 7 for 7 Touch Down Drink Special - $7 Rub and Rye (Rye Whiskey, Budweiser, maple syrup, BBQ bitters and Beef Jerky!)

WINGS ‘N THINGS GRILL 714.375.0022 18302 Beach Blvd., Huntington Beach Place your wing order early for the big game! Over 32,000 wings sold last year on game day!

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Long Beach MALARKEY’S LONG BEACH 562.598.9431 168 N. Marina Dr., Long Beach Join us for football & grub! Happy Hour 6 Days a Week 4pm8pm

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562.437.3734 Shenaniganslb.com 423 Shoreline Village Dr., Long Beach Watch the Big Game with us on 14 screens! Giveaways, Raffle Prizes, Bud Girls, Food & Drink Specials and More!

949.673.2747 Crowburgerkitchen.com 3107 Newport Blvd., Newport Beach TV’s with full sound, extensive beer and wine list Restaurant Week Special: Burger, Side and a Soda or Beer for $15

MALARKY’S IRISH PUB 949.675.2340 Malarkysirishpub.com 3011 Newport Blvd., Newport Beach $0.49 Wings during the big game!

Orange TILTED KILT 714.633.5458 Tiltedkilt.com 1625 W Katella Ave., Orange With every purchase of alcoholic beverage, you will be entered to win an electric guitar, t-shirts and more!

Santa Ana MISSION BAR

657.266.0699 302 N. Main St., Santa Ana Offering Happy Hour All Day! $4 Beer & Wine - Enjoy game in full surround sound!

Newport Beach Tustin BAJA SHARKEEZ 949.673.0292 Sharkeez.net/Newport-beach 114 McFadden Pl., Newport Beach Over 50 HD TV’s & Crystal Clear Surround Sound 22oz Drafts - $5, 220z Double Shot Cocktails -$7.25 Hail Mary Happy Hour Menu, Super

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MAKE YOUR OWN WAFFLE

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Noodlin’ After Midnight NGUYEN’S KITCHEN 445 S. Main St., Ste. B, Orange, (714) 7715410; www.nguyenskitchen.com.

I

Gold Standard

BRIAN FEINZIMER

Bluegold in Huntington Beach is big, bold and ambitious—but still a bit uneven By Edwin GoEi

B

despite resembling a soggy mess of bones and connective tissue, were actually welldone and smothered in a gravy not unlike authentic vindaloo. I would gladly pay $21 again for that dish, but I don’t think I’d commit another $18 for the Maine lobster and corn chowder. The chowder came in a bowl large enough for three, and for every third spoonful I slurped, I found a tiny morsel of lobster—but it’s still $18 for soup. The most impressive thing I’ve eaten at Bluegold so far was the platter of smoked, canned and cured seafood. Found in the charcuterie section, it included mussels and scallops swimming in silky oil, smoked salmon, and a fricassee of octopus and potatoes. At first, my only complaint was that there wasn’t enough bread and crackers to answer it all. But a few days later, I found out that when a friend ordered the same dish, his had an extra plate of baby eels I never got. Now that I think about it, shortly after we were served the seafood platter, a Brussels sprouts side dish we never asked for arrived with no explanation other than it was “compliments of the chef.” Was it supposed to compensate for the missing charcuterie dish? Or was it to apologize for the cramped seating arrangements? I still don’t know. Whatever it was, I’m guessing something must have been communicated but got drowned out by the cacophony. After all, it’s just as noisy in there for them as it was for us. BLUEGOLD 21016 Pacific Coast Hwy., Ste. D200, Huntington Beach, (714) 374-0038; dinebluegold.com. Open daily, 9 a.m.-10 p.m. Dinner for two, $50-$100, food only. Full bar.

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minded and scattershot. Three different people asked if I wanted my leftovers boxed. I said yes to all of them, but only the last person actually did the job. When I checked what he packed, I realized the steak was missing that wonderful topping, the tomato salad, and, most important of all, the sauce. When I told our server, he scrambled to get me some in a small container. Then, as I was leaving, another person ran up to me holding an even bigger takeout bowl of sauce. “Are you the one who needed the sauce?” he asked, out of breath. On another night, a Monday, while sitting in a spacious C-shaped booth, I discovered the dish that seemed to be the polar opposite of the steak—the toro tartare. Not only was it egregiously priced at $21 for a few crackers and a tiny bowl of raw fish paste no bigger than an In-N-Out thimble of ketchup, but also the tartare itself was slimy, full of gristle and tasted so fishy it was as though it came from a bait shop. However, the service that night couldn’t have been more impeccable. Because of the unevenness I experienced, I can’t say I’ve really formed a final opinion on Bluegold. There are, for sure, really great meals to be had here. The “O.G.” pizza—basically a margherita—was as good as any pizzeria flouting an Associazione Verace Pizza Napoletana certification. But the thick dough on the shrimp and crab ravioli muffled all the crab flavor from the filling. The best part of the ravioli dish, it turned out, was actually the fried shrimp heads. But they were so disjointed from the ravioli, they could’ve been an entirely different dish. There’s also a terrific slow-cooked pork short ribs cooked Indian-style that,

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luegold in Huntington Beach’s Pacific City isn’t just one restaurant. Technically, it’s two. There’s a restaurant within a restaurant called LSXO, which lies beyond a second set of double doors to the right of Bluegold’s kitchen. But for now, I’m focusing on Bluegold itself, which already feels as if it’s four restaurants in itself. The kitchen—with its raw bar, steam-kettle station, roaring pizza oven, stoves upon stoves, and at least two grills with two different fuel sources—has enough man- and firepower to feed a steakhouse, a Cajun restaurant, a seafood joint and a pizza place all at the same time. And the room is so cacophonous it has the volume level of those four places put together. Yet depending on what you order, where you sit and who serves you on what day, dining at Bluegold can also feel as if you’ve been in as many different restaurants, with varying results. One night, while crammed into a tight-seating section near the kitchen, I ate a Vietnamesestyle, 10-ounce New York strip steak that felt as if it weighed at least a pound. It cost $36. But because of its portion size, the salad of tomatoes and a bowl of buttered rice, it’s still the best deal I’ve found so far. The steak itself was already wonderful— perfectly charred on the outside, sliced thickly, and flavor-packed even before the garnish of cilantro, mint, onions, chiles, and a shower of crispy fried garlic went on top. But onto that, I spooned a sauce made seemingly of magic; thin, tangy and chile-flecked, it was a combination of the dipping sauce Thai restaurants serve for Crying Tiger and Vietnamese nuoc cham. But the service on that Saturday night, while well-intentioned, was often absent-

t’s 1 a.m. on a Thursday, and I’m barreling down Main Street in Orange, returning from . . . somewhere . . . when I slam on the brakes so hard my ’79 Ford Ranger Supercab nearly flips over into St. Joseph’s Hospital. I couldn’t believe it: Nguyen’s Kitchen, a dive in the shadow of CHOC, was not only open, but it was also hopping. I’d been eating at Nguyen’s for months, enjoying its delicious secondgen take on bánh mìs—but it was always during the daytime, and I was usually one of only a few customers. But so late at night, there was only one empty table, the rest filled with what seemed like Kaba Modern members on a date night. Waiting in line were nurses in uniform, millennial drunks ready to soak up the booze in their guts, and older gabachos who didn’t want to make the drive down Main to Norms in SanTana. The restaurant’s gamble to stay open until 2:30 a.m. every night and reopen for breakfast was paying off—so I celebrated with an order of garlic noodles. The menu is akin to a greatest hits of what’s popular with OC’s AsianAmerican foodies right now: Fat macarons filled with ice cream sit in the freezer; Thai iced tea and Vietnamese iced coffee chill in a fridge. There’s Cajun crawfish pasta and Korean-style fried chicken and Taiwanese popcorn chicken and sliders enlivened with a black sauce halfway between hoisin and teriyaki. The bánh mìs are hefty and on an ideally crispy baguette; rice bowls get topped with bulgogi or shrimp, then drowned in Sriracha. About the only thing missing here is poke. Nguyen’s Kitchen isn’t high dining—but it’s not the Viet-bro lovefest of Afters or Glee Donuts & Burgers, either. There’s nuance in the garlic noodle, care in the green sauce that comes with it (a jalapeño bearnaise, maybe?). Does ol’ Nguyen have more ambition? Here’s to hoping the next time I swing by late, more challenging dishes pop up on the menu—and that Nguyen’s be as hopping as ever.

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New Top Chef Uni and bone marrow toast at Twenty Eight

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ANNE MARIE PANORINGAN

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he person who came up with the PB&J sandwich was one smart cookie. They took two ingredients that tasted good on their own and merged them into one cohesive bite. There are other great duos out there—mac and cheese, Jack and Coke, Jimmy Fallon and Justin Timberlake—but how far should someone go for an ideal pairing? One executive chef is finding out. Served at dinner, Twenty Eight’s combination begins with fresh Santa Barbara uni distributed over toasted country loaf. Garnished with micro greens, this would be perfectly good as is. Yet we were encouraged to scoop out the included

EatthisNow

» anne marie panoringan marrow and put it onto the toast. Fatty, salty and buttery, we realized this was a savory equivalent to dessert. Almost too indulgent to start with, this designated “small plate” was made for sharing. If chef Jay Lacuesta’s other changes to the menu are as delicious, we have a lot to look forward to this year. TWENTY EIGHT 19530 Jamboree Rd., Irvine, (949) 852-2828; www.twentyeightoc.com.

DriNkofthEwEEk » cynthia rebolledo Miss Delicious at Blinking Owl Distillery

W

e make no apologies for featuring Blinking Owl two weeks in a row in this columna, especially since co-owner Robin Christenson teamed up with OC shrub queen Emily Delicce on a new cocktail for the SanTana distillery. Miss Delicious was made in honor of the Women’s Marches around the world—sisters doing it for themselves, son! THE DRINK

The piquant cocktail features Blinking Owl gin, Cocchi Americano aperitif and kumquat simple syrup derived from fruits sourced in Floral Park. Muddled kumquats create aromatic

CYNTHIA REBOLLEDO

qualities of essential citrus oils—YUM. When paired with the gin’s juniper and hibiscus steez, it produces a warm five-spice earthiness that makes Delicce’s stint at the soonto-open Vacation even more exciting. It’s an off-the-menu special while fruit supplies last, so hurry over to Blinking Owl and get woke! BLINKING OWL DISTILLERY 802 E. Washington Ave., Santa Ana, (714) 542-5928; blinkingowldistillery.com.


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Here’s where to find ramen right now in Long Beach

E

Sun - Thurs: 11am-9pm | Fri-Sat: 11am-10pm | Reservations Recommended NEWPORT BEACH/COSTA MESA

260 Bristol Street 714.444.4652

LongBeachLunch » sarah bennett

LETTERS@OCWEEKLY.COM

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ramen bowls are good enough to be called authentic but cheap enough ($7.75) to eat regularly. Go for the opaque miso ramen, which is made traditionally with yellow, curly, egg noodles, green onions and sweet corn; the ordinarily standard ramen toppings such as egg, pork chashu and vegetables are only available as add-ons here. The best of Long Beach’s current ramen options is Kihon (5662 E. Second St., Long Beach, 562-433-3800; www.kihonsushi. com), the high-falutin’ Japanese restaurant that’s part sushi bar, part izakaya and, now, part ramen-ya. Chef Erwin Angeles, a former computer-software engineer who took on a second life as a sushi chef, opened Kihon in 2014 and earned a following outside the tony Naples crowd by offering top-quality fish and an alwaysimpressive omakase. Angeles makes beautiful bowls of 16-hour tonkotsu ramen that taste of pure liquid pig fat and a spicy miso ramen that, though milky and savory in all the right ways, feels timid on the spice (a recent “extra-spicy” order still packed less heat than a good habanero salsa). Kihon presents its ramen as close to the ideal as possible: broth and long white noodles with a pile of menma (pickled bamboo shoots), a gelatinous slice of pork chashu and a pristine six-minute egg, its soft-boiled yolk begging to ooze out and join the mess. Perfect for those rainy days that dribble down the windows and chilly nights that seep into your bones.

LAKE FOREST

23600 RockfIeld Blvd. 949.587.9008

FE BR UA RY 0 3 -0 9, 2 017

ven in usually mild Southern California, winter weather calls for ramen. But there’s long been a dearth of homey, quickservice places in the immediate vicinity of the International City. Until recently, not a single Japanese restaurant in the city bothered to steep animal bones in salty broth for hours. You could say Long Beach was in a ramen crisis. Rumors of a real ramen-ya floated around for years, and a few years ago, there was even talk of a local restaurateur seeking Tokyo-trained noodle makers for a new project that was to go in where Great Society Cider and Mead now lives. In the meantime, three Japanese restaurants—Sushi Studio, Bamboo Teri House and Kihon—have picked up the slack and started making their own ramen, first only on weekends, then every day. Sushi Studio (4917 E. Pacific Coast Hwy., Long Beach, 562-498-9008), known for its bizarre rolls with a Thai twist (the Yellow Submarine is vegan, topped with mango instead of fish), makes three kinds of ramen: shoyu, tonkotsu and a tonkotsu shoyu, all of which are on the lighter end of the flavor spectrum and are priced around $10 per bowl. It’s a good introduction to the salty shoyu and creamy tonkotsu broths that have made ramen a national trend. One of Long Beach’s oldest bento-boxslingers, 31-year-old Bamboo Teri House (3391 Atlantic Ave., Long Beach, 562-5956049; bambooterihouse.com), also started making its own ramen last year, albeit in its typical quick-service fashion. As with its lunchtime portions of simple sushi rolls, Japanese curry and teriyaki bowls, Bamboo Teri House’s miso and shoyu

3pm-6pm Daily

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| classifieds | music | culture | film | food | calendar | feature | the county | contents | February 03 - 09, 2 017

In LUNAFEST, a timely showcase of up-and-coming female filmmaking talent BY AIMEE MURILLO THE HONEYS AND THE BEARS

NIÑERA

THE THIRD DAD

I

chosen to support female film students at Chapman University’s Dodge College of Film and Media Arts. “We just really feel [it’s] important to support and encourage women to get involved [in the film and entertainment industry],” says Hilary Kaye, chairman of the event. “We’re hoping this will promote more women getting into film.” Nine short films will be screened at the university’s Marion Knott Studios after a party with refreshments, a raffle, a silent auction and mingling. Here’s a look at what films audiences will see: Another Kind of Girl: In this documentary

by Syrian teenager Khaldiya Jibawi, she shares her experience living in a refugee camp and how it has changed her world. It’s Jibawi’s first feature and has already won the Free Press Unlimited Award for its journalistic perspective. The Honeys and the Bears: Veena Rao’s uplifting documentary captures the tenacious senior ladies who take part in a Harlem-based synchronized-swim team and the empowering freedom they find in the water. Free to Laugh: Writer/actress/director Lara Everly’s documentary takes a look at the impact of standup comedy on the lives of female inmates post-incarceration. Family Tale: This animated short was directed by Dr. Patricia Beckmann-Wells, animation professor at Irvine Valley College whose résumé includes authoring books on 3D animation, developing

NKOSI COIFFURE

ALL PROVIDED BY LUNAFEST

content for Oxygen Media and working as an executive at Dreamworks SKG. Beckmann-Wells’ film follows one family’s triumph and union after a series of misfortunes and adversities. Partners: A couple’s complicated relationship after their professional and romantic lives become intertwined in this light comedy directed and produced by Joey Ally. Niñera: Diane Weipert’s short examines the sad but real lives of children of nannies, who are left to fend for themselves while their mothers dote on other children as hired help. (Weipert is also developing a film called Boyle Heights on the life of an immigrant woman after she has been sterilized as part of a eugenics program, based on the very real cases of Mexican-American women’s experiences being sterilized in late 1960s and ’70s Los Angeles.) Join the Club: Eva Vives’ Sundance-

hitting short features Ari Graynor (Whip It, Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist) in a comedic performance as a New York writer who ponders the decision to join a female networking club to her therapist. Nkosi Coiffure: Belgian filmmaker Frederike Migom wrote and directed this short drama about a woman who finds refuge in a Congolese hair salon after an argument with her boyfriend. The Third Dad : Scotland-based filmmaker/artist Theresa Moerman Ib depicts one woman’s quest to understand her deceased father years after their fraught relationship caused her to break all ties. AMURILLO@OCWEEKLY.COM LUNAFEST ORANGE at Marion Knott Studios at Chapman University, 326 W. Palm St., Orange; www. lunafest.org. Sat. Preparty, 1:30 p.m.; screenings, 2:45 p.m. $15-$40.

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t’s not exactly an alternative fact that women in the filmmaking industry have had a harder time finding employment opportunities than men, let alone a chance to take the director’s chair. However, despite some semblance of lingering misogyny and sexism among studios, sisters are making movies for themselves and are more active behind the camera than ever. So even if a female director can’t get nominated for an Oscar more than once in a while or get the green light to direct a Michael Bay-sized production, the least we can do is support women filmmakers on independent, local levels, you know? Which is why the LUNAFEST exists. Since 2000, LUNA—the company that makes healthy, nutritious snack bars for women—has sponsored a traveling showcase of short films made by and for women around the world to promote their social causes, reflect their stories and raise money for deserving nonprofits. This year marks the eighth that Orange County has hosted LUNAFEST; the program is sponsored by the Zonta Club of Newport Harbor, which grants scholarships and resources to women working toward a variety of causes, from preventing human trafficking to providing afterschool programs and health services. As is the norm for each city that participates in LUNAFEST, 15 percent of the day’s proceed will go to the Breast Cancer Fund, with the rest funding a cause of the host city’s choice; Zonta Club has

M ON TH X X–X X , 2014

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Sisters Gonna Work it Out

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Shots In the Dark

GOVERNOR BADASS

CHINA FILM GROUP

Tues., 7:30 p.m. $6.25-$9.50. Also at the Frida Cinema; thefridacinema.org. Tues.-Wed. Call for show times and ticket prices; AMC Orange 30 at the Outlets, (714) 769-4288; and AMC Fullerton 20, 1001 S. Lemon St., Fullerton, (714) 992-6962. Wed. Call for show times and ticket prices. Casablanca. I have seen this 1942 Bogey classic from beginning to end several times, but much more often in recent years, I have caught bits and pieces of Michael Curtiz’s film, which is one of those rare pictures you can drop in and out of and still appreciate the hell out of. In Casablanca during World War II, exiled American freedom fighter-turned-nightclub operator Rick Blaine (Humphrey Bogart) wants no part in helping a Czech underground leader who is trying to escape the Nazis. Further souring Rick on the mission is the fellow’s partner being Ilsa (Ingrid Bergman), who previously left her then-lover Rick waiting at a Paris train station, never to show up. Of all the gin joints in all the towns in all the world, she walks into Rick’s. Regency South Coast Village, (714) 557-5701. Wed., 7:30 p.m. $9. Let the Bullets Fly. Director Jiang Wen’s 2010 action/comedy has him starring as a bandit who descends on a town posing as the governor. This is part of the Graduate Students of East Asian Languages and Literature’s East Asia Cinema Series of free screenings and discussions, which include free drinks and snacks. UC Irvine, Humanities Gateway Room HG1010, West

Peltason and Campus drives, Irvine; humanities.uci.edu. Thurs., Feb. 9, 5:30 p.m. Free. SoCal Film Fest. Organizers were already warning at press time that only a limited number of seats remained for the festival’s openingnight picture, Occupants, a sci-fi/ horror/thriller from director Russ Emanuel. Award-winning documentarian Annie Curtis and her husband, Neil, embark on “30 days of clean living” that is captured on cameras she has set up all over their home. But

complications arise when the footage captures the couple in a parallel universe. Now in its 12th year, the festival showcases indie shorts, features and documentaries, as well as the up-andcoming filmmakers who often talk about their works at post-screening Q&As, through Feb. 11 (the Saturday when most of the programming is presented). Huntington Beach Central Library Theater, 7111 Talbert Ave., Huntington Beach; socalfilmfest.com. Thurs., Feb. 9, 8 p.m. $3.75-$30. MCOKER@OCWEEKLY.COM

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Westminster Blvd., Westminster, (714) 893-4222. Mon., 6:30 p.m. $8.50-$10.50. Get Out. Universal Pictures presents a prerelease screening of this horror/ thriller about a young African-American man (Daniel Kaluuya) discovering there is something sinister behind a visit to his white girlfriend’s (Allison Williams) family estate. Chapman University, Marion Knott Studios, Orange, (714) 997-6765. Mon., 7 p.m. Free. Gone With the Wind. The 1939 historical-romance epic, based on Margaret Mitchell’s novel from three years before, influenced everything from the 2007 play Moonlight and Magnolias to a 1976 Carol Burnett Show skit that was famous for its imaginative use of a curtain rod. Regency Directors Cut Cinema at Rancho Niguel, 25471 Rancho Niguel Rd., Laguna Niguel, (949) 831-0446, Tues. Call for show time. $8. Si Può Fare (We Can Do That). This comedy is set against the fallout from the closure of state psychiatric hospitals and asylums in Italy under the Basaglia Law of the 1980s, when many former patients were left with few resources and little hope of reintegrating into society. Chapman University, Argyros Forum 119A, 1 University Dr., Orange, (714) 744-7846. Tues., 7 p.m. Free. Ghost In the Shell. Lionsgate and Funimation Films bring the groundbreaking 1995 anime back to theaters for a two-day limited theatrical engagement. The Frida Cinema, 305 E. Fourth St., Santa Ana; thefridacinema. org. $7-$10; also at Edwards Irvine Spectrum 21, (844) 462-7342, $12.50. Tues.-Wed., 7:30 p.m. Wayne’s World. Wow, I was just watching a YouTube video claiming Mike Myers can be difficult on a set, based in part on the experiences of his breakout film’s director, Penelope Spheeris, and the craft-services department. Perhaps that is why she is leading a 25th-anniversary discussion of the film with Tia Carrere, Robert Patrick and Colleen Camp, while “special” footage shows a separate conversation between Myers, Dana Carvey, Rob Lowe and Lorne Michaels. The movie is introduced by Rolling Stone critic Peter Travers. The movie is about Wayne and Garth (Myers and Carvey) getting their cable-access show Wayne’s World picked up by a local TV station, whose slimy Svengali (Lowe) has the hots for Wayne’s girlfriend (Carrere). Cinemark Century Stadium 25, (714) 532-9558;also at Cinemark Century 20 Huntington Beach, (714) 373-4573.

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Io, Arlecchino (I, Harlequin). Italian Movie Night presents this 2014 film directed by Matteo Bini and Giorgi Pasotti, who also stars as television host Paolo. This is presented in Italian with English subtitles. Regency San Juan Capistrano, 26762 Verdugo St., San Juan Capistrano, (949) 661-3456. Thurs., Feb. 2, 7 p.m. $11. Dorothea Lange: A Visual Life. The 46-minute film brings to life five decades of American history through Dorothea Lange’s photographs and insights. Bowers Museum of Cultural Art, 2002 N. Main St., Santa Ana, (714) 567-3600. Sat., 1:30 p.m. $9-$12. LUNAFEST. See my colleague Aimee Murillo’s preview of this festival of short films promoting awareness of women’s issues and female filmmakers. Chapman University, Dodge College of Film & Media Arts, Marion Knott Studios, 283 N. Cypress St., Orange, (714) 997-6765; www. lunafest.org/orange0204. Sat., 2:30 p.m. $15-$40. Resurrecting Black Wall Street: The Blueprint. This documentary uses Tulsa, Oklahoma’s Little Africa of 1922 as a shining example of how black people can realize economic goals if they are pursued collectively. Expo Arts Center, 4321 Atlantic Ave., Long Beach, (562) 754-0007; andystreetlb.org. Sat., 4 p.m. Free, but RSVP required because of limited seating. Swan Lake. A Jan. 25, 2015, Bolshoi Ballet performance of the Tchaikovsky classic is beamed into theaters nationwide by Fathom Events, BY Experience and Pathé Live. AMC Orange 30, 20 City Blvd. W., Orange, (714) 769-4288; also at Cinemark Century Stadium 25, 1701 W. Katella Ave., Orange, (714) 532-9558; Cinemark Century 20 Huntington Beach, 7777 Edinger Ave., Huntington Beach, (714) 373-4573; Edwards Aliso Viejo Stadium 20, 26701 Aliso Creek Rd., Aliso Viejo, (844) 4627342; Edwards Irvine Spectrum 21, 65 Fortune Dr., Irvine, (844) 462-7342; and Edwards Long Beach Stadium 26, 7501 E. Carson, Long Beach, (844) 462-7342; www.FathomEvents.com. Sun., 12:55 p.m. $16-$18. Also at Regency South Coast Village, 1561 W. Sunflower Ave., Santa Ana, (714) 557-5701. Sat., 12:55 p.m.; Tues., 7 p.m. $14-$17. XXX: The Return of Xander Cage (with open captions). For those who are deaf, hard of hearing or learning the English language, this screening of the action picture is presented with onscreen text of the dialogue, character identifications and descriptions of key sounds. Regency Westminster, 6721

BY MATT COKER

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» aimee murillo

Absence of Androgyny

UC Irvine exhibit explores gender identity in the Trump era By dAve BArton

I

FIND YOUR AVATAR

WILL TEE YANG

ing every word it hears. It’s discomfiting for several reasons: Aside from the piss brain-washing, there’s the image of “the wall” and upended life, crucifixion overtones reminiscent of Saint Paul, and the polycarbonate itself, making the body look fresh from a butcher shop, carved, sealed in plastic and ready for the freezer. The pseudonymous Sputniko! is a Japanese/British critical-design artist whose Menstruation Machine resembles a space-age chastity belt. Its sleek edges are a shiny torture device, made for men to wear, that simulates the experience of a woman having her period. Electric stimulation forces muscle cramps, and there’s a surprise drip of unexpected red fluid designed to stain your clothing. Taken in tandem with the accompanying music video—in which the artist is dressed as a boy, puts on female drag and the machine, and then goes on a date with a girl—it’s one of the few pieces in the show that’s overtly confrontational about gender. Besides the Freewaves piece, the only other work that really approaches this is trans artist Cassils’ series of archival pigment prints, Time Lapse (Front), Time Lapse (Back), Time Lapse (Left), Time Lapse (Right), documenting the physical transformation when a weight gain and weight-training regimen radically sculpts a softer “feminine” body into a muscular, more “male” form. I watched several people as they entered their information into the Bodies INCorporated website and created digital

avatars of themselves. Looking like the heroic mutants of X-Men, the avatars can be upgraded as earthly bodies decline, and if artist Victoria Vesna has her way, our ideal artificial bodies will be around in a database long after we’re gone. As she walked me through her backhanded ode to New Age capitalism, she talked openly about trying to create something that could be seen, even make money, outside of a gallery. I’m not sure how it will play without her there—a URL instead of the computer will be there for future patrons—but the conversation was as witty and light as could be, considering that our conversation was about our own eventual deaths. If the raft of ideas and imagery makes the show successful as an art exhibit, it fails at consistency of theme: Each of the works on display has its own agenda, so trying to shoehorn the work into a single political-slash-ideological category is an act of futility. What’s missing is more androgyny, the blurring of the two sexes. That riskier, more uncomfortable, harder to pinpoint, queerer discussion is what much of the show approaches, but then steps away from, falling back into safer, more traditional concerns. “MASCULINE<-->FEMININE” at Beall Center for Art + Technology, Claire Trevor School of the Arts, 712 Arts Plaza, Irvine, (949) 824-6206; beallcenter.uci.edu. Open Tues.-Sat., noon-6 p.m. Through May 13. Free.

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nly a year old, Golden Years Vintage Market has already defined itself as the destination event for vintage-clothinglovers eager to dive into racks of retro garments, accessories and records and score some awesome, gently pre-owned goods. (And if you’re wondering, yes, it’s named after the David Bowie song.) Golden Years is the brainchild of Sarah Sunderman, the vintage-fashion maven behind the Santa Ana-based Cameo Appearance, which she started with her mother in Las Vegas. Sunderman fell in love with the downtown SanTana promenade area and quickly decided it would be the location for the event. For each Golden Years, Sunderman curates a medley of 20-ish eclectic vendors with their own vibes and brands, including Naked Cowgirl Vintage, No Accounting for Taste, Prairie La Crosse Shop and West of the Barbary Fig. There will also be treasures from the Airstream-based Blossom Vintage and steampunkfocused Sputnik’s Curiosities (operated by our badass web editor Taylor Hamby); record shops Left of the Dial Records and Juan Vinyl Collector; and much more. Plus, DJs will spin records while patrons swig cocktails from the nearby Lola Gaspar and Gypsy Den. “I just really wanted a place where vintage vendors can get together and have fun doing what they love doing and support one another,” Sunderman says. “What we do is so fickle and inconsistent, so to have other vintage vendors to be friends with is really fun and important.” In the past, Sunderman has only organized Golden Years markets in spring and winter, but she is adding one this summer. She hopes to one day take her market on the road, “but what I really love about Golden Years now is that it’s supported by Orange County,” she says. “That’s been the biggest feedback, people saying, ‘Finally!’” AMURILLO@OCWEEKLY.COM GOLDEN YEARS VINTAGE MARKET at Second Street Promenade, Second Street and Broadway, Santa Ana; goldenyearsmarket.com. Feb. 11, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

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’m sitting opposite two members of Freewaves, a media-arts organization that’s doing a performative piece about the latest iterations of feminist and gender theory in their project, DIS . . . MISS. The post cards laid out on the table between us are precisely designed, some funny, some obscure, others aggressive. I end up picking a photo of masked indigena activist bicycle club Ovarian Psycos. One of the two artists then documents our discussion in writing, as the other peppers me with questions about how I would “radicalize” or change the image in front of me. I Sharpie a sentence on the back, and we talk about women feeling they have to ask permission, badass grrrls, the alt-right as a hipster movement, and the recent Muslim Ban. It’s the first night of “Masculine<--> Feminine” at UC Irvine’s Beall Center for Art + Technology. Crowds are awful at openings, it’s difficult to get close to the work without interruption, and meeting artists can be awkward, since they generally don’t know how to talk about themselves or their process. The resulting conversation is usually anything but enlightening, a public-relations spin with few ideas exchanged. That’s not the case here. Curated by Beall Artistic Director David Familian, with the support of Chapman University professor Micol Hebron, the intermedia show is busy but not crowded, noisy but not overbearing, with intense personal conversation the byproduct of the work. According to the press release, the show is meant to challenge issues of gender in an attempt to provide freedom “from the masculine/binary.” I don’t think the show is successful at following its own intentions, but it still led to two hours of discussion about despair, joy, Donald Trump, liberal Facebook meltdown, activism, the corporate co-opt of our bodies and massive vulvas dispensing piña coladas. Stephen Kinged in a road accident a couple of years back as he walked across the street, Danial Nord’s polycarbonate castings of his own damaged body compose much of his mixed-media sculpture Sleeper. Within the castings are LEDs that throb like a bloodstream or imply x-rayed bones and Frankensteinian internal organs. Hanging from scaffolding, the sculpture’s enlarged head is tilted at the neck as if its hit the ground, as a steady stream of water pours from the body’s penis into its ear. Heard from speakers is a call and response between the recorded hate speech of Donald Trump—mixed with the sound of very wet farts—and the voice of a Winston Smith stand-in, parrot-

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music»artists|sounds|shows

Jack Grisham’s Haunted Roots

The TSOL singer’s new album is inspired by ghosts in more ways than one By Nate JacksoN

J

ack Grisham lives in a haunted house. For those who know the TSOL front man, that probably isn’t much of a shocker. Anyone who’s read his books, heard the band’s classic track “Code Blue” or knows anything about their history is aware that Grisham’s mind is hardwired to live with (and fuck with) the dead. Onstage, his proclivity for white face paint and black eyeliner and long dresses makes him look about as ghoulish as anything you’d find in a Dario Argento flick. So it makes sense he’d find the only haunted property on the block in his middle-upper-class neighborhood of Huntington Beach and move in with his wife and teenage daughter. In its former life, the domicile was the first schoolhouse the city ever built, way back in 1900. According to Grisham, the place was already occupied with spirits before he moved in. During any given time of day or night, you’re liable to see lights and electronics flicker on and off, chairs move, hear strange voices in the halls, and a host of other creepy, pants-shitting surprises. “We’ve had two separate psychics say it’s a boy and a girl, two kids and some adult—supposedly the kids are cool, but the farmer guy is like lost or something, and he’s not cool,” Grisham says matterof-factly as he sips a mug of black coffee. Sporting pajama pants, a vintage Mickey Mouse T-shirt and tousled head of faded green hair (which he typically slicks back), the 55-year-old punker looks a bit like the Joker on his day off. “We’re supposed to even have some paranormal researchers come out here in the next couple of weeks to check the house.” Part punk museum, part bohemian art gallery, Grisham’s house is already littered with small shrines to the undead past, albeit more colorful and cool than scary. Chief among them is a painted portrait of him from his days as a rebel heartthrob in the early 1980s. It sits right above an old piano on which he plunked out the first chords of songs that would become The Trigger Complex, the band’s first album in eight years (released Jan. 27 on Rise Records). In their own way, the 88 keys of ebony and ivory unlocked the spirit of inspiration that compelled Grisham to make what he considers to be a true roots record. “I hear these punk guys say, ‘We’re going to go make a roots record,’ and go make something that sounds of Johnny Cash,” Grisham says. “And I’m like, ‘Well, maybe that’s somebody’s roots, but that’s not my roots—that’s not what I listen to.’ If I was gonna make a roots record, it would

SCARING THE TREES

JOHN GILHOOLEY

sound like Sound Effects by the Jam or Machine Gun Etiquette by the Damned.” Sitting around his living room coffee table with guitarist Frank Agnew and bassist Mike Roche, Grisham searched for themes, lyrics and riffs that reminded him of a time when punk included a hefty side of pop, à la the Kinks, Gen X or the Jam. From there, it was a matter of getting his band mates together—no easy task these days considering drummer Chip Hanna lives in Arizona, lead guitarist Ron Emory is based in Iowa, and keyboardist Greg Kuehn is up in LA. Once they had the foundation of the album ready to record, the band just had to get into the studio for a few days to lay it all down. “We decided not to practice the fuck out of these,” Grisham says. “We just said, ‘Here’s the song; here’s how it goes,’ and we just went from there and kept it fresh. . . . For me, I just like listening to the bass and drum parts because they’re so tight. I was telling Mike Roche, ‘This is the best you’ve played in years; you might be old and falling apart, but you’re playing awesome.’” From the first shot, Trigger Complex feels like a poppier caliber from the rest of the TSOL catalog. Album opener “Give Me More” is a blast of energy that blows a hole in your head, leaving plenty of room for TSOL’s jagged shards of Brit pop

aesthetic to fill your newly opened mind. Throughout the album’s 13 tracks, the songs revolve less around the punk cliché of scaring the masses and more around making them dance, think and, yes, even laugh. For Grisham, the point of maintaining a punk mentality 40 years later is about being different, not subscribing to what now amounts to a stale rehash of “plain wrap anarchy.” “I don’t know why they did that to punk rock later on, like, with the looks uniform and the sounds uniform,” Grisham says. “It’s, like, everything that we fought against . . . Thirty years ago, you sound like that and wore clothes like that, and you were challenging people. Now, if you walked on the street looking like that and sound like that, the average guy on the street says, ‘Killer, Redbull!’” These days, Grisham can still use punk to quell his fascination with the afterlife, but in a way that’s more self-reflective than crass. A perfect example lies in the lyrics of the album’s lead single, “I Wanted to See You,” a song inspired by ghosts other than the ones that live in his house. “The first song I put out was about missing someone with a great longing, like, you’ll never see these people again,” Grisham says. “I was sitting out in my back office one day, thinking about all my friends and girlfriends that are dead.

There’s a line in there where whatever relationship I’ve had or whatever they said to me, it still influences me now. Like, whatever I do, your voice is in my song, and nothing here is anything like you, so I just want to see you now.” Though all the voices of the dead swirling around him might sound like a bit of a downer, in some ways, it inspires Grisham to live with even more enthusiasm as he passes through middle age with the same fire he had when TSOL was putting out album after album. In the end, he says, the dead inspire him to keep living life on his own terms. “If I died at this moment, like right now, then I have basically lived my life doing whatever the fuck I wanted at any time I wanted without listening to anybody,” he says. “If I died right now, I go out on top.” Of course even when he checks out, he says there’s little chance he’d ever really take a minute to rest. “I have a whole list of people who I would haunt,” Grisham says with a smirk as he sips his coffee. “And it’s not going to be pleasant.” NJACKSON@OCWEEKLY.COM TSOL perform with the Dwarves at the Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; www.observatoryoc. com. Sat., 8 p.m. $15. All ages.


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How an aging hipster parent teaches resistance

L

were marching alongside us. By modeling what it means to be a citizen in a free society, it showed him that protest should come naturally to Americans who cared about their country. And the best way to do it? Through music. Here’s a list of songs I use to explain political ideas to my son.

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“This Little Light of Mine” recorded by Odetta. Here’s a good song to explain

why your opinion matters, even when you’re only one person. It’s also a great way to explain how powerful it is to band together and protest as a group.

“Everybody Knows” by Leonard Cohen.

As Cohen fans, my husband and I have played this song around the house since our son was a baby. It’s a good way to teach him about inequality in the world.

ATM

“Redemption Song” and “Buffalo Soldier” by Bob Marley. My son and I couldn’t

choose which Marley song to highlight; he said both of these songs were cool and talked about freedom.

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“Sleep Now In the Fire” by Rage Against the Machine. This band has to be moni-

tored around kids because many of Rage Against the Machine’s songs have profanity, but “Sleep Now In the Fire” is really great, especially the video (which was FILMED TO BLOCK THE ENTRANCE OF THE NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE). With its factoids about poverty and health care, prepare to answer so many questions after watching! “Talkin’ ’Bout a Revolution” by Tracy Chapman. My son asked, “Why is she play-

ing guitar all alone without a band?” I explained that protest songs originally came out of single artists with just a guitar, so you can sing and protest anywhere you wanted without setting up. “Besides,” I said, “sometimes it’s just cool to know you can touch thousands of people just as one person.” LETTERS@OCWEEKLY.COM

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ast week, my husband and I dragged our 6-year-old son and 17-month-old daughter to the Women’s March in Santa Ana. The night before, a friend of ours (who has a 5-year-old daughter) expressed her misgivings about what we were planning: “What if it gets violent? What if you get separated? What if they get hurt?” She offered to watch my kids so the grownups could march for our beliefs peacefully. “I want to play with my friend!” my son whined. I explained that it wasn’t an option: “It’s very important for you to see that when we don’t agree with something the government does, we can get together with everyone and protest. It’s what makes us Americans.” Admittedly, my friend’s worries went through my mind as we were preparing drinks and snacks to stuff into my daughter’s diaper bag, but I feel extra-privileged to be able to protest in America because I grew up in the Philippines under a dictatorship. During the 1986 People Power revolution, my mom brought my sisters and I—all under the age of 10—to rallies to protest the Marcos regime. It was there that I learned there is power in people banding together and taking the streets to express your beliefs. And that is one lesson I want to impart to my kids. So on Jan. 21, my family headed into a sea of 20,000 protesters, armed with posters and pussy hats, clutching our American flags. It was amazing—especially in Orange County, which voted blue for the first time since 1936. Plus, my friend’s fears were unfounded: It was a very peaceful rally filled with positive vibes and high-fives for all. We even bumped into other children from my son’s kindergarten at the rally. I got to tell my son about our family history of dissent and why his gay godparents

By LiLLedeshan Bose

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our teenagers are bringing back indie prog rock with an unstoppable drive and kick-ass tunes. But don’t let their ages fool you—with their technique and attention to detail, these kids shred harder than your cookie-cutter highschool band. The Taco Truck started in 2013 when longtime friends bassist Alex Soto and drummer Cesar Landa decided to perform at their middle-school talent show for the second year. They invited fellow concert-band mate vocalist/guitarist Sid Piravi to join them in what they thought would be a one-off. “The vibe was so good that we just stayed together,” Piravi says. “We could all tell that we were made to write together.” The group met guitarist Emma Hattesohl at Los Rios Rock School in San Juan Capistrano in 2015. After playing a few gigs with the guys that summer, Hattesohl (whom the band refers to as “the blond, female Slash”) officially joined in September. Their first EP, South County, was released in November 2015. For a year and a half, the Taco Truck worked on brand-new tracks for their first full-length album, expected to drop in March. The band say the forthcoming release will have a “mystical” indie/prog/alternative rock sound that is influenced by Rush and Kings of Leon, something that’s much more theoretically advanced and mature compared to South County. Landa’s father, Victor, has supported the Taco Truck from the beginning and has taken on the role of their booking agent and mentor. He also provides the band with a place to practice, drives them from point A to point B, and keeps them motivated to always strive to be better. “They

VICTOR LANDA

LocaLsonLy

» yvonne villaseñor really believe in what they do,” he says. “I don’t do anything for them artistically or tell them where the band goes. . . . I learn a lot more from them than they do from me.” An ardent prog fan himself, the senior Landa considers the band’s music to be a tribute to prog—or what he calls “millennial prog.” Being high school students comes with its own set of challenges: tests and changing voices and hormones. But being in a band adds more to that load: struggling to gain appreciation from established musicians, creating a distinct sound, and, of course, your young age preventing you from getting the amount of gigs you’d like. Despite these predicaments, the Taco Truck have become successful not only as a band, but also as individuals. Yet they remain humble, versatile, forward-thinking, ambitious and passionate about what they love. “Our goal as songwriters is to create something that someone who doesn’t know much about music can like because it sounds cool,” Hattesohl says, “but also [that] someone who does know a lot about music can say, ‘Whoa, this is complex.’” Hey, Orange County/Long Beach musicians & bands! Mail your music, contact info, high-res photos & impending show dates for possible review to: Locals Only, OC Weekly, 18475 Bandilier Circle, Fountain Valley, CA 92708. Or email your link to: localsonly@ocweekly.com.


THIS WEEK FRIDAY, FEB. 3

CHAPMAN UNIVERSITY SINGERS: 7:30 p.m.,

$10-$15. Musco Center for the Arts, 1 University Dr., Orange, (844) 626-8726; muscocenter.org. COMMON KINGS: 8 p.m., $30-$40. City National Grove of Anaheim, 2200 E. Katella Ave., Anaheim, (714) 7122750; citynationalgroveofanaheim.com. MARC COHN: 8 p.m. The Coach House, 33157 Camino Capistrano, Ste. C, San Juan Capistrano, (949) 4968930; thecoachhouse.com. THE MOTELS; MISSING PERSONS: 6:30 p.m. The Yost Theater, 307 N. Spurgeon St., Santa Ana, (888) 862-9573; yosttheater.com. THE NUDE PARTY: 9 p.m., $5. The Wayfarer, 843 W. 19th St., Costa Mesa, (949) 764-0039; wayfarercm.com. OPIUO: 9 p.m. Constellation Room at the Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; constellationroom.com. SHATTERED FAITH: 9 p.m., $8. Diego’s Rock-N-Roll Bar & Eats, 220 E. Third St., Santa Ana, (888) 862-9573; rockandrollbardtsa.com. WARREN G: 8 p.m., $5. The Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; observatoryoc.com.

SATURDAY, FEB. 4

DOWN BY LAW; GUTTERMOUTH; PULLEY, WHITEKAPS; SIDEKICK: 8 p.m. The Yost Theater,

307 N. Spurgeon St., Santa Ana, (888) 862-9573; yosttheater.com. FARTBARF: noon, $10. Alex’s Bar, 2913 E. Anaheim St., Long Beach, (562) 434-8292; alexsbar.com. FATSO JETSON: 8 p.m., $10. Diego’s Rock-N-Roll Bar & Eats, 220 E. Third St., Santa Ana, (888) 862-9573; rockandrollbardtsa.com. NICOLE MITCHELL ENSEMBLE: 8 p.m., $6-$16. UC Irvine Winifred Smith Hall, 4000 Mesa Rd., Irvine, (949) 494-8971. REBELUTION: 8 p.m., $29.50. Fox Theater Pomona, 301 S. Garey Ave., Pomona, (877) 283-6976; foxpomona.com. RON KOBAYASHI TRIO: 7 p.m., free. Moulin Bistro, 1000 N. Bristol St., Newport Beach, (844) 376-6243; moulinbistro.com. THE WALCOTTS: 9 p.m., $8. The Wayfarer, 843 W. 19th St., Costa Mesa, (949) 764-0039; wayfarercm.com.

SUNDAY, FEB. 5

ANDREA MILLER: 6 p.m., free. Bayside Restaurant,

RICH THE KID; FAMOUS DEX; THOUXANBANFAUNI; JAY CRITCH: 9 p.m.,

$10. The Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; observatoryoc.com.

MONDAY, FEB. 6

DASHBOARD CONFESSIONAL; VINYL THEATRE: 8 p.m., $27.50. The Observatory,

3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; observatoryoc.com.

KILL THE INTERNET WITH DJ CARDIGAN & DESIRABLE D: 8:30 p.m. Que Sera, 1923 E. Seventh

Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; constellationroom.com. SINATRA & DINO DINNER SHOW: 6 p.m. La Cave, 1695 Irvine Ave., Costa Mesa, (949) 646-7944; lacaverestaurant.com.

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St., Ste. A10, Costa Mesa, (714) 546-8580; kitschbar.com. BATTLE AT THE BEACH: 8 p.m., free. Hurricanes Bar & Grill, 200 Main St., Huntington Beach, (714) 374-0500; hurricanesbargrill.com. THE BIG DRAW: DJ Abeltron, 8 p.m., free. The Copper Door, 225 1/2 N. Broadway, Santa Ana, (714) 543-3813; thecopperdoorbar.com. BLUES WEDNESDAYS: 7:30 p.m., $5. Mozambique, 1740 S. Coast Hwy., Laguna Beach, (949) 715-7777; mozambiqueoc.com. CHICAGO: 8 p.m., $50-$85. Long Beach Terrace Theater, 300 E. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach, (562) 436-3661; longbeachcc.com. DEREK BORDEAUX BAND: 7 p.m., free. Original Mike’s, 100 S. Main St., Santa Ana, (714) 550-7764; originalmikes.com. DEVILDRIVER: 7:20 p.m. The Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; observatoryoc.com. HIP-HOP WEDNESDAY: 9 p.m., free. The Karman Bar, 26022 Cape Dr., Laguna Niguel, (949) 582-5909; thekarmanbar.com. MODERN DISCO AMBASSADORS: 10 p.m. La Cave, 1695 Irvine Ave., Costa Mesa, (949) 646-7944; lacaverestaurant.com. RICK MARCEL: 7:30 p.m., $10. Spaghettini Rotisserie & Grill, 3005 Old Ranch Pkwy., Seal Beach, (562) 5962199; spaghettini.com. SAMMY ADAMS: 8 p.m. Constellation Room at the Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; constellationroom.com.

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ANDREW BLOOM: 7:30 p.m., $5. Mozambique,

1740 S. Coast Hwy., Laguna Beach, (949) 715-7777; mozambiqueoc.com. DIVE CLUB: 9 p.m., free. Kitsch Bar, 891 Baker St., Ste. A10, Costa Mesa, (714) 546-8580; kitschbar.com. DOUG LACY: 6 p.m., free. Ralph Brennan’s Jazz Kitchen, 1590 S. Disneyland Dr., Anaheim, (714) 7765200; rbjazzkitchen.com. DW3: 8 p.m., $25. Spaghettini Rotisserie & Grill, 3005 Old Ranch Pkwy., Seal Beach, (562) 596-2199; spaghettini.com. GRN+GLD: 9 p.m., $3. Que Sera, 1923 E. Seventh St., Long Beach, (562) 599-6170; queseralb.wix.com. THE MOLOCHS: 9 p.m., $10. Constellation Room at the Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; constellationroom.com. NOIR: hip-hop and house, presented by M.D.A., 8 p.m. Holiday, 719 W. 19th St., Costa Mesa, (949) 278-8728. RO JAMES: 11 p.m. Constellation Room at the Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; constellationroom.com. RON KOBAYASHI: 6 p.m., free. Bayside Restaurant, 900 Bayside Dr., Newport Beach, (949) 721-1222; baysiderestaurant.com. RUDY LA SCALA: 9 p.m., $25-$50. Xalos Event Center, 480 N. Glassell St., Anaheim, (714) 925-6700; xalos.com. THRASHER THURSDAY: 8 p.m., free. The Karman Bar, 26022 Cape Dr., Laguna Niguel, (949) 582-5909; thekarmanbar.com.

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St., Long Beach, (562) 599-6170; queseralb.wix.com.

THE LEMON TWIGS: 9 p.m. Constellation Room at the

MacArthur Blvd., Newport Beach, (949) 287-8270; envyloungeoc.com. MAYHEM: 8 p.m. The Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; observatoryoc.com. MIC DANGEROUSLY: 8 p.m., free. Gallagher’s Pub & Grill, 2751 E. Broadway, Long Beach, (562) 856-8000; gallagherslongbeach.com. NUI ROOTS: 8 p.m., free. Casa Costa Mesa, 820 W. 19th St., Costa Mesa, (949) 877-4011; casacostamesa.com. R3FLECT: 9 p.m. Que Sera, 1923 E. Seventh St., Long Beach, (562) 599-6170; queseralb.wix.com. SEVYN STREETER: 9 p.m. Constellation Room at the Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; constellationroom.com. SONGWRITERS @ SUNSET: 8 p.m., $10. Schooner at Sunset, 16821 Pacific Coast Hwy., Huntington Beach, (562) 430-3495; schooneratsunset.com.

Fe brua ry 0 3- 09, 20 17

900 Bayside Dr., Newport Beach, (949) 721-1222; baysiderestaurant.com. BACH AND ROCK: 3 p.m., $20-$60. St. Mark Presbyterian Church, 2200 San Joaquin Hills Rd., Newport Beach, (949) 644-1341; stmarkpresbyterian.org. LOUIS SCHWIZGEBEL: presented as part of the Distinguished Piano Concert Series, 7:30 p.m., $25-$35. Musco Center for the Arts, 1 University Dr., Orange, (844) 626-8726; muscocenter.org.

JAZZ NIGHT: 8:30 p.m., free. Envy Lounge, 4647

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Advice Columnists Without Borders I am a 26-year-old heterosexual European man. I have been for four years in a monogamous relationship with my girlfriend. Recently, she cheated on me. When she told me what she did, I felt a very strong pain, even stronger than I expected. After a few days of pain, however, I found that the sexual attraction for my girlfriend, instead of decreasing, increased after her adventure. In particular, I am now having a cuckold fantasy. I would like that she tell me everything she did, without sparing any detail, while we have sex, or that we try to play an actual cuckold game in which she has sex with someone else in front of me while I give her instructions and tell her exactly what to do. My problem is that I am not sure what her reaction would be if I ask her to play out these fantasies. She feels very guilty and witnessed my pain when she told me she cheated. I fear that talking to her about these fantasies would scare her. I also fear that, as she is feeling guilty, she would say yes, but without really wanting to do this. I also don’t want her to think I liked what she did when she cheated on me. I did not like it, but I would like to relive it in a playful way, in which I have complete control. How do you think I should approach this talk? Which reactions should I expect? How can I make sure that she is really into this if she says yes? Feeling Obsessed Replicating Treason & Dominating Adulterer Cuckolding, as with all fetishes and/or fantasies, is unique to the person and adaptable within particular relationships. But it’s erotic humiliation—of the person being cheated on—that distinguishes cuckolding from hot wifing/ husbanding or swinging. The cuck’s partner, a.k.a. “the cheater,” is in control, and the cuck gets off on having his nose rubbed—sometimes literally—in the evidence of his partner’s cheating. (That’s the theory, anyway; I’ve gotten lots of letters from women—and some men—who are married to very controlling cucks.) Zooming out: Your reaction to learning you’d been cheated on—pain and shock, quickly followed by increased feelings of lust for your girlfriend—is not uncommon. It’s less common for the cheatee to eroticize the betrayal; a couple may reconnect sexually in the wake of an affair, but rarely does a couple wind up incorporating eroticized infidelity into their sexual repertoire. But in your fantasy, FORTDA, you would be calling the shots, giving instructions and telling your girlfriend what to do. That’s definitely not a cuckold fantasy, FORTDA, and it may be a revenge fantasy. But a cheating crisis presents a good opportunity for both parties to be completely honest with each other about what they want going forward. And that’s what you should do, FORTDA: Be completely honest. First, make sure your fantasy is an authentic impulse, i.e., it’s a genuine turn-on, unearthed by this revelation, not an excuse to punish your girlfriend for cheating. Make sure this isn’t a revenge fantasy. If it’s a genuine turn-on, FORTDA, share everything: this surprising new turn-on, your own confusion and your legit concerns (you don’t want her to agree to do it out of guilt; it’s not a license to cheat). She might freak out. She might be into it. She might freak out, and then later be into it. (That’s the origin story of most cuckold couples: Husband/BF proposes it; wife/GF freaks out; weeks, months or years later, the wife/GF asks if cuckolding is still on the table.) You can figure out the parameters later, if you decide to explore this at all, but it starts with a conversation. Good luck. I write you from Italy, where I follow you through Internazionale. I am a guy in his 30s sexually paralyzed with his girlfriend. We are together four years, and during the past year, sex has gradually faded away, leaving me alone with my skillful hand (left one). The sexual paralysis is beginning to affect our behaviors. We don’t accept each other anymore. We are starting to mutually ignore. Verbal communication is poor. However, we are exceptional friends. I am good-looking, sociable,

SavageLove » dan savage

fit and with plenty of semen. Girls are quite interested, but I don’t want to cheat. I don’t believe in monogamy, but my girlfriend could never tolerate betrayal. What the fuck to do? Literally Outta Order Penis Sometimes a relationship dies but we insist on propping the body up in a corner, LOOP, and pretending it’s still alive. We do this because even if the relationship is dead, our partner isn’t. And we can’t declare the thing dead—we can’t break the fuck up already—without hurting someone we used to have romantic feelings for and may still very much like as a person. So we tiptoe around the decomposing corpse until the stench can’t be ignored any longer. This relationship is dead, LOOP: You no longer accept each other, you ignore each other, and the sex dried up a year ago. On top of all that, LOOP, you don’t believe in monogamy, and she can’t tolerate betrayals. Even if your relationship weren’t dead—and if it isn’t dead, LOOP, it’s so close you need to slap a Do Not Resuscitate order on its chart—you two aren’t a match. End the relationship, do your best to salvage the exceptional friendship, and stop letting all that semen go to waste. English is not my mother tongue. Bear with me. I’m bisexual, age 26—I always knew I was, but like many bi girls, I ended up with guys. I had a long, serious relationship with a man when I was young and only started exploring my sexuality after I found the guts to leave him. Then I fell in love with a girl. She’s a lesbian, and after a long and hard-fought chase, I finally got her. It’s been two months; I came out to my parents (with whom I live—adults living at home is acceptable in my culture; don’t judge), and they did not exactly welcome the news. But all would seem to be going well: I love a girl, she loves me, my parents let us be. Problem is, I want cock. I want a man to grab me and have sex with me. I’ve had the chance to do it and didn’t because I wanted to respect the exclusivity of my relationship. My girlfriend knows about my doubts but says they are part of “questioning my non-heterosexuality.” I don’t want to leave her because she’s my princess and my goddess, and I want to adore her for eternity. But I worry about bad judgment and impulses. Where do I go from here? Wanting A Dick Those aren’t doubts, WAD. They’re desires. You know what you want: You want your girlfriend, you want cock, you want a man to grab you, and you want to continue questioning—and shaping and defining—your non-heterosexuality. The problem, WAD, isn’t that you don’t know what you want; it’s that you don’t know how to fuse all these wants into a coherent identity. (Possible answer: “bisexual, lesboamorous, likely non-monogamous.”) There are plenty of options you and your girlfriend can explore—together or separately. Get a fake cock and use it together. If that doesn’t slake your hunger for cock, maybe your girlfriend would be up for a threesome. If she’s not DTFAGWY (down to fuck a guy with you), discuss whether an open relationship is a possibility down the road. That said, WAD, you and the Princess Goddess you worked so hard to land have only been together two months. If you’re wrecked over your need for cock at this early stage—if you’re not able to focus on her alone at eight weeks—maybe sexual exclusivity isn’t the right choice for you. Listen to my weekly podcast, the Savage Lovecast, at savagelovecast.com. Contact Dan via email at mail@ savagelove.net, and follow him on Twitter: @fakedansavage.


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STOREFRONT Gram Kings: DAILY DEALS | Discounts for Military, Veterans, Disabled | 10189 Westminster Ave. Suite #217, Garden Grove 714.209.8187 | Hours: Monday-Sunday 10am-10pm South Coast Safe Access: FTP: Buy an 1/8, Get a FREE 1/8 | 1900 Warner Ave Ste. A, Santa Ana 92705 | 949.474.7272 | MonSat 10am-8pm Sun 11am-7pm Top Shelf Anaheim: $35 CAP | FTP: 4.5 Gram 8th OR $10 OFF Concentrates | Free DABS with Any Donation DOGO Deals & oz Specials 3124 W. Lincoln Ave. Anaheim | 714.385.7814 Ease Canna: FTP- All 8th will be weighed out to 5GRAMS!! | 2435 E. Orangethorpe Ave., Fullerton, CA 92831 | 714-309-7772

195 Position Wanted Acupuncturist(Irvine, CA) Diagnose patient’s condition based on the medical history and current symptoms/disorders to formulate an effective acupuncture treat plan; Insert very fine needles into acupuncture points on patient’s body surface and maintain related care; Apply other types of method tailored to patient’s specific needs such as herbal practice, heat, magnet, acupressure therapy, etc. 40hrs/wk. Master in Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine, Acupuncture License in CA req’d. Resume to Healing Tree Medical Management, Inc., Attn: Shane Lee, 14785 Jeffrey Rd, Ste 109, Irvine, CA 92618

421 Used Auto CARS FOR CASH I’LL BUY YOUR CAR, TRUCK, RV OR VAN! Paying Cash $100-$5000 Running or Not 714-514-0886 949-375-5178

#1 We Bring You $1,500 to $6,500 Cash Up Car's, Truck's, Van's, SUV's Generous Local Service Polite Since 1975 Cell/text (714) 808-3084

552 Handy People Need a Legal Handyman? We do it all! Call Johnny on the spot!! 949-300-0642 Over 30 yrs of Building & Repairing in OC Free Estimates LIC. #577982 Bug Squad Protect Against Termite Swarming Season $200 off any termite work $50 pest control Orange oil treatment, Fugmigation, Repairs, Ants, Rodents, Bees, Rats, Gophers, Birds www.bugsquad-POW.com lic #PR1255-56 949-430-7203

Harmon Plumbing We send out Plumbers... Not Salesmen. Drains, Water heaters, Leak Detection, Hydro-Jetting, All Plumbing needs 562-943-4399 714-870-9957 www.harmon-plumbing.com BC Hauling and Demolition Let us haul away all your clutter! Appliances, Furniture, Trash, E-waste Job Site Debris, House, Yard, & Garage Clean up 949-365-6397 858-4BC-HAUL Orange county hauling We Haul Away Anything! furniture, Trash, Appliance, Electronics, Construction Debris, Yard, House, & Garage Cleanout. Same Day Service. Free Estimates. Orangecountyhauling.com 949-315-0532 714-328-0720 Low Cost Remodeling Baths, remodel, Additions, Drive ways, New constructions & More Lic#841037 FREE Estimates. Call: 714-224-6221

The Air Man Heating & Air conditioning Lowest prices of the year! Free In-Home Estimates Trusted Since 1984 Call: (714) 630-5001 www.theairman.com

JUNK REMOVAL WE PICK UP: Trash, Furniture, Jacuzzi, Appliances, Metal/ Wood Sheds, yard/storage/garage, vacacies, patio, Construction Debris and Concrete removal/demolition. ALL unwanted items.

FREE ESTIMATES • SAME-DAY SERVICE Small Jobs welcome.• All Estimates incl. labor & Dump fees.

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One Time Yard Clean Up Trimming, Weeding, Planting, Drought Tolerant, Ground Cover, Landscaping, Design, & Hauling. Small/Big Jobs Welcome. Free Friendly Estimates. Visa/MC/DC/AMEX GK: 949-344-4490

Robbed by your Employer? Working overtime & called salaried? Told to clock out but continue to work? Called an independent contractor/1099 employee? Speak w/attorney Diane Mancinelli at no cost to you. (714)734-8999

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RE-UP: FTP Specials: 3G's Private Reserve $30 | 3G's Gold Crumble | 7G's Top Shelf | FREE PreRoll w/ $10 Donation 8851 Garden Grove Blvd, Ste 105 Garden Grove, CA 92844 | 714.586.1565 From The Earth: We are the largest dispensary in Orange County! 3023 South Orange Avenue, Santa Ana, CA 92707 Tel (657) 44-GREEN (47336) | www.FTEOC.com OCCC: FREE .5 Gram of Wax (FTP, not valid w/other offers) FREE Joint (w/min $20 don) | 8th's start at $15 | Grams start at $5 Concentrates .5 G start at $10 | 10 AM - 10 PM Daily 714.236.5988 | 10361 Magnolia Ave. Ste. B, Anaheim CA Hand N Hand: FREE Joint w/ any purchase | 20% OFF Any Edible (limit 1) | 20% OFF Wax Product 2400 Pullman St., Suite B, Santa Ana | 657.229.4464 SHOWGROW: Voted BEST DISPENSARY in OC 2016! 1625 E. St. Gertrude Pl. Santa Ana CA 92705 | 949.565.4769 | ShowGrow.com

215 Open House

17232 Santa Barbara Street Fountain Valley Saturday, Feb. 4th (call for times) Sunday, Feb. 5th (call for times) Home Size: 1,831 sq ft Lot Size: 7,405 sq ft Year Built: 1964 4 Bedrooms/ 2 Bathrooms Lily Campbell (714) 717-5095 LilyCampbellTeam.com

LA MIRADA HEALING CENTER: $35 CAP | FREE DAB WITH EVERY DONATION FTP'S: 4.5 G 1/8 | $10 OFF CONCENTRATES | $3 OFF EDIBLES 15902 IMPERIAL HIGHWAY LA MIRADA, CA, 90638 | 562-245-2083 Green Mile Collective: First Time Patients Receive a FREE Private Reserve 1/8th with order. The Only Superstore Delivery Service | Call 1-866-DELIVERY or Order Online at DeliveryGreens.com

DELIVERY 9763 Sanmian Court Fountain Valley Saturday, Feb. 4th (call for times) Sunday, Feb. 5th (call for times) Home Size: 1,690 sq ft Lot Size: 1,768 sq ft Year Built: 1985 3 Bedrooms/ 3 Bathrooms Lily Campbell (714) 717-5095 LilyCampbellTeam.com

7901 19th Street Westminster Saturday, Feb. 4th (call for times) Sunday, Feb. 5th (call for times) Home Size: 1,794 sq ft Lot Size: 6,000 sq ft Year Built: 1953 2 Bedrooms/ 1 Bathroom Lily Campbell (714) 717-5095 LilyCampbellTeam.com

16641 Wellington Circle Huntington Beach Saturday, Feb. 4th (call for times) Sunday, Feb. 5th (call for times) Home Size: 2,578 sq ft Lot Size: 8,428 sq ft Year Built: 1966 4 Bedrooms/ 2.5 Bathrooms Lily Campbell (714) 717-5095 LilyCampbellTeam.com

HIGHER PURPOSE DELIVERY: LONG BEACH'S PREMIER DELIVERY. FREE GRAM & FREE EDIBLE (FTP W/ MIN $40 DON.) WE ACCEPT ALL MAJOR CREDIT & DEBIT CARDS! 855-665-3825 Rite Greens Delivery: OC's Most Trusted Cannabis Source 9AM10PM Daily | 714.418.4877 | ritegreensdelivery.com PURE & NATURAL THERAPY: DELIVERING QUALITY PRODUCT TO LB, HB, SEAL BEACH & SURROUNDING CITIES | 7 GRAMS FOR $50 ON SELECT STRAINS | 3 FREE PRE-ROLLS WITH EVERY ORDER* | 714.330.0513

DR. EVALUATIONS Releaf Wellness: Renewals $25 / New Patient - $35 657.251.8032 / 1540 E Edinger Ste. D Santa Ana CA 92705 6833 Indiana Ste. #102, Riverside CA 92506 OC 420 Evaluations: New Patients - $29 | Renewals - $19 1490 E. Lincoln Ave., Anaheim 92805 - 714.215.0190 1671 W. Katella Ave, Suite #130 Anaheim - 855.665.3825 4th St Medical: Renewals $29 | New Patients $34 with ad. 2112 E. 4th St., #111, Santa Ana | 714-599-7970 | 4thStreetMedical.com Cali 420 Rx: PLEASE CALL FOR LATEST SPECIALS! Sundays Appointment only | 714-723-6769 | 2601 W Ball Road, unit 209, Anaheim CA 92804 | Hours: Monday - Saturday 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM

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Public Relations Specialist: Assess and promote company’s image, products and perception. Req’d: BA in Liberal Arts, Int’l Relations or related. Mail Resume: Rainbow Beauty Co. 5900 Dale Street, Buena Park, CA 90621

Affordable Handyman Same Day/Next Day Service Skilled Tradesman. All types Installation, Repairs & Improvements 25 yrs Serving OC Call Frank: 714-470-6195

525 Legal Services

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Principal Management Consultant (Irvine, CA) Inspect project sites to monitor progress / ensure conformance to design specifications&safety. Provide technical advice to industrial&managerial personnel regarding design, construction& program modifications. Manage all aspects of a project as the team leader&supervise, train staff engineers. 40hrs/wk. Master’s in Civil Engineering or related Reqd. Resume to Kayuga Solution, Inc. Attn. Colin Chung, 9641 Irvine Center Dr, Irvine, CA 92618

THE OCEAN Corp. 10840 Rockley Road, Houston, Texas 77099. Train for a new career. *Underwater Welder. Commercial Diver. *NDT/Weld Inspector. Job Placement Assistance. Financial Aid avail for those who qualify 1.800.321.0298

554 Misc. Home Services

Fe br ua r y

IT Project Manager (Tustin, CA) Plan and implement IT systems. Bachelor’s in computer science + 2 yrs exp. Resume to: WJ & Company Inc. 335 Centennial Way #200, Tustin, CA 92780

554 Misc. Home Services

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CybEye, Inc. seeks UI/UX Graphic Designer. Mstrs. in Art, Art Education, Graphic Design reqd. and must have 24 mths exp. in graphic design. Design & update graphics for online presence, evaluate and make recommend. for clients’ websites, design graphics for client’s html email & social media sites, use Photoshop, Illustrator, Sketch, InVision, AfterEffect, HTML/CSS & Javascript. Work site: Torrance, CA. Mail resumes to 21515 Hawthorne Blvd, Ste. 690, Torrance, CA 90503.

106 Misc. Education

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CONDITIONS: All advertisements are published upon the representation by the advertiser and/or agency that the agency and advertiser are authorized to publish the entire contents and subject matter thereof, that the contents are not unlawful, and do not infringe on the rights of any person or entity and that the agency and advertiser have obtained all necessary permission and releases. Upon the OC Weekly’s request, the agent or advertiser will produce all necessary permission and releases. In consideration of the publication of advertisements, the advertiser and agency will indemnify and save the OC Weekly harmless from and against any loss or expenses arising out of publication of such advertisements. The publisher reserves the right to revise, reject or omit without notice any advertisement at any time. The OC Weekly accepts no liability for it’s failure, for any cause, to insert an advertisement. Publication and placement of advertisements are not guaranteed. Liability for any error appearing in an advertisement is limited to the cost of the space actually occupied. No allowance, however, will be granted for an error that does not materially affect the value of an advertisement. To qualify for an adjustment, any error must be reported within 15 days of publication date. Credit for errors is limited to first insertion. Drawings, artwork and articles for reproduction are accepted only at the advertiser’s risk and should be clearly marked to facilitate their return. The OC Weekly reserves the right to revise its advertising rates at any time. Announcements of an increase shall be made four weeks in advance to contract advertisers. No verbal agreement altering the rates and/or the terms of this rate card shall be recognized.

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2975 RedBANDILIER Hill Avenue, CIR, Suite FOUNTAIN 150 | Costa Mesa, CA 92626 | 714.550.5940 | free online ads & photos at oc.backpage.com 18475 VALLEY, CA 92708 | 714.550.5947 | OCWEEKLY.COM

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SAFE ACCESS DIRECTORY

41


1 ST LICENSED MEDICAL MARIJUANA DISPENSARY IN ORANGE COUNTY

SCSA

SOUTH COAST SAFE ACCESS

Largest Showroom & Biggest Selection in OC

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HOURS: Monday-Saturday 10am-8pm • Sunday 11am-7pm *Physician's Recommendation Required for Treatment of: Anxiety | Chronic Pain | Diabetes | Insomnia | Arthritis | Glaucoma

1900 Warner Ave. Ste. A, Santa Ana 92705 (Conveniently Located Off the 55 Freeway) 949.474.7272 • Hours: Mon-Sat 10am-8pm Sun 11am-7pm


February 2, 2017 – OC Weekly