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No. 01 / December 2011 The Testosterone Trap / Civilising the World Wild Web? / Violence Against Women / Education Beyond Institutions / The 360° Consumer World / The Power of Stories

Innovation & Authenticity


e d i t o r i a l

Dear guest of DLDwomen, Dear DLD friend,

The past DLDwomen conference “Innovation & Authenticity” left us with many new friends, ideas and action points. For the second time, the reunion of both female and male role models, opinion leaders and creative minds offered tasty food for thought and action at the Bavarian ­National Museum. Uniting topics like leadership, female markets and consumer behaviour, social innovations and how digitalization is shaping the life of women in today’s society, it was like a guidepost on a journey that has just begun. Being authentic and innovative are both essential qualities to navigate this journey towards empowerment and diversity. Facing the crossover collection of stories, projects, and ideas that were presented at the conference, we were looking for a nice way of capturing what has been touched and let you recap, reflect and share. We hope you enjoyed it and would be happy to receive your ­comments and feedback. Cheers,

Today, we’re living in a world that is vastly different from what it was only a lifetime ago. In the turnover of ideas and paradigm shifts, one thing remained perpetual: ­power and initiative prevailed. My great-grandmother Katharina von Kardoff-Oheimb was not only a member of the Reichstag but also of the automotive club in the 20’s,­ something extremely unusual those days. And it was my husband’s mother Aenne Burda who once said: “I frequently told myself that I can do whatever I want.” This way she has written one of the largest success stories of the Wirtschaftswunder. Against this, I felt privileged to be part of this extraordinary community sparkling with the will, power and initiative to compass new realities. In 2010, DLDwomen “The Female Decade” initiated a public debate from quota to erotic capital that has become more relevant than ever. The discussion continued now at this year’s DLDwomen “Innovation & Authenticity.” It was a lively exchange of ideas and vision, a source of inspiration, a great gathering of role models and a space where discerning questions were addressed. As the Chairwoman of DLDwomen, I was truly honoured to welcome all guests and partners to the Bavarian ­National Museum. Sincerely Yours,

Steffi Czerny and Marcel Reichart, DLD Founders and Directors

Maria Furtwängler-Burda, DLDwomen Chairwoman

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Images Video Music

gettyimages.com


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c o n t r i b u t o r s

Illustration and Interviews

Five Visiting Authors and One Illustrator

Susann Remke is the Burda Office Chief in New York. For this issue, we asked her to do the significant interview with Irene Natividad. Susann also works as Senior US Correspondent for FOCUS Magazine, covering social issues, entertainment, fashion and literature. She has a master’s degree in British & American Literature and previously worked for DIE WELT, Welt am Sonntag and The Miami Herald.  Page 22

Lynn Hatzius added the cherry on this DLDwomen cake with her stimulating and colourful illustrations. Lynn works freelance for publishers, record labels, magazines, private commissions while further exploring personal projects through collage, various printmaking techniques and paper engineering illustration. Check out more of her great work at www.lynnhatzius.com

David Schocken did the wonderful interview with Lidewij Edelkoort for this DLDwomen mag. His out of the box creativity and enlightened spirit provide him with a unique toolbox. During the past years he has worked in the fashion, design and business circuits in Holland, China, South Korea, USA and Israel. At the moment he is a founding partner at BRAIN&PIXEL, a communication design studio based in Tel Aviv.

Jennifer L. Schenker wrote all the DLDwomen profiles for this issue.  She is a veteran journalist who has been covering technology in Europe for 25 years, writing for publications such as the Wall Street Journal Europe, Time Magazine, the International Herald Tribune and BusinessWeek. Jennifer currently runs Informilo, an online magazine about the global tech sector.  Page 36, 48, 64, 74

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Eva Karcher is a close DLD friend and conducted the interview with Pola and Katharina Sieverding. She works as an independent journalist and specialist in the field of contemporary art, and the crossover of fashion, design, science, philosophy and art. She is a contributor for German VOGUE, Süddeutsche Zeitung, Welt am Sonntag and Burda Media and has published several books. Page 88

Flora King is a UK-based freelance journalist, presently contributing to publications ranging from Monocle to The Guardian and The Sunday Times. Previous jobs have taken her from the corridors of Vogue to an outback Australian sheep station, but she can now be found in the city of London, writing about anything from urban farming to haute couture. With her journalistic know-how, Flora advised on a few texts in this issue. 


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Contents

38 Violence Against Women – The Mother of All Issues

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The Female Century

On the run for success

Tr e n d s

 orea Canales, Somaly Mam, Pat Mitchell L and Hibaaq Osman

40 “The Best Thing That Happened to the People – Social Media!”

Fragments of Hibaaq Osman

41 Civilising the World Wild Web?

H ow free the Internet has to be

10 The Age of Doubt Trend gazing is Lidewij Edelkoort’s profession. She predicts what storm of desirable items will break down on consumer hearts. Three decades of successful prophecy crowned her the queen of all fashion and design must-have forecasters. Recently, her gaze widened towards social change and global economics. Page 10

14 Turning Twelve in 2012

 oung identities in a technology storm – Y Joanna Shields

16 The Way Forward

Luxury consumer involvement L e a d e r s h i p

18 Voluntary Agreements Are Not Enough

Ed u c at i o n

Yellow is the new pink

Legal female quota – Ursula von der Leyen

46 Education Beyond Institutions

48 Pioneering IT’s Next Frontier

Change for those who go for it

22 The Testosterone Trap

Women mean business – Irene Natividad

24 The Third Billion

 longside China and India – A James S. Turley

Gabi Zedlmayer – A DLDwomen profile

52 Frontiers of Education

Can kids teach kids?

56 Integrating Social Impact 56 Creating a Statement Through Tradition

19 Fighting Stereotypes

Can knowledge be taught everywhere?

 oroccan handicraft as a new concept M of luxury design

56 Fighting Child Marriage

Forget me not

57 Commitment by Global Players

A disaster management draft

57 Social Fashion From Bangladesh

A model about beauty fabrics

24 Setting the Tone From the Top Ursula von der Leyen called for a legal female quota. The German Federal Minister of Labour and Social Affairs urged the necessity of lifting more women into leading positions. Page 18

Making performance visible

25 Rise of Talent

Majority of educated capability

27 Sparking the Stalled Revolution

T e c h n o l o g y

Women shall dream bigger

 ntrepreneur empathy, trust and E ­t ransparency – Ofra Strauss

Sex differences matter

30 On Authenticity Heroines in conflict situations are rare? Reality draws a different picture. Stefanie Babst, the highest ranking NATO woman, and Abigail Disney, filmmaker and producer of “Women, War and Peace”, alongside Zika Abzuk, CSR manager of IsraeliPalestinian issues (CISCO), give personal examples. Recruiting is fully intended. Page 34

Bodies mirrored by distorted self-image Po li t i c s

32 Heaven Under Mother’s Feet

A journal by Shahrizat Abdul Jalil

33 Understanding Botswana

 f female priests and young mothers – O Pelonomi Venson-Moitoi

34 Call to Action

Heroines in conflict situations

36 Beyond Usual Ideas About Diversity

Laura Liswood – A DLDwomen profile

 eaving two-dimensional techniques beL hind – Sabine Anger, Christine Aylward, Jane Gilson, Rebecca Grossmann-Cohen and Franziska von Lewinski

62 From Experience to Targets

H e a lt h

30 From the Brain Frontier

I n n o vation

60 The 360° Consumer World

28 Channels of Communication

&

 canning the Net for female value – Irene S Au, Elisa Camahort Page, Delphine Gatignol, Polly Sumner and Ilana Westerman

64 The Satellady

Candace Johnson – A DLDwomen profile

66 Future Sounds

Digital revolution and the music industry

68 Ease Your Life

Technology’s supporting effects

68 From Idea to Ignition

Profiles of extraordinary business women

70 Entrepreneurs in Conversation

Is it possible to make a success of failure?

72 “The Shoe of the Month Club”

Stylistpick

72 Organizing Life

Manilla

72 Mapping Art 73 The Virtual Medical Home


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On the Cover

73 Russia’s Silicon Valley

Creative hub Skolkovo

73 Personalised Therapeutics

Gender issues in disease treatment

74 Technology’s Ability to Bring About Social Change

Megan Smith – A DLDwomen profile

76 Sky’s Focus on Female Products

Secrets in brand information

76 Crowdsourcing Challenges

The perfect app for women

76 Technology for Good

C reating the uncreatable

Feu i l l e t o n

80 A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters

Taryn Simon’s Tate Modern exhibition

Kids teach kids how to use the computer, professor Sugata Mitra observes with amazement. It is just a hole in the wall, set in a rural dusty area in India. Yet, children learn by themselves to withdraw knowledge from the Internet. Like sponges they absorb all the vocabulary, by downloading the Speaking Oxford Dictionary. Page 52

82 From Bourgeois to Simon

Judith

 hat is female in art? Hans Ulbrich Obrist W on a quest

Conrat Meit Malines, about 1525

83 The Power of Stories

 ow fiction enriches life – Maria FurtwängH ler-Burda, Patrick Ness and Shamim Sarif

87 Long-Lasting Documenta

Avant-garde, growth and Judith Butler

88 Passing on the Gene of Art

 olitical engagement and mutual inspiratiP on – Katharina and Pola Sieverding

92 Tradition – A Contemporary Approach

 oring? Not the Bavarian National B ­M useum

94 Wonderful Patron

 n the origins of the Arts in Marrakech O ­B iennale – Vanessa Branson

Google’s vice president for new business development, Megan Smith, is no ordinary engineer. Her biography carries a belief in social change and the will to pursue it. Page 74

95 Magnetic Cuisine

Current trends in cooking

96 Page Turner

 ighly recommended for epiphany hours: H DLDwomen editor’s pick

97 Dancing Music Note

Tune in: From Lady Gaga to Zwirbeldirn Soci e t y

Sa l o n

100 Summer Night’s Dream

C hairwoman’s dinner

102 Jazz, Food & Drinks

P ublisher’s dinner

104 Each Ball on Target

 nited for Africa: Charity Goal Wall U Campaign

105 Glitter, Football & Electro Pop 106 Stay in Touch 107 Imprint

A Living Man Declared Dead – Taryn Simon does not shy away from controversy. In her recent work, produced over a four-year period and displayed in London’s Tate Modern, the artist indulges in bloodlines. An intense worldwide research brought her closer to the stories underneath, for instance of the victims of genocide in Bosnia. Page 80

The Old Testament heroine Judith saved her Jewish town Bethulia by seducing Holofernes, the enemy general of the Babylonian king Nebuchadnezzar. The virtuous widow was brought into a tragic conflict in trying to save her people. Going against the traditional conduct expected of a widow she dressed herself to attract the general’s attention. When invited to his camp, Judith decapitated Holofernes who had become drunk and fallen asleep. Though shown naked by the artist, Judith’s thoughtful glance towards Holofernes’ head proves that the statuette’s meaning is more complex than the merely erotic. Judith is not shown as the murderer of a man, but as a heroine and therefore as a symbol of virtue. This view concurs with the contemporary 16th-century discourse that the beauty of a nude female body was a sign of moral predominance over men. Meit’s autonomous statuette can be considered as a landmark in the “querelle des femmes” – a debate conducted in the Early Modern era. This figure of Judith demonstrates that the role of women received attention long before DLDwomen took the decisive step towards establishing a platform connecting female leadership. Conrat Meit’s statuette – a masterpiece of virtuoso carving – is considered to be the ultimate embodiment of early Northern Renaissance art. Executed for the private collection of an individual, as yet unknown patron, Meit’s signature demonstrates the self-confidence of the artist, who was one of the preeminent sculptors of the Northern Renaissance. www.bayerisches-nationalmuseum.de


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V i e w

1942

Timeline

The Female Century On the run for success: historical achievements by women

1910

1923

1911

1928

1913

1931

1914

1933

Women from over 17 countries at the Second International Socialist Women’s Conference in Copenhagen vote for an International Women’s Day to promote women’s rights.

Marie Curie receives the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for discovering the elements radium and polonium. Marie Curie was also the first woman awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1903.

In Russia, Princess Eugenie M. Shakhovskaya was assigned duty as an artillery and re­- con­n aissance pilot; she is the first woman to become a military pilot.

Helen Keller, the first deaf blind person to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree, founds the Helen Keller International.

1915

At the 7th International Women’s Day Russian women gathered in a mass protest calling for political rights.

1917

Rosa Luxemburg was killed, in order to end the left-wing revolution. She died for her beliefs in the Marxist theories.

1918

The magazine Vogue publishes a picture of a short black dress from Coco Chanel and comments “The simple dress will be like a uniform for all women with taste.”

Amy Johnson-Mollison is the first woman to fly alone from England to Australia, since then she has become one of the most famous pilots in Great Britain.

The movie “The Women” is shown in the movie theatres. It’s a movie without any male par- ticipants althought the trailer says: “It’s all about men”.

Margaret Mead publishes her book “Sex and Temperament in Three Primitive Societies”, a major cornerstone of the feminist movement. The book claims that females are dominant in the Chambri Lake region of the Sepik basin of Papua New Guinea without causing any special problems.

1941

The US government starts the “Rosie the Riveter” – campaign, to urge women to join the labour force during World War II. More than six million female workers helped build planes, bombs, tanks and other weapons and replaced men in every industry.

On the 21st of April the French Provisional government decides to give women the right to vote. The first elections with female participation were the municipal elections of 29 April 1945 and the parliamentary elections of 21 October 1945.

1948

On the night of September 28 Eleanor Roosevelt, speaker on behalf of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, calling it “The international Magna Carta of all mankind”. The Declaration was adopted by the General Assembly on December 10, 1948.

1949

Simone de Beauvoir publishes her book “The Second Sex” which is considered a milestone in feminist literature and made her the best-known intellectual in France.

1950

Aenne Burda founds the sewing pattern magazine “Burda Moden” (today “Burda Style”) and writes one of the largest success stories of the European Wirtschaftswunder.

1951

Marion Donovan creates the first disposable diaper.

1952

The diary of a young girl is first published. The book is the “Diary of Anne Frank”, a 13 year old Jewish girl which is one of the most discussed victims of the Holocaust.

1955

The African-American civil rights activist Rosa Parks gets arrested for refusing to stand up for a white passenger. Later on Parks became “The mother of the freedom movement”.

1910 1911 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960

On August 18, the Nineteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution is ratified, which prohibits any United States citizen to be denied the right to vote based on sex.


Pa n o r a m a

1960

On July 23rd the birth control pill becomes accepted for contra­c eptive use in the United States.

1961

Audrey Hepburn stars in “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” and shapes a new image of women.

1963

The first woman in space is the Russian cosmonaut Valentina Tereshkova.

1967

The United Kingdom Parliament passes the Abortion Act, legalising abortions by registered practitioners, and regulating the free provision of such medical practices through the National Health Service.

1971

Alice Schwarzer raises public attention with her project “Women against § 218”, which was the German statute that made abortion illegal.

1975

Japanese Junko Tabei is the first woman to climb to the top of the Mount Everest.

1975

The first female president of Argentina Maria Estela Martinez de Perón takes over the government after her husband and President Juan Peróns death.

1977

Margaret Hilda Thatcher becomes UK’s first female Prime Minister. Her hard line against trade unions and tough rhetoric in opposition to the Soviet Union earned her the nickname “Iron Lady”.

1981

President Ronald Reagan appoints Sandra Day O’Connor as the first female member of the U.S. Supreme Court. She will serve the court until her retirement in 2006.

1984

Indira Gandhi is assassinated. She was leader of the Indian National Congress and the third Prime Minister of the Republic of India.

1988

For the first time a Muslim country, Pakistan gets a female prime minister with Benazir Bhutto.

1993

Toni Morrison is rewarded with the Nobel Literature Prize. Her novels are known for their epic themes, vivid dialogue, and richly detailed characters.

1995

In honour of her achievements, the remains of Marie Curie are transferred to the Panthéon, Paris. She became the first – and so far the only – woman to be honoured with interment in the Panthéon on her own merits.

Madeleine Albright is appointed the first female United States Secretary of State by U.S. President Bill Clinton.

2000

The European Court of Justice decides that the exclusion of women for nearly all military uses of the Bundeswehr is too general and therefore contrary to Community law.

2001

Condoleezza Rice becomes the first woman U.S. National Security Advisor.

2002

Halle Berry wins the Oscar for her main role in Monster’s Ball. She is the first Afro-American woman to win this trophy.

2003

The Iranian lawyer and human rights activist Shirin Ebadi is the first Muslim woman to receive the Nobel Peace Prize.

2004

The Iraqi-British architect Zaha Hadid is awarded with the Pritzker Prize. She is the first woman to receive it.

2005

Liberia elects the first female African leader and the world’s first black female president: Ellen Johnson.

2007

Germany’s women’s national football team wins the World Championship for the second time in a row.

2009

Germany re-elects its first female chancellor, Angela Merkel, for her second term.

1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

Jane Goodall establishes the Jane Goodall Institute (JGI), to support the protection of chimpanzees and their habitats.

1979

1996

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Trends The Age of Doubt Page 10

Turning Twelve in 2012 Page 14

It’s All About Shoes Page 15

The Way Forward Page 16

right: “Yellow is the new pink” – images that illustrate the next big trend in fashion, foreseen by Li Edelkoort, Pictures by Marie Taillefer

Lidewij Edelkoort

The Age of Doubt

Social reshuffling: yellow is the new pink. An Interview by David Schocken “I have seen the future, and it works,” the American Lincoln Steffens famously pronounced after witnessing communism in the Soviet Union in 1919. Lidewij Edelkoort could be forgiven for saying “I have seen the future, and it’s work.” As well as establishing herself as one of the world’s leading trend forecasters over the past three decades, she has successfully widened her gaze from the worlds of fashion and design to encompass social change and global economics. When Edelkoort talks about the future, people listen (she has a far better track record than the aforementioned Steffens). So when she says the trend for going to the gym will die out and be replaced by an appreciation for hard graft and physical labor, you’d better stop bench-pressing and start preparing your hands for the hard work ahead. Likewise, when she talks about the emergence of a “do it yourself ” culture, rest assured that those hands will boast green fingers; and who knows, maybe one day you’ll finally become

adept at assembling IKEA furniture. Some people like to live in the past, but Edelkoort has always preferred the future. A pioneer in the world of trend forecasting, her magazines – View on Colour, InView and Bloom – have been influencing the creative sphere for almost 20 years. When she says people in the future will take more responsibility for their lives, but still seek out someone to oversee their actions, she could almost be describing her own niche. Born in post-war Holland, Edelkoort has been honoured by both the Dutch royal family and French government for her work, and it’s in the French coastal village of Yport, in Normandy, that we meet. Edelkoort owns a summer house in the tiny, charming village which is situated in a valley. It’s apt that her house overlooks the entire village, for Edelkoot is someone who exists outside the mainstream, above it, looking inside. With extreme sensitivity to emotions and details, and a rare capacity to grasp situations from an historical perspective, she foresees where mankind is heading. The summer house was built almost 200 years ago and has a poetic beauty. The numerous rooms are filled, but not overly so, with beautiful objects. Edelkoort’s own bedroom is located on the second floor, overlooking the lush garden, a space she clearly cherishes. It’s also a space she sees as emblematic of the future, where old-fashioned craft skills and modern technologies will combine to create a whole new range of possibilities. “I see the day,”

Edelkoort explains, “that I will go out to the garden and bring into the house the table [yes, table] that just grew enough. Once inside, it will continue growing; the table will grow, and I will be able to cut another piece off it, another table. A young branch will grow out of the table,” she says, demonstrating her point with one of her generous hand gestures. Her gestures are hard to describe in words. They involve a sound, like the sound of a distant lion, dramatic expiration in the eyes, and a big hand movement which make it all look like part of a dance. Most beautiful was when she showed me example gestures she saw in a war dance between two tribes deep in Africa. She was lucky to get out of there alive. She had no such problems when she delivered her last talk at DLD, which started with a YouTube clip of different street artists singing the song “Lean on Me” in different places around the globe. She explains that this is the way she gets the audience in the mood, but it also underscores another serious point: “It is the end of the era of the individual,” she believes. “We are going back to team-working, to groups, to couples.” In Lidewij’s eyes, the concept of the family is becoming increasingly important, and “we will all need to lean on each other far more. “We are heading towards a major change in the structure of society,” she states, suggesting that men have become far more accepting of fatherhood


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as a life choice. “Now it is often the boys who push the girls” to have children; “the girls are the ones who want to put it off and it is the boys who want to become fathers,” Edelkoort says. “We suddenly see all these fathers carrying their babies, and that is very new; we’ve never seen that in society.” This new phenomenon will create a new kind of baby, one that will be educated equally by both the mother and father. “Hopefully this will change the Oedipus complex, as well as other complexes, but it will create other complexes. The kids of the future will get more of their fathers and they will run less after proving their own masculinity, they will become free of that.” According to Edelkoort, in the near future we will sha r e m o r e, c a r e l e s s about owning things and care more about giving. While still joining groups, churches and clubs, instead of transforming and giving up ourselves like we are used to (by wearing uniforms, using a specific way of speaking, behaving under a specific code), we will now be donating ourselves without losing our own sense of self. Companies will have to reshuffle the cards, rehire people, and place them in positions that fit, positions they will succeed in, rather than recruiting random people to close empty holes in the system. It will be more like casting jobs. This will be the way to extract the maximum power and devotion out of a person. As Lidewij sees it, the system will have to adjust itself, be able to accept the different ‘donations’ of people. Some people will donate more than others, some will donate during the day, some during the night. The general requirement will be to have a happy lifestyle and to be productive for the company, for the society. “The known management pyramids will become more of a plateau; the high positions will descend and it will all be flatter.” “It is the end of the era of the individual.” Lidewij Edelkoort There will be a general need to maximize the qualities of each and every one of us, with Edelkoort using a term more likely to be found in the garden to describe the new type of management – organic. Managers will have to learn to listen more, be more sensitive to the needs of their team. We will have

to create systems that will be much more flexible – finding a way to let people work in two different companies, for instance. We will need to give space for the developing multidisciplinary way of being. “It will be unpopular to be an individual,” Edelkoort warns, adding, “It is almost old-fashioned already.” Those who choose to live as an individual will have to work much harder, because now, to be accepted and recognized as an individual, you will have to become a Picasso; simply being talented will not be enough. Edelkoort says the successful societies will be the ones smart enough to let go of the concept of the individual and instead work as a team. “City planners fail to see it,” she says. “They plan the future cities for the individual. They don’t realize that we want to be together. In the future, we will have family compounds where the grandparents will live next to their children and their grandchildren. There will be a mix, society will blend. “Privacy will be reevaluated,” she continues. “How a person is managing his time will be less important than the actual results of his actions.” In order to have privacy, we will have to unwire from everything, from our emails, mobiles, social networks. Edelkoort cites the past as the way forward, noting that we used to be more foolish, more humorous, more playful, and we need to recapture that creativity again. Edelkoort says she first noticed these changes at the ground-breaking Design Academy Eindhoven, where she presided as chairwoman from 19992008. Her students there kept saying they didn’t want to do the assignments on their own, but instead wanted to work in groups. “In their presentation they would line up, standing as a group while everyone took exactly the role that fitted him or her,” Lidewij recalls. “It was a safer and easier way for them to pass. And they had beautiful results.” Later she saw the trend starting in society. “Of course the Internet plays a massive role in spreading the new trend,” she says. “We are aimed towards this new society where there is more compassion, more empathy, where men are less macho, where man and woman are more like partners. I see more and more designers work in couples. They live and work together, they travel together; they are not one, they are two individuals in a team.” Similar to the world-renowned Dutch

Edelkoort’s 7 Trends DIY Improvising is the make-do design. People are hungry to create with their own fingers. Do it yourself will be the mega tendency of the future, e.g. knitting and crafting. They are symbols for togetherness. Yellow is the new pink Lidewij predicts yellow and gold to be the rising star colours as they symbolize light, optimism and sun, important for life. Cartoons like ‘Alice in Wonderland’ will spill into design with a lot of fun and colour. The individual society will fade We will go back to team-working, groups and couples. People do not want to work alone anymore. They will put themselves in their most talented role, spend their individual self to the group and work together. Men, please stop training! Muscles are out. Women favour a new archetype of man – a slender romantic kind. New fathers Families and family compounds take more and more center stage. It is now the boys who want to have babies. These new fathers will also take care of the children which results into a more complete society as babies are fathered and mothered. Farming The borders between rural and urban will disappear. The sustainable consumer will work in the country and incorporate nature in the city like a modern farmer. Design The modern consumer is interested in a continous stream of information, ideas and mentality. Fluidity in design will become very important. The role of product recycling and longevity will grow. Material tends to become lighter, very invisible.


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academy she created, Lidewij sees a future world with less importance placed on gender, race, and age, but more on essence and content. At the academy, a student will never sit with the same people in two different lessons; they mix. There are also no classrooms, everything being based on an open space concept. If a student sees a lesson which he finds more interesting on the other side of the space, he is welcome to go and join it. He is free to do whatever he desires as long as at the end of the day he will present convincing work, and that is the challenge – at the Design Academy, only 30 percent of the students who start the course actually graduate. It takes huge motivation and self-discipline for a student to push himself through this challenging system. “The changes always start at the creative circles and later spread to the masses,” Edelkoort says, supporting the method. Education has become a major passion for Edelkoort over the years, and she complains that academic establishments are having to do a job not being done by parents, peers and leaders. “Unfortunately, our politicians today are using a language that we don’t want our children to use,” she says, prompting her to discuss the ‘Respect’ course she introduced to the curriculum in Eindhoven. During the course’s first three months, the students learn to take care of themselves – what does the self mean, how to make responsible decisions. For the next three months they learn to respect another person in the group, and finally to respect the group, the society. “I think this is one of the main reasons why our students are so successful,” Lidewij states. I think these subjects must be covered by all schools.” A good design, she argues, is based on respect for the user, for the human being, and you can’t design a good product if you don’t respect yourself and others. “Our governments don’t get it at all. The system needs a shake,” Edelkoort declares, suggesting a radical new solution of two governments, one for the short term and one for the long term. The one for the long term will deal with the big questions, the global questions of finance, environment, health, etc. It should be a world federation, elected for a long period of 10-15 years, comprising a group of wise men and women, thinkers and philosophers. The short-term government will deal with the daily management of the communities. Edelkoort believes humanity is

left: Rolling up the sleeves for more do-it-yourself culture, pictures by Marie Taillefer Right: Industrial design by INNOVO will have a handmade look, picture by Anaëlle Madec

left: Colours are getting lighter, Design by Van Heesch Design, picture by Anaëlle Madec Right: Organic shapes take over, interior design by Malit Segal Raayoni, picture by Anaëlle Madec

left: Design by Patricia Urquoila, picture by Anaëlle Madec Right: Celebrating crafts, Design by Lenneke Langenhuijsen, picture by Anaëlle Madec


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now ready for a global government and a global currency. She also has a name for it: “The Global.” At the academy in Eindhoven, students learned how to question the question, recognizing that doubt is the most important thing in development. In this way students learn how to think for themselves. These days, people live in doubt. Nothing is real: we think we buy organic food but it is full of chemicals; we think someone is beautiful and then companies get lawsuits for over- manipulating the images. Everything is fake. Edelkoort predicts there will be less and less truth in our lives. “Everybody can fake everything,” she says, so therefore we will see people with trust issues. “It is going to be gorgeous in fashion,” she smiles. “It is amazing, getting truth into our field!” “The changes always start at the creative circles and later spread to the masses.” Lidewij Edelkoort Lidewij Edelkoort dares to say what she thinks. She believes that many people see correctly but no one dares to stand up and speak out. “My weak point is listening to myself,” she says, surprisingly. For example, her trend book in 2000 was all about gold. She predicted that gold was going to be the hit of the century, as a material, as a color in fashion and as an investment. “Even the cover of my book was gold and yet I didn’t invest in gold myself – and we all see what happened with gold prices in the past decade,” she notes. “Gold and yellow colors are up because of the sun. People need hope and optimism, and yellow reminds us of the sun.” Now she believes the right investment direction is in art, design, real estate and education, all things that will play a bigger and bigger part in our lives in the near future. Of all her trending topics, “do it yourself ” is perhaps the key one for Lidewij, and one she will present next month in China as part of her world tour. She suggests that people are more and more interested in the process rather than the end result, so there is a hunt for both, a combination, and therefore designers are creating DIY products. Take IKEA, for example: it’s not for nothing that it is such a huge success. It’s bringing interest into people’s lives. Edelkoort adds that it’s the same in farming and cooking, citing the recent trend of apartments without kitchens as a mistake of society. In Amsterdam,

for instance, apartments were built without kitchens for the non-married individual. Now the inhabitants realize it was a mistake and are installing kitchens. Family structure is coming back. In China, Edelkoort will be telling her consumers to think for themselves and be creative. “For centuries they had no say, they were always governed

our status quo – if we doubt everything, and embrace it – it will become an interesting state of mind. We need to take for granted that everything might not be what it seems to be. Once you think about it, you learn to not fear it and it becomes romantic.” And if we learn to live with the uncertainty of the era, we’ll be less depressed, and less people will take their

by a totalitarian government or emperor or whatever was there, so now they need to be educated to think, first of all,” she states, matter-of-factly. “It takes time, it will take a few generations.” Indeed, the Chinese may be in for a pleasant surprise at the lectures: “They hire us to give them trend forecasts but we find ourselves teaching them. I love teaching.” On a subject close to home, Edelkoort says designers are increasingly interested in rediscovering their roots, leading to an “infusion of crafts and industry.” We already see a lot of handmade-looking products; the industrial design is booming due to the current economic climate as mass production is necessary to reduce costs. “When we put industrial products together with handmade ones, everything starts to sing,” is how she defines it. In this analogy the consumer becomes the director, conductor and composer. “The whole future lays in the hands of consumers becoming the curators of their own lives.” Edelkoort will also potentially be the bearer of bad news to some Chinese businesses: Production in Asia is becoming more and more expensive, therefore manufacturing will return to Europe, and that will trigger the end of low-priced brands. Products will be made to a higher standard and sold for higher prices. They will become more sustainable. Eastern Europe, Greece and Portugal will be the big beneficiaries of this shift. According to Edelkoort, this trend will become big in five years’ time. In general, Edelkoort sees everything in our lives becoming more and more flexible. We will therefore doubt everything. “We should learn to embrace doubt,” she says. “If we learn to doubt

own lives, Edelkoort believes. This fashion depression is a temporary thing, she says, although she adds that if she were to contemplate suicide, she would do it with a snake, like Cleopatra, “in a beautiful bed, in a beautiful dress.” (Don’t worry, she says she wouldn’t have the nerve.) Edelkoort’s new trend book for summer 2013 is called “Bliss” and will be launched in September: “The book is going to zoom in on the small spiritual moments of everyday life. Taking care of somebody else, loving the sun’s rays coming into your house, working in the garden, tending your plants, celebrating with friends, cleaning up your act, and all the other small silly things that give color to life.” It is about the added value of our actions, she points out, but it is not about “New Age [mysticism], Yoga and meditation. It is about the beauty of relationships between us, and the people and objects around us.” According to Edelkoort, this is what people need these days – an optimistic reminder from our surroundings. When asked what gets her out of bed in the mornings, Edelkoort says simply, “Curiosity and discipline. I am an Iron Lady, and I do what I have to do. I am very strict and accountable. If you promise, you must deliver. I always say yes too easy, and then get crazy delivering, yet I always deliver. Always.” With our interview at an end, I ask the Iron Lady what her message to the world would be if she could get their attention for one moment. The response is unequivocal: “U-turn! That would be my advice. We need to vigorously turn around. It is not going to be as painful as people think, and we will feel so much better if we do it.”  www.trendtablet.com


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Joanna Shields

Turning Twelve in 2012

thoughts or ideas to share. By posting high-res photos or videos they immediately connect with their peers. “It’s becoming cool just to be yourself.”

What is it like to be young within rapid digital innovation and social networking? Facebook executive Joanna Shields sees through the eyes of her son.

A common picture: A technology-savvy youngster surrounded with modern tools. A mobile phone, fast Internet connection and the ability to share thoughts and feelings, instantly. Unlike previous generations, this specific group of adolescents has been growing up completely in a digital age. Those who turn twelve in 2012 actually leave the comfort of childhood behind, their ability to live as a carefree innocent being. Ahead of them lie adulthood and societal responsibility. “Today’s twelve-year-olds know more about the digital age than anyone else.” Joanna Shields sees it everyday in her own twelve-year-old boy. The Facebook executive since 2010 finds it astonishing that her son’s generation is a group of little experts in the digital field now. “They know more than us, and we are the grown-ups who are meant to be advising and guiding them.” The digital world creates an upside-down reality. All of a sudden, those who are supposed to be mentored teach how to move smoothly in the mine field of online

self-exposure. Naturally, this triggers challenges for all role models. Here, they face a generation which has a social networking DNA. It is impossible to imagine Joanna’s son for instance simply being left with no digital connection to his peers. A parent ignoring this issue of reversed capabilities risks being left out as an authority. When Joanna watches her son, she constantly asks herself: “How can I guide him? How can I help him live up to his potential?” These supposedly are the key questions for the respective parents. All the children who are turning twelve in 2012 will break boundaries, Joanna argues. Life and all of its complexities will be experienced in a truly digitally connected world. It is a perfect storm of technology. “When we took summer holidays and wanted to stay in touch with a friend, we had to communicate via sending a postcard,” she remembers. “We would handwrite it and take it to the letterbox, hoping - that it would reach the person we intended it for.” Now children may have fifty epiphanies a day, coming up with amazing

While observing her son and his friends, Joanna concludes that they are much more open than her own generation. It is about accepting the individual as these kids are being exposed to so many different types of people, she says. This way no teenager has to hide anymore who he or she really is. Although peer pressure still exists nowadays, “Kids are the author of their own life story.” Social networking appears to be the ideal form, which starts empty and is filled with a growing child’s character. “It’s opening up a new realm of possibility,” Joanna explains. “It’s not impossible to imagine a young boy posting an amateur video on YouTube and then becoming the next Spielberg.” Today’s children seem to be well prepared for their future. Joanna herself grew up in Pennsylvania in the ‘Rust Belt’ part of the United States. Back in 1974, when she was twelve years old, girls were expected to be nurses or teachers, not businesswomen or entrepreneurs. They were not taught to dream big or encouraged to challenge themselves. Secretly Joanna would dream about leaving Pennsylvania and travelling across the world. “I had this one teacher, a fairly tough man, who observed how I was trying to fit in with the ‘in’ crowd at school. He took me aside one day, and I thought he was going to reprimand me. Instead he told me to forget what those girls thought of me, to go over and sit and study math and physics with the boys.” Building Identities It is this inspiration and advice children today seek in social networking. In Joanna’s case it needed a random school teacher’s advice to open up her mind towards the possibility of a different future. It encouraged her to work hard and finally leave her small town. Until that day, nobody but her parents had shown any belief in her potential. “It takes someone who you really respect to give you the confidence you need to move forward in life,” Joanna points out. This inspiring figure helped her to study with the boys, to finish school early and to get a master’s degree by the age of 22. In order to build identities, today’s youngsters communicate online. A


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Facebook profile is empty and characterless until it is filled with friends, favorite music and must-see TV shows, sentiments and opinions. Everyone builds a Facebook identity from scratch. It’s a platform made for expression. Yet how has information become a commodity? A gaze in the past reveals that it could take hours at a minimum to collect data. One had to walk over to the library and pull out various volumes to come across satisfying answers. A painfully slow process compared to the blitz bytes sent online. Search engines have taken over, at the single click of a button. “But the value of this information isn’t just in its accessibility,” Joanna argues. “It’s in what we choose to do with it.” Her message is straight forward: “Don’t just consume information, make it your own!” Youngsters should ask themselves how to process, moreover analyze it. The key is to make it special. “How might you add something unique to the data in order to increase its value?” Like one of Joanna’s former schoolmates, Tariq Krim. He always was baffled by idealism and optimism, a certain determination to change the status quo. When others organized protests and put up banners he would sit on the sidelines. However, “It was Tariq who became the successful entrepreneur. We had the ideas but not the tools. Tariq on the other hand always did things his own way.” People today do have the tools, but do they also have the desire? Joanna’s advice to young people is to find their passion, to find the one thing that inspires them, and to see it through: “With the tools and the desire they really will be able to change the world.” “Via social networking, kids are able to express themselves far better.” Now, readers and participants should join her on Facebook. The community is called ‘12 in 2012’ with a leading question: “If you could travel back in time to when you were a twelveyear-old, what wisdom would you share?” Joanna’s commitment is to assemble all of this information and to put it into a usable framework. This is the ultimate way in for the role models, to inspire and give a new source of reference: “Let’s give these kids a new pathway, just as my old teacher did for me!” 

It’s All About Shoes At the DLDwomen Conference 2011 a variety of amazing and colourful shoes was spotted on stage and in the crowd. Here are our favorite picks.


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Susanne Seibel, Gyorgy Konda, David Rowan

The Way Forward Consumer industries and the luxury industry in particular need to quickly adapt their product development and marketing in a more consumer-centric way due to the digital age’s many implications. Barclays’ Susanne Seibel and Bain & Company’s Gyorgy Konda discussed with WIRED UK’s David Rowan why consumer involvement is the way forward and how luxury brands still struggle to fully embrace the opportunities presented by the internet. DR: Susanne, when it comes to the idea of consumer-centric product development, how can a company actively involve its consumers? Shall they put the problem out on the internet and see if people can solve it through open innovation? “Consumers need to be heard. It’s time that they stand up and say what they want. Digital media is an incredible opportunity for that.” Susanne Seibel SS: Yes. There are many examples of consumers who take an initiative and increasingly ask for products that are green, environment-friendly or recyclable. Consumers need to be heard and the internet offers the chance for them to stand up and say what they really want. DR: Which brands “listen” to their consumers in an effective way? Could you state some specific examples? SS: Take the example of cars. It is women who often take the initiative to buy a car and make the decision. Women are very well informed as they gain their information through the internet and publicly available sources. If you offer appealing products, the ones that are at the forefronts of consumer’s mind, you as a company or an entrepreneur will have the audience. DR: Gyorgy, many of the luxury brands have been quite hesitant about going online, particularly for transaction. Luxury is about limited supply, it is about controlling the user experience. Has this finally changed? GK: I wouldn’t say changed, no - but changing, yes. There is an increasing understanding on the side of owners and top managers of luxury firms that this is a channel that they simply cannot live without in the future. Wheth-

er that is really driving change within the organisations is to be seen. Unfortunately many of these companies don’t really have the right people or right organisations to deal with the online channels – both in terms of sales and marketing. The big question always is: where do we put this thing? Is it in the marketing department? Or should we create a separate department for it? There are some very fundamental questions around how to really do this. DR: You are consulting with a lot of the big brands. Who are the role models or the ones that are actually doing this right that the rest of us can learn from? GK: Some of the brands are doing very well, clearly the biggest ones who have a lot of money to invest in marketing and who have the ability to actually set up something relevant in the digital world with a small portion of their marketing budget. “Digital marketing is really a lot more targeted and cost effective than the usual marketing activities.” Gyorgy Konda DR: Give us some names! GK: I think Louis Vuitton is doing a great job, Gucci is doing a great job and there is a whole set of other smaller players as well that will be doing great. What we need to take into consideration is that digital marketing is really a lot more targeted and cost effective than the usual marketing activities. I am convinced we will see a lot of it coming. But currently the sector is still in a process of gathering the capabilities to meet this challenge. DR: If you talk to Joanna Shields from Facebook she’ll explain to you that increasingly the social graph is driving actions - what your friends recommend etc. And they talk a lot about social commerce being the next few billion dollars of revenue for Facebook. How

should brands understand and respond to the growing power of that social influence? SS: In the luxury industry we see the strongest change for cosmetic companies. They increasingly communicate and test their products through digital marketing and online channels. And they get their information from the consumer side. Again, this is a great example how females interact, how they exchange their experiences with a product and how they influence the companies. It is not the push model à la “I have a great new face cream” but more about asking “what do you as a consumer expect from a face cream?” and about going back to my lab and creating it. Only then I start to market it to the target group I have taken that feedback from. This is probably the first time ever that consumer companies actually have something to say to luxury companies which have always considered themselves superior concerning the way they address the consumer. DR: But how important are the social networks for delivering not only feedback but actual transactions? GK: For now, I don’t think that this is happening on the normal or traditional online channels. It is probably happening a lot on the wholesale side of the business but on the retail side it is not really happening yet. We as Bain & Company and I myself are firm believers of the notion of recommending – this is a very important part of a business’ success. We actually developed a very interesting metric called the “Net Promoter Score” which basically answers the question of how likely people would recommend this brand to a friend on a scale from 1 to 10. People stating a 9 or 10 are considered promoters of the brand. What we found is that across industries, including luxury, this is tremendously correlated to the performance and the growth of the brand. In that sense this is something


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that was already happening before, only now we have a new channel where this can really be scientifically implemented. Before that it was something that you as a company could not really control because it was basically about people talking to people. DR: The internet has just officially gone mobile. The last quarter, sells of PCs for the first time were eclipsed by those of smartphones and tablets combined. Now that consumers are connected wherever they are and transacting through their mobile devices, which brands make the most of this at the moment? SS: At the moment it is still the telecom brands but the mass market brands are starting to use this as well, especially in emerging markets. The penetration of mobile phones in emerging markets is much higher than the penetration of TV or any other modern media. Not everyone in these markets has a computer but most people have a mobile phone. Unilever for example uses mobile marketing to sell deodorants via mobile phones. This is the way forward. Years ago we had a massive surge in Cadbury Chocolate sales when an ad was put on Youtube. People suddenly were responding and buying it. Mobile technology is a great way forward to bring products closer to consumers. Young people don’t want a television for their dorm anymore when they go to university. They only have their laptops. Companies have to change their marketing and market

for their target groups. And as we heard nearly 80% of those are women. DR: One of the messages I got from both of your presentations was that the conversation with consumers has to be much more emotionally driven. You have to sell a product with a sense of meaning. It is no longer just the old 1950s advertising telling you what is good for you. So how do the rest of us incorporate that sense of emotional intuition, not only for women consumers but more generally? “In the luxury companies, there is a bit of deafness concerning the voice of the consumer. The big challenge for the luxury industry is to be more consumer-centric.” Gyorgy Konda GK: The great thing about luxury is that if it is one thing for sure, that’s emotional. People have a very strong emotional link to the brands. So in the case of luxury to some extent that emotional factor was already there - on the other hand there is also a little bit of deafness concerning the voice of the consumer side. One of the big challenges going forward for the luxury industry will be definitely becoming more consumer-centric. Today there are tech-

nologies available allowing you to browse and see what is happening. You don’t need to go out and conduct consumer interviews anymore. You can get very valuable insight for basically no investment at all. How to do this and merge it into your value proposition will make all the difference. DR: If you were each going to set up a business now that is going to make you tons of money over the next five years, what sector would you invest in? SS: I think the combination of wellbeing and sustainability is incredibly powerful. We all have enough of consumer products that we consume and throw away. We don’t want that anymore. Whether this is cosmetics or food or beverages – it has got to be good for you and not only for you but also for those around you. And I think this is where the future lies. GK: If I had to do that today I would probably go for some kind of service initiative helping clients like the luxury industry to get closer to the digital world, both for sales but also in terms of marketing, organising themselves and so forth. I definitely see a great potential in that area. 

The Mobile DLDwomen Video Experience

Reading The Signals

Close Up: Luxury & Consumer Industries

Joanna Shields, Facebook Page 14

Gyorgy Konda, Bain & Company Page 16

David Rowan, Wired UK Page 16

Susanne Seibel, Barclays Capital Page 16


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Leadership Voluntary Agreements Are Not Enough Page 18

Fighting Stereotypes Page 19

The Age of Possible Page 21

The Testosterone Trap Page 22

The Third Billion Page 24

Setting the Tone From the Top Page 24

Rise of Talent Page 25

Sparking the Stalled Revolution Page 27

Channels of Communication Page 28

Ursula von der Leyen

Voluntary Agreements Are Not Enough The German Federal Minister of Labour & Social Affairs sheds light on women in leading positions and proves the necessity of a legal female quota. Although the word “quota” is not very appreciated in Germany, Ursula von der Leyen introduces it explicitly. Ten years ago there was a voluntary agreement between politics and industry to raise the amount of women in leading positions, especially women on boards. Ten years ago 2.5 % board members of listed companies were women in Germany. When she was inaugurated as Federal Minister of Family Affairs, Senior Citizens, Women and Youth, she inherited this voluntary agreement and felt obliged to do her homework, e.g. expanding childcare for children that are younger than three years old or to introduce parental payments, called ‘Elterngeld’ in Germany. More so, she introduced the father’s month and paternal payments. In Bavaria she was told that ‘Wir Männer brauchen kein Wickel-Volontariat’ (We men don’t need a dipper leave). Four years later, today, 25% of men take their parental leaf - even 30% of Bavarian young fathers take their parental leave.

There was a lot to do in politics. In 2009, Mrs. von der Leyen switched to the function of Federal Minister for Labour and Social Affairs. Last year, in December, she reviewed and assessed what has happened with this voluntary agreement over the last decade and if industry and politics have done their homework. The numbers she found were unbelievable; women on executive boards in listed companies rose from 2,5% ten years ago up to 3,0% nowadays, my ladies. “I was wondering about the outcry we would have heard if that was the rise in profits in those companies,” she still says in sincere outrage, “I’m speaking about the last TEN YEARS.” The lesson was learnt. To her, this proved the limits of voluntary agreements. If there are no targets and numbers that are measured, the goal will not be reached ever. Still, the preconditions are good - 65% of young people leaving the universities are women; 31% of those self-employed are wom-

en. In small and medium enterprises, the ‘Mittelstand’ and backbone of German industry, daughters climbed slowly but gradually went up into leading positions. They now account for 25-30% top positions. Looking at the listed companies where money and power joins, the glass ceiling remained rock solid. “I think we have to break that glass ceiling. We want the quota in Germany, now!” Ursula von der Leyen started to ask the H&R managers for the reasons why there are so little women on boards? In response, she heard arguments that are not up to date anymore. The first argument was: ‘Qualified women just don’t exist.’ A very hard thing to hear for a whole generation, actually her own generation, that it does not exist. Reacting against this myth, the association of German women entrepreneurs had simply made available a talent pool of 200 perfectly qualified women; if somebody is really looking for a qualified, a brilliant woman just needs to have a look at that database. The second argument: There are too few women in technical occupations. That is true but there are too few men in technical occupations, too. If it was only the wrong career that women choose, causing the lack of women on boards of technical industry, what is the reason why there are almost no women neither in banks or insurance companies? One does not need to be an engineer to run a bank or an insurance company. Share of women on corporate boards and executive committees Executive

Boards

Commitees Sweden

17%

27%

United States

14

15

Britain

14

12

Norway

12

32

Russia

11

8

China

8

6

France

7

15

Spain

6

10

Brazil

6

7

Germany

2

13

India

2

5

NYT Supplement in Sueddeutsche Zeitung (11. Juli 2011)

The third argument is a classic: Women fear leadership. They shy away. “Well, that is certainly true for many


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Germany has undergone a fundamental shift in attitude in the last ten years. ChildIsland care, day schools and Norway parental payments are Countries with Sweden female quota all outcomes of a lively debate. Ursula von Law agreed der Leyen says she did not believe in quotas Law planned when she was younger. Source: www.welt.de S h e wa s c o n v i n c e d that tough women who Netherland are great in their jobs, make it up to the top. Belgium Still, in other counGermany tries, where quotas have been introduced, there was a real France change; it made a real difference. For examItaly ple in 2003, Norway incorporated a minimum Spain representation of 40% of each gender into company laws and the result is that today they have women on 42% of seats and boards in listed comwomen but also for many men,” as- panies in Norway. Other European sumes Mrs von der Leyen dismantling countries have been following this this argument. “Not all of the men want path by now, speaking of Spain, Iceto be leaders.“ Finally, the last and most land, Austria, and for example France. frequently offered argument is: Ger- Even the conservative government of many does not very well in reconsid- Sarkozy just introduced quotas for eration of work and family. That is true, the listed companies in France. They but the mere fact that there neither aim to have 40% of seats occupied by are women with children nor without women until 2015. Why did Sarkozy children on boards speaks for itself. do that? “It’s simple, because employ“It’s not about children,” concludes the ers asked him to do so,” she explains feisty minister. “We have taken a look and continues: “I wish we had such at these few rare examples, those few employers here in Germany. That women on boards and what we have would be perfect. I have never been seen is that 80% are married and 2/3 a real fan of quotas from the beginof them have children – so where is ning but to be honest: so far I like the results of quotas.”  the problem?” Marilyn Johnson, Alexandria Mathole, Ursula Schwarzenbart

Fighting Stereotypes Marilyn Johnson IBM hired its first female employee in 1899, an administrative assistant. From an early stage on, IBM’s founder, Thomas J. Watson Senior knew that diversity and inclusion are essential. His insightful early investment in labour was brilliant. “In 1953, IBM grew and expanded to the Southern States North Carolina and Kentucky. The 50’s

and 60’s were shaped by the civil rights movement, so IBM authored a letter to the two states governors that said that IBM does not practice discrimination. We will hire blacks, we will have integrated cafeteria service, we will have blacks managing whites, we will have women managing men and we will pay everybody for the job that they do on a pay scale,” says Marilyn John-

son, VP Global Market Development and responsible for women in business at IBM. This was groundbreaking because the letter leaked to the press and the governors would not sacrifice those jobs and the payroll tax that would come along with the 1,000 employees that IBM planned to hire from the general location - an investment in talent. Marilyn’s job is to value business leadership. When starting in 2004, she was passionate about opening up doors for women in the IT industry and conducted an internal inspection on the percentage of female executives among the board or on how many suppliers are females. This resulted into a troika between HR, marketing and procurement to measure IBM on the incorporation and inclusiveness of diverse talent. Marilyn gets measured on a quota of how much revenue she brings to the company and to target a specific market segment. In some markets, specifically the US, she targets Asian-owned businesses, whether they are male or female, black-owned, Hispanic-owned or Native American businesses. “Now women are leading as producers on revenue because more women are becoming entrepreneurs than any other costumer set in the world. My legacy at IBM was to get the internal male executives to realise that this investment was not being benevolent. This was going to determine the future of our company,” she explains. Women are powerful all around the world, not just in the US. “Now we are moving more towards marketing on indigenous people or people that have been disenfranchised because of colonisation. My job is to understand their business, to understand our solution offerings and to match those. We have to go back and fight for the rights of women, to get the correct loans and investment dollars, to measure ourselves and be the force that I know all women are,” Marilyn ends. Alexandria Mathole “A very well-known date in South Africa is June 16, 1976, the day South Africa revolutionised. At the front of the revolution stood not only young people but women. One hundred years ago, it was women who decided to protest and to demand the right to vote in South Africa. That has always been the corner stone and the basis for the growth in this country.” says Alexandria Mathole, Executive Director of Southern Africa for Siemens.


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That underlines one fundamental element: change is in the hand of those that want it. What happened in South Africa serves as a role model. Today, 30% of cabinet positions and 28% of senior management positions are held by women. Within the last seven years, there has been a 25% increase of proving a continuous effort even within corporations to ensure equal opportunities for women. For Alexandria the key leader for change in a corporate environment is the tone from the top. “Leadership determines the tone of any business and when leaders play quiet and deal with issues as non-issues, business takes on the same kind of mentality. There is a concept called ‘The Inarticulate Premise’. It is a premise that says: people have a culture, people have a socialisation and people have a kind of thinking influenced by the manner they were raised with. So when they come into a business, these premises will determine the decisions they make.

to pull to make sure that you eliminate this. It is said that business is not a business of forecasting the future – we are involved in constant calculation that necessitates looking at gender balance. More and more women get educated so any business has to realise to address women issues in an innovative way to achieve sustainability.” Siemens also mentors and coaches women. Here, Alexandria shares a personal story. The coaches in her life have been male, all of them. “Achieving gender balance is not about women outshining men. It is about giving women the ability to succeed when they need to. At the end of the day individual accountability determines individual success. While the opportunities are presented to us we individually have the responsibility to put our shoulder behind the wheel. For women I think authenticity is the key. We ought not to allow people’s perception of how we should behave dictate the type of directors and executives that we are. We

If a person has an inarticulate premise that says: women are not assertive enough, even though they do not articulate that view, it will inform the type of placements that they do,” Alexandria says. Therefore, Siemens decided to set a strong tone at the top of leadership that talks about the need of diversity management. She continues that “you may not necessarily change where people come from but you have the ability to make people conscious of the type of prejudices that they have. If you want to succeed as a manager, you have to know what steps you have to take, what strings you have

really have an opportunity to direct and change this path with the decisions and actions that we take,” she closes. Ursula Schwarzenbart Ursula is Head of Global Diversity for Daimler and known as a true thought leader in the field of diversity. This year, one of the company’s brands she is responsible for, Mercedes, celebrates 125 years of car building. Only a few know that the first person to ever ride a car was a woman – it was Bertha Benz who wanted to market the product her husband was developing. 125

years later, the German conservative automotive industry struggles with two challenges - to enthuse female engineers and to implement a performing diversity management. The latter was tried to be solved by hiring women for diversity offices. But from Ursula’s experience, only women won’t solve the gender issue as nobody takes their concept serious. “They told us to be smart and let diversity management develop itself naturally,” she says. Considering the data from 2000 – 2005 and the development of women in executive positions, this ‘natural development of diversity’ in Germany turned out to be a nightmare she refused to accept. “We found out that if the tremendous pace we had seen is kept, it would take until 2069 before we would see a share of 20% percent women in executive positions.” Therefore Ursula and her team decided to implement ‘the aspiration guidelines’ which is a target agreement. Since 2006, figures have been growing to 1.5% each year. Currently, Mercedes’ target is to have 20% of women in executive positions in 2020 (in 2011 they had 10%). “Three out of four (car) buying decisions are made by women. In 2010, I was very proud as a diversity manager to see that proven, when in the US over 50% of new car purchases were made by women. There was no reason to say that women don’t have an impact in car buying solutions any longer,” explains Ursula. In the last ten years the percentage of women in executive positions and boards has only increased by around 1%. “If a company would have an ROI of around 1% a year – could you imagine that its top executives were still in place?” In her opinion, it’s not appropriate at all, that we are satisfied with 1% in ten years when it comes to diversity. “We discussed that we need to fix the figures because men believe in facts and figures. To me this seems different because we have a lot of research that shows that more women in corporate boards can increase the performance of a company. This is the first research I know that hasn’t had any impact on a company’s usual business. Maybe companies are no longer in need of business advantages?” she questions. It is time to find a different approach and to convince the top and middle management. For Ursula, Germany does not have a conceptual or implementation problem, but the problem of a lacking will to execute. We will definitely loose talent because of that. 


Ana-Cristina Grohnert

The Age of Possible How can we drive change? The opening of this year’s DLDwomen conference was orchestrated by Ernst & Young. The audit company produced a video on “The Age of Possible”, about 60 years going back, questioning how we can drive change. It’s taken from different perpectives like space travel, the end of racial segregation, female emancipation, technical improvement or social networks.  


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Irene Natividad, Susann Remke

The Testosterone Trap

Haven’t women made it? Susann Remke (FOCUS Magazine) interviews Irene Natividad, president of the Global Summit for Women, on the point of quotas, why women mean business and what could drive change. SR: You are the president of the Global Summit for Women which was established in 1990. Why was it created? IN: It was created because there are actually very few international fora for women that focus solely on business and economics. Since the economic barriers that women face worldwide are so well known, we wanted the Summit from the outset to focus on best practices – on exchanging what worked in different countries, so we can jumpstart each other’s efforts. We also made a decision early on that we would have government, business, entrepreneurship and NGO business leadership represented from the get-go. Those are the three pillars which comprise our audience. This artificial separation between government and business and civil society is a false separation, which we want to bridge in order to foster real lasting change to happen for women. We need all three pillars to work together in partnership. SR: How has it since evolved? IN: It has not only grown in size – we had 1,000 women from 81 countries in Istanbul last May – but also in its parts. In addition to the main conference, we now have a Ministerial Roundtable, because we have, on average, about 30 women government ministers of different portfolios who attend and who want to meet with their peers. The

Roundtable enables them to do policy exchanges without having the official position of a country necessarily being articulated because the Summit is not the United Nations, for instance. We now WEXPO, a mini-trade fair we created upon the request of women entrepreneurs who wanted to display their goods and services. They also asked for WEXPO online so they can access possible partners across borders. And at the Berlin summit in 2007, we created a Youth Forum, which allows university business students to be exposed to women’s business leadership at a Summit session organized just for them. SR: At DLDwomen 2011, your talk’s topic was “Diversity Means Business.” Germany has a female Chancellor. Very vocal and highly visible US politicians like Michele Bachman or Sarah Palin who (may) run for President in the US. The Atlantic Monthly recently ran a cover story with the headline “The End of Men.” Do we still need to talk about diversity? Haven’t women made it? “Only 19 women serve as Prime Ministers or Presidents in all 192 countries.” Irene Natividad   IN: Absolutely not! Certainly not in top leadership roles. Only a few have reached the top, as Angela Merkel has done in Germany. Worldwide, only 19 women serve as Prime Ministers or Presidents in all 192 countries. That’s just 10 percent – 10 percent representing more than half of the population of the globe! Also, there are a mere 12 female CEOs among the 500 largest

US companies ranked by Fortune magazine. If you look for female heads of any major public institution in any country, you will find few women at the helm. The power women have lies not at the top, but at the fundamental base of each economy, as half of the world’s workers, the majority of its consumers and the growing cadre of women entrepreneurs and investors. And, by the way, I hate the term “The End of Men.” That is not what we are working for. We want men. However, we want women to have equal opportunities as men. But that doesn’t mean that we want them to disappear. SR: You are asking for a shift in the discussion, away from women being absent from leadership and being economically vulnerable to women being economically valuable. To shift our focus from economic need to economic power. Why should we do that? And how do we do that? IN: Women are economically powerful! We have to use that economic impact to bring about changes in leadership. Women are 80 percent of the consumers in this country but we haven’t used that power yet in the way that other groups have. When the African-American community says, we may boycott this company, everybody gets scared. Perhaps we should too. The World Bank just backed us up with their new 2012 report saying that economic development globally will hinge on equality for women and girls ­globally. What I am saying is not hyperbole, it is a fact! But having it be understood by women themselves, the power that they have in their pocketbook, and as workers, and as entrepreneurs, and having it also be absorbed by institutions like government and the private sector is another matter. SR: What happens when nations don’t engage women fully in their economy? IN: According to a McKinsey report, they simply lose a percentage of their GDP. If the United States fully utilized its women, it would increase its GDP by 6 percent, Europe by 9 percent and Japan by 16 percent. If you don’t use half of the talent in your economy, then you lose. It’s just common sense. But now it is being quantified by economists. “If you don’t use half of the talent in your economy, then you lose!” Irene Natividad   SR: We don’t need any more research to show we are valuable. Everybody seems to intellectually understand it.


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Why don’t business leaders and politicians act on it then? IN: Because there are still centuriesold perceptions of women’s roles. And it is the informal stereotypes of what is appropriate for a man to do as opposed to what a woman does that stand as barriers. Cultural barriers are a lot harder to break because they took a long time to form. Let’s take Sweden and their mandated paternity leave for a positive example. They did that because they found that only women were taking parental leave, and their pay kept being lower because they were out of the work force and that damages their career. Then, all of a sudden 80 percent of the men were taking leaves because they had to. Now, for every month a father takes off, a woman’s pay potentially increases by 7 percent. Couples share the parental leave now – and the divorce and separation rates have lowered dramatically as a consequence. It not only changed attitudes about parenting by forcing fathers to take time off, it also changed perceptions of what is male and what is female. Nurturing is now considered part of both worlds. But it also improved women’s marketablility, their earning potential. I certainly think of Sweden as a microcosm of what is possible. SR: Many countries use quotas in order to fill up more board seats with women. Is that a successful strategy? I think so and I applaud Europe for taking that initiative. When France, for example, first started talking about quotas, it was stuck with a representation of 7 percent women on boards. And then, in 2009 the quota bill passed in the Lower House only, the number moved up immediately to 10 percent. Now, a year after the law was passed in the Senate too we are at 20 percent. They are halfway there already – change that would have never happened if the quota law were not in place. SR: Shouldn’t women rather be promoted based on their talent than on a quota? IN: Some companies – and women – say “Oh, you’ll just fill up the boards with women who are incompetent and have no experience.” I hate that argument. We looked at how many women had been appointed since 2009 in France – 113. We then looked at their bios. 67 percent of them were corporate executives. A lower percentage were professionals like lawyers and entrepreneurs. They were highly qualified. Nobody talks about male inexperience when they first come on a board.

Above: Irene Natividad together with Pelonomi Venson-Moitoi (Cabinet Minster in Botswana), Ursula von der Leyen (German Federal Minister of Labour and Social Affairs), and Shahrizat Abdul Jalil (Minister of Women, Family and Community Development of Malaysia)

Also, hopefully that will impact on corporate governance. Look at the financial crises that we are in. Who sits on these boards does matter. The addition of new perspectives cannot possibly do worse than where we are now. Where were the more experienced male directors of financial companies who led us to this crises? SR: If you look at the average board of directors, most likely you’ll see people from roughly the same demographic: male, white, 50+. Are these individuals that need to initiate the change part of the solution or part of the problem? IN: They are both. It is very human to connect with those who are very much like you. So, these board members have been nominating each other. With quotas, they are now forced to change. It may well be, based on Norway’s experience, that they will accept the change and actually make gender diversity a

non-issue. And that’s the whole point of quotas. It’s supposed to be a temporary transition step. And hopefully once there is a critical mass of women on these boards, we won’t think of gender anymore. We’ll just pick on the basis of talent in the future. SR: What can every individual woman do to help the cause? IN: It’s up to you to become responsible. You have to be an agent of change yourself to create the pressure for change. If you remain quiet and don’t act, why do you expect others to act for you? If you say it depends on politicians, then vote for politicians who advance women’s issues. If you are an investor and have stock through your company or on your own, don’t vote if there is an all male slate. That’s frankly a strategy that quite a few women in the United States are doing. Alone, women can’t do very much, but as part of groups you have a voice. 


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James S. Turley

Kasper Rorsted

The Third Billion

Setting the Tone From the Top

For James Turley, CEO of Ernst &Young, times are changing – even game-changing – in many ways. During the crisis, he says, we saw most companies turn inwards, focusing on what was to loose instead of embracing it as an opportunity to gain something. While the majority of mature multinationals saw the situation of uncertainty after the crash as an existential threat, more than one third of smaller entrepreneurial companies looked at the crisis as an opportunity. For James, already this mindset makes a huge difference. However, mindset only gets you so far if you don’t have a clear-cut view of the big and broader trends that have not been stopped by the crisis in any way: fundamental shifts in capital and – even more important – in demographics. “Issues of demographics are up front in the centre, not only for me, but for Ernst & Young as a company,” James explains. By 2020, the average age in Western Europe and Japan will be at 46 as opposed to 26 in the Middle East, India and Africa – meaning a full generation younger: “What impact does that have on buying patterns or investment decisions? These are fundamental implications.” While demographics are not only about gender disparity but issues of ethnicity, nationality, sexual orientation or religion, James is convinced that women have become an incredibly vital force in the world – their influence could even be captured as that of a “third billion” next to China and India. “The way we at Ernst & Young think about things is really driven by these shifts because at the end of the day, we are all about people. We are only as good as the way we can bring different people together and the effectiveness with which they work together in teams.” Making a rich mix of people work will be crucial, as in the future teams will be even more diverse than they already are. James is convinced that “truly diverse teams are rarely middle of the road in their performance.” This not only requires companies to take the necessary steps such as hiring more women, but to foster inclusive leadership. And it requires them to lead the way forward also in societies where diversity is still seen with a feeling of unease. 

As the CEO of one of Germany’s most successful and diverse companies, Kasper Rorsted has a clear vision of his role as a leader: “my primary responsibility is to make my company more successful every day. I do this is by getting the best team on board and the best team is a diverse team.” Diversity means an opportunity for businesses. For Rorsted, it is as simple as that. Leaving out women and recruiting from only 50 percent of the talent pool out there is just not a clever decision to make. Firmly believing in the value diverse teams add to his company’s operations, Rorsted tells how Henkel refused to do a business case on the potentials of engaging women for profitability. “The moment you start doing these things, you are on the wrong track. Why should I justify having women on board of my teams?” The most important thing for him are the people he works with and Rorsted is convinced that leaders regularly need to wonder if they would want to work in the corporate environment they have created: “I wouldn’t want to sit in a meeting every Monday with nineteen women, being the only man.” Recalling his experience of working for female managers, he stresses how important it is not to categorise who people are but how they perform. One of his first decisions at Henkel has been to put a diversity manager in place on board level. Since then, the issue has been placed on the agenda of every

management team. The share of female leaders at Henkel is growing 1 to 1.5 points every year without a quota in place. While he makes clear that Henkel will not push diversity at the cost of quality, he is convinced that given the amount of talent out there, the risks are not very high. For him, the decision on the top to make diversity a leadership topic is decisive. “You can make an immense difference if you set the tone from the top – if you go out and speak about it,” he says. Taking a leadership position on all levels is crucial for success. He doesn’t even shy away from establishing an internal “hall of fame and shame” – letting female members of management teams stand up in general meetings to make progress visible and detect deficits. To get the right people on board they need to be given enough freedom, including enabling women to work from home when they have children. “My primary responsibility is to make my company more successful every day.” Kasper Rorsted For Rorsted, the fact that Henkel is considered a pioneer in diversity is rooted in the way the issue has been pushed internally: “It is the same as with doing homework in school: it takes a long time to finish something you are not really working on.” At Henkel, the CEO has been working on it exemplary.  

Henkel & Diversity: Quick Facts

32 % of Henkel’s 48.000 employees are women. The share of women in leadership position has increased from 21.9 % in 2003 to roughly 30 % in 2011. Diversity is a fix element of Henkel’s Code of Conduct as well as of the company’s Code of Teamwork and Leadership. Henkel is a member of a number of international diversity networks like “European Women’s Management Development Initiative” and has developed internal networks like the “Women in Leadership” network where female employees can connect, exchange experiences and develop possibilities to actively boost their careers. If new employees are hired at Henkel, at least one of the company’s diversity requirements (age, nationality and gender) has to be fulfilled. Balances are checked and evaluated monthly. Henkel offers day care for 165 children aged 4 months and older, supports families in their search for nurseries and enables women with children to work flexibly through part-time or home-office models.


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Avivah Wittenberg-Cox

Rise of Talent There are so many talks about the importance of diversity. Why is it that there are all those statistics on the reality of corporate leadership facing the rise of women? How is it that we particularly here in Germany can have so few women in leadership when 60% of university graduates are women, 52% of graduates in China are female as well as 63% in Iran and 70% in the UAE? In case you haven’t heard it, women are not a minority or a diversity! “Women are the majority of the educated talent in the world.” The OECD has been tracking the scholastic performance and girls have been outperforming boys at almost every grade level in almost every country. But why is there such a big gap between companies’ inside and the majority of talent on the one side and the majority of their markets (80% of consumers are female) on the other? It is because of the way that we have been trying to change companies? We have organised into networks, into women’s conferences, we had a conversation among women about the business case, about the numbers, about how important this issue is. What we haven’t yet begun to do is convince the men who currently sit in power. When CEOs stand up and say they are absolutely convinced of diversity and they sit at the head of executive committees with perhaps one woman on it I beg to differ. But it is also an issue of language. Who ever accepted the term ‘gender diversity’? There are only two genders. So either you are in balance between men and women or you are out of balance. The corporate world has rather preferred addressing the issue of gender as a sub-dimension of diversity than the issue of gender balance on their leadership teams. We are all a huge proponent of meritocracy – the belief that the only way you will make it in this company is through competence. But the reality of the charts in most companies is not that women are gradually moving up the ranks in companies and only getting blocked at the very top by the “glass ceiling”. There is no glass ceiling! I wish

we had a glass ceiling. That would be a fantastic problem to have. The reality in companies is that at every management level, almost from the very first one, the percentage of women begins to drop and the percentage of men begins to rise. “This is not a glass ceiling issue – these are issues of gender asbestos.” It is in the walls and cultures and mindsets of today’s companies that we need to transform and change. That will not capture the economic opportunity of women as 60% of the talent pool and 80% of the market. We need transformational change. The real 21st century discontinuities companies are facing are what is called the “three W’s”: Web, Women and Weather. There is a technological revolution going on. Companies have only just begun to adapt to the changes that the internet generated. The massive arrival of women into the ranks filled with men for the first time in our human history is a revolution that companies need to adapt to as well. The real issue is how do you adapt? I would suggest we have seen twenty years worth of very well-meaning corporate efforts to get women to adapt to companies. This is what we call “fix-the-women-approaches”: “Why do women can’t make

it to the top in our companies? Let’s help them! Let’s coach them, mentor them, create a women’s network so they can talk to each other!” Is that what your company is doing? That is what most German companies are starting to do this initiative-driven stuff we have seen in other countries for twenty years. Let me tell you, Ladies: it doesn’t work. Leap-frog, don’t benchmark, against stuff that hasn’t delivered elsewhere. What really requires doing is to get companies to adapt to the massive change in the talent and the market. It requires reframing the issue of gender balance as a business opportunity. That change in the companies who have made it is based on only one criteria: it is not the women, it’s the leadership. Always check out the executive committee. If it is not gender balanced, the mindsets of the managers haven’t shifted. In the 21st century, gender bilingualism – the issue of managing both men and women as customers and as talent – should be seen as a leadership competency, not as a diversity subject. And in conclusion, I will give you my favourite quote from my first book: “in an improving gender balance, women may hold the keys but men generally still control the locks.” Don’t try to bring another woman up behind but transform another man ahead. 


Seamless Performance


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Libby Leffler

Sparking The Stalled Revolution Libby Leffler, 26-year old Chief of Staff to Facebook’s female COO, wants women to dream bigger. I distinctly remember my first business class in college. It was the very first time I realized that my gender could impact my place in the workforce. The professor gave us a simple task: “Think about what your career will look like in twenty years and what you imagine you’ll be doing.” Seems simple enough, right? Hardly! I immediately began charting my strengths and weaknesses in an Excel spreadsheet, the places where I imagined I could add value in a company. I tried to imagine my “dream job” as objectively as I could. “Think about what your career will look like in twenty years and what you imagine you’ll be doing.” When I ran into a group of guys from my class the next day, I asked them: “So, do you guys actually know what you want to do in twenty years?” Without pause, they all looked at me and said, in unison, “Yeah… a CEO,” and continued on with the conversation. They knew, with certainty, that they wanted to do something big. I also asked some girls how they were tackling the project. Each of them explained in detail how she was methodically considering the traits that would make her well-qualified for a specific role. It became clear to me that the guys were just aiming higher and, not only that:

they had the confidence to admit it. We girls were hiding behind spreadsheets, forgetting to dream and afraid to achieve. Today, I think about gender constantly. I work for Sheryl Sandberg at Facebook. She cares deeply about global issues for women and girls. Yet, the fact remains: Sheryl is 41. I am 26. We come from two different generations of women that think differently about issues and challenges when it comes to our roles at home and in the workplace. Women of my generation suffer from what experts call “gender fatigue.” We are lacking the energy to tackle something that we no longer see or experience as a problem in our daily lives. Women like Sheryl had to fight. Those of my generation focus on calculating every single precise step of their careers. We sit back to avoid taking chances. And we forget to fight for what we deserve. “My dream is that my generation will dream bigger, fight for their dreams and take more risks.” The reason why the story about my business school class is important? The numbers show that women are still not making it to the top. 2% of CEOs in the US, 5% of CEOs in the UK and 15% of board members are female. However, Laura Liswood, Secretary General of the Council of Women World Leaders, has noted: there is no longer an intake problem, this is an upgrade problem. Women may emerge at the top with more regularity, but we are starting out as less ambitious to begin with. Among a group of highly-qualified women on the cusp of the most senior levels, 26% self-reported that they did not want the promotion. Studies show that only 7% of women negotiate their first salaries out of college compared to over 57% of men. These figures disappoint me. Women have exactly the same ability to negotiate as

men. We know better than anybody that we can learn to close a $40M deal, or negotiate with our partners to pick the socks up off the floor – and let’s be honest: the latter is often more difficult than the former. We owe it to ourselves to take risks and chase chance in the pursuit of our big dreams. In 2008, I received an offer to work at Facebook. There was only one problem: the risk of leaving my comfortable job at another large, established company for something new and unfamiliar. I didn’t take the job at Facebook. I was paralyzed with fear to just take a risk. One Friday evening though, I called my recruiter and told her that I’d made a mistake and that I was (still) perfect for the job. I took a risk. A halfhour later, my recruiter called me back and told me that the team would still have me. This is why I would like to voice my big dream: that my generation of women will, hopefully soon, dream bigger, take more risks and seize chances to spark our “stalled revolution.” “I would argue that fighting for this equality is a fight not just owed to the next generation, but one due to the women that came before.” We have a responsibility to change the world in which our children will grow. I would argue that fighting for this equality is a fight not just owed to the next generation, but one due to the women that came before. While at a dinner a few weeks ago, I heard one woman say that her generation fought so that we could have choices. Those women, however, did not think that these were the choices we were going to make: to sit back, to avoid risks, to leave our jobs. I stand here today with the hope that we will continue to assume and look forward to a future large with promise and dreams. Seeking no favors because we are women. Knocking at the door of equality and acceptance for all. Demanding, not asking for, but unapologetically seeking an equal shot. And when the door opens for one of the women from my generation, I hope that she walks through that door with confidence and with a sense of purpose. Because if she doesn’t, there will be a line of twenty guys behind her, waiting to sprint through. We should walk through every open door with not just a dream, but the biggest dream we could ever imagine – not just believing but knowing, that you, along with your big dreams, are truly worth it. 


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Ofra Strauss

Channels of Communication

Beyond Compliance Ofra Strauss is not a big theorist – she is a Jewish businesswoman. There is nothing about her personality that is particularly philosophical. Recently the Pope invited her to spend two and a half days in the Vatican to talk to an audience on the subject of Business and Ethics. If the Pope wants her to share her thoughts on ethics, she figured she feels comfortable enough to share them with the DLDwomen too. F i r s t l y, a s u c cessful business shouldn’t make any kind of distinction between class, race or gender. A successful business is about reaching out to as many people as possible, about promoting dialogue and communication. Since the global downturn, so much has changed and with such changes occurring, Ofra believes, ethics in the workplace need to be re-addressed. The Strauss Group is an Israeli company, now operating in as many as 17 countries. Although Israel is accountable for 50% of its turnover, it has branches in Brazil, USA, Central and Eastern Europe, and several international partner companies including Pepsi, Dutch Unilever, another French company and a Chinese one. One thing Ofra learnt working with so many different nationalities is that it’s essential to be open-minded, and respectful of cultural differences. Re-establishing trust As Chairwoman of the Strauss Group for ten years now, in terms of how to run a business, she has experienced a very steep learning curve. With 14,000 employees – and in turn 14,000 families – it is a great deal of responsibility! “It’s no use being impartial, or being detached from your employees and your customers,” stresses Ofra. “Ev-

eryone has a face, a name and a point of view. It’s crucial to get to know who you are working with, to experience different viewpoints, to understand different cultures and religions.” The world is undergoing dramatic changes and is globalising at an astonishing rate. Countries are interacting, questions are being raised. What should be done about lack of natural resources? How should climate change be tackled? These are global concerns, and countries are communicating in a way they never used to. In recent years, businesses have become increasingly influential, while the power of governmental bodies – in some circumstances – has decreased. But the years following the economic crisis have been tough. Across the world, people’s lives have been affected; the amount of time they spend with their family, the money they spend, the food that they eat. Many people feel let down, that there’s nobody to rely on, and as a result, the business community has lost the trust of its people. While to lose trust only takes a minute or two, to win it back takes much longer. Business leaders have to – however gradually – win it back. Running a business without people’s trust is impossible. A business can’t function in isolation. It needs the faith of its customers and the confidence of its partners and its shareholders. A symptom of this loss of trust is the constant barrage of negative press. There have been plenty of scathing headlines attacking big corporations, referring not to profits but to high prices, corruption and abuses of power. The media scrutinises big corporations, it demands they act in a certain way because the general public fears their

dishonesty. It’s crucial to make the right decisions and to do the right thing. But what does ‘doing the right thing’ actually entail? Is it something you learn in business school, at law school or at art school? Moral responsibility requires the constant guarding of human dignity and loyalty to the principles of a democratic regime that echoes the rule of fairness. But how can that be put in action? The Bible says, “Depart from evil and do good. Seek and pursue it,” while in his Encyclical ‘Caritas in Veritate’ the Pope puts forward a general observation: “Business management cannot concern itself only with the interests of the proprietors, but must also assume responsibility for all the other stakeholders who contribute to the life of the business: the workers, the clients, the suppliers of various elements of production, the community of reference.” Building a dialogue These are good instructions, agrees Ofra, and recommends forgetting about compliancy, about acquiescence, about doing something just because someone else has told you to. The successful brands of tomorrow will be those that promote dialogue and teamwork, those that don’t just delegate but that listen to the needs of their staff and their consumers. Business leaders must change the way they talk. Business leaders must be open. They must stand in front of a crowd of business analysts and share with them their visions, values, and goals. There needs to be greater transparency in the way businesses are run. It’s no longer possible to run a business behind closed doors. Ofra used to write four business reports every quarter, analysing what was happening internally and across other markets. Now, her priority is less the report itself than its level of transparency. Is the information correct, who has access to it, and has everyone heard the right information at the right time? Transparency isn’t something that can be achieved overnight. The business community needs to come to together, to be creative, to reconsider business and ethics and the way the two things interact with each other. An ‘ethical’ decision is a multi-faceted thing. It cannot be made in an instant. It requires dialogue and communication between every single party involved. Building dialogue is the way to win back trust. “It may take some time and effort, but it will be worth it.” 


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The Mobile DLDwomen Video Experience

Leadership Outlook: Views From Germany

Leadership Outlook: Views From the Corporate Perspective

Ursula von der Leyen, German Federal Minister of Labour and Social Affairs Page 18

Marilyn Johnson, IBM Page 19

Alexandria Mathole, Siemens Page 19

Ursula Schwarzenbart, Daimler Page 19

Irene Natividad, Global Summit of Women Page 22

Kaspar Rorsted, Henkel Page 24

James S. Turley, Ernst & Young Page 24

Avivah Wittenberg-Cox, 20-first Page 25

The Age of Possible

Duck Dialogue

Business & Ethics

Ana-Cristina Grohnert, Ernst & Young Page 21

Libby Leffler, Facebook Page 27

Ofra Strauss, The Strauss Group Page 28

Diversity Means Business


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H e a lt h

Health From the Brain Frontier Page 30

On Authenticity Page 30

Martin Korte

From the Brain Frontier Biologist Martin Korte tries to prove that brain differences ­between sexes really matter. Martin Korte, a professor of cellular neurobiology at TU Braunschweig is researching cellular mechanisms of learning, memory and forgetting. One of the most cited neuroscientists in Germany, Martin shares his insights about the gender specifics of the human brain. Historically, the famous Parisian neurologist P. Paul Brocca (1824–1880) was the first to research sex specific brain differences. Kicking off his keynote, Martin mentions that it took the inventor of the IQ test, Alfred Binet, three years to tweak the system in order to see equal results (girls originally scored higher). Today’s science recognizes that female brains have less weight, but they are better in learning and memorizing. Weight isn´t the only gender difference. The grey matter, or the volume of neurons is higher for women. Even worse: The heavy weight of male brains is mostly water weight. “Basically a man’s business is to be obsessed with size,” Martin concludes jokingly. Over the past decade neuroscientists have documented an astonishing array of structural, chemical, and functional variations in the male and female brain. For instance, psychological diseases are more often related to women than men, in ratio two females to one male have the psychological disease depression – but when it comes to chronic stress disorders men are more affected. Bigger areas in a woman’s brain relative to a man’s brain have to do with emotions: emotional control and empathy. 75% of communication is non-

verbal, emphatic communication. His research indicates that we have to accept somebody as a role model to learn from him (copy learning). Teaching and mentoring is a lot more than didactic skills, the person – and the gender of the person – is important. Other differences include the female data transfer system between left and right hemisphere of the brain is much better than the male. This is good for language, speech skills and multitasking. However, men and women are equally bad at multi-tasking. Still,

whenever it comes to language women have an advantage. Men and women also differ in computer usage: women make more use of social networks while men more into gaming. General problems (especially for men) with new media usage are wrong attention training, the reward system is not calibrated, cognitive processes are prone to error, and fine motor skills, social competence (empathy), and language skills are not trained. In conclusion, gender differences in the brain do matter after all. 

Susie Orbach, Maria Furtwängler-Burda

On Authenticity Last year, famous psychotherapist Susie Orbach talked about her latest book “Bodies” and women´s distorted selfimage caused through the merchants of body hatred (media, society etc.). Chairwoman, actress and physician Maria Furtwängler-Burda interviewed her this time on DLDwomen’s 2011 theme “Authenticity”. “70% of men compared to only 15% of women think that they look good the way they are.”   Maria Furtwängler-Burda MFB: You see more and more beautiful, young, accomplished women, with a master from Harvard, who are married and have an excellent job. Yet, they come to your therapy and don’t know who they are. They don’t feel themselves. SO: This happened within the conver-

sation of the two generations. Mothers inadvertently foisted on their daughters the notion of achievement and accomplishment and happiness. Specifically young women are supposed to tick every box of positive attributes and characteristics (body, relationship, academics etc.) but inside there is no space for unhappiness, complexity, fear, hesitation and vulnerability. Girls are constantly pressured, they fear the moment of not performing or being themselves. MFB: When did we loose this concept of being? Babies and animals are always totally themselves. When did we, as humans, lose the natural relationship to our bodies? SO: From the very first moment babies try to get maximum reactions. They want to connect with the environment, so they will do anything to


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charm the caregiver. If you are a very expressive mother, you will probably have a very expressive baby. So, babies will find their own development of their psychology in relation to their environment. In that certain aspect, self will not develop. These are the aspects which are not recognized, not acknowledged. They will feel a certain shame about the parts of us that we offer back to our parents, that they can’t find. MFB: Is there an authentic self? SO: In different environments you have different aspects of yourself, different self states but when they connect and are reliably there for you, it is a form of authenticity. If you have no idea who you are going to be and you require the stimulation of the other then authenticity is much more problematic. MFB: How do you work with young women and people that feel totally decomposed? SO: There is no formula. It is important to symbolize experiences and feelings and fears by finding words for it in order to locate and place the problem. MFB: Why are women so much more victims to body insecurities? SO: Well there is far too much money to make to create body hatred and selling it around the world. In the new economies, we now see the kind of procedures that was sold to men and women. In China they do leg extensions for men or in Iran, lots of the nose transformation are for men. Historically, we’ve always been surrounded by women who have been subject to discom-

fort and distress. So, while growing up, girls experience their body like a product. It does not offer natural comfort and pleasure, but demands constant transformation and work. MFB: There is this survey about body building for men: Instead of getting more confident about their body appearance, they feel unhappier and more insecure about themselves. SO: In England they try to add the component of education in order to combat body problems in the gym. It’s about how we can engage with the body hatred, with the fear or the dislike of the appetite the body is trying to create. MFB: You were one of the organizers of the famous Dove campaign of less skinny women. In publicity we don’t see one normal picture that is not photo shopped. SO: In order to market Dove, consciousness needed to be raised to show women’s difficulties to feel beautiful. This took about two years and we included over 1000 people to think about their relationship towards their bodies, their daughters, their sisters and brothers. We wanted to understand the difficulties. You can’t just go out and say “women need to be more beautiful” but the brand really wanted to show that it understood women’s difficulties. MFB: This makes us come back to the topic – What is beautiful? Is it only the picture we get through the airbrushed world, through all the ads? SO: When we have a love affair, what we really want is a sense of the private, the vulnerable, the fears, the interest, the excitement, the things a person feels a little bit shy about. Why

don’t we show that a little bit more? So there is this example which drives me crazy. When you are in New York and you buy a newspaper, they say ‘Have a great day!’ and you know what – I don’t want to have a great day, I just want to have the day that I’m having. I don’t want to be interrupted. I think, here I prefer the English ‘a good day’ because it is kind of neutral. MFB: Do you have any advice for us women that will help us feel more authentic, and happy? SO: An advice could be to incorporate more aspects of the diversed dimensions of our personality. What do we have to be afraid of ? 

The Mobile DLDwomen Video Experience

News From the Brain Frontier Martin Korte, TU Braunschweig Page 30

Authenticity The Dove Movement for Self-Esteem provides women everywhere with opportunities to mentor the next generation and celebrate real beauty.

Susie Orbach, Psychoanalyst Page 30


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Women in Malaysia

Politics Heaven Under Mother’s Feet Page 32

Understanding Botswana Page 33

Call to Action Page 34

Beyond Usual Ideas About Diversity: Laura Liswood Page 36

Violence Against Women – the Mother of All Issues Page 38

“The Best Thing That Happened to the People – Social Media!” Page 40

Civilising the World Wild Web? Page 41

I n 1985, the Government of Malaysia formulated the National Policy on ­Women as a guide for women’s participation in the development process. I n 1995, commitments were set forth during the UN Fourth World Conference on Women to enhance women’s advancement. Other aspects include safeguarding women’s rights to health, education and social well being and remove legal obstacles and gender discriminatory practices. I n 2001, the Ministry of Women and Family Development established a mandate to address issues on women such as poverty among female-headed households or violence against women. Malaysia’s Constitution was amended to prohibit discrimination in any law on the basis of gender. E  ducating girls is key to development since it provides girls with economic ­o pportunities throughout their lifetime. W  omen’s participation in the workforce, though low, has increased from ­ 44.7 per cent in 1995 to 47.3 per cent in 2004. T  he representation of women in legislative bodies is one indicator of ­s ociety’s commitment to women’s empowerment.

Shahrizat Abdul Jalil

Heaven Under Mother’s Feet

The Malaysian Minister is a real powerhouse. Her keynote brought the house down in rock star fashion at DLDwomen. A journal My name is Shahrizat. I am the Minister of Women, Family and Community Development of Malaysia. I would like to talk about my country and quotas. Malaysia is situated between Thailand and Singapore. We are one of the most connected nations in the world. My prime minister (Najib Razak) is very social media savvy. Did you know that our internet penetration rivals that of advanced European countries like France and Italy? 50% of our population is less than 25 years old and the internet is one of the most significant channels to reach our audience. 8 million Facebook users, 500,000 blog-

gers, 800,000 twitter users – and I tweet too. Malaysians spend more than 20 minutes per session on social media sites, and are highly engaged. This is one of the reasons why I’m here, because as a politician, I have never been to a conference like this ever – ever! As soon as I am back in Malaysia, I am not having conferences in hotels anymore! I am going to have it in museums, on open fields; I am going to bring back Bob Dylan – Times are changing. In Malaysia, we need more women in politics. Just as we need more women in the corporate sector. You got to groom, your children, all the younger generation to rise to the challenge, because, whether you like it or not, in politics you can make the difference. I have been Minister for ten years now but I am not telling anybody my age. But I tell you: I am 58 and feel very young. I carry the responsibility to make sure that change happens in my country. My party is very responsible and forward thinking. We listen to what people want and have to say. Actually I am the worst combination: I am a lawyer and a politician; you cannot be worse than that. So I decided, first thing when I became minister, to persuade my government to amend the constitution of Malaysia. Today, it is explicitly stated in our constitution that there is no discrimination between

men and women. That is to uphold the principle in Islam. In Islam, if you were to interpret it correctly – in the spirit of the Koran, as was brought about by our beloved prophet Muhammad. Women are given their dignity and they’re put up there. In fact that is a saying which says that heaven is under the feet of one’s mother. Let me tell you a short story. Our prophet married a women who was 16 years older than him; who was the original Muslim woman entrepreneur; who was his boss. Her name is Siti Caticha. They were married for 24 years until she died and he married other women. But Siti was his inspiration, his driving force. If you should ever see a negative image of women in Islam, remember what I said: Religions don’t oppress women! It’s people that do that! I hope that next time when you think of Muslim women, you will think of me. I represent 14 million women in Malaysia. We are a maturational country; we are Muslim, we are Buddhists, we are Catholics; we are everything. We are truly Asia! As a last statement, I would like to say this: If you choose your women leaders well; and if you make sure that in government you have more women to fight your battles for you, believe me, the future will belong to the women in the world. 


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Pelonomi Venson-Moitoi

Understanding Botswana Botswana is a country hardly known to many people. Pelonomi Venson-Moitoi, Minister of Education, sheds light on educational programs in the developing country. In Botswana, there are many women in positions of power. The Governor of the Bank of Botswana is a woman, as is the Auditor General, the Speaker of the National Assembly, the Commissioner of Labour and the head of the DCEC (Directorate of Corruption and Economic Crime). Even the Anglican Church has just ordained a female priest. Education First As the Minister of Education and Skills Development and a member of the Botswana Democratic Party, Pelonomi Venson-Moitoi would like to see more women in Parliament. Out of 57 constituencies, only two are currently held by a woman. However, as much as she likes to see a quota introduced for female seats, she believes that reforms at the education level are even more important: “If we make sure that girls do benefit from education as much as boys in Botswana, and if we make sure the FES research groups (Fiedrich Ebert Stiftung) are led by female students, then a quota at parliamentary level might not even be necessary.” Enrollment in school is evenly spread between boys and girls in Botswana. Difficulties arise as a result of teenage pregnancies: pregnant girls drop out of school and education is prematurely lost to them. To counteract this, it became permissible for girls to return to school once they have given birth. Moreover, non-governmental organisations are running programs for young mothers on skills development and home-school programs exist where mothers receive education remotely. This way, young women can stay at home to care for their children while still continuing their education. For these programs, Botswana has recently been awarded the SADC (Southern African Development Community) Region Certificate.

Legally, laws have been re-written to ensure gender equality. Every single law treats both men and women in equal measure. Botswana may be a developing country in Africa, yet, two years ago a law was passed in Botswana declaring education to be the basic right of every single child. A life and death matter According to the ILO (International Labour Organisation) an ‘essential service’ is a function that relates only to life or to health (and therefore not inclusive of education). While the ILO laws were written as early as the 1930s this exclusion of education is hardly surprising. Back then, societal rights were of much less significance than, say, religion. The Bible says ‘thou shalt not kill’ and ‘thou shalt not steal’, and

eighty years ago people were much more preoccupied with laws like these. But as the years unfolded and women started to vote, people became increasingly interested in women and children´s rights. Today, Pelonomi Venson-Moitoi thinks that it is about time to re-write ILO laws. The ILO should now declare education an essential service. Education is a matter of life and death. Without it, children have no opportunities. She stresses that it is of great importance both for Botswana, and for the rest of the world; education is a global concern. In order for Botswana’s economy to grow, and for every female child there to get the education they deserve, Pelonomi Venson-Moitoi highlights that economic growth is crucial for our young generation. 


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Zika Abzuk, Stefanie Babst, Abigail Disney

Call to Action The predominant view on crisis situations and military conflicts is that they are (best) dealt with by men. The actual state of affairs draws a more diverse picture. Stefanie Babst, the highest ranking NATO woman, Abigail Disney, the filmmaker and producer of “Women, War, and Peace”, as well as Zika Abzuk, CSR Manager of Jewish-Palestinian issues (CISCO), share their stories. Establish a way to win Stefanie Babst represents the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO);

protecting women and children. The resolution calls to empower women, to play a role in peacekeeping, and reconstructing issues after a particular conflict. The transatlantic alliance NATO has tried to make a contribution on the operational side. In Afghanistan, the International Security System Force is mainly fighting the Taliban and protecting the Afghan population. Additionally, it aims to make sure that the constitutional enshrined rights of women and girls in Afghanistan are not put at risk. The Islamic government of Afghanistan has started negotiations with the Taliban as part of their policy of integration and reconciliation. Obviously, the women in Afghanistan still suffer a lot, their possibilities to access medical facilities, schools and a proper education is limited.

issue that has to be resolved. There is an immediate need out there to empower women not only in Afghanistan but also across the world. Women proved to be more successful in enabling other women to be part of negotiations and political processes in their respective countries. Storytelling of War Everything you can think of about war – unless you have actually been there – comes from novels or movies. It has been set. In the storytelling of war, male combatants describe landscapes and ethnic conflict, the particular weapons, and the particular tactics. All wars are like snowflakes completely different from one another. Talking to women about war, they describe one thing no matter whether they were in Afghanistan, Columbia, Bosnia or anywhere

100 Years ago, almost all casualties in war were men in uniform

Today, the majority are women and Children

an organisation which is not particularly known for being very women friendly. She advocates that women should care more about security and broader defence issues on a larger scale. Both men and women should have a say in global defence and security issues. More and more young women have developed an interest in these issues, so far male dominated. In the operational theatre men and women are currently involved in various operations and missions. Starting with Afghanistan, where NATO is running a very challenging operation up to the current operation in support of the United Security Resolution 1973 on Lybia. NATO has aimed to ensure that we all can live in peace for 62 years. In the Republic of Congo more than 1,000 women are raped daily in the civil war and 80% of human trafficking victims are women. Women and girls have become victims in various forms during global conflicts. Resolution 1325 on Gender Issues has called communities to make a difference in

Often forgotten in the storytelling of war: women. The pictures displayed above are screenshots taken from the series “Women, War and Peace” by moviemaker Abigail Disney. It reminds us of the

NATO has started programs to ease this situation. In particular the USA and a few other countries have deployed female teams to engage with the female population. The project has shown that women feel more encouraged not only to open up, but also to build mutual trust, to work, and to share their immediate and local community concerns, with other women. NATO lives from the capabilities and the military contributions that individual nations provide. U.S., the British, and a few Scandinavian countries have been at the forefront in terms of training female soldiers and mainstreaming gender perspectives in the operational objectives and planning process. The number of women in armed forces still ranks between 3% on the lowest level and 15% (U.S.). This lack of women in uniform – not only in lower levels but also in the senior commanding levels – is a problematic

else. They describe fire, hunger, they describe running, trying to hold families together, continue to educate their young, get health care for the people they love. With her series “Women, War and Peace”, filmmaker Abigail Disney reminds us of the fact that women have always been a part of the landscape of war. Historically, war is associated with combat. That is just a small piece of war. War is a much larger thing: it is totalising, it swallows cultures as a whole. Women have always been in the centre of it. Since the end of the cold war, they have more and more been pushed to the centre. In Bosnia, rape was deliberately used as a tool for ethnic cleansing. A warlord said: “If I go into a village and kill everyone, they will come back, but if I go into a village and rape all women no one ever comes back to that village.” In 2003, a group of Liberian women –


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some Muslim, some Christian – were sick of the civil war. They came together and protested. When the peace talks broke down, they took up arms; they surrounded the building and proclaimed the representatives of the rivalling parties as hostages of the women of Liberia. In Ghana, where West African leaders were conducting peace talks, women protesters threatened to strip naked unless the Liberian government, rebels and political parties agreed to a peace deal. Successfully! Later on in the peace process, they monitored the disarmament and organised around the election. In the end, Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf was the first woman elected to become a national leader in Africa. It is an extraordinary story. Women have done this for centuries. As quickly as they do it, they get forgotten. Abigail’s series is an attempt

lection of how to be inclusive. In the end, there were two classes of 50 children, 25 Jewish, 25 Arabs, who started for two years. 50 started and 50 graduated. Today it is a country program. More than 1500 children have graduated already. By now, it is also known around the Mediterranean, including the following countries: Morocco, Egypt, Yemen, Palestine, Jordan, Israel, Turkey, Cyprus and Portugal. The next step is to connect the youth in Africa as well. Nevertheless, adults are nothing else than grown-up children. Whatever works with children has to work with adults as well. One example is Cisco’s business activity in Palestine. It is a story that started with hesitation and doubt. But once Cisco made the leap of faith it became a story of determination and stubbornness. The

fact that women have always played a central role in the complex tragedy of war. The five part ­s eries documentary is fully available online at: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/women-war-and-peace/

to tell the different side of the story. “Let’s see what happens if we put that camera into a sari and how war starts to look like through a camera in a headscarf,” she explains her ambition. Half the world can’t make a whole peace. Investment for Good After having lived in the US for over 7 years, Zika Abzuk decided to return to Israel with her children. Upon her return from a privileged life, she found the Israeli society to be very polarised: seperation between Jews and Arabs, between religious and secular people, between the new immigrants and the native Israelis. At the same time, high tech started to be the crown jewels of the Israeli society. Cisco was running a technological training program for girls. Eventually the girls called and said we want the boys in as well – Zika’s first

belief that the investment in the Palestinian neighbours is going to turn into a good business investment overcame all obstacles. In 2010, John Chambers visited the region, and Cisco announced a ten million dollar commitment to invest in a model for job creation and economic development in the Palestinian territories. Immediately thereafter, the management board of Cisco’s Israel site volunteered to take part in this initiative. At the same time, the Palestinian ICT

community, mainly with a track record in the outsourced development sector, built confidence in the investment. Ala Alaeddin, the Chairman of the Palestinian Information Technology Association (PITA), says: “It was a milestone in the ICT sector; it opened the door for international and multinational companies to come in, and also, it opened the door for the Palestinian ICT sector to start looking beyond the borders of Palestine.” At Cisco, the decision was taken to transfer from a social responsibility to an ongoing business relationship, because it made sense from the business point of view. The initial funding turned into a sustainable progress that created a win-win situation. The generation of employment, the transfer of know-how, high-tech and methodologies, and the interaction

with an international company turned out to be not only crucial for the growth of the Palestinian IT sector – but also for the deconstruction of barriers and prejudices. In conclusion, these three examples powerfully demonstrate how women engage in response to crisis, how ­they drive solutions in forlorn situations, how they – in times of profound mistrust – become the warrant of social inclusion and how they maintain solidarity. Still, most importantly, it shows that there is so much more that can be done – it is a call to action. 

Women, War & Peace “Women, War & Peace” is a five-part PBS television series challenging the conventional wisdom that war and peace are men’s domain. The series reveals how women are becoming primary targets and suffering unprecedented casualties and yet are simultaneously emerging as necessary partners in brokering peace and as leaders in governing conflict. “Women, War & Peace” spotlights the stories of women in conflict zones from Bosnia to Afghanistan and Colombia to Liberia, placing women at the center of an urgent dialogue about conflict and security, and reframing our understanding of modern warfare.


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It is lonely at the top, and all the more so if you are a wom- 2001 terrorist attack became a reserve police officer in an. But that’s changing, thanks in part to Laura Liswood, Washington, D.C. and currently holds the rank of sergeant. Liswood’s role as an architect of change began in1992, the co-founder of the Council of Women World Leaders, a forum for women heads of state that provides an alterna- when she took on the job as director of the Women’s Leadership Project, identifying global leadership contributions tive to the old boys club. The council, located at The Aspen Institute in Washing- by women heads of state. She interviewed 15 current and ton, DC and founded with the help of Iceland President former women presidents and prime ministers, in a book and video documentary entiVigdís Finnbogadóttir, is a tled “Women World Leaders”. place for women political leadThe daughter of a policeers to network and brainstorm man who dropped out of high approaches to world probschool and a housewive, Lislems. wood says it took courage for Liswood, the group’s secreher to work up the nerve to tary general, says she was moapproach heads of state. “I tivated to create the council, had to overcome my own inwith the help of Iceland Presternal fears,” she says. The ident Vigdís Finnbogadóttir, bicycling trip through Sibein 1996 because women leadria taught her how to do just ers often feel isolated. “You that. can’t do it alone,” she says. It The cycling trip required also remains tougher to sucenormous physical strength ceed if you are a woman. and energy but her fears “Women really have to have about safety and her ability a passion for what they are to succeed were proving to be doing because there are over draining, she recalls. “I knew scrutinized, there is less tolI had to do something but had erance for mistakes,” she says. read that if you try to tamp Liswood never let that hold down your fears they just pop her back. She earned an MBA up somewhere else so I knew from Harvard Business the only solution was embracSchool, a BA from California ing it,” she says. Her strateState University, San Diego gy? “I knew I was going to and a JD from the University have fear, so I decided to menof California, Davis, School of tally put it in my backpack, Law, and is admitted to practake it out and look at it from tice law in California and time to time, but not be Massachusetts. Her work dragged down by it.” The same with women presidents and strategy helped when she was Author: Jennifer L. Schenker | Informilo prime ministers was the inan unknown approaching spiration for the White House world leaders, she says. Project to change the culturHer latest book, “The Loudal message in the United est Duck” is a business guide States about women as leadthat uses anecdotes to examers. ine the challenges to tradiIn 2000, the U.S. Secretary tional workplace diversity efof Defense appointed her to forts. There is still much to a three year term on the Dedo to attain a gender balance fense Advisory Committee on not just in politics but in busiWomen in the Service. Her ness, she says. career also includes manageHer advice to women who ment positions in the airline A DLDwomen Profile wa n t t o b e c o m e l e a d e r s ? industry, a job as a consultant “Start at as early an age as for the Boston Consulting Group and managing Goldman Sachs’ global leadership possible and practice standing in front of a crowd and and diversity division. She is now a senior advisor to the having your ideas challenged, speak out, aim for the top,” firm. Along the way she wrote several books, found time she says. And don’t let politics get in the way. “Change to bicycle across Siberia and, following the September 11, them,” she says. 

Beyond Usual Ideas About Diversity: Laura Liswood

The Loudest Duck Laura Liswood (2009) “The Loudest Duck” dives into the many aspects of diversity in the increasingly global workplace. Laura Liswood explains how to ­e nsure a fair and level playing field for anyone working his or her way up the ladder in the new corporate world order. Liswood discusses some of the reasons for the challenges encountered by historically underrepresented groups and suggests ways to overcome those obstacles. If the loudest duck in China gets shot, but the squeaky wheel in the U.S. gets the grease, there must be a way for the two different approaches to be appreciated as globalization continues to ‘shrink’ our world. This book details why those differences should be made conscious and why awareness of such issues should be embraced and harnessed to the benefit of all in order to create a workplace where no one is subtly advantaged or disadvantaged because of their diversity.


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Lorea Canales, Somaly Mam, Pat Mitchell, Hibaaq Osman

Violence Against Women – the Mother of All Issues The Big Picture “Violence against women harms families and communities across generations and reinforces other violence prevalent in society” – this was concluded by the United Nations many times, most recently in the UN Secretary-General’s Campaign “UNITE to End Violence Against Women”. The UN estimates that 70 percent of all women experience violence in their lifetimes at least once, the most common form globally being violence inflicted by an intimate partner or through family members. Around the world, one in three women will be beaten, raped or otherwise assaulted in her lifetime, drawing an alarming picture of the status quo. Violence against women takes many forms and shapes. They range from economic and physical violence to psychological abuse, emotional pressure and the denial of participation, education and self-development. They affect women and girls of all ages, social groups and all countries, although big regional differences exist concerning the different types of violence against women. In fact, according to World Bank data, “Women aged 15-44 are more at risk from rape and domestic violence than from cancer, car accidents, war and malaria.” The mother of all issues The costs of violence against women are extremely high – economically and in terms of human suffering. Violence against them impoverishes not only women but also their families and communities and diminishes women’s abilities to participate in public life. It holds their countries back from development and progress of which the involvement of women is a vital part. As the panellists Pat Mitchell, Hibaaq Osman, Lorea Canales and Somaly Mam made very clear at DLDwomen 2011: Violence against women is at the heart of many issues. Unless we succeed in ending systematic violence and mistreatment of women, our efforts to tackle the world’s most pressing problems will lack their full vigour. Representing different backgrounds and telling their individual stories, all four agreed that violence against women appears in various forms with var-

ious social consequences. In fact, says Pat Mitchell, violence against women is a problem in every country around the world: “We must find ways to end it because until it ends women and girls will never be able to fully realise their potential and capture their given rights as human beings.”

Women and Egypt’s revolution: broken promises and the hope for lasting change Looking at the situation in Egypt, Hibaaq Osman – founder of the Arab Women’s Fund and on the forefront of women’s rights activism for many years - explained how for women, the lack of participation and the denial of self-determination is a form of violence and should be addressed as such. When looking at the revolutionary events in Egypt, she has mixed feelings. To see that during the demonstrations “there were women who really found their voices and were at the front lines standing next to men and demanding change” boosted her hopes for an improved situation for women in Egypt and the region. Like men, she says, Egyptian women went to Tahrir Square and stood up for freedom, fairness and democracy. And like the men they did not back down when the government forces used increased brutality and violence against demonstrators. “No one said that women better stay behind. There were covered women as well as uncovered women. Women even slept next to men in the tents without being afraid of sexual harassment. I think the Arab Spring has prov-

en that women are absolutely part of this society in a big way.” “We really need women to become policy makers and change the laws. Women are very conscious, politically wise and they are very concerned.” Hibaaq Osman However, in the transition process that has now begun, she cannot find any major signs of improvement for women: “Within weeks conservatives made plans to change the few laws that women have successfully fought for over the last decade because they belonged with the regime we had just gotten rid of.” What makes her especially angry is the fact that in the constitutional committee drafting the Egypt’s new constitution, women are not represented at all. Instead, she says, ultra-conservatives are trying to gain ground again, often backed by traditional political parties rejecting women in leadership positions. She urges that meaningful participation and women’s rights are rapidly included in the new constitution before momentum is lost. Tahrir Square’s most important legacy is that women are no longer willing to go back to being non-political again. They are getting involved. When the first elections take place, she hopes there will be women ready to run for office and fight for their rights against all opposition. “We really need women to become policy makers and change the laws. Women are very conscious, politically wise and they are very concerned. But it is difficult because everyday something changes.”

Mexico: femicide and the fight against collective neglect Being a lawyer and writer from Mexico, Lorea Canales is shocked about how violence against women is tabooed in her home country. While on average


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four women are killed in Mexico every day and another two commit suicide, national and local governments typically turn a blind eye on this. Eightynine percent of crimes in Mexico go unreported, amounting to an impressive balance sheet of lacking accountability. “There is absolutely no trust in our legal system,” Lorea says. Violence against women is simply neglected or not taken seriously. Before court it is almost impossible to place the message that women are actually the victims and not the perpetrators or cause of violence against them, she knows from her own experience as a lawyer. Their cases are played down or turned against them by the judges, leaving them feeling lost and neglected. Since the opening up of the Mexican society ten years ago, together with other lawyers she has fought for oral proceedings that let the victims actually be “If the culture and the understanding and definition of what constitutes harassment and violence don’t change, there is nothing we can do.” Lorea Canales seen and heard before court. “The subservience and objectification of women is very ingrained in the Mexican society,” Lorea explains. “It already starts in school and among teenagers. Women systematically are treated like they are not valuable.” For her what is going on in Mexico is femicide – the systematic approach to punish women for being a woman and to destroy them as a means of destroying communities. Among Mexican women, the awareness of injustice is increasing but the sense that this is a huge societal problem only trickles down into people’s mindsets slowly. “If the culture and the understanding and definition of what constitutes harassment and violence don’t change, there is nothing we can do, even with constitutional changes,” Lorea says. “We have to dig deeper and change the culture.” Human trafficking and forced prostitution in Cambodia: women in modern day slavery Somaly Mam’s story is one of incredible suffering and an even greater belief in the impact of commitment. Sold to a brothel in Cambodia at a very young age, Somaly has survived and escaped what many girls around the world have to face: sexual slavery. For over ten years she was raped and beaten on a daily basis, deprived of her rights and failed by state and society.

are a lot of pedophiles coming to Cambodia because the girls are so young. Extradition laws can help to arrest and actually convict these people. But we need the political commitment.” “My work is to empower the victims.” Somaly Mam

When she finally escaped and lived in France she could not forget her past and neglect the fact that millions of girls still suffer what she had overcome. So she returned to Cambodia and founded AFESIP (Agir Pour les Femmes En Situations Precaires). AFESIP not only works to rescue trafficking victims but aims at rehabilitating and reintegrating them into their societies. Today, there are three centres in Cambodia, two in Vietnam and two in Laos. With the Somaly Mam Foundation she has established a funding organisation supporting programs and organisations committed to the eradication of modern day slavery. “My work is to empower the victims,” she says. For Somaly, tackling the demand side of the issue is a decisive factor in the struggle against sex trade. “There

The political will to drastically and sustainably act on violence against women is also what Lorea and Hibaaq are missing in their countries. “Child prostitution is also a big problem in Mexico,” Lorea explains. “It would be very easy to detect tourists specifically coming for sex tourism. Airlines can monitor it, hotels can monitor it and the police forces can monitor it. But there is no political will to act on this and this is terrible.” Women need to feel and actually be backed by their leaders and governments when they stand up for themselves, all panellists agree. “We all have to put our hands together politically and try to bring immediate change,” Hibaaq agrees. “It is frustrating for me to see how the west and other more developed countries act detached from that issue because they think it is not happening in their backyards.” Creating awareness and visibility for all issues related to violence against women is crucial, Pat Mitchell is convinced. “Only then can we begin to hold societies and individual perpetrators collectively responsible.” 

Somaly Mam who was a child prostitute herself now fights against the sexual abuse of girls and women. The Somaly Mam Foundation rescues girls from sex slavery.


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People at the Tahrir Square are celebrating the victory of the 2011 Egyptian Revolution when ­p resident Hosni Mubarak stepped down from office. Amongst other things, the regime change bears huge potentials for more female participation.

Hibaaq Osman

“The Best Thing that Happened to the People – Social Media!” Once you get the chance to talk to powerhouse Hibaaq Osman, you immediately feel drawn into the spirit of a new era – the spirit the world has seen on the images of the Egyptian Revolution at Tahrir Square. In this interview, the lively activist shares her experience of the Arabic Revolution, the equalizing effects of computer-driven mobilisation and gives an outlook on the new Egypt to come. DLD: Please tell us about how you experienced the uprise in Egypt? HO: I never thought that I will see a revolution happening in my lifetime. When it was unfolding under my eyes,

it was a wonderful moment. It was a moment of uncertainty, and a moment of excitement. DLD: What do you predict for the region? HO: It is the young people who really made the revolution in Egypt, who are now going to be first time voters. They are going to determine where Egypt is going. They are non-religious, they are very engaged, and they are very peaceful. When the police left the streets, the people came down to protect each other and each other’s properties. When the traffic police was not there, the young people basically took care of the traffic. It’s a nation that literally came together in every sense of the word. DLD: Has there been a specific female movement within the Egyptian uprise? HO: Egypt now is a nation that literally came together in any sense of the word. For the first time you see women at the forefront and in leadership positions. They are talking about women’s rights and they will make sure

that the constitution has laws that protect and promote women’s rights. When they drafted the constitution at first, women were not on the committee. In consequence, women came together and had all kind of press releases to apply pressure and make sure that the constitution protects women and women’s rights. Generally, a country that has women engaged and in leadership positions is a prosperous country. Likewise, if you look at countries that have left women absolutely behind, you see a country that is going downhill. DLD: Has social media played a crucial role? HO: I would hate to think that it was because of the social media. It was peoplebehind the keyboards. But political organization became a lot easier, people relating to each other became a lot easier. It was full equality between men and women. I believe that the best thing that happened to the people was social media. And the worst thing that happened to dictators – social media. 


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Dorothee Bär, Geraldine de Bastion, Anke Domscheidt-Berg, Angelika Niebler

Civilising the World Wild Web? Nicolas Sarkozy would have had a tough stand in this discussion evolving around his claimed necessity to “civilise the Internet”, voiced at the eG8 summit in Paris in May 2011. Instead, an inspiring and thought provoking debate was launched around one of the present’s most controversial questions: how free does the Internet have to be and where do we need rules to crop it?

extent of power concentration and the development of monopolies online, or the way that sensitive data is treated – we don’t need to start on the topic of child pornography – no rules are not an option.” Pointing to the deficits of the net and its imminent dangers of abuse, she is convinced that the Internet has passed the phase in which a no-regulations approach can be carried further without exposing citizens where they should be protected by the state. A need to strengthen civil society Geraldine de Bastion explicitly misses the inclusion of civil society and the advocacy of citizens’ and consumer rights. Firmly opposing the instrumentalisation of fear to conduct the discussion in a certain direction, she is

because it creates a whole new level of accessibility and inclusion for people of all social groups.” To ensure that every member of society is equally able to participate in this, she is a strong advocate of universal access and education in media competency: “It has taken years to convince older politicians that broadband access it part of basic services and that this is not something our economy can take care of alone.” She is convinced that more and broader initiatives are needed to prevent a widening of the digital gap and to build bridges linking the generations. This is also where she sees civil society organisations as important stakeholders.

Universal access and net neutrality While all four panellists agree on the importance of universal access to ensure equal opportunities for Radical freedom vs. factual participation, especially Angecensorship: is there a third way? lika can not fully support the noFor Anke Domscheidt-Berg, tion of complete neutrality of the founder of opengov, the buzz Internet: “Why shouldn’t we difwords at the core of her work ferentiate and exclude the marare openness and transparency. ket economy if someone would She is convinced that all the delike to download bigger data cisive features of the Internet, packages faster then others? I from jump-starting innovation find it absolutely fair to tie difto enabling direct participation ferent packages for different and inclusion of citizens, are prices – that is a market-orientrooted in its freedom: “I could ed approach like we have it evcompletely dismiss the question Dorothee Bär (CSU), Anke Domscheit-Berg (opengov), Geraldine erywhere else.” For Geraldine, if the Internet should be ci- de Bastion (Digitale Gesellschaft), and Angelika Niebler (European the economic strength of the Invilised because I’m convinced Parliament) at DLDwomen. ternet exactly results from its it cannot be civilised.” The deequality and neutrality. Like bate around such regulation in her convinced that the Internet first and Anke, she is convinced that a differenopinion is largely driven by fear. Even foremost offers an unprecedented tiation of participants by means of more problematic, she argues, the fear chance for corporations and govern- spending power would lead to the creof citizens is consciously instrumen- ments to step into a democratic and ation of bottlenecks and the destruction talised to push through legislation innovative dialogue with their share- of every space for creativity and innoamounting to a censorship of the In- holders, stakeholders, consumers and vation. For Dorothee, fairness primarternet. “People at the top are afraid of citizens. While the economic sphere ily means realising universal access – transparency and utilise the fears of has largely colonised the Internet over only then, she says, will we be able to citizens to prevent it. Few people vol- the last decade and with the political use the full educational and democratuntarily create openness about things sphere now trying to catch up, she crit- ic potential the Internet offers us. She they prefer to do secretly.” Especially icises that the rights of civil society sees urgent demand for that among her the Internet’s mobilising potentials for are not taken into the equation suffi- own peers in parliament and the govcitizens drive governments to worry ciently. Especially in Germany uncer- ernment. What worries her is that ofabout their positions and let them set tainty and ignorance hinder a construc- ten, officials are not familiar with the up a regulatory infrastructure to be tive debate on how to better include Internet but already talk about regulacitizens into the process, she says. tion. And Anke agrees: “for the Internet used flexibly once established. Angelika Niebler adds a European- “Many countries have embraced the the same should hold true as for tree political perspective to the debate. new technologies in a very construc- houses: those who cannot enter it withFirmly agreeing on the Internet’s dem- tive manner. In Germany, there have out help should not make rules for it.” ocratic potential, Angelika is never- only been small steps on how to use For her, the key to bringing civil society theless convinced that it is also in ur- the Internet in a positive way.” and the public sphere in line on that For Dorothee Bär, online input from point are community-public-partnergent need of rules. Arguing especially in terms of consumer and data protec- civil society and citizens is one of the ships: civil communities with relevant tion mechanisms, what worries her is Internet’s pivotal features. “In the par- knowledge and capacities cooperating the accumulation of power in the hands liament we depend on this very much,” with the state who offer support and reof a few corporations operating in the she says. “Our democracy is incredibly sources to realise initiatives and ideas Internet business: “if you observe the enriched by the Internet, especially benefiting everyone. 


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The Mobile DLDwomen Video Experience

Leadership Outlook: Views From Malaysia

Leadership Outlook: Views From Botswana

Civilising the World Wide Web

Sharizat Abul Jalil, Minister of Women, Family and Community Development of Malaysia Page 32

Pelonomi Venson-Moitoi, Minister of Communications, Science and Technology Page 33

Geraldine de Bastion, newthinking communications Digitale Gesellschaft Page 41

Dorothee Bär CDU/CSU Page 41

Angelika Niebler, European Parliament Page 41

Andrian Kreye, Sueddeutsche Zeitung Page 41

Dirk von Gehlen, jetzt.de / Sueddeutsche Zeitung Page 41

Stefanie Babst, NATO Page 34

Abigail Disney, Fork Films Page 34

Alison Smale, International Herald Tribune Page 34

Civilising the World Wide Web Anke Domscheit-Berg, fempower.me / opengov.me Page 41

Call to Action Zika Abzuk, Cisco Page 34


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The Mobile DLDwomen Video Experience

Violence Against Women – the Mother of All Issues Lorea Canales, Novelist, Journalist & Lawyer Page 38

Somaly Mam, AFESIP Page 38

Pat Mitchell, The Payley Center of Media Page 38

Hibaaq Osman, Karama Page 40


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Education

Idit Harel Caperton, Michael Matias, Catherine Milliken, Shirin Natour Hafi, Michal Segalov, Dale Stephens

Education Beyond Institutions

Education Beyond Institutions

Page 46

Pioneering IT’s Next Frontier: Gaby Zedlmayer Page 48

Frontiers of Education Page 52

Integrating Social Impact Page 56

Creating a Statement Through Tradition Page 56

Fighting Child Marriage Page 56

Commitment by Global Players Page 57

Social Fashion From Bangladesh Page 57

When talking about education we think of lively schoolyards, ivy-entwined college buildings and modern adult education centres. Education and institutions – these notions are inseparably connected. But are they? Or will we have to adapt to a future where education will happen everywhere except from the places we used to go to in order to get it? A global innovation economy requires new skills “In the global innovation economy, we need education of a completely different kind” – for Idit Harel Caperton, founder of the innovative learning projects World Wide Workshop and Globaloria, the truth is very simple. Our children face a whole new world – a sensible conclusion drawn from that is: old educational approaches and concepts don’t fit anymore because they fail our children in preparing them for their future. Idit is convinced that in the future, STEM (Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics) skills will be decisive for children to acquire. Already, job growth is very strong in this sector – even in the US where unemployment rates continue to be very high. She is convinced that creative learning concepts provide a key tool to imparting these skills to children. Especially women and girls are still missing from today’s STEM workforce, she states, because they were not encouraged to choose this path.

With her work, Senior Google Engineer Michal Segalov tackles exactly this problem. At Google’s Israel offices she has launched the program “Mind the Gap” aiming to encourage girls that are still in school to select computer science as their major at university and to pursue careers in computer science and technology. For Michal, the most important effect of her program is the erasure of the many misconceptions and clichés that particularly girls tend to have about computer science: “We explain to them what computer science really is, then we expose them to Google’s high tech environment and they get a chance to talk to employees and computer scientists on a very personal level.” From the 2000 girls that already went through her program, Michal says, 40% have later selected computer science as a major. “This is really encouraging.” Creative learning: the impact of musical education For composer and musician Catherine Milliken, musical education needs to move back to the centre of the way we educate and teach our children. As the director of the Education Program of the Berlin Philharmonics she aims at making various styles of music more perceptible to children and adults alike. “My whole philosophy is to bring music closer to people’s hearts and to bring people to music in an active way”, she explains. “I work together with the Ber-

lin Philharmonic because that is an institution that has as a resource 120 musicians.” In Germany she has worked with prisoners and children from socially disadvantaged backgrounds, using the medium of music as a means of empowering them, to reestablish their confidence and help them to form functioning relationships with other people. Catherine is convinced that “music is not a luxury in our lives, it is a necessity. And we will loose that part of our lives if we push too much on certain skills, leaving the creativity aside. I have seen so many kids coming to school without breakfast and when they perform a piece of music, they are completely different kids.” For Catherine, conventional education as we know it fails to recognise the powerful impact music can have on the individual development especially of children. We don’t know what problems and challenges our children will have to face in twenty years, she says. “The best thing we can give them is a feeling and a knowledge and self-confidence that they can approach any problem that is going to need solving.” For her, musical education is a central part of that task. Colleges and higher education: a thing of the past? For Dale Stephens, the 19 year old Thiel Fellow and leader of the social education movement UnCollege, higher education as we know it has pretty much


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run its course. “I am challenging the notion that college is the only path of success for us because college may no longer be a good investment,” he says. With tuition fees in the US and Europe sky rocketing while the actual quality of academic education continues to decline, Dale observes that, “We are at a point where academic inflation is rampant. Bachelor’s degrees are the new high school diplomas.” So what does this mean for the future of education? “I think if we want to encourage people and prepare them for success, we should motivate them to take their education beyond the classroom.” What worries him is the extent to which students run up debts to be able to pay for their higher education. “Students are taking on an astronomical amount of debt – in the United States the average student graduates with $34.000 Dollars debt. People are mortgaging away their freedom to innovate and create in the real world in exchange for a degree. Once they have it they are stuck on a narrow path finding a job to pay off their debt.” Dale is convinced that we urgently need to change our notion of higher education and enable young people to have the courage to pursue whatever education they feel is right for them – “Whether it’s in college, whether it’s outside of academia or a blended model of the two.” He hopes that the UnCollege learning philosophy applying methods of self-directed homeschooling to higher education will

bring students to realise that learning is life-long and not coupled to specific institutions. Education means opportunities As the principal of the first Arabic school in the Israeli town of Lod, Shirin Natour Hafi experiences education as something going well beyond the institution of her school in a very different way. Her children often come from socially difficult backgrounds and precarious family situations. For them, she says, school is much more than a place they go to in order to get educated. “On the first day of holidays the children come knocking on the school door,” she says. “That is why we never have holidays.” Her school is a chance for her children to escape their difficult surroundings and to hope for a better perspective. Adding to that, many people don’t approve of her work – be it either because at her school girls and boys learn side by side or simply because of the fact that she runs an Arabic school in an Israeli city. It is a difficult and challenging situation to teach in. For Shirin, the most important thing is, “To give Arabic children in Lot the chance to dream like a child from a wealthy background.” She believes that education is a central factor for the solution of the conflict between Israel and Palestine. Only if we are aware of the other’s hopes and fears can we start to build a lasting peace, she says.

Education 2.0: technology-enabled teaching and learning Bringing the voice of a student into the discussion, 9th grade student Michael Matias reports from his experience with creative and innovative learning methods. Being a technology enthusiast and the initiator of a strategic technology planning committee at his school in Israel, Michael has not only grown into a connected world but is actively using new technologies at school to improve his education. At his school, technology has become an integral element of both teaching and learning: “One of the programs that my school has started is a one-to-one program with laptops. Starting in sixth grade, the school provides a laptop to every student and encourages them to learn, to take notes and write exams using the laptops, including homework and communication among students on the internet.” Michael and his classmates chat instead of meeting, create Google documents from their notes and share them with everyone in order to provide all students with as much information as possible to improve results. They download maths courses onto their iPods and smartphones and listen to them while waiting for a bus or train. “These are things that even five years ago, you couldn’t do,” he says excitedly. “But now there are millions of examples even in my school for how we use technology. It is very effective.” 


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Early in her career Gabriele Zedlmayer, now HP’s vice pres- bile health company Positive Innovation for the Next Genident, office of social innovation, took a gutsy risk to get eration (PING). It is the largest mobile health pilot program in Botswathe world’s richest and most powerful people to start using personal digital assistants at the World Economic Fo- na, running throughout the malaria season. Future prorum’s 2000 annual meeting in Davos. Now, she is spear- grams are planned to reach additional outbreak-prone disheading an effort to use similar devices to help curb eases in the region. The technology being piloted offers lots of advantages deadly disease and put a crimp in the sale of counterfeit drugs in some of the poorest and least connected parts of over the current system:healthcare workers can collect data via a web application the world. on a mobile device, upload The peripatetic HP exthe data (including picecutive is convinced that tures, video, audio and GPS technology has the power coordinates) over a mobile to address some of the network, and analyze and world’s most difficult globshare the data via the al health challenges. “It is cloud, in hours rather than the information technolthe weeks normally needogy sector’s next frontier,” ed. And, when an outbreak she says. “We can add is detected, healthcare transparency, speed and workers can quickly alert better access and delivery authorities via text mesof healthcare services.” sage to ensure rapid deZedlmayer is one of ployment of preventative some 80-plus scheduled measures to reduce disease speakers at DLDWomen, transmission. a conference in Munich In the next phase of the June 29-30 organized by program, HP and PING Hubert Burda Media. The plan to develop a cloudconference, which focuses based health services on women’s influence on package for consumers in developments in technolBots­wana to deliver healthogy, media, markets and related information. society, is expected to atDespite progress in distract 500 women in busiease eradication, the World ness and the arts. Health Organization reUnder her leadership, ports that hundreds of HP’s social innovation dithousands of people die vision has expanded from from malaria-related illbeing focused on education nesses each year, most of to include programs not Author: Jennifer L. Schenker | Informilo them children under the just on monitoring health age of five. Mobile technolbut also on entrepreneurogy has the potential to ship and community endrastically improve malargagement. “I can see and ia surveillance by speeding feel the impact we are havdata collection and genering, “ says Zedlmayer, who ating more context-aware lives in Germany with her information about outhusband and two sons, but breaks. commutes to HP’s offices In addition to the colin Switzerland and spends laboration with PING, HP much of her time on planes. has alliances with African The latest program she A DLDwomen Profile social enterprise mPedioversees, launched in eargree to fight counterfeit ly June, equips healthcare drugs through a mobile workers in Botswana with phone and cloud-based serHP Palm Pre 2 smart phones to collect malaria data, notify the Ministry of Health vice ; nonprofit organization mothers2mothers to help preabout outbreaks and tag both data and disease surveil- vent HIV transmission from mothers to infants; and the lance information with GPS coordinates. This data will CHAI to improve the speed of HIV diagnosis for infants contribute to a first-ever geographic map of disease trans- in Kenya. The current focus on health and the developing world is mission in the country, enabling faster response times and better measurement of malaria cases in order to monitor worlds away from what Zedlemayer, a German native who treatment and scale up the distribution of mosquito nets, earned a bachelor’s degree in business from Georgia State University and a master’s degree in finance from the Unishe says. The program is being run in partnership with the Clin- versity of Miami, was doing in the early days of her career. After being hired in 1987, Zedlmayer held several positon Health Access Initiative (CHAI) and mobile network provider MASCOM, and uses technology developed by mo- tions within HP EMEA, including head of corporate af-

Pioneering IT’s Next Frontier: Gabi Zedlmayer


E d u c at i o n

fairs; vice president of marketing services, corporate marketing and customer relationship management for the enterprise systems group (ESG); and general manager of ESG marketing and solutions. In 2000, back in the days when it was challenging to get an Internet connection in Davos, the snowy Alpine resort town where the World Economic Forum’s annual meeting is held, Zedlmayer proposed distributing – for free – an HP personal digital assistant called Compaq – to all of the movers and shakers attending the event. At the time, few chief executives or world leaders were experienced using handheld devices for data communications and communication channels in Davos were sketchy. “There was a huge risk, I had to put my career on the line,” says Zadlmayer. “Not only did it work, there was a tremendous response, but it could have gone the other way.” Zedlmayer went on to become vice president of corporate marketing for HP’s Europe, Middle East, and Africa (EMEA) region, where she was responsible for comprehensive global marketing strategy. While in this position she led regional branding efforts and marketing initiatives, including corporate communications, internal communications, brand and digital strategy, advertising, and glob-

al citizenship. In addition to her current job as a vice-president in the social innovation unit, she leads HP’s Global Citizenship Council and serves as a member of the Board of Directors of Junior Achievement Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA), the EU Commission e-skills Leadership Board and HAAS Center for Business Responsibility. Zedlmayer also leads the Executive Diversity Forum for HP in EMEA and is a member of the Women’s Council of HypoVereinsbank UNICREDIT. Her many roles and demanding travel schedule make balancing work and family life challenging but she says she gets a lot of satisfaction from feeling like she is making a difference. “When I see how we can ensure that the return of blood samples for newborns in Africa is done in time for them to get UV treatment so they can have a chance to live; when I see a farmer in Nigeria who has used a personal computer to start a small farm from scratch and scale up to thousands of chickens and to know that training from HP has made all of the difference in her life; and when I go to Russia and see entrepreneurs we have trained who now have jobs, it feels like very meaningful work and makes it worth the extra time and extra effort,” she says. 

mPedigree Fighting Counterfeit Drugs Founded in 2007, the mPedigree Network has picked up the fight against one of the developing world’s most pressing problems: counterfeit drugs and their consequences for global health. According to the WHO, 10% of the global medicine supply is counterfeit, amounting to 30% in the developing world. Actual figures are likely to be even higher, leading to microbiological resistances and causing at least 700,000 deaths annually. The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime has observed that trade with fake medicine is most widely spread in countries where regulatory capacity is low, being the case for many countries in Africa and South-East Asia. To change that mPedigree has introduced a revolutionary system empowering consumers to instantly and reliably verify over a free text message service whether their drugs are genuine or potentially dangerous. All they need is a mobile phone. Beyond that, the network has established a resource system aimed at creating greater market transparency and enhancing efficiency in the regulatory process. Since the launch of its first drug authentication programs together with HP, the company has been a close and vital partner for mPedigree, helping to kick-start the initiative and providing the cloud infrastructure and security

and integrity systems to make tracking reliable, secure and fast. The partnership is at the core of HP’s Global Citizenship commitment, providing the company’s know-how and most advanced technology solutions to tackle global problems with a special focus on initiatives improving global health and healthcare.

www.mpedigree.net

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A vital piece of information. A brilliant idea. The spark of innovation. All have the potential to change the world. But first, they need to connect. Connected to the right information, in the right place at the right time, we have the power to make better decisions. We can mobilize millions by inspiring an audience with a single idea. We can fuel human progress by bringing the right minds together with the spark of innovation. At HP, we’re expanding access to a connected world— uniting people with each other, and with bigger ideas and better ways of living and working. And we’re just getting started.


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E d u c at i o n Right: Hole in the wall: Indian children ­t eaching themselves how to use the computer. Far Right: Three computers built in a wall in a rural and poor area in India.

Sugata Mitra

Frontiers of Education For students, 70% of their learning comes from growing up in their local day-to-day environment, 20% comes from their peers and another 10% of learning comes from schools and formal education. In the light of such figures, one could wonder: why are kids still going to school and colleges? There is a growing trend around that question. Children have stopped going to classes for things they are learning from online resources. There are pretty seismic shifts happening in learning and education. Professor Sugata Mitra is at the forefront looking for these tipping points. He likes to express this radical change in a little puzzle; people access the Internet and they have been accessing the Internet for ten, fifteen years now. Originally, they accessed the Internet on pretty large computers. Over the years that machine has been changing. Now you see people everywhere looking at little devices and you can be sure that they are online. Still you can tell if someone is accessing the Internet, because he holds a gadget. Imagine ten years from now when that gadget has become so small and so ubiquitous that when a person is talking you can no longer make out if he or she is really talking at lip from his own brain or if he is reading out a webpage. He thinks this is imminent and the moment that happens will change all the definitions in both education and assessment – particularly in assessment. It is not a question of whether change will happen in education - it is a question of when it will happen. We have come to a discontinuity. A short story in that context: everywhere on the planet there are places you can’t build

schools in or where good teachers either don’t want to go or can’t go. This situation is not going to change. Does that mean that the world is always going to have two kinds of education – good education and bad education? Another serious problem: good teachers want to teach in good schools. If all the good teachers went to the good schools, then what happens to the bad schools? The good teachers should be working in the bad schools but they don’t. That situation is not going to change either. Hole in the wall In 1999, Sugatra Mitra was working for a relatively posh school on courses training children how to program, in a fancy office next to a big urban slum. Through that immediate presence of both worlds, one thought crossed his mind: why should it be assumed that the children in these slums wouldn’t perform as good in programming as the children taking the expensive courses? The dilemma was that teacher would not go there for security reasons. The solution was brilliantly simple: He brought two computers to the slums and plugged them into the local wall. He built a do-it-yourself ATM around the computers, put them into the wall, turned them on and just left them there. Very quickly it turned out that instead of breaking the computers, the children were actually using

it. They were browsing and teaching each other how to browse. That was a buzz because they didn’t know any English and they hadn’t seen a computer before. They didn’t know what the Internet was. How was this possible? To rule out the possibility one of the students must have taught them, the experiment was repeated in a very far away village. When returning to the remote village after three months, he saw two children playing a game on it. As soon as they saw him, they said: “We need a faster processor and a better mouse.” He then aked: “How do you know all this?” And they answered: “Well this machine works only in English so we had to teach ourselves English first. And that is how we learned it.” Obviously, the children were teaching themselves without any assistance. The experiment was carried out for five years all across the length and breadth of India looking at different minority groups, different ethnicities, different genetics, and different socioeconomic backgrounds. One observation is that young children are often teaching older children how to do things. That was a clue. Everywhere the same things were happening at approximately the same rate. Sugata measured it and on a computer literacy scale over a period of nine months. The result is a straight graph going upwards. The top of that graph ends at about 43%. That corresponds to the average computer user – and to the respective curve of children in schools with teachers. These ravishing findings lead to the conclusion that groups of children can teach themselves to use computers and the Internet, irrespec-


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tive of who and where they are. Every child seems to be able to do it. What else can they teach themselves? In a big city in southern India, Sugata encountered a specific problem. Children who were learning English from local teachers, adapted a pronunciation that was extremely coloured by the local accent and they were almost impossible to understand and faced difficulties in the labour market. A computer with a speech-to-text-program made the difference: after two months he returned to check on the progress. They had downloaded the Speaking Oxford Dictionary. If you type a word in, the dictionary pronounces it for you. They would copy the accent and speak it back into the computer and see if the right word was coming up. They had invented a pedagogical system all by themselves! Another experiment he designed was to give pupils a problem and the task to solve it online. Again they came up with the answer. In the slums the teachers were reporting to him that the quality of the children’s English had improved dramatically and their homework was fantastic. Sugata’s suspicion drove him to investigate and found that they had discovered Google and were googling their homework. First he thought: what have I done? Is this learning? An experiment in 2006 delivered the answers. He was assigned to improve the quality of schooling in impoverished areas at Newcastle University. He designed an experiment intended to fail. The research question was: “Can Tamil-speaking 12 year old children in a village in South India teach themselves the biotechnology of

DNA replication in English from a street side computer?” Sugata was certain that this would definitely prove that we need teachers. The children of Kalikuppam received two wall computers to play with. Into those computers, the biotechnology of DNA replication in English was uploaded. He showed it to the children and they said: “This is full of diagrams, how are we supposed to learn this?” He said: “I have no idea,” and walked away. Prior, he had given them a test to start with and they got a zero as you would expect. He came back after two months and called the children together. They said: “We have understood nothing.” He asked them how many times they had tried until they had come to that conclusion. They said to him: “We look at it every single day.” “You don’t understand it but look at it every day – what for?” he asked. A little girl said to me in broken Tamil English: “Apart from the fact that improper replication of the DNA molecule causes genetic disease we have understood nothing else.” The following test resulted in an educational impossibility. They had gone from zero to 30% in two months. Remember the context: 12 year old Tamil speaking children in this tropical heat learning DNA replication with side computers in English. Still, 30% is a fail. How could they pass? Sugata learned that the children were friends with a local accountant whom he asked if she could teach them a little bit more about biotechnology. She said: “Absolutely not, I didn’t have science in school, I don’t understand a word on that screen.” Instead, she just stood behind them and every time they do

something just say, “Wow, fantastic how you can do that.” She did this for two months and the scores jumped up to 50%. Again, the results were equivalent to the ones from the school in Delhi with a trained biotechnology teacher. “I looked at the graph and thought: this is getting really serious. This is not supposed to happen,” says Sugatra. “I finally had no choice but to make a blanket statement: groups of children can teach themselves almost anything.” Similar experiment with groups of children in England, each group consisting of four children and using one laptop, brought them to a 30% learning progress. In an article in the Guardian, Sugata called for grandmothers with broadband access and a webcam who would spare one hour of their time per week. 200 mostly retired teachers, mostly women, responded and have so far done over 800 hours of instruction. They are called “the granny-cloud.” The granny-cloud sits on the Internet and when there is a student in need they are beamed over via Skype. That is called self-organised learning. Basically, the idea is that children self-organise around big questions. There are schools in England, Hong Kong, Melbourne and South America that have picked it up. A typical question they address in these experiments could be: “How does an iPad know where it is?” You let them loose on this question and after some time they come up with GPS and the concept of three satellites. “Groups of children can teach themselves almost anything.” Sugata Mitra | Newcastle University So the job of the teacher is to design the right questions and then let the whole system take care of itself. Content is everywhere to be found, but teachers need to ask the right questions. Sugata believes that we only need three preconditions for primary education: reading comprehension, information searching and retrieval skills and we need an irrational system of belief. If this is proliferated, the system will take care of itself. Currently Sugata Mitra is working on a new project in India and Sierra Leone together with MIT. The basic research question will be: “Can children teach themselves how to read?” If children turn out capable of teaching themselves the three preconditions for education, the world doesn’t need any traditional education at all. 


„Smaller space needs bigger

thinking.“ Gary Chang, Architect/Hong Kong

The Audi Q3 meets any expectations. Its interior can be fitted with a choice of elegant materials and also features numerous intelligent solutions such as the innovative storage system and the passenger seat that can be fully folded forward. A further highlight is the optional Audi MMI Navigation Plus system with seven-inch colour display, 20 GB hard drive and Audi music interface. The Audi Q3 leaves you in no doubt about what a modern, compact SUV has to offer.


Built from new expectations. The Audi Q3.

youtube.com/AudiQ3


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Lakshmi Pratury

Integrating Social Impact When Lakshmi Pratury addresses a topic that is complex in nature and illustrates her idea of what social impact really is, she starts by telling a little story. It’s the story about a small boy who decides to buy plain ice cream instead of ice cream with a topping to be able to tip the waitress who is impatiently serving him. “I feel social impact is something like that. It’s not about giving what is in excess or what you don’t want, it is about giving out of what is really meaningful to you,” she says. “It is not a nice-to-do thing. For us as a community to exist togeth-

er, it is a must-do.” For social impact to happen we need to redefine our role models. Instead of focusing our attention on alleged ones like politicians or celebrities, she feels we should look for them among ourselves. Everyone can make an impact, she says. Especially big corporations have an obligation to do so: “Corporations are the new Medicis. If they don’t step in, we can’t have social impact that is sustainable. It is not only about having a little department called CSR, but about integrating social impact into your innovation and products.” From her experience as a social entrepreneur, Lakshmi knows that above all, social impact is a journey. It is nothing that can be achieved overnight but requires patience and the power of endurance. To illustrate that, of course, she knows a little story.  

left: Andrea Kolb and a Moroccon handicraft woman are discussing the design.

Andrea Kolb

Creating a Statement Through Tradition The story of ABURY is one of a new concept of luxury. Combining exclusiveness and uniqueness with sustainability and social entrepreneurship, Andrea Kolb’s new project is about the preservation of cultural diversity through the distribution of authentic handicrafts from all over the world. She explains why cultural richness is a vital part of human kind: “With the loss of cultural diversity we lose a lot of knowledge that we need to develop our societies. For many people their handicrafts are their cultural capital. Currently this cultural capital is getting lost and with it, they lose their identity.” ABURY supports people caught in the poverty trap by helping them to reactivate old crafts and turning them into a source of income. To-

gether with the experts of the Club of Marrakesh, Kolb wanted to develop a process to activate existing potentials and assets in poor societies. The result is ABURY. “The basic thought was: these people have assets – their cultural handicrafts and traditions. Our assets are market access and expertise in marketing and production – why not combine all this?” Central to this approach is the cooperation with local communities. Before being able to start a line, those bringing the skills need to be brought on board: “They need to feel taken seriously. It is about reviving their self-confidence and self-respect. They only need somebody to push them a little – the potential comes from their side.” ABURY’s latest project is a line of leather Berberbags. Being produced and embroidered in Morocco using a centuries-old technique, ABURY encourages girls and women to learn the handicraft and employs them in its production teams to save the art from getting lost. Combining tradition and modernity, the first newly designed product will be an iPad case. “For us local ownership is the key. Fifty percent of the profits flow back to the villages. People understand that the money is not a funding but that they have worked to earn it. These bags are not a help project, they are luxury goods – handmade and unique. Each of them is a statement.” For Kolb the bags are ambassadors for a new kind of luxury – sustainable, value-oriented and authentic. 

Mabel van Oranje

Fighting Child Marriage Mabel van Oranje is the co-founder of several organisations, including the European Action Council for Peace in the Balkans and the Dutch War ChildFoundation. Among the many issues that keep her going, there is one she finds especially pressing: child marriage. “Ten million girls are getting married under the age of eighteen every year - many of them as young as eight or nine. They are forced to marry men they have mostly never met before and who are often twice their age. The wedding day typically ends with rape and the girls get pulled out of school. Instead, they are forced to have many children very quickly and the chances for them to die during pregnancy or birth are very high. They often cannot negotiate safe sex with their husbands. The chances that they get HIV-infected are twice as high as for girls from their communities who are not married. Also domestic violence is twice as high. Because of the health, educational and economic consequences, child marriage means that the poorest families and communities stay poor. It is not only a driver but also a symptom of poverty. I am convinced that parents all over the world want the best for their children. So how come that in some places parents think it is in the best interest of their families to marry them off at a very young age? There are three key reasons: gender inequality, poverty and tradition. Still many cultures consider women inferior to men and don’t see educating their daughters as a good investment. Secondly, families are often so poor that by marrying their daughters off they have one mouth less to feed and might even get a bridal price. Thirdly, child marriage often is the way communities have been doing things for centuries - if girls aren’t married by the age of fifteen they become outcasts. We need to start talking about this to increase awareness. It is a sensitive topic - there is always the fear of being accused of cultural imperialism. There already are a lot of grassroot-programs helping girls to stay in school. Education seems the best protection against child marriage. It is a complex problem and the solutions aren’t easy either. But complexity can’t be an excuse to do nothing.” 


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Michaela Rennschmid-Haase

Bibi Russell

Commitment by Global Players

Social Fashion From Bangladesh

A logistics expert, DHL has commissioned its expertise to the improvement of disaster management worldwide. With the “GoHelp” program, the company has established an arm under CSR explicitly focusing on disaster relief, preparedness and response. Together with UNDP, it has developed the GARD (Get Airports Ready for Disaster) program, preparing airports in disaster prone areas to better handle the flow of incoming relief supplies when time is precious. To enable quick and effective support on the ground, DHL has set up special Disaster Response Teams (DRT) in partnership with the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (UNOCHA), providing logistic “first aid” concerning the organisation of relief supply chains, warehousing and the preparation of supplies for onward transport. Based in Panama, Dubai and Singapore, the three main DRTs provide a pool of 300 trained DHL employees voluntarily dedicating their time and skills to disaster management. Once the UNOCHA requests support from DHL, the teams are ready for deployment within a maximum of 72 hours. DRT operations have occurred following disasters in Haiti or Pakistan with more than 200 operations conducted since 2005. “Gender distribution in the DRTs is nearly fifty-fifty,” explained Michaela Rennschmid-Haase, Head of Marketing & Communications for DHL’s Solutions & Innovations, at DLDwomen. Her department is closely cooperating with the DRTs and working on new solutions to constantly improve their work: “This does not always have to include high-tech solutions. We have redeveloped our transport sacks for letters in a way that they can be stuffed with humanitarian goods. When they are thrown out of an airplane the goods stay intact for immediate use. Such solutions are often about simple and creative redevelopment of what we have.” 

Bibi Russell was born in Bangladesh and spent her childhood there before moving to Europe where she became one of the most celebrated models of her time. When looking back, she recalls how Bengal was “Full of culture and full of music and art.” While she knew that she was growing up in one of the world’s poorest countries, her parents assured her that Bangladesh was a lot more than just poor. “I saw people weaving beautiful things in beautiful colour combinations, among them a very fine fabric dating back to the 13th century,” she says. “And there are four Nobel Price Laureates coming from Bangladesh.” Combining the love for her home country with her passion for fashion and clothes, she launched Bibi Productions in 1995, a brand bringing the ageold crafts of Bengal to new life and distributing collections of clothes made out of the traditionally woven fabrics

right Above: Bibi Productions helps the Bangladeshi crafts people to revive traditional fashion. right: Locals are picking up first aid packages provided by the DRT and UNOCHA

typical for Bangladesh. Strongly believing in the positive influence fashion can have on development, Bibi has extended her efforts to combat poverty not only in Bangladesh but throughout Africa, South-East Asia and Latin America. “For all these countries we keep talking about poverty, but their people all have incredible skills to make beautiful things by hand. Fashion really can help to further social and economic development. I believe in competition, but one thing I don’t believe in is charity. These people can compete with others once they are given the chance to prove it,” she says. Bibi Productions’ first clothing line was launched at the UNESCO headquarters in Paris in 1996. Since then, the company has employed thousands of Bangladeshi weavers and artisans and presented several shows in Europe, most of which were supported by UNESCO. At DLDwomen, Russell spoke about the moment that catalysed her activities: “When I came back to Bangladesh 15 years ago, I realised one thing: the people there have incredible skills, but they are poor. And I thought, once you give them the confidence and respect them, this can be stopped.” Since then, she has not stood still in doing so. 


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The Mobile DLDwomen Video Experience

Education Beyond Institutions Idit Harel Caperton, World Wide Workshop Page 46

Catherine Miliken, Berlin Philharmonics Page 46

Shirin Natour Hafi, New Arabic High School Page 46

Education Beyond Institutions

Frontiers Of Education

Social Impact

Dale Stephens, UnCollege Page 46

Sugatra Mitra, Newcastle University Page 52

Andrea Kolb, Abury Page 56

Social Impact Bibi Russell, Bibi Productions Page 57

Michal Segalov, Google Page 46

Michaela Rennschmid-Haase, DHL Page 57

Technology for Good Lakshmi Praturi, INK Conference Page 56

Mabel von Oranje, The Elders Page 56

Gabi Zedlmayer, HP Page 48


Design: KMS TEAM

The exhibition is supported by PIN. Friends and Patrons of the Pinakothek der Moderne, the Theo Wormland Foundation and other donors who wish to remain anonymous.

www.pinakothek.de


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Sabine Anger, Christine Aylward, Jane Gilson, Rebecca Grossmann-Cohen, Franziska von Lewinski

Technology & Innovation

The 360° Consumer World

The 360° Consumer World Page 60

From Experience to Targets Page 62

The Satellady Page 64

Future Sounds Page 66

Ease your Life Page 68

From Idea to Ignition Page 68

Entrepreneurs in Conversation Page 70

“The Shoe of the Month Club” Page 72

Organizing Life Page 72

Mapping Art Page 72

The Virtual Medical Home Page 73

Russia’s Silicon Valley Page 73

Personalised Therapeutics Page 73

Technology’s Ability to Bring About Social Change Page 74

In the digital world, the consumer is no longer two-dimensional. For businesses and creators, that constitutes both a challenge as well as an opportunity that should be seized – that was the key message of the four panellists. Franziska von Lewinski As CEO of the creative agency Interone, Franziska knows a lot about the supposedly unknown species that is the modern consumer. Offering multichannel communication and advertising solutions, Interone puts the consumer right at the centre of it all, she explains. Against the common opinion that all buying behaviour is shifting online, she argues that “from research we know that there is no such thing as a pure offline or a pure online buyer. We are multi-channel buyers.” Online channels have even aided offline retailers, she says. “A lot of people research online but then go to the store and buy their products offline because stores still offer instant availability.” “There is no such thing as a pure online or offline buyer. We are multi-channel buyers.” Franziska von Lewinski

For retailers, this is good news. “Convenience really is the trigger – not Page 76 price”, Franziska is convinced. “Price Crowdsourcing Challenges will always matter, but convenience Page 76 matters more, especially now that people have less time.” The general takeTechnology for Good Page 76 away from it, she says, is that linear, predictable buying behaviour is a thing of the past. Consumers use all channels to buy and businesses need to adapt to this. “The consumer has already taken down all kinds of existing sales and distribution channels. He doesn’t care – he shops where he wants.” Businesses have to rethink their advertising and retail concepts in order to be able to fully embrace and profit from today’s multi-channel realAbove: Christine Aylward (MakingOf), Jane Gilson (Microsoft), and ity. There is a lot to Sabine Anger (Vivendi) leave flat techniques behind. Sky’s Focus ­on Female ­Products

be gained from consumers’ insights and feedback, she explains. “Companies should build their concepts around this. At the end of the day, multi-channel will be the winner.” Rebecca Grossman-Cohen Rebecca has been involved at The Daily from the very beginning and helped to build the world’s first iPad-only daily news publication from scratch. Launched in February 2011 without any beta or testing phase, The Daily combines real-time text, image, audio and video content and is specifically built for the iPad. With several years of experience in the magazine business, Rebecca firmly believes in the subscription model. What excites her most about this new kind of publication is its flexibility and responsiveness to consumer feedback: “The Daily has already changed significantly since the beginning. Speaking of the 360° consumer, our changes are mostly based on feedback we receive from our users. Because the iPad is brandnew itself, we are really learning from consumer behaviour as we go.” The Daily doesn’t have a web presence and that is intentional. It is designed and conceptualised in a way that will only work on a tablet with all its features a PC can’t offer. “People find using their iPads a very leisurely activity – they read them like a magazine. It is somewhere between a Smartphone, which is extremely intimate, and a PC, which “People like to spend time with our content, to dig into it and share it. You can’t really ask for more when looking for the best kind of consumer.” Rebecca Grossman-Cohen you are much less connected to in comparison to your mobile devices.” In terms of consumer expectations, Rebecca explains that from The Daily’s experience it becomes obvious that tablet users are looking for highly customised experiences. That is why the


Te c h n o l o g y

incorporation of consumer feedback and the outcomes of usability labs are so important to keep innovation going, she is convinced. “People like to spend time with our content, to dig into it and share it. You can’t really ask for more when you are looking for the best kind of consumer.”

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channel consumption is the main challenge the industry will have to deal with in the future. Jane Gilson Microsoft Germany’s COO Jane Gilson sometimes is still stunned by the path that technological innovation has taken: “When you remember the movie

companies, also from the entertainment industry. “The entertainment industry is an important partner in getting people used to new technologies,” she explains. “By the time they are introduced and available, people have already been socialised to the idea and feel a lot more comfortable finally using them.”

Sabine Anger As Executive VP for International Busi- “Not long ago, we were scared to death Christine Aylward ness, Sabine is a member of Vivendi using a PC with all its complex func- Christine is the co-founder and CEO Mobile Entertainment’s management tions. Now we have this user interface of MakingOf, an international entertainment company she founded togethboard. Her company is building inter- that makes it so much easier for us.” er with actress Natalie Portman. Maknational business with multimedia and Jane Gilson ingOf offers movie creators like actors, video-on-demand services. For Sabine, the most important question is how ‘Minority Report’ with Tom Cruise directors or costume designers a platpeople’s possession of many different where he has flat touch screens all over form to connect, share their insight and engage with fans. In dodevices (in Europe, an avering so, MakingOf is explicitly age of five stationary and five not about gossip but about aumobile devices per household) thenticity and passion for the has changed the way they conart, Christine says: “We are all sume entertainment: “How do about moving the conversation we allow consumers to use enfrom gossip to the authentic tertainment across their destories behind the creation of vices for reasonable pricing? movies.” The fact that the comThe consumer is so overpany has stuck to this initial whelmed and that is why we vision has made it highly introduced our video-on-desought-after. “We get a lot of mand services,” she explains. demands for content from the For Sabine, the magic word is site,” she explains. Changing cross-channel entertainment: and multi-channel consumer “We want just the right mix behaviour has a lot to do with of content. To achieve that, we Above: Rebecca Grossman-Cohen (The Daily) and Franziska von Lewinski (Interone) on stage at DLDwomen. MakingOf ’s daily business, do a mix of market research and a mix of teams.” The consumer out his office and is pulling data back and Christine is convinced. “When we startthere is 50% male and 50% female. The forth with his hands – that was five or ed, the iPad didn’t exist. Now when danger of going too far in one direction seven years ago and back then simply you think of your ability to watch a in terms of product development is seemed impossible. Today, that tech- movie as a form of entertainment on averted by diverse and balanced teams, nology is readily available to people.” the big screen while having your iPad she says. When it comes to the 360° For her, it is interesting to see how some next to you, we are actually providing consumer, for Sabine the most impor- futuristic ideas coming from the en- the stories behind the creation of evtant development in her industry is tertainment industry have become real erything that goes into a particular definitely the individualisation of TV and commercialised. For the consumconsumption behaviour: “In the 50s er, this means a great deal of conve- “When you think about the recent nience and opportunity, she says: “It changes in technology, we don’t and 60s, watching TV was an event. wasn’t that long ago that we were even know what will exist a year or two “In the 50s and 60s, TV was an event. scared to death using a PC with all its years from now.” The whole family sat together. Today, complex functions. Now we have this Christine Aylward people watch individually. They don’t user interface that makes it so much easier for us to navigate and find what scene. The opportunities of that assemble anymore.” we are looking for.” Today, consumers changed consumption are significant.” Sabine Anger expect to turn something on quickly, Additionally, the site provides creators The whole family sat together. Today, to connect to the internet and down- with an unprecedented opportunity to people watch individually. They don’t load information wherever they are, engage with and step into a dialogue assemble anymore.” However, watch- she says. They don’t need to worry with fans: “These people certainly want ing TV has become social in a very about the complexity of the technolo- to connect with their fans. They are different way: “Today, people watch in- gy behind their devices. “That is the just looking for the right way to do it. dividually on one device while commu- coolest thing about where we are to- When you think about the recent nicating and sharing their feelings with day,” she is convinced. “Twenty years changes in technology, we don’t even friends on another. That is very differ- ago, things were not only very complex. know what will exist a year or two years ent from the way TV has been consumed Now it is all completely transparent.” from now.” Although MakingOf has so originally.” While she believes that TV Her company spends over 9 billion dol- far been focused on the US industry, events like live sports will stay impor- lar each year to map where the future Christine is convinced that there will tant, the overall shift from linear TV might be and in that context maintains soon be a presence in Europe and parconsumption to a more complex multi- a number of partnerships with other ticularly Germany. 


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Irene Au, Elisa Camahort Page, Delphine Gatignol, Polly Sumner, Ilana Westerman

From Experience to Targets One of the questions that corporations and marketers still struggle to answer sufficiently is how women behave online, and – more importantly – how to reach them on the Net as a specific target group. Looking at the issue from a quantitative and qualitative research perspective as well as from the angle of corporations and the female target group itself, the panellists all agreed very quickly that women as a consumer group are still not embraced sufficiently and targeted effectively enough. There is a lot of potential still to be explored in all directions – that was the key message transported by them. “Fewer women are on social networking sites but they stay online much longer. In some countries they spend nearly twice as much time as men.” Delphine Gatignol Kick-starting the discussion with some concise facts and figures about women’s behaviour and usage of the internet, Delphine Gatignol – responsible for comScore France and Belgium – made clear that while women are still outnumbered by men concerning the overall usage of the internet, the decisive fact determining their value as a target group is that they spend much more time online than their male counterparts. “We can say that maybe fewer women are on social networking sites but they stay online much longer. In some countries like for example Hong Kong they spend nearly twice as much time as men. As a marketer, when you think about where to reach those women, that knowledge is very valuable.” This also correlates with the categories and features that women are mostly attracted to when they surf the net. While for example services, portals and conversational media are not solely appealing to women alone, the overall majority of them states that these are most important to them when it comes to their online usage and consumption. BlogHer co-founder and COO Elisa Camahort Page agrees: “Women are in a lot of different places online and they are really interested in interaction and community. That is the main driving goal.” According to Delphine, a second important aspect

especially for corporate marketers is the fact that women not only recall the ads they see online more often, they are also more likely to be affected by them and to engage with advertising, determining their choices as consumers: “It is not only about where to reach women online but you also need to have relevant messages for them. Research from A to Z is key to that.” Supporting these observations by the extensive qualitative research she has done over the past 15 years of working in the industry, Create with Context’s CEO Ilana Westerman is convinced that adapting to women’s specific needs when designing products means good business for companies. “Women tend to be very outcomefocused,” she says. “They want to do “Women tend to be very outcomefocused and have the buying power.” Ilana Westerman something with the piece of technology they purchase. They tend not to be so interested in how it works or the spectrum of its features and functions. For them it really is more about the question: how is this going to work for me?” Because women tend to use technology “by feel” rather than thinking about the processes going on inside, they often run into issues with very complicated products. “This has nothing to do with the fact that women are less capable, they often just don’t care. Almost all the women we interviewed had some story about a piece of technology that they didn’t know how to use in a public situation and they became embarrassed. That is a real challenge I put out there to marketers and product developers. You know that someone doesn’t love your product when she becomes embarrassed while using it. And she definitely doesn’t want to upgrade to the next version of it.” For Ilana in order to target women and their needs more effectively, product development and design should focus more on directing products towards


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the right outcomes and less about their features and functions. “If we could design products in way that they fit into women’s lives rather than designing products that they have to come to, I think adoption rates would go up significantly. It is simply good business. Women do have the buying power and the capacities so we should be focusing on them.”

social media they use. When you treat them all the same you fail being on their radar.”

“As a company, your goal shouldn’t be to drag and lure women to your destination. You should try to reach them where they are – on blogs or social networks.” Elisa Camahort Page

As President and Chief Adoption Officer at salesforce.com, Polly Sumner knows a lot about the rise of individual voices in the consumer world. “At the moment, we see a fundamental shift in what is happening in IT and technology and certainly in the way that companies interact internally,” she explains. Companies not only need to consider listening to what is being said about their products and brands on public social networks, but also to interact and engage with them because a lot of valuable knowledge can be gained from that. Secondly, a huge trend is happening inside of companies to set up their own private social networks. “Can you imagine what happens in a corporation when there is 100% transparency between the CEO and the person that works anywhere in this business? No longer do you as the leader have to have every message translated for you - you can actually see and learn what is going on with your employees, what they care about or what their ideas are. This is what the social enterprise is about.” In Polly’s opinion, the more corporations particularly product developers and marketers understand the social profile of individuals – especially of the female consumer – the better they can innovate and deliver customer services in a way that meets special needs. For women, she examines, the social enterprise opens up radically new opportunities to not only articulate their ideas but to actually see them surfaced within the company. Moreover, she is convinced that it allows women to stay in touch when they decide to leave the company and have children: “If you have a culture that recognises individual contributors, which I believe is the way that the world will go, you are going to be able to come back into the enterprise maybe 10 years after having kids and be just as effective going forward.”

With the BlogHer network, Elisa Camahort Page and her two co-founders in 2005 started a trend to counter what she calls “the old-boys networks” that was beginning to form in the blogosphere at that time. “A lot of the male reporters were quoting the male bloggers who never seemed to link to the female bloggers, culminating in one blogger asking: where are all the women who blog?” she recalls. “He had the theory that women don’t blog, particularly about politics, because they don’t want to participate in the rough world of the political blogosphere or debate their ideas.” Seeing the many women already passionately blogging about all kinds of topics, including politics, who were being denied broader attention, Elisa was convinced that there was a lot of raw potential for success to be channelled. The result was the BlogHer network that has now reached 25 million uniques a month. Admitting that she is still conflicted about the creation of a separate forum for women that might also be seen as an “echo chamber where the men don’t listen and they are just talking to themselves,” as moderator and Google’s head for User Experience and Design Irene Au provocatively put it. Elisa is nevertheless convinced that BlogHer has made a significant contribution to the recognition of female bloggers worldwide: “I don’t think anybody is asking ‘where are the women that blog?’ anymore and that is a good thing.” Concerning women’s potential as a target group she is sure that a different model is needed to reach them: “As a company, your goal shouldn’t be to drag and lure women to your destination because they are already out there at their own destinations, having a perfectly good time. You should try to reach them where they are – on blogs or social networks. Women’s purposes are different depending on what kind of

“If you have a culture that recognises individual contributors, women are going to be able to come back into the enterprise maybe 10 years after having kids and be just as effective going forward.” Polly Sumner

The message of the discussion was very clear: women are a complex but powerful and valuable target group. Treat them accordingly! 


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then serving as Luxembourg’s ambassador to the U.S. Candace Johnson, an American who helped pioneer the (The two celebrated their 30th wedding anniversary this satellite industry on the Continent, was dubbed “The year.) Satellady” in a 1996 Economist article. A career as a trailFrom the start Johnson had no intention of becoming a blazer also earned her a few other labels: she was called demure tea-serving ambassador’s wife. While still in her “the most dangerous woman in Europe” by an angry me20s she joined a small broadcasting business, created a dia mogul after she foiled his plans to build a cartel and satellite distribution network for them and sold it within “Enemy No. 1” by Germany’s Deutsche Telekom when she a year for several million dollars, earning a commission won a landmark case against the company for illegal subequal to three years salsidies of data networks. ary. So when Meisch was Johnson says she has posted back to Europe earned all of these titles in 1982 and the prime over the course of a 35minister’s chauffeur year career in the tech took her on the tour of industry by “always trythe Grand Duchy, Johning to create something son started thinking new” and usually breakabout how she could ing monopolies in the help the country she process. would soon call home, “What I am really which was in the midmost proud of is that I dle of a steel crisis. made SES (Societe EuNever one to think ropeene des Satellites) small, she proposed that become the world’s largLuxembourg launch its est satellite system at own satellite and made the time and the pregood on her promise to mier satellite system tomake it happen. Johnday and that I was able son used the broadcastto create other compaing company commisnies, all of which sion to work without pay, contributed to the adconcentrating all of her vancement and democtime on putting togethratization of access to er a group of private intelecoms, media and Investors to fund Astra, ternet for the world,” the first privately owned says Johnson. European television satBuilding innovative ellite and SES as well as infrastructure that deobtaining the frequenmocratizes new types of cies, putting a manageservices remains her ment team in place, and core mission. Through negotiating with the sather global investing acellite and launch comtivity started ten years Author: Jennifer L. Schenker | Informilo panies. Later, while on ago, Johnson, now 58, the board, she architecthas widened her scope ed and implemented of expertise to include SES Global. Today, SES clean tech and med tech is Luxembourg’s largest and has been actively taxpayer. involved in financing A DLDwomen Profile The satellite business such companies as the was a natural one for Blue H Group, which opJohnson. Her father, erates deep-water offGeneral Johnny Johnshore wind farms, Nheson, was the head of telecommunications for the U.S. armed olis, a home-turbine energy company, and CertiNergy, forces and ran telecoms policy in the White House under France’s first B2B2C energy-credit trading company as Presidents John Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson and later, well as Quotient Diagnostic and AboDiag, life-sciences at age 57, was recruited by venerable Silicon Valley ventechnology and services companies. ture firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers to help select Johnson’s path has taken more than a few interesting and then manage interesting communication start-ups. turns of its own. After growing up in Hawaii and graduThere was not only talk about satellites at the Johnson ating from Punahou, the same Honolulu high school later family dinner table. Architects of the Internet such as attended by U.S. President Barak Obama, Johnson went Vint Cerf were regular guests, says Johnson. Her father on to earn five degrees in music, including a bachelors dealso taught her how to have a head for business. When, gree from Vassar College and masters degrees with honas a little girl, she told her father she wanted to run for ors from France’s Sorbonne and Stanford Universities. class president, he told her she would need a marketing Through an early job as a producer at a U.S. classical muplan and taught her how to design one. Anytime she wantsic station, she met her husband, Adrien Meisch, a clased to do a project he would tell her to create a business sical pianist and diplomat 23 years her senior, who was

The Satellady


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plan and again, showed her how it was done. So, for Johnson, entering the tech business didn’t require any special training in engineering or business. But it did require moxie. Johnson is credited with helping Astra flourish by fighting a lonely battle on SES’ board to block Europe’s biggest broadcasters from taking over the company and suppressing smaller, new channels –a role that earned her the “most dangerous woman in Europe” title. Seventeen years after she started SES in 1983 and 15 years after it was actually incorporated as a company she stayed with SES on the board to help build it to be not only number one in Europe but also to architect and implement a plan for SES Global, thus creating the world’s largest satellite system at the time. “It took an amazing effort to make SES Global happen since there was much internal opposition and once I pushed it through everyone was so mad at me,” says Johnson. “I had to fight for five years to get all my efforts recognized and it was for this that the Grand Duke and the Prime Minister gave me the Commander of the Luxembourg Order of Merit after they had already given me the Officer of the Couronne de Chene for having started SES.” Creating ASTRA also frightened politicians and companies alike. Recently, when Johnson saw Hans-Dietrich Genscher, Germany’s legendary former foreign minister, she says his first remark in seeing her after 10 years was that the late Francois Mitterand, France’s President from 1981 to 1995, complained to him that she was, “selling Europe’s skies to America.” Johnson retorted, “No, as you can see with SES Global I made Europe’s skies global, something Mitterand and the industrial policies of all European governments could never do.” Johnson also started a venture to use satellites to bust telecom monopolies in Europe, launching Teleport Europe in 1990. Within 18 months it became Europe’s biggest independent private trans-border satellite communications network. Johnson convinced some of Europe’s biggest companies to invest, including Germany’s RWE and Vebacom. The investors asked her to come and run the company. “I told them I am not going to work for you – I am going to sit at the shareholder’s table with you,” Johnson recalls. This took some doing as making a physical person rather than a company a shareholder in such a venture, was highly unusual, but Johnson stuck by her guns and was given a 1% share. When Loral, a subsidiary of Orion Network systems, an international satellite communications provider, announced it wanted to buy Teleport Europe, RWE and Vebacom agreed but Johnson refused to sell. She continues to own 1% of the company, which is now known as Loral Skynet. Johnson’s next high profile venture was Europe Online. The vision, in 1993, was to do just that – to get Europe online by pioneering the delivery mechanisms that would enable Europeans to receive Internet-based interactive entertainment via their PCs and televisions. Johnson patented the digital delivery of content via satellite but gave her idea to a consortium that included Burda Media, AT&T, Pearson, Matra and a group of Luxembourg banks. The company morphed into a content play and ultimately failed. Johnson says she learned a lot from her experience with Europe Online (she bought back the name at an auction and still owns the URL) “When you are an entrepreneur you have to implement your idea at the beginning – you can not expect others to do it for you,” she says. Johnson remains an integral part of the Internet and communications sectors and is a fervent promoter of wom-

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en in these businesses. She is a founder of the Global Telecom Women’s Network (GTWN), which will celebrate its 20th anniversary in March 2012. Still going strong, she and her colleagues at GTWN hosted a breakfast at the Mobile World Congress last February that attracted some of the industry’s highest flying female executives, including Qualcomm Executive Vice President Peggy Johnson and Xin Fanfei, vice president and executive director of China Mobile. As thanks for decades of effort, Johnson has been decorated not only in Luxembourg but also as an Officer of the German Bundesverdienst Kreuz 1. Klasse for her work in de-regulation, innovation, privatization, and globalization at Astra, Teleport Europe and Iridium, (she helped that global satellite company obtain its global frequencies and country codes while serving as it vice president worldwide) and for the creation of the VATM, Germany’s private telecom operator’s assocation. Johnson is the second recipient ever of the UN-sponsored World Teleport Associations’ “Founders Award” and received the “Lifetime Achievement Award” along with Vinton Cerf and Tim Berners Lee from the World Communication Awards in 2002. That’s not all. In 2006, she created the Festival of the Fourth Dimension, the world’s first festival of the Arts, Technology, and Sciences, which has since become a major French government global initiative for Industrial Innovation and Creativity (Pole ICI) of which she is the first vice-president, the President being a French government official. Rather than resting on her laurels, Johnson is now playing a big role in investing in Europe’s start-ups, arguing that if Europe wants to ensure its economic prosperity everyone is going to have to do its part to keep young entrepreneurs from moving elsewhere. To that end, she is president of Johnson Paradigm Ventures (JPV) which is a principal founding shareholder with AXA, Caisse des Depots, Bayerische Landesbank, and the SPEF of Sophia Euro Lab, Europe’s first trans-border early-stage investment company based in Sophia Antipolis. JPV is also a principal founding shareholder in London-based Ariadne Capital, headed by Julie Meyer. In her personal capacity, Johnson is a member of the Supervisory Boards of Paris-based Iris Capital and Turkey’s Inovent; a founding member and former president of the Board of the Sophia Business Angels in Sophia Antipolis, France; and founding president of three multi-million Euro investment vehicles, Succès Europe, Croissance Europe and Innovation Europe, together with Meeschaert Gestion Prive. Johnson has also been instrumental in the creation of the Galata Business Angels in Turkey, the Luxembourg Business Angels and most recently, the Cologne Business Angels. She is a founding member of all three groups. Johnson is also a member of the board of governors of EDHEC, France’s largest business school, the University of Haifa in Israel, Sabanci University in Istanbul, Turkey, and a Senior Enterprise Fellow for the University of Essex in England, working together with the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to bring entrepreneurship around the world. Her advice to other women? “Choosing something that makes you go beyond yourself is exciting and allows you to reach new horizons,” she says. Spoken like a true Satellady.  www.ses.com

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Caroline Drucker, Shakil Khan, Kathleen McMahon, Kathryn Moreadith

Future Sounds The digital revolution has been as much of a blessing as it has a curse for the music industry. “Music is the most social activity on the web.” Shakil Khan, Spotify As an early investor and current Head of Special Projects at Spotify, Shakil Khan has been involved in the company’s operations since 2006. With over 10 million users across seven different European countries, the Swedishfounded music streaming company was one of the earliest to foresee a decline in the music industry, responding by offering listeners an entirely new model for the consumption and distribution of audio content. “Music piracy was and is a huge problem,” Shakil says. “The only way to tackle the issue of piracy was to come up with a brand new product for music lovers, a safer product and something that people would feel more comfortable using.” Spotify’s pay-for-access model has proved to be a great success, allowing users to easily find, listen to and share almost any song they can think of, without having to worry about breaking the law. So far more than 300 million Spotify playlists have been created. “Our users get a much better experience than they would if they were illegally downloading music,” adds Shakil. “Spotify has grown into a hugely profitable business, with most of our original stakeholders still involved.” Within the company, employees believe that music sharing is the most social activity on the web. “It’s even more sociable than sharing photos, because

music files appeal to a much broader spectrum of people.” Shakil says one of the biggest challenges, however, is how to manage the shift from revenue through physical sales to revenue through digital ones. “We are definitely still in a transitional period, but my outlook for the future of the company is a positive one, although Piracy Inc. remains our biggest competitor.” Now, in certain countries (including Spotify’s home country of Sweden), piracy rates are declining while digital revenues are on the rise, and Shakil believes the greatest potential in terms of revenue is in the mobile communications sector. “The mobile sector is going to get bigger and bigger, with products and connectivity constantly improving, and devices becoming much more efficient at handling music.” “UJAM has tremendous potential to democratise music.” Kathryn Moreadith As a classical pianist and composer, Kathryn Moreadith is passionate about music. She is interested in innovative methods of musical education, and in the role music plays in modern society. For her, UJAM is a way to apply her passion, to put it to good use, joining the company as Product Manager and working from its offices in Bremen and San Francisco. “UJAM offered me an opportunity to realise my various musical interests, to combine them in an exciting way.”

UJAM is a cloud-based service enabling everyone – musician or not – to produce music and share it. It’s simple to use, and access is free. Previously, music production was done only by people in the industry, and hard for the majority of people to practice and understand. “But UJAM,” explains Kathryn, “has tremendous potential to democratise music, to make music production more accessible to people who wouldn’t otherwise have had the skills or financial means to get involved with it.” What makes UJAM special is the way users, without any previous production knowledge, are guided through the process step-by-step. At the end of this process they have produced their very own musical piece which they can then listen to and share with others. “No prior experience is needed. Users can be as creative as they like, experimenting with different sounds and receiving valuable feedback. UJAM brings together all kinds of different people. It’s a very collaborative way of making music, as opposed to the isolation and exclusion of a professional studio.” Similarly to Shakil, Kathryn sees the future of music as a bright and promising one, and envisions lots of different ways to connect her company to the many other audio services on the web. “Who knows, perhaps next year the stars of American Idol will rise to fame through UJAM!” Kathleen McMahon – a SoundHound executive and responsible for company revenue and marketing strategy – is a mobile cellular communications industry veteran, working with cutting edge technologies to radically change the way people interact with their personal devices. Prior to joining SoundHound she worked in Business Development for Shazam, where she led the company’s mobile strategy. Driving her work at SoundHound is her passion for new


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user habits. “The behaviour of brand new users is what really excites me,” she explains. “The technological revolution of the next ten years will be in using your own voice, speaking to your mobile device in order for it to do what you want.” Kathleen McMahon While the last decade saw the development of touch technology, the next she believes will see ground-breaking new voice recognition. “The technological revolution of the next ten years will be in using your own voice, speaking to your mobile device in order for it to do what you want. In this field of innovation, SoundHound is a leader. It offers the fastest and most precise voice recognition technology in the world.” Kathleen goes on to explain how technology has driven the distribution of music, increased its mobility. “We went from Vinyl to CDs to internet downloads, and now mobile technology will give even greater reach to music fans.” Already, SoundHound is releasing music that is exclusive to mobile devices. “It’s a little like jumping a queue. No one has to wait all night to be the first person to buy a record anymore, and that’s of great value to artists.” Since the company’s inception the level of return engagement has been high, while social features such as search and share have led to an improved user experience. “Music, of course, can be a personal thing. But research and data show that it’s also becoming a way to socialise.” Berlin-based SoundCloud has a goal to “un-mute the web,” and Marketing Manager Caroline Drucker describes the company as, “The internet’s YouTube for audio.” Allowing everyone to upload, record, promote and share all sorts of audio content, the format gives music creators complete control over how they want their tracks to be heard

and released into the digital realm. “It’s an empowering tool,” adds Caroline, “an online audio toolbox for personal expression. Sound is a powerful thing, and often life’s milestones occur because of things we say or hear.” With SoundCloud users are able to communicate and discuss their audio creations in a way they were never able to before. Discussion can range from music fanatics sharing their newest discovery with friends via social networking channels, to music teachers giving online feedback on pieces that their pupils have uploaded. “More than 170 different applications are currently connected to the service,” explains Caroline. “Absolutely anything that uses sound can connect to SoundCloud.” Caroline describes how it’s an exciting time to be working at the forefront of online music streaming, giving people a much broader access to music

and connecting music lovers from all over the world. To illustrate her point, she tells a story: “One of the most active bands on SoundCloud at the moment is the Foo Fighters. Once they gave all of their fans a virtual ‘drunkdial’ at 4 o’clock in the morning, causing a wave of excitement and generating heavy traffic on all of the big social networking channels.” “Sound is a powerful thing, and often life’s milestones occur because of things we say or hear.” Caroline Drucker, SoundCloud The company has a model of free basic access, with a paid upgrade to premium versions, and this works well. “It’s fantastic that SoundCloud is not only generating company revenue, but creating a platform for musicians who want to earn a living from what they do.” 


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Sandra Navidi, Irina Hemmers, Elizabeth Varley

From Idea to Ignition Three businesswomen profiled

Regine Pohl

Ease Your Life Drawing from her own experience as a business woman, HP’s director for webOS & Telecom Category Management EMEA, Regine Pohl, talked to the DLDwomen 2011 audience about how modern technology can make a woman’s life much easier, less chaotic and more effective: “I think we all worked very hard to be at the place and in the job we are today. We don’t want to make compromises in our jobs or private lives. Women are very demanding, that’s definitely very true.” When it comes to technology women shouldn’t be forced to compromise or organise their lives around it, she says. Instead, technology should much rather be able to adapt exactly to the individual ways that women live their lives. “Life might be complicated but technology shouldn’t be,” Regine is convinced. Key buzz words in that context are synergy and integration. Because people in general and women in particular don’t only use one PC and one simple mobile phone anymore but are constantly online via a number of different interacting devices, synergy between them is vital for ensuring efficiency and flexibility: “Synergy is at the core of HP’s webOS concept”, she explains. “We integrated it into almost every application of HP’s new TouchPad. Users no longer need to access different devices, accounts or websites to collect and aggregate the information they want and need. It is all in one place.” Moreover, HP’s touch-toshare technology enables the easy sharing of content between several devices by one simple touch. This awards women a lot more time to focus on what is essential, Regine says: “It is innovative, intuitive and natural to use – the way technology would have been for the last 30 years had it been designed by women.” 

Sandra Navidi Sandra Navidi is a lawyer working in two jurisdictions, Germany and the United States. She began her career working in international capital markets at Deloitte & Touche and - following an offer from a client - relocated to the United States. After the economic crisis hit Sandra started working for Nouriel Roubini, an economist who’d attracted attention for predicting the crisis several years in advance. Three months ago she left Roubini’s company to start up her own, and says, “while everything starts with a great idea, the real challenge is great execution.” Sandra’s idea was born out of demand; she was being approached by a number of clients she’d worked with previously. Turning down various job offers to work in hedge funds she began to think about setting up on her own, and when she approached former clients about this they were very receptive. Such positive feedback gave Sandra the courage to put an idea into action, and soon she was working with clients directly and independently, relying on a strong contact network, drawing on senior advisors where necessary and minimising extra labour costs by hiring people in India.

Having worked in a ‘commercial think tank’ with Nouriel Roubini, Sandra had looked at the economy from a global, ‘topdown’ perspective. With so many of their clients being government officials or CEOs of large banks, the company acquired tacit ‘insider’ knowledge about the state of the global economy, and the picture that was being revealed was a worrying one. Today, the only certainty in European macroeconomics is that the immediate future is deeply uncertain. The debt crisis is grave, uncertainty means volatility and panic can break out at any minute. It’s a domino effect; when one country reveals its financial woes others follow suit, as was the case with Greece, Ireland or Portugal. In contrast, the German economy has remained relatively strong, thanks to a series of structural reforms over the last ten years. Ultimately, Sandra believes that the global economic crisis should be seen not just for its negative impact but for the opportunities it brings to implement change. Change is valuable, she advises.

Elizabeth Varley Elizabeth Varley is an entrepreneur with a background in communications, technology and events. She is the co-


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founder and CEO of TechHub, a workspace and community for technology entrepreneurs. The company’s aim is to bring together all those different parties that operate within the startup landscape; entrepreneurs, students, investors, government services and big businesses. First launched in London in 2010, plans are underway to open two more branches in San Francisco and New York by the end of 2011. The London branch is located in Shortridge, already home to some 600 digital companies. While female CEOs in the technology sector are still very much a minority, Elizabeth attributes this to various factors. In a previous role she worked with Digital Eve, an organisation with a special focus on women in technology, committed to providing a supportive, educational community. Elizabeth believes women should have a stronger belief in their own ability, and exposure to the industry from a younger age. She also believes that it’s necessary to change the image of what technology actually is, a process that is already occurring through the widespread use of social networking sites and mobile phones. ‘Technology’ is no longer perceived as a bunch of brainy men in spectacles tapping away in their grey offices. Technology is now part of the everyday, a feature of everyone’s lives. In addition to TechHub, Elizabeth is also currently working with the UK Prime Minister’s Tech Team, the Mayor’s Office, UKTI and the Technology Strategy Board to support tech startups in the UK via the Tech City project. Considering the current economic climate, she’s optimistic about the profitability of smaller and medium-sized businesses as opposed to vast corporations. In the UK particularly a huge resurgence is occurring in technology, innovation, small startups and entrepreneurship. Research last year by the Boston Consulting Group showed that the internet industry contributes 100 billion pounds to the UK economy every year; an equivalent of 7% of the GDP (while the finance industry contributes 9%). The UK government is now placing a lot of emphasis on the internet and fresh opportunities in this sector are always arising. A big financial problem in the UK is how to access small amounts of seed capital. Many entrepreneurs are now

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looking to launch businesses with £250k or less, while small-scale technology companies are operating with just enough of a profit margin for two co-founders to eat and pay their rent. Institutional investors in the UK and across Europe have been criticised for being too cautious, while angel investors are usually more willing to take that early risk, offering a small amount of funding before a company has got to revenue stages. At TechHub Elizabeth chose not to wait for investment and instead accepted a small family loan and a small business loan from the bank. Before renting premises they offered fifty different people an opportunity to buy into the business. This then gave Elizabeth and her partner Mike Butcher one more vital injection of cash, enabling them to really get things off the ground, and ever since then the business has been seeing decent revenue returns. Elizabeth believes that when starting a business a key question is this: How can I generate revenue quickly in ways that doesn’t necessarily involve raising investment?

Irina Hemmers Irina Hemmers is a Partner in the Apax Partners Media team. Since joining Apax Partners in 2001 she has worked in Munich, supported the company’s investment activities in Greater China from its Hong Kong office and is currently based in London. The reason she gets up to work in the morning is to invest in media, and particularly in media that fulfils the following criteria: most important for her is growing usage, secondly a high return on customer investment and a position as a market-leader. From an investor’s per-

spective she is optimistic about Europe. Apax has a long and great history of European investment and despite current economic doom and gloom – that in her opinion doesn’t do Europe very much justice - the company is very much intending to continue its operations in European markets, she explains. Looking at secular growth, in all European countries there are many areas that are steadily and structurally growing, and one of these areas that Apax invests in heavily is the conversion from traditional print media to digital media. This conversion has potential even in the European countries that were especially hit by the financial crisis, she is convinced: “Personally I think, for Europe the glass is half full.” In terms of gender equality, Irina points out that the private equity and venture capital industry is very male dominated; only about 10% in the boardroom and 5% in more senior positions are women. This inhibits the industry in certain ways, and prevents it from being a true vehicle of change. Unfortunately, gender disparity is only marginally less in many of the companies that Apax invests in. In response to this, Irina recommends implementing programs that encourage women to stay in the workforce, taking into account challenges such as having a second child. She also stresses the importance of overcoming prejudices in the workplace. More generally, Irina believes that a lack of personal interaction between colleagues or partners is a key reason for the failure of start-ups. She admires initiatives like TechHub where internal relations are harmonious and employees appear to be enjoying themselves. Ideally, Apax invests in businesses that have a promising record of good internal relations or in groups of people that have been working together for a long time, looking more closely at teams within the company than at single individuals. Irina firmly believes there is no better indicator towards a company’s longevity and staying power. She also points out that a long-term corporate outlook and sustainable decision-making capabilities within the company are a crucial factor, and that companies from her experience operate best and most successful if they develop a ten year plan, at the least. 


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Verena Delius, Claudia Dietze, Daniela Hinrichs, Sara Hürliman, Benita Justus

Entrepreneurs in Conversation Is it possible to make a success of failure? Is it necessary to make mistakes in order to improve ourselves and live up to our full potential? Daniela Hinrichs, Claudia Dietze, Verena Delius, Sara Hürliman and psycho-physiognomist Benita Justus discuss how to be a successful business leader, considering how we benefit from mishaps and how gender comes into play.

“It’s important to fail, sometimes,” says Verena Delius. Making a mistake every few months or failing catastrophically every few years can even be beneficial to an entrepreneur. It keeps them on their toes, and makes self-reflection a necessity. According to serial entrepreneur Verena, every time she failed in something she found a way to self-improve, meaning that in her next business venture she did better than she might have done otherwise. First she opened a sushi restaurant in Bielefeld, then a franchise salad bar and finally a finance company, building her skills base with each undertaking and reinventing her business model time and again. But while her salad bars failed for lack of premium locations, it’s important, says Verena, to keep an eye and an ear out for warning signals. Many people from the industry warned her that location was of paramount importance, but Verena didn’t consider this to be too great a risk factor at first. With hindsight, she now talks to a great variety of people with different mind-sets, and always heeds their advice. Courage in Failure Sara Hürliman says that failure requires courage, that “if you don’t dare to fail, then you’ll never dare to succeed.” Her belief is that what doesn’t ruin you can only make you stronger, that in being open to the possibility of failure you might even end up gaining something. In 2004, the dentist had an idea of how to improve her practice, but when she started to implement it, she met with resistance from the mar-

ket and it didn’t take off. For a long time she was fettered by funding problems, and so approached some of the big banks in Switzerland for financial aid. “You should see the bankers there,” says Sara, “all attractive and dressed in fine suits, with a smile plastered to their faces as they tell you that there’s absolutely no way they can help you.” She approached several banks and they all declined her. Now, jokingly, she acknowledges that there’s no reason for a bank to lend money to an inexperienced entrepreneur like herself, with no real money behind her, and no proven successes in the field. Eventually, Sara came across a different, rather more unpretentious bank, the Swiss Migro Bank. “They don’t have expensive software systems, nor are they immaculately dressed with a deceptive smile. The bankers for this bank are real people, and they actually listen to what you’re proposing rather than letting the computer do all the work. They helped me in a time of need, and I’ve been a loyal customer ever since. I would never have secured the loan, however, were it not for strong belief in my own ideas.” Embracing Change: Another Route to Success “Yes, you can benefit from failure,” says Claudia Dietze, “but this isn’t necessarily the right route to success.” Her advice is this; if you want to found a company, it’s crucial that you have real passion for the product or service you are trying to promote. She started her career as an entrepreneur with a spinoff research institute, in partnership with Daimler and DASA. With entrepreneurship in her genes, Dietze hoped

the collaboration would prove to be a great success. Nothing, however, happened according to plan. When the company was founded the idea was to build big enterprise software that runs in browsers, and also robotics software, with particular focus on the latter. But getting caught up in the internet buzz, and with travel booking engines and ‘last minute’ deal sites proving so popular, their ideas shifted from robotics, and “Travelchannel” became their first big project. Having ventured down this unexpected path, the company subsequently became a producer of big-scale e-commerce systems. “We completely changed the business model,” says Claudia, “and as a result saw lots of success.” The economic downturn, in her eyes, was just another unprecedented opportunity to learn.

Beyond Growth Claudia believes that growth should not be pursued at any cost. The success of her company, she says, is not just down to profits, but to efficiency, organisation and a distinct corporate culture. Growth is something that comes from passion. If you hire someone to do computer programming, for example, she stresses they should be nothing less than a ‘computer geek’, someone who is hungry to learn more and who will give their all to something that genuinely interests them. Her company Freiheit.com Technologies began without an investor. Cashflow concerns meant that the company started on a small scale and was slow to grow, but this allowed time for a company culture to evolve. The main goal, Claudia says, is always to avoid bureaucracy, and to not sacrifice everything in order to meet financial objectives. “If you have the business un-


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der complete control,” she concludes, “then you’re just not going fast enough.” The Right Recruits

Benita Justus is an expert in helping individuals to analyse their personal strengths and weaknesses. Using the technique of psycho-physiognomy she analyses physical elements of the head and face, then finding parallels between these physical elements and a person’s behavioural patterns and character traits, including their strengths and weaknesses. She says that merely by looking at somebody she can tell if they have the mentality, focus and creativity to be a successful entrepreneur. But can this technique of psychophysiognomy help in recruiting the right kind of employee? Benita says there are several forces at play, several factors to consider. While a successful company needs employees who excel in their field, personality matters just as much. The most important thing is to find a group of people who are able to work well together. An entrepreneur faces tough decisions when it comes to recruiting; it’s not just a question of whether that person will do their job well, but whether they’ll fit into a team, whether they’ll fit with the company culture and ethos. Benita believes that psycho-physiognomy can be of great help when recruiting, and in discovering a particular person’s talents. Attracting Investment “In order to secure investment you need to have a vision,” recommends Verena. Women tend to only pitch on what they can currently deliver, but in front of a possible investor you must convince them of your future potential. Sharing her own experiences of pitching to investors she believes it’s about being passionate, courageous and convincing, and also having an answer to any question, even if it means making one up. “You put yourself under enormous pressure, which is a good thing. The idea is to sell much more than you are currently capable of, so you then have the challenge of running fast, catching up and

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delivering on your promise. The secrets of success are to be super-confident, extremely prepared and to have real belief in what you’re trying to achieve.”

Sara adds that without money nothing happens, so early fundraising drives are crucial. Once a company has been established, her advice is to try and secure private funding, but only when the company vision has been properly formulated. Women, she says, need to learn how to really sell themselves, and she illustrates this point with a story from her days of working as a university teacher. “In each exam, one of my final questions was this; how many points do you think you have scored in this exam? Interestingly, almost all the male students estimated that they’d done better than they actually had, while the women tended to under-sell themselves. You have to learn how to promote yourself, not solely on your experience, but on the strength of your vision, too.” Finally, Daniela Hinrichs shares her experience of venture capitalists; that they are perfectly nice until you sign the documents. “As soon as you’ve accepted their money in order to help build a company, there’s no more sugar-coated sweetness. He’ll be asking you ruthless, incessant questions, making you explain yourself, making you repeat your pitch again and again.” Company Culture How best to establish a company culture that is both personal and professional? Claudia stresses that leadership is crucial, that a company atmosphere is dictated from the top. It’s also important to know details of everything and everyone you manage. Her second piece of advice is to hire people that could, potentially, be friends. Besides having the right experience and a good university degree, personality and ability to get along with others is important. Sara, however, challenges this. She believes that if you only hire potential friends, people you’d naturally gravitate towards, the company becomes homogenous. Her belief is that employees should share an interest in the company, but that personality differences otherwise can be a good thing. Putting Ideas into Action “I personally don’t have a continual resource of ideas,” confesses Verena,

“but I know enough people with ideas who don’t choose to execute them.” In Berlin where Verena works the professional landscape is characterised by small startups, but many of these were founded by someone other than the person who came up with the original idea. In the internet sector, for example, there are very few women who have founded a company. They don’t have the courage to take another idea and to make it their own. But Verena believes that ideas are abundant, that they’re everywhere. Less abundant are those people willing to take an idea and to put it into action. When studying at university she attended an Entrepreneur Forum and heard two

inspiring talks by the Samwer brothers and Lars Hinrichs. At that moment she found herself wishing away the next two years at university, wishing she could start her career as an entrepreneur immediately. Referring to Maria Furtwänglers’ comment about the importance of images, Verena believes that we do not have enough images of inspiring female business leaders in our mind. This, she says, has to change. 


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Juliet Warkentin

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Jessica Insalaco

Raphaëlle Heaf

“The Shoe of the Organizing Month Club” Life

Mapping Art

DLD: What is Stylistpick and what do you do? JW: We are the UK’s market-leading subscription based digital fashion brand. Backed by two big VCs (Index and Accel Partners), we are a source for shoes and accessories and an online stylist at the same time. Basically, a “Shoe of the Month” club for women. For 39.95 pounds a month you get six pairs of shoes that are chosen for you by a series of renowned stylists. We describe ourselves as a social media fashion brand. We constantly talk to our customers via different online channels. DLD: Why this product and why now? JW: Women have too little time (to shop) and there are too many choices out there – on the High Street as well as online. Shoes are fashion pieces attainable for most women, which is incredibly important for us. Stylistpick is different from the Net-A-Porters of the world because we aim not to gather several fashion brands on one platform but create our own products and sell them online to a wide customer base. That kind of differentiation is key in the market. DLD: Why did you go into this business in the first place? JW: The total UK e-commerce market size in 2010 was 58.8 billion pounds. Fashion e-commerce is expected to grow to 6.9 billion in 2015 and over two thirds of UK consumers aged 14 and older – about 26 million people – bought something online at least once a month last year. On top of that, the UK footwear industry is growing in size on a regular basis exponentially in comparison to everything else. DLD: How does it work? JW: First, women take a quiz. As a result we understand what style category they fit into. Based on their style profile they get six pairs of shoes every month, but can also buy two at a time or skip a month. From a business point of view, we have constant cash flow - predictable and allowing for fastrevenue growth. Our customer is very regular, coming back month after month. Because we are only putting out 18 pairs of shoes every month, the stock inventory is low. It also means that our stylists have to get it right every single month. 

Raphaelle Heaf is the founder of ArtSpotter, an interactive mobile art map. Its single purpose is to enable art lovers to discover and interact with exhibitions, galleries and street art everywhere around the world. “Imagine you have just come out of a meeting, you have half an hour left and you would like to do something different,” she explains. “With Artspotter you can discover exhibitions and art in your area.” It also allows users to upload own content. In a nutshell, it aggregates information all over the world – both high quality and user generated. By its DNA, it is profoundly social: you can share, rate, talk about it, tell your friends or post it on Facebook. Suddenly, there is art everywhere, accessible for everyone, and existing barriers - like information gaps – disappear. Moreover, ArtSpotter is not about professional

Manilla is a free personal account management service that just launched into Beta for US customers. It aims at changing the paradigm that most people have concerning the management of their service providers and accounts, making organising them much easier and more convenient. In a nutshell, the online service allows you to manage your bills, financial accounts, travel rewards programs and subscriptions in one secure place — for free. Manilla’s EVP and CMO Jessica Insalaco explained: “We have seen a lot of innovation in shopping, gaming and so forth but nothing in the business and consumer space. That is what Manilla is all about. Consumers are really overwhelmed. They have a lot to manage – family, friends and businesses – and their accounts add to the stress, often summing up to an average of 15 to 20 in the US.” And that only includes basic accounts, she says. On top of that, numerous travel reward programs, subscriptions or insurance policies want to be managed. The person mostly responsible for this is the “Chief Household Officer” who is a woman most of the times: “Women often are overwhelmed by getting 35 pieces of account-related mail every week and find it hard to stay on top of things”, Jessica says. “Manilla’s aim is to make life much easier and managing it a lot faster.” For her, the biggest problem has a lot to do with paper. US citizens are only 15% paperless - 85% of people are still getting paper documentation for all their accounts, equalling 40 billion pieces of mail every year at a cost of 30 billion dollars. “This is a huge waste for consumers and businesses,” Jessica explains. On Manilla, users see what mails have been delivered recently and all their obligations that are coming up, whether these are payment deadlines or tax declarations. “It is a very simple system and easy to set up,” she says. “We hope it will save a lot of valuable resources for businesses, consumers and the environment, because there is a lot of waste that we hope we can prevent.” And precious time that is simply better spent for things we love to do. 

critics but about friends, the people who have local knowledge or what tourists have discovered. For the Venice Biennale, Raphaelle and her team have created an interactive map. Through its API it was easily embeddable anywhere. Throughout the Biennale it was continuously updated with official information that was fed into the system. Additionally, people added a lot of user-generated information themselves. “For me, looking at art is also about actually discovering it,” concludes Raphaelle. “It is about seeing and being a part of it. What ArtSpotter does is allow you to do just that very easily.” 


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Ron Gutman

Beatrix Förster

The Virtual Medical Home

Personalised Therapeutics

At DLDwomen, HealthTab founder and CEO Ron Gutman spoke about why modern health management is shifting online and how his company changes the way we source our information and interact with physicians. “HealthTab focuses not only on ­reinventing personal health but it is actually focused on women”, Ron ­explains. “We started with preg­nan­cyrelated topics and will be expanding to female health in general.” Women are the Chief Medical Officer of the family. They don’t only take care of themselves and their children but many times of their parents and spouses as well. So what do women do when they want to get informed about health and health management? “They used to go to doctors but doctors are no longer the primary source for information about health. Our doctor visits are becoming way shorter - health conversations don’t take place in the doctor’s clinic anymore. All this is shifting online”, Ron says. The majority of people use the internet before visiting a doctor. However, satisfaction rates with health-related information online are very low. Often, sites are not person-

alised, not trustworthy and not engaging. “At the moment, people have the choice between seeing a doctor whom they trust but what is costly and not immediate, and surfing the internet which is free and immediate but not personal and of unknown quality.” HealthTab is an interactive combination of the two and Ron is convinced that it fills a long existing gap: “We are building a comprehensive knowledgebase enabling us to understand where people are coming from and to create a unique profile for their background and needs.” About 70% of doctor visits are purely informational and often standardised. HealthTab takes all of this online, virtualised and accessible for everyone. “We call it the virtual medical home of your physician”, he explains. “On HealthTab, medical experts can store their answers and standardised information so that they can spend more time with you as a human being.” He is convinced that this will reduce time and costs for both patients and physicians and improve the quality of the time patients are getting during consultations. “And we are open 24/7, whenever people need information.” 

Ekaterina Gaika

Russia’s Silicon Valley More than twenty years after the dissolution of the Soviet Union, a young and creative generation of Russians is driving change towards more openness and greater innovation. An important part is Skolkovo, Russia’s Silicon Valley. A global innovation centre combining technology, science, education and business, Skolkovo was launched by the Russian government in late 2010. The goal is for it to become an ecosystem for innovators, disruptive ideas and a new economy. One of the people involved in the implementation from the very beginning is Ekaterina Gaika. Born and raised in Moscow, she has left her career (successful fashion photographer aged 19, economics degree from Columbia, project manager for a top consulting firm) behind to return

to Russia and become part of what she calls the build-up “Of a new Russia a Russia that does not depend on oil or raw-materials but one that is technological and forward-looking.” The five main pillars of Skolkovo are IT, energy efficiency, nuclear energy, biotechnology and space. In each of them, different projects will be kick-started or fully realised. Ekaterina – now Deputy Director of the project’s IT cluster – explains: “So far, we have gone through about 500 different projects and already funded about 30 of those. About 100 more get special taxation laws and special support. We believe that this project will have a huge impact.” The first building is to be erected in 2014 – a university and the whole infrastructure will follow. 

Men and women are different in many respects. In fact, they have completely different risks and exposure probabilities when it comes to diseases. While women are more likely to suffer from depression, osteoporosis or auto-immune diseases such as MS, men tend to get cardio-vascular diseases like heart attacks or suffer from strokes. Beatrix Förster heads a laboratory developing anti-cancer drugs at TRION Research, a research centre located in the Innovation and Start-Up Centre for Biotechnology in Martinsried near Munich. She advocates the immense potentials that personalised therapeutics offer concerning efforts to improve disease treatment. Today, drug development is still mostly using a prototype that is male, 35 years old and weighs about 75 kg. All recommendations concerning dosage and usage are tailored to this prototype. “Women are disadvantaged by that for a number of reasons”, she explains. Solving the Gender Issue in Disease Treatment “The metabolise drugs completely different. For some diseases like cardiovascular diseases, already the manifestations between men and women are different. They don’t show the same symptoms.” The result is: women usually have much less benefits but much more side effects from the drugs they get prescribed. The solution of this dilemma is the development of personalised drugs: “Cutting-edge life-science technology allows us to generate diagnostic tests that help us to identify subgroups among the population of patients for which we can determine if a medication works and is safe. The next step is to generate tailored medication specifically for this subgroup.” An example for that is Herceptin, a breast-cancer medication only working for a special subgroup of patients with genetic specialty. Beatrix is convinced that “Personalised therapeutics will make drugs safer, more efficient and definitely have the potential to solve the gender-related issues of the way drugs are currently developed.” 


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global problems get Smith excited. Smith credits her parMegan Smith, Google’s Vice-President of New Business ents – who she refers to as “change agents” --with inspirDevelopment, is no ordinary engineer. She is adventuring her to push to try and make an impact on the world ous: she once raced a solar-powered car 2,000 miles across around her. Her father taught in public schools and sought Australia’s Outback. She has a knack for business, helpto make them better and together her parents actively ing PlanetOut, a gay and lesbian online community, grow participated in obtaining more housing for the elderly and tenfold in reach and revenue, during her tenure as chief desegregation. Over the years, Smith has personally conexecutive. And she is a big believer in technology’s ability tributed to a wide range of engineering projects, such as to bring about social change. designing an award-winning bicycle lock to thwart wheel At Google, Smith has led several of the company’s key theft; working on a space station construction research strategic acquisitions, including Keyhole (Google Earth), project; and running a field-research study on solar cook Where2Tech (Google Maps) and Picasa. She also briefly stoves in South America. headed Google.org, the Becoming an engineer philanthropic arm of the was an obvious choice, she search giant, helping the says. For starters, she was company further its social surrounded by them as projects by making better she was growing up: her use of its more than 12,000 grandfather was a civil enengineers. gineer who built bridges In her current job, Smith and highways, an uncle oversees teams that manworked as an engineer in age early-stage partnerthe energy sector and she ships, explorations and has a brother who is an technology licenses. For electrical engineer. example, she brokered the She also liked building first distribution deal with things and quickly found a carrier for Android, out that she was good at Google’s mobile operating it. Smith competed each system. She is also responyear in her high school’s sible for a handful of poscience fair, often working tentially game changing on alternative energy projlong-term projects at ects, which earned her the Google which she says nickname “The Solar Kid could both “ impact society from Buffalo, New York.” and also have a big comAnd she frequently won mercial impact.” Most are prizes, helping her to win in stealth mode so Smith admittance to the Massacan’t talk about them. chusetts Institute of TechOne that has already nology. Megan holds a come to light is driverless bachelor’s degree and a cars. Smith and Google master’s degree in mearen’t saying much about chanical engineering from the project but press reAuthor: Jennifer L. Schenker | Informilo MIT, where she now serves ports speculate that on the board. She completGoogle’s automated driver ed her master’s thesis system has the potential work at the MIT Media to become the operating Lab. standard for every car in It was during her time the world – the Windows at MIT that Smith joined of motor vehicles. a team of students particGoogle’s driverless cars ipating in the solar powuse video cameras, radar ered car race across the sensors and a laser range Outback. But Smith didn’t finder to detect other cars just drive the car - she and develop detailed maps helped drive the project to navigate the road head, A DLDwomen Profile an early indication of her taking advantage of the business acumen. It was company’s data centers, Smith, who claims she can which can process enor“sell anything,” who convinced United Airlines to sponsor mous amounts of information gathered by its cars when the team’s trip to Australia. mapping their terrain. The company recently asked for After graduation Smith went to work at Apple Computpermission, in the state of Nevada, for legislation that er Japan , where she helped develop the multimedia marwould make it the first state where cars could be legally ket. She spent six years, as product design lead and then operated on public roads without human hands on the as manager at General Magic, an Apple Computer spinoff steering wheel. Such vehicles “could help people have a that made a handheld communications device long before better transit experience and increase safety and save personal digital assistants smartphone and iPads existed. lives,” says Smith. Projects that apply engineering to

Technology’s Ability to Bring About Social Change


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From there, Smith jumped to PlanetOut, a media and entertainment community exclusively targeting the gay and lesbian community. ( Smith, who is public about being a lesbian, currently lives in San Francisco with her partner Kara Swisher, a former Wall Street Journal reporter who now co-authors the paper’s blog AllThings D. The couple have two children.) In addition to driving revenues at PlanetOut, Smith helped attract a contingent of high-powered investors including America Online Investments, Eden Capital and Mayfield Fund. “It is harder for women to raise venture capital,” says Smith. “One of the ways around that was that we found other people who could vouch for us, angel investors and advisors, and that was a signal to the VCs that we had already been vetted.” Among the company’s individual backers were RealNetworks founder Rob Glaser and Internet visionary Nicholas Negroponte. Smith left to join Google in 2003. Part of her time was spent heading up Google.org, which aims to use technology to drive solutions to global challenges such as climate change, pandemic disease and poverty. Thanks to Smith Google.org now places its strategic focus on those projects that can leverage the resources of Google staff, particularly its engineers. Current Google.org projects that harness the power of information and its engineers include Google Flu Trends,which uses aggregated Google search data to estimate flu activity up to two weeks earlier than traditional methods. This system has almost 90% accuracy in real time flu prediction, making it a useful tool for healthcare agencies. Another is disaster relief. In response to the Haitian earthquake, a team of engineers worked with the U.S. Department of State to create an online People Finder gadget so that people can submit information about missing persons and to search the database. Google Earth satellite images have also been used to document the extent of damage. The same technology was used to help people after natural disasters in Queensland, Australia and Japan, says Smith. One of the big focuses of Smith’s new business development team at Google is the developing world. “The 900 million people of Africa are coming online and can finally be interconnected with the rest of us and take action for their own lives,” says Smith, who believes that the greater interconnectiveness is a major liberating force. Google has opened seven offices in Africa and identified 15 countries where Google can open for business, says Smith. There are big opportunities for Android, Google’s mobile operating system, as use of mobile data and services like mobile money explode across the developing world, driving the kind of change and commercial impact that Smith –and Google –thrive on. 

Google Person Finder Google Person Finder is an open source web application that provides a registry and message board for survivors, family, and loved ones affected by a natural disaster to post and search for information about each other‘s status and whereabouts. It was created by volunteer Google ­e ngineers in response to the 2010 Haiti earthquake. It is written in Python and hosted on Google App Engine. GPF is typically embedded in a multilingual Crisis Response page on Google‘s site, which also contains various other disaster tools such as satellite photographs, shelter locations, road conditions, and power outage information. Other noteworthy deployments include the Chile earthquake, Christchurch earthquake, and the Töhoku earthquake and tsunami.


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Julia Meise

Pia Erkinheimo

Sky’s Focus ­ on Female ­Products

Crowdsourcing Challenges

Being the female manager of a team of men, Sky Germany’s Vice President Product Development, Julia Meise, has a lot to say about the female aspects of product innovation. Sky is the home of sports TV in Germany and most of the company’s resources are allocated to it. Meise explains how even sometimes her own people forget that there are other areas the company heavily invests in. With the product development department established only recently under her supervision, she recalls how in her research she encountered a fact that was astonishing even to her: Sky’s female consumers are significantly more satisfied with the company’s products than men and recommend them much more frequently as well. Drawing the only sensible conclusion from that she has pushed efforts for women to become a target group that Sky seriously cares about. “At the moment, there is a big ambivalence in the way Sky treats its female customers. The marketing has been clearly focused on the male consumers because we have such a strong dependency on live sports.” Sky’s plug and play experience, which she says is exactly what women want, is still too limited. To change that, she has made women a much bigger focus of product development innovations, bringing simple things and ideas like appealingly designed receivers to the table. She has also thought a lot about the female aspects of Sky Go, Sky’s new portability service for mobile devices. “It ends the power battle around the remote control”, she explains. “Now men can watch the Champion’s League on their iPad while their women are watching a romantic movie.” Meise is now one of the main drivers behind increased efforts to better integrate women’s wants and needs into Sky’s products. What is it that a female manager brings with her? “My job is to make sure that everybody collaborates in developing innovations. I do problem solving”. Her female empathy helps her to do this job. Being the only one in her team who fights for consumer experience, she is convinced that this is a battle worth taking. “I’m not a ter-ritory marker. I care about keeping the team together and giving them a vision.” 

There are apps for almost everything, making people’s lives easier, more convenient, more fun. But can apps also help to empower women? Nokia is convinced they can and, together with DLDwomen, has decided to find the best apps helping women in work, education and leisure. Instead of sending its corporate developers on the hunt, Nokia and DLD have decided to use something called “wisdom of the crowds” by launching an initiative allowing creative people to send in their

ideas for the perfect app for women. Suggestions are submitted online and a jury of female innovators and business leaders will choose the best among them. These will then be realised by a team of female developers and posted for free in the Ovi Store. The results will be presented at the DLDwomen conference in 2012. Together with Steffi Czerny, the challenge is hosted by Nokia’s Head of Crowdsourcing, Pia Erkinheimo, who sees it as a kind of collective brainstorming: “This business model we also exploit to localise services or find points of interest for navigation and maps. It really is about empowering ideas and democratising innovation. The next Twitter or Foursquare isn’t necessarily coming from a community of developers or programmers – it is really us housewives that could come up with the next big thing,” she outlines how the awareness of women being the majority of today’s online users has finally trickled down into Nokia’s business strategy. Quoting the saying that if one meets the expectations of women, one exceeds the expectations of men, she is convinced that creating products appealing to women

presents the greater challenge for her company because women are more demanding. For her, women are not only the key target group to tackle – they are also a highly valuable source of collective wisdom to use for corporate strategy and development. And when it comes to apps empowering women, what better crowd to source from than the DLDwomen community? 

Yonca Brunini

Technology for Good As diverse as technology are the ways to use it for good. At DLDwomen Google’s Senior Director of Marketing Yonca Brunini outlined that there are countless creative ways to do so if the right ideas are encouraged and put into practice. All of the initiatives kickstarted by Yonca and her team are rooted in Google’s belief that ideas can come from everywhere. Hundreds of e-mails from employees followed an internal call for ideas on how to use technology for good, numerous of which are now realised. They range from partnership projects helping small businesses to step into the digital age to the digitalisation of popular museums. Explaining a project with Yad Vashem, she says: “We digitised it and brought it online. And we put all of the archives of photographs and data from the Holocaust online, making them searchable for everyone.” The initiative has helped numerous people to find lost pictures or documents of relatives. “We have the duty to use our technology for big ideas,” Yonca says, pointing to a set of firm corporate values alive since Google’s early days. Probably the most famous example that these values are also defended when put to test is the case of Wael Ghonim. Now seen as one of the leaders of the Egyptian youth movement, Yonca recalls how Wael – a member of her team – took a few days off to fly to Egypt on “holiday” and disappeared in detention. Google’s subsequent efforts to find him are now something close to legendary: “We still had relationships with the Egyptian government and people in the Egyptian office. But from the top, the message came to look for him, no matter what – and we found him because at some point everybody knew we were looking for him.” 


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The Mobile DLDwomen Video Experience

The 360째 Consumer Sabine Anger, Vivendi Page 60

Christine Aylward, MakingOf Page 60

The 360째 Consumer

From Experience to Targets

Franziska von Lewinski, Interone Page 60

Irene Au, Google Page 62

From Experience to Targets Polly Sumner, salesforce Page 62

Ilana Westerman, Create with Context Page 62

Jane Gilson, Microsoft Page 60

Rebecca Grossman-Cohen, The Daily Page 60

Elisa Camahort Page, BlogHer Page 62

Delphine Gatignol, comScore Europe Page 62


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The Mobile DLDwomen Video Experience

Female Tunes

Tech Drivers Candace Johnson, Europe Online Page 64

Megan Smith, Google Page 74

Female Tunes

Caroline Drucker, SoundCloud Page 66

Shakil Khan, Spotify Page 66

Invest & Ignite

Kathleen McMahon, SoundHound Page 66

Kathyrn Moreadith, UJAM Page 66

Irina Hemmers, Apax Partners Page 68

Invest & Ignite

Interactive Entrepreneur Session

Elizabeth Varley TechHub Page 68

Verena Delius Young Internet Page 70

Claudia Dietze, Freiheit.com Page 70

Sandra Navidi, Beyond Global Page 68

Daniela Hinrichs, Angel Investor Page 70


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Interactive Entrepreneur Session

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Sara Hürliman, zahnarztzentrum.ch Page 70

Benita Justus, Personality Coach Page 70

Ekaterina Gaika, Skolkovo Foundation Page 73

Juliet Warkentin, StylistPick Page 72

Beatrix Förster, TRION Research Page 73

Jessica Insalaco, Manilla Page 72

Raphaëlle Heaf, ArtSpotter Page 72

Start Ron Gutman, HealthTap Page 73

Innovation Regine Pohl, HP Page 68

Technology for Good Julia Meise, Sky Germany Page 76

Pia Erkinheimo, Nokia Page 76

Yonca Brunini, Google Page 76


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Feuilleton A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters Page 80

From Bourgeois to Simon Page 82

The Power of Stories Page 83

Long-Lastig Documenta Page 87

Passing on the Gene of Art Page 88

Tradition – A Contemporary Approach Page 92

Wonderful Patron Page 94

Taryn Simon

A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters

Magnetic Cuisines Page 95

Page Turner Page 96

Dancing Music Note Page 97

“The project was produced over a period of 4 years. I travelled around the world recording 18 bloodlines and their related stories. I was interested in the external forces of power, religion, governance, and territory and how they collide with psychological and physical inheritance. More so I was intrigued by ideas around fate – and whether it is determined by chance, blood or circumstance. The stories that I document in the project are almost archetypical episodes from the past that are occurring now and will occur again in the future. I wanted to consider the possibility that the stories themselves and the chaos around us is ordered and patterned as well: the collision of order and disorder. Each work is comprised of three components. The first frame is where I systematically order the members of a bloodline. The second panel is where I write the text for the narrative that is at stake and in the third panel, I allow the environment to enter into the photographs and there’s a bit more entropy. In this panel I present fragments of the stories and beginnings of other stories. It refers to how we engage with information and stories on the Internet, in conversation or memory – where

Taryn Simon was born in New York in 1975. Her recent work, A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters, ­ I – XVIII, that chronicles generational histories through an elaborate assembly of image and text, is on exhibition at Tate Modern until January 2, 2012.

things are less linear. The fragmentation is in direct contrast to the determined order of a bloodline. In Chapter 1, you see a bloodline from Uttar Pradesh, India. The man on the top left went to the local village land registry and discovered that he was listed as dead. His land was no longer listed in his name. This was done to interrupt the hereditary transfer of land so that other family members could seize this land upon his father’s passing. His two brothers were also listed as dead. They were forced to leave their home and have been fighting to be recognized as living for several years. Every time they show up to have their case heard the judge never appears. It was an interesting irony to photograph these men who on paper do not exist. This quandary led to the title of the project which considers that we are all the living dead, representing ghosts of the past and future. There are empty portraits in some of the chapters, representing living members of a bloodline who could not be present for the shoot. The reasons for their absences include dengue fever, military service, imprisonment, kidnapping. In Chapter 1, the empty portraits represent women who weren’t

allowed to participate for religious or social reasons. Chapter 4 is about the body double of Uday Hussain, Latif Yahia. Yahia was removed from his family for several years in service to the Hussain family. He was tortured and threats of rape against his sister were made before he agreed to accept the position. He had to undergo plastic surgery to look more like Uday. He also had to wear lifts in his shoes to be the proper height. In the footnote panel are goldplated sniper rifle and an AK-47 that are inscribed as a gift from Saddam Hussain to Uday. I was interested in the idea of doubling, having a double life in one lifetime, in the same way that the AK-47 can be both a symbol of revolution and a luxury item coated in gold. He was taught to act as Uday: the salute, the wave, the smoking of the cigar; and given gold medals for his service. The principles of the blank, empty background: That was a purposeful decision. The use of a plain background and consistent lighting creates this environment of the non- place. The works appearance refers to patterns and codes and


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considers the possibility that the stories are as patterned as blood itself. The day of the epiphany: I was always cataloguing things and giving them the appearance of something comprehensive but they inherently weren’t. I started to consider the possibility of an absolute catalog. Something I cannot curate or edit, something where there is no choice. I arrived at bloodlines. A set that determined order beside the disorder represented in the narratives. The text-image relationship: What I am most interested in is the space I cannot create. I spent an enormous amount of time on the writing of these stories. They are an integral component of the book and exhibition. What interests me is the space of translation between text and image.” 

Above: Excerpt from Chapter 1, A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters, I – XVIII; Portrait Panel. Left: Excerpt from Chapter 4, A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters, I – XVIII; Medals received by Latif Yahia in 1991 for alleged service to the Iraqi government as Uday Hussein’s body double in Kuwait. Personal effects, undisclosed location, Ireland. Gold-plated Iraqi AK-47 and AlKadissiya sniper rifle seized by members of the American Defense Intelligence Agency during a search of Uday Hussein’s palace in Baghdad. Inscriptions on the guns translated from Arabic read:“A gift from the ­p resident of the republic, Mr. Saddam Hussein.” Saddam Hussein produced gold-plated weapons for use on ceremonial occasions and as gifts. Defense Intelligence Analysis Center, Bolling Air Force Base, Washington, D.C. Opposite page: Installation View / Tate Modern, A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters, I – XVIII.


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Hans Ulbrich Obrist

From Bourgeois to Simon

Hans Ulrich Obrist examines the female factor in the art world. He shares his view on female pioneering artists, the urge to revisit them now and how his famous Interview Project is integrated at DLD. There are extraordinarily female artists. We all know Louise Bourgeois and she is a great heroine and very important artist. But there are so many other pioneering women artists who who have to remembered. Just last week, I visited Zarina (Hashmi), a great Indian artist based in New York, who is now in her seventies, a week before I met Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian, whom I have met many times in the last couple of years, a pioneering Iranian artist who is in her late 80ies. These are all amazing pioneers who simply have to be more recognized. One thing that is important is that these artists very often were starting at a time where only a few women artists were recognized. As Eric Hobsbawm says, there has to be an “urgent protest against forgetting.” I think it is important to also look back and revisit them now. Another very important thing is to develop a long-term vision about that, archives, memory. Exhibitions are obviously one thing, another thing is production of reality. I have always believed artist projects to be realized. The third thing is obviously own history. It is very important to record these pioneers and make these voices heart in the 21st century.

Book recommendation:

Female Curators Looking at the important magazine “Eau de Cologne”, edited by Monika Sprüth and Rosemarie Trockel. It should almost be reprinted! There is a very early interview with Kathy Halbreich about her vision as a museum director. Also when I edited the “Brief History of Curating”, it was crucial how many paths led to Lucy Lippard. As a pioneer of curating, she is a very independent voice. She never really staid within the institutions, she was very free. I would like to emphasize that Lucy Lippard whose work has developed in such a free way, moved of course through many different geographies and cultures, and has (re)invented so many rules of the game of how an exhibition works. The Interview Project at DLDwomen When Steffi (Czerny) called me to talk about last years’ DLDwomen, we started to think that may be it could become a series, and that each year one could realize one interview as part of my interview project with a very important architect or artist that is celebrated at DLD and whose work is shown. It’s almost like a homage. Last year it was the homage to Zaha Hadid, this year, just before her great show opens in the Neue Nationalgalerie Berlin, it’s Taryn Simon. It’s the exhibition that Udo Kittelmann is curating. It is also very important that these things are not a sprint but a marathon. It’s interesting how such conferences like DLD evolve over the course of the year so we can really develop content as a sort of complex dynamic system with many feedback loops over time. Final Text Message by HUO: “I forgot to mention that in our manifesto in the Serpentine, Tino Sehgal said that manifestos are very masculine and so is the 20th century. The 21st century is more like a conversation.” (I suggest you film this sms as my answer to your last question after the spoken answer ping pong ever x). 

“A Brief History of Curating” Hans Ulbrich Obrist (2008) “Supercurator” Hans Ulrich Obrist is currently Co-director of Exhibitions and Programs and Director of International Projects at the Serpentine Gallery London. Due to his abiding fascination with the history of art institutions and curatorial practice, he began to research the topic in his early 20s. He has since helped to rectify this gap with exhibitions on curating and builds a historic stage for the oldmasters with his book “A Brief History of Curating”. The publication – part of the ongoing interview project – comprises a unique collection of interviews by Hans Ulrich Obrist mapping the development of the curatorial field – from early independent curators in the 1960s and 70s and the experimental institutional programs developed in Europe and the U.S. through the inception of Documenta and the various biennales and fairs – with pioneering curators Anne D’Harnoncourt, Werner Hoffman, Jean Leering, Franz Meyer, Seth Siegelaub, Walter Zanini, Johannes Cladders, Lucy Lippard, Walter Hopps, Pontus Hulten and Harald Szeemann. Speaking of Szeemann on the occasion of this legendary curator’s death in 2005, critic Aaron Schuster summed up, “The image we have of the curator today: the curator-as-artist, a roaming, freelance designer of exhibitions, or in his own witty formulation, a “spiritual guest worker”... If artists since Marcel Duchamp have affirmed selection and arrangement as legitimate artistic strategies, was it not simply a matter of time before curatorial practice – itself defined by selection and arrangement – would come to be seen as an art that operates on the field of art itself?”


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Maria Furtwängler, Patrick Ness, Shamim Sarif

The Power of Stories

Maria Furtwängler-Burda, Patrick Ness and Shamim Sarif explore the importance of stories, and how fiction can enrich our lives. MFB: Shamim, stories can have a huge effect on a person, whether it makes them joyful, miserable or desperate to dress like one of their fictitious heroes. What makes a story powerful? SS: Because our lives are made up of them. Each person has their own individual attachment to a story, and this is the key. As a film director I discovered that stories help us to not only understand the world surrounding us but to create our own internal worlds. Imagination is a gift. It gives us things we never knew existed. Also, when people identify with characters in stories they realise that it’s possible to feel a certain way, to challenge certain boundaries or to view a relationship differently. That’s immense power. PN: I agree. The power of a story is that it’s personal. We can put ourselves inside it. We respond to it in an individual way. If a story is trying to be impersonal, or to push a universal message, then it can become sermon-like. Nobody wants to read a sermon. MFB: Patrick, in “A Monster Calls” you describe a mother dying from cancer and her son’s struggle to say goodbye and let her go. When I read it, I was deeply touched by it. You have broached similarly raw topics in other stories, too. Is there ever a point at which you feel you might have gone too far, especially when writing for the young adult market? Or do you think an author has the right to write on subjects that may cause pain? PN: I get asked that question frequently – but you should see what teenagers themselves write about! It’s harrowing stuff. I judge various teenage writing competitions and it’s all about murder and suicide and abortion. What I’m after in my writing is the truth. I think

the job of any artist is to see what’s there and report it as it is, not how they hope it will be or how other people said it would be. In “A Monster Calls”, when the mother dies, I wanted to avoid sentimentality and instead explore what it’s really like to be thirteen years old and facing such a loss. What does it really feel like? Anything less would be cheating. MFB: Shamim, perhaps you remember the TV Series ‘Holocaust’ from the 1970s. At the time this show caused a lot of controversy, as some people thought it wildly inappropriate to make a TV show about the genocide of Jewish people, to turn such a tragedy into something banal that we can watch from the sofa in our living room. In fact, it enabled a lot of people to emotionally identify with the characters, and in turn to what really happened to the Jews. In this context, which do you think is more powerful: TV or film? SS: I think they are equally powerful. We’ve all read a book that has left us in floods of tears, that has prompted us to tell all of our friends to read the same one. There is something powerful about visual imagery, however. It’s connected to neuroscience and the palm effect. If you place an image inside people’s minds it can arouse emotion very easily. This can happen i n a s e c o n d o r t w o, whereas with words on a page it takes much longer. When we released “The World Unseen” as a film it created a bigger reaction than the book, particularly in countries where women are traditionally repressed. We received lots of emails from women across China, Pakistan, India and parts of Africa, from women who felt trapped in a society that expects them to behave in a certain way, but who didn’t want to cause trouble or hurt their family. The film made them feel empowered, suddenly, that it might be possible to live a little differently. In my work I concentrate a lot on powerful people, on strong women particularly, but on strong men as well. MFB: Patrick, what makes a good story? Is it, as you said before, the truth in characters and scenarios? Or is a good story something that the author has experienced themselves? Do you have preconceived ideas about the effect you wish to create, and the audience you wish to reach?

PN: I think if you have very strong preconceived notions about the effect you want to create and the audience you wish to target you can end up with a sermon, rather than a story. I always write for an audience of one, and that one person is me. I need to react to my own story. I only write about what I really feel. Writing scenes from “A Monster Calls” I found myself crying. Perhaps that sounds awfully self-indulgent, but if I want my readers to feel the sadness then I need to feel it too. This is what makes a good story. One of my pet hates about writing, particularly writing for teenagers, is how cheap violence can be. It’s always ‘A-Team’ violence. Someone gets knocked over but a page later is back without a scratch. This is not real violence. Violence cracks the world apart. It’s brutal and horrible. It’s not about shooting a bunch of people dead and nobody giving a damn. Writers have the power to make people feel something, not just what it feels like on the page, but in reality too. Whether it’s grief or joy, both such powerful emotions, this is where the strength of a story lies. Not in mindless violence – that makes me so angry, but in making people feel something, in writing about the truth. MFB: Shamim, “The World Unseen” and “I Can’t Think Straight” are about women under huge pressure. You touch on themes such as apartheid and the pressures of family. Your female characters find themselves in difficult social situations and must fight their corner. How much are these women a reflection of you? Do you write because you want to convey messages to women, or encourage them to break certain rules? To what extent do you analyse the effect your writing has on the public? SS: I don’t over-analyse it, no. And I agree with Patrick in that if you have too strong a pre-conceived idea then you are running into the danger of preaching before you even begin. I want to tell stories, and I want to challenge my central characters. As you said, my characters are undergoing huge pressures, sometimes within families, sometimes within society, often against a political backdrop. In “The World Unseen” the backdrop is apartheid South Africa, and for the next movie it will be post-Stalinist Russia. Political backdrops create pressure, and I am interested in how my characters react to that pressure, how it defines


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them, how it strengthens them, or how it ruins them. Generally, my outlook for humanity is a hopeful one, and I enjoy writing stories where my characters learn something, where something happens that enables them to see the world differently. As a result they are able to enjoy their lives that little bit more. MFB: Times are changing. My feeling is that those traditions of grandparents telling myths and fairy-tales to their grandchildren is slowly disappearing. After finishing dinner people run to check their emails, these days, or to look at their iPad. There’s no time left for telling stories. My kids write more than I ever did at their age but it’s all on Facebook, using words like ‘cool’, ‘wow’ and ‘dude’. Only occasionally do they write something on there that’s longer than a couple of sentences. Is this a new generation of superwriters, or are kids losing the ability to really write, to really listen? PN: I talk at schools quite often, to thirteen and fourteen year olds. There are always some who don’t read anything and who spend all their time online.

But still, even with mobile phones, texting, online gaming and everything else, they are still interested to meet someone who has written a book, they still have questions to ask about it. I don’t think that books and the online world are mutually exclusive, and I don’t think digital media is necessarily replacing the written word. From my personal experience of teenagers, no matter how much time they spend in front of a computer screen, many are still interested in reading a book. MFB: Would you say the need for stories has remained the same through the generations, Shamim? That there’s no difference between a printed book, a Kindle or a story read online? SS: I think stories remain important, yes. We often look to a story to explain how we got here, what we’re doing here. Stories can often provide an answer to fundamental questions about life. I think the word to use in this instance though is expansion. Via Facebook, Twitter and blogs the medium of writing has expanded, and through all of them we express something about our-

selves. I don’t think these new social networking tools replace film or fiction. In fact they give people the opportunity to express themselves even more. MFB: Patrick, in your trilogy you created this character Todd, and he’s able to hear other men’s thoughts. In the book he lives in a noisy world, unable to sleep because his head is so full of sound. Where did the inspiration for this character come from? PN: In the book this condition is referred to as the Noise; a world where everyone can hear everyone else all the time. With mobile phones, constant texting and social networking I think the world has become pretty noisy. These days, teenagers’ phones are beeping incessantly. The question I wanted to explore is this; What if you couldn’t get away? Today when I speak to teenagers I often point out that they have less privacy than anyone in a Western country has ever had before. There are consequences to that. Privacy is important. It’s a place where you may think things that you can’t always say out loud. That’s one part of the story. It’s also


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significant that with the Noise men can only hear other men thinking, not women. I wanted to explore how human beings deal with this difference. How would people really react if a world like this existed? Again, I’m trying to get to the truth of something, to push the idea of differences between humans to the extreme. MFB: Shamim, in the Journal of Management Development it says that stories can help to create relationships, and in turn these relationships can open up leadership opportunities. Being an excellent storyteller, and with many business leaders in the room today, what advice would you give them? SS: I’ve attended a lot of conferences in my time, and DLD is exceptional because women tell stories here in a very personal way. I think when it comes to leadership, it’s always helpful to be able to relate things to experiences you’ve actually had. People are always interested to hear about other people’s experiences, to learn from them. It’s an emotional, very real connection. PN: Good stories teach you how to em-

pathise. People who read less fiction tend to empathise less. If you can make your business personal, if you can tell a personal story, then you’ll find people have empathy for what you’re setting out to achieve. Suddenly it becomes not just a business issue but a human one too. SS: I also wanted to talk quickly about self-image. The stories we tell ourselves are often the most powerful, and so we have to be aware of what we tell ourselves. Often I meet incredible women achieving incredible things, but for whatever reason they are self-deprecating and they still don’t feel good about themselves. I think it’s possible to alter your own story, to tell it in a different way, and to end up looking at yourself in a better, more positive light. That’s an enormously powerful thing. Life is precious at the end of the day. We want to make the most of it, instead of being crippled by self-doubt and uncertainty. Try altering what you tell yourself in your head. It can work wonders. MFB: Does that theory count for men, too?

PN: I can’t speak for all men, but I understand what you mean. Women and men are different though. I have lots of female friends who’ll probably ring me after this conference and tell me I rocked the house. Whereas my male friends will more likely just tell me I did OK. MFB: So what you’re saying is that women need their girlfriends to tell them they’re great, whereas men can just rely on themselves? PN: I don’t think you can say that women are one way and men are another. Everybody is different. People are complex. In all of my stories there’s a boy and a girl. I work hard to avoid stereotypes; the dim but brave boy and the brainy girl with glasses. It’s not all Harry and Hermione, right? I want my characters to be like the real boys and girls that I know, equally wonderful, equally foolish and able to do brilliant things together. I hope there’s an implicit message to teenagers in my books. I hope the message is that ‘you’re complex, but that’s OK.’ We all feel contradictory emotions. That’s normal. 


10 years of Felix Burda Foundation One decade of fighting against colorectal cancer

“More than

4 million people

have undergone a preventive colonoscopy in Germany since 2002. Through this around

100,000

cases of colorectal cancer were prevented. Further

50,000

patients were diagnosed early enough to cure the cancer. These are

150.000 saved lifes.

A great success! But we still have a lot of work to do.� Dr. Christa Maar CEO Felix Burda Stiftung Munich, Germany

felix-burda-stiftung.de


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Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev

Long-Lasting Documenta Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev is the artistic director of documenta13. This article introduces documenta and reflects her fundamental thoughts about avantgarde and de-growth. Carolyn is the second woman to direct documenta. The first woman was Catherine David in 1997. In the 13th edition it was easy to double the statistics at documenta in one go. Therefore, it is even more a responsibility as a woman towards the fellow female colleagues around the world who are working in art. Documenta is a periodic exhibition of art, which began as a proposal by Arnold Bode in the immediate postsecond-World-War-period in Kassel, Germany. It opened first in 1955 as an attempt to re-establish culture and the visual arts as a primary focus of society; therefore, in order to reconnect Germany with the field of international art at the time, after the trauma of the World War II. Since then, generally every five years it has become an exhibition of contemporary art but mostly a moment of reflection. The tribe, all the artists, the curators, the thinkers, and writers from all over the world gather every five years. It has become a reflection on the relation between art and society. The last edition of documenta drew over 700,000 visitors from all over the world in a hundred days. This makes it the key event in the art universe. At the juncture However, documenta is not exactly an exhibition. Its DNA is different. As it emerged within a very particular space in which collapse and recovery are articulated, it emerged also at the juncture where art felt to be of utmost importance as an international common language, a world of shared ideas and hopes, which implies indeed that art itself has a major role to play in social processes of the reconstruction, of civil society building, healing and recovery. At the juncture between that and a conception and notion of art as the most useless of all possible activities,

therefore, within the legacy of the notion of modernism and the autonomy the modernist art, which was dominant until the 1950’s and mid 1960’s. At the juncture of these two spheres, the social role of art and the autonomous field of art met le gent de l’aprèsguerre of the West in the mid 20th century for better and for worse. From documenta 2 onwards, it came to signify in the context of Western Europe, a place in which freedom of expression could be achieved, even in the cold war policies towards the Eastern bloc. More recently since 1997, with the only female predecessor in charge, it has been a platform for critique against Euro-centricism and the assertion that exhibition making and exhibition viewing is also a discursive and a political practice. In contrast to other periodic international exhibitions it viewed today in our imaginary systems as having a strong theoretical grounding and a sense of the urgency of art in society, a sense of the political. This obviously also comes from the legacy of Joseph Beuys whose 7,000 oaks were planted and therefore spear-heading many of the ecological and environmental policies that are enacted today all over the world. What is the political? Where is it constituted? Is it the space where a person appears to others and others appear to him? This is the space required for politics to occur. But is also the space that politics gives rise to as Hannah Arendt teaches. And yet this space cannot be the polis as the old greek term indicated – as that would simply imply that those without appearance would be stateless, voiceless, excluded. Carolyn believes that it is the space of preservation of life on the planet, as Judith Butler says. Political life is the exercise of freedom in concert with others. If it is concerned with the preservation of life on the planet, then it implies that an engaged form of art is related to healing and processes of healing, suturing wounds and separations, destructions of life, modes of alliance, both liberal and communitarian models. It can affect conflict; whether internal, personal or societal; both imagining alternatives and withdrawing from it. Poised as it is, on the edge of the almost sin-

gular expression of the almost private sphere and the broader webs of subjectivities that it is instantiated by and contemporaneously instantiates. In a nutshell, Carolyn is interested in a worldly alliance that de-anthropologies culture – which means it moves us away from the thinking that the human is particularly central. “We are living in a time where perhaps we should be thinking less about the human alone but more about the system, the ecological system within which many species live. Darcy (her Maltese dog) is in this sense fundamental part of my research about cohabitation of several species. That’s why I am not particularly interested in old-fashioned feminist views but I am interested in the feminism that has developed into theories around multi-species co-evolution.” Video Povero Contemporary art is her DNA. As a museum director, she is interested in the positions intellectuals have vis-àvis the world at large. What an artist feels towards the world when he/she acts. The position of the artist determines the form of the exhibition in a way. Those positions are feeling under siege or in a state of withdrawal, or a state of hope. These affects determine the form of the exhibition. She comes from the arte povera movement. Hence, her interest is not in artwork that was made with high budgets but rather interested in how such can be extremely resourceful and creative with very little. It’s about de-growth. Also, she has always brought together early revolutionary 20th century avantgarde work with contemporary artists. This mixing of artworks from past and present is an arte povera idea, too. Once Mario Merz said to her that everything within our visual field is contemporary. Everything, an old shoe and a new shoe, they are both today. Everything that exists is contemporary. In this context, she believes that YouTube is crucial: it is changing the status of the image and brings in the opportunity of video povero - a taste and possibility for poor video. While looking at Darcy as if it was her crystal ball, she wittily concludes that this is probably determining the end of the high period of video installation. 


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Katharina & Pola Sieverding

Passing on the Gene of Art

Read what world famous artist Katharina Sieverding thinks about authenticity and how she uses her work to demonstrate ­political engagement and how her daughter Pola has been influenced through her family. In this family of artists, discussions about creativity and image production are omnipresent. At DLDwomen, Katharina and Pola Sieverding spoke with journalist and art expert Eva Karcher. EK: Katharina, when did you know that you would become an artist and what does it mean to you today? KS: It was a long process, not spontaneous or from one day to the other. First, I studied medicine what you can see in my work and attitude. Then, I studied theatre and I was also, very early, collaborating with very famous directors, for example with Fritz Kortner for ‘Münchener Kammerspiele’ and later together with him in Vienna, at the Burg Theatre. After that I did several other productions. Then I met Beuys who asked me for many months to come into his class. I had to decide that in summer ’67 after the Salzburger Festspiele. EK: It was a very revolutionary time then, the hippies, summer of love, just before the student revolt. Pola, and what about you? PS: I was actually into acting before I started to study art. But after a while I found out that I am more interested into the stage in terms of cultural spaces; and that was basically the point where I started to switch into making videos and photography and that eventually led to the art school. EK: Have there been discussions in the family as you are the daughter of two very artistic parents? Your father, Klaus Mettig, is a pioneer of multimedia art. PS: It has never been a discussion whether I should or shouldn’t try to become an artist, but yes, there are a lot of discussions about what each of us is doing content wise and what we’re interested in. KS: I did a lot of teaching in Asia, Eastern Europe and also Salzburg. So, I had to manage, with three children, to be there. When the kids were very young, I took them with me and day by day they experienced the teaching

and practising process. Maybe this was also some inspiration or connection to this profession. EK: Photography, video and film are the media you both work with. When you started, Katharina, you have been one of the pioneers of artist photographers in Germany. What aspects of the medium have been fascinating to you? Why did you choose this medium? KS: In 1967, when I was still working in Salzburg at “The Magic Flute”, I heard about all these riots and demonstrations in Germany. That summer I decided that I really quit with theatre and all this sort of hierarchical world of high-culture, especially in Salzburg and went back to Düsseldorf to be in the class of Joseph Beuys to participate in all these discussions. I started then with photography to document the demonstrations and happenings. By doing that, I could participate: I developed these photographs over night and published them at the wall of the academy the next morning. This was a very important moment: Not to be alone in a studio and do some creations, but to be in public and to work with the camera and be a testimony for what you really fight for. “For me authenticity happens in the tension of intention and perception. Like with the political I do not consider authenticity a fixed factor.” Pola Sieverding EK: Your work has been like an interactive dialogue from the beginning on. Would you describe your work as being political? KS: When I started to work with media, I stopped with traditional disciplines like painting and sculpture. You immediately came into another field of critical analysis and conceptualism. Some people from the Beuys class founded the film class at the academy in Düsseldorf in the late sixties. We had support from the media-theoretician Gerd Albrecht and filmmakers like Harun Farocki and Ole John. So

we had a completely broader field of new references compared to these monopolists of modernism. I think that media art is in general stimulated by references to political discourses and critical debates. EK: And you, Pola? PS: If you don’t understand the political merely as a means of governing conflicts, it’s very much a question of context. Of course a work can be political because on its content and it may need text and is not only an aesthetic product. But also work not intended to be political can appear in a political context and become political. I think the political is a constant process. EK: Pola, let us speak about your experiences as an artist in residence in Ramallah. How did this period influence your work? PS: I’ve been invited to Palestine in 2008 for the first time as an artist in residence and have been there again this year in spring to teach at the academy in Ramallah. The idea was to figure out a notion of artistic research and how it is different to research in other disciplines. Basically what I have done is continuing my interest in performance; I was researching about image production in Palestine with a focus on the performative aspects. It’s been the beginning of protests that, of course, were connected to the ‘Arab Spring’. These protests, wherever they are, need an image to communicate or to be the icon of that revolution. So one aspect of my project there was that I was looking at the visual presentation of that protest which was produced by the young people who were demonstrating. EK: Did you do a portrait series of the people? PS: I am working on an installation which will consist of video material and still photography. It focuses on the question of visual presentation and image construction. This is very interesting because it’s a highly political area where images are excessively used to communicate or to bring across (po-


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litical) ideas and positions from all different parties involved. EK: Katharina, this panel deals with the issues of authenticity and in your work it’s a central topic as well. How would you define authenticity? KS: It’s a complicated question because I don’t deal too much with authenticity but rather with the construction of

site: from the very first moment I tried to break with this idea of authenticity. EK: We all play different roles and have different images of ourselves and the way we represent ourselves. Pola, what is your perception of authenticity? PS: For me authenticity happens in the tension of intention and perception. Like the political I do not consid-

Katharina Sieverding. Die Sonne um Mitternacht schauen. SDO/NASA. 2010; digital video projection. Installation view QUADRIENNALE 2010, imai-inter media art institute, c/o NRW-Forum, ­D üsseldorf © Katharina Sieverding, VG Bild-Kunst; Foto: © Klaus Mettig, VG Bild-Kunst

Untitled (Cadavre Exquis I,III,II) 2009. A/D Process (Micro Piezo Print), each 230 x 112 cm © Pola Sieverding, VG Bild-Kunst

identity and within that I guess it’s rather important to question a classical concept of authenticity. I started of course with self portraits and these big interfaces of my face, but I was never interested that everyone discovers: ‘Oh that’s her’. Quite the oppo-

er authenticity a fixed factor. EK: Katharina, have you ever had something like an identity crisis? KS: Because I don’t hustle for these big things like “the” authenticity and “the” identity, I don’t get that much into a crisis. It’s a part of the perform-

ance and in the arts there is a broad field to connect with diverse concepts of identity. EK: How do you manage your artist profession and private life, Pola? PS: I am lucky to not only have a family-family, but also a wonderful production-family. My work is very much dependent on my relationships to my friends, colleagues and my brothers. I just did a sound performance with my brother for instance. We all support each other through assisting, critiquing and helping out on each other’s next projects and deadlines. EK: Do your productions happen in your studio in Düsseldorf? KS: Yes sometimes, or in Berlin or wherever. Production is not only laboratory work. Having taught many young people for many years now it has always also been sort of a collaboration and the idea of a constructive heritage makes it a very important issue of production within the field of “fine arts”. Fine arts are still backward in terms of constructive heritage and the deconstruction of the genius cult.  EK: The idea of the genius - is it an issue for you, Pola? PS: Certain ideas that arose through theories like feminism definitely influenced me, because there are strategies within feminism that are able to question power structures that organize societies and of course, the idea of the genius becomes a little bit ridiculous nowadays. I think it is also a question of understanding how to practice art; whether this is based on a higher call or if you have certain issues you want to get across specifically through the means of artistic language. EK: Today art is about communication and dialogues. Interaction has become much more important than the lonely “genius” artist. KS: Yes, artistic profession today gets more and more interdisciplinary. It is reflecting its own knowledge and its relationship with sciences, it is interrelated with a broad field of disciplines and influences and also histories. Translation is inevitable, communication absolutely important. EK: What are you both admiring from each other? What do you like to adopt from the other? PS: Her generosity, her courage and her sex appeal. KS: And vice versa. 


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Where can I make curiosity my profession?

Ghada Trotabas dares to ask. At Siemens, her career has taken her in directions she never expected. She was born in Lebanon and studied in Germany and France. Now Ghada Trotabas is using that international experience to make a global impact. She started as an imaging scientist at Siemens. Then, with the company’s support, she went to business school in Chicago. Today she’s helping Siemens bring advanced lab diagnostics to developing countries. Where could working at Siemens take you? Dare to ask.

siemens.com/careers


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Renate Eikelmann

Tradition – A Contemporary Approach

The Bavarian National Museum houses a large collection of European artefacts from the late antiquity until early 20th century.

The Bayerisches Nationalmuseum was founded in 1855 by King Maximilian II of Bavaria. The ultimate name of this institution was determined by the king himself. He wanted to strengthen the awareness of history among his people and loyalty towards the Wittelsbach dynasty. The first building was erected in the Maximilianstraße (today the State Museum of Ethnology) and officially opened in 1867. From the start, the building was too small and, for this reason, the decision was made to erect a new building in the then-beingplanned Prinzregentenstraße. It was designed by the Munich architect Gabriel von Seidl and formally opened in September 1900. The Bayerisches Nationalmuseum was one of the most important buildings of its time. The institution is the proud custodian of extensive and excellent collections of fine, decorative and folk arts, as well as objects of immense cultural-historical significance ranging from the 9th – 20th century. These are displayed over three stories: On the ground floor, we offer the opportunity to stroll through the cultural history of Europe. On the upper floor there is the chance to engage with the internationally important specialist collections and in the basement with folk art and crafts. Overall there is 13,000 m2 of exhibition space.

The core section of the collection is the objects once in the possession of the Wittelsbach dynasty. The extent and variety of these collections have grown since. To this day they are continually expanding and our museum policy focuses on filling in the gaps in special areas. A number of major private collections have found their way to us, many of them as endowments or bequests. It is thanks to this unique history that we are able to count important examples of medieval and modern sculpture, furniture, goldsmiths’ work, textiles, ceramics and glass, not to mention timepieces and scientific instruments, as well as folk art among our holdings. The latter department, folk art, includes a large number of nativity scenes dating from the late 17th to the early 19th centuries, the importance of which exceeds that of any other public or private collection of this type in Europe. In summary: the National Museum has a decidedly individual character formed over the course of the last 156 years. It and we cannot be reduced to a single strapline. The question challenging this institution today is: How can a museum make people aware that the legacy of the past has determined the direction of the present and with this, will determine the future? The core business of our museum now is mediation, or

rather public education and learning. How can we communicate with our public and which role does digital mediation play? We communicate with the public in many different ways – guided tours, audio guides, and workshops to help children and adults to understand objects. This comes to over 1500 events in one year. Working with children – our future visitors – is particularly close to the museum’s heart. We encourage children to engage with art and to develop an affinity for the museum using night time treasure hunts which take place in the historic rooms giving youngsters a taste of Harry Potter’s Hogwarts for example. In the future, we also plan to expand the offer of interactive media, for example touchscreen computers or screens. It is important to preserve the tradition in the future. New media will certainly provide valuable support when it comes to communication and represent an enormous advance in all respects, but they will not be a replacement of the experience of a museum visit and art. Because of this we must be careful that the virtual world does not squeeze out the real. Aldous Huxley cited the lamentation of Goethe’s sorcerer’s apprentice in one of his visions of the future. We cite him here too: “Die ich rief, die Geister, werd’ ich nun nicht los.“ Translated this reads: “Now, I cannot rid myself of the spirits I have conjured up.” 

The building was erected from 1894 to 1900. It was planned by architect Gabriel von Seidl and is one of the most original and significant museum buildings of its time.


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“Minerva” Ignaz Günther

“Satyr’s Mask with Antlers” Christoph Angermair

“Flora” Hans Krumper

The life-size statue of Minerva by Ignaz Günther is one of the museum’s most important pieces of Rococo sculpture from Bavaria, as well as being the artist’s most beautiful secular work.The figure of Minerva, which was originally white, is from a palace in Munich. It stood there in a niche in the stairwell wall. Minerva, the goddess of wisdom is shown here as the counsellor of a wise general. The decoration on her helmet is splendid with a crest of four feathers.

Abnormal antlers were highly sought after as curiosities for princely collectors. The Bavarian Elector Maximilian I, a passionate patron and collector of the arts, commissioned a series of satyr´s masks from his court ivory carver Christoph Angermair. Born in Weilheim iin 1580, Angermair lived and worked in Munich since 1600. In matching the vigorously shaped antlers with the invented face of his laughing satyr he created a unique object that heralds the stylistic tendencies of the Baroque.

This bronze figure represents the personification of Spring and is one of a group depicting the Four Seasons. They were made by Hans Krumper, a court sculptor to Duke Maximilian I of Bavaria. Made for a fountain in the grotto courtyard of the Munich Residence, each of the four bronze figures was originally mounted above an elegant basin and stood atop a small pedestal. The jets of water that gush forth from the openings in these figures are caught in the fountain bowl below.

“Isabella” Franz Anton Bustelli

“Saint Barbara” Tilman Riemenschneider

“Cup in the Shape of a Moor’s Head” Christoph Jamnitzer

Isabella and her adorer Octavio are the heroes of the Commedia dell’arte, a spontaneous theatre form from Italy which was very popular across Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries. Its protagonists, stereotyped characters, were produced by almost all German porcelain factories as decorations for the dessert table. Designed by the modeler Bustelli the sixteen comedy figures of the Nymphenburg factory are regarded as the most expressive and finest porcelain sculptures of the Rococo period.

In the late Middle Ages Saint Barbara was one of the most venerated female Saints who is said to have died through the hand of her own father who did not approve of her conversion to the Christian faith. The subtlety of the carving and the highly stylized, almost classical, facial expression are typical features of works by Tilman Riemenschneider, by far the best known German sculptor of this period. The Bayerisches Nationalmuseum houses one of the largest and most important collections of his masterpieces.

Munich, approx. 1765

Nymphenburg, approx. 1760

Munich, approx. 1625

Würzburg, approx. 1510

Munich, approx. 1611/12

Nuremberg, approx. 1602

This extraordinary silver gilt and partly polychrome goblet shaped like the head of a young and beautiful man with Negroid features is one of the most important works of the Nuremberg sculptor and goldsmith Christoph Jamnitzer. It was created for the marriage of Elector Christian II of Saxony to the Danish princess Hedwig celebrated in Dresden in 1602, probably as a tournament prize. The cup stunningly unites powerful sculpture with the exquisite delicacy of goldsmith’s art.


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Vanessa Branson, Tina di Carlo

Wonderful Patron How did the AiM (Arts in Marrakech) Biennale come into being? Tina di Carlo interviews art collector and curator Vanessa Branson on her creative trajectory and visions for the fourth instalment of this lively Moroccan arts festival. TdC: Vanessa Branson is a multidisciplinary arts collector and co-curator of the Arts in Marrakech Biennale, which in February returns to the Moroccan city for a fourth year. She is interested in art that raises questions, provokes discourse and broaches delicate topics, and in art that has a genuine voice. VB: I first developed an interest in the visual arts at 16, when I fell in love with a boy studying History of Art at Cambridge. Reflecting on all the key turning points in my life, they’ve been a result of meeting someone who inspired me. TdC: It goes without saying that there are many different strands of thought in conceptual art, and the challenge is always how to develop these ideas. How much has your desire to turn ideas into realities been a driving force throughout your career? VB: Very much so. It’s similar to when you meet someone who by chance says something that you feel is important, who gives you a message you wish to re-convey. Everybody has ideas, but it’s the people who see them through that make their mark. The thought of losing ideas haunts me. Whenever one comes to me I feel I must solidify it before moving on to the next thing. TdC: Two of your first big ideas that came to fruition in the 1980s were the Portobello Art Festival and your Vanessa Devereux gallery in Notting Hill, during which period you were one of the first curators to exhibit works by young, provocative artists such as Tracey Emin and William Kentridge. VB: You can’t underestimate the im-

portance of getting your timing right. When I started out in 1986 with a tiny little art space it was just as this surge of fresh creativity was occurring in England. It was exciting, like catching a wave. We could be experimental, as we weren’t driven by profit. Selling art isn’t necessarily the most important thing; it’s more about showing it, putting up an exhibition that you really believe in. Around this time I was lucky enough to meet the young South African artist William Kentridge. It was during apartheid, and much of his art was chronicling the inequalities of this period. I saw his work, and instantly felt that what he was doing was interesting. At this conference we’ve been talking a lot about authenticity and art that has a genuine voice. TdC: Your early role as a curator and gallerist brought different ideologies and happenings into relation; the Young British art scene, apartheid, the trade embargos and other concerns resulting from it. Are you driven to confront political issues? VB: Showing William’s work was the first time I realised that you should never isolate the arts from the bigger picture. Strong creative output is often a result of wider issues, of global affairs. I also believe that creativity attracts creativity. William used to live next door to the great writer Nadine Gordimer, who was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature. Art inspires fashion, drama, literature, and vice versa. TdC: So, you admire art for not just being something to look at, but for something that can be translated into other mediums. VB: Yes. I am very much a groupie when it comes to art. I always covet new contacts and friendships, and it’s amazing how working with someone can fast track you in to an intimate relation-

ship. This social aspect is something I find very rewarding. TdC: What lead you to work in Marrakech? VB: It happened by accident. After lunch and a large glass of white wine I ended up buying, rather spontaneously, an old ruin in the city. It was huge, and I made the decision then and there to turn it into a hotel. That glass of wine gave me courage to do something. The hotel project provided me with an anchor in the city, some stability, something to work on while dreaming about other things. Marrakech is a beautiful city, where it’s possible to make magic happen. Because of my history as a gallery owner and curator the hotel project was inevitably going to be an experimental one. Where possible we sourced natural materials to build with and used local artisans based nearby. Marrakech is full of people making things, carving things. In 2004, not long after 9/11, hostility towards the Islamic world was widespread. But this hostility felt so at odds with the experience I was having in Morocco. As a child my parents always told me that anyone can make a difference. Being someone who had experience in the art world, the idea came to me to create an arts festival, a festival that would promote dialogue and the exchange of ideas, that would bridge cultural differences. The first AiM (Arts in Marrakech) was held in 2005. A lot of really interesting people came, and it was just fabulous. This year is the festival’s fourth edition. It has grown tremendously, and we now call it the ‘Biennale.’ Our aims are to create an environment in which artists are proud to exhibit, to have fun, to attract figures from the international art world.


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Mike Emmerz

Magnetic Cuisines

Eating is being. In this interview, Mike Emmerz, the Chef of the Bayerisches Nationalmuseum talks about the current trends in modern cuisine and shares a yummy recipe.

Left: Cosmopolitan crowd mingles at the AIM Above: Rebecca Lenkiewicz & Hardeep SinghKohli on stage at the AiM

TdC: The Marrakech Biennale has several distinguishing features; a multidisciplinary arts programme, an exotic location and an eco-conscious ethos, to name a few. VB: Yes, I wanted it to be a cross-disciplinary arts festival because I think it’s important to not isolate the visual arts from literature and film-making. When an artist and a poet collaborate it can be absolutely spiritually enriching. We always try to be innovative with the program. This year we are inviting 25 emerging international artists to go out to the streets of Marrakech and respond to the city in whatever way they choose. The idea is that they produce their work there, collaborate with local craftsmen and students. We do not just want to ship work in, dump it somewhere and expect local people to automatically engage with it. TdC: While art exhibitions can generate so much waste, from transport emissions to bubble wrap, the Biennial aims to keep its ecological footprint to a minimum, is that right? VB: Yes, and bubble wrap is a symbol of how we’ll destroy the planet! If we could have an arts event without using a single piece of bubble wrap, that would be a success. TdC: AiM is a site-specific festival in that it celebrates the beauty of the city. It’s very much about being in Marrakech. VB: Yes, we are interacting with the city in so many ways. I think you all should come to experience it yourself. www.marrakechbiennale.org

DLD: Innovation and Authenticity – how does this interplay influence your cuisine and philosophy to it? ME: Our team predominantly turns regional products into extraordinary and unforgettable creations of modern and classic influences. By using stateof-the-art techniques and ways of preperation as well as the regional highclass ingredients, we always aim to create experiences – both in taste and visually. Basis for this is the french cuisine. DLD: At DLDwomen, the famous trendscout Li Edelkoort has talked about micro cultivation of own herbs and spices as well as the exclusive usage of regional and seasonal products. What’s your point of view on that and what trends are coming next? ME: As fas as possible we prefer to use regional products. At the same time we don’t want to leave out on delicacies such as tuna, turbot or lobster. These fish are not resident in the Starnberger Lake. Nevertheless, we sincerely consider the provenance of our products. Thus, we also like to use local

whitefish and char from the Chiemsee Lake. At the moment, ongoing trends from Asia, especially from the Japanes cuisine, are predominant. I believe that they are going to last for a while. Moreover, the next trend in cuisine styles will be very much influenced by the Mexican cooking culture. Generally, there is one clear trend towards quality and higher standards. DLD: One “big thing” in Web 2.0 is the exchange of recipes. As an experienced chef, do you use the Web for research and inspiration? ME: We are trying to realise our own and genuine cuisine style. We do get our inspiration by eating and savouring as well as visiting colleagues. Hence, we do not participate in the exchange of recipes online. Contrarily, many chefs guard their recipes like secrets. We use the Internet to look for new products, to order and to keep in touch with our guests. DLD: A propos recipes, would you kindly share one of your secrets? Healthy, a few ingredients and easy in preparation... 


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Page Turner DLD traditionally is a platform to opinion-leaders, changemakers and creative thinkers. Hence, the book section lists selected book picks for recommended reading.

“Bodies”

“A Monster Calls”

Susie Orbach (2009)

Patrick Ness (2011)

Esteemed Psychotherapist and writer Susie Orbach diagnoses the crisis in our relationship to our bodies and points the way toward a process of healing. Throughout the Western world, people have come to believe that general dissatisfaction can be relieved by some change in their bodies. Susie Orbach explains the origins of this condition, and examines its implications for all of us. Incorporating the latest research from neuropsychology, as well as case studies from her own practice, she traces many of these fixations back to the relationship between mothers and babies, to anxieties that are transferred unconsciously, at a very deep level. In the past several decades, a globalized media has overwhelmed us with images of an idealized, westernized body, and conditioned us to see any exception to that ideal as a problem. The body has become an object, a site of production and commerce in and of itself. Instead of our bodies making things, we now make our bodies. Susie Orbach reveals how vulnerable our bodies are to negative stimulus, the true dimensions of the crisis, and points the way toward healing and acceptance. Twitter: @psychoanalysis

At seven minutes past midnight, thirteen-year-old Conor wakes to find a monster outside his bedroom window. But it isn’t the monster Conor’s been expecting – he’s been expecting the one from his nightmare, the nightmare he’s had nearly every night since his mother started her treatments. The monster in his backyard is different. It’s ancient. And wild. And it wants something from Conor. Something terrible and dangerous. It wants the truth. From the final idea of award-winning author Siobhan Dowd – whose premature death from cancer prevented her from writing it herself – Patrick Ness has spun a haunting and darkly funny novel of mischief, loss, and monsters both real and imagined; an unflinching and deeply moving story of a boy and his seriously ill mother, and an unexpected monstrous visitor. “The book has the thrills and ambition you would expect from the author of the Chaos Walking trilogy. It’s also an extraordinarily beautiful book. Kay’s menacing, energetic illustrations and the way they interact with the text, together with the lavish production values, make it a joy just to hold in your hand.” www.patrickness.com

“Women Mean Business”

“The Road of Lost Innocence”

Avivah Wittenberg-Cox and Alison Maitland (2009)

Somaly Mam (2009)

Never before has there been such a confluence of international attention to the economic importance of women. Their position as consumers, employees and leaders is being recognised as a measure of health, maturity and economic viability. They are becoming central to labour market solutions to the challenges of an ageing workforce, falling birth rates and skill shortages. Countries and companies are urgently seeking policies to enable women to fulfil their potential. Why Women Mean Business takes the economic arguments for change to the heart of the corporate world. Women today are a majority of the talent pool and make up to 80% of consumer purchases. This powerful new book brings together in a single, concise volume the multiplicity of opportunities available to companies that really understand what motivates women in the global workplace and marketplace. The optimisation of women’s talents will boost business performance. Taking action to achieve this will require sustained courage and commitment from today’s corporate leaders. This is an opportunity not to be missed.

A riveting and beautiful memoir of tragedy and hope by a woman named Time magazine’s list 100 most influential people in the world. Born in a village deep in the Cambodian forest, Somaly Mam was sold into sexual slavery by her grandfather when she was twelve years old. For the next decade she was shuttled through the brothels that make up the sprawling sex trade of Southeast Asia. She suffered unspeakable acts of brutality and witnessed horrors that would haunt her for the rest of her life – until, in her early twenties, she managed to escape. Unable to forget the girls she left behind, Somaly Mam became a tenacious and brave leader in the fight against human trafficking, rescuing sex workers – some as young as five and six – offering them shelter, rehabilitation, healing, and love and leading them into a new life. Written in exquisite, spare, unflinching prose, The Road of Lost Innocence is an outcry for justice. This memoir will leave you awestruck by the courage and strength of this extraordinary woman and will renew your faith in the power of an individual to bring about change.

www.whywomenmeanbusiness.com

www.somaly.org


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F e u i lle t o n

Dancing Music Note From Lady Gaga to Zwirbeldirn, DLD music is already as diverse as managing boards should be. Again, there is a wide range of incredible artists to be explored. Tune in! an countries in 1996. She managed to publicize her debut album “Something Real”, which helped her transition into pop music and her second album “Believe” was even more popular then the first. In 2004, the singer began to delve into a new project, the “First Friday” club night, which has become a part of the Berlin culture.

sicians who revolutionize the alphorn instrument and venture it beyond folk music. The new album “Travellin’ Root” fuses arabesque and tango elements, Swiss folklore and rock, a colourful mix with bold arrangements, recorded in Winterthur and Los Angeles. www.elianaburki.ch

The Naked and Famous Anna F.

www.judy-weiss.de

The Naked and Famous are an Indie Rock band from Auckland, New Zealand. Their single “Young Blood” debuted on the NZ charts at number one in 2010. TNAF released their debut studio album “Passive Me, Aggressive You” in September 2010, and they have been nominated for the BBC’s Sound of 2011 poll. „They combine the intimate boy/girl interplay of the xx, the stompalong electropop of MGMT and the dissonance of Nine Inch Nails,“ reviews Caroline Sullivan for the Guardian.

Anna F. is an independent artist and musician. Without a record contract and with no preprogrammed marketing machinery behind she won the Austrian Music Award “Amadeus” three times with only one album out and was at the same time the opening act for the last European tour with Lenny Kravitz, who personally asked her to join him on his tour for 12 consecutive shows. www.annaf.com

Leonie Casanova

Judy Weiss The multi-talented singer Judy Weiss possesses a wide range of abilities, extending through a variety of genres and types of music. In 1994, Judy got her first major role in “West Side Story”, and in “Beauty and the Beast” only one year later. The romantic pop sing “Vivo per Lei”, a duet with Andrea Bocelli, topped the charts in several Europe-

Leonie Casanova is a Londonbased singer and songwriter. Born and raised in Zambia to an Italian father and Zambian mother, and schooled in Swaziland, England and the USA where she studied Economics and French Literature before working on Wall Street. Leonie’s colourful and almost nomadic background has deeply informed her approach to song-writing and to the intrinsic and essential storytelling element of this process. Leonie crosses and fuses genres and musical textures fluidly which allows exploration of what she calls “an endless work playground”. She has written and recorded songs for award-winning feature films “I can’t think straight” and “The World Unseen”. Twitter: @leoniecasanova

www.thenakedandfamous. com

Tegernseer Tanzlmusi The local heroes from Tegernsee, the seven thoroughbred musicians simply have fun making music together. Authentic, genuine and in Lederhosen always. www.tegernseer-tanzlmusi.de

Please save the Date for

DLD12 Eliana Burki “A lot of people think of the alphorn as a very simple instrument. But it’s extremely difficult to play, you have only the naturals at your disposal,” says Eliana Burki. She is the youngest of the league of mu-

22–24 January


98

F e u i lle t o n

The Mobile DLDwomen Video Experience

A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters

Interview – Hans Ulrich Obrist

An Artist’s Dialogue

Taryn Simon, Artist Page 80

Hans Ulrich Obrist, Curator Page 82

Pola Sieverding, Artist Page 88

Katharina Sieverding, Artist Page 88

and it lasted a long-time

The Power of Stories

Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev, Documenta 13 Page 87

Maria Furtwängler Burda, DLDwomen Chairwoman Page 83

Patrick Ness, Author Page 83

Shamim Sarif, Novelist, Screen Writer & Feature Film Director Page 83

Wonderful Patron Vanessa Branson, AiM Page 94

Tina di Carlo, Writer & Curator Page 94

DLD11 Book “Update your Reality”


Society Salon Summer Night’s Dream Page 100

Jazz, Food & Drinks Page 102

Jeder Ball ein Treffer – Every Ball on Target Page 104

Glitter, Football & Electro pop Page 105

above: Corinne Flick, Convoco (l), and Ana-Cristina Grohnert, Ernst & Young below: Corinne Hunt (l), Hanan Kattan (m), Lakshmi Pratury

above left: Marcel Reichart, Regine Sixt, Hubert Burda, Maria Furtwängler-Burda, Steffi Czerny (fltr) Right: Ofra Strauss, The Strauss Group (l) and Charles Schumann far right: Dagmar Bily, Editorin-chief Burda Style (l), and Hibaaq Osman, Arab Women’s Fund left: Shahrizat Abdul Jalil, Malaysian Minister of Women, Family and Community Development (l), Christine Haderthauer, Bavarian Minister of Social Affairs (m), and Irene Natividad, Global Summit of Women


S o c i e t y

S a l o n

Chairwoman’s Dinner

Summer Night’s Dream Maria Furtwängler-Burda invites the DLDwomen to a Pre-Dinner On the eve of the conference 2011, the DLD team invited this year´s DLDwomen Speakers, Partners and Friends to an intimate Chairwoman’s Dinner. Publisher Dr. Hubert Burda and his wife, the German actress and physician Maria Furtwängler-Burda together with DLD Founders Steffi Czerny and Marcel Reichart and DLDwomen Co-Founder Regine Sixt welcomed the guests during a mild summer night outside of Schumann’s Bar at the Hofgarten in Munich. The mesmerizing atmosphere was further enriched by groovy saxophone sounds of jazz singer and musician Mel Rosenberg. DLD friends appreciated the dinner, which was supported by Sixt, as an in advance get together and possibility for exchange. 

Far left: Daniela Hinrichs (l), Stephanie Gräfin von Pfuel (m), Petra Winter Above: Jacob Burda (l), Sylor Lin (m), Lisa Burda Right: Editors-in-chief Annette Weber, InStyle (l), Ulrike Zeitlinger, Freundin (m), and Sabine Nedelchev, Elle

Left: Susanne Kloess (l), Anke Domscheit-Berg, opengov (r) Right: Mel Rosenberg (Tel Aviv University)


above: Anna von Bayern, Mabel van Oranje, Hubert Burda, Lidewij Edelkoort, Manuel von Bayern (fltr) Below Right: Burda’s Phillip Welte (l) and his wife Judy Weiss

Right: Lorea Canales, Abigail Disney, a DLD friend, Vanessa Branson (fltr) Below: Gabi Zedlmayer, Katarina Borchert, Verena Delius, Ana-Christina Grohnert (fltr)

Publisher’s Dinner

Jazz, Food & Drinks One night in Schwabing On the evening of the first day of the DLDwomen conference, the Publisher’s Dinner took place in his mansion in vicinity to the Siegestor. Dr. Hubert Burda invited DLD guests to his private rooms for dinner. Around 100 guests gathered in and outside the house and contributed to a splendid atmosphere. On top, the husband of Alison Smale, pianist-composer Sergei Dreznin initiated a spontaneous jazz session together with violinist Hermina Szadó. Overall, it was a brilliant‚ highlight in the circle of events that surrounded DLDwomen 2011. 

above: Megan Smith, Google (l), and Yossi Vardi

above: Candace Johnson, SES (l), and Stefanie Babst, NATO Below: Yonca Brunini (l) and Pat Mitchell


Please save the Date for

DLD12 22–24 January


S o c i e t y

S a l o n

Women’s World Cup Night

Jeder Ball ein Treffer – Each Ball on Target

above: Patricia Riekel (Bunte), Maria Furtwängler-Burda, Peter Löscher (Siemens), and Susanne Anger, GEMEINSAM FÜR AFRIKA (fltr) Below: Peter Löscher aiming at the the target Far Below: Actress Uschi Glas is showing her skills at the football kick

Charity Goal Wall Campaign of the Burda Style Group for UNITED FOR AFRICA

Right: FC Bayern Munich President Uli Hoeneß

On the occasion of the World Cup match between Germany and Nigeria at the Women’s World Cup Night, guests could test their own hand-eye coordination. The Burda Style Group hosted a charity soccer wall themed “Our Goal/Door to Education”. The minimum fee of five euros for three shots was donated directly to ­UNITED FOR AFRICA, which uses the funds to support a girls’ school in Nigeria. The charity evening’s aim was to ensure the education of as many girls as possible. Among the celebrities who participated were host Dr. Hubert Burda, Siemens CEO Peter Löscher, the president of FC BayernMunich Uli Hoeneß, actress Uschi Glas and “Bunte” magazine’s editor-in-chief Patricia Riekel. That night, the BURDA STYLE GROUP raised a total of around 3,000 Euro for UNITED FOR AFRICA, enabling over 50 girls in Africa to attend school. UNITED FOR AFRICA is an alliance of 23 recognised charity organisations with the goal of conveying a new and diverse image of Africa – an image which does not reduce the continent to its problems, but emphasises its potential and strengths instead. Over 100 famous public figures as well as a large number of citizens lend their support to UNITED FOR AFRICA. 


left: Sonia and Willy Bogner

above: Helena Schoeller and Mi Scheublin (r) conducted the exciting auction for the Bavarian National Museum

Women’s World Cup Night

Glitter, Football & Electro Pop DLD and Siemens invited to a big night out On the second day of DLDwomen, Siemens CEO Peter Löscher, Maria Furtwängler-Burda, Steffi Czerny and the Burda editors-in-chief welcomed all DLD friends in the Bavarian National Museum for an official conference cocktail. After a discussion with Bunte editor-in-chief Patricia Riekel, management consultant Susanne Klöß, Peter Löscher and FC Bayern Munich’s president Uli Hoeneß on “Women on the ball – global diversity as a chance”, everyone watched the Women’s World Cup match between Germany and Nigeria and of course celebrated the German 1:0 victory. Later on, the performance of the electro-pop-group “The Naked and Famous” (TNAF) rocked the house. Benefiting the Bayerisches Nationalmuseum, a limited amount of signed posters by TNAF was auctioned to the guests. 

above left: Andrea Kolb, Vanessa Branson, Katia Gaika, Maria Furtwängler-Burda, Ursula Karven, Marie Jo-Lafontaine (fltr) Below left: The Naked and Famous live on stage Below Right: Brigitte von Boch, Caroline Templeton und Franziska Countess Fugger von Babenhausen (fltr)


c o n ta c t

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And at: www.dldwomen.com


c r e d i t s

Imprint

On the Wings of Truth

Management & Concept: Stephanie Czerny & Dr. Marcel Reichart Implementation: © 2011 DLD Media GmbH, Arabellastr. 23, 81925 Munich Editors-In-Chief: Alexandra Schiel & Lukas Kubina Editing: Katharina Nachbar, Marcella Miner, Laura Weinert Art Direction: Annette Kokus-Jung Design: Michel Karamanovic Production: Sabine Schmid Printing: B&K Offsetdruck GmbH, Gutenbergstraße 4 – 10, 77833 Ottersweier Photo Credits: Sascha Baumann – Getty Images, Sabine Brauer, Adrian Campbell-Howard, Flo Fetzer, Daniel Grund, Flo Hagena, Anaëlle Madec, Klaus Mettig, Goran Nietschke, Johannes Simon – Getty Images, Marie Taillefer DLD, DLD Media, DLD Ventures are trademarks of Hubert Burda Media Holding KG All Rights reserved

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