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Issue #28 05/07/06 - 01/08/06

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The Sleepy Jackson If you’ve had trouble figuring out the title to the Sleepy Jackson’s second release “Personality – One Was A Spider, One Was A Bird”… well, that’s understandable. One thing that’s very clear, however, is the impressive entrance of their first single, “God Lead Your Soul”, which recently punched in at the #25 position on the ARIA charts. Drummer Malcolm Clark spoke to Dave Williams about the Perth scene and why SJ’s ex-members are probably kicking themselves for leaving…

just down at the venue, getting it all ready, and we’re going to do a dress rehearsal tonight. It should be cool. You going to get friends in for the dress rehearsal, or is it just going to be closed? Yeah, we’ll probably invite a few friends. In fact, we definitely will, because we’ve had to cut the door list down for tomorrow night because of the venue size. Yeah; we’ll be getting some people in.

going, yeah – there’s a lot of good shit going on. There seems to be a steady stream from Perth – End Of Fashion, Little Birdy, Art Of Fighting…you guys. There seems to be a lot of success coming out of there at the moment. Got any idea why? Yeah. There’s another new band as well, Avenue, which just recorded an album. I heard a bit of that last week. They haven’t really broken through yet, but I reckon they’re going to be another band to pop up, so keep a listen out for them.

You’ve been here before? No, I haven’t. I’ve been wanting to go there for a long time. I was living in Melbourne for a while, and I was going to catch one of those ferries across, but never got round to it. Maybe one time you guys can come down and play some shows down here? Yeah. We definitely want to come down there this time. We haven’t played there yet. A bit of a shame, you know? You’re doing a tour, on the back of this album? Yeah; a bit later in the year…August, I think, we’ll probably do an Australian tour, so we’re going to try and get down there then. Whereabouts are you at the moment? I’m in Perth – we’re just setting up the show for the first Sleepy show, which is tomorrow night. So we’re

O u r

I reckon those guys must be spewing now that they’ve left the band, since you guys are getting so much attention… (Laughs) Yeah! Probably! That’s what happens!

of breaking through, you know? And it just died out when dance music came through. So it just picked up again. It just takes that one band to break it through. The single from the album, “God Lead Your Soul” – you’re doing quite well with that? Yeah…it’s a bit different. A lot of people are like, “Oh, I’m not sure yet – I don’t really get it”. The album – when is that due for release? Ah…the album’s due for release on…I think it’s the first of July. You’re already getting quite a bit of attention because of the single and that sort of thing; is there something you think there is about this particular album that stands out from what you guys have done before? Yeah. I think it’s different. It’s going to be one of those albums you might need to listen to a few times. Yeah; I think it’s got something about it…it’s got a lot going on there; we’ve simplified a lot of things. We went back and simplified the drums and take a lot of cymbals out and stuff because there was so much

It just takes that one band to break it through.

I’m in Tasmania. Tassie! Nice one!

G e t

Oh yeah? How come? The other two guys left just before we were going to record the album; just working on their own things. We kind of recorded it ourselves and got some guests in to play guitars and stuff like that.

What’s the scene like in general in Perth at the moment? It’s pretty rocking at the moment – there’s a lot going on. Venue-wise, it’s a little bit difficult, because they’ve shut down a few venues because of noise restrictions, which is a shame. So we’re sort of struggling to find a good place to play that’s different from an arts centre. But as far as the bands are

Hi Malcolm, how you going? Good! How are you, mate? Where are you calling from?

We

US? He went both to the US and the UK, to catch up with the label and do a couple of listening parties and stuff. I’ve stayed here and rehearsed the band. We’ve got a couple of new members now.

So you’ve sold it out, have you? Yeah. What’s the venue capacity there? It’s a small one – five-hundred capacity. A lot of people have been turned away, which was a bit of a shame. In the last month, what’s the band been up to? We’ve been rehearsing. Luke went overseas to do some promo stuff, so we’ve basically been rehearsing; just trying to get things together and stuff. Whereabouts has Luke gone overseas? Europe or the

Ro c k

F i x

We’re in a similar sort of situation, in that both Perth and Tasmania are isolated from the big east coast three; Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane. You guys seem to have overcome that problem of isolation – what conditions do you think have produced that? I’m not too sure… Sleepy and Eskimo Joe...about the same kind of time, were touring a lot over in Sydney and that. And then they ended up scoring a deal. As soon as that happened, it kind of opened up a big thing over here in Perth. The WAMI Awards as well. So for the first time since the eighties, people and record companies started coming over here, checking out bands and stuff. Because around the ‘eighty-five and that, the music scene was massive, and there was a lot of bands around the place that were sort

going on with the orchestra and all the other things that were on top of it. We had to make a nice little base for it to sit on, you know? But I don’t know. It’s weird, because we don’t have anything to compare it to. This sounds like a whole bunch of different things. Were the new members of the band the catalysts for this new direction and sound? Kind of. That’s why we ended up calling it “Personality…” because Luke and myself…it was just me and Luke who did the album, and then we got in other people as guests…that kind of bought out the personality of the album; everyone’s different vibe. Jim Moginie from Midnight Oil and Davey Lane from You Am I and stuff like that. It’s kind of good that we managed to build something from it. Alright man. Thanks a lot for talking with me about it. Yeah – no worries, man. Hope your show goes off tonight with no hassles! Yeah! Should be cool! Looking forward to coming to Tassie for the first time! By Dave Williams

Fr o m

The Exploders resurgence of garage rock in the last few years? Do you think that its popularity has had a negative affect on the genre? It has been both good and bad. Garage rock is something that always happens, so it is good that quality rock music is given the spotlight for a bit. However, it has become a bit of a trend, which sort of takes away the whole idea of garage rock. How big a role does the band play in other areas of your life? [It] rules it! How has your relationship with the rest of the band changed over the time you’ve played together? It is still the same as ever. We just spend a lot more time together hanging out, but this helps us to all stay good mates.

SAUCE fired our stylists, let our hair down, lit up a ciggie and lifted up the roller door of garage rock to have a word with The Exploders. Garage rock is something t h a t a l w a y s h a p p e n s …

What have the Exploders been up to in the last month? We played as support on the Evermore tour, played at the Come Together Festival, have just finished our own tour and have worked on some demos. What are your feelings towards the massive PAGE 10

Back in May, we heard that you were recording demos for a new album. What stage is the production at now? The demos are pretty much done which we’re happy about. There’s just a little bit of preproduction to be done and it’s sorted. What did you take away from your last visit to Tasmania? A hell of a hangover… What’s next for you guys? A couple of farewell shows are coming up, recording the next album, probably a few overseas shows, then hopefully an tour around Oz for the last few months of the year. The Exploders play Hobart’s Republic Bar on Friday the 28th

By Tom Wilson

WITH GOODWILL


M o v i n g Fa s t e r T h a n E v e r B e f o r e , i t ’ s

Pee Wee Ferris When was the last time that three billion people listened to the work of one musician…simultaneously? Six years ago, as a matter of fact. But for tech-trance DJ/producer Pee Wee Ferris, having almost half the world’s population hear his work as the soundtrack for the Sydney 2000 opening ceremony wasn’t enough.

Do you like working that fast? Absolutely. You get a track listing and you stall it, because you’re like, “Aww, I really want to put this on now!” Then you’ve got to get approval for it, and then you want another one…it’s good,

It was very much tribal, with influences from music around the world. I had musicians from

You’ve been doing this for about fifteen years… A little bit more, but yeah. (Laughs) Good lord – you started when I was about five. What are some of the most important lessons that you’ve learned from doing this at a professional level? Ah…mostly, you have to do it because you love it. If you do it just for the ego, then forget it, because you just can’t survive. You’ve got to only do it It’s just not worth it. It’s like anything in the arts; it goes up and down, and there’s hard times and good times. The only thing that holds everything together is music. That’s the most important thing. Always do what you believe, even when you know that everybody doesn’t like it. You go, “This is what I think it should be, so I better do it.” And luckily, I’ve been pretty much right. I’ve progressed in certain directions that have worked for me. It might not be the current top, popular thing, but it works for me. I survive by doing it. If you keep changing or doing

The only thing that holds everything together is music. ever usi c.

Where are you at the moment? I’ve got a studio, so I’m there, trying to sort everything out…I’ve got a tour in a couple of weeks away from Sydney, so I’ve got to do the mix today…tomorrow! (Laughs) My schedule…skiing gets in the way! (Laughs)

The turnaround’s super-fast these days. It used to be, like, two months. Now, you finish it, it’s gone, it’s out really, really quickly.

In an interview we did with your brother John a while ago, he said that he learned to DJ “though a lot of mistakes”. Is that how you learned? I don’t think I learned that way; you learn on the job! (Laughs) I learned mistakes at home, but I actually taught myself when I was still at school, or had just left school. I actually learned using really second-rate equipment.

You composed music for the Sydney Olympics… the opening and closing ceremonies. I did, yeah. On the opening, I did “Arrivals”, it was called. It was when all the cultures came out.

So what have you been up to today? Today, I’m actually doing a new CD. It’s called “Wild Weekends, Volume 3”. I’m actually right in the middle of mixing it…okay, I’m nearly about to do it! I’m just getting everything ready.

It’s been a pretty quick turnaround, this CD and the one coming out now; “Peaktime” came out within three weeks of me finishing it.

The one I’m doing now is a bit more commercial, but I still have the same attitude; I want to have the newest thing I can find that’s perfect for the market. That way, the CD lasts a lot longer.

That was the best way for me to learn; that was the only choice I had. I had a tape deck and a beltdrive turntable and a little Realistic mixer. This was before it was cheap to buy equipment; technology in the old days was a lot more expensive, and you couldn’t afford it. Now everything is super cheap.

The younger brother of fellow DJ John Ferris, he’s working at a faster rate than ever before, producing the follow up to his last release “Peaktime”, and he had so much to say about it that I could hardly get a word in…just the way it should be.

Musically, what have you been up to in the last month? It’s basically, pretty much just doing this stuff. I haven’t done a lot of my own stuff, musically. Basically just compiling this new CD, because I just finished the last one.

didn’t know with some music that they do know. The last deadline is perfect for what I do.

around the world play over a song that I produced and I wrote. Then I would sample that, and re-incorporate it; making it into a seven-minute piece that incorporated the whole world’s music!

because you know by the end of it that the last three, four tracks are brand new, which no one has. Otherwise, everyone’s got them, and you go, “Oh, what’s the point?” Unless it’s a really big pop, commercial release; they just want classic pop tracks. But in the dance market, it doesn’t really work that way; they want to hear music that they

Fuck… It was great! So I had to record West Africans, Samoans, New Zealanders… The classical bits I did, and then I got Spanish singers, and some American stuff as well. It was really good fun. That must have been pretty cool – having, what was it? A billion people listening to your stuff? Three billion, it was. It was good. Actually being there; that was the best bit. It was a great atmosphere in the stadium. Everyone was in one of those moods.

it for what people say, you never succeed in the end. You do it for a while, and then you go, “Well, why did I do that? In the end it didn’t help me.” So what’s next in the coming months? I’ve got a big tour for this CD…big time. I’m going skiing in the snowfields; working down there, which is good. I’m in Melbourne this week, and then I’m up to the Kimberlys, which is something different. I’ve never worked up there – I don’t think any DJs worked up there...Nunamara, which is a first for me! (Laughs) I think there’s only one pub there! It’s pretty exciting to do something that no one’s done, which is hard these days. Pee Wee Ferris plays Syrup in Hobart on Friday the 28th of July. By Tom Wilson

Touring Artists

Ritual

DJ Tee Bee

“I get to play quite a variety of gigs when it comes to drum n’ bass which means I get to really test out most of the spectrum of the music. From playing funk and atmospheric stylings at a residency at Home that lasted almost 5 years, to roughing up the ride at 50/50’s Tuff Cookie Coalition and tearing it up for the raver crew, it’s the across the board aspect of drum n’ bass that keeps me interested. Doing one of the most accessible drum n’ bass radio shows every Tuesday night helps to perpetuate the junglist vibes to further reaching audiences and take the music further. It’s very possible you’ll hear a half time hip-hop tune in a set as well as a culmination of both the freshest (from the promo packs) to the favourites (from the collection) - you must expect the unexpected. All these aesthetics come from a schooling of monthly Green n’ Jazzy parties with ‘the boys’ Kid Kenobi and Q45 from early in 1996. Drum n’ Bass wise I have been signed to Congo Natty (run by the legendary Rebel MC) who have started an “Outernational” label for overseas talent and have a myriad of releases slated for release forthcoming months.” Ritual plays Hobart’s Halo on Saturday the 15th

Since first surfacing on the drum and bass circuit, DJ Tee Bee (aka Torgeir Byrknes) has set a new pace for the drum and bass movement. Although he resides in Norway, Tee Bee has enjoyed considerable success with London labels Rugged Vinyl, Moving Shadow, and Certificate 18, as well as U.S. label Thermal Recordings. Tee Bee is worried about what could happen to drum and bass if it fails to reinvent itself, so he challenges himself and the world to a new sound that is unpredictable and fresh. It’s not what fans want, but what they need. Tee Bee explains, “When myself and (production partner) K started making music we wanted to push ourselves that little bit further. Though people want those hard beats and bass lines, we try to do it with a twist. Every little hi-hat and snare is in there for a reason rather than just for the punch of it.” Tee Bee’s production studio is known as Black Science Labs, a name that suits his music well.

Tee Bee plays Hobart’s Halo on Thursday the 6th

Artificial Intelligence Phil Smart

Artificial Intelligence are the duo responsible for two of the biggest drum & bass club hits last year including “Desperado” and “Uprising”. This year their main project is compiling and mixing the second album in the Liquid V Club Sessions series released last year which will include twenty exclusive Liquid V rollers from artists including, Roni Size, Makoto, LTJ Bukum, TC, Stress Level & TC1, Kabuki, Simonn Bassline Smith, Calibre, Total Science, Utah Jazz and remixes from Marky, High Contrast and Logistics. Liquid V has been building its profile over the last twelve months with monthly nights at Medicine Bar, The End and Egg. There have also been one off nights in Bristol, Birmingham and around the UK and overseas including Vienna, France and Switzerland. Promoters at big events such as Innovation (where Liquid V have hosted their second arena) are already requesting Liquid V nights for their second room to add another dimension of drum & bass to their night. There’s been a lot said about Liquid drum & bass and one of the misconceptions is that it’s not really for the clubs. Liquid V smashes that myth head on. Artificial Intelligence plays Hobart’s Halo on Wednesday the 26th

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Undoubtedly one of Australia’s most prominent and respected underground DJs, Phil Smart has always been one step ahead and another step sideways. He has a reputation for breaking new sounds, playing a wide range of styles from deep house and techno to breaks and electro, as well as head music and bar room sets. Voted Australian DJ Of The Year at the National Dance Music Awards in 2000 and appearing twice in DJ Magazine’s list of the world’s Top 100 DJs, it is Phil’s passion for music that gives him his unique edge. It is an indication of his musical versatility that Phil has been chosen to play alongside visiting DJs as diverse as Sasha, John Digweed, Carl Cox, Adam Freeland, Sven Vath, Derrick Carter and Jose Padilla. Making regular trips overseas he has played across America for people like Funky Teknotribe, Spundaes and Basics, while European clubs include Bedrock, Club UK and E-Werk. He co-founded the respected Thunk label and has released original material under various guises, including Earthlink, with upcoming releases on Nine09 Released and a remix for Fire Records. Phil Smart plays Hobart’s Halo on Saturday the 8th

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Around Oz & Inside the Head of

Bass Kleph Thin Things can get a bit crazy, bu but I wou ay wouldn’t have it any other way

Breaks DJ, producer, radio host…it’s one thing to be multi-talented (and we do mean talented – he just mixed half of the sixth InTheMix compilation to critical acclaim). But it’s another thing to have such an outrageously awesome DJ moniker. Hobart clubbers, Bass Kleph is coming down to get a Halo… What have you been up to today? Just got back from the Gold Coast this ‘arvo. I did a live set at Elsewhere last night. It went down really well, and the crowd was heaps of fun too. Musically, what have you been doing in the last month? I just wrapped up a tour with Hyper for the ‘InTheMix Is 6’ mix CD we just released. I did six dates around the country and last one was with James Zabiela in Canberra at Academy. I had a great time doing all the shows, and found I got along really well with Guy (Hyper) too. Aside from that I’ve got some new tunes about to hit the shelves on the new “Breaking Point Remixed” label, a monster remix of Amiel set to come out on Warner (with talk of a film clip too), plus Nick Thayer and I have just picked up a commercial with Toyota. It’s the new Hilux campaign, and features our song “Fucking The Groove”. You last spoke to us in February – how have things changed for you since then? Well aside from the above, I have also been finishing of a couple of artist albums, and been really enjoying all the gigs down at our new Sydney breaks night “Break Inn” @ Chinese Laundry. Out of DJing and producing, what do you enjoy doing the most? I like both. They kinda go hand in hand. One always inspires, and helps you with the other. You’re involved with Sound Orchard. How has that been going? What have you been working on there?

They look after the corporate/advertising side of the Floating Point/Breaking Point label. They are the guys responsible for getting my tunes on Toyota commercials etc. You recently mixed half of the last InTheMix compilation – how do you feel about your work, looking back on it? I’m really happy with it, and have received great feedback from a lot of people now too. I tried to do a CD that gives you a taste of what I do in the club, but also keeping in mind the environment it will be played in. e.g. in the car, at home etc. I think this really comes through in the flow of the CD, and the varied track selection. You also work as a host on a Sydney radio show “Beat Box”. What have been some of the benefits of this, regarding your DJing work? It’s really just a fun way for me to play my new tunes each week to everyone, and a have a little chat/gossip about them too. Although we do also get some great guests too. Recently we had an interview with Meat Katie, and have also had guests such as Plump DJs, Stanton Warriors, Pendulum, London Elektricity, Uberzone and many more. It’s a great outlet for Sydney’s breakbeat scene in general. All the travelling you do as a DJ must take its toll – is there a Bass Kleph Travel Tip you could offer for aspiring DJs to make the journeys a little smoother? Travel light, and get to the airport early. Panadol is also an essential item for that post night club head feeling. You’re about to return to Tassie to play in Hobart – how are you received down here, compared to the rest of the country? I think good. This will be my fourth time, and each time before has always been a blast! Hobart crew know how to have fun, and really enjoy their music. Things can get a bit crazy, but I wouldn’t have it any other way. What’s next for you? New remixes released, finishing albums, heaps of gigs and maybe some over seas travel. Bass Kleph plays Hobart’s Halo on Saturday the 22nd of July.

By David Williams

SAUCE goes under the drill to get a

Love Tattoo No, ladies and gentlemen; the man in that photo is not a bikie. He’s a DJ. The Australian music scene considers him a legend, and so they should – he’s been doing this since the end of the seventies. He’s seen every shift and trend of electronic music – “survived” might be a better word – and now, in his twenty-eighth year of spinning the decks, he’s returning to our shores. I rolled up my sleeve and gritted my teeth as Mr Stephen Alkins gave me a Love Tattoo.

What have you been up to today? Doing errands and preparing for a trip to Tokyo and a gig on Sunday with my singer Merenia and my drummer Vincent. Musically, what have you been doing in the last month? Promoting the album, touring and doing a couple of new mixes of tracks off the album “Bodywork”. You started DJing back in ’78. What were some of the qualities clubs had back then that have been lost in the years since? Clubs used to be a lot more left of centre. Truly underground. Music was played that was only ever heard in the clubs. It seemed a lot friendlier and there was more of a dance community and not a dance shopping mall. What have the reactions been to “Bodywork”? And what do you think it indicated when the single “Put Your Body Into It” got the number ten position in the ARIA chart? All the reactions I’ve had have been very

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positive. I feel I haven’t been forgotten and it’s nice that something a little different can still work. What experiences have you had overseas? Lived in New York for nine months in 1988 and it changed my musical outlook. I like going to Tokyo for shor t trips because it’s the best city in the world and going back again next week. I’ve played at Ibiza at one of the big clubs, Space, and it was interesting to say the least. I’ve been in London and it’s just so vast. That’s a few places for star ters! From the time you started out, how long did it take before you could make a living out of electronic music? I star ted DJing in 1978 and that has been my rent-paying job ever since. If a “love tattoo” was an actual tattoo design, what do you think it would look like? It is an actual design and it’s on my back! It is a dagger going from the top of my neck down my spine half way, with big orange and yellow flames coming up from the dagger and then the word “love” in big bold old English writing appears across the top of my back. I had it done in 1997 in Sydney. What are some words of wisdom you could offer to up-and-coming DJs? Be yourself. Believe in your own taste in music. You’re set to play three dates in Hobart in July; how has Tasmania received you in the past? And what do you think crowds down here offer that you don’t see on the mainland? I came down to Hobar t four years ago not knowing what to expect and had a hoot! The venue was packed, the crowd was great and the promoters were fantastic. I had a great time. What’s next for you? More of the same. More music. More DJing. More life! Love Tattoo plays the Hobart Uni Bar on Friday the 21st of July.

By Tom Wilson


Talking Jager Bombs and Eyebrow-Licking with

Goodwill There’s a saying that goes “good will makes the world go round”. For us at SAUCE, it went around very quickly indeed thanks to the aptly-named DJ/producer. One of the golden boys of Sydney’s electronic music scene alongside the likes of Kid Kenobi, Goodwill may have been in the middle of his first “Sessions” tour, but that

Musically, what’s been happening in the last month? I am loving [the] acid flavoured stuff – D Ramirez, Paul Woolford, Tim Deluxe and so on. What’s been happening in the Sydney scene? The Sydney scene is growing again after a bit of a low-point. Kink and Smut are great nights and the love scene is pumping! Poxymusic was quoted as saying, “Goodwill makes music that the world wants to sing to”. What do you

If I keep ke drinking…at this rate, I will ll have earned an endorsement contract… act… didn’t stop him from being there for SAUCE, when we needed him most. (Deadline! - Ed) What have you been up to today? I woke up late after another big weekend on the tour. If I keep drinking Jager Bombs at this rate, I will have earned an endorsement contract from Jagermeister of some kind.

think this means? Ha-ha! I share a studio with those guys and we write music together. Have you ever met Pocket from Poxymusic? He’s a dreamboat! What’s your current equipment setup? And what would you like to improve on? It’s Pioneer all the way for me, especially the CD players. For me, no other CD player is as good.

What do you think are some of the hallmarks of a good mix? Well, it has to be in key, and it has to be about the drop. But some of the best sets I have seen are from DJs who weren’t even mixing. Gilles Peterson as an example. It’s all about programming I think. You’re currently playing the MOS Sessions Tour. How is this year measuring up, compared to previous years? It’s my first Sessions tour and I am loving it! What’s the single weirdest thing you’ve seen happen during one of your sets? Someone came up to me at a gig once and asked if they could play a record. There were about two thousand people in the crowd. I admired his confidence for asking, but the fact he was licking his eyebrows at the time was even funnier. What impressions do you have towards Tasmania? I love Tassie. I’ve been there loads now. [I] would love to see more of it, though. Where in Australia have you seen the most promising

local talent? (And that’s DJs, not babes… though comment on those too if you wish) Canberra. There always seems to be good talent and music coming out of Canberra. What’s the most annoying thing about being a DJ? DJ questionnaires! Just joking – it’s a great job; there isn’t anything too annoying about it After the Sessions shows, what’s next for you? I’m off to New York and China, and then back for the big summer! Goodwill plays Lonnies on the 22nd and Sirocco’s in Burnie on Saturday the 29th of July.

By Tom Wilson

SAUCE goes a few rounds with Title Fight’s

Dopamine It It’s al already commonplace to see someone eon playing pl yin a set with Ableton Live on a laptop pt p It’s amazing how childhood experiences shape who we are as adults. As a kid, Matt Goddard was given a Kraftwerk tape by his dad. Now, as Dopamine, he’s exploring the tougher, harder side of breaks, signed to Klaus “Heavyweight” Hill’s Title Fight label; efforts which scored him a nomination for Breakthrough Producer in this year’s Breakspoll. What have you been up to today? That’s an unusual way to start an interview! I’ve been burning promos to play at my gig tonight and finishing off a remix I’m working on. I had sushi for lunch. What have you been up to in the past month? Loads of studio work. A short tour of New Zealand. Gigs at Chinese Laundry here in Sydney. Eating lots of Japanese food and judging a Title Fight song writing competition with Klaus Hill. We have a winner! Bloody good tune it is too. You’re involved with the Title Fight label run by Klaus Hill; why did you choose to get involved with this? When did this happen? I had been speaking to Klaus since just before I signed “Hold You” to TCR. He was basically giving me loads of advice and we became quite good mates even before he had heard any of my music. I sent him a CD of my other tracks and he wanted a few of them so we just went from there. Klaus is very well respected in the UK and Title Fight has a great reputation all over the world, so I was really keen to be a part of it. It also makes things a lot easier when the label is local. Trying to communicate via email all the time when you’re in opposite time zones can be a real pain in the arse. Your biography explains that being signed to Title Fight has allowed you to explore the tougher side of breaks. What changes did Title Fight’s influence effect on your music? Title Fight is a certain sound. It’s a dark, driving, fat and chuggy type of sound so I guess when I write music for Title Fight it’s going to fit that mould. I still keep my own slightly quirky electro thing there though. I dunno, it’s hard to say exactly how much it has influenced my own music. What changes have you seen in the breaks field over the last few years? I have only been writing and djing breaks for a couple of years so I haven’t seen a huge change personally. I guess there’s a lot more division between subgenres which is what happens with any style of music as it grows. People whinge and moan about it but it just happens. How did you first get started in electronic music? My dad bought me a Kraftwerk cassette when I was a kid. I

always loved the bleepy electronic sounds in music. I started djing when I was eighteen but didn’t actually start writing until about five years ago. I was into techno and house back then so I was writing all kinds of weird stuff. I didn’t actually gel with writing tunes until I discovered breaks. You were nominated for Breakthrough Producer in the 2006 Breakspoll – how did that turn out? And in what ways has this recognition affected the way you work? Yeah it was great to be nominated for Breakthrough Producer simply off the strength of my first single! To think I was runner up, and up against some amazing producers after people had only heard two of my songs, is really something very special. After that I did feel some pressure to live up to that every time I went into the studio, which stressed me out a little bit but once I realised that I wrote better when relaxed I just put it out of my mind. Winning best single for that first release was also nice. He he. In your press kit it says that you have been “bringing fresh and exciting elements to the genre” – what do you think they’re talking about here? It’s got to do with my history with electro, house and techno. I incorporate a lot of what I learnt when writing those styles into my breaks which I guess is part of my sound. A lot of DJs talk about where they think electronic music is going, but what about DJ equipment? What do you think will be the next technical innovations here? Interesting question. I think for the time being more and more people will continue to move to CDs, and vinyl sales will keep dropping off. More laptops will be used in clubs. In Sydney it’s already commonplace to see someone playing a set with Ableton Live on a laptop and a MIDI controller. I think the MIDI controllers will be become more and more integrated with that kind of software. Allen & Heath have already incorporated MIDI into their DJ mixers, which is a step in the right direction. Not too sure what will come next. I’m happy to wait and see. What’s next for you? Just keeping my head down in the studio as usual. Loads of releases coming up on Title Fight, Menu Music, Sound Of Habib, Spinout, Unstable, Rex House and maybe something else on TCR….. Gigs coming up at Halo in Hobart, Ambar in Perth and another UK tour in November. I’m also supporting Meat Katie in September on my birthday which is going to be very messy! Dopamine plays Hobart’s Halo on the 29th of July.

PAGE 13


Talking Travel Tips and Manhole Covers With

The Stanton Warriors

And getting pissed… And getting pissed, yeah. I do that anyway when I work. (Laughs) And what have you got planned for the rest of today? I suppose more computer games and laying around? A few more interviews? Lunch date…dinner date…I dunno! (laughs) Just do nothing! You’re popular; lunch and dinner dates… Yeah, why not? (Laughs) The more the merrier, you reckon? Yeah. I think it’s good for the soul to get out of the studio. I’ve been in the studio for too long – too many years. We actually have almost a second album finished now. We’re actually producing far too quickly, so we’re just taking a break, because otherwise we’re going to have far too much material to put out. So the “Stanton Sessions CD 2”…you’re not talking about that, are you? (Laughs) I’m talking about another one! Another one? Yeah. We’ve just got so much material. It’s quite ridiculous. We’ve actually got another one on top of another one. We’ve almost got another album finished of tracks. We’ve just got stupid amounts of new material.

W ve been working every day and night for the We’ve e last god-k ughs) god-knows-how-long. I hate him, but it works. (Laughs)

Given the body of work amassed by breaks outfit The Stanton Warriors in recent times – not to mention clocking up 250,000 air miles of touring – a week-long binge of doing absolutely nothing seems more than appropriate. Such was the level of this relaxation, in fact, that we had to call Briston-born DJ Dominic B three times before we managed to wake him up. We like this guy already… Hi. Is that Dominic? Hi, how you doing? Sorry, I’m a bit hung-over – I just

A n a r c h y

i n

lost my phone! You lost your phone? No, I was just hung-over – my phone was ringing, but I thought I was dreaming. But it’s okay – I’m awake now. (Laughs) Was it business or pleasure that led to your hangover? Always pleasure! Did it start off as a working night and progress into something else? No – it’s been a lazy week. I’m just kind of doing nothing, instead of being in the studio and being all chaotic. I’ve taken a week off from DJing for the first time ever, and have just been kicking back; eating food, smoking weed and playing computer games. Being a student for a week, before I get back into hardcore DJing and studio work.

t h e

U K

meat katie His DJ name comes from a porn flick. His new album is called “Vibrator”. You’d be forgiven for thinking that interviewing UK DJ Meat Katie would be a fairly simple, shallow affair. You’d also be wrong. As Dave Williams found out when he spoke with him, even making a living off a job you love can still have its pains. He’s heading to our shores in September on the back of his new release, but, as you’ll read, there’s one thing he wishes he had more time for.

single day. I love it. And I love working with people; when I work with other artists, collaborating. They’re normally friends, so we have a good time; it’s very sociable. So yeah – it’s a lot of fun. I was listening to an interview about bands who produce albums over many, many years. It can’t be fun, going on for that long… I don’t think so. But then, it’s a different style of music. I’m just capturing what I’ve been doing in the last year. I’m a DJ/producer; I didn’t want to pretend to be anything other. That’s why you’ve got twelve drum-n-bass tracks on an album, as opposed to some down-tempo tracks, some mid-tempo, maybe a drum-n-bass track…loads

Yo only live for X-amount of time – You what’s the point in being miserable? w of different things. How long was the whole process of putting this “Vibrator” CD together? Ah…maybe eight months. That’s pretty quick, really… Yeah. Well the thing is, when I’m working on one single thing… I’m not very good…I can’t concentrate on lots of different things, so on this particular album, every track – that was all I did. I’d go in on Monday, and I wouldn’t work on anything else until I’d finished that track. It works out a lot quicker as a process, to be honest. I’ve always worked with loads of different ideas floating around, but with this particular album it came together a lot quicker, because I was a lot more focused on doing it. That’s all I worked on. Would you describe it as a fun experience? Yeah! Definitely – I love writing music. I’m still really…I get excited going into the studio every

PAGE 14

I stood by what I’m trying to create. I’m envious of you, in loving going to work and being able to do something which you feel really honest about. Yeah. It’s great. That’s what I’ve always been trying to achieve, is to actually enjoy what I’m doing. You only live for X-amount of time – what’s the point in being miserable? (Laughs) If these are the benefits that have come from the hard work that you’ve done, what have been some of the more unpleasant parts of it that you’ve had to put up with in order to get the gold at the end? You know, one I do suffer with is that sometimes I wish I was home more, because I want to spend time with my kids. And because of the nature of the job, there’s a lot of travelling; there’s a huge amount of travelling. And that’s the one thing that I beat myself up about. I need to put a bit of personal time aside for my

Do you guys work separately, in separate studios, and then bring the stuff to each other? How does it go? Nah, we have one studio to work together. But we’ve just been working so heavily in the past few years; making so many tracks and stuff… We work together; we’re quite sick of each other now. We’ve been working every day and night for the last god-knows-how-long. I hate him, but it works. (Laughs) Now the name, “Stanton Warriors”; it reminds me of that seventies movie “The Warriors”. That’s just what it reminds me of. What’s the history behind it? Well people either think it’s [named] after New York gangs, or they think it’s the Stanton Needles…but it’s actually none of those things. It’s actually named after manhole covers in England. When you’re walking around, the manhole covers in the street, which is the entrance to the underground, say “Stanton Warriors Pty”. The name came about by Mark tripping over one, and then that same day we had a track someone wanted to sign; they wanted to

children. Although I’m not home during the week, every night I put them to bed, and I get up with them in the morning…The only problem is, on the weekends – when a lot of fathers get to spend a lot of time hanging out with their children – I’m working. That’s the only thing that I wish I could change. It must be tough on relationships too; with your partner… Yeah. You know, it’s hard full-stop. It’s the time thing; not having enough time. But when I do take time off, we tend to go away or do something, and it’s so nice having a few weeks dedicated quality time with the family – it’s wicked. Does your partner work as well? Well we’re having another baby at the moment! So she’s heavily pregnant with our third child! We love children! (laughs) You’ve got girls or boys? Two girls. I don’t know what the third one’s going to be yet. I reckon it’s going to be a girl… I think so. But you know what? As long as the child’s happy and healthy, I don’t care… Yeah; it’s lovely, being a father. I don’t know if you suffer from that [family withdrawal] Yeah, a lot. The whole thing…I wish I had a bit more time, you know? As a last thing, could you complete this sentence for me? “When not making or playing music, you can often find me…” In my garden, doing the barbeque! (Laughs) Actually, you’re touring in September – have you heard anything about a Tassie date yet? I’m going to be playing at Halo again. Come up! If you can; give me a shout. We’ll have a drink. By Dave Williams

sign it on the spot. They wanted a name there and then. We said “Stanton Warriors” for a joke, basically, and that became the name. It was a last minute thing. So have you got any plans for touring with this CD? Yep. I’ve just done my far eastern dates in America, Canada, the whole of Europe, Russia, Israel and everywhere like that. I come to Australia for the Parklife Festival in October. Both of you? I’m not sure at the moment. I think Mark might have to take some time off from DJing to sort of recuperate from doing so much touring. We’ve toured so much; we’ve toured more than any other breaks DJ. I think our sound stretches a bit more than just breaks; it kind of works in festivals and stuff. Do you have a travelling tip? Have you got a little trick that you have, for travelling on the plane so that you get a bit more comfort? Yeah. Always take hand luggage. Always flirt with the lady at the check-in so that you can get an upgrade. And always get late flights after gigs, because you know you’re going to be hung-over and tired. They’re my three survival tips for the international DJ. Thanks very much for talking with me…this morning for you, tonight for me, Dominic. No worries. Pleasure. I hope when you come to Australia, you guys will consider coming down to Tassie, because we’ve got a pretty good breaks scene down here. I love it down there in Tasmania! When did you come down here last? Well on my last tour, unfortunately I didn’t do it. But on the tour before that, I played in Tasmania… On a Wednesday night, me and Mark played, and no lying, we played like a ten-hour set or something ridiculous. We started playing, and kept on playing and playing. The DJs that were playing after us just gave up and went home. We just played and played until like seven or eight in the morning…and we’d started about nine. It was the most ridiculously long set I’ve ever played in my life was in Tasmania! And that was just because the crowd wouldn’t leave you alone? Yeah! The crowd stayed there! It was mid-week as well! For that fact alone I love Tasmania.

By Dave Williams


Get Down with The Booty Man ... (Hobart)

Dave Webber There really isn’t much more a person can ask for than to get paid for doing something that they love. I do, and so does Hobart’s Dave Webber. I’m a music journalist. He’s a house/breaks DJ whose played pretty much everywhere in Tassie. So really, why wouldn’t we be interviewing him? What have you been up to today? Just been enjoying my uni holidays; had a bit of a mix this morning, and caught up with a friend from Brisbane who’s down here at the moment Musically, what have you been up to in the last month? Well I bought a heap of records up in Sydney, and I’ve been trying to start a funk and down-tempo collection, this has meant heaps of searching on the net for the sort of tunes I’m after. So far I only have about twenty funk records so I’m trying to build that collection up. I’ve been playing Wednesdays, Fridays, some Saturdays and Sundays too, so that keeps me busy.

What style of music do you play mostly? I guess I would play more house music than anything else. I’m mainly playing house and break beat. I keep changing my preference for which I like better, house or break beat, and at the moment I would say my favourite is house, as there seems to be better house tunes being released at the moment. My music collection is getting more and more diverse, ranging across different genres, but the bulk of it is still made up of house and breaks. What’s the best thing about being a DJ? Well at the moment I’m being paid to do what I love doing, so I can’t complain with that! The last job I had was in retail so I’m glad to have swapped that for DJing. Almost all of the money that I earn goes straight back into buying new tunes and equipment though… What’s the worst? For some unknown reason I’m trying to keep really fit, so I try to get into the gym and on the bike a bit. This can prove to be really hard sometimes with all the late nights you have DJing. Sometimes you can fall into a different time zone to the people around who have the 9-5 jobs; it just takes a little bit of getting used to. Where in the world would you most like to play?

Fabric in London would be my choice of club, but I really love the whole outdoor summertime vibe, so playing somewhere sunny and exotic like the coast of Spain would be awesome. Describe your ultimate gig. Hmm…My ultimate gig would be at a big outdoor festival, playing in the hot afternoon sun to a huge crowd, with the likes of Mark Farina, Miguel Migs and Ian Pooley. There’s something I love about funky house tunes in the afternoon sun; a feeling I just can’t capture playing indoors in clubs. How did you get and where was your first gig? Well I first started playing at the Metz on a Friday or Saturday night I think…But I guess my first real

Tass Tassie clubs should have more ore appreciation from crowds! gig would have been at Halo, playing in the bar supporting a UK breaks DJ (I can’t remember who). The first gig I really earned was at Syrup, after I sent a demo CD in. Tassie clubs should have more…? Tassie clubs should have more appreciation from crowds! We are seeing more international artists here in Tassie then ever before, and it really sucks when a DJ is here from overseas and they play to a half-filled room. I would love to see more people really make an effort and get behind the local music scene. We really have some awesome home grown talent here in Tassie, and I’d love to see more people voting with their feet and coming along to more local events. And less? Less restrictions from the various groups such as the licensing commission, who really are causing a lot of grief for everyone at the moment! Where do you want to take your DJ career and how

[LOVE] TAttOO

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will you get it there? I don’t really have a master plan at the moment and I’m happy to take it as it comes. If someone had told me that I would be a DJ about three years ago I

would probably have laughed at them. DJing really has become my passion now; I’m only 22 so I have a bit of time up my sleeve to see what happens. How much production have you done? As yet I haven’t done any of my own production, though it has always been an interest I’d like to pursue. What’s next for you? Well I actually got a new computer today, so I’m going to try and get a bit of a home studio thing happening, and give production a crack. I’ve got this book full of little notes and ideas for my own songs, and I’ve been waiting to get started, so we’ll see what happens over summer. You can often find Dave on the decks at Syrup’s “Late Night Booty Call”, on Wednesday nights.

By Tom Wilson

With.........../..Scientists of Modern Music (Live), ........../......SMC, Modal & Will.co....../............... ................../..............Live VJ’ing by 313RGB.../.. .../........Intelligent lighting array........./................ Uni Bar../...Friday 21st July 10.00pm–late...../... .../.Free entry to TUU members* / $10 general ./. *Not a m e mb e r o f th e T U U ? . . . . . . . . . . . Sign up for free online at www.tuu.com.au (Only students of University of Tasmania Hobart Campuses are eligible for TUU membership)

PAGE 15


GIG GUIDE BROUGHT TO YOU BY MISSING LINK ENTERTAINMENT

GIG Guide 05/07/06 - 01/08/06 WEDNESDAY 5TH

FRIDAY 7TH

1 HOBART

1 BURNIE

This month Missing Link Entertainment presents…. The Green Day Show, a Green Day tribute act from Sydney and Paul Green from NSW Details below…

ENTERTAINMENT

For more info and band bookings for any occasion call Missing Link Entertainment, Booking Agents, Promoters, Artist Management. 6234 7755, 237-245 Elizabeth St, Hobart.

The Vic

WEDNESDAY 12TH

Burn-Styne

Stage Door the Café

Couta Blues

Neil Gibson, folk’n blues artist, 7.00pm., $5 cover

Republic Bar & Café

charge.

Josh Rawri

1 HOBART

9pm

King’s Bar

Upstairs – Late Night

Gone Fishing

Booty Call With Dave Webber,

Couta Blues

O’Farrell, 7.00pm., $5 cover charge.

WellHungMonkey ($4) Republic Bar & Café Black Coffee

Coyote Serenade

“JOHN CRAIG” 10pm

Republic Bar & Café Love Outside Andromeda

Trout

supp. The Inches

Montezuma, Visitoradio,

$12/10conc.

Lakoda ($3)

10pm

1 LAUNCESTON

Upstairs – Break Even with Adam, Mez and

Mark Stinson & Dj Earl

guests Downstairs – BOOGIE

1 BURNIE

with Nick and Duncan

from the venue. Wolf

Upstairs – Late Night

Mail in FB, free entry.

Booty Call

Stage Door the Café Trout

SpinFX and guests

James Bar

Lark Distillery

Dave Graney & Clare

Couta Blues

Good Company

Moore $17 cover 10pm

1 HOBART Upstairs - Dirty F*cking

Coyote Serenade

Dancing with Adam T

Syrup

and Gillie and guests on

Upstairs – Late Night

Luke Parry

The Vic

Reality

“JOHN CRAIG”

Republic Bar & Café

rotation; DSKO, Modal,

Booty Call

Dj Mac D

10pm

Sugartrain

Corney

With Dave Webber,

10pm

Dj Nikko Trout SUNDAY 9TH

BrandNewSecondHand

Syrup

DJ night

Upstairs – La Casa, Matt

1 BURNIE 1 LAUNCESTON Shindig No.7, Mark

Batman Fawkner Inn

Downie & Friends,

Mark Stinson & Dj Earl

5.00pm, $5 cover charge.

Trout

Downstairs – BOOGIE

Metal Night ($4)

(Hobart)

Exit Wounds (Melb) ($6)

Sundy Side Up

James Hotel

1 LAUNCESTON

8:30pm

Cheap ass Wednesday Johnny Stitch

Batman Fawkner Inn

Dj Mac D

Mark Stinson & Dj Earl

Dj Earl

Dj Nikko

1 LAUNCESTON

flugelhorn, 8.00pm, $5

Batman Fawkner Inn

Fusion

cover charge.

Dj Earl

Presents

Stage Door the Café

Fire, Catfight Sex Toy,

Love Outside Andromeda

Viktor Zappner Trio,

James Hotel

+ The Inches

featuring Steve Hill from

Doors open @ 8pm

Ben Castles

The Green Day Show

Reality Dj Mac D

1 HOBART

O’Keefe’s

SATURDAY 8TH

Tee Bee (Norway) $15 Lark Distillery Live @ Lark

The Leather Wookies,

Republic Bar & Café

Uni Bar

Sunday, Something

Merchants in Groove

Ill-Starred Captain w/

Launceston on vocals

Ruined, Palm This, Kids

8:30pm

The Embers

and percussion, 8.00pm,

In Sandbox. All Ages

$5 cover charge.

Show $6 6pm start

1 LAUNCESTON

THURSDAY 20TH

O’Keefe’s

1 BURNIE

York Town Square entrance.

DJ Tim Lark Distillery

Irish Murphy’s

Live @ Lark

Dave Graney & Clare Carl Fidler

Quiz Night

Sforzando

$2 Door Charge

8:30pm

9pm James Hotel

G.B Balding (country

$5 cover charge.

The Vic

Syrup

James Bar

blues fingerpicker)

Uni & Backpackers night,

MESH – Hobart’s oldest

Leigh Ratcliffe

8:30pm

1 DEVONPORT

“Who Killed Kenny

club night

Reality

playing live from 10pm

With SpinFX and guests

Dj Mac D

The Vic

Dj Nikko

Uni & Backpackers night,

Republic Bar & Café

1 LAUNCESTON

The Vic

“Who Killed Kenny

Kisschasy supp. Trial

playing live from 10pm

Kennerdy & Hanna $15

Stage Door the Café Up Close & Personal with

Spurs/Warehouse The Unit

MESH – Hobart’s oldest club night

1 HOBART

With SpinFX and guests

James Hotel

The Vic

Phil Smart (SYD)

Jeremy Matcham

$8

10pm

Jeremy Matcham

Saloon

10pm

Butterfingers

UTAS TUESDAY 11TH 1 HOBART

1 HOBART Lark Distillery Live @ Lark

pre-sale $18 door 1 LAUNCESTON

9pm

James Hotel

Syrup

1 BURNIE

Ho Club

MESH – Hobart’s oldest

Sirocco’s

TUESDAY 18TH

With SpinFX and guests

1 HOBART

The Vic

1 LAUNCESTON

club night Butterfingers

Republic Bar & Café

Batman Fawkner Inn

Simon & Atlanta

Student & Backpacker

Republic Bar & Café

9pm

Night, live music & Dj

Stage Door the Café

Earl

Gaye Clarke & the Big

Republic Bar & Café

Band Sound, 7.00pm.,

Old Shepard

$5 cover charge.

9pm

1 DEVONPORT

The Vic

Spurs/Warehouse

Warmers”

Mischief

Various acoustic duos.

Batman Fawkner Inn

8-10pm

Student & Backpacker

Love Outside Andromeda supp. The Inches

Batman Fawkner Inn

$12/10conc.

Student & Backpacker

10pm

Night, live music & Dj Syrup Upstairs - Dirty F*cking James Hotel

Dancing with Adam T

Uni Nite

and Gillie and guests on

Sgt Green

rotation; DSKO, Modal,

Dj Nikko

Corney

PAGE 16

8.00pm, $5 cover charge.

Hot Strings Bands

Wolf Mail ($5)

Earl

from Burnie on vocals,

SATURDAY 15TH

Butterfingers

Lark Distillery

1 LAUNCESTON

1 HOBART Republic Bar & Café

Ho Club

Halo

Trout

featuring Yoly Torres

Republic Bar & Café

9pm Syrup

Viktor Zappner Trio,

Republic Bar & Café

Jordan Miller band $3 cover

Stage Door the Café MONDAY 17TH

Moore

1 BURNIE

Katy Pakinga, 7.00pm, Republic Bar & Café

(Adelaide Musical Comedy Team)

1 HOBART

1 HOBART

Sour Bob, Lord Stompy

1 HOBART

MONDAY 10TH Halo

Irish Murphy’s SUNDAY 16TH

Future Chaos, Mindset, The Kill Police, Fall As

DJ Tim

Dj Nikko

CABARET OF TOXIC WASTE: Separatist, This

1 BURNIE

1 LAUNCESTON

Luke Parry Reality

James Hotel

Spurs/Warehouse

Josh Owen Band

Batman Fawkner Inn

1 LAUNCESTON THURSDAY 13TH

UTAS

James Hotel James Bar

Republic Bar & Café

Reality

Batman Fawkner Inn Dj Earl

Trout

The Friendly Ghost – Producers Night ($2)

The Vic

Glenn Moorhouse, Waiter

10pm Trout

1 LAUNCESTON Oscar

The Vic “JOHN CRAIG”

B and Gillie and guests

Irish Murphy’s

baritone/tenor sax, and

Forgetful Jones

with Nick and Duncan

Stage Door the Café

1 HOBART

SpinFX and guests The Vic

The Black Lodge ($4)

James Bar

9pm

Lark Distillery

Bad Luck Charms, Burn

1 DEVONPORT

Republic Bar & Café 4 Letter Fish

Syrup

from Deloraine on

Launceston on trumpet/

1 HOBART

Republic Bar & Café

featuring Greg Harrison

Cameron Scott from

Live @ Lark

King’s Bar

With Dave Webber,

The Vic Detour

Viktor Zappner Trio,

Syrup

Syrup

Batman Fawkner Inn

THURSDAY 6TH

Green Day Show, Tix $15

WEDNESDAY 19TH Lark Distillery

1 DEVONPORT

9pm

James Hotel Lark Distillery

The Vic

S.I.N.

$8

Lady Crimson,

1 HOBART

SpinFX and guests

Batman Fawkner Inn

DJ Ritual (SYD)

Elly Hoyt with Music

Batman Fawkner Inn Syrup

Halo

Lark Distillery

1 DEVONPORT

1 LAUNCESTON

Stage Door the Café

Hammerhead,

1 LAUNCESTON

1 HOBART

1 BURNIE

Trout Lark Distillery

FRIDAY 14TH

The Vic “Acoustic Winter

James Hotel

Warmers”

Uni Nite

Various acoustic duos.

Funkin Unbelievable

8-10pm

Dj Nikko

1 LAUNCESTON

Jeremy Matcham 10pm Trout Lord Stompy “Acoustic Winter

1 LAUNCESTON

Batman Fawkner Inn

Night, live music & Dj

S.I.N.

Earl


Irish Murphy’s

1 HOBART

TUESDAY 25TH

1 LAUNCESTON

Halo

1 HOBART

Batman Fawkner Inn

Ill Starred Captain, The Embers

Student & Backpacker

Bass Kleph (SYD) James Hotel

$8

Uni Nite

Republic Bar & Café

Night, live music & Dj

Lord Stompy & Sour

Earl

Sgt Green

Lark Distillery

Sob-Bob

Dj Nikko

Back Porch Boys

9pm

James Hotel Uni Nite

FRIDAY 21ST

Masonic Hall KISSCHASY supp. Trial

1 BURNIE

The Vic “Acoustic Winter

Kennedy

Warmers”

ALL AGES – DAYTIME GIG

Various acoustic duos.

Dj Nikko FRIDAY 28TH

8-10pm

Stage Door the Café

1 BURNIE

Tamworth’s Wayne

Republic Bar & Café

Elliott, easy listening

Josh Owen Band

country to old time

$7/5conc.

rock, 7.30pm., $5 cover

10pm

1 LAUNCESTON

Syrup

Batman Fawkner Inn

Upstairs - Dirty F*cking

S.I.N.

Stage Door the Café Neil Gibson, folk ‘n blues artist, 7.00pm, $5 cover

charge. 1 DEVONPORT

3Sum

1 DEVONPORT

Dancing with Adam T King’s Bar

and Gillie and guests on

Black Dog

rotation; DSKO, Modal,

charge.

WEDNESDAY 26TH 1 DEVONPORT

The Zip Up Casuals

The Vic

Devonport Entertainment

1 HOBART

New Age Hippies

Centre Diesel + Strings

Coyote Serenade 4 Year Bash!!!

The Roobs, The No No’s Republic Bar & Café

1 HOBART

($4)

Kisschasy supp. Trial

Lark Distillery Coyote Serenade

Trout

Queens Head Café Halo

Paul Greene 8pm

Kennerdy & Hanna $15

UTAS

Artificial Intelligence

pre-sale $18 door

Josh Owen Band

$10

10pm

Republic Bar & Café 1 LAUNCESTON

Syrup

Lark Distillery

The Exploders +

Couta Blues

Sounds Like Chicken $12/10conc.

Upstairs – La Casa with

Batman Fawkner Inn

Matt B, Adam and guests

Ill Starred Captain &

Republic Bar & Café

Downstairs – BOOGIE

Halfmast

Rowan Smith

with Nick and Duncan

10pm

CD Launch – “Watch

Syrup

James Hotel

Scratched Faceless”

Upstairs – Pickle – PEE

The Vic

Reality

9pm

WEE FERRIS with DSKO,

Detour

Dj Mac D Dj Nikko

Trout Red Rival, Midnight

SUNDAY 23RD

Corney Syrup

Downstairs – BOOGIE

Upstairs – Late Night

with Nick and Duncan

Booty Call With Dave Webber,

Caller ($4) 1 HOBART

SpinFX and guests

Oscar

Ill-Starred Captain w/

Lewisham Tavern

The Vic

Trout

Mark Vincent

Ill-Starred Captain w/

“JOHN CRAIG”

Bad Luck Charms (EP

LOVE TATTOO supp.

Mark Vincent

10pm

Launch), Ragged Anns

Scientists of Modern

Josh Owen Band

Music, SMC, Modal &

1 HOBART Halo Dopamine (SYD) $8 Lark Distillery Live @ Lark Republic Bar & Café The Drones, The reactions, Hana $10/8conc. 10pm Syrup Upstairs - Dirty F*cking Dancing with Adam T and Gillie and guests on rotation; DSKO, Modal, Corney The Vic Detour Trout Jacks Agenda ($4) 1 LAUNCESTON Batman Fawkner Inn The Exploders with Dirty Harry & The Rockets James Hotel James Bar Luke Parry Reality Tasmusic Showcase This Future…Chaos PMXI Turbo Mindset Dj Mac D Dj Nikko Theatre Royal Diesel + Strings SUNDAY 30TH 1 HOBART Foreshore Tavern Paul Greene 8pm

The Vic

UTAS

Republic Bar & Café Sundy Side Up 8:30pm 1 LAUNCESTON

($4)

O’Keefe’s DJ Tim

Metal Night

1 LAUNCESTON

MONDAY 31ST

Batman Fawkner Inn

Trout

Will.co

Republic Bar & Café

10pm-late $10 non-TUU

Cake Walking Babies

members

8:30pm

1 LAUNCESTON

1 LAUNCESTON

1 LAUNCESTON

Batman Fawkner Inn

Dj Earl Miss Nude Tasmania. 1st

James Hotel

Batman Fawkner Inn

James Hotel

prize $20,000. Tix @ the

James Bar

Dj Earl

Reality

door.

Leigh Ratcliffe Reality

Fusion James Hotel

Presents

Irish Murphy’s

Dj Mac D

James Bar

Kisschasy + The Dead

Nathan Weldon, Ray

Dj Nikko

Luke Parry

Abigails + Trial Kennedy

Crimmin

Dj Mac D

O’Keefe’s

Uni Bar

Dj Nikko

DJ Tim

Josh Owen Band

Reality

O’Keefe’s Word Play Princess Theatre

SATURDAY 22ND

MONDAY 24TH

THURSDAY 27TH

Diesel + Strings

1 BURNIE

1 HOBART

1 HOBART

1 SWANSEA

Sirocco’s

Republic Bar & Café

Lark Distillery

Bark Mill Tavern

KISSCHASY supp. Trial

Joe Piere

Live @ Lark

Paul Greene

Kennedy

8:30pm

8pm

1 HOBART Republic Bar & Café Quiz Night 8:15pm The Vic Uni & Backpackers night, “Who Killed Kenny playing live from 10pm 1 LAUNCESTON James Hotel HO Club AUGUST TUESDAY 1ST 1 HOBART Irish Murphy’s Elephant Mojo (acoustic show)

Republic Bar & Café Triosk $5/3conc

Stage Door the Café

SATURDAY 29TH

9pm

Hot Strings, Burnie-

The Vic

based contemporary

Uni & Backpackers night,

singer-guitarist, 7.00pm.,

“Who Killed Kenny

Syrup

$5 cover charge.

playing live from 10pm

MESH – Hobart’s oldest

Sirocco’s

club night

Ministry of Sound

1 BURNIE

1 DEVONPORT

1 LAUNCESTON

With SpinFX and guests

Sessions 3 – DJ Goodwill

Spurs/Warehouse

James Hotel

The Vic

Stage Door the Café

Donut

HO Club

Jeremy Matcham

Gaye Clarke & the Big

10pm

Band Sound, 7.00pm., $5 cover charge.

Venue Guide

Spurs/Warehouse Voodoo Lounge

King’s Bar

Corney 1 HOBART Lark Distillery

1 DEVONPORT

The Vic “Acoustic Winter Warmers” Various acoustic duos. 8-10pm

Burnie Sirocco's Bar & Nightc lub 69 Mount St Bur nie 6431 3133 Sta ge Door The Cafe 254 Mount St Upper Bur nie 64322600

Devonport

Spurs/Warehouse 18 Kings St Devonpor t 6424 7851

Kings Bar & Nitec lub 25 King St Devonpor t 6423 3488

Hobart

Halo 37a Elizabeth St Mall Hobar t 6234 6669 Republic Bar 299 Elizabeth St Nor th Hobar t 6234 6954 www.republicbar.com Soak @ Kaos 237 Elizabeth St Hobar t 6231 5699 Syrup 1st Floor 39 Salamanca Place Hobar t 6224 8249 syrupclub@bigpond.com The Lark Distillery 14 Davey Street Hobart 03 6231 9088 www.larkdistillery.com.au The Victoria Tavern (The Vic) 30 Murray St Hobart 6223 3424 Trout 381 Elizabeth St North Hobart 03 6236 9777 Uni Bar - Hobar t Campus 1 Churchill Ave Sandy Bay 03 6226 2495 www.tuu.com.au

Launceston Irish Murphy’s 211 Brisbane St Launceston 6331 4440 James Hotel Reality Nitec lub James Bar 122 York St Launceston 6334 7231 www.jameshotel.com.au info@jameshotel.com.au

O’Keefes 124 George St Launceston 6331 4015 Saloon Bar 191 Charles Street Launceston www.saloon.com.au hotel@saloon.com.au 63 317 355 The Batty The Batman Fawkner Inn 35 Cameron St Launceston 6331 7222

1 LAUNCESTON Batman Fawkner Inn S.I.N.

To list your gig in the Gig Guide, email details to gigguide@sauceonline.net PAGE 17


Butterfly Kiss

Coachella

Hayseed Dixie

Scummy Man

Eunice (Amanda Plummer) paces up and down the highways of cold, grey England, searching for “Judith”, a former lover. She soon meets Miriam (Saskia Reeves), a shy service station attendant whose mundane life revolves around TV and caring for her mother. Inexplicably drawn to the wild (and murderous) Eunice, Miriam takes off with her on a road trip; one that leads to desperation, self-pity and death. Hooray.I worry about directors like Michael Winterbottom, who seem bent on not just earning the “controversial” banner but hoisting it up and waving it around so people will take notice. Wow, you’re “controversial”; good for you! In “Butterfly Kiss”, he has created a world of grey skies and misery (the latter being self-imposed most of the time). Quite frankly, it was a world I was very keen to get out of.

Set amongst the green fields and sunlit palms of the Coachella Valley, this is a music festival that was just dying to be filmed; begging for the camera in the same way as the “Woodstock” documentary so many years earlier.

When I got handed this for review, I’m sure the look on my face was priceless.

As someone who’s never travelled there myself, I can’t be sure.

Hayseed Dixie are four good old boys from the American Midwest. The fact that the DVD has a confederate flag on the cover should illustrate that quite clearly. Weirdly enough, though, it’s actually very enjoyable.

But if the depictions of its native filmmakers are anything to go by, Britain seems like a very depressing place.

This is not a film without its interesting points. Eunice is tormented by frustration; no matter how heinous a crime she commits, the judgement and punishment she longs for never comes, not even from God. Through this, her masochistic tendencies are explained (no one will punish her, so she punishes herself, most notably in the hideous chains she wears under her clothes). But it’s never enough to inspire sympathy. The only decent people in this film are the ones Eunice and Miriam kill off. This is where “Butterfly Kiss” plummets into needless decay – after all the violence, the only ones left standing are the two you hate the most. It’s sad; when misery swallows them in the final scenes, I didn’t feel sorry for them; I felt that they fucking deserved it. “Butterfly Kiss” deals with the punishment some people inflict on themselves. But sadly, it feels like a form of punishment to be inflicted on the only people who are in a position to appreciate the film; the audience. I really didn’t need it, and I don’t think you do either. 2/10

By Tom Wilson

Jimmy McMacken’s

SK8 Wrap-up

A rich, vibrant cultural and artistic tapestry, the Coachella Festival is what Falls would be like if we had about six times the population. More people means more diversity, and that’s what’s on display here. There are many memorable moments. Bright Eyes reducing a fan in the front row to tears. The Flaming Lips frontman crowd-surfing inside a giant hampster ball. Rock legends The Pixies asking “Where is My Mind?” to an epic crowd roar. Iggy Pop being, well, Iggy Pop (“I wanna fuck something up! Can I fuck yooouuu up?”). Occasionally the filmmakers will cut away from an artist mid-song, which can be annoying if you were enjoying the performance. But then, this isn’t a live DVD, it’s a documentary, and it’s a bloody good one. Encompassing the entire lifespan of the festival from 1999 up to last year, it is both a showcase both of the artists who have performed there – from Bjork to RHCP, Squarepusher to The Mars Volta – and a candid mosaic of the people who go.

Featuring a second disc full of photos captured by many, many photographers who have shot it over the years, “Coachella” is a fine depiction of what is clearly a fine festival.

In all honesty, I thought this would suck monumentally, so the fact that it has some high points makes it worth the time. Whether it’s worth paying money for, however, is a different matter entirely.

10/10

By Tom Wilson

finished, and quite a few crew have gone and checked it out. Reports are mixed on this one, with some saying its a bit of fun and others claiming its not worth the mission. Apparently the upgrade features a couple of ledges that some like and others don’t, and a strange quaterpipe that sounds a bit tricky.

Sean Holland’s new magazine, “Skateboard Journal” hits newsstands this month and the hype is huge for what some industry insiders are calling “the best skate mag ever.” Whoa. Last month saw Melbourne and Sydney hold games of skate, with the overall winner being flown to America for the “ES International Game of Skate”. Of course, Tassie was not included in this, but that didn’t stop the boys in Hobart doing there own thing. Local skater/cameraman Lewis Carney organised a game of skate at E.C skate park.

PAGE 18

Hearing “Whole Lotta Rosie” strummed out on a banjo – solo and all – is almost worth the sale price alone. An almost sacrilegiously bad cover of Motorhead’s “Ace Of Spades” is not. As I said, it’s patchy.

After the brutal tarnishing of Woodstock’s reputation – the ‘99 event marred by rape, violence and arson – it’s refreshing to see that America hasn’t lost its festival spirit, especially in the times post 9/11.

I quote, “jump trains and eat out of garbage bins”, end quote. What the fuck, Chris? On other travel news, Ben Newman – who is in New Zealand snowboarding – has broken his wrist while on his skatey.

I reported a couple of issues back that Dodger’s Ferry skate park was receiving an upgrade. This is

I must say, I’ve never found myself wondering “what would “Fat Bottomed Girls” sound like played at a ho-down?” But then, I do like surprises. The concert – filmed in Liverpool – is a patchy collection of rock numbers and traditional folk songs. Some of them work. Some of them don’t.

The band’s musicianship actually raises this above mere novelty, however. While the “Dixie-isations” (their term) fall flat as much as they succeed, it has to be said that these guys can play like demons – no better illustrated than their rendition of “Duelling Banjos” from the film “Deliverance”.

Chris Burrows has left the state for a while and is spending some time in the good ol’ US of A. Apparently he has already made himself at home and has met up with some cool crew who,

T’was another big month in skate in Tas, considering it is the middle of winter; for some good, and for others not so good. It is with great sadness that I report that Tassie’s original skate shop, 3twenty6 in Devonport, has closed its doors for good and from all reports apparently Ozone in Hobart is also closing down. This is indeed sad news for the Tassie skate scene as these two Tasmanian-owned and operated shops have been supporting Tassie skating for a long time. I guess at the end of the day, we – the Tassie skaters – didn’t support them. Let this be a lesson to us to support Tassie skateboarding.

Why? Because this overall-wearing, tobacco-chewing gang like to play what could only be described as “hillbilly versions” of classic rock songs, covering everything from AC/DC to Led Zeppelin on banjos and acoustic guitar, sans percussion.

4/10

By Tom Wilson

For those of you that don’t know, a game of skate is basically DONKEY (the basketball shootout game) on a skateboard. There was a huge turnout, and the competition was fierce. In the end it was the local park rats that came out on top, showing that all their hours at the park have paid off.

Think of Danny Boyle’s “Trainspotting”, or Michael Winterbottom’s “Butterfly Kiss”. Granted, both films dealt with characters in near-poverty (as does this one), but certain elements of the country – first and foremost, its weather – sure make a gloomy canvas for English filmmakers to work with. Comprised of two short films inspired by an Artic Monkeys song, both works are cleverly – if slightly Tarrantino-ish – flip-sides of the same series of events. One means very little without the other. While this may seem sound, almost novel in practice, the notion of making “dependent” works – relying on the presence of its companion piece – seems, to me, gimmicky. But then, that charge could be laid on this release as a whole. I don’t know what the retail price of this will be, but I wonder; will anyone who isn’t an Artic Monkeys completist even want to buy this? And is there even such thing as an Artic Monkeys completist given the relative youth of the band’s existence? I didn’t pay for this, and I’m not an Artic Monkeys fan, so I can’t really say. Nifty collector’s item, though. 3/10

By Tom Wilson

The stand-out would have to have been Cameron McRae with a 360-flip over the rail and a nollie heal flip back lip on the rail. (What the fuck?)

Claremont skatepark finaly got its skateday last month. The team from Jimmys turned up and skated the park and gave out a bunch of Christian Karafylis (more affectionately known as goodies. The usual suspaects ripped this park Wogga) came in 3rd and scored a globe hat and some apart. Kieran McKenzie and Anthony “strawbs” Ipath goodies for his troubles. Jade Dale was 2nd (Krooked T-shirt) and the dark Broadberry showed there aireal skills and horse of the day, the amazingly consistent Beu (so amazed the young crowd. Shout outs to Renate smooth he only has one name) took out the glory and Hughes and the Glenorchy city council for the 1st prize of a pair of Globe shoes. putting on this event. The day didn’t end there. Excitement was in the air, Devonport skate photographer “Peewee” is slowly so a bit of an impromptu best trick comp on the rail making a name for himself across the country as took place. one of Australias up and coming talents so keep an eye out for him. Some of these young guys are so fucking good these days that the standard of tricks going down was That’s it for skating this month, so take care and amazing. keep shreddin.


67 Special - Republic

Bar 09/06/2006

By Tina Anderson

The Go Set - Batman

Fawkner 20/05/06

By Ryan Cooke

The Hard-Ons! - James

APOLOGY

Hotel 17/06/06

By Tom Wilson

Sauce wishes to apologise to Syrup, and its patrons, for any offence taken from views expressed in last month’s edition.

67 Special rocked the Republic Bar in Hobart on Friday night. It was well worth the three-and-a-half hour drive after work to see them. Their support band, Hobart’s Burn The Black Lodge, sounded a bit like Placebo crossed with a manic punk influence, with a lot of screaming. They were alright for the first few songs, but too much screaming for my liking, and I lost interest when I saw all the guys from 67 Special standing off to the side of the stage watching them. Soon as 67 Special came on everyone fled to the dance floor – something I wasn’t really used to as it was my first pub gig in Hobart – coming from the North West Coast, everyone is scared of getting up close and personal. Hobart Rocks! They kicked off with “Hey There Bagdad!”, originally known as “Hey There Bomb”, but Ben changed around the titles of the songs on their set list; there were a few funny ones on there, like instead of “Walking Away” he’s got “Pork Tin In May” and for “Boys & Girls” he’s got “Boys & Biartches”.The Spesh performed a few new songs too like; “Killer Fleas”, “Patch Me Up” and “So Help Us All”. “Killer Fleas” rocked! Plus the old goodies like “Cotton Sheets” and “Radio Kill”. They missed out “Curious Mind” though, I was hoping they’d play it but they never did. Some girls kept yelling out “Play some Slayer!”. Ash goes, “Sayer? You want Leo Sayer?” Just joking around – that was quite funny, but then they got annoying because they kept yelling it out. There were a few technical difficulties through the show with Gavin’s guitar and also their keyboard, but apart from that, they sounded awesome and their performance was so energetic. It was a great show!

Borne - Irish Murphys 28/06/2006 By Tom Wilson

The 20th May 2006 will go down as a sad day for me; that morning I had to have my sixteen-year-old dog put down after she was hit by a car a few days earlier, so I wasn’t in the best of moods when I went to catch the second show of the day by these guys. First up were local all-female group The Lasses. I was really surprised how the crowd reacted to these girls doing Irish-themed music (I assume that’s what it is called?). After thir ty minutes the girls had had enough and it was time for Launnie’s drunkest punkers The Belchers, who of late have lost the fun edge they use to have, which is disappointing at times. But tonight they were on fire. Maybe it was just the alcohol they had consumed by the time they arrived on stage. At one point Dan, their drummer threw up on himself… Fun times all around! Halfmast were up next. This was the first time I had witnessed the band with long time fan/new bass player Hag. They were good as never, but still lacked that something extra that they had with their previous bass player (not you Cameron, the other guy). Ballpoint are always great, no matter where you see them but big stages aren’t really the best setting to see them in… It’s more an up close and personal thing with them. All the big tracks were played including “Steve Irwin”, which rarely gets heard these days, which sucks. Late but cer tainly not least, The Go Set graced the stage, and from star t to finish blew away the audience. Their set went for at least two hours and the crowd loved every second; some kids getting into some traditional Irish dancing which is always a little silly-looking. My shit day was made a little better – a good time had by all.

Tim Freedman - The

Republic 03/06/06

By Ian Murtagh

Opening the night was Hobar t’s The Reactions. As I’ve said before, straight rock doesn’t really thrill me. But these boys managed to raise my eyebrows more than once with some psychedelic numbers (their newer material, I believe) which put them in the same neighbourhood as Led Zeppelin and “Scabdates”-era Mars Volta. I look forward to seeing them again. Now, I’d heard their name bandied around the music world as I was growing up, but until that night I’d never actually seen or heard The Hard-Ons before. From the moment they slung on their guitars – well below the crotch, mind you – and burst into their first number, I was literally a rabbit in headlights. The Hard-Ons’ live show was absolutely relentless; rock-metal played as hard and fast as the genre would allow (thir ty seconds into their set, though, it was clear to me that “genre” isn’t something these guys give a toss about). From radio-friendly melodic choruses to double-kick blast beats that would give Slayer’s Dave Lombardo a hard-on (pun intended), I wasn’t “impressed” so much as “brutally schooled”. Bands of this calibre need no introduction, and so they didn’t waste any time; speaking nary a word, pausing only to thank us for coming and share a few far t jokes. The energ y in the room was palpably intense. Bass guitars were played behind heads. Guitars were shoved between legs. Shir ts came off. Sweat flew. The tightness of twenty years’ experience melded with the chaos of a paranoid schitzophrenic on an acid bender. As their last song drew to a close, Blackie slammed his guitar strings-down on the edge of his amp, yanking the cable; feedback shrieking over the cheering audience. Half-deaf and thoroughly schooled, I couldn’t believe my ringing ears. So that was The Hard-Ons…hot damn…

Procedure 286 - Batman

Fawkner 19/05/06

By Ryan Cooke

At around the strike of ten o’clock, Melbourne’s Borne took to the corner stage of Irish Murphy’s for a mostly unplugged session of songs from their latest EP, as well as some mood-inducing covers. Surprisingly opening with “Sexual Healing” before moving into their own material, they soon had heads turning in their direction. I quite like the effect loud, solid drumming has on acoustic music; in Borne’s case giving some of the choruses a thick groove. While their singer bore a more-than-close resemblance to Coldplay’s Chris Mar tin, their music was distinct enough for the band to retain a strong sense of sonic identity. Supping the occasional glass of red, the guys looked very comfor table on stage, and that seemed to spread to the audience. They offered some candid introductions to their original numbers, for the most par t infused with some very wry humour. “This was apparently a hit,” they told us in the lead up to “Sleep with Your Eyes Open”, “but we haven’t seen a penny!” From the song that followed,

Considering Tim Freedman blew into town only last October, it was encouraging to see that he again packed the house. Opening with the legendary “No Aphrodisiac”, he had the crowd on side instantly. Either he’s sick of hearing it requested, simply resigned to the fact that he’ll always have to play it, or he’s just plain smar t. One of the joys of seeing Tim Freedman live is his amazing showmanship; He’s funny, he’s witty, and he’s got one hell of a voice, which was in spectacular form. Unlike last time, Tim was cour teous enough to bring along his drummer, which admittedly improved the show enormously. He only played one or two tracks from his last album “Torch The Moon”, leaving room for tracks from his four th album “Love This City” which didn’t get much of a look in last time, proving to me that he’s wor th catching every time he floats in. The crowd chucked a joyous spaz over old favourite “I Make Hamburgers”, and any fan of the mammoth release “Eter nal Nightcap” cer tainly got their fix as he played pretty much most of it.

I think they should have, if only from the exceedingly cool fish-scale sound their lead guitarist managed to wrangle out of his acoustic. Their playing seemed almost telepathically tight, and their melodies were definitely impressive. Thinking back over it, it almost aggravates me that some venues are content with one or two-piece cover bands – who, more often than not, are backed by nothing more than a drum track off a minidisc – instead of offering oppor tunities for full bands. These guys played a very warm, enter taining set, and if I can’t see more bands like them playing in Launceston, I’ll just be eagerly awaiting their next tour.

I’m shocked he managed to fit in so many songs from his new double album “Little Cloud”, as well as get the very talented suppor t act Iota up on stage for a bit of romp. Probably the only bad thing about seeing Tim at the Republic is that the crowd just won’t shut the hell up during the quieter and more intimate songs, though it was amusing watching Tim try and “shhh” the audience. Still, that’s twice I’ve missed Tim sing my favourite song “The Curse Stops Here” due to rowdy crowds. Tim’s on-mic comment that “We’re just bollocks on stage selling piss for publicans” summed the evening up quite nicely, to which one blissful fan shouted “I love you!” followed by Tim’s loving response; “I didn’t ask if you love me, shut up!” Definitely $25 wor th of fun.

Dirty South -

A Night On The Greenwood - Oak

James Hotel 1/7/06

By David Williams

01/07/06

By David Williams

Reviews are qualitative statements; opinions which include personal impressions. These impressions, being unique to the reviewer, are influenced by their personal biases, and are not meant to be treated as fact. David Williams Publisher

Tasmusic Showcase

-James Hotel

24/06/06 By Tom Wilson

Modus After a brief introduction from TasMusic trooper and Dead Abigails frontman Carl Fidler, the second TasMusic Showcase was opened by solo singer/ guitarist Meegan May. Singing almost painfully honest and hear tfelt songs with a sincere, mature voice, her talent is absolutely undeniable. Humble without being mousey, confident without being cocky or arrogant…it’s safe to say that she won me over significantly. Next up were The Humans. I joked with them afterwards that their rock sound would be ideal for the arbitrary swooping helicopter shot in a road movie, and in hindsight I still can’t think of a better way to sum up their sound. They played a tight rock show, and they sounded great.Then it was time for the headliners. Anyone who has read my ar ticles in the last month or so will know just how highly I regard this band, and how wor thy I feel they are of bigger things. My impressions have not changed an iota. “Questions” was absolutely mesmerising; I still can’t believe that a song like that, featuring one of the coolest rock riffs I’ve ever heard, came from the band who’s lead singer lives three doors down from me. It was a family affair for Ahmed, whose uncle graced the stage wearing a stone-washed denim jacket decorated with some truly impressive Modus ar twork done entirely in blue biro. The band put out a hell of a lot of energ y; guitarists going so far as to almost fall over each other during riff-duels. The verdict? TasMusic has pulled it off again. A “showcase”, it cer tainly was. And these ar tists deserve such recognition.

Tech Itch

-Halo 28/06/06 By Alex Napier

Proper hardcore tours in this state are few and far between. Melbourne’s Procedure 286 were gracing our state for the first time and were taking Tassie’s most promising punk band Stand Defiant along with them for the ride. Devonpor t’s newest band Mindset was up first. They had a huge buzz already even though they had only played their first show six days earlier at the second Cabaret. Mindset is hard, fast and so good… only problem is they need to draw the line between punk and hardcore. Bass player Ty’s punk attitude is always a highlight as is guitarist Chang’s shredding. This Future…Chaos are at the moment are probably one of the most popular bands in the state, especially in the all ages market and tonight’s performance was just another reason why. From the opening chords of “Casket Hunter” to the set closer “Born Burning” there was no let up at all. Even a few punters got in on hardcore dancing which is always good for a laugh. Procedure 286 were up next and boy they didn’t disappoint; they played a raw style of hardcore rarely seen in this state. Their vocalist was up in everyone’s faces, going off his chops. At one stage he even grabbed my hat and rubbed it on his crotch and threw it back to me. Their set was quick, tight and over far too quickly. Highlight was their Integrity cover; last but not least Stand Defiant star ted their set. From the opening track “Play with Fire” they were on top of their game. I haven’t ever seen Stand Defiant play a bad performance and I don’t think I ever will. One of the best local shows in ages; let’s hope Disconnect continue to bring down quality acts.

Melanie Gent - Batman

Fawkner 17/06/06

Halo set the scene for a Drum & Bass bonanza. Star ting the night off, Tassie’s Model T really kicked it in the guts and charged the crowd with great precision. Rolling smooth progressive drum and bass with a hit of funk sent the people to the front of the stage. Basking in nicely positioned vocals, grooved licks and hear t-stopping pace, the local really set the crowd attention for the main act Tech Itch. One thir ty, each and all arose to greet the foreigner with a smile, yet this man was on a mission. Concentrating on beat selection, not once did Tech Itch show crowd interaction. This didn’t make any difference to all that attended since it was all about the music. His hard bass rolls slammed out over the happy attendees and pumped up the volume of the event.The drum and base is one of the only styles where, when seated, head and limbs couldn’t be stationary. Move people Move! Many stated that “drum and base is not normal for Tasmania”, yet it is well received.Jumpy groves & quick-step funk, Tech Itch had us under his spell; even when his bass rolls didn’t match, it was so chunky that it didn’t matter. Although it was a Wednesday night, the crowd par ticipation was at its max. Turnout could have been better. Once again, all that went really enjoyed the evening and will be happy to see Tech Itch back again. That kid had skill, but a smile would have been nice.

The Ragged Annes - Trout

30/06/06

By Duncan Ewington

By David Williams

The room, at 1am, when Dir ty South took over the decks from PD, was about half full, but it seemed almost everyone was on the dance-floor, bumpin’ and grindin’ to, amongst others, Paddy’s original electrohouse tracks. Dir ty South didn’t star t all that dir ty. Actually it was quite soft, but in hindsight, it was just a warm-up – a settler, to build on for the main action. With Dir ty South in control, the room filled to capacity quickly. It was a sell out. Then the dir tiness began – that nasty, electro sound that I love so much, second, in my opinion, only to hard-trance. Then Dir ty South showed why he’s the “rising star” of Oz house music. Originality. Unpredictability. These were the traits on display which raised my level of enthusiasm and enjoyment higher. There was jarring, screeching noises mixed in with funky tracks. Then things got harder, Then a bit trippy. Then he built it up, stretched it out, prolonged it fur ther, building the tension (I love this bit) up to a climax. But even this was done in an unpredictable way. Instead of milking the climax, making it a “moment” in the night, Dir ty South cut the climax shor t, instead rolling it out into a deeper groove. It was just the first of many with each one a bit bigger, until the monster climax at the end. I even shook “ma booty”. Wicked vibe, wicked night. WICKED DJ!

The Fat Band With a touch of sadness, due to the origins of this event, I rocked up to the inaugural “Night on The Greenwood” fundraiser gig for the Damian Greenwood Memorial Prize, to be awarded, annually, to a musician voted Tassie’s “best up-and-coming”. I only caught Hobar t’s The Fat Band, as I had arrived late, but the Boatshed at the Royal Oak was the fullest I’d ever seen, which was a great reflection on the level of affection in the community for Damian, who recently passed away, as well as the music community’s suppor t for this new award. It was the first time I’ve ever seen The Fat band, and it was well overdue, as I was well-impressed. I had always heard great repor ts on their live performances and the hype was not undeserved. When I walked in, the funk was flowing freely, with the dance-floor packed and groovin’. Nelly (singer) was like a python, writhing to a sensual rhythm, captivating the audience with her moves and her vocal talent. Their gig was intermingled with funky, politicallycharged lyrics, which I loved. Music has the power, people, so let’s use it! Top performance and a top night. RIP Damian.

Unfor tunately, due to time constraints and other commitments, I wasn’t able to stick around for Jenny Morris, but I was lucky enough to catch the suppor t, Melanie Gent, a singer-songwriter from Hobar t. Although the room could have done with some more bodies, those who were there obviously enjoyed Melanie’s performance, ending each of her songs with strong applause. I applauded because of her beautiful voice, her innovative, jangling guitar technique and her melancholy lyrics. Simple and strong, Melanie’s songs seemed largely autobiographical, telling stories of troubled times. The set-up in The Batty was really good – the PA showcased Melanie’s talents, and a decent lighting rig and placement created a warm atmosphere on a chilly night. I par ticularly enjoyed the stage, in Voice, at the street-end of the room, with the windows as a backdrop, which reminded me of the “Live At The Cathedral” DVD. I suggest, if you see Melanie’s playing at a venue near you, go along. I think she’s special.

I was happy to find out that I was assigned a gig review at Trout, as it’s one of my favourite haunts to see contemporary original live music in Hobar t. Not so happy was the fact I was meant to be in five places at once, but I guess that’s the life of the intrepid journalist I lead...Trout was surprisingly subdued this night, which was unusual for a Friday. First up were The Ragged Annes who I hadn’t seen play for a long time. Apparently they’ve been busy concentrating on recording a lot more, so it was good to see what they’ve been up to of late. I was disappointed to see the up-front percussion had been scrapped, which I thought had been good in a different way. But it proved to be a positive change, as Madeline’s skilled voice was no longer overshadowed by excess noise, and she could now have strict focus on vocal duties. It seemed like their style has shifted since the release of their first EP, and they’ve added speed to the rock ’n’ roll equation. They’ve got a new EP in the works, so keep an ear out for that, as by the sounds of things to come it’ll be a doozy. Red Rival has quickly risen as one of Hobar t’s explosive acts and have been playing a lot of shows lately. Tight musicianship, driving tempo, and screaming vocals make their style comparable to The Vines or Mess Hall. Some have said their onstage antics are clichéd, but unfor tunately I had to leave early due to time restraints so I missed out on any possible guitar throwing dummy spits. I was on a mission that night, so maybe next time...

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But it actually didn’t, so we figured that, if we’re going to do the workload, we want to have full control. There’s three of us involved in Seawitch Music [their independent label] – two musicians and one person handling the business – we just thought we’d use our experience. (Laughs) And it’s something we’ve always wanted to do, because we want one day for Seawitch Music to be almost a record label for people who live away from the main centres. We’re trying to see what we can do with it.

They’ve been described in the UK press as “what happens when The White Stripes start sounding like “White Album”-era Beatles”. Both an acoustic and electro rock duo, singer/guitarist Scott Bassham and drummer Justin Francis have been playing since 2001. Dave Williams spoke to Scott ahead of the band’s return to Tasmania. Your new record – you’re doing some work towards that? Yep, yep. Basically it’s all written. But yeah, we’re doing it a bit differently. We’ve got our own setup in Lincoln now where we can take a bit more time; the other ones we’ve had to fit in between hell-hole tours that we’ve been doing…we’d only get like two days. We’d come in, get down what we could, and then we’d bail again. So we were always racing against the clock and paying for studio time and all that sort of thing. The last one we did was very much the two-piece sound; this one we may broaden a bit. You released “Yeh Nah” a while back. How did you release it? Well with “Yeh Nah”, we actually recorded it ourselves. And we sort of licensed it to Greasy Pop, and put it out through them. But we’ve always done everything ourselves. And we thought that having a record label would kind of take some of the workload off our shoulders.

Publisher / Editor David Williams Graphic Design Simon Hancock

shancock@sauceonline.net

Editorial Tom Wilson

twilson@sauceonline.net

Contributors: Emma McIntosh, Sam Eddy, Duncan Ewington, Andrez Bergen, , Tina Anderson, Ryan Cooke, Carl Fidler, Paul Woolcock, Dean Swanton, Jimmy McMacken, Ian Murtagh, Jason Forrester, Laen Deakin, Alex Napier. Deadlines Sauce #29 (Aug 06) Adver tising Booking: 26/07/06 Adver tising Ar twork: 27/07/06 Gig Guide: 27/06/06

Address: Po Box 5094, Launceston, Tas, 7250 Phone: 03 6331 0701 Advertising: advertising@sauceonline.net Editorial: editorial@sauceonline.net Opinions expressed in Sauce are not neccesarily those of the editor, publisher or staff.

Contents 2 3 4-10 11-15 16-17 18 19 20 22 23 24 26 27 28-29 30 PAGE 2

Rock Salt News / Feature Rock Salt Bangers Gig Guide DVD/Xtreme Spor t Gig Reviews Bangers Hip Hop Hard Boiled On The Sauce CD Reviews Fashion Poster Games / Heatlamp Street Fashion

I understand that you feel that not enough people got exposed to “Yeh Nah”, and that it was a bit of a disappointment. Yeah. I think that was pretty much the case. The people who have got it, really love it. I mean, it got out there, but there was no real push for it…you would never have known [about it]. It was just one of those classic small label releases. They put out an album in a really small way, and it just gets buried. There are a lot of really unusual names for bands these days, but yours has got to be one of the more interesting. Can you give me a bit of a story behind the name? I actually got the name from a book written about Matthew Flinders and another sea captain; it’s called

Mak in g

th e ir

r et u r n,

it ’s

ILL Starred Captain “Ill-Starred Captains”. They were the first people to chart this area. That’s always been fascinating. I’ve always loved those dark sea names; “The Cruel Sea” and “The Ocean Stares”. It’s got a bit of a dark edge to it. My Mum thinks we’ve cursed ourselves hugely. She’s very superstitious – “You can’t call yourselves that!” and that kind of thing…

finish off this DVD. Maybe start putting some stuff down for the record. Then we’re touring up to Darwin and then all the way down the west coast… By the end of the year, we’ll have pretty much gone around the whole country. I think in January we’ll do another tour, and then go overseas again in June, this time next year.

You came down here about six months ago. What do you remember about that trip? Because you weren’t

So what’s the timetable for the record? Well I’m hoping to have it ready to go by February. We’ll probably put out the DVD around the same time, and

[S al labels] put out an album in a really [Small ea y s m a l l w a y, a n d i t j u s t g e t s b u r i e d . particularly well-known down here at that point. It was excellent. We had an absolute blast down there. We played at the Batman Fawkner with a couple of punk bands. Halfhast was one of them. That was a great night. My bag got stolen in Launceston, and the lads from Halfmast did a big street-sweep to try and get it back! (Laughs) I was like, “Don’t hassle any old grannies!” It was a great trip.

even re-release…there’s another EP that we did before we signed to Greasy Pop, and then there’s “Yeh Nah”. Once we work all that out…we’ll probably just put it all out again! (Laughs) We’re really finding our way, you know?

After the tour, what happens then? Then we’re going to have six weeks where we’re going to

By Dave Williams

Ill-Starred Captain play five shows in Tasmania this month. Check Gig Guide for details.


I t ’ s

F r e a k i n

H u g e ,

I t ’ s

a

massive attack By Tim Duggan

Listening to Massive Attack’s greatest hits compilation “Collected” is a bit like wandering through a foggy forest of memories. Truncated beats and swirling rhythms float gently through the air, underlined by fuzzy trip-hop and soaring vocals all wrapped up in a decade-and-a-half of Massive Attack music. Hailing from the musical incubator of Bristol in the UK, “Collected” is a tight selection of fourteen of the group’s favourite tracks taken from four genre-defying albums: 1991’s “Blue Lines”, 1994’s “Protection”, “Mezzanine” in 1998 and “100th Window” from 2003. The interesting thing about the collection is that it’s been programmed for flow instead of chronologically, turning it into a fascinating aural experiment that treats the back catalogue as a whole whose sum is greater than its parts. “Nostalgia is quite a powerful sort of sensation isn’t it?” says Robert Del Naja, the beating heart of Massive Attack. “It wasn’t really so much an exercise in nostalgia but kind of like putting another record out. I figured that anyone could put together a best-of list these days for any band.” “We put tracks that were 15 years old with tracks that are now,” adds Daddy G, a member who many people thought had gone for good after skipping the process of making the last album, but who is now well and truly back on board. “It’s kind of good, ‘cause the actual sonics of the tracks…and the actual atmosphere go together quite well. So we were quite surprised to see what from “Blue Lines” went with what from “100th Window”, and the fact that the tracks have stuck together quite nicely really.” Sorting through all their previous work gave the pair a chance to reflect on their achievements and sift logically through the past. “[The music] reflects the stuff that’s going on around in the times and in your personal life, on the news or whatever, you feel

PAGE 20

like you immerse yourself in it, you wallow in it, and then you get over it,” says Del Naja. “And obviously, things have got a lot darker recently and I think we’ve always been accused of brooding and dwelling on the darker sides but it’s that kind of thing that to me, blues and sad music and things that reflect what’s going on around you are actually uplifting.” Working through the catalogue, it’s surprising to find out that critical adulation and public consumption does not always match up. Take the case of two previous Massive Attack albums; although both are universally adored, “Mezzanine” continues to “dramatically” outsell “Blue Lines”, says Del Naja, “even though “Blue Lines” has been sort of recognised as “our greatest achievement (in inverted commas)…but you know the record sales don’t really add up to kind of the way people sort of perceive what the albums represent and what relevance they have, but they’re very different aren’t they?” Massive Attack are midway through working on a new album at the moment, due for release early in the new year. This time around, Daddy G is back on board, having taken a break around the time of “100th Window” leaving Del Naja alone and moody in the studio. It was a precarious time for Del Naja, recruiting long time collaborator Neil Davidge to work with him on the album that only too obviously reflected his dark and twisting mood. “It was really sad, ‘cause you’re talking about relationships that go back, like, eighteen years. It was really difficult, it was a very traumatic for everyone,” says Del Naja. “It’s just a real moment of stress, it was a nasty period of time and it ends up becoming legal and it becomes less personal and more mechanical, which is a really bad way to end anything, you know what I mean?”

But The Girl’s Tracey Thorn, Elizabeth Fraser and Sinead O’Connor have been showcased in the past. “We’ve been able to sort of choose people that we’ve always stood on the sidelines and sort of admired and bring them into the studio and work with them,” says Daddy Gee. The pair even worked with Madonna when she covered Marvin Gaye’s classic “I Want You”. “It was a great project to be around,” says Del Naja. It’s a very American experience, lots of lawyers, you know, lots of producers, all involved.” “We went to New York and had a really good time in the studio,” says Daddy. “I mean she was just an amazing professional, which sounds really crap and really cold but she’s obviously a great performer too. And it was just a really bizarre experience for someone like us who were kind of just weren’t in that world, but it was a mutual respect thing going on.” The pair have so far completed seven tracks for the fifth album, titled “Weather Underground”. Recorded in both Bristol and Brooklyn with help from friends like Dave Sitek from TV on the Radio, the new album will contain a “more soulful sound” says Del Naja. “We’re going to try a lot of things out, but there’re so many directions you can go in…You’re not sure which way you want to go. It’s like the blue pill or the red pill in “The Matrix”, you’re not completely convinced yet, you’re going to try everything out and it will start to become obvious where you want to go.”

The relationship between Del Naja and his band members is always an interesting topic of conversation, with the ties firming and slackening as the years roll by. It’s an issue that Daddy Gee is only too familiar with. “You know there’s obviously built up frustrations over the years that we have, and sometimes they do come out at the wrong times, but I think that’s the nature of working quite intently with someone for this length of time. We’ve known each other twenty-five years now and you know just like brothers and sisters, sometimes there are sibling rivalries and quarrels and stuff like that, And sometimes basically we both get on each other’s nerves, but that’s the nature of, you know…” At this stage, Del Maja chimes in: “Men!” “Yes men,” says G. “But also creative people with combined egos and stuff like that. Sometimes you do get a clash, you know? God knows what it’s going to be like in the future, but so far it’s been alright. It’s been worth it, put it that way.” And we couldn’t agree more.

Daddy G explains it himself: “Between myself and D, we kind of didn’t really see eye to eye musically on where we were going….and for the next album I’m back in the studio working on some tracks, so I’m back now. You know we always look at Massive Attack as being a shifting project, it’s bigger than the sums of all parts really.” One thing that stands out over the years of Massive Attack are the sublime vocalists they rope into collaborating with them on their tracks. Everyone from Jamaican legend Horace Andy to Everything

It’s like It lik the blue pill or the red pill in “The The Matrix d yet Matrix”, you’re not completely convinced


THE HERD  THE TRAMPLED TOUR 

Thursday 17 August

THE SALOON, LAUNCESTON Friday 18 August

Tickets available from www.theherd.com.au, The venue (03) 6331 7355, Chilli DJ (03) 6331 2384 and Mojo Music (03) 6334 5677 // Doors open 9pm

UNI BAR, HOBART Tickets available from www.theherd.com.au, Uni Contact Centre Sandy Bay (03) 6226 2495, Ruffcut Records Hobart City (03) 6234 8600 // Doors open 9pm

Saturday 19 August

SIRROCCO’S, BURNIE Tickets available from www.theherd.com.au , Sirrocco's (03) and collectors corner (03) 6431 6616 // Doors open- 9pm

TRAMPLED: THE ELEFANT TRAKS REMIX ALBUM OUT LATE JULY THROUGH

Presented by:

featuring remixes of The Herd, Hermitude, Urthboy, Combat Wombat and more by Pivot, TZU, Tunng and more, as well as remixes by Herd members of Waiting for Guinness, TZU, Gauche, Sparrow Hill and more.

PAGE 21


To m G e t s H i s H i p - H o p O n W i t h

The Hilltop Hoods We’ll be enjoying the calm before the storm! We’l orm m! On the cusp of their biggest tour ever, I spoke with DJ Debris about travelling “The Hard Road” and swerving to avoid the potholes along the way… What have you been up to today? We’ve been doing a photo shoot for tour promo in the tunnels under Adelaide city.

of like Eddie is to Iron Maiden. I don’t think he particularly reflects our music but he gives our artwork a consistent theme, and when people see him they know it’s something to do with us. You’re doing a national tour for the second time in the space of a few months – why are you hitting the road so soon? The tour we did in April was focused on the capital cities. This tour is more focused on the regional areas.

What have the Hilltop Hoods been up to in the last month? We performed in Darwin and Broome. Other than that we’ve been preparing for our upcoming tour and watching the World Cup!

We’re making up for the lack of touring in the year leading up to the release of the album.

What have been some of the reactions to “The Hard Road”? There’s been nothing but a good response to “The Hard Road”. We’re really chuffed with the way it’s gone so far.

What are the consequences of touring this much? Being away from home and loved ones

I suspect that you guys have already started working on new material. Are you finding that you’re evolving already from what you’ve done on “The Hard Road”? And to what extent? Actually we haven’t been working on much new material. We pretty much go through phases of recording and performing, and at the moment we’re just preparing for the biggest tour we’ve ever taken on. Having said that, I’ve been making beats whenever I get a chance but it’ll be a while until we get back in to seriously making tracks for our next album. A lot of the artwork used to promote that album had a cartoon, urban samurai theme going. What was behind that? And how do you think it portrays your music? Our mascot is called “Armageddon”; he’s been on all of our artwork since our first release…sort

How hard is the road? Pretty hard, with lots of potholes…

When you last spoke to us, you were heading overseas. How did that go? We had a great time overseas. London and Canada both had a really good turn out and the crowd really got into it. Hopefully we’ll be heading back to London later this year. What stands out in your mind about playing in Tassie, compared with anywhere else? Real rowdy eager crowds that do our lyrics louder than us! What’s next for you? We’re gonna spend the next few weeks preparing for our tour. We’re working on introducing a lot of new stuff so we’ll be spending a lot of time getting it right. Other than that we’ll be enjoying the calm before the storm! The Hilltop Hoods play Launceston’s Saloon on Thursday the 28th of September, and Hobart’s Wrest Point Entertainment Centre on the 29th

By Tom Wilson

VSU – Students Speak Out As of the 1st of July, university students will no longer receive the benefits and access to facilities and entertainment that has, in previous years, been provided through their required membership to a student union, due to the introduction of the Howard government’s VSU (Voluntary Student Unionism) legislation. In order for student unions to now provide the benefits enjoyed by students in previous years, such as live bands on campus, counselling, support services, and all the other benefits, previously enjoyed, students now need to join up voluntarily. We asked some of you what you thought about it all …

Rael:

Laura:

“It’s the last act of a desperate government trying to rape and pillage the rights of uni students in Tasmania who want to listen to decent music .”

I think VSU is going to permanently damage Tasmania’s music scene.

Gus: “The Howard government is a reason for anarchy, and this proves it.”

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Matt: Basically, universities are going the same way that Telstra’s gone. “Privatise everything!” says John Howard. “Get rid of the ar ts, and create a society that’s based on accounting!”


E g g y

t a l k s

f a n

l o y a l t y

w i t h

The Butterfly Effect It was 2003 when one of Australia’s hardest-touring bands released their first LP, appropriately titled “Begins Here”. And begin it did for The Butterfly Effect; causing tidal waves in the Australian music scene with every flap of their metaphysical wings, pummelling crowds into submission across the country with their signature blend of pounding rhythm and vocal empathy. Now, three years later, they have returned with their second LP “Imago”, recorded in the US with Tool producer Joe Barresi. On the eve of a tour that will see them playing to an estimated 40,000 fans, Clint Boye spoke to SAUCE’s Ryan Cooke… So what have you guys been up to lately? Well, not a lot. Bit of down-time, actually from recording… Just getting ready for the tour; talking about the show, what we want to do to it, how we want to look and portray ourselves on stage. Just all of that standard stuff you do before you go out on a tour; [standard] for us, anyway. A lot of talk about the show and what songs we want to play; putting together a set list together. Trying to stay out of trouble, other than that; that’s been the toughest

part. Not partying too much, so we’re fit and healthy for the tour. Your album only came out last weekend; how have the fans reacted to it so far? From what I know, pretty good. I had a look at the Myspace site and there was a lot of positive feedback on that. We’ve had a lot of interest from some…weird places in the world. When I say “weird”, it’s odd for us because we’ve never played there.

come across live as well as the old stuff did? I don’t know. It’s going to be one of those interesting scenarios. I think with “Begins Here”, we toured literally the day of release, more or less. The first week in, we were playing these brand new songs off the album, and people didn’t even know what the hell we were playing. So the response was mixed. But the next time we came around, a month later, people had had a chance to digest the album, and they were just going nuts. So only time will tell, I think. Do you think that your live show, and the energy that you guys have, is the reason you have such a large fan base? I think it’s certainly one of the reasons. I don’t think any one factor could really be pinpointed.

We f We feel deeply privileged and honoured tha that t people p eop have stuck with us for this long.. We got an email from some people in Chile, some people in Spain, people all over the place. It’s really interesting. It’s good that your music’s getting out there to such a wide audience… Absolutely. I think that’s really the essence of longevity for a band these days; to have that music move slowly but surely through different avenues and different places. When it’s sought-after by the people, and it’s circulated by word of mouth – I think that’s the most important thing. It’s not being rammed down your throat by some faceless record company that’s doing an advertising blitz. It’s real people finding the music for themselves. That’s really important to us. Your new album’s a lot different to your past release, “Begins Here”. Do you think this stuff will

I’d like to think that we’re pretty strong in all the areas of playing, but it certainly helps. I think that it depends on your definition of “live” band; what is a “live” band? Because I’ve heard people walking out of gigs where the band does not move a muscle and they say, “Man, that’s the best live show I’ve ever been to!” Which is really odd. When I go and see a live band, I want to see a “live” band! In some cases there’s a difference between being energetic and being skilful… Absolutely, yeah. One of the best points of reference is probably Tool. You can go and get totally lost in the music because it’s so lush and quite complicated; you don’t really need to go and watch those guys jump around on stage. The music does it all. It depends on what your definition of a good live band is, as much as it depends on the band’s skill level. Talking about Tool, the guy who produced your new album worked with Tool. Do you think he brought something new to the table? Yeah. I think that whenever you work with somebody different, it certainly inspires or fires up a different feeling inside you. It’s one of those things…that’s why you choose different producers; to either change your sound slightly, or make it bigger, or strip it back. These people are specialists at what they do. That’s the reason we wanted to go to America, really. No one knew us over there. That was important to us – going somewhere where no one knew us; where it would just be us vs. the world. That’s the reason why we chose him…and the reason he chose us. Your album was delayed in recording for a while due to Tool taking so long with their album. Do you think fans got a little bit over you guys, because of the wait between “Begins Here” and the new album? I wouldn’t know. I really couldn’t say for sure. I think the fact that we were such an underground band to start with has helped us a great deal. Because the fans that we do have are knowledgeable about the band. And I think there’s a great loyalty in Australian music…if the band remains loyal to the fans, they’ll remain loyal to you. I think there were some people who’d only just got onto the band who may have felt that it was too long a wait, but going back to Tool…they’ve taken six years between most of their albums, and they still have a massive fan base. So I think it depends on the band, certainly, and it depends on the style of music that you’re playing. Talking about fan loyalty, I would say that you’ve got one of the most loyal fan bases in Australia. How does that make you feel? Pretty special, actually. It’s something we’ve worked pretty hard to achieve. Not letting the fans down is another thing. It all ties into everything that we’ve been talking about; the live show, the album, the sound of it. And going and doing underage shows, because there are lots of fans who are under eighteen, obviously. You’ve got to constantly stick with them; I don’t think you can become lax, or let the ego run away or think that you’re better than everyone else, because you’re not. We’re only as good as the next best thing that we do. We feel deeply privileged and honoured that people have stuck with us for this long. So we deliver, to those people, what they want to see. It’s a great coupling, really. Tasmanian dates for The Butterfly Effect will be announced soon. “Imago” is out now.

By Ryan Cooke

Hard Boiled - In July By Ryan Cooke

It’s been the talk of Myspace all weekend, and many are skeptical to its validity… but word on the street is it’s for real. According to the band’s Myspace page, Carpathian are having a major lineup reshuffle. Founding member Ant is sick of touring and is leaving the band. Current vocalist Marty will take on guitar duties, and they will install a new singer…none other than ex-I Killed the Prom Queen vocalist Michael Crafter. Reactions to this news have been mixed. Crafter, a controversial character in the Australian hardcore scene, who has been occupying himself with new projects since being sacked from Prom Queen earlier this year, has as many fans as he has detractors. But, the story gets more interesting. There are rumors to suggest that Carpathian have already been penciled in as the national support for a massive upcoming IKTPQ national tour. Crafter was very public regarding his falling out with his ex-band mates, and they had apparently not spoken in months. At this stage there is no news as to whether this hostile relationship will affect Carpathian’s rumored spot on the tour. IRON MAIDEN plan to release their new studio album, entitled “A Matter of Life and Death”, in early September. The band started writing songs at the end of 2005 after a short break from their hugely successful festival appearances in Europe and the USA. After Christmas, the songs were completed and rehearsed when the band then got together with producer Kevin “Caveman” Shirley at Sarm West Studios in London to start work on recording the backing tracks. The Frontier Touring Company are stoked to confirm that Taste Of Chaos, the surprise touring sensation of 2005 will return down under with an extra tasty lineup for 2006. The Rockstar™ Taste of Chaos 2006 tour of Australia and New Zealand has attracted a stellar international lineup of Taking Back Sunday, Thursday, AntiFlag, Underoath, Senses Fail, and Saosin. Parkway Drive will appear as the mainstage domestic act in each Australian city while Cold by Winter will take the stage in Auckland. As with last year’s tour the smaller local stage will be reinstated to showcase the talents of local acts in front of thousands of fans more info about this at a later date. This year’s Download festival @ Donnington in England was certainly full of drama. Korn frontman Jonathon Davis was hospitalised on Saturday morning, however the band played their headline slot with a variety of special guests including members of Avenged Sevenfold, Trivium and others taking JD’s place. Coheed and Cambria played with their drum tech after announcing that permanent drummer Josh Eppard was ill. During Guns n Roses’ closing night headline spot, Axl Rose slipped over on stage and spat it. Most believed it would be the end of the performance but surely after he returned to the stage and was joined by exguitarist Izzy for a few numbers. Highlights of the festival though were Metallica playing their full 1986 masterpiece “Master of Puppets” and Soulfly frontman Max Cavalera joining the Deftones onstage. In recording news, Converge are currently in the studio recording their follow up to the 2004 smash “You Fail Me”. Three new Slayer tracks see the light of day on, of course, the 6th of the 6th 2006, from their upcoming album which should be out later this year. The new Muse album has been leaked online now for a few weeks. Locally expect to see some quality shows in July and August. Psycroptic are playing their first Hobart show in a while on August 19th @ the Republic with Ruins. Exit Wounds from Melbourne are in the state in mid-July playing shows in Launceston and Hobart and check out Mindset, This Future… Chaos, Separatist and more playing at the 3rd Cabaret of Toxic Waste @ the Batman Fawkner Inn on July 14th. The show is all ages and only costs $6 for ten bands. Currently spinning: Refused - The EP Compilation Fall as Fire Demo Sick of it All - Death to Tyrants Johnny Cash - Live @ San Questin Prison Day of Contempt – Blue Demo 1998.

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Burnie

Jason & Peta @ Sirocco's

Jeremy, Claire & Matty @ Sirocco's

Bethwyn & Travis @ Sirocco's

Bethwyn & Travis @ Sirocco's

Adam, Krystal & Amy @ Kings

Alisha, John & Leanne @ Kings

Jeremy & Rodney @ Kings

Jessica, Sarah & Troy @ Kings

Nicholle, Troy & Sharon @ Kings

Damian, John & Daemion @ Spurs

Jackie & Scott @ Spurs

Kim, Dean & JD @ Spurs

Krystal & Phil @ Spurs

Nathan, Habibi & Drew @ Spurs

Brooke & Kirk @ Halo

Jamie & Ben @ Halo

Mel & Lisa @ Halo

Mel & Tim @ Halo

Sarah & Dean @ Halo

Dave, Mel @ Joseph @ Republic

Denise & Andrew @ Republic

Emma & Whitney @ Syrup

Josh & Uncle Tim @ Republic

Aaron, Ally & Priscilla @ Syrup

Adam & Jason @ Syrup

Corissa, Lyn, Kate & Karen @ Syrup

Mistress Ann & The Rose @ Syrup

Stu & Alex @ Syrup

Allanah & Oden @ Trout

Ben, Allison, Michael & Joe @ Trout

George & Chris @ Trout

Jason & Ellie @ Trout

Josie & Jemma @ Trout

Joel & Mieke @ Irish Murphys

Ben, Allison, Michael & Joe @ Trout

Kevin & Bonny @ Irish Murphys

Mat & Bec @ Irish Murphys

Meegan, Katie & Amy @ Irish Murphys

Adam & Rowan @ James Hotel

Jess, Sam & Draper @ James Hotel

Kylie & Bianca @ James Hotel

Alex & Fraser @ The Batty

Sarah & Tash @ The Batty

Lauren, Ashlee & Ebony @ The Batty

lAUNCESTON

hOBART

Devonport

Bethwyn & Travis @ Sirocco's

PAGE 24

Luke, Morgan & Bronney @ James Hotel

Sahw & Fenton @ The Batty

Leon, Dave, Peter, Jess & Screm @ Republic

Shawnte & Natalie @ James Hotel

Simon, Adam & Sam @ The Batty


Why sit around doing nothing until January? You can start your revolution right now with a degree at the University of Tasmania. Enrol now for our July intake and get yourself six months ahead of the crowd. By next year, you’ll be well on your way to the freedom of a well-paid, satisfying career.

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PAGE 25


Frank Black

Fast Man Raider Man By Carl Fidler This album surprised me. It was not what I expected at all. I’m a big Pixies fan and Black’s early grunge pop had a massive influence on me, so I guess this is my warning to all Pixies fans! “Fast Man Raider Man” couldn’t be further away from the old grunge God’s usual bag of tricks – it’s probably closer to Van Morrisson! The opening track “If Your Poison Gets You” is a jazz ballad, and then the farm boy country shuffle begins with “Johnny Barleycorn”. I thought it might be a piss-take due to the title, but the whole album is a bit country. It’s the instrumentation on “Fast Man…” that gives it the country flavour; ukulele, pedal steel guitar, harmonica, honky tonk “piani” etc... although the songs really lend themselves to this style of arrangement. The songs are good, but I’m not into this style at all so I found it a bit dull. There’re twenty seven tracks on this double CD and I couldn’t actually find one track that appealed to me, but I was probably searching for aspects I loved in the Pixies. The second disc has a few tracks that get closer to the sound I was waiting for. You can hear the old chord progressions in “In The Time Of My Ruin” and “Kiss My Ring” but there’s no distortion or noise. I was relieved to hear that Frank Black is currently on tour with The Pixies – all is not lost...

Sonic Youth Rather Ripped By Carl Fidler

Ah, this takes me back...back to my favourite era. It was ‘92 when I first fell in love with Sonic Youth and their celebration of noise, sweet melodies and dumb rock on the album “Dirty”. I’m so pleased to report they’ve still got it. They’ve mellowed out a bit now but they wear it well; after all, they were the kings of slacker/waster rock, so it’s just a little more slack or wasted really but the guitars are in tune! My good buddy at TasMusic, Dave Sykes, is an old Youth fan and after hearing the CD thought it sounded like “...a play fight between your two best girlfriends in the back of your favourite car”. I can only imagine what that means (I don’t drive!) but it sounds right. All the important Sonic Youth ingredients are present on “Rather Ripped”, catchy guitar-driven Indie pop progressions, waster rock vocal delivery, and plenty of guitar noise. The standout track for me was “Incinerate” (track 2). It’s catchy enough to be a single for them, but what appealed to me was the gorgeous melancholy in the guitar lines. It’s the perfect Indie pop tune; short and sweet and leaves me with a faint smile.

You Am I Convicts By Carl Fidler

Tim Rogers is back and more intense than ever before. Recorded shortly after the “Falls incident” (and we all remember the “Falls incident”!) I can’t help thinking that a reasonable amount of soul searching took place with song titles like “Thank God I Hit The Bottom”, “By My Own Hand” and “I’m A Mess”.. The songs are punchy and saturated, with thick edgy guitars and Tim Rogers’ self-styled bent-onpop hooks. There’s a hint of Oz punk on “Convicts”, but it could just be that they’re playing their usual rock riffs a little faster. There’re also a few tracks with Rogers’ usual dark sense of humour with “Explaining Cricket” and the explosive “Thuggery”.. “Convicts” is a good solid album for You Am I, but it doesn’t have the instant appeal of “Hi-Fi Way” or the longevity of “Hourly, Daily”. It’s great to hear the boys back in effect, but what seems to be lacking is the progression they were on with the earlier albums. It just seemed to stop and the latest recordings all feel a bit the same; good solid rock songs that don’t really take you anywhere. Rogers has simplified his writing style and lost the quirkiness that defined their sound.

Vanna

The Search Party Never Came By Ryan Cooke I’m sick to death of picking up CDs and getting all excited due to the bands mentioned on the cover as “similar to”/”for fans of” and the CD being absolutely shit! But this EP certainly isn’t one of them. The sticker reads “Vanna bursts upon the scene with a massive metalcore debut that is not to be missed”, and it is so true. Rising from the prominent hardcore scene of Massachusetts, Vanna are rapidly PAGE 26

becoming a force to be reckoned with amongst the countless other melodic hardcore acts making a name for themselves today. Their EP kicks off with “A Dead Language for a Dying Lady”, and never lets up for a second. Through the heavier songs (“That Champagne Feeling”, “Schadenfreude”) and the more melodic selections (“I Am the Wind, You Are the Feather”, “The Search Party Never Came”), you are completely hooked on for a ride through this amazingly catchy and brutal display of talent. I don’t mean to sound like a record label sticker, but this is an EP that you cannot miss, from a band that you need to know. I reckon this to people who aren’t over metalcore yet…this EP is for fans of Norma Jean, Underoath, The Chariot and Everytime I Die.

chunky bass lines. Although John has got many popular songs such as Evermore’s remix of “It’s Too Late”, TV Rock’s “Something on Your Mind”, Bob Sinclaire’s new hit “World Hold On” and many more. So in a nutshell, if you want the latest popular dance tunes in a double CD this is definitely worth buying. I enjoyed it, so get your ass down to your local CD store, slap it in your boom box, stick your “Fuck Me Boots” on, and dance all night whilst sucking on your cherry lollypop. I’m Giving This 9 of 10 Dirty Bum Diseased Festy Monkeys.

The DFA Angels & Airwaves We Don’t Need to Whisper By Ryan Cooke

I will say this from the word go – Angels and Airwaves is only for hardcore fans of Blink 182 and pop punk fans; others need not read this. Angels and Airwaves is the long awaited new project created by Blink 182 guitarist Tom DeLonge. His friend and former Box Car Racer member David Kennedy, Offspring drummer Atom Willard and former Distillers bass-player Ryan Sinn are also members of Angels and Airwaves. In addition to this, DeLonge is currently directing a movie called “AVA” which is meant to be released in conjunction sometime in the future with this album. So let’s start about the music. ‘We Don’t Need to Whisper” basically picks up where Blink 182’s 2003 self-titled album left off. Songs like “Start the Machine” set his cathartic choruses over loud-softloud rushes, synth washes and fussy guitar parts that evoke U2’s “The Joshua Tree”. “Carpe Diem” anthems like “The Adventure” burn with wailed hooks and every dude candor, and DeLonge stages a melodramatic goodbye amid the boomy space rock of “The War”. I personally wouldn’t recommend this album to everyone, but it’s OK for a listen and for something different to check out.

Remixes Chapter One By Patrick Duke The DFA (Tim Goldsworthy & James Murphy) have returned on a great label with great tunes. Yes kids – The DFA have released the “Remixes Chapter One” on CD and 12” for the vinyl junkies. With artists including Gorillaz, The Chemical Brothers, Hot Chip, Soulwax and more, this album offers many diverse natures of dance tunes for any array. These guys just previously finished a tour in Miami with Hot Chip to spread their pro-active minds and their own remixing capabilities. For some reason the first track has grown on me; “Deceptacon” – Le Tigre. First off it sounds like a cat cutting its paws off with a cheese grater then feeding on it once again, yet the funky porn bassline keeps kicking out, driving it to become a really easy tune to enjoy. [A cheese grater? I worry about you – Tom] “The Boxer” – The Chemical Brothers is a very easy-going, slow electro blitzer that keeps flirting with flow and funk lines, with big chunky synths getting turfed into the centre stage. Track four is definitely my favourite on this compilation; “Another Excuse” by Soulwax; an electro-house tune with some Latin beats hidden amongst the track. Of course, “Dare” by The Gorillaz…if you love them, you’ll love this twelve-minute rendition of the smash hit. It personally shat me to tears when I first listened to it. I was waiting for the ending, reluctant in knowing the end was nine minutes away. God Damn! Verdict – 8 Filthy horrible diseased monkeys out of 10 for this compilation

Fabric 28

Wiggle By Patrick Duke Another great CD from Fabric, this exclusive mix is worth the vibration to anyone’s cochlea. Featuring some of the finest from Terry Francis and Nathan Coles, how damn funky is this deep-tech-house CD? With many smooth transitions, this mix has an elusive sound all the way through it! This is to be known as an expression of their past experiences through throwing parties for their mates earlier in their career, and who are now mixing it up in many of the biggest clubs around the world. From dirty lyrics with fanatical hi-ends working the dynamics of the songs, lifting you up and down, it’s a definite body-mover. From their known mixing, it’s surprising their umbilical cords aren’t attached to each other due to their subliminal communication. If you want to steer into a direction away from mainstream top-40 dance, this CD is a defining example of deep, funky tech-house. Every listen seems to pull you in towards the elusive mix with the hypnotic bass driving its direction. The first half of the CD is very uplifting, teched-out and glitchy, causing a very eclectic and effective choice of beats with vocals that blend together nicely. The second half of the CD is still bass-driven, but thrown to synths and low-key vocals bringing on the morning sunlight feel. Overall it’s a great style of beats; simple but effective! 7 Herpefied elephantoid Monkeys Out Of 10

Ministry of Sound Sessions Three By Parick Duke

Yes ladies and gentlemen, Ministry of Sound have yet another release of their series, with new bump and grinding tunes that have been hitting the dance floors around Oz for this winter. Presenting the big names in the industry, John Course and Goodwill are mixing up the flavour of tunes they like to smash across hot and sweaty clubs. This is definitely another added favourite to my CD collection, with the fortitude of many tunes that have been slamming the charts world-wide; with big names such as Bob Sinclaire, Joey Negro, Mark Dynamix, Coburn, The Knife and many more getting remixed by many urban legends such as Tom Novy, Dirty South, TV Rock, Hi_Tack…and the list goes on. With both CDs varying from happy house to big fat funky electro, personally I think Goodwill’s mix appeals more to me, hence being a fan of deep

Thievery Corporation Versions By Randall Stafford

Thievery Corporation’s latest release is an album full of remixed classics and old-time favourites, as well as some of the outfit’s original material. There is no denying how brilliant Rob Garza and Eric Hilton are; their music has an unmistakable maturity, and crossing sonic boundaries is their forte. This talent has seen Thievery Corporation sell millions of units worldwide, writing, DJing, and producing all types of different styles and sounds. The music is carefully thought out and the production is amazing. The album opens with a typical dub style tune “Tarana” (Ustad Sultan Khan). It is soft and slow with that Middle Eastern twinge that is present throughout dub currently. Stand out tracks are “Who needs Forever” (It’s not the first remix of this track) by Astrid Gilberto which is pure bliss to relax to, and “Strange Days” by The Doors. This remix is awesome, the sultry vocal of Jim Morrison is kept in it’s traditional state while a house groove with a simplified chord progression keeps the track gelled. There are some more pure dub tunes such as “Lemon Tree”, Herb Alpert and “Beloved” by Anoushka Shankar. To finish up the album there are some Thivery Corporation tracks that cover everything from chilled-out house to evocative and inspiring film soundtrack material. This is truly music that is heading forward. It’s ambient and ethnic but also has some clever aesthetics a lot of chilled-style dance music lacks. There is no time or effort spared in producing an album like this; on a purely musical level it is complex. The one down point I have is that occasionally dub/dance has the one-, two- or four-bar drum line that never varies and occasionally it just makes some of the tunes a little flat. All in all, this is a special album and Thievery Corporation are certainly modern music masters.

Shapeshifters Sound Advice By Randall Stafford

At last, the long-awaited release of Shapeshifters’ debut album “Sound Advice” hits the shelves. “Sound Advice” is a superbly produced album with loads of integrity and all the subtleties of intelligent house music. Shapeshifters are Simon Malin and Max Reich; producers, DJs, musicians and label owners who currently hold residencies at the coolest clubs throughout Europe and added a “Best Breakthrough DJs” award to their list of accomplishments at last year’s House Music Awards. Their rise to prominence in 2005 surrounded their top-ten hit “Back to Basics” and massive number-one hit “Lola’s Theme”. At the time “Lola’s Theme” was a hit, I had at least six mixes in my record bag at

any one time. It was an instant classic and the undisputed house tune of 2005. “Sound Advice” opens with “You Never Know”; a politically motivated vocal piece co-written by vocalist Jenna Gibbons slides over slick beats and crisp musical production. There is not much to say about “Lola’s Theme”; it is a brilliant house tune with longevity. “Sensitivity ” has a more stock sound, with disco strings, congas and a straight groove, while “Route One” is a top-class deep house tune with subtle sounds and another clever string line. There is even a ballad “Beautiful Heartache”, with a grooving break beat and an acoustic guitar that just drips over another gorgeous female vocal. Shapeshifters truly know how to create dance floor atmosphere without having to be loud or inyour-face. This is a very impressive release without that obvious commercialism that has germinated the radio in the past two years. Before “Sound Advice” was released, there was a feeling that Shapeshifters were just another disco-influenced house act. How wrong that is. This is an album full of class and amazing production quality.

Apathy

Eastern philosophy By Paul Woolcock This one took me by surprise. Having only heard a little bit about Apathy doing some work with Jedi Mind Tricks and the Demigods (he is part-founder of the Demigods crew) I had assumed this release would be another onslaught of battle rhymes. And while there certainly is a decent amount of battle tracks on “Eastern Philosophy”, there are thankfully also a lot of actual topics covered. “All About Crime” has Apathy commenting on the all-encompassing scope of crime from small time to global, starting off the track with: “Its been all about crime pretty much since the beginning of time / early man killed each other for objects that shine / now businessmen do it with progress in mind…” while another attention grabbing track “Chemical” is a dark commentary on the various chemicals that control our lives. “…Back when I was little and they had me on Ritalin / I was chillin’, literal zombie like feeling…” This track covers everything from junk food to caffeine to heroin, all expressed with fluid and entertaining delivery. Possibly the best example of Apathy’s ability to piece together clever, thoughtful lyrics is “The Buck Stops Here”. This track has Apathy considering the circulation of a dollar bill – “…Same dollar bill that’s stuffed in a stripper’s thong / could be the same dollar bill that’s out shopping with your mum / same dollar bill that’s buying drugs for junkies / is the same dollar bill for your kids lunch money…” This particular track is very well written and backed by a brilliant beat (produced by 8TH and Vertigo). While he does sound sick of a lot of shit, oddly enough, Apathy doesn’t actually seem that apathetic. According to himself, “I’m not apathetic at all; the name is a reminder, like a tattoo on my arm, of how society slips more and more, and how disconnected people have become.” “Eastern Philosophy” does cover some interesting topics, with smooth flows over nice beats, however some may still find him too harsh and perhaps a little negative as there isn’t much in the way of happy lyrics. For those who like a bit of intelligent social commentary with their dark American hip-hop, I reckon Apathy is the best thing to show up in a long time.

Jedi Mind Tricks Presents

Army Of The Pharaohs – The Torture Papers By Paul Woolcock Originally conceived by Vinnie Paz of Jedi Mind Tricks, “The Torture Papers” is basically a compilation of collaborations featuring a lot of vicious rappers getting together and making some dark and chunky hip-hop. As you would expect of any album presented by Jedi Mind Tricks, the majority of the rhyming is battle-based and aggressive while the beats are intense and dramatic, often using classic-sounding samples mixed with thumping bass and percussion. Fans of JMT will instantly feel at home with the stream of verbal attacks but those who get sick of being lyrically abused will quickly get over the vocals. There is quite a large list of artists involved, including 7L, Esoteric, Apathy, Planetary, Celph Titled, Vinnie Paz and many more. While this makes for good variety, it does seem to occasionally confuse the flow of some tracks. Amidst all the wellstructured (if a little repetitive) battle rhyming is one or two tracks that is actually about something; “Into The Arms Of Angels” is a surprisingly reflective effort with far more emotional (but still nasty) lyrics than expected from Vinnie Paz, Crypt The Warchild and Faez One. The production quality is generally outstanding. Some of the beats are absolutely awesome, occasionally capturing the epic feel of old JMT material. Unfortunately if you are expecting something as consistently tight as a normal JMT release you may be a little disappointed; there are so many artists involved it would probably have been impossible to keep up that kind of intensity, but if you are after some new artists who make similar styles hip-hop, this seems like a good place to start looking.


Carmen Dressed By

Joel Dressed By


SOCOM 3: US Navy SEALs – PS2 It seems only a few short years ago the first “SOCOM” burst onto shelves with the promise of online multi-player action via the included USB headset add-on and optional Network Adaptor needed to hook the old 1st-gen PS2 systems up to the internet. No other game in the history of the PS2 can be attributed with shifting more network adaptors and headsets than SOCOM and I’m not even going to pretend that I was one of those consumers who consumed. However I do remember the big SOCOM packaging down at K-Mart and thought to myself “that looks like a bit of fun, right there”. Unfortunately, me and a little game possibly starting with “Grand Theft” and ending with “Auto” were having a merry time all by ourselves at the time.

So it should come as absolutely no surprise to anyone, least of all me, that I totally missed “SOCOM 2”. It’s only with this latest iteration of “SOCOM” (that’s “SOCOM 3: US Navy SEALs” from Zipper Interactive) that I’m finally getting to see what all the fuss is about. And this is without having the luxury of trying out its strengths as an online multi-player experience so that’s enough of me banging on about that right now. What we’ve got here is a thinly-veiled US armed forces training simulator disguised as home entertainment. Oh, I know wargames have been around for as long as computers, or even tabletops if we’re going to get pedantic (I’m looking at the “Warhammer 40K” players here), but with every leap in computing power, we have systems capable of keeping up with the technological advances in warfare. However, despite my personal political misgivings, it’s a hell of a lot of fun.

me and the lads were ambushed by some rampant durka-durkas out in the desert and poor old Killjoy bought the farm. However, in the next mission, he was all patched up and ready for the fightin’! What a trooper. Whereas this lack of wartime realism may not appeal to those of us who can remember golden oldies games like Sensible Software’s “Cannon Fodder” (where each and every one of your fallen troopers was hilariously commemorated with his own headstone) [The memories! – Tom] I forgive it in the overall scheme of things. And that scheme of things involves mayhem and

compared to the earlier games in the series (I’m reliably informed) on which to dance your Jig-ODeath. Again, I’m reliably informed that unlike previous games, this one includes a whole host of vehicles with which to traverse the terrain, which includes everything from vast, expansive North African deserts to cramped shanty towns. From gunboats to all manner of four-wheeled contraptions, it takes only a tap of the X button to load your team up to become a mobile dispenser of destruction. There are a lot of controls to learn, but it’s all elegantly accessible and the in-game (though slightly jarring) tutorial will have you lobbing grenades while simultaneously ordering your team-mates to “breach and frag” (less dirty than it sounds, unfortunately) in about thirty

You’ll start “SOCOM” (well, the single-player campaign version anyway) playing a soldier codenamed Spectre. With your controllable team buddies Jester, Killjoy, and Simple, you’ll be assigned to various trouble-spots around the world where some foreigner is up to no damn good and needs a show of mighty US force to step back in line and stop making with the dissent. For the record, you’ll probably end the game with Spectre and associated buddies. In one particular hair-raising campaign,

blowin’ shit up real good! Yes, this game will bring out that hidden side of you that enjoys Michael Bay films, eatin’ beef jerky, and crawling through dirt. You’ll need to do that too, if you want to take out the enemy nice and stealthy-like. Speaking of taking out the enemy, you have a vast array of weaponry at your disposal – over nine hundred combinations of guns and accessories. My favourite so far has to be the good ol’ fashioned air-strike. Using a laser-targeting system, you merely point it at the object you want destroyed (like a tank!) and within a few seconds it’s ker-blammo’ed! That’s a technical term. Look it up. With a system capable of Dolby Digital II output, you’ll hear things go “ker-blammo” as bullets narrowly avoid connecting with your brains with disturbing accuracy. Helicopters and air-strikes (yay!) sound great as they whoosh overhead. The graphics fare a little less well off. Textures are simple, but this is the trade-off for a vastly increased map area

minutes. If you’re accustomed to PC gaming, where accuracy is determined by your skills with a mouse, you might find the analogue stick controls unwieldy, but there is a generous aim-assist which means if you’re generally spitting lead in an enemy’s direction you’ll fill their digital body with digital bullets until they keel over and breathe their digital last. Sweet! For those of you who secretly entertain fantasies of going to new and interesting countries, meeting new and interesting people, and killing them in new and interesting ways (in the name of freedom), then you’ll enjoy this. “SOCOM 3” offers an immersive and satisfying gaming experience without the hassle of having to wipe the blood of your enemies from your clothes. 4 thundering air-strikes out of 5.

By Chris Rattray

Trasharama Film Festival Take everything you know about good film. Take everything you know about good taste, big budgets and high standards. Write them out. Pour petrol on them. Light the sons of bitches on fire. A celebration of Zgrade dodginess, zombies, and most of all trashiness, the Trasharama film festival is the long-overdue antithesis of the film industry. Anyone can enter. Anything can be entered. It just has to be trashy ... according to festival director, Jero.

(Stumpy) who ran a video shop in Brisbane called Trash Video and who had a couple of months earlier held his own festival called Eat my Schlock. Dick then poached some films off Stumpy along with movies he asked local film makers to provide. He then had a program, booked a venue, got some punk bands to play for free (after proudly showing them photos of his wonderful Easter he spent visiting Charles Manson in his Detention Centre…photos go along way…) Dick did that for two years and as the number of punters got increasingly larger he decided to move Trasharama to the Mercury Cinema in Adelaide, and tour to some of the other capital cities. He turned it into a competition begging lots of national sponsors to donate prizes. He explained that he wouldn’t tell anyone that they were involved. Reverse strategy in the world of Trasharama. Where in Australia have you seen the most consistent output of good (or, as the case may be, utterly shocking) trash films? Without trying to sound bias, South Australia seems to have had the most consistent amount of quality trash entries, although Tasmania seems to be catching at a steady pace. I guess the fact that SA is known for being the serial killer capital might have something to do with it.

When did the festival begin? What spurred its existence? Trasharama was spawned in 1997 when Dick Dale came 2 nd place in Foxtel’s Graveyard National Shifty Film Competition with his Z-grade production, “The Beast From Bomb Beach”. It was funded on a Social Security loan and he netted himself $1000 of loot. After he squandered the money on a keg of beer, wild women and a payment on a video camera he realised that there was a market for these types of films. It would also be a great way to inflict his own own disasterpieces on audiences and view other damaged minded persons works as well as find some new drug connections. He contacted a friend

PAGE 28

What is the reigning king of all the Trasharama disasterpieces? I guess this would be a good time to praise one of the local Tasmanian film makers, Frank Daft. Last year he sent us a film called “Martie Don’t Surf ”. The story involved bong smoking, goon drinking, illicit drug-taking teenagers, (with Tourettes syndrome), who decide to go on a bit of a killing spree… And they live in a house made entirely of four-litre wine casks. Need I say more? (We can’t wait to see what Frank might have in store this year!) STAY SICK! Checkout www.trasharama.com.au for entry details, and get cracking; deadline for entries is August 19 th. Slacker deadline is September

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Ta l k i n g

About

Video

Lives

with

Fiora “Video Lives”, a very different kind of reality television. She spoke to Dave Williams about the challenges of turning the camera on herself. How did you get involved with the “Video Lives” program in the first place? Well “Video Lives” was a competition that ABC2 held last year. They put a HD camera, a great HD camera up as a prize. And we secretly wanted a HD camera… (Laughs) So I’d had this idea for a while to make a little animation about life in my family. So I put that together, and my friend James Gunt animated it for me in 3D animation, and entered it into the competition, and it became a finalist.

To film another person is one thing, but to film yourself – and, in the process, capture a snapshot of your own life – is a different matter entirely. And that is exactly the challenge faced by Fiora, a Launceston musician who was chosen by ABC2 for

Exhibition Review

“Less Everything More Something” @ Sabotage By Duncan Ewington

After that, they decided that they would make an actual show out of “Video Lives”, and asked the finalists from the competition to submit video diaries every two weeks. So how long have you been submitting video diaries for? Now I’ve been doing it about twelve weeks, which seem to have flown, actually. But I’ve got another… it’s forty weeks all up, so I’ve got another…what’s

Speck, Dave Peterson, Daniel Weeda, Alasdair Shurman, Jonno Howell, Megan Perkins, and me, myself and I. Exhibitions like this are what make Hobart such a happening place! Photographs, prints, paintings, sculpture, and even clocks were all in the mix. There’re some really incredible young artists starting to emerge in Hobart, and this is the best place to check out the talent. The artwork was cutting edge, and I couldn’t really single out anything there as my favourite, as the range and standard were all so good, but there was definitely “more something” to this show.

that…thirty-eight? No. I can’t add up! (Laughs) Another twenty-eight weeks to go or something! Have you found the process interesting, in terms of what you’re seeing as changes over that period of time, or how you’ve approached the process? Is it becoming a personal thing for you? Is it meaningful? Yeah. It’s a really interesting creative process actually. I used to just make little home videos for my friends, and I guess that’s the way I kind of approach it. I kind of freak out if I think that the whole country can maybe see… So I kind of think of it like I’m making a video for a friend. And while...you know, it does become personal, because you see the house, and you see my everyday life, and the boring, mundane parts of that. But I’m also very conscious that people are giving you five minutes of your time – maybe – to watch this video, so you don’t want it to be really boring. So, to keep a narrative going, and keep it amusing and funny, which my life kind of is, anyway; that’s the way I tend to look at it. But the creative process is also quite challenging, because I’ve got a lot of other things going on in my life, and rather than make a video that is about the video itself – document two weeks of my life which is actually about the process of making a video – I have to keep the rest of my life going. And it’s quite time

them, I think – as a musician…the creative skills that you have, and the crew, really help in all types of genres. If you can write music, and you understand composition – the balance of things coming together… not overdoing one section of it…and you understand what music to put to one section of it. Really, apart from camera angles and lighting and that kind of thing – which are really technical skills – in terms of creative ability, I find filmmaking very much about editing. I’m not a cinematographer. I don’t know a lot about lighting. I didn’t really pick up those skills anywhere; just reading books and whatever. But I do tend to concentrate on the subject matter. And I’ve worked with people who spend a lot of time setting up the shot and all that kind of technical stuff. In the kind of video diaries that I make, you really lose the moment if you’re going to spend a long time worrying about that kind of stuff. It’s about everyday life, and it’s about capturing reality…it’s all about vibe. It’s the musical side of stuff really. Understanding the tempo of the way you want to cut something; understanding how the emotions of something is being put across, and if that’s the right vibe that you want to put across. That’s really been my education; it’s all sort of come out of what I’ve learned as a musician. You’re also involved in something that’s absolutely blown my socks off, called the “Guerrilla Mixer”

There’s no shower scenes! I’m just not that exciting, I’m afraid. consuming to make a video diary. And when anything major happens; when you see something on the news, and there’s something major happening, there’s a cameraman there to film it. When it’s your own “Video Life”, you have to take the video yourself! (Laughs) Sort of like self-censoring “Big Brother”. Well yeah; it is kind of like that. I mean, my video… I’m not really a fan of “Big Brother”, so my videos aren’t like that. They’re not really voyeuristic or anything like that. No shower scenes, then? There’s no shower scenes! No…! Eww… (Laughs) No. I’m just not that exciting, I’m afraid. [It’s a] Different type of video… Definitely different. Yeah, definitely. So how did you learn filmmaking skills to begin with? Well really, for me… I’m a musician, really. I think some of the creative skills that you have – a lot of

project. I saw the DVD pilot recently, and I was gobsmacked. Well that’s really come out of our knowledge as musicians. We have a company structure, and we make these kinds of things. But all of that that you’ve seen; I haven’t been to film school. It’s about having a musical attitude to art, I think. A musical attitude to creativity. So what are your goals for “Guerrilla Mixer”? Well ideally with “Guerrilla Mixer”, we’ll turn that into a series. We’ve got some very exciting leads. We just went to a big conference and met some very interesting people from all over the world. It seems to be the kind of thing…no one else is doing anything like that. It seems to fill a lot of people’s needs at the moment. So we’ll just see who the best person would be to develop that with. Ideally, we’d make that on an international scale. But that’s a big dream. We’ll just have to see. But it will become a series.

By Dave Williams

For more information, photos and good stuff check out www.hellavate. net. The show runs till August 11 so get your arse down to Sabotage to check out some of the freshest contemporary art in town. You’ll be inspired. Once again the masterminds behind Art Mart, Hellavate, and Sabotage pulled out all the stops and brought together an amazing exhibition in the Sabotage shop space. The theme, as the title suggests, was less everything, more something, and it was up to the artists to interpret it however they liked. With a large collection of artists involved, the level and diversity of the art work was amazing. Some of the featured artists you may, or may not have heard of, and included new works by Rob Cordiner, Joe Hamilton, Finbarr Shaw, Empire, Jamin, Dave Macarthur, Callum Don, Momo, Amy Watts, Scot Cotterell,

1 Short Courses taken by industry professionals 1 3 Chip Digital Video Cam, sound and lighting hire 1 Post Production equipment hire 1 Screenings and Seminars 1 Assisting Tasmania’s Emerging Film makers Wide Angle Tasmania 03 62238344 : http://www.wideangle.org.au WIDE ANGLETASMANIA ACKNOWLEDGESTHE FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE OFTHE AUSTRALIAN FILM COMMISSION AND SCREENTASMANIA PAGE 29


DJ Promo Breaks World Non-Stop DJing Record For Charity Thanks to www.inthemix.com.au and bma magazine.

The heat drained Matt’s energy, requiring him to get constant massages to loosen his neck and back. But even on his breaks, matt was constantly exercising to staying focused. By Thursday morning he’d been spinning for almost three days straight, but was still 20 hours away from the record. The strain was getting to him. “I Almost dropped my headphones on the turntable, I had no concept what was going on,” he later explained. The Red Cross was on the verge of forcing him to quit. “I was almost in tears,” confesses Matt. He kept going.

DJ Promo breaks the world DJing record, promoting healthy living and raising funds for charity.

By that evening, the Vertex was packed out. Renee Moullet joined him for some backing vocals. And, at last, the screen behind him declared that the record had been matched. At that moment, he was spinning Pete Heller, “Big Love”. That’s what the crowd gave him, and what he gave back. “Thanks to everyone who kept this whole idea

The he dance e music m industry y has been een used as a scapegoat s peop for people that tak ugs. We really need to unite u e as take drugs. an iindustry ustry to dispel the my hat myth that ever e that tha is in a club has to be e on everyone drugs ... it’s all about the music. mus On June 12, Matt Solo AKA DJ Promo matched, and outdid, the Guinness World Record for the longest DJ session in history, beating last year’s record set by DJ Genix at 84 hours. In the spirit of the cause, Matt totally revamped his lifestyle. No drugs, alcohol, junk food or smoking, vowing to break the record drug-free. “The dance music industry has been used as a scapegoat for people that take drugs.” He said. “We really need to unite as an industry to dispel the myth that everyone that is in a club has to be on drugs ... it’s all about the music.” It was a cool nine degrees when Matt began his marathon in the Vertex, a specially built pyramid structure in Federation Square. The estimated fifteenhundred-track marathon began with Kraftwerk’s “Trans Europe Express”. Covering all genres, Matt was joined by Sara Brooke doing guest vocals on Monday night. Then the Socceroos kicked off at their World Cup game, and as a result, the crowd went insane.

Duncan Ewington, musician in Hobart band, “The No No’s”, and writer and photographer for Sauce, wears his heart on his sleeve, as Dave Williams prods him over the myths surrounding the music industry.

the people involved making the music. Some people love to live up to the rock star mentality, and some are just happy to make music they like, and hope that other people like it too. By creating something that makes people feel good, or feel some other emotion, they’re showing a very powerful ability. So, I guess if you’ve got what it takes, people admire that ability and, in turn, do the things people do when they like you…

What are some of the myths that surround the music industry, in general? ...it really depends on which perspective you’re What are some of the myths surrounding the coming from and what you’re looking at. As dance music scene? there’s a lot money involved in the industry, it’s Lots of drugs, not much sleep, DJ’s are quite often that arrogant and get the musicians … what w t y you do in life is going ng t to be paid shit loads, don’t see much gr ly iinfluenced by past experiences, erie es, greatly sleazy people, of it. It’s big attitudes, and tastes, and opinions. I try to be unbitas es, a bibusiness, so with that bouncers are ased, but usually that doesn’t t w work … corporations often worse then involved, the the clientele. soul of music can be easily corrupted by the chase for the dollar. DIY is where it’s at. To what extent do you think they’re true? Why? What are some of the myths that surround being in a band, playing rock ‘n’ roll? Probably the most common ones are - making lots of money, getting lots of girls, rock star treatment, getting wasted … you know, all the clichés. To what extent do you think they’re true? Why? To some minor extent, they’re true I guess… depending on the band. It really depends on

It … will vary, depending on venue, DJ, punters and staff. How hard is it, as a creative writer, photographer and musician, to leave your myths, your biases, at the door when you are being creative? It is hard, as you know who you are, and what you do in life is going to be greatly influenced by past experiences, tastes, and opinions. I try to be unbiased, but usually that doesn’t work, so I say it how I see it ....

alive – it’s overwhelming,” Matt said to the crowd. He laughed wearily. “So are you guys all staying until 1 PM tomorrow?” They might have, but – probably fortunately – the world’s longest-playing DJ made a very, very hard decision; the decision to step away from the decks before he killed himself through exhaustion. At midnight, he decided that it was in the best interests of his health to stop. Almost delirious and incoherent through sheer fatigue, there was a definite sense of wry humour in his last song – “Manamana: by The Muppets. The crowd surely appreciated the parallel between the song’s babbling nonsense and Matt’s burntout state of mind. The longest DJ set ever played on earth was over, eighty-six hours after it had begun. Matt Solo went to sleep that night a charity hero and a DJing legend. Well done. Well done indeed.

Something For Kate “DESERT LIGHTS”

The Butterfly Effect “IMAG O” IN STORE NOW

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Name: Danicia Age: 20 Fave Band: LIVE What can’t you do without? My Mobile Phone What do you wish you could do without? My Mobile Phone Last thing to make you laugh? SMS Message on my Mobile Phone Last thing to make you cry? My car broke down

Name: Eddie Age: 26 Fave Band: The Corrs What can’t you do without? Music What do you wish you could do without? Money Last thing to make you laugh? A friend’s phonecall Last thing to make you cry? A Movie (X-Men III)

Name: David Age: 34 Fave Band: Dave Mathews Band What can’t you do without? My Wife Michelle What do you wish you could do without? Flavoured Milk Last thing to make you laugh? Eddie Izzard Last thing to make you cry? Socceroos loss to Italy

Name: Jenna Age: 16 Fave Band: The Clash What can’t you do without? Food What do you wish you could do without? Cigarettes Last thing to make you laugh? Liam Last thing to make you cry? My ex-boyfriend

Name: Izzac Age: 17 Fave Band: Grinspoon What can’t you do without? Money What do you wish you could do without? Phone Last thing to make you laugh? Jo Last thing to make you cry? Losing Grand Final

Name: Liam Age: 17 Fave Band: Red Hot Chilli Peppers What can’t you do without? Cigarettes What do you wish you could do without? Cigarettes Last thing to make you laugh? Jenna Last thing to make you cry? My ex-

Name: Jo Age: 17 Fave Band: Sarah Blasko What can’t you do without? My Phone What do you wish you could do without? My Phone Last thing to make you laugh? Isacc Last thing to make you cry? Finishing doing ‘HAIR’.

Name: Michelle Age: 33 Fave Band: The Waifs What can’t you do without? My Husband David What do you wish you could do without? Lots of good fattening food Last thing to make you laugh? David Last thing to make you cry? The story of a little girl hit by a car in Sydney.

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?JAN') +/(%DO Chris Löfvén (1976) M 90 mins 6\ddY]jbdjgZY6jhh^ZjeYViZd[ i]ViXdgcndaY=daanlddYXaVhh^X!The Wizard of Oz#>ci]^hkZgh^dc!9dgdi]n ?dn9jchiVc^hVh^miZZc"nZVg"daY \gdje^Zg^Y^c\l^i]VgdX`WVcYl]Zc! hjYYZcan!i]ZkVc^h^cVgdVYVXX^YZci# 8^cZbVid\gVe]Zg9Vc7jghiVaaYdZhV \gZVi_dWl^i]i]Z[Vhibdk^c\iVaZ VcYi]Zl]daZbdk^Z]VhVgZVahZchZd[i]ZbV\^XVa!VhlZaa Vhd[[Zg^c\hdbZ^ch^\]ihbVnWZ^cidi]Z6jhh^ZehnX]Z#Do^h V\gdjcYWgZV`^c\VcYjiiZgandg^\^cValdg`WnVaVg\Zan[dg\diiZc [^abY^gZXidg#

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Ta l k i n g f a n s a n d s t i t c h e s w i t h

Kisschasy It’s been a busy twelve months for Melbourne rockers Kisschasy. After playing at the esteemed South-BySouthwest festival in Austin, Texas, and touring nationally with The Living End, they’re about to travel down here for the first time ever, playing a set list assembled by their fans voting online. I spoke to bassist Joel Vanderuit about the fans, the upcoming album, and why he has a very sore backside… So what have you been up to today? Today, I went to the doctor, and I got seven stitches put in my bum.

all-ages show everywhere you go, because they always have to be on a Saturday or a Sunday, and you have to be able to find a venue that can do it that day. But we do really like to do them, and we understand that kids sometimes get the raw end of the deal with shows; we do as many as we can. Do you think your music has a special appeal to adolescent audiences? Oh, definitely. I mean, we’ve got music that my parents like; they dig it. But the majority of our music is…I wouldn’t say targeted for young audiences, but they definitely relate to it very well and receive it very well, and let us know. They’re very interactive with us, which is very cool.

Does that normally happen at gigs? Not generally. I have fallen over a few times, but I’ve never cut myself before.

You’re working on a new album now? We’ve just been lazily demo-ing. I think we’ve demo’ed about eighteen tracks over the last six months; in between tours we get together and try and record them, so we can forget about them until it’s time to do the album. There’s eight in there. Obviously they’re not all good enough to go on the actual record – we’ll probably try and write another twelve to sixteen before we sit down and nut out exactly what we’re going to put onto the album.

On this tour, you’re playing a lot of all-ages shows. Are most of your shows all-ages? I wouldn’t say most. We try and do as many as we can. It’s really hard logistically to get an

I know it’s still early days, but how do you think it’s measuring up against your previous releases? How do you reckon it’s going to be different?

All About Life’s “Reset” Button with

want to compromise anything. I wanted it to be…I wanted it to sound good; be sonically top-quality. Yeah, I just wanted to do it right, and I feel like I’ve got it there. I spent a lot of time gathering songs. The other thing is, I wanted to go in there and be a musician, rather than be a record label and producer and manager and everything…

The Sonic Serenade of a Highway at Night from

Which you are… Well that’s what I have been doing in the past. I’ve been doing everything. This time, I just wanted to be a musician, and just play my soul out.

In the headlights of a moving car, the things we see sometimes last only for an instant; appearing and disappearing in the blink of an eye, as the night swallows them back up again. Imagine music made in the same fashion, and you’re somewhat close to the eerie, majestic beauty of the latest offering of Sydney’s expanded jazz trio Triosk. I spoke to pianist Adrian about “The Headlight Serenade”.

In your bum? Why? It happened on stage last night, in Ballarat; I fell over and smashed a glass…got in a bit of a mess.

Paul Greene For a songwriter, inspiration can come from anywhere, at any time. For track and field star turned singersongwriter Paul Greene, it comes from touring in regional areas – something which has helped cement his musical reputation in places few musicians tread. But with his third album “Reset”, inspiration came from something far more important, as we found out when he spoke to Dave Williams. How would you compare the album “Reset” to what you’ve done before? Not so much whether it’s better or worse or anything – how is it different? Well…after making four albums, and I’ve been working a bit as a producer – I’ve got a little home studio – I’m feeling a lot more comfortable in the studio. I’ve done, like, a thousand gigs in the last five years, so I’m really comfortable playing live. But the studio is something I’ve always felt a little…I had trouble translating the songs; translating what I do into the studio. That always felt a bit awkward. But I found a producer who just… I just loved his sound. He’s a brilliant engineer and a brilliant mixer. And he also gets the live, touring acoustic thing. He was able to translate it really well, and then add another layer; sort of the “ear candy” side of it, as well as capture a live performance. Which is pretty much how we did all the songs; we did everything pretty much live, with the band in the room just banging it out. I didn’t

LE! A S D C MEGA AT

“Reset” means “to go back to the beginning; to start again”. Is that how you’re viewing this album? Yep. Very much, I think. “Reset” for lots and lots of reasons. I’ve just become a dad in the last two years; there’s a lot of that reflected on the album. Every album is sort of like another phase of your life, in a way. It was very much a re-appraisal. Having Lilly really made me change my perspective on just about everything, including the way I do music and the way I write. Like moving to a new city – it’s a whole new kind of life. I just can’t emphasise how profound the affect of becoming a dad is… You do a lot of touring in regional areas. Apart from the obvious differences, what are some of the differences you see between playing regional versus playing capital cities? Well, every town’s unique. And every town has a different kind of reception. Triple J has a lot to do with it actually, because places I go where there’s no Triple J have a very different approach to places I go where there is. That’s just the music they’re exposed to. Different ideas and concepts, too… Yeah. You turn up in some towns...I had one guy come up to me and say, “Mate, what are you doing? What are you playing? What do you call this style of music?” And I go, “Um…I don’t know, I just make up songs…” And he’s like, “It’s not blues, and it’s not country, so what is it?” Just that sort of approach to music. To be reminded of that – you don’t need to be working in paradigms, and I try not to in a way. Paul Greene is playing five shows in Tasmania in late July. Check the Gig Guide for details.

By Dave Williams

… got seven stitches put in my bum… …I m… I think we all agree, and all the people around us agree, that it’s going to shit on the old record. I know Darren’s songwriting has matured tenfold, and we’re all putting in a lot of different ideas. We’re all kind of broadening our musical horizons. It’s going to be a little more rock-y. I don’t think there’ll be any more ballads on it, like the last record. It’s still going to have

Valid to the 15th of August 2006 *excludes laybuys and holds

Ruffcut Records - 33a Elizabeth St Mall, Hobart PAGE 4

One song on the album, “Lazyboat”, clocks in at eleven minutes. What are some of the advantages and disadvantages of songs reaching that kind of length? “Lazyboat” is quite an epic. It seems quite still, even ambient, but it really bubbles with currents of energy under the surface. Gradually that energy takes over the song before it drifts off again.

What are some of the strengths of instrumental music, compared to vocals?

Triosk play Hobart’s Republic Bar on Thursday 27th of July

By Tom Wilson

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We are essentially an expanded jazz trio – piano, double-bass and drums, but also we’re really interested in how using electronics and other keyboards and production techniques can develop our music further.

What’s next for you guys? We finish up our Australian tour in Brisbane on August 2. After that we’re heading off to Japan, then for a longer stint in Europe.

Word Play DJ Tim

By Tom Wilson

“The Headlight Serenade” is a beautiful album. How do you think it stands up against your previous works? It’s really a consolidation of five years of working through ideas of how a jazz trio can clash with experimental electronics and a keen interest in post-production… On the first two albums, we used the electronics as a static kind of accompaniment to what went on in the trio, but now we’ve got them really interacting and interlaced with much more dense live band material.

Friday 28th July

Sunday Nights

Kisschasy are playing five dates on the 20 th to the 23 rd of this month, supported by Trial Kennedy. Check the Gig Guide for details.

Triosk pharoahs

Thursday 3rd August Buy 2 CDs get 15% off total price Buy 3 CDs get 25% off the total price Buy 4 CDs get 30% off the total price

the same up-tempo, good feel about it; it’s just going to be a little more rock-y, and less stopstart as the last record was.

Live music every Wednesday, Thursday, Friday & Saturday nights. No cover charge. 6pm til late 14 Davey Street Hobart 03 6231 9088 or www.larkdistillery.com.au

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N o w S o l e l y A Tr a d e r

Rogue Traders In many ways, Rogue Traders singer Natalie Bassingthwaighte is a different woman to the one we spoke to in the lead up to their performance at MS FEST earlier this year. Since shooting her last scene for “Neighbours”, her focus has narrowed onto the electro-rock band she joined roughly a year ago, and she spoke to Dave Williams about the group and her changed perspective…

together and the more times you do gigs, the tighter you get, the more experience you have.You come up with new ideas. So definitely. Where do you see the cur rent direction of the band, musically? Are you still focusing on that pop-rock genre? You know, I think that we don’ t want to…we don’ t want to lose sight of the fact that it is an electro-rock act, you know? James c a m e f r o m t h e d a n c e v i b e … I t ’s s t i l l electro in there, but we’re a band, so it’s pretty rocking as well. Have you had any interest over seas yet? Yeah – we’re about to go to the UK next week. “Voodoo Child” is being released on the 10 th , and the album’s being released on the 17 th . So far it’s been played by Radio 1, like, six weeks out. Just the energ y of the songs is really exciting at the moment.

Loud At The Lark SAUCE got the low-down from Matt Sertori of LOUD MUSIC about original music at The Lark Distillery. You work with a pretty diverse range of artists at the Lark, how did that happen? Partially through the success of the open-mike sessions which we do at every gig. You just get approached by so many people to play and after a few beers people just start jamming with one another and making stuff up. At the last gig we had the Green Mist, African drumming group Tumba and Jordy from Viva Computer on stage at once – it was the most bizarre-looking band and it’s pretty typical of the spontaneous stuff that happens when you put a bunch of musos in a room with fifty

barrels of whiskey. The Lark also attracts a crowd you simply don’t see at other venues, we have people aged from fourteen to eighty and people from all walks of life. Why do you think its working so well? A lot of people are open-minded about music and want to listen to new stuff they wouldn’t normally be exposed to, and simply the Lark is a great room for music; thick eighteenth-century walls and a low ceiling that has natural reverb like a cellar. For the artists they can just rock up and play, they don’t even need to pack an instrument because we always have plenty of guitars and sometimes other instruments for people to play. We also like to use our music to support charities and these have been some of our best nights.

The Spondooli Brothers

Ill Starred Captain touring tasmania in july Whereabouts are you at the moment? I’m in Melbour ne. That’s your home, isn’ t it? Yeah, it is. I’ve just been away for a couple of weeks, and I’m back home. Whereabouts did you go? I actually went to Bali. Just a little trip to rest and relax. Were the weeks before you went away pretty hectic? Well, the last week was pretty intense, with “Neighbours”; just got a bit emotional and all of that. The week after that, I had a few days off. And then we did quite a bit of publicity and stuf f like that. I’m really relaxed now! (Laughs) Are you finding it hard to jug gle the two career s these days? Well I finished “Neighbours” three weeks a go. So I feel alright. I suppose it will be a little while before we actually see you leave on screen? Yeah; it ends up being about September, I think. You left “Neighbour s” to concentrate on Ro gue Trader s? I did, but also…it was time. I was ready to… in the acting business as well; I was ready to do my own thing. I think if you play any role for longer than three years, it’s pretty hard for people to see you somewhere else. So I made my decision based on that. And I needed a bit of a break, because I was just too exhausted. Also, to really indulge in the Rogue Traders, and see what can happen with it. I spoke with you just before you did the MS FEST show in Launceston. That was fantastic. We had such a g reat time at that show. It was sold out. It was a huge crowd. It was awesome, yeah. It was so g reat. Yet another eye-opener for us. Do you think that, from then till now, there’s been some evolution in the band? Ye a h , ab s o l u t e l y. Th e l o n ge r t h a t yo u ’re

I’m not a baby anymore… re…

Launceston Uni - w/ The Embers thu 20th Irish Murphys (Lton) - w/ The Embers fri 21st Hobart Uni Bar w/ Mark vincent sat 22nd The Batty - w/ Halfmast Sun 23rd Lewisham Tavern w/ Mark vincent wed 19th

We’re not sure what’s going to happen, but it’s pretty exciting. You’ve released “Voodoo Child” on vinyl as well. (Laughs) Have we? You’d know more than me! I guess that’s sor t of paying respect back to James’ DJ and electro days. I guess so, yeah. I think it’s impor tant to do that; for James as well as all of us, because that’s the direction where it star ted. “Voodoo Child” has been a big success for us so far. When you’ re on the road, and you guys are all to gether, what’s the dynamic? Who’s the funny one? Who’s the serious one? Who’s always got smelly socks? Um…well, I’m the only girl, so I’m the only nice one! (Laughs) No, joking! James is probably the kookiest one; he’s a nutba g. Some might say me, but I would say him. Tim’s pretty quiet. He’s also got a really hysterical personality; he’s ver y funny as well. Cam’s probably the balance of all of us. As for smelly socks, we probably all have smelly socks! You must have had a lot of advice from people along the way; what’s a bit of advice that you’ve gone back and returned to in cer tain situations? Um…I think it’s stuff that you kind of lear n yourself. I’m not a baby anymore – I’m thir ty years old. I still make mistakes, and I still get advice, and sometimes it’s right, and sometimes it’s wrong. You have to believe in yourself, ultimately. I’ve just lear ned from my mistakes along the way. More than anything, I’ve lear ned to be happy. Some people are going to like you, and some people are going to hate you. That’s okay. Just do what you do and do it well. Th e Ro g u e Tra d e r s p l ay t h e D e r we n t Enter tainment Centre on Wednesday the 27nd of September with TV Rock

By Dave Williams

g i g i G G

e0e66 d i u y0 ly u u G l J G u

Fri & Sat 7 & 8 July Sat

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Love Outside Andromeda+the inches $12/10 Dave Graney + Claire Moore $17 Kiss Chasey$15 presale $18 Doorsale The Josh Owen Band $7/5 Lord Stompy+Sour Sob Bob Triosk $5/3 The Exploders $12/10 +Sounds Like Chicken

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Mondays World Famous UNI + BACKPACKER NIGHT

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Tuesday Every Tuesday night from 8-10pm "Acoustic Winter Warmers" Various acoustic duos

Wednesdays Home to Acoustic Duo

JohnCraig 10pmOnwards

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Matcham July Gigs:

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7th - Detour 8th - Burn-Styne 14th - Oscar 15th - Forgetful Jones 21st - Detour 22nd - New Age Hippies 28th - Oscar 29th - Detour

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Ta l k i n g A t t a c k S h e e p a n d C o l l a p s e d L u n g s w i t h

Elephant Mojo

euphemistic! (Laughs) This debut that you’re hoping to release next year – while it’s still early days, what can you tell me about the sound of the release, other than what just happened when you opened the studio door? (Laughs) We haven’t even really settled on a sound. We’re just going to keep on writing songs until the end of this year, and we want to be able to choose from an absolute plethora of sounds…anything that comes out of us at the moment we’re going to put down. And afterwards we’re going to sit back and see what will actually work on an album, or what direction we’re really keen to go in. At the moment, we’ve probably gone a bit more rock-y; getting a bit more of a solid groove happening. I actually just watched the clip for “Cool In America”. The chorus [“We say what we say ‘cause it’s cool in America…”] – what are you guys trying to say with that? Is it what you see most Australian musicians doing, or does it go deeper than that? Yeah…it’s not only just music-wise; it’s everythingwise. I guess it’s the whole Ali G syndrome. Everything that is popular in America…America sets a trend, and we’ll all just hook up to it. But basically, we’ve got so much great stuff happening in Australia; so much great music, so much great fashion… We have a lot going for Australia, but we don’t seem to…it’s almost Australian to be down on yourself. Don’t be arrogant – don’t love yourself – but be proud of what we’ve got. That’s pretty much what we’re saying with the song. Do you think that this is a recent phenomenon? Probably not! (Laughs) It’s probably been going for a while – you just notice it more now. With MTV and all that…even “Idol” and all that stuff. Even though “Idol” didn’t actually start in America, we still get all those Kelly Clarksons over here… A lot of the time you just feel a bit awash. For a slight change of tact here, I’ve heard that you actually have problems with your lung… Yeah, that’s not too good. That lung has collapsed on me twice. I’ve had an operation on it. But it’s not because of…I don’t smoke or anything like that. It’s just being tall, male and thin, apparently – it makes me susceptible to it. But I read an interview the other day where it said that bass-heavy music can cause collapsed lungs, so I’ve had to move Paul’s bass to the other side of the jam room! He loves to hit that octave, and he loves to hit the bass-overdrive distortion pedals…so whenever that happens, I kind of curl up into a little ball in the corner!

I go got food poisoning and passed out on stage… e… I’m going to go out on a limb here and say that it’s understandable to see the heading “Elephant Mojo” and get a mental image of something odd and probably inappropriate for small children… For those with an ear to the ground in Australian funk-rock circles, however, it means something else entirely. A four-piece from Brisbane with three EPs under their collective belt and plans to invade Tasmania, Elephant Mojo are, in my humble opinion, something for Tassie punters to get excited about. I spoke to guitarist Nick Matheson about their forthcoming LP, lung collapses and…well… ”attack sheep”. So you’re ready to do the interview? Oh, I’m pumped! You’re pumped! Excellent! Apart from being pumped, what are you up to today? I had to get all my pedals checked out for tour…just all the boring rock stuff that people don’t like to see. Just getting my pedals right…I’ve had to pick up my amp...I’ve got to buy strings for two months worth of touring, so that’s like two hundred dollars worth of strings. All the mundane stuff. People don’t realise that, do they? Even musicians have to mow their lawns… (Laughs) I’m thinking about getting a little sheep for the front of the house! It’ll keep the grass down while we’re away. But we’ll have to train it to be an attack sheep, because we need it to guard the house! What’s Elephant Mojo been up to in the last month? Well, the last two months…I moved down here with the rest of the band to Melbourne. We’ve just been booked away in our little studio here in Melbourne. We’ve got a jam room set up, and if you don’t believe me have a listen to this! [Door opens. Deafening blast of drums. Door closes.]

I’m going to get in trouble for that. “Cool In America” is your third EP in as many years. You’re preparing to do the full-length, but what do you see as some of the main strengths and weaknesses of EPs? Basically the first EP got us out there. That’s the main strength of it – you’ve got to get your music out there for people to know you. When we first got together, I think the first EP came out after six months. It was really rushed; it’s very different to what we do now. It was a bit of a maelstrom of the time when we were putting everything in, hoping that what we were going to create was something good. But you can tell that with our first EP there were a lot of influences involved; we were coming from different backgrounds. But it helped us get gigs, because if you’ve got a good enough EP you can play it to venues and say, “Put us on sometime”. As it progressed…it’s mainly to get more of your music out there; get it on community radios, try to get it on Triple J. Just get as much airplay as possible so at least people know the name. Which is…original, to say the least… (Laughs) It is, it is. We still have to think of a good story of how we got it, but it’s pretty boring. We just got it off the internet. Well apparently elephants have enormous penises… Apparently! That’s the other thing that we were going to say, but we didn’t want to be

Does it really affect how you guys tour and play shows? I’ve been pretty lucky, actually. It’s only affected one show, which was when my lung collapsed and I had to go into hospital; we missed one show. Other than that…I don’t know what stroke of luck it is, but it’s never been during a tour or anything like that. I’ve been incredibly lucky that way. The only time I’ve ever been sick on tour was when I got food poisoning and passed out on stage. Elephant Mojo are playing five dates in Tassie from the 1st of August to the 5th. Check Gig Guide for details.

By Tom Wilson Illustration by Dean Swanton

The

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'Service Industry Night' LIVE MUSIC CHEAP DRINKS

Student & Backpacker Night

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Ill Starred Captain & Halfmast Miss Nude Tasmania 1st prize $20,000 The Exploders w/ Dirty Harry & The Rockets

The Valley The Fauves The Audreys Scientists of Modern Music PAGE 7


got a better live thing, but not for a solo artist; more for a band.

Ta l k i n g A w a r d s a n d W i s h f u l T h i n k i n g w i t h

You played at Falls at the beginning of the year. How did you feel about that? That was unbelievable. It was a great opportunity to play with such recognisable bands.

Jordan Millar

Do you think you took a lot away from it that you didn’t have before? Yeah. I learned a lot about entertaining people on a much bigger scale than just sitting in a pub; you’re on stage, and you’ve got heaps of people walking past. You’ve got to grab them; you’ve got to go, “Come and listen to this!” You learn stuff about that. You also learn about how it all comes together; how it all works. Backstage, how it’s all run, contracts…it was really great. When was “Wishful Thinking” released? It was released February this year. How do you feel about that now? I don’t think it’s an accurate representation of what I really do. It was good to have, and it’s good to have something that people can take away from the concert, so that they can remember who you are. But I’m still in Sydney, over in the studio, trying

to get a more radio-friendly EP together to take to record companies and stuff. So it’s good, and I like the songs, and I still play all the songs…but I don’t know if I’ll be re-printing it! (Laughs) I understand that you’re a bit of a Sudoku master… (Laughs) That was interesting – that came out of the last interview I did for SAUCE! I’m definitely not a master, but I do enjoy it, particularly at work, because in winter nobody wants to buy sunnies! I do a lot of it, but [I’m] not a “master” – I definitely wouldn’t put myself in the “master” category! How old are you now? I’m nineteen. It’s a hard thing to think about, but what are your future directions? Do you think you’re going to remain a solo artist? Are you interested in being part of a band? Yeah, definitely. I’ve got a band in Hobart, and I’m coming down to play with them…which is why we’re doing this interview! (Laughs) I’m coming down to play with them again. But I’m looking for a band up here, because it opens up whole new doors; you can play in different styles, and at different venues.

So yeah; I love being part of a band, but I think I’ll always be doing my songs under the name Jordan Millar. What’s the band that you’ve got in Hobart? We’re just the Jordan Millar Band. We’ve played a couple of things; we played the EP launch…did really well down there for a while. They’re all still really keen to play, so I’m coming down to do that again. It just allows us to jam and solo and have a good time, I suppose. When is that? When are you coming back down? I’m coming back down to play in Launceston on the 5th…Wednesday the 5th of July at Irish Murphy’s, then the next night I’m playing in the Republic Bar in Hobart. Thanks very much for talking with me, and sorry I called you late. Not a problem mate. Thanks a lot. As he said, Jordan Millar plays Launceston’s Irish Murphy’s on Wednesday the 5th of July and Hobart’s Republic Bar on the 6th.

Unless you’re the CEO of Microsoft or have a bad sinus problem, $5000 is nothing to be sneezed at, and so it goes without saying that singer/ songwriter and ex-pat Tasmanian Jordan Millar won’t be reaching for a hanky any time soon, having just reaped the rewards of a national songwriting competition. Now living in Sydney, he’s venturing back down to the state that spawned him for gigs in Hobart and Launceston, which is why SAUCE dropped him a line…a little later than was organised… So apart from waiting for me to call you, what else have you been up to today? Today? Well…I got up really early and watched the World Cup, which was a great game. I’ve been at work for the rest of the morning. What do you do for a day job? I work in a sunglasses place in Sydney.

END OF FASHION

In terms of your music, what have you been up to in the last month? In the last month…playing heaps of gigs up here around Sydney, in the city and stuff. I won a big national songwriting award. What’s the award you won? It’s the National Youth Week Rock IT competition… the Industry award. What’s the judging criteria? It’s pretty much entry for anyone eighteen to twentyfive; you enter your song and they judge it on the lyrics, the composing, the chord structure and all that sort of stuff. What song was it that you submitted? And what do you think it was about that song that they liked? “Lost My Way” was the song. And the judge said to me that he just thought the chorus was great, the melodies were great, and the guitar chords…so, yeah. Pretty good overall wrap… Yeah! Definitely! What does this mean for you, in terms of your career? Well it’s a great thing to put on your CV, when you’re going to record companies and all that kind of stuff. You can say, “I won a major national award”. It also gives me a five-thousand-dollar music voucher as the prize, so that’s going to help me out heaps. Is that to spend on equipment or something? Yeah. I’m going to get some home recording equipment; set myself up. Besides that…it’s not massive exposure, but it’s really…it’s a good one to win, because it’s not just a state one, but a national competition out of hundreds of entries and stuff. Hopefully it’ll help me along! Congratulations. Thanks, man! Cheers! You’re living in Sydney. Yeah. I only moved up here a couple of months ago. Had you always lived in Tassie? Yeah; my whole life. Why have you moved to Sydney? Well it was a musical thing, really. You kind of get stuck in circles in Tassie, playing the same pubs to the same people. I just really wanted to push it – I’m young still. So I came up here, and I’ve been playing heaps. I went into the studio yesterday, actually; spent a day in a studio up here and came out with some really good stuff. I don’t know; it’s a really good place to be for music, because there’re so many more people here to hear it, and so many more opportunities. So, why Sydney? I just had a couple of friends here. I knew Sydney well…I liked Sydney a bit more than Melbourne. It’s

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SAUCE gets the soulful blues of

The Josh Owen Band For modern soul trio the Josh Owen Band, the ball is well and truly rolling. Having met in a pub in Melbourne, they have recently filmed their first music video, and are on their way down here for a series of shows around the state. Mr Owen had a word to SAUCE.

For these reasons the music always takes on new shapes and contours as we move into the future. Whenever I write I am very conscious of trying to be soulful and while I borrow from the old sound I always try to fuse it with something new therefore making it “modern”. You’ve also said that you are “applying blues to songwriting”. What do you think are some of the most noticeable attributes of the sound that is created? The most noticeable attributes I think are the tones of our instruments and some of the contours of the melodies. The rock n roll of the 50s was at is core blues. Most soul and funk came from gospel and blues. If you are going to be playing music that has soul,

I know they are not a roots band but you see my point. You can never foresee anything, but the fact is, everything will evolve! I do think it is looking good for the fans of this style. There are so many bands taking the music to new places. Where and when can Taswegians catch you? 19th July at the Hobart Uni, 20th July at St Helens for the Wilderness Society, 22nd July at the Republic bar in Hobart, 23rd July at the Lewisham Tavern, and 26th July at the Launceston Uni. What’s next for you guys? We are busy working on tracks for our first album that we hope to have out in the not too distant future!

By Tom Wilson

Y u can never foresee anything, but You bu the fact is, everything will evolve! lve ! You’ve described your sound as “modern soul music” – what do you think it is about your sound that earns it the modern tag? Well first of all it is 2006 and so we have all the elements of the last twenty years or so to draw on. Anything that is being done now is in essence “modern”, unless you are a purist or a cover band. We love the funk and soul sounds of the 60s and 70s. So much time has past since our parents’ generation and the world is not the same place as it was.

Musically, what have you been doing in the last month? Last month, not so much, I guess. A new record is coming together. It needed to be mixed and edited on ProTools. I’ve been focusing on that. Lots of “screwdriver work”, I guess you could call it. Shifting things. Tinkering with little bits. Nothing really on the Gotye front. You know, when you put an album out yourself as I’ve done, and you want to promote it yourself and do everything short of distribute it to stores, that’s been taking up my full attention really.

If you want a job done properly, you’ve got to do it yourself. Just ask Wally de Backer, known to the music world as Gotye. He’s released his awesome new album, “Like Drawing Blood”, independently, which is consistent for a guy who bangs out his tunes from home. Disappointing on some levels, gratifying in others, Sauce spoke with Gotye, about, amongst other things, how the record companies didn’t show him enough love to sign-up. What are you doing for the rest of today? The rest of today? Oh, god…I’m actually focusing on some basic stuff today. I’ve got to write some scripts and things for something we’re rehearsing tonight; an almost theatre-style cabaret thing we do, which will be different. But I’ve also got to rehearse for a listening party we’re throwing tomorrow for the new record.

How have the reactions been to “Like Drawing Blood”? Oh…horror…shock…praise…mad frothing at the mouth… (Laughs) It’s funny you mention that, because I was just thinking of some negative reactions recently. Overall, it’s been overwhelmingly positive, with a few sprinklings of polarised opposite opinions. Which is good, I guess; it’s good when you get strong reactions to something. Well you know you’ve got their attention, I suppose… Yeah. That’s true. Which is good, because I’d be far less satisfied if I put something out that was just under the radar; an “oh yeah – that’s that” kind of record. So it’s good, I think; lots of good things happening in the first four weeks of the record’s release. It’s really freaking me out, really, because the response has been quite broad, and actually quite huge compared to my expectations. What changes have you noticed, as the creator, between “Boardface” (2004) and “Like Drawing Blood”? Ah…I think “Like Drawing Blood” is a far better realised album…at least in terms of the mix and the production. From the production point of view, I guess that comes a little bit from how I was putting tunes together; choices of sounds, and how I was tinkering with things. But from the overall sonic depth and control and sparkle of the record, Frank’s input – his mastery of the mix and of

IRISH MURPHY’S

there will always be an element of blues in it. So, instead of writing blues songs I am applying some of the blues elements to my songs. While it’s clearly not the only genre you play in, where do you think roots music is going in Australia? You can never predict where music is going to go. No one saw Jimi Hendrix coming. Another classic example is the way Nirvana totally changed the radio sound-scape in the early nineties with one song.

the mastering stage – really makes the album a betterrealised record. But I think there’s charm to “Boardface”’s lo-fi-ness, which is the result of me having very cheap software and mixing it all in my bedroom. Why did you choose to release “Like Drawing Blood” independently? Was it a choice? Ah…not completely. I was set to release it independently around the start of this year, in January, because the music was finished around December and January. So that was sort of the plan. But some opportunities came up where some labels approached me, and I had to put things on hold a little bit to consider the possibilities. But to cut a long story short, things didn’t really pan out. Nothing was really offered in the end, so after three or four months of being set back and looking at deals, I just came back to putting it out independently again, which I’m really happy with. As I said – with such a strong response to it, there’re lots of great things about being independent; taking things totally at your own pace, and there’s far better cuts per album sale. It’s a lot of hard work. You’re not free to just go and start making music again, which is something that would be nice to do. But you learn so much more about how the industry

works, and what it’s like actually putting a record out and promoting it, and what it takes for people to start talking about it. In describing your songwriting process, it was said that “They come to Gotye in his dreams, and he gathers them around him like little children around a campfire.” What the hell does that mean? Shed some light, please! (Laughs) I don’t know if I can, man! Maybe there was more than enough light being shed on my brain when I was up late at night, tapping away, coming up with something silly for my bio! (Laughs) I like to be lighthearted with things like that… I had a good – to me, it was flattering – comment from somebody the other day, which was, “Your bio is perhaps the most hilarious and

6 :

July Feature Gigs

F r i

7 :

S at

8 :

F r i

1 4 :

Fri 14th

D a v e G r a n e y $2

Wed 19th

Sour Bob & Lord Stompy (Adelaide Musical Comedy Team)

Thurs 20th

Ill Starred Captain + The Embers

Wed 26th

Nathan Weldon + Rhys Crimmin

(Hobart)

Door Charge

Wednesday Originals Night $ 8:50 Carlton or Cascade Jugs + $ 10 Stella Jugs + $ 17:50 Hoegaarden Jugs

Live Music 7 Days

Theres Always Something happening At Irish

Gotye simultaneously uninformative bio I’ve read for years”. So that was flattering! Do you still make music in your bedroom? Well…I suppose it’s never been in my bedroom as such. I’ve preferred to have two small rooms, and not sleep in the same room as the computers and screens and stuff like that. Bad Feng Shui… Yeah…it can be. And when you spend a lot of your day on your computer in a certain room, you want to shift somewhere slightly different to go to sleep in. But you know, it’s just a little music room in a house in a suburb somewhere.

What are some of the advantages of having the home studio setup? Well you can tinker away and put an album together piece-by-piece over two-and-a-half years! (Laughs) Rather than having to have everything planned and then go into a studio for only one week because that’s all you can afford, and knock everything down. The kind of music I write…it couldn’t possibly come together in a studio as such, unless I was able to hire a studio for a few months… I guess I’m a fairly patient man, in that regard. “Like Drawing Blood” is out now.

By Tom Wilson

J u ly G i g s T h u

Glenn Moorhouse + Waiter

Drawing Blood from …

…horror…shock…praise…mad frothing at the mouth …

211 Brisbane St Launceston 6331 4440

Wed 12th

CDs are available from www.joshowen.com.au and all good record stores!

W e d

1 9 :

F r i

2 1 :

S at

2 2 :

F r i

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W o l f M a i l B a d Lu c k C h a r m s B u r n T h e B l a c k L o d g e H a m m e r h e a d L a dy C r i m s o n E x i t W o u n d s (Melb) T h e F r i e n d ly G h o s t - P r o d u c e r s N i g h t R e d R i va l M i d n i g h t C a l l e r T h e R o o b s , T h e N o N o ' s B a d L u c k C h a r m s (EP Lau R a g g e d A n n s

n c h )

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Sauce - Issue 28, 5-7-06