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2011

HEALTH

CAREguide

A Directory of Medical Services for Wayne & Holmes Counties

Tuesday, August 30th

presented by

The Daily Record


Area is home to quality health care rooms, a Kinesis room, a larger occupational therapy area, a larger speech therapy area and an expansion of the health and wellness “gym” space. David Rhoad, marketing and public relations manager at the hospital, said during the expansion project, a radiology room was also added, along with more physician suite space in the facility. Bill Sheron, CEO of Wooster Community Hospital, noted this was the first expansion undertaken since HealthPoint opened in 2002, which allowed the facility to better take care of health Wooster Community Hospital Wooster Community Hospital was recognized on the list of and wellness members, as well offer more space for rehabilitaThomson Reuters Top 100 Hospitals for three consecutive tion patients. years. Its leadership and board continue to expand facilities and Cleveland Clinic Wooster services. The Cleveland Clinic Ambulatory Surgery Center opened In recent years, the hospital added two floors, known as the its doors to the public this April, offering the community a first patient tower, above the Women’s Pavilion and the Progressive glimpse into the state-of-the-art, $9.4 million addition at the CleveCare Unit. The two new medical/surgical floors contain 50 pri- land Clinic Wooster’s Milltown Specialty Center. vate rooms. The center is designed for outpatient surgery, and CynThe hospital has moved to private rooms for patients, which thia Rosa, a Cleveland Clinic administrator, estimated allows for greater control over heating and cooling and elimi- about 3,200 procedures will be done annually. nates the possibility of disturbing another patient. A number of Surgical Director Dr. Richard Guttman said the operatthese rooms are equipped with ceiling lifts, to assist nursing with ing rooms were built on the open-heart surgery model, though moving patients who might be paralyzed or obese. It promotes those procedures will not be performed there. safety not only for the patients, but staff, too. Technology is a major component of the new center, from the While the hospital offers private rooms for patients, there are latest equipment and medical devices, computerized dispenssome family rooms. These rooms feature sleeper sofas, refrig- ing systems for medication to the Cleveland Clinic’s electronic erators and microwaves to accommodate family members who records system. Because of the comprehensive records system, might choose to remain with a loved one around the clock. Wooster Community Hospital’s HealthPoint has expanded, See Pg. 3 — HEALTH CARE too. A $2 million project saw the addition of new exercise classStaff Reports Talk to community leaders, and they will tell you there is no shortage of high quality care in Wayne and Holmes counties. This area boasts the Wooster Community Hospital, the Cleveland Clinic Wooster, Dunlap Community Hospital, Pomerene Hospital, Summa Wadsworth-Rittman Hospital and Lodi Community Hospital. Each one has been recognized and awarded for the quality of services provided, and the awards cover a range of categories.

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Dunlap’s staff has worked hard to make the hospital a leader in wellness care. Dr. Andy Naumoff created the innovative Growing Healthy Habits initiatives in 2003, and it has earned the city statewide recognition for Orrville’s efforts to become the healthiest community in Ohio.

Health care (Continued From Page 2) which all of the physicians in the Cleveland Clinic network can access, doctors, anesthesiologists and nurses are alerted if there are any allergies a patient might have when medication is dispensed from the automated Pyxis system. The ASC features three operating rooms and a shell for a fourth one that could be ready to go quickly. The Cleveland Clinic Wooster takes a collaborative approach to medicine, Medical Director Dr. Tony Tizzano has said. It’s not just one physician looking at the best way to approach a patient’s needs, but a group.

Dunlap Community Hospital In July 2011, Dunlap Community Hospital in Orrville announced it was in the process of becoming a subsidiary of Aultman Hospital in Canton in order to ensure it would continue to fulfill its mission of providing family-centered care and wellness. President and CEO Dr. Marchelle Suppan stated in a news release the agreement was a logical choice because the management teams from both hospitals share a vision of “developing highly effective, integrated system of health services.” By joining with Aultman, Suppan noted the arrangement would allow for Dunlap to continue to invest in new equipment and technology. Edward J. Roth III, president and CEO of the Aultman Health Foundation, said the agreement means Dunlap will remain a not-for-profit community hospital in Orrville. The facility will continue to operate as a critical-access hospital with its current management team intact. During 2010, the hospital invested $1.9 million and served more than 28,800 individuals through its programs.

Pomerene Hospital Pomerene Hospital faced its share of challenges over the past year, but along with them came opportunities for growth and efficiency. When the hospital released its 2010 community benefit report, President and CEO Tony Snyder noted increased charity care, which reached $2 million, bad debt and a hospital franchise fee created financial adversities. Despite the challenges, the hospital did not have to lay off workers, it minimized costs and delivered the same level of high-quality care to the community. The hospital unveiled a new slogan, “I Believe in Pomerene,” and it rang true for many area residents, as evidenced by an increase in its Press Ganey score, which measures patient satisfaction and hospital performance. From the third quarter to the fourth quarter of 2010, customer satisfaction rose from 88.6 percent to 91 percent, placing the hospital in the top echelon of health care providers. Not only is Pomerene a good place for patients, but also for workers. It was among the winners of a NorthCoast 99 Award, which recognizes top workplaces, again. Snyder believed it was the fifth time the hospital was recognized. To meet the needs of patients throughout Holmes County, Pomerene Hospital has been taking services into the communities, most notably the community health screenings it does every month. Rebecca Ragon, public relations and marketing coordinator, has said Pomerene tries to reach all areas of the county with the screenings on a monthly basis and at a very low cost. See Pg. 4 — HEALTH CARE

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during the day for occupational therapy services, and it is used for overflow emergency care on nights and weekends, when those services are more in demand, Winter said. Summa Wadsworth-Rittman has seen its Founders Hall utilized more (Continued From Page 3) by physicians and health care offices. The third floor houses the WomThe Amish make up a large portion of its patient base. By bringing an’s Center, a dialysis center and an eye center. In 2010, the fourth floor the services to places like Charm, Mount Hope and Berlin, people do was developed. There is now a Sleep Disorders Laboratory with four beds.The sleep lab is now larger, and each unit features a shower, which not have to travel as far. Pomerene was able to add new health services over the past year, allows patients to get ready and leave for work from the hospital. like three new ear, nose and throat specialists; a new sleep lab, which Lodi Community Hospital has two private rooms with handicapped-accessible amenities; a partLodi Community Hospital continues to gain national recognition for nership with Aultman Home Medical to offer durable medical equip- the quality care of its emergency department, and in 2010 it earned its ment; and digital mammography. fifth consecutive Press Ganey Summit Award. The hospital’s emergency department was the only one in Ohio and Summa Wadsworth-Rittman Hospital Like other hospitals in the region, Summa Wadsworth-Rittman Hos- one of three nationwide to have earned the award for five consecutive pital has been in expansion mode, doubling the number of intensive years. In light of their fifth award, members of administration and the hoscare unit beds, from four to eight, in a $2 million project. The new, eight-bed ICU was part of a long-term strategic vision, and pital’s Service Improvement Team came up with the idea to shoot a it includes a bariatric room to accommodate larger patients, complete celebration music video. Custom lyrics were set to the tune of “Mambo No. 5” and marketing with specialty equipment.Among the new features are lifts on the ceiling in four of the rooms to help nurses move patients. Six of the rooms coordinator Christine Gorey directed the video project, which included more than 18 departments throughout the hospital. are geared toward critical care and two are multi-purpose rooms. When the video was shown during Lodi Community Hospital’s anThe space vacated by the former four-bed ICU unit will be converted to surgical suites, and when the project is completed there will be six nual post-holiday party, President Thomas Whelan noted, “This video beds in all, with each one being around 600-650 square feet, President provides us with an opportunity to show our staff how much we appreciate their hard work and dedication to exceeding our patient’s exTom DeBord has said. The new surgical suites are expected to be completed by mid- to late- pectations with each visit.” The hospital also started the first phase of transitioning into electronic September, said Beth Winter, regional marketing director for Summa medical records, Akron General spokesman Jim Gosky said previousWadsworth-Rittman Hospital and Summa Barberton Hospital. The expansion of the emergency department is done, and it added ly. The health system will continue to roll out additional phases. In 2010, the hospital, which is part of the Akron General system, about 12 beds. Wadsworth-Rittman broke ground on the $2.5 million project in 2010, which saw the emergency department grow by 6,200 added a community liaison nurse. The role of the community liaison nurse includes promoting public awareness of healthier lifestyles and square feet of space. Summa Center for Corporate Health utilizes the additional space of available screenings and resources, establishing workplace wellness programs and networking with businesses, churches, schools and other organizations in the community. Other additions at the hospital, over the past year or so, to address patients needs included the addition of digital mammography services and an upgrade to its computed axial tomography (CT) scanner. The digital mammography helps physicians detect breast cancer earlier and more succinctly than in the past, Whelan had said. With the upgrade in CT scanner, Lodi Community stayed with 16slice technology, but it was a more high-tech version that is able to withstand more weight. Whelan said statistics show the country is becom138 E. Liberty St. ing more obese, and this type of equipment will help better serve the community. “We are not here to judge, we are here to serve,” he said Wooster, Ohio 44691 previously. For larger patients, the hospital can also bring in equipment and furniture to better accommodate them. (330) 264-9797 In January 2011, the hospital announced it would be working with a professional counselor to offer outpatient mental health care services Mon.-Fri. 10am-6pm • Sat. 10am-5pm for the area.

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Pediatricians: Sports in heat OK with precautions By LINDSEY TANNER AP Medical Writer CHICAGO (AP) — Playing sports in hot, steamy weather is safe for healthy children and teen athletes, so long as precautions are taken and the drive to win doesn’t trump common sense, the nation’s largest pediatricians group says. New guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics arrived just as school sports ramped up in sultry August temperatures. The advice comes just after two Georgia high school football players died following practices in 90-plus degree heat. Authorities were investigating if the weather contributed. The guidelines replace a more restrictive policy based on old thinking that kids were more vulnerable to heat stress than adults. New research shows that’s not true, the academy says. With adequate training, water intake, time-outs and emergency treatment available on the sidelines, healthy young athletes can play even in high heat and humidity — within reason, the guidelines say. “The more educated parents, athletes and staff are about risks associated with heat illness, the more likely they will think twice before allowing a competitive culture to overtake sound sensibilities,” said Dr. Cynthia Devore, co-author of the policy and a physician for schools in the Rochester, NY area. Government data released last week showed that more than 3,000 U.S. children and teens younger than 20 received emergency-room treatment for nonfatal heat illness from sports or exercise between 2001 and 2009. A few young athletes die annually from heat-related illness. Over a 13year period, 29 high school football players died from heat stroke, data from the American Football Coaches Association and others show. Football is a special concern, because players often begin intense practice during late-summer heat, wearing uniforms and padding that can be stifling. Dr. Michael Bergeron, a University of South Dakota sports medicine specialist, said the academy’s old policy was often ignored because it recommended limiting or avoiding sports even in common hot weather conditions.The new policy is more detailed and nuanced, recommending that athletes be evaluated individually for play in hot weather. Still, Bergeron warned that overzealousness can be dangerous even for healthy kids, and even in relatively tame summer weather. “You can take somebody in 80-degree heat and you can kill them if you work them hard enough,” he said. The guidelines don’t list temperature or humidity cutoffs, but say safety should be the top priority. Other academy advice includes: — Teams should have emergency plans with trained personnel and treatment available and policies for avoiding heat illness. — Give kids about two weeks to adapt to preseason sessions, gradually increasing intensity and duration. Closely monitor more vulnerable kids, including those who are overweight or have diabetes. — Make sure athletes are well-hydrated before practice or games. Dur-

ing activity, kids aged 9-12 should drink about half a cup to a cup of water every 20 minutes; for teens, 5 or 6 cups an hour. Sports drinks containing electrolytes and sodium should be offered during extra strenuous activity. — Educate everyone about signs of heat stress, including dizziness, muscle cramps, headaches and nausea. Kids with symptoms should be sidelined and treated immediately; athletes should be encouraged to report if teammates seem to be struggling.

AP Photo/Salina Journal, Tom Dorsey

Members of the Salina South High School soccer team work out for conditioning training early July 20, in Salina, Kan., to beat the heat of the day. The temperature was expected to reach 106 degrees in the Salina area.

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The sleep-deprived society Why are we losing sleep and so sleep-deprived? processes worse and harder to treat for physicians or can actually cause these health problems. Therefore, it is very important to know when one needs to seek medical help for their sleep deprivation. If a person’s sleep is disturbed only a few days out of the month or occasionally, that is certainly normal. Stress and worry contribute to sleeplessness also; however, if sleeplessness occurs night after night and month after month (especially if you have chronic medical conditions), you should speak to your primary physician about your sleep problems as there could be an underlying sleep disorder such as sleep apnea, restless legs syndrome, or chronic insomnia, which are more common disorders. It’s important to understand the signs of a sleep disorder. The more notable signs are excessive daytime sleepiness, fatigue, snoring-gasping-snorting, morning headaches (a result of loss of oxygen due to sleep apnea and can be very dangerous), dry mouth, restless sleeping with much tossing and turning, constant movement and twitching of legs, up and down at night, sleeping in only two to three hour increments. These are all sure signs of a sleep disorder. If you have these symptoms the majority of your nights, it’s imperative you seek help. Make sure to make sleep a priority in your life, as it dictates the quality and quantity of life that one has and if you are not getting good sleep and have the above symptoms, talk to your physician. By Lisa Naidu, RPSGT, Sleep Technologist at The Sleep Disorders Center Wooster Community Hospital

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WOOSTER — Sleep deprivation will cost employers an estimated $2,000 to $3,000 annually per employee, resulting in billions of dollars lost in productivity. Moreover, insufficient sleep is responsible for motor vehicle and machinery-related accidents, causing substantial injury and disability each year. Why are we losing sleep and so sleep deprived? One of the primary reasons is because people do not understand the importance of sleep. The sleep cycle is a basic need that we must have, just like eating and drinking. Most people feel they don’t have enough time in their days and they don't make it a priority in their life. As a society, we’re short on time and have too many demands between family, work, school, church and our social lives. We tend to cut short our sleep time to make room for everything else in our lives; while it may be possible to do this short term, over time the results are detrimental to our health. Studies have shown that sleep is essential for normal immune system function and to maintain the ability to fight disease and sickness. Sleep also is essential for normal nervous system function and the ability to function both physically and mentally. In addition, sleep is essential for learning and for normal, healthy cell growth. In addition, an estimated 40 million people have underlying sleep disorders that have not been diagnosed and people are failing to realize that sleep disorders are closely linked to other health problems such as hypertension, diabetes, stroke, wound healing and cardiac problems. A sleep disorder can make disease

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Hospital meals move to restaurant style service By AMANDA ROLIK Staff Writer WOOSTER — The needs of patients are being considered more than ever in the kitchens of some hospitals. Nutrition managers are taking steps to meet the challenges presented by patients with varying dietary needs by changing the food they serve and the way they serve it. According to Bonnie Willis, manager of Nutritional Food Services at Wooster Community Hospital, patients can have their needs catered to with a room-service style menu that makes eating at the hospital more like dining in a restaurant. The serving style allows patients to eat when they’re hungry, and not when their caretakers want them to eat. “It’s more about the patient,” Willis said. The meal itself is left up to the patient as well. “Basically, whatever you want you can order,” Willis said. “We try to accommodate as many challenges as the patient has.” The new approach takes into account a patient’s medical condition may require him to eat differently than normal. “The goal is often to have (patients) eat and get better,” Willis said. Willis added there is a lot of emphasis on making sure patients receive quality food, especially because eating may be their only chance to settle down and relax during their hospital stay. “Our patients are our company; they are our guest while they’re here,” Willis said. To appeal to its patients, the hospital has taken into account the way the local public is used to eating. “In Wayne County, it’s about basics,” Willis said. “(The) majority are still eating the way they eat at home.”

However, there are slight changes occurring that show the public moving away from the traditional, such as an increased interest in eating fish and vegetarian dishes. The hospital also provides “celebration meals” for new parents and their families, as well as joint replacement patients and their families, to enjoy before going home. The patients are able to choose the menu for their special meal. Putting patients’ dietary needs first has become a priority at Dunlap Community Hospital as well. Its Meals on Demand program allows patients to select what and when they wish to eat, within their doctor prescribed diet. “It puts the patient in control,” said nutrition manager Karen Fleck, who noted the program has shown to be a “tremendous improvement” for the hospital’s patients as well as the dietary department. The program allows patients to order off of the selective menu anytime from 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., with each nursing unit being stocked with foods such as sandwiches, fruit beverages and soups to be available after hours for patients and family members. The hospital’s dietary department also focuses on food quality, and does comparative shopping to ensure the use of the best quality food possible. DCH’s menu features more than 50 percent heart healthy options. It also includes necessary information for patients who are diabetic or trying to watch their sodium or cholesterol intake. See Pg. 10 — SERVICE

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You need to know antioxidant level SUGARCREEK — As a naturopath in private practice, I have always felt it my ethical duty to offer the best to the clients who have sought out my services. In the field of preventative health care, namely preventative nutrition, one thing that has always been of concern for me is the inability to substantiate or prove just how much our holistic services have been helpful. With many therapies we have to trust the client’s interpretation of how well or to what degree the therapies and services are helpful (which can be enough in many instances). This leaves, though, much room for error and speculation, which in many instances causes a “fly by night” approach that can be frustrating not only for the practitioner but especially for the client. There are testimonials that have value, but many times fail to prove or ascertain just how effective the product or therapy may be. There are many wonderful products that can be helpful in many instances but the questions still remain. Is what I’m taking the most effective formulation, juice, or supplement? To what degree is it helping? Is there something better? And if so, how can it be proved scientifically and ethically? These questions have always been a concern to me in dealing with effective supplementation. There are so many choices and so many stories and so many claims that after awhile a person can be left in a state of confusion and skepticism. The scientific community has become aware of the direction which the public has taken and is beginning to focus much-needed attention and value to the supplementation and wellness area. They are providing new technologies, clinical studies, discoveries and products that are just astounding and encouraging. The public and the scientific community (which does not always include the medical community) are creating measurable proof concerning the value of complementary, holistic, nutritional and preventa-

tive avenues. In fact even the Journal of the American Medical Association (June 20, 2002), has recommended that every adult should be taking vitamin supplements. One such instance of this proof involves a new device, the Pharmanex Bio-Photonic Laser Scanner, which measures the antioxidant levels in the human body without blood or tissue samples. It is completely non-invasive and allows the client to have the results within minutes. It is based upon Raman Spectroscopy (Dr. Raman won a Nobel Prize in 1930 for this discovery of light scattering), a blue-light laser which measures the carotenoid antioxidant molecules. The most recent clinical research from three of the top medical universities in the United States validates that this devise actually is clinically more accurate than blood work and is a true indicator of the person’s overall antioxidant status. This is a tremendous breakthrough for several reasons. First of all, this allows a person a very inexpensive way to get a true measurement of their antioxidant health. Second, it allows a person to know if the supplements they are taking are truly working. In fact, clinical studies show that higher antioxidant levels can cut your risk of heart disease up to 70 percent, diabetes 40 percent, lung cancer 30 percent, and breast cancer 20 percent (USA Today, Jan. 18, 2004). What are antioxidants, though, to begin with and how do they protect us? Antioxidants are the anti-agers of the nutrient world by protecting your body from free radical damage. Free radicals are highly reactive forms of oxygen that are missing an electron. When they come into contact with normal molecules, they try to steal an electron, damaging the healthy cell and its DNA. Some estimates show that every cell in your body takes 75,000 oxidative hits to its DNA daily. See Pg. 10 — LEVEL

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Level (Continued From Page 9) Free radical damage has long been believed to be a risk factor of many of the chronic diseases that accompany aging which would include heart disease, eye degeneration, memory loss, damage from UV light and cancer. Antioxidants work to counteract the damage caused by free radicals by gobbling up as many free radicals as they can and deactivating them, preventing them from doing damage. If damage has already taken place, they may give the free radical an electron to stabilize it, or combine with it to form a different, more stable compound. The only sources of antioxidants are from fruits and vegetables or from truly high quality supplements. Almost every-

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one doesn’t eat enough fruits and vegetable. USDA states you should eat up to 9-12 servings of antioxidant rich foods (fruits and vegetables) per day. Most people don’t. As far as supplements are concerned, most individuals are taking all sorts of supplements without any scientific validation if what they are taking is truly working. Most supplements are of low quality or have little effectiveness (bioavailability) because of this lack of ability to measure their effectiveness at the tissue level. This has now changed. Each nutriceutical company I use in my practices has a unique strength or focus due to their science. Over the years I have learned that no one supplemental company makes the best supplements in all categories ... that is why I use different companies for different purposes, to create the desired results. In conclusion, it is vital that we take action. It is vital that we know our antioxidant status. It is vital that we know that the nutriceuticals and supplements we are taking are working. And it is vital that we invest a portion of our wealth to protect our health or our health (or lack of) will rob us of our wealth. Therefor, don’t wait until you are experiencing your health failing ... be proactive ... do something now to protect it or improve it. Jedidiah D. Smith is a Clinical Holistic Health Practitioner in private practice for 28 years and maintains two offices, one of which is in Sugarcreek. He has lectured internationally on various holistic health topics. You can find further information at www.jedidiahdsmithllc.com .

Service (Continued From Page 8) According to Fleck, the small size of the hospital works to its advantage as well, since it allows them to treat each patient as an individual as well as maintain a familial atmosphere. “We are able to take more time with our patients, whereas larger facilities may not have the time,” Fleck said. At Wooster Community Hospital, food services have started putting labels on entrees in the cafeteria to help everyone at the hospital make better selections, said Willis. The labels indicate “go slow” and “woah” foods, or foods that people should be cautious of or avoid altogether. It is a color coded system that uses green labels to indicate foods that are good, yellow to indicate foods you should eat occassionally and red to indicate foods that are high in fat or high in sodium. “You can make the choice,” Willis said. The system has been put in place for visitors and employees, and not necessarily patients. It is meant to be educational since, according to Willis, not everyone knows which foods are the right ones to choose and “the hospital should be a setting of example.”

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Dunlap rehab program ‘as aggressive as any’ By PAUL LOCHER Staff Writer ORRVILLE — Back in the dark and olden days of medicine — say, 20 years ago — a patient who underwent a total hip replacement, total knee replacement, or had abdominal surgery, could expect to spend an average of five days recuperating in the hospital before beginning any kind of therapy at all. This typically led to what is today viewed as a longer-than-normal convalescence, with a longer-than-normal hiatus from one’s regular life routines. But today that hospital stay has been typically whittled down to only three days, and rehabilitation therapy begins almost as soon a patient comes out of the anesthesia. Stacey DiGiulio, physical therapist and rehabilitation services manager for Dunlap Community Hospital, and Larry Hamrick, physical therapist, say that post-operative rehabilitation today begins almost as soon as a patient becomes alert after surgery. And because of the advent of new anesthesias like epidurals and various kinds of pain blocks, says DiGuilio, there is no longer any kind of mental “haze” in many cases. “Older patients now feel less foggy or confused coming out of surgery,” said DiGiulio, “and we can begin working with them faster.” Moreover, DiGiulio notes, surgical techniques have vastly improved during the past couple decades. “There is less cutting today because scopes are used in many surgeries now. Because of this there is less blood loss, less time recovering, and pain control in general has became much more effective. “Because of all these things,” said DiGiulio,“patients are able to begin rehabilitation faster.” In addition, said Hamrick, new and better materials are being used in artificial joints, making it possible to operate on younger people.

“It used to be,” said Hamrick, who has worked in rehabilitation at Dunlap for 23 years, “that doctors wouldn’t do a total knee (replacement) or total hip (replacement) in a younger person, because the materials wouldn’t hold up for the rest of their expected lifetime. If they did this operation on a younger person, they felt that patient would wear out the device before the end of their life, and they would have to get it replaced a second time, which is hard to do.” DiGiulio said that where formerly bed exercises were prescribed for people following serious surgeries, “Now, we’re geared toward getting people out of bed as soon as possible and getting them to walk at least a household distance so that they can go to the bathroom and do light household chores on their own. There’s an expectation,” she continued, “that the patient will be able to get up and down on chairs and into and out of bed.” After leaving the hospital, Hamrick said, most patients need to enter rehabilitation services after a prescribed period. At Dunlap, these rehabilitation services take place either within the hospital itself or at the nearby Dunlap West rehab facility on Crown Hill Road. Hamrick said such therapy sessions typically last between six and eight weeks. Hamrick said that in this therapy, patients undergo “functional strengthening,” through weight-bearing exercises, going up and down steps, balance activities and endurance activities. DiGiulio said, “Patients now come in the door better, and are able to get rid of their walker at two weeks instead of a month. After that we’re able to work with them on maintaining their wellness over time.” According to DiGiulio, who has worked in the physical therapy field for 25 years in both Summit and Wayne counties, Dunlap’s post-op rehab program is considered “state-of-the art,” and she adds, “They are as aggressive as anyone.” Hamrick and DiGiulio have been joined in Dunlap’s physical therapy department by Marla Weisend, a recent graduate of Walsh University.

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330-698-2015

129 N. Wenger Rd., Dalton

330-828-2223

“Providing high quality, timely medical care & health guidance for families.”

Health Guide • Page 11


What Do I Need To Know About

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Health Guide â&#x20AC;˘ Page 12

Yearly eyecare helps avoid future health problems (StatePoint) Did you know that everyone needs a regular eye exam â&#x20AC;&#x201D; even someone who doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wear glasses? Most people assume an annual eye exam only checks a lens prescription, but your eye doctor is also checking to make sure your eyes are healthy. The eyes are the only unobstructed, non-invasive view of blood vessels in the body, and they can tell a lot about your overall health. Through comprehensive eye exams, eye doctors can see eye conditions like glaucoma and macular degeneration, as well as signs of diseases like diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol. Eye doctors can even identify signs of diabetes up to seven years before a patient would typically show symptoms and be diagnosed by a primary care physician. People are three times more likely to get an eye exam than a routine physical, so eye exams are a great way to identify the early warning signs of many diseases. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With health care costs skyrocketing, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more important than ever to diagnose and treat medical conditions as soon as possibleâ&#x20AC;&#x161; â&#x20AC;&#x153;before they become a true burden on a patientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s body and wallet,â&#x20AC;? says Jonathan Stein, O.D., a VSP Vision Care provider in Manhattan Beach, Calif. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And with diseases as prevalent as diabetes, hypertension and high cholesterol, regular eye exams become a critical part of managing a patientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s overall health.â&#x20AC;? One condition an eye doctor checks for during a comprehensive eye exam is diabetic retinopathy. The condition is marked by damage to the blood vessels in the retina and can lead to blindness if not treated early. However, with annual eye examinations and proper follow-up care, 90 percent of all diabetes-related blindness can be prevented. High cholesterol is another condition eye doctors can detect by looking for waxy, yellowish buildup in the blood vessels of the eyes. In fact, 65 percent of the time, eyecare providers detect high cholesterol before any other provider, according to a recent study commissioned by VSP Vision Care, the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest not-for-profit vision benefits company. By getting annual comprehensive eye exams, families and individuals alike can save hundreds if not thousands of dollars on medical costs. Proper preventive care can help avoid costly medical procedures in the future. Even more money can be saved by avoiding medical supplies and medications, time off work and potentially higher-risk insurance premiums for advanced chronic conditions. For more information on the benefit of eye exams and their role in overall health, visit www.seemuchmore.com. Remember, scheduling eye exams is a relatively easy way to protect your familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vision and health.


Vista Hearing Aid Services: ‘Hear what you’ve been missing’ By KATHERINE RYDER Spectrum Publications Editor Questions and answers with Nancy Funk, hearing instrument specialist and Walter Whitney, owner Q: Tell me about Vista Hearing. A: The founder, Walter Whitney, of Vista Hearing Instruments & Audiology, fit his first hearing aid about 50 years ago. At that time, nobody, including Whitney, knew that he would establish a company that would become an industry leader in serving the hearing needs of people in Ohio and Pennsylvania. In 1981, Whitney decided that there had to be a better way to provide high quality hearing health care. Thus, Vista Hearing Instruments & Audiology was born with five basic philosophies: 1. Certified Clinical Audiologists and Hearing Instrument Specialists working together create an unbeatable team. 2. Good hearing aids work better than low-cost or sub-standard hearing aids. 3. Superb service along with a sincere desire to provide excellence in hearing care result in happy patients. 4. Thorough explanations about hearing loss, hearing aids, and long-term hearing health care results in more informed patients. 5. Honesty is the very best policy. Q: What is your focus/mission in serving your customers? A: Helping them hear well. Vista Hearing is known for its service. As a whole, we pride ourselves on our service. As a specialist, I take the time to go out and meet our customers if they are unable or have forgotten to make their appointment. I’m out in the Amish community once a week, knocking on doors and familiarizing myself with the people in our area. Sometimes it’s difficult for customers to accept that they need a hearing assistance device. A lot of times it takes the spouse or another family member to push the other person into coming to the office. There’s a denial stage with hearing loss — acceptance and embarrassment are difficult ... but the hearing aids we have now, the newer lines are very hard to see. Q: What would you consider to be the business’ biggest success? A: Service. Q: What is something you could improve on? A: Getting our name out. Marketing the business is something we’re continuing to work on. Q: Describe your relationship with your competitors? A: We don’t have any competitors in Orrville. They’re mainly based in the Wooster and Wads-worth area. Our Internet competition is what really hits us hard, though. I don’t look at what my competition does or doesn’t do; we all have a different approach to the business. Vista prioritizes trust and confidence with the customer above anything else. We know that the customer isn’t going to want to work with us if they can’t trust us.

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Q: What do you offer your customers (in terms of products and financial assistance)? A: We work with Care Credit, which is a financial company. We also accept any insurance plan that helps with hearing aids. We have a private label on our own hearing aids so we don’t have to deal with a lot of different manufacturers. We also offer help to our customers in finding any hearing aid related devices. Q: How does an individual know they might need a hearing aid? A: Recognizing and accepting the fact that your hearing isn’t as good as it used to be is difficult. Generally, there is little or no physical discomfort associated with hearing loss and there are no visible signs of a hearing problem. And since it usually occurs slowly, you tend to get used to doing without sounds you no longer hear. Doing without sound becomes a way of life because you also start doing without social activities, conversations, even friends. Chances are other people noticed you had a problem before you did, although they probably didn’t realize the problem was poor hearing. Some of the “symptoms” of hearing loss are: 1. raised voice 2. turning the television or radio up too loud 3. continually asking people to repeat or speak louder 4. straining to hear 5. misunderstanding conversations 6. ringing or buzzing in the ears 7. other people seem to mumble 8. being accused of not paying attention Vista Hearing has two store locations in the area: 117 E. Market St., Orrville and 74 W. Jackson St., Millersburg. For more information call 330-682-8844 or 330-674-7499. You can also visit Vista’s corporate website at www.vistahearing.com.

FAMILY PRACTICE CENTER, Inc. Family Practice Center, Inc. has provided Wayne, Holmes and Stark counties for more than 40 years. Welcome to the family you can trust with your families medical needs. Robert F. Lindsay, D.O., Charles D. Milligan, D.O., Cheryl A. Brinley, MSN/FNP, Douglas R. Brown, D.O., Matthew P. Wayt, P.A-C.

Hrs: Mon-Wed 8am-8pm; Th 8am-6pm; Fri 8am-5pm; Sat 8am-noon 56199

365 S. Crown Hill Road, Orrville, OH 44667 (330) 682-3075 (24Hrs.) Health Guide • Page 13


Be sure to get a yearly mammogram WOOSTER — According to the American Cancer Society’s guidelines, mammography is recommended for women beginning at age 40 and continuing annually as long as a woman is in good health. However, more and more physicians are getting a baseline mammogram at age 35 (this is particularly important for women who have a family history of breast cancer), and then begin yearly mammograms at age 40, as long as results remain normal. It is important to know that mammography has complementary tests that may assist with possible diagnosis. For example, an MRI in addition to a mammogram may be recommended for women who have a strong family history, genetic risk, or other risk factors for breast cancer. In addition, ultrasound can be utilized to determine if a mass-like structure is concerning. The digital mammogram is often preferred over traditional films because they take an image much like a digital camera. To the radiologist, the electronic digital image is much easier to manipulate to visually examine the various tissue densities in the breast.With digital mammography, the magnification, orientation, brightness and contrast of the image may be altered after the exam is completed to help the radiologist more clearly see certain areas without having to repeat the mammogram. However, the greatest difference is a higher sensitivity to abnormalities within the breast. Although both digital and traditional film screen mammography utilize radiation, small studies have shown less radiation exposure is used in digital. Women can feel confident about having regular mammograms to find cancers early, as mammography is the gold standard for breast cancer diagnosis. With today’s digital technology, mammograms are quick, less painful, and use far less radiation. For example, at Wooster Community Hospital’s HealthPoint facility, the digital mammography unit has a hinged, gentle compression paddle, Mammopad cushions are used for

each patient, which provide warmth and comfort, and the HealthPoint unit produces only a quarter of the Mammography Quality Standards Act for acceptable radiation dose for accreditation. Most importantly, all women are encouraged to continue self-examination breast exams whether they have yearly mammograms or not. The American Cancer Society believes the use of mammograms, complementary additional testing, clinical breast exams and reporting breast changes to a physician early offer women the best chance to beat breast cancer, if diagnosed. Dave Harrison R.T.(R)(N), MBA, Manager of Imaging Services Wooster Community Hospital

Backpack safety tips for kids (StatePoint) School may be a figurative pain in the neck for many children, but what about a literal pain in the neck — and back? These days, the answer is yes, and backpacks are to blame. Or more specifically, the improper use of backpacks. “The average child carries a backpack that would be the equivalent of a 39-pound burden for a 176-pound man, or a 29-pound load for a 132pound woman,” says Dr. Rick McMichael, president of the American Chiropractic Association. “Growing children should only be carrying 10-20 percent of their body weight.” Heavy backpacks can negatively affect your child’s health by pulling on ligaments and muscles that cause neck and back pain and can possibly cause deformity of the spine, according to the ACA. See Pg. 15 — BACKPACK

Keeping smiles unique with dentures Custom-made molds and wraparound care sets Signature Denture apart Smiles set people apart, even if they are crooked, a little coffee-stained or big and toothy. So when it’s time to select dentures, Dr. John Dawe at Signature Denture said he wants to preserve the individuality of each set of teeth he must replace. “We’re a little unique here,” Dawe said. “You don’t find many places that do what we do.” In a lab filled with models of people’s teeth, Dawe and his associates design and craft full and partial dentures on their off days from patient visits. Having a lab and adjoining dental office blends Dawe’s experience as a general dentist and his specialization in dentures as a former dental technician.

“Teeth are like fingerprints and they’re different in all of us.” - Dr. John Dawe, Signature Denture Dawe said he isn’t alone in his methods, but that it is rare to find practices that offer a lab and an office in the same location. In most cases,

dentists must send denture molds and measurements to commercial labs. These technicians do not work with patients individually and will not always catch the details of where the original teeth were placed. At Dawe’s office, he uses a magnifying video camera so he can identify the fine details of a person’s smile from old photos or even from the person. He also said that knowing the shape and measurements of a person’s face can change how he shapes a set of dentures, so he takes the time to determine how the teeth should be. “Teeth are like fingerprints and they’re different in all of us,” Dawe said. “You want your teeth, that are not too perfect...nature doesn’t make straight lines.” Dawe said he chooses from 50 different shades of hue and color for teeth, which he said is almost impossible without having a laboratory and a dental office. When a tooth cannot be salvaged, it’s removed; but not without the consideration of the patient. Signature Denture will create an “immediate

If Your Smile Is Not Becoming To You - You Should Be Coming To:

Signature Health Guide • Page 14

denture” that will keep the patient from going without teeth. Over the next seven to eight months, Dawe will make adjustments so that it fits as the gum swelling subsides. With an immediate denture, whoever designs the permanent denture will have a reference point of how the natural teeth looked. “That way, we don’t have to start from scratch and just imagine what the teeth looked like,” Dawe said.

John R. Dawe, D.D.S.,

General Dentist Denture Studio & Laboratory 567 N. Market Street • Wooster, OH

330-264-7226


Chiropractic offers non-invasive healing alternatives WOOSTER — At Chaffee Chiropractic Clinic, 242 E. Milltown Road, the community’s health is the No. 1 concern. The clinic combines a variety of treatments to provide its patients with faster, longer-lasting correction of their health conditions. The doctors at Chaffee Chiropractic use chiropractic manipulation, physiotherapy, rehabilitation, massage therapy, nutritional and wellness coaching, nutritional supplements and acupuncture to achieve the desired result. The clinic’s approach does not include surgery or medications, which means patients get alternatives that are non-invasive, personalized, hands-on and effective. “We believe that chiropractic care is an affordable, natural and effective approach to overall health and well-being, including pain relief,” said Dr. Tami Chaffee, who runs the practice along with her husband, Dr. Bryce Chaffee. At Chaffee Chiropractic Clinic, they understand that no two people are alike and each person’s health concerns are unique. Their goal is to offer relief of pain while working to correct the cause of the patient’s condition and maintain their health and wellness with them as an active participant. “Each person is different, and we want to take the time to address their specific health concerns, said Dr. Bryce Chaffee. Many people are unfamiliar with the benefits provided by chiropractic care, and that is why Chaffee Chiropractic Clinic focuses on patient education. At a patient’s first visit, a skilled doctor will discuss their specific needs. An examination to determine their health and wellness level will follow, along with safe, digital X-rays, if necessary. The doctor will then present a complete findings report and treatment recommendations. “If our doctors find a patient will benefit from chiropractic care a unique treatment plan will be created,” said Dr. Bryce Chaffee. Commonly treated conditions include low back pain, headaches, disc bulging pain, sciatica, neck pain, sports injuries, carpel tunnel, fibromyal-

gia, arthritis and whiplash. Health insurance, workers’ compensation, or auto accident insurance may pay for chiropractic services. For more information or to schedule an appointment, contact Chaffee Chiropractic Clinic at 330-345-0444.

Backpack (Continued From Page 14) — Choose a backpack with wide, padded shoulder straps and a padded back.They should be adjustable so the backpack can be fitted to your child’s body. Straps that are too loose can cause the backpack to dangle uncomfortably and cause spinal misalignment and pain. — Encourage your child to use both straps. Lugging the backpack around by one strap can cause a disproportionate shift of weight to one side, leading to neck and back spasms. — A backpack with individualized compartments helps in positioning the contents most effectively, keeping pointy objects away from the back. — Check to see if your children’s textbooks are available on e-readers or consider buying a second set of textbooks. — Learn some back-strengthening exercises to build up muscles. — Encourage your child to tell you about any pain or discomfort. Do not ignore any back pain in children or teenagers simply because they seem too young. If you or your child experiences pain or discomfort from backpack use, call your doctor of chiropractic, who is licensed and trained to diagnose and treat patients of all ages. Doctors of chiropractic can also prescribe exercises to help children develop strong muscles, along with instruction in good nutrition, posture and sleeping habits. You can find more backpack safety tips and learn about treatment for back pain at www.acatoday.org/patients.

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Health Guide • Page 15


Diabetes can have effect on your hearing WOOSTER — Diabetes and hearing loss are two of America’s most widespread health concerns. Nearly 26 million people in the United States have diabetes, and an estimated 34.5 million have some type of hearing loss. The numbers are similar — is there a link? Yes, says the National Institute of Health. In fact, the NIH has found that hearing loss is twice as common in people with diabetes as it is in those who don’t have the disease. Also, of the 79 million adults thought to have pre-diabetes, the rate of hearing loss is 30 percent higher than in those with normal blood sugar. How does diabetes contribute to hearing loss? Hearing depends on small blood vessels and nerves in the inner ear. Researchers believe that, over time, high blood glucose levels can damage these vessels and nerves, diminishing the ability to hear. I don’t think I have any problem with my hearing. Are you sure? For most people, hearing loss happens over time. The symptoms can be hard to notice. Quite often, family members and friends notice hearing loss before the person experiencing it. Your doctor may not always screen for hearing loss during a physical. Even if your doctor does check for hearing loss, you may still “pass” the screening test in a quiet exam room. Common signs of hearing loss include: — Frequently asking others to repeat themselves — Trouble following conversations that involve more than two people — Thinking that others are mumbling — Problems hearing in noisy places such as busy restaurants — Trouble hearing the voices of women and small children — Turning up the TV or radio volume too loud for others who are nearby I’m not even 65 — how could my hearing be bad already?

Most people with hearing loss are younger than 65. Hearing problems can even happen in children. What should I do if I suspect a hearing loss? You may then want to seek help from a hearing specialist like: an audiologist, a licensed hearing aid dispenser or a doctor who specializes in hearing problems. From a full hearing exam, you’ll learn more about your hearing loss. You will also be told what can be done to treat it. What can be done to treat a hearing loss? Sometimes the problem is just an earwax build-up and the patient is referred to a doctor to remove the wax. Treatment will depend on the type of hearing loss. The most common type of hearing loss is called “sensorineural hearing loss,” This is the kind usually found with diabetes. It cannot usually be cured. However, most cases of sensorineural hearing loss can be treated with hearing aids. How can I be sure that hearing aids will help? Hearing aids have changed a lot in the past few years. Instead of making all sounds louder, like the old kind, newer hearing aids are better at making what you want to hear more clear. These hearing aids also have special features. They may have automatic volume control and can reduce background noise. But I don’t want to be seen wearing hearing aids. Hearing aids are getting smaller and smaller. It is unlikely anyone will notice when you are wearing them. The truth is, people are more likely to notice your hearing loss. People who don’t treat their hearing problems can become depressed and try to avoid their friends. On the other hand, studies show that people who wear hearing aids often have a better quality of life. For more information, visit www.diabetes.org Call Cleartone Hearing Aid Services (330-262-2200) to schedule your free hearing screening.

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Health Guide • Page 16


56152

Health Guide â&#x20AC;˘ Page 17


Do guys take better care of their cars or themselves? (ARA) — It’s no secret that guys love their cars, but are they more likely to always change the oil on time than to visit the doctor for their annual checkup? Almost 70 percent of men find it easier to care for their cars than for their personal health, according to findings from a new survey of 501 men ages 45 to 65 commissioned by Men’s Health Network and Abbott. In addition, more than 40 percent reported they would be more likely to address issues with their car than their health. Men may bring their cars in for service when an issue arises, and schedule regular tune ups to ensure that things are running smoothly, but they might not address their health in the same way. As a result, some men may be ignoring the symptoms of certain health conditions because they are reluctant to visit the doctor, the survey found. If men treated their bodies the way they treat their cars, they would schedule regular doctor’s appointments in the same way that they schedule regular tune ups. The survey is part of “T-Talk Tune-Up,” a new national campaign to raise awareness of men’s health issues. Racing champion Terry Labonte and national men’s health expert Dr. Harry Fisch have teamed up to lead the campaign and encourage men to schedule annual checkups with their doctors. “For many men, tuning up our cars is easier than getting checkups for our health,” says Labonte. “With the help of my wife, Kim, I began to think about my body and my health in the same way I think about the care of my cars. As a result, I scheduled a doctor’s appointment and a series of tests to help stay on top of my health.” Dr. Fisch recommends five health tests every man should discuss with his doctor, including a testicular exam, prostate exam, cholesterol test, testosterone test and blood pressure screening. “It is important to schedule annual checkups because some men may not recognize the symptoms of many treatable conditions such as low testosterone,” says

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Health Guide • Page 18

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A survey of 501 men ages 45-65 and their spouses/significant others, showed more than 40 percent were more likely to address issues with their cars than their own health. Fisch, board certified urologist and clinical professor of medicine at New York Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical College and director of the Male Reproductive Center. Millions of American men are estimated to have low testosterone, but it may be overlooked because the symptoms are subtle and similar to those caused by other conditions. Men may experience symptoms such as sexual dysfunction, decreased sexual desire, decreased muscle mass, loss of body hair, low sperm count, decreased bone mineral density or increased body fat as a result of having low testosterone. To learn more about the importance of men’s health visit www. TTalkTuneUp.com. The site provides men with tips for caring for their cars and their bodies, including a free health maintenance guide. The guide includes information on important tests guys should know about and tips to help keep their bodies running as smoothly as their cars. ——— About the Survey Abbott and Men’s Health Network commissioned Yankelovich Inc., a division of the Futures Company, to conduct a national survey to assess men’s and women’s knowledge of common men’s health issues and gain insight into men’s understanding of their health as it relates to car care. A survey of 501 men ages 45-65 and 501 of their spouses/significant others was fielded to determine just how proactive men are when it comes to their health. Findings are based on an online survey conducted between May 19-23, 2011, among a total sample of 1,002 men and women.


Medical Directory 2011 Allergy/Immunology Allergy & Asthma Treatment Center, Inc 185 Wadsworth Rd Suite H, Wadsworth, OH ......330-334-6212 3562 Commerce Parkway, Wooster, OH ..............330-345-6446 Saad A Sanyurah, MD Eric D White, MD Cleveland Clinic Wooster ......................................330-287-4500 1740 Cleveland Rd, Wooster, OH Sheila Armogida, MD

Ambulance Services Auble EMS & Ambulance .....................................330-682-2966 512 E Oak St, Orrville, OH Samaritan Care Ambulance ..................................330-682-3885 400 S Crown Hill Rd, Orrville, OH Smith Ambulance of North East Ohio.................330-262-4367 1660 Enterprise Parkway, Wooster, OH

Audiology Avada Hearing Care...............................................330-345-1050 114 E Liberty St, Wooster, OH Beltone Audiology & Hearing ..............................330-264-6655 343 W Milltown Rd, Wooster, OH Cleartone Hearing Aid Services ...........................330-262-2200 636 Beall Ave, Wooster, OH Gandee, RJ Hearing Aid Sales & Service............330-264-8344 137 Beall Ave, Wooster, OH Premier Hearing Center ........................................330-674-4327 6 S Washington St, Millersburg, OH Vista Hearing Instruments, Inc 117 E Market St, Orrville, OH ..............................330-682-8844 74 W Jackson St, Millersburg, OH ........................330-674-7499

Bariatrics Northeast Ohio Bariatric Medicine ......................330-473-4525 151 Parkview Dr, Millersburg, OH 3727 Friendsville Rd Suite 3, Wooster, OH Robert A Hart, MD

Cancer/Oncology American Cancer Society ......................................330-347-1563 721 E Milltown Rd, Wooster, OH Cancer Treatment Center ......................................330-262-6060 2376 Benden Dr, Wooster, OH

Cleveland Clinic Wooster Hemotology/Radiation Oncology ........................330-287-4500 721 E Milltown Rd, Wooster, OH Lapman Lun, MD Paul Masci, DO Michelle Uhl, MD James Karol, PA C Daesung Lee, MD Mathew Vossler, MS

Cardiology Cardiovascular Consultants, Inc ...........................800-654-8076 2600 6th St Suite A-2 710, Canton, OH Outpatient Offices Millersburg, Dover, Massillon Gregory J Bonavita, MD FACC Terrance L Cogswell, MD FACC Stepjem M Demming. MD Milan R Dopirak, MD FACC Carlos E Fabre, MD FACC Ira Friedlander, MD FACC Franklin W Griff, MD FACC Gregory C Kloehn, MD FACC Steven A Malosky, MD FACC John J Paulowski, MD FACC John J Paulowski, MD FACC Ramana Podugu, MD FACC John Prodafikas, MD FACC Donald L Russell, MD S. Dinakar Satti, MD FACC Akbar Shah, MD FACC Terrance E Tegtmeier, MD Adnan R. Zaidi, MD FACC Cleveland Clinic Wooster ......................................330-287-4500 721 E Milltown Rd, Wooster, OH Kenneth Schafer, MD Bennett Werner, MD Michelle Murray, PA, C Richard Sterba, MD-Pediatrics Wooster Heart Group ...........................................330-202-5700 1761 Beal Ave., Suite A, Wooster, OH Paul F Moodispaw, MD FACC Alexandros Nicolozakes, MD FACC Cyril S Ofori, MD FACC

Chiropractic Physicians Abbe Chiropractic ..................................................330-674-4988 8128 St Rt 241, Mt Hope, OH Absolute Chiropractic ...........................................330-359-5363 15700 W Main St, Mt Eaton, OH American Chiropractic & Spinal Decompression Center ...................................................................................330-601-0917 2922 Cleveland Rd, Wooster, OH

Health Guide • Page 19


Medical Directory 2011 Bardall Chiropractic ..............................................330-682-9444 531 S Main St, Orrville, OH Bunker, Donald DC ..............................................330-317-1445 3693 Kidron Rd, Kidron, OH Campbell Chiropractic ...........................................330-345-7188 2680 Cleveland Rd, Wooster, OH Carla S Jacobs DC Inc ...........................................330-698-0134 4564 S Carr Rd, Apple Creek, OH Chaffee Chiropractic Clinic 242 E Milltown Rd, Wooster, OH .......................330-345-4440 5336 Co Rd 201 Suite C Millersburg, OH ............330-893-0444 Chiofalo Chiropractic Clinic .................................330-683-1533 516 W High St, Orrville, OH Complete Chiropractic Life Center .....................330-345-3336 5225 Cleveland Rd, Wooster, OH Doylestown Chiropractic Center ..........................330-658-7246 400 Collier Dr, Doylestown, OH Hall, Winston G DC ...............................................330-893-3559 4455 Twp Rd 367, Berlin, OH Hensel Chiropractic Center, Inc ...........................330-674-6700 24B S Clay St, Millersburg, OH Holmes Spine & Sport Chiropractic ....................330-674-0444 1245 Glen Dr, Millersburg, OH Johnston T L ............................................................330-264-8726 709 Quinby Ave, Wooster, OH

Clinics ASAP Medical Care ...............................................330-345-8032 4164 Burbank Rd, Wooster, OH Viola Startzman Clinic ...........................................330-262-2500 1874 Cleveland Rd, Wooster, OH Pomerene Express Care Center-Mt Hope ...........330-674-4711 4606 Twp Rd 634, Millersburg, OH Pomerene Express Care Center-Berlin ...............330-893-2754 4900 Oak St, Berlin, OH

Dentistry/Orthodontics Allcare Dental & Dentures North Canton, OH ..................................................330-649-9000 Cuyahoga Falls/Akron ..........................................330-929-8800 Aspen Dental .........................................................330-262-8383 3847 Burbank Rd, Wooster, OH Baus, Michael DDS ...............................................330-264-2249 1724 Beall Ave, Wooster, OH Bopreman, Thomas H DDS ..................................330-669-2071 157 S Milton St, Smithville, OH Dr. Brad Welsh Dentistry .....................................330-674-4876 231 Parkview Dr, Millersburg, OH Buckeye Dental ......................................................330-263-1667 133 N Buckeye St, Wooster, OH Ronald C Ostroski, DDS

Moore Chiropractic & Wellness............................330-262-6655 347 W Milltown Rd, Wooster, OH

Complete General Dentistry .................................330-264-9271 325 S Market St, Wooster, OH Mark A Larj, DDS

Orrville Chiropractic Center .................................330-682-6876 345 S Crown Hill Rd, Orrville, OH

Dental Arts Building ..............................................330-262-4121 621 Quinby Ave, Wooster, OH

Ross, Dr. Bob...........................................................330-345-7506 231 N Buckeye St, Wooster, OH

Didrick, Barton J DDS ..........................................330-682-0946 446 W Market St, Orrville, OH

Shreve Chiropractic ................................................330-567-3996 126 W McConkey St, Shreve, Oh

Difilippo, Alexander DDS OFC...........................330-345-7100 178 E Milltown Rd, Wooster, OH

Smith, Thomas L DC .............................................330-262-0971 365 W Liberty St, Wooster, OH

Earney Dental Associates, Inc 135 S Clay St, Millersburg, OH .............................330-674-8080 128 W McConkey St, Shreve, OH .........................330-567-3333 William W Earney, DMD PhD

Spine Joint & Nerve ...............................................330-345-1222 2835 Cleveland Rd, Wooster, OH Sterling Chiropractic Center, Inc ..........................330-939-3191 13078 Seville Rd, Sterling, OH Wooster Chiropractic Clinic .................................330-263-5365 521 Beall Ave, Wooster, OH

Health Guide • Page 20

Fiorita, Vincent L DDS MS ...................................330-345-1582 208 E Milltown Rd, Wooster, OH Gesiotto, James DMD ............................................330-359-6447 15988 E Chestnut, Mount Eaton, OH


Medical Directory 2011 Ghazarian, Krikor DDS & Associates .................330-264-9678 130 S Market St, Wooster, OH Gustafson, Mark E DDS OFC ..............................330-264-8973 3431 Commerce Parkway, Wooster, OH Innovative Dental Concepts .................................330-925-2986 314 N Main St, Rittman, OH Wade Karhan, DDS Johns, Sarah M DDS ..............................................330-658-6983 25 N Portage St, Doylestown, OH Kiefer, Alan R DDS ...............................................330-264-8623 1706 Beall Ave, Wooster, OH Lincoln Way Dental Group ...................................330-682-0244 131 N Kohler Rd, Orrville, OH Kevin B Cochran, DDS James A Miller, DDS Theodore C Feucht, DDS Lipaj, James DDS ...................................................330-658-3747 201 N Portage St, Doylestown, OH Lyons, John D DDS ...............................................330-683-1906 1440 W High St, Orrville, OH Madigan, James S DDS ..........................................330-682-0911 310 Maple St, Orrville, OH Matia, James DDS MSD ........................................330-264-5851 1706 Beall Ave, Wooster, OH Miller, Michael E DDS OFC .................................330-264-6519 325 S Market St, Wooster, OH Miller, Steven H DMD...........................................330-264-9799 621 Quinby Ave, Wooster, OH Monheim, John W DDS .........................................330-682-0946 446 W Market St, Orrville, OH Orthodontic Specialists of Wooster, Inc ...............330-345-3070 208 E Milltown Rd, Wooster, OH Neil L Pooler, DDS MS Susan Grimm, DDS MS Pesicek, Christopher DDS .....................................330-264-8688 1457 Burbank Rd, Wooster, OH Pratt, Timothy M DDS ...........................................330-276-3705 163 W Front St, Killbuck, OH Raber Dental...........................................................330-857-0144 3693 Kidron Rd, Kidron, OH Rhodes, Steven & Kelly DDS ..............................330-264-5522 909 Dover Rd, Wooster, OH

Ryan, James L DDS ...............................................330-925-8388 300 N Main St, Rittman, OH Salmans, Robert S DDS .........................................330-262-1121 2300 Gateway Dr, Wooster, OH Walnut Creek Dental .............................................330-893-3363 2962 St Rt 39, Walnut Creek, OH Wooster Dental Associates ...................................330-262-0206 567 N Market St, Wooster, OH Stephen S Pesicek, DDS Daniel S Zupansky, DDS Paul W Hamm, DDS Zacher, Thomas R DDS .........................................330-345-5858 370 E Milltown Rd, Wooster, OH

Dentures Aspen Dental .........................................................330-262-8383 3847 Burbank Rd, Wooster, OH Signature Denture Studio and Laboratory..........330-264-7226 567 N Market St, Wooster, OH John R Dawe, DDS and Associates

Dermatology Cleveland Clinic Wooster .....................................330-287-4500 721 E Milltown Rd, Wooster, OH George Kuffner, MD Wooster Dermatology ...........................................330-202-3360 128 East Milltown Rd, Wooster, OH Rene Bermudez, DO

Ear, Nose & Throat Wooster Ear, Nose & Throat Associates, Inc 1749 Cleveland Rd, Wooster, OH .........................330-264-9699 1245 Glen Dr, Millersburg, OH .............................800-524-9884 Arun K Mathur, MD FACS James R Hessler, MD PhD Keven K Mathur MD FAAOA

Endocrinology Cleveland Clinic Wooster ......................................330-287-4500 721 E Milltown Rd, Wooster, OH David Shewmon, MD B.J. Shook, CRNP Wooster Endocrinology ........................................330-202-3430 3727 Friendsville Rd, Wooster, OH Everett Burgess Jr, MD

Family Physicians Akron Nephrology Associates, Inc ......................330-345-8986 387 W Milltown Rd, Wooster, OH Christine I Lee, DO

Health Guide â&#x20AC;˘ Page 21


Medical Directory 2011 Tom (Tan) Tanphaichits, MD John F Jacobs, Jr, MD Ratnaja Katneni, MD Bay, James H, MD, Inc ..........................................330-345-6622 128 E Milltown Rd. Suite 102, Wooster, OH Chippewa Family Medicine ..................................330-658-1550 80 N Portage St Doylestown, OH Cleveland Clinic Wooster .....................................330-287-4500 1740 Cleveland Rd, Wooster, OH Dale Angerman, MD Brian Beam, MD Frank Cebul III, MD Mark D. Elderbrock, MD Scott Hannan, MD Jeffery Kontak, MD Kyle Lang, MD Darby Baker, CRNP Theresa Malmon-Berg, CRNP Kelly Smith, CRNP Dunlap Family Physicians 830 S Main St. Orrville, OH .................................330-684-2015 49 Maple St Apple Creek, OH .............................330-698-2015 129 N Wenger Rd Dalton, OH .............................330-828-2223 Rober H Hutson, MD Steven D Murray, MD Andrew J Naumoff, MD Larry D Sander, MD East Holmes Family Care, Inc Baltic Medical Clinic, 103 E Main St Baltic, OH ................................................................330-897-4211 Berlin Medical Clinic, 4907-A Dalbey Ln, Berlin, OH ..............................................................330-893-2341 Winesburg Medical Clinic, 2040 Paint Twp Rd 661, Winesburg, OH ......................................................330-359-5989 Walnut Creek Medical Clinic, 4981 Walnut St, Walnut Creek, OH ..................................................330-893-2431 Kim E Boyd, MD Maurice W Stutzman, MD Kim Kornhaus, MD J Eric Miller, MD Titus L Dutcher, MD Family 1st Healthcare.............................................330-345-8410 3477 Commerce Parkway, Wooster, OH Tina M Nelson, MD Family Practice Center, Inc ...................................330-682-3075 365 S Crown Hill Rd, Orrville, OH Douglas R Brown, DO OFC Oliver C Eshenaur, DO OFC Robert F Lindsay, DO Deanne E McCarroll, DO Charles D Milligan, DO OFC Rochelle Pondt, DO

Health Guide â&#x20AC;˘ Page 22

Family Practice Center of Wadsworth .................330-334-6229 251 Leatherman Rd, Wadsworth, OH Timothy E Coleman, MD Michele L Coleman, MD Robert S Crawford, MD Matthew P Finnerman, MD Holmes Family Health Associates .......................330-763-0045 5797 Twp Rd 353, Millersburg, OH Roy Miller, MD Holmes Family Medicine ......................................330-674-1200 151 Parkview Dr, Millersburg, OH Robert Hart, MD Scott Brow, MD John Vaccariello, MD Laura Barr, MD Kimberly Hills, PA-C Medical Center of Rittman ...................................330-925-4911 223 N Main St, Rittman, OH Paul Fracasso, MD Milltown Family Physicians ..................................330-345-8060 128 E Milltown Rd Suite 105, Wooster, OH Amy Joliff, MD John Miller, MD Nashville Medical Clinic ......................................330-378-4951 107 W Millersburg St, Nashville, OH Rittman Family Practice ......................................330-925-3857 or ...............................................................................330-925-3858 25 S Main St, Rittman, OH Darrell Widmer, MD Richard Gunning, MD Wooster Family Medicine .....................................330-202-3422 128 E Milltown Rd Suite 201, Wooster, OH Han Jianming, MD

Gastroenterology Cleveland Clinic Wooster ....................................330-287-4500 721 E Milltown Rd, Wooster, OH James Murphy, MD Cynthia Thorpe, CRNP Jabour, Vincent , MD Wooster, OH ...........................................................330-263-7372 Millersburg, OH ......................................................330-674-4791 Orrville, OH ...........................................................330-684-4791

Geriatrics Adult Geriatrics of Wooster, Inc ...........................330-345-5374 1761 Beall Avenue, Ste. C, Wooster OH 44691 Tai-Chi Kwok, MD


Medical Directory 2011 Wayne Family Medicine .........................................330-345-0058 128 East Milltown Rd., Ste. 205, Wooster, OH 44691 Aly Zewail, MD Kase Speelman & Cullen MD’s, Inc ...................330-723-3256 970 E Washington St Suite 4B, Medina, OH Swisher, Benjamin MD ..........................................330-497-2700 4465 Fulton Dr NW Suite 100, Canton, OH

Hair & Skin Care Cutter’s Hair Studio & Spa ..................................330-264-4200 611 Quinby Ave, Wooster, OH Larry’s Barber Styling ............................................330-262-4247 228 S Market St, Wooster, OH Spa Collections .....................................................330-263-5480 135 W North St, Wooster, OH Winning Image Cosmetics & Boutique................330-264-5500 243 E Liberty St, Wooster, OH

Health & Diet Foods Jenkins Herb & Health Shoppe ............................330-925-1856 148 N 2nd St, Rittman, OH Mt Hope Country Health Store ............................330-674-2202 8129 St Rt 241, Mount Hope, OH Nature’s Food Market of Berlin ...........................330-893-2006 4860 E Main St, Berlin, OH Overman’s Healthy Choices ..................................330-276-4234 9227 Twp Rd 82, Killbuck, OH Wooster Natural Foods ..........................................330-264-9797 138 E Liberty St, Wooster, OH

Hospice Crossroads Hospice ................................................330-899-9100 3743 Boettler Oaks Dr Suite E, Green, OH Hospice & Palliative Care of Greater Wayne County .........................................................330-264-4899 or 800-884-6547 2525 Back Orrville Rd, Wooster, OH Hospice of Holmes County ..................................330-674-5035 931 Wooster Rd, Millersburg, OH

Hospitals Affinity Medical Center .........................................330-832-8761 875 Eight St NE, Massillon, OH Akron Children’s Hospital ...................................330-262-0333

One Perkins Square, Akron, OH Akron General Medical Center ............................330-444-6000 400 Wabash Ave, Akron, OH Aultman Hospital ..................................................330-452-9911 2600 Sixth St SW, Canton, OH Dunlap Community Hospital ...............................330-684-4791 830 S Main St, Orrville, OH Lodi Community Hospital .....................................330-948-1222 or ..............................................................................888-520-6000 225 Elyria St (St. Rt. 83), Lodi, OH Pomerene Hospital ................................................330-674-1015 981 Wooster Rd, Millersburg, OH Summa Health System ...........................................330-615-3001 115 5th NE, Barberton, OH Wooster Community Hospital .............................330-263-8100 1761 Beall Ave, Wooster, OH

Internal Medicine Cleveland Clinic Wooster .....................................330-287-4500 1740 Cleveland Rd, Wooster, OH Loren Kirchner, MD James H Mooney, MD David Reynolds, MD Jill Schaeffer, MD Michael Schuler, MD Liza Talampas, MD Victor Velasquez, MD Terri Weiland, PA, C Sue Ellwood, CRNP Trisha Kalamaras, CRNP Comprehensive Internal Medicine .......................330-202-3434 3727 Friendsville Rd, Wooster, OH Debra Fast, DO Kathleen K Fearon, DO Dana Bonezzi, MD Ghoubrial, Sam MD Inc .......................................330-925-1500 25 S Main St, Rittman, OH Internal Medicine of Wooster ...............................330-202-3330 128 E Milltown Rd Suite 101, Wooster, OH Tushar Patel, MD Millersburg Clinic Inc ...........................................330-674-3434 1261 Wooster Rd, Millersburg, OH Butros Latouf, MD Yasser Omran, MD Stark Medical Specialties ......................................330-684-1300 830 S Main St, Orrville, OH Mark J Tereletsky, DO

Health Guide • Page 23


Medical Directory 2011 Medical Equipment, Supplies & Repair

Shady Lawn Health Care Community .................330-828-2278 15028 E Lincoln Way, Dalton, OH

Lander’s Health Care ............................................330-642-0227 140 E Market St, Orrville, OH

Sprenger Health Care Systems .............................800-772-1116 4110 E Smithville Western Rd, Wooster, OH

Sizewise Rentals, LLC ...........................................330-345-5466 5246 Cleveland Rd, Wooster, OH

Horn Nursing & Rehabilitation Center ............... 800-772-1116 230 N Market St, Wooster, OH

Wayne Health Services & Supplies, Inc .............330-345-7730 2571 Cleveland Rd, Wooster, OH

Sycamore Run Nursing and Rehabilitation Center 330-674-0015 6180 St Rt 83, Millersburg, OH

Nursing & Home Care Apostolic Christian Home ....................................330-927-1010 10680 E Steiner Rd, Rittman, OH Autumnwood Nursing and Rehabilitation .........330-927-2060 275 E Sunset Dr, Rittman, OH Brenn-Field Nursing Center .................................330-683-4075 1980 Lynn Dr, Orrville, OH Country Pointe .......................................................330-264-2446 3071 N Elyria Rd, Wooster, OH Doylestown Health Care Center .........................330-658-2061 95 Black Dr, Doylestown OH Glendora Health Care Center ..............................330-264-0912 1552 N Honeytown Rd, Wooster, OH The Good Shepherd 419-289-3523 622 Center St, Ashland, OH Home Care Assisted Living .................................330-264-7272 142 W Liberty St, Wooster, OH Horn Nursing Center ............................................330-262-2951 230 N Market St, Wooster, OH JAG HealthCare Burbank Parke 14976 Burbank Rd., Burbank, OH .....................330-624-1030 Wooster Sub Acute 3071 North Elyria Rd., Wooster, OH ..................330-264-7881 Orrville Pointe 230 South Crown Hill Rd., Orrville, OH ............330-682-2273 Majora Lane Center for Rehabilitaion & Nursing Care 330-674-4444 105 Majora Lane, Millersburg, OH Personal Touch Home Care ..................................330-263-1112 543 Riffel Rd, Wooster, OH Scenic Pointe Nursing and Rehabilitation Center 330-674-0015 8067 Twp Rd 334, Millersburg, OH

Health Guide • Page 24

Walnut Hills Retirement Community .................330-893-3200 4748 Olde Pump St, Walnut Creek, OH Wayne County Care Center ..................................330-262-1786 876 S Geyers Chapel Rd, Wooster, OH West View Manor ...................................................330-264-8640 1715 Mechanicsburg Rd, Wooster, OH

Obstetrics & Gynecology Cleveland Clinic Wooster Women’s Health Center ........................................330-287-4500 1739 Cleveland Rd, Wooster, OH Wayne Bare, MD Charles Brown, MD Karmon Kriechbaum, MD Jessica Lukowski, MD Rebecca Russell, MD Anthony Tizzano, MD Brenda Davis, CRNP Molly Hastings, CRNP Julie Yates, CRNP Planned Parenting ..................................................330-345-7798 334 E Milltown Rd, Wooster, OH Twin Springs Medical Center, Ltd .......................330-857-0177 4774 Kidron Rd, Kidron, OH Wooster OB/GYN .................................................330-345-2229 546 Winter St Suite 100, Wooster, OH Emily L Benkos, MD FACOG John M Weeman, MD FACOG Ann Shriner, MD FACOG

Optometry Family Eye Care Associates ..................................330-674-6121 1275 Glen Dr, Millersburg, OH James Conway, OD Holly Conway, OD Family Eye Care of Wooster..................................330-262-0028 961 Dover Rd, Wooster, OH Rebecca Lauffenburger, OD Melanie Lang, OD


Medical Directory 2011 Ferriman, Curtis, OD ..............................................330-925-4901 89 E Ohio Ave, Rittman, OH Guster, Michael P, OD............................................330-682-1276 859 S Main St, Orrville, OH Manning, Bruce L OD & Associates ...................330-336-9177 150 College St, Wadsworth, OH Millburn, Drs O, OD, Inc .......................................330-345-2020 3880 Cleveland Rd, Wooster, OH Miller, Robert OD ..................................................330-893-2215 4909 W Main St, Berlin, OH Milltown Optemetrists 370 E Milltown Rd, Wooster, OH Timothy C Karg, OD ...........................................330-345-3871 Joel A Kennedy, OD ...........................................330-345-3620 Bradley J Smith, OD ..........................................330-345-1551 Perry Optical ...........................................................330-264-2344 503 E Liberty St, Wooster, OH Douglas Oney, OD Jim Oney, FNAO Raber Eye Care ......................................................330-857-0123 3693 Kidron Rd, Kidron, OH Sears, Robert OD .................................................330-674-3564 1640 S Washington St (Inside Walmart Vision Center), Millersburg, OH The Looking Glass .................................................330-345-8076 114 E Liberty St, Wooster, OH Jennifer Miller, OD

Ophthalmologists - Eye M.D. Wooster Eye Center ...............................................330-345-7200 3519 Friendsville Rd, Wooster, OH Harry Zinnk, MD John W Thomas, MD Thomas C Fenzl, MD Jeffrey W Perkins, MD Anson T Miedel, MD

Orthopedic Athleticare ..............................................................330-345-8060 128 E Milltown Rd Suite 105, Wooster, OH Christopher B Ranney, MD Tri-County Orthopedic Surgeon, Inc....................330-682-7925 3244 Bailey St NW, Massillon, OH Daniel N Moretta, DO Jeffrey M Cochran, DO Joseph F Davis, DPM

Wooster Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center 3373 Commerce Parkway Suite 2, Wooster, OH 330-804-9712 1261 Wooster Rd Suite 120, Millersburg, OH .....330-674-0775 830 S Main St Suite 103, Orrville, OH ..................330-684-4772 Michael S Knapic, DO James V Gesler, MD FAAOS Mary Jo Logee, MD MS Rodney A Miller, MD FAAOS Jonathan A Kase, MD Paul M McGhee, PT OCS MDT

Pediatrics Akron Children’s Hospital Pediatrics ..................330-345-1100 128 E Milltown Rd Wooster, OH Kathryn Helmuth, MD Louise Miller, MD Shellie Russell, MD Cleveland Clinic Wooster .....................................330-287-4500 1740 Cleveland Rd, Wooster, OH Melissa M Burgett, MD David Burke, DO Adam Keating, MD Richard Maxwell, MD Timothy Playl, MD Dana Schmidt, MD John Strong, MD Deb Jones, CRNP Pomerene Pediatrics ..............................................330-674-3333 1261 Wooster Rd, Millersburg, OH Karen Bringelsen

Pharmacies Buehler’s Pharmacies 1114 W High St, Orrville, OH ...............................330-683-2060 Milltown, 3540 Burbank Rd, Wooster, OH ..........330-345-5908 CVS Pharmacy 105 N Portage St, Doylestown, OH .....................330-658-2711 325 W Smithville Rd, Orrville, OH ......................330-684-2602 2284 Back Orrville Rd, Wooster, OH ...................330-264-7788 Discount Drug Mart ..............................................330-264-8404 625 Beall Ave, Wooster, OH Kmart Stores Pharmacy .........................................330-262-2614 1799 Portage Rd, Wooster, OH Mast Pharmacy 2105 Glen Dr, Millersburg, OH ............................330-674-1891 119 N Market St, Shreve, OH ................................330-567-2823 4900 Oak St, Berlin, OH ........................................330-893-3179 Maurer Pharmacy ..................................................330-264-8479 1827 Cleveland Rd, Wooster, OH

Health Guide • Page 25


Medical Directory 2011 Rite Aid Pharmacy 222 S Main St, Orrville, OH ...................................330-683-8711 155 N Main St, Rittman, OH ................................330-925-6015 1955 Cleveland Rd, Wooster, OH ........................330-262-9045 Ritzman Natural Health Pharmacy 234 N Main St, Rittman, OH .................................330-927-3175 Wooster Community Pharmacy 1761 Beal Ave. ........................................................330-202-5570 Wooster Community Pharmacy 1761 Beall Ave., Wooster, OH ...............................330-202-5570 Wooster Prescription ..............................................330-202-9081 235 W Liberty St, Wooster, OH

Podiatrists Cleveland Clinic Wooster ......................................330-287-4500 721 E Milltown Rd, Wooster, OH Nicholas Brown, DPM Bi County Foot Care ..............................................330-674-4462 211 N Washington St, Millersburg, OH John L McLaughlin, DPM Ronald B Scherer, DPM

Rehabilitation Affinity Therapy Services ......................................330-683-2744 1710 Paradise Rd, Orrville, OH Atlas Rehab & Wellness .......................................330-658-5661 593 Gates St, Doylestown, OH Aultman Therapy Services .....................................330-493-0009 6100 Whipple Ave NW, North Canton, OH College Avenue Home ..........................................330-264-6311 651 College Ave, Wooster, OH Complete Care Rehab, Inc ...................................330-262-0802 1584 Wedgewood Way, Wooster, OH Dunlap Rehabilitation Services ............................330-684-4735 832 S Main St, Orrville, OH Hilltop Group Home, Inc .....................................330-674-3080 8961 Co. Rd 393, Millersburg, OH Majora Lane Center for Rehabilitation ..............330-674-4444 105 Majora Lane, Millersburg, OH

Kemper Foot & Ankle Care ..................................330-828-0123 129 N Wenger Rd Suite A, Dalton, OH

Maximus Athletic Club ..........................................330-345-0830 242 E Milltown Rd, Wooster, OH

Myers & Miller Podiatry 1261 Wooster Rd, Millersburg, OH ......................330-674-3000 126 1/2 N Broadway, Sugarcreek, OH ..................330-852-3646 Adam Myers, DPM Andy Miller, DPM

Ohio Rehabilitation ServicWes.............................330-345-8200 543 Riffel Rd, Wooster, OH

Podiatric Health Physicians, Inc ...........................330-345-5500 365 Riffel Rd Suite A, Wooster, OH Richard A Ransom, DPM Lee Russeell Sayner, DPM Nicole D Horn, DPM

Shady Lawn Rehabilitation ...................................330-828-2278 15028 Old Lincon Way E, Dalton, OH

Suppan Foot & Ankle Clinic .................................330-682-6070 1720 Paradise Rd, Orrville, OH

True Care, Inc ........................................................330-264-3467 2201 Bendon Dr, Wooster, OH Rheythoidology

Wooster Foot Clinic ................................................330-345-8300 470 E Milltown Rd, Wooster, OH Eric T. Richman, DPM

Psychiatry Dennis Helmuth, M.D., PhD ................................330-345-6555 128 E. Milltown Rd., Ste. 202, Wooster, OH 44691

Pulmonary Medicine Robert Sibilia, MD ................................................330-345-2459 324 East Milltown Rd., Wooster, OH 44691

PT Services .............................................................330-658-5438 400 Collier Rd, Doylestown, OH

Summa Health System ...........................................330-334-2774 195 Wadsworth Rd, Wadsworth, OH

Wadsworth Family Physical Therapy ...................330-335-4200 145 Smokerise Dr, Wadsworth, OH Wooster Community Hospital - In patient Rehabilitation Unit 1761 Beall Ave., Wooster OH ...............................330-263-8421

Rheumatology The Arthritis Clinic, LLC .......................................330-262-1500 3727 Friendsville Rd., Suite 3, Wooster, OH 44691 Padma Vellanki, MDSpecialists Akron Nephrology Associates, Inc ......................330-345-8986 387 W Milltown Rd, Wooster, OH

Health Guide • Page 26


Medical Directory 2011 Clinical Strategies Sleep Center ...........................330-601-0033 1749 Cleveland Rd, Wooster, OH Pomerene Multi-Specialty Care Clinic.................330-674-3000 1261 Wooster Rd, Millersburg, OH Vein Specialty Center .............................................330-264-5347 2317 Gateway Dr Suite C, Wooster, OH Larry A Stern, MD FACS Wooster Infectious Diseases .................................330-202-3450 3727 Friendsville Rd, Wooster, OH Denise Signs-Pizzuti, MD

Urology Paul Crowley, MD Juan Miguel Proano, MD .......................................330-345-5533 546 Winter Street, Ste. 210 Wooster, OH 44691 Cleveland Clinic ......................................................330-287-4750 721 East Milltown Rd., Wooster, OH 44691 John J. Malgieri, MD

Health Guide â&#x20AC;˘ Page 27


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Health Guide • Page 28


2011 Community Health Guide