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Attractions • Events • Maps • Shopping

mish eartland

February 2014

Broad Run Cheese House

Amish Circle Letters “Chat lines” for the Amish Community


The Secret Keeper

Book Review

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Reviewed by Amanda Nixon • AMISH HEARTLAND CONTRIBUTOR This book was just as educational as it was entertaining to read. In her latest book, “The Secret Keeper,” Beverly Lewis describes a rare Amish tradition: a “seeker” going through “the proving.” Jennifer Burns has decided to pursue the Amish way of life. In Amish terms, this makes her “a seeker.” She has left her modern life to embrace the Amish lifestyle. Her sponsor family, Rebecca and Samuel Lapp, take her in and start the mentoring process. If she truly does accept all aspects of the Amish way of life, she will go through a “proving” period with the Bishop and ultimately be baptized into the faith. This was a fun story to read and follow Jenny Burns as she quickly realizes it is not easy to be Amish. She stumbles through many daily routines that come naturally to Amish born women. Jenny has a pure and Plain heart, but is it enough to make it through “the proving?” In the midst of her learning, Jenny comes across a secret that will test her faith. Does she go to the Bishop like a true Amish is required to do? Or does she keep the secret and protect someone near and dear to her? Wanting to do the right

thing, but also not break a trust, Jenny struggles with many decisions and ultimately makes a life changing decision that will affect many people involved. As a lover of Amish fiction, this book demonstrates how an Englisher yearns for the “Old Ways” and decides to pursue her heart. I have never heard of “a seeker” or “the proving” before and found this book fascinating. fasc fa s inattin i g. It truly demonstrates a struggle to find where you truly belong, Plain or not.


A H mish

eartland Contents

30 ABOVE PHOTO TAKEN BY

CATIE NOYES AT THE AMISH & MENNONITE HERITAGE CENTER

FEATURES

TRAVEL INFORMATION

Broad Run Cheese House: You are welcome here .................................................................... 06 Amish Circle Letters: “Chat Lines” for the Amish Community ............................................. 12 Furniture Heartland: The Bedroom ................. 26 Amish & Mennonite Heritage Center: A good place to start your trip in Amish country .. 30 Red Tomato Market: On its way to becoming a community favorite ....................................... 36

Visitors’ Guide....................................................05 Calendar of Events............................................ 16 Amish Heartland Map ......................................20 Just Visiting: Amish Heartland’s Inns ............40

COVER PHOTO TAKEN BY

Amish Heartland SPECTRUM Publications

CATIE NOYES

IN EVERY ISSUE

Book Review: The Secret Keeper .................... 00 Editorial ...................................................................... 02 Recipes ................................................................28 Patchwork Quilt Contest ...................................42 Buggy Wheel......................................................44

OFFICE Spectrum Publications • 212 E. Liberty St. • Wooster, OH 44691 • 330-264-1125 amishinfo@spectrumpubs.com www.amish-heartland.com Publisher Andrew S. Dix • Ad Director Rhonda Geer • Spectrum Sales/Marketing Director Amanda Nixon, 330-264-1125 (Ext.2221) • Sales Melissa McDonald, 330-287-1668; Donna Tomak, 330-264-1125 (Ext. 2210); Kriss Ott, 330-264-1125 (Ext.2277); Michele Pratt, 330-287-1628 Editor Catie Noyes

SUBSCRIPTIONS: Amish Heartland is published 12 times a year, with 32,000 copies distributed throughout Ohio and adjacent states with each printing. Subscriptions are available for $25/yr. or $40/two-yr., payable in advance. To subscribe, send payment to the above address. AMISH HEARTLAND

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(/4(-, When was the last time you got out an old fashioned pen and paper and wrote out how you felt about the one you love. Sure, you could type out a romantic email or text message, but that message could carry so much more meaning if you took the time to create it by hand. It seems that the “English” (non-Amish) culture has drifted away from the art of letter writing. The Amish, on the other hand, are no strangers to this form of communication and still practice it widely. In order to stay in the loop with what is going on from community to community the Amish write letters to one another. Circle letters are special letters that the Amish participate in and share common interests and hobbies with other Amish in and around their communities. Plan a romantic getaway in the secluded countryside of Sugarcreek. Treat your significant other to a day of wine tasting and sampling some of the finest cheeses from Broad Run Cheese House. Find out why Nancy Schindler’s guests love coming back year after year. Nancy and her four legged companion love to make their guests feel welcome as they relax with a glass of wine and good conversation. Maybe it’s your first time visiting Amish country and you have become fascinated with the culture but don’t completely understand it. Consider making your first stop at the Amish and Mennonite Heritage Center. Learn the history of the Anabaptist culture with a 30-minute tour of “Behalt” - a 265 foot wide by 10 foot tall mural that depicts the story of the Amish and Mennonite people. Before you head home from your Amish country adventure, be sure to pick up some Amish goodies at the Red Tomato Market. This upscale, bulk food store has everything from fresh produce to specialty dry Amish goods. Grab some lunch at the small soup and sandwich shop and check out the deli for some of Amish country’s finest meat and cheese selections. The gently falling snow and the sounds of horse and buggy galloping through the countryside creates the perfect romantic atmosphere. Write a love note to your significant other letting him or her know how much they mean to you and surprise them with a getaway to Amish country this Valentine’s day.

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Catie Noyes Spectrum Publications Editor


INDEX OF ADVERTISERS

For more information about advertising in Amish Heartland, contact Amanda Nixon, 330-264-1125. PHOTO TAKEN BY CATIE NOYES

ANTIQUES & ART

Walnut Creek Antique Mall .....11

ATTRACTIONS

Behalt/Amish & Mennonite Heritage Center ..........................05 Guggisberg Cheese Factory.......34 Helping Hands Quilt Shop and Museum ................................34

CRAFTS & COLLECTIBLES

Parsley Pot ...................................05 Sol’s Exchange ............................11 World Crafts................................11

BULK FOOD STORES

Bulk Food Country Store ..........34

DINING & FOOD

Boyd & Wurthmann ...................11 Kauffman’s Country Bakery .....11 Miller’s Bakery ...........................05 Mrs. Yoder’s Kitchen ..................34 Shisler’s Cheese House ..............05 Troyer’s Home Pantry ................10

FURNITURE & WOODWORKING

Green Acres Furniture...............27 Homestead Furniture .................27 Jake’s Handcrafted Oak ............10 Troyer Furniture .........................27 Walnut Creek Furniture ............27

LAWN FURNITURE, STORAGE & GAZEBOS Kauffman Lawn Furniture ........10

LODGING

Berlin Grande Hotel ..................41 Berlin Village Inn .......................41 Cricket Hill Cabins .....................41 Donna’s Premier Lodging .........41 Scenic Hills RV Park ..................10

SHIPPING/PACKAGING

PackShip USA ............................05

SHOPS & SUCH

Main Street Bears .......................10 Olivesburg General Store..........05

AMISH HEARTLAND

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Health Expo February 14-15 :KHQFri., 8 a.m.-7 p.m. and Sat., 8 a.m.-2:30 p.m. :KHUH Buckeye Event Center, 624 Henry St., Dalton Dennis Keim formed the first ever Tri-County Health Expo in 2008. After seeing a number of health advertisements in a variety of forms and practices, Keim wondered how he could get them all under one roof so that they were more accessible to the general public. “From natural supplements, to vitamins, to special arch supports for your shoes, the health expo has grown to include many different aspects of the health world,” said Laura Miller, daughter of Keim and secretary to the expo. The expo will feature everything from natural remedies to medical health pointers and not just pills and vitamin drinks. “When it comes to natural products, there are many different opinions on the matter,” said Keim.The health expo itself does not have any one viewpoint or opinion on natural health products. “We allow all different vendors to come and share their ideas and allow the consumers to make up their own mind based on the information they have gathered throughout the day.” 4

For no cost at all, guests can choose from two different days to wander around the expo and talk with different vendors. 11 different seminars will be going on throughout the two days covering a variety of health topics. The “Building New Clinics” session on Friday, Feb. 14 at 11 a.m. is a promising new session. This session will share a message to parents and caregivers of children and adults with special needs. Vendors will not only be focusing on the physical health but also mental health; dealing with depression and anxiety. The past couple of years has brought a strong interest in organic and glutenfree foods and products. There has been a shift in people becoming more health conscious and becoming more educated about their health. For more information on the 6th annual Tri-County Health Expo, call 330-359-6345 ext. 2, or visit www. tricountyexpo.com for a complete list of sessions.


STEP INTO THE PAST

Visit

Visitors' Guide ~ HOLMES COUNTY ~ BERLIN: Behalt at the Amish & Mennonite Heritage Center³ America’s most-exciting

OLIVESBURG GENERAL STORE

Mon. - Fri. 7am to 8pm Sat. 8am to 8pm & Sun. 9am to 7pm AMISH CRAFTS GIFTS CANDLES OIL LAMPS & SUPPLIES HOMEMADE CHOCOLATES 400+ COOKIE CUTTERS PIZZA, DELI SANDWICHES CROCKS HAND DIPPED ICE CREAM SHAWSHANK SUNDAE READERS CHOICEOFAWARD FOR BEST COUNTRY STOREOF IN MID OHIO FOR 2013 RECIPIENT THE 2012 TOURISM AWARD EXCELLENCE 4778 STATE ROUTE 545, ASHLAND, OH 44805 419 8951038 • WWW.OLIVESBURGGENERALSTORE.COM

E R’S B A K E R M“De Good Old Fashioned Bakin” Y IL L

Pies • Cakes • Jams & Jellies • Cookies Donuts • Candies • Pasta & more! Crafts, Clocks & Dolls

cyclorama of Amish & Mennonite history; half-hour tours, bookstore, gifts; NE of Berlin,

330-473-8175 4280 TR 356, Millersburg OH 44654 Off SR 557 Near Charm

off US 62 at 5798 CR 77, (330) 893-3192, www.behalt.com; Open Year Round

Hours: Mon. - Sat. 7am - 5pm Closed Sundays

Mon.-Sat. 9-5

~ WAYNE COUNTY ~

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furniture, antiques, fine art — no item too

E O H A SHOP FOR

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We pack ... we ship ... anything, anywhere;

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ORRVILLE: PackShip USA —

ALL SEASONS

small or too large; Instapak foam to protect high value items; you shop ... we’ll ship; (330) 682-PACK (7225). www.packshipusa.com ORRVILLE: Shisler’s Cheese House — “The

"Celebrating 39 Years!”

Best Little Cheese House in Wayne County”. Open 7 days 8am - 6pm. Cheese, Smoked Meats, Gourmet Foods, Heggy’s & Coblentz Chocolate.www.cheesehouse.com 55 Kidron Road, (330) 682-2105

419-281-7514 East of Ashland, Ohio at 697 Co. Rd., 1302 HOURS: Tues.-Sat. 9-5; Sun. 12-5 CLOSED Monday Call for directions. All major credit cards accepted (look for tourist activity signs)

AMISH HEARTLAND

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No matter who you are or where you are on life’s journey, you are welcome here.

STORY & PHOTOS BY CATIE NOYES • EDITOR

Nestled along the winding back roads of Sugarcreek is a small cheese house with a broad history of fine cheese making. “It is the smallest in the area,” said Nancy Schindler, owner of Broad Run Cheese House. But that does not stop it from having a large, far and wide reputation. Some of Nancy’s biggest fans just happened to be stopping by for a wine tasting and cheese break as I met with Nancy to learn more about her cheese house. “We have been coming here for years and it is always our first stop,” said Tony Tarantino who travels with his girlfriend Madonna Knaus. “We could just sit here for hours and chit-chat,” said Tarantino. 6

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The Broad Run Cheese House was established in 1933 by a group of local dairy farmers trying to get more money for their milk. Their efforts surpassed their expectations and the small cheese factory began its journey into becoming an award winning cheese factory. Nancy Schindler and her husband Hans came to the area in 1969 when the cheese factory was in need of a cheese maker to keep the tradition running. After serving in the military, Hans went to work for Steiner Cheese where he learned the trait of cheese making. When Hans and Nancy took over Broad Run Cheese House, Hans taught Nancy’s brother and their


son the art of cheese making. Since then, Broad Run Cheese has stayed a family affair. In 1989, Nancy incorporated something she loved into the business. The Schindler’s added a new addition to the cheese house and incorporated a small store where Nancy could sell ruffled curtains and lace. It became apparent that the milk supply was not going to be enough to sustain the cheese business. “We started losing milk and we were afraid of being left with a cheese factory and no milk to make the cheese,” said Nancy. In the fall of 2002, the Schindlers began fermenting their own wine. “We had been thinking about doing it for

some time and we just decided it was the right thing to do,” she said. With the help of their son, Chad, the Schindlers got into the wine making business and developed the Swiss Heritage Winery. The winery and cheese house was a perfect marriage. Nancy likes to say “wine without cheese is like a hug without a squeeze.” Hans passed away in 2004 but he told Nancy that he would not change a thing about his life. “That made me feel good,” said Nancy. They faced a lot of struggles throughout their first few years of business and Nancy can remember many breakdowns. The cheese business became a huge priority in the Schindler’s life and “Hans worked for three years

Below: Nancy Schindler (far right) poses with her staff all dressed in authentic Swiss dresses.

AMISH HEARTLAND

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’’

Wine without cheese is like a hug without a squeeze.

without a day off,” said Nancy, about their first few years as owners of the cheese house. Walking into the cheese house you get a sense of the Swiss heritage that has made the cheese making industry what it is as well as Nancy’s German family heritage. From the spring to the late fall months the workers wear traditional Swiss dresses and greet 8

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customers with warm welcoming smiles. “I have been blessed with wonderful employees,” said Nancy. One of her employees has been helping to manage the store for 35 years. “I seem to fall in love with all my employees.” Broad Run Cheese house has a very laid back and quiet atmosphere. Take a stroll along the cheese bar and sample some of Broad Run’s famous cheeses


like their signature Blue Ribbon Swiss Cheese. To the left you will find a wine sampling area set up with handdecorated tables and bar stools. Each table is decorated with various wine labels from all their different varieties. Sample some of their most favored wines like Victorian Lace, which is a white wine made from Catawba and Niagara blend grapes. Other favorites include First Love, a semi-sweet blush wine and Dog Gone Good, a sweet red wine. With Valentine’s Day just around the corner, Broad Run Cheese House is the perfect place to plan a romantic getaway for two. On Friday, Feb. 14 and Saturday, Feb. 15, Broad Run Cheese House will be serving up a Valentine’s special of their signature Raspberry Wine served in chocolate rimmed glasses. Find your way over to the gift shop and pick out a gift she will love to complete your romantic outing. Not only does Nancy carry some of the finest lace and ruffled curtains but a variety of gifts from home décor to the trendiest fashion accessories. If you’re just looking to get away from the hustle and bustle of main street Amish country, this little cheese house tucked away in the countryside makes for the perfect, peaceful escape. You may even find a furry, four legged companion wondering about the store. “When I’m working, Madelyn comes down to the store and when I’m not working the customers always ask for her,” said Nancy. Madelyn, the cheese house guard dog, loves to visit each customer and put on her best begging face in hopes that someone will share a piece of cheese with her. “She is a very friendly, well-behaved dog and she knows she is not allowed behind the cheese counter. But she loves to beg for cheese,” said Nancy.

“Everyone who meets her (Nancy) falls in love with her and Madelyn,” said Knaus. Nancy has fallen in love with the cheese house and more importantly her customers. Everyone who walks through the front door becomes a friend of Nancy’s and she shares a quote from her church with all those who come to the cheese house: “No matter who you are or where you are on life’s journey, you are welcome here.” “I don’t think I will ever retire,” said Nancy. Broad Run Cheese House is located at 6011 Old Route 39, Dover, halfway between Sugarcreek and Dover. Hours are Monday-Saturday, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. For more information call 330-343-3884 or visit www.broadruncheese.com.

Above: In 1989, Nancy incorporated something she loved into the business, ruffled curtains and lace. AMISH HEARTLAND

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$17,48(6 &2//(&7,%/(6 HUGGABLES TO COLLECTIBLES FOR TEDDY BEAR LOVERS!

RETIRED STEIFF BOYDS BEARS BEARINGTON COLLECTION GUND Plus Much More! 225 NORTH MAIN ST. • (RT. 21) • NAVARRE

(330) 879-9655 WED - SAT 10:00 - 4:00

10220777

Scenic Hills s!RMOIRES s.IGHT3TANDS s#HAIRS s#URIOS s (UTCHES s"OOKCASES

9LVLWXVRQ0DUNHWSODFHRKLRFRPMDNHVKDQGFUDIWHGRDN 42 &OLLOW S (OLMESVILLE /( THE3IGN 330-695-5090 6OICE-AIL    (OURS-ON &RI 3AT #LOSED3UN

Enjoy peace & quiet of the country lifestyle 4483 TR 367 Millersburg, Ohio 44654

10107842

s"EDROOM&URNITURE s$INING2OOM&URNITURE s%NTERTAINMENT#ENTERS s4ABLES s$ESKS s2OLL4OP$ESK

Located near shops and dining RV PARK in the Amish Heartland

330-893-3607 • www.scenichillsrvpark.com 10220781

• Bread • Rolls • Pies • Cakes Cookies Stop by For the Weekly Pie Special! M-F 6-6; Sat. 6-5; Closed Sunday

668 W. Main St., Apple Creek • 330-698-4182

10220784

FULL LINE OF OUTDOOR FURNITURE:

4540 US 62 • Millersburg, OH 44654 NE of Berlin at the bottom of the hill between Berlin & Bunker Hill

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330-893-3149

www.kauffmanlawnfurniture.com

10183682

Adirondack Chairs • Arbors • Bird Feeders & Houses • Gliders • Picnic Tables • Swings • Storage Barns • Gazebos and Log Cabins Huge selection of Poly Furniture


Downtown Berlin 330-893-3287

Walnut Creek Antique Mall

Mon. - Sat. 5:30am - 8pm

-11,000-square feet of Antique dealers(Next to Walnut Creek Water Tower)

Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 9-5 • Fri. 9-6 • Sat. 9-5 (330) 893-4010

10220786

10192348

4872 McKinley Place Drive, Walnut Creek

www.boydandwurthmann.com One of the Largest Bakeries in Amish Country

STOP IN TO SEE MANY UNIQUE FAIR TRADE ITEMS!

Baked Goods Made Fresh Daily

QUALITY BAKING SINCE 1992! Bakery • Café • Bulk Ice Cream Parlor

Fairly Traded Handicrafts from 35 Developing Countries • Home Decor • Wedding Gifts • Scarves • Jewelry • Cards • Coffee • Teas • Chocolate Kidron, OH 330-857-0590 Lehman’s Mercantile behind Lehman’s Hardware www.worldcraftsfairtrade.com 10220787

“Featuring Grilled Panini Sandwiches” 330.893.2129

10220776

Mon.-Sat. 9:30-5

4357 US 62, Millersburg Across from Heini’s Cheese in the of Amish Country Open Monday-Saturday Sundays (May thru November)

www.kauffmanscountrybakery.com

Sol’s in Berlin

www.solsinberlin.com

Ohio’s Largest Arts & Crafts Mall An Amish Country ‘Must See’ Since ‘93

Search: Sol’s in Berlin

June-October Open 9am-7pm Daily

Open Memorial Day, 4th of July & Labor Day

10220783

November - May Open 9am-5pm Daily

OPEN YEAR ROUND • Closed Sundays 4914 West Main St. • Berlin, OH 44610 • 330.893.3134 AMISH HEARTLAND

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Amish Circle Letters “Chat Lines” for the Amish Community STORY BY CATIE NOYES • EDITOR

W

hen was the last time you sat down with pen and paper and hand wrote a letter? The art of penmanship and scribbling down your thoughts in a journal or sending them on to someone is not as commonly practiced among “Englishers” (nonAmish) as it once was. Cell phones and the internet have made connecting with friends and family as easy as a click of a button. A person could be over a thousand miles away but it can be hard to tell when their response to your last text message was within the second.

In a culture where technology is very minimal and the simplest forms of communication still exist, it is no surprise that letter writing is still a prominent form of communication among Amish communities. Amish families are often quite large and spread out. For the Old Order Amish, letters are one of the few ways in which Amish families can stay in touch with each other. Forums and chat rooms are great ways for those of us with modern technologies to share common interests and swap trade secrets with others and not even leave the house. While the Amish approach isn’t as instantaneous, they too have a way of keeping up on the latest trends and topics in other Amish communities. Circle letters tend to have a common interest on everything from adoption, to teaching, to history, to family deaths and


illnesses and even hosta collections. As a retired school teacher, one Old Order Amish man – who wished to remain anonymous – has written in several different circle letters. But how do the Amish find these circle letter groups to become a part of? A popular Old Order Amish newspaper, Die Botschaft (a Pennsylvania Dutch term for “The Message”), is a weekly paper written by unpaid Old Order Amish and Mennonite “scribes.” These scribes write down happenings in their communities. The classified section of the newspaper often has a listing or two of invitations to join a circle letter. The listing will have the name of the person wishing to start the circle letter along with the topic of interest. All those interested in participating in the circle letter send their name and address to address listed in the paper. Sometimes a circle letter can generate an abundance of interest. A circle letter invite for Amish men and boys who were or are school teachers had so much response it had to be divided into three separate groups, explained the Amish man. A list of names and addresses of all those interested in being a part of a circle letter are printed up and the first letter in the group is drafted. The letter along with the list of addresses is sent on to the next person in the list. As the letter is passed along from person to person, a new letter is inserted sharing their thoughts and knowledge on the subject matter. On average, a circle letter will have general shared news on a topic but sometimes a person may wish to comment directly to another person within the letter. With letters on special collections, such as hosta collections, a circle letter could cover anything from tips on AMISH HEARTLAND

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growing and maintaining the plants to actually arranging to swap plants. More serious letters about family illness and death may be focused more on sharing stories of heartache and how to cope. It can be a support group of sorts for those dealing with these issues. Depending on where a person falls on the list, they could be receiving an envelope filled with dozens of letters from each person in the group. Each letter is labeled with the Amish person’s name and a number as a way to keep the letters in order. It is important to keep these letters moving amongst the circle once it is started. Sometimes there is even a penalty for holding on to the letters for longer than a week before sending them on. This penalty can be something like paying the postage for the next few people within the group. After a letter has come full circle, the original author of the letter may remove their old letter and write

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a new one. These letters can go on for years and can travel as close as a street or two away while others travel nationwide. The Amish man said that he is a part of one circle letter that travels to nine different states and another letter that has been exchanging hands for 24 years. Some of these people he has never met. While one can get to know a person pretty well through their letters, some circle letters have reunions. Everyone who is a part of a circle letter can plan to meet and talk for the first time face to face. “It can be interesting to finally meet these people and find out you may have actually attended similar Amish events and never known it,” said the Amish man. Circle letters can be an important part of the Amish community. In a way it is an Amish “chat line” of such and a way to keep in touch with other communities outside of their own.


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AMISH HEARTLAND

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February 5

Wilderness Walk

When: 10-11 a.m. Where: The Wilderness Center, 9877 Alabama Avenue, S.W., Wilmot Join a naturalist on the first Wednesday of every month for a walk on our trails. See what’s interesting today! For more information call 1-877-330359-5235 or visit www.wildernesscenter.org

5, 12, Mt. Hope Weekly Livestock Auction When: 11:30 a.m. 19 & Where: Mt. Hope Auction Barn; 8076 SR 241, Mt. Hope and non-Amish bring their animals to market every Wednesday 26 Amish year round. Observers will see very old-fashioned carts and wagons and horses and buggies coming and going from the market. During fair weather flea market vendors sell their wares on the outside. A large building also provides shelter for flea market vendors and shoppers. Flea market opens at 7 a.m., Hay Auction and Produce Auction begins at 10 a.m., Livestock Sale begins at 11:30 a.m. and the Poultry Sale begins at 1 p.m. During the summer, small animals such as ducks, chickens, geese, turkeys, rabbits, etc. are sold. For more information call 330-674-6188 or visit www.mthopeauction.com.

7-8 Chocolate Daze 2014

When: Store Hours Where: Downtown Wooster Downtown Wooster never tasted so good! Participating retailers and restaurants will offer all kinds of chocolate themed promotions. For more information call 330-262-6222 or visit www.mainstreetwooster.org.

7-9 Wooster Oilers Game

When: Fri & Sat, 7:45 p.m.; Sun ,1 p.m. Where: Alice Noble Ice Arena, 851 Oldman Rd., Wooster The Wooster Oilers are a USA Hockey Tier III Junior Hockey Organization which plays within the Minnesota Junior Hockey League (MNJHL) a USA Hockey sanctioned Tier III Junior Hockey League. For more information call 330-345-8686 or visit www.woosteroilers.com.

10- Berlin’s Sweet On You 15 Valentine’s Day

When: Daily Where: Downtown Berlin Many sales will be going on throughout Berlin.

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Photo by Catie Noyes


14- Valentine’s Dinner Concert 15

When: 6 p.m. Where: Carlisle Inn Walnut Creek, 4949 SR 515, Walnut Creek Join us for two Valentine’s Day Dinner Concerts with speakers and musicians, Steve and Annie Chapman. With over twenty-five years of ministering through music, Steve and Annie Chapman continue to hold the family as the theme of their lyrics. Tickets include dinner, entertainment, a long stemmed rose and chance to win an overnight stay at Carlisle Inn plus dinner for two. Drawing will be held the night of the show. $39. For more information call 330-893-2981 or visit www. dutchmanonline.com.

Buckeye Tool Show

When: Fri, 8 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sat, 8 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Where: Buckeye Event Center, 624 Henry St., Dalton This two-day event usually draws a crowd of about 4,500+ people and over 120 different vendor displays. Admission is free. For more information call 330-828-2466 or visit www.buckeyeexpo.com.

Tri-County Health Expo

When: Fri, 8 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sat, 8 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Where: Buckeye Event Center, 624 Henry St., Dalton 6th Annual with the goal to help you and your family have a healthy future. Wide variety of vendors and speakers. Admission is free. For more information call 330-359-6345 or visit www.tricountyexpo.com.

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Voices from the Past: “Louisa May Alcott” V

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Bird Banding Demonstration B

W When: 2 p.m. Where: Wayne County Historical Society, 546 E. Bowman St., Wooster W Tickets available at the historical society or the Wooster Book Company. T

When: 1-2 p.m. W Where: The Wilderness Center, 9877 Alabama Avenue, S.W., Wilmot W See birds up close as banding procedures are explained and demonstrated. Discover what is learned from bird banding research. For more information call 1-877-330-359-5235 or visit www. wildernesscenter.org.

Girls’ Night Out

Where: Historic Downtown Millersburg Enjoy a night out on the town for just the ladies as Historic Downtown Millersburg hosts Girls’ Night Out!! Enjoy pampering, refreshments, sales, and absolute steals as our downtown businesses open their doors, offering their own wares and hosting special events and vendors, including massages, glamour shots, chocolate fountains, and MORE - all for you! For more information call 330-674-3955 or visit www. historicdowntownmillersburg.com AMISH HEARTLAND

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Guided Winter Walk G

When: 2 p.m. W Where: Seaman Orientation Plaza-Secrest Arboretum, 1680 Madison Ave., W Wooster W Enjoy the unique beauty of winter in the arboretum. Parking and admission are free. Come dressed for the weather. For more information call 330-464-2148 or visit secrest.osu.edu.

27- Amish Country Home and Garden Show Mar 1

When: Thu, 1-7 p.m.; Fri, 10 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sat, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Where: Buckeye Event Center, 624 Henry St., Dalton Get ready to upgrade the look of your home. Great landscaping ideas, lawn care and seminars on decorating and cooking. Admission: $5 per person, 12 and under free. For more information call 740-397-7788 or visit www.homeshowsrus.com

Full event listing for the month can be found online at www.amish-heartland.com!

18 Photo taken at the Amish and Mennonite Heritage Center by Catie Noyes


A H mish

eartland

Published Monthly this Magazine Offers: • Readership of over 90,000 • 70% of the total circulation reaching outside the Heartland area. • Distribution through AAA locations across Ohio & some in Pennsylvania; at convention & visitor bureaus, Ohio Dept. of Transportation Stops and Chamber of Commerce. • Each contracted advertiser will have a map locator key noted.

To be included in our next issue call 1-800-686-2958 AMISH HEARTLAND

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A ROUND TR = Township Road

A H mish

SR = State Route

eartland

CR = County Road

US = US Route Includes GPS coordinates

1 Alpine Hills Historical Museum

6 Behalt/ Amish & Mennonite Heritage Center

28 Helping Hands Quilt Shop & Museum

106 West Main St., Sugarcreek (40.562007º -81.807211º)

5798 CR 77, Millersburg (Berlin) (40.5671534º -81.7815958º)

4826 E. Main St., Millersburg (Berlin) (40.5615638º -81.7961283º)

3 Amish Heartland Tours

27 Guggisberg Cheese

51 Yoder’s Amish Home

5568 TR 381., Millersburg (Berlin) (40.503017º -81.641373º)

5060 SR 557, Millersburg (Charm) (40.5246103º -81.8043815º)

6050 Ohio 515, Millersburg (40.5753226º -81.7126356º)

5 Beachy’s Country Chalet

16 Broad Run Cheese House

42 Shisler’s Cheese House

6011 Old 39 NW, Dover (40.510957º -81.573298º)

55 Kidron Rd., Orrville (40.796565º -81.746371º)

Restaurant 115 Andreas Drive NE., Sugarcreek (40.499299º -81.635022º)

31 Kauffman’s Country Bakery

14Boyd & Wurthmann 4819 E. Main St., Berlin (40.561531º -81.7957431º)

15 Brick Towne Tavern 980 W. Main St., Sugarcreek (40.499299º -81.635022º)

6013 CR 77, Millersburg (Berlin) (40.5738493º -81.781379º)

35 Miller’s Bakery 4280 TR 356, Millersburg (Berlin) (40.5308237º -81.8118837º)

44 Sugarcreek Discount Grocery 124 E. Main St., Sugarcreek (40.502667º -81.640291º)

47 Troyer’s Home Pantry 668 W. Main St., Apple Creek (40.7554854º -81.8442625º)

36 Mrs. Yoder’s Kitchen 8101 SR 241, Fredericksburg (40.6241479º -81.7915683º)

8 Berlin Grande Hotel

11 Berlin Village Inn

4787 TR 336, Millersburg (Berlin) (40.5594623º -81.8910436º)

5135 SR 39, Millersburg (Berlin) (40.5597161º -81.80692º)

9 Berlin Hotel and Suites

13 Blessings Lodge

5330 CR 201, Millersburg (Berlin) (40.556183º -81.820933º)

5174 TR 359, Millersburg (Berlin) (40.5644642º -81.8078983º)

21 Cricket Hill Cabins 5631 TR 351, Millersburg (40.5646509º -81.8497804º)

20

22 Donna’s Premiere Lodging 5523 East Strees, Berlin (40.560806º -81.795587º)

41 Scenic Hills RV Park 4483 TR 367 NE, Millersburg (Berlin) (40.5513798º -81.7821696º)


2 Amish Country Peddler

26 Greenhouse Shoppe, The

3239 SR 39, Walnut Creek (40.5451448º -81.7386129º)

3649 Cleveland Rd., Wooster (40.8453279º -81.9284401º)

4 Audrey’s Attic

29 Homestead Furniture

147 N. Main St., Orrville (40.841048º -81.764447º)

8233 SR 241, Mt. Hope (40.6268459º -81.784219º)

7 Berlin Furniture

30 Jake's Handcrafted Oak

5044 CR 120, Millersburg (Berlin) (40.556679º -81.832382º)

8239 TR 562, Holmesville (40.659197º -81.918054º)

48 Walnut Creek

10 Berlin Leather & Pets

32 Kauffman Lawn Furniture

4774 US Route 62, Millersburg (Berlin) (40.5613792º -81.7939588º)

4540 US 62, Millersburg (Berlin) (40.5690155º -81.7849802º)

4872 McKinley Place Dr., Walnut Creek (40.5404832º -81.7202957º)

12 bfearless.

33 Kiko’s Greenhouse

3147 SR 39, Walnut Creek (40.544962º -81.737848º)

15579 Lincoln Way West, Dalton (40.798646º -81.646774º)

18 Charm Harness & Boot

34 Main Street Bears

4432 CR 70, Charm (40.506574º -81.784203º)

225 N. Main St., Navarre (40.7225129º -81.5224304º)

19 Collectors, Decanters &

37 Ole Mill Furniture

Steins 119 East Main St., Sugarcreek (40.502761º -81.640391º)

45 Swiss Country Lawn & Crafts 2131 SR 39, Sugarcreek (40.5172712º -81.6999655º)

46 Troyer’s Furniture 985 W. Main St., Sugarcreek (40.5110001º -81.6529587º)

Antique Mall

49 Walnut Creek Furniture 3473 Ohio 39, Walnut Creek (40.5463267º -81.7477899º)

50 World Crafts 13100 Emerson Rd., Kidron (40.7412134º -81.7450194º)

4422 SR 557, Millersburg (40.505882º -81.78427º)

38 Olivesburg General Store 20 Country View Wicker 2701 SR 557, Baltic (40.841048º -81.764447º)

4778 SR 545, Ashland (40.855888º -82.318932º)

39 Packship USA 23 Gospel Book Store 4900 Oak Street, Berlin (40.7071309º -81.679855º)

1347 N. Main St., Orrville (40.856341º -81.764703º)

40 Parsley Pot 24 Gospel Shop, The 112 East Main St., Sugarcreek (40.502816º -81.640546º)

697 CR 1302, Ashland (40.8768762º -82.2596821º)

43 Sol’s Exchange 25 Green Acres Furniture 7412 Massillon Rd., Navarre (40.561738º -81.799496º)

4914 W. Main St., Berlin (40.5617104º -81.7991439º)

18 Bulk Food Country Store 14396 Dover Rd., Dalton (40.705216º -81.725832º) AMISH HEARTLAND

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38 40 26

30

22 2


39 4

33

47

CARR RD

42

50 34 17 25

29 36

31

21

51

32 13 3 8 6 9 43 14 11 28 22 10 2 12 49 23 41 7 35

27 37

48

45 46 15 1 20 24 44 5

18

16

20

AMISH HEARTLAN HEARTLAND AN A ND

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U P CLOSE TO B ERLIN – T HE HEART OF A MISH C OUNTRY

31

21 8 9

3 11

27

24

13

43 23

35

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14 28

22

10

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3 Amish Heartland Tours

27 Guggisberg Cheese

5568 TR 381., Millersburg (Berlin) (40.503017º -81.641373º)

5060 SR 557, Millersburg (Charm) (40.5246103º -81.8043815º)

6 Behalt/ Amish & Mennonite Heritage Center 5798 CR 77, Millersburg (Berlin) (40.5671534º -81.7815958º)

14 Boyd & Wurthmann 4819 E. Main St., Berlin (40.561531º -81.7957431º)

28 Helping Hands Quilt Shop & Museum 4826 E. Main St., Millersburg (Berlin) (40.5615638º -81.7961283º)

31 Kauffman’s Country Bakery 6013 CR 77, Millersburg (Berlin) (40.5738493º -81.781379º)

8 Berlin Grande Hotel

11 Berlin Village Inn

4787 TR 336, Millersburg (Berlin) (40.5594623º -81.8910436º)

5135 SR 39, Millersburg (Berlin) (40.5597161º -81.80692º)

9 Berlin Hotel and Suites

13 Blessings Lodge

5330 CR 201, Millersburg (Berlin) (40.556183º -81.820933º)

5174 TR 359, Millersburg (Berlin) (40.5644642º -81.8078983º)

35 Miller’s Bakery 4280 TR 356, Millersburg (Berlin) (40.5308237º -81.8118837º)

22 Donna’s Premiere Lodging 5523 East Street, Berlin (40.560806º -81.795587º)

41 Scenic Hills RV Park 4642 TR 367, Millersburg (Berlin) (40.5513798º -81.7821696º)

21 Cricket Hill Cabins 5631 TR 351, Millersburg (40.5646509º -81.8497804º)

7 Berlin Furniture

43 Sol’s Exchange

5044 CR 120, Millersburg (Berlin) (40.556679º -81.832382º)

4914 W. Main St., Berlin (40.5617104º -81.7991439º)

10 Berlin Leather & Pets 4774 US Route 62, Millersburg (Berlin) (40.5613792º -81.7939588º)

23 Gospel Book Store 4900 Oak Street, Berlin (40.7071309º -81.679855º)

32 Kauffman Lawn Furniture 4540 US 62, Millersburg (Berlin) (40.5690155º -81.7849802º) AMISH HEARTLAND

25


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The Furniture Heartland www.furnitureheartland.com

THE BEDROOM Your bedroom is your oasis. Not only should it be a place of rest, but a place to escape and relax. You should feel comfortable in your room. You should be able to reach a state of peace and rejuvenation in your room. All these things should be taken into consideration when picking furniture and designing your personal space. It is important to have a plan before you begin any type of major re-design project. Think about the color schemes and design patterns before you start covering your walls in paint and wallpaper. Colors- Your color choices can reflect your personality but can also affect your mood. If you are looking for a calm, serene oasis, consider using blues, grays and greens; cool colors. Maybe you have a darker space and your looking to brighten up the room with reds, yellows or pinks; warm colors. Furniture- It is important to keep

26

in mind exactly how much space you have to work with. This may sound like common knowledge, but taking exact measurements and laying out a floor plan can save you the hassle of having to return furniture that didn’t end up fitting as planned. Accessories- A throw pillow here, a table lamp there. Accessories can really show of your sense of style and complete your image. Not only does the bedside lamp provide another source of light, but it could make a decorative statement. Make it Functional-You can never go wrong with extra storage space. Consider a bed that sits high off the floor making it easy to stow away storage bins or purchase a bed with storage units built in. End of the bed storage units can double as a decorative chest or bench. Plan a trip to a furniture store and view bedroom set-ups presented to you right in the store. Whatever you’re looking for, the friendly staff at each of the Furniture Heartland stores will be more than happy to offer their expertise in finding furniture and accessories to fit your style.

Bedroom set featured from Green Acres Furniture


Recipes CREAMED TOMATO SOUP WITH FRESH BASIL Ingredients: *3 lb. ripe, red tomatoes *3 oz. butter *Fresh sweet basil leaves *Salt and pepper to taste *1 large onion *1 pt. rich cream *1 tsp. brown sugar

Directions: 1. Melt butter in a large soup pot, and sautÊ onion until browned. Add tomatoes (washed, cored, coarsely chopped) and 1 tblsp. sweet basil leaves, crushed. 2. Let mixture simmer about 30 minutes; then put through Foley food mill or sieve. Heat this mixture through. 3. Add whipping cream, salt and pepper and some chopped basil. Heat through and serve. Yield’s 6 servings

GRILLED CHEESE SANDWICH Yields 4 Sandwiches

Ingredients: *8 slices of Italian Bread *1 cup of extra sharp cheddar cheese, shredded *2/3 cup of provolone cheese, shredded *2/3 cup of swiss cheese, shredded *2 tablespoon of butter

Directions: Divide the bread into 4 stacks of 2 pieces. Butter the tops and bottoms of the sandwiches. In between the slices, divide up the shredded cheeses. In a hot skillet - or cast iron pan/griddle works best - grill the sandwiches on medium heat for about 3 minutes on each side until they are brown and the cheese has melted.

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BROCCOLI PASTA SALAD Salad

Ingredients: *8 oz. rotini or penne pasta *2 1/2 cup fresh broccoli florets *2/3 cup diagonally sliced carrots *1/2 cup thin strips of red bell pepper

Directions: Cook pasta in boiling water until al dente. Then add broccoli and carrots to the pasta and boil 1 minute. Drain pasta and vegetables and rinse with cool water. Dressing

Ingredients: *1/2 cup non-fat mayonnaise *1/3 cup non-fat sour cream *1/4 cup orange juice *1 tbsp. prepared mustard *1 tbsp. fresh basil, or 1 1/2 tsp. dried *1/4 tsp. pepper

Directions: Combine the dressing ingredients well and toss with pasta, cooked vegetables and bell pepper; chill two hours. This makes a good summer meal if thin strips of grilled chicken are added.

BAKED HASH BROWN POTATOES Ingredients: *1/2 cup margarine *1 can cream of chicken soup *1 pt. sour cream *2 cup shredded cheddar cheese *2 lb. frozen hashbrown potatoes

Directions: Melt margarine and mix with the soup, sour cream and cheese. Combine with potatoes and pour into a 9” x 13” baking dish sprayed with non-stick vegetable spray. Cover and bake at 350° for 1 hour. Remove and bake 15 more minutes or until bubbly and golden brown. AMISH HEARTLAND

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Amish and Mennonite Heritage Center A good place to start your trip in Amish country STORY & PHOTOS BY CATIE NOYES • EDITOR

Above: “Behalt” is a handpainted cyclorama that wraps around the mural room at 265 feet wide and 10 feet tall.

30

As you make your way into the heart of Amish country, you suddenly notice a shift in time. The people here seem to be traveling at a slower pace and it feels as if you have transported back in time. They dress differently, their main mode of transportation is horse and buggy and even their field work is done by horse power. These people speak in a dialect that is unfamiliar to you. Why is it that these people seem to be trapped in a time warp of the 1800s when the rest of the world has moved on to our modern day conveniences? And where can you go to learn more about this fascinating culture? The Amish and Mennonite Heritage Center, located just off of Country Road 77 on your way into the heart of Amish country, is the perfect place


to begin your exploration of this new culture. “Making [the heritage center] their first stop will give people reasoning behind why the Amish and Mennonite are the way they are and give them insight they wouldn’t get otherwise,” said an Amish staff member – who wished to remain anonymous – at the heritage center. Last year the heritage center had visitors from 111 different countries. These visitors ranged in their professions and interests from Washington politicians to Hollywood actors, and visitors from other countries studying different cultural practices to the everyday tourists looking to explore new cultures. All of these travelers share a common interest. They want to learn about this unfamiliar culture and what makes them so different.

How Behalt came to be: German born immigrant, Heinz Gaugel came to Holmes County, Ohio in 1962. An artist by trade, he was in search of a glazed brick to complete a mural he had been working on in Canada. Heinz was unfamiliar with the Amish lifestyle that made up most of Holmes County but he was intrigued by their use of a similar German dialect. He moved to a small farm in 1972 where he could work on various art projects in the area. Tourism was on the rise in Holmes County and a number of Amish and Mennonite people in the area began to express their frustration with these people who didn’t understand their faith. In 1978, an Amish blacksmith shared his frustration with Heinz. “I wish there was some place in the area that people could go and find out why we live the way we do.” Heinz became intrigued and set out to create this place. He had committed

Inside a one-room Amish schoolhouse at the Amish and Menninite Heritage Center. AMISH AMIS AM A M IS IS ISH SH HH HEARTLAND HEA HE EA EA AR RT TL LA AN ND 3 31 1


himself to developing the centerpiece of this information center by painting a cyclorama (a mural in-the-round) that would depict the history of the Anabaptists – a task that would require painstaking historical research until the mural was complete. Word of his project spread fast throughout the community and 32

the Amish and Mennonite’s grew concerned the information would not be accurate. Other’s felt the mural needed to remain in the hands of the Mennonite’s and used to tell the story of Anabaptism rather than used for private business. After much discussion, representatives of the local Mennonite community agreed to open a Mennonite Information Center with the intent of distributing accurate information about the Amish and Mennonite’s to the visitors in the area. The center first opened its doors in 1982 in the old Dunkard Church in Bunker Hill – the same building where Heinz had begun his painting months earlier – but was later moved, in 1984, to a building on State Route 39 just east of State Route 62 in Berlin. With only 100 feet of his mural complete, the Mennonite Information Center purchased the painting from Heinz in 1988. The center agreed to build a special building to house the mural in which Heinz agreed to complete the painting once the


building was established. Ground was broken in March of 1989 and the unfinished mural was moved to the mural room in the fall of 1989. Visitors to the center were able to watch Heinz paint the mural until it was completed in October of 1992. He entitled it “Behalt,” from the German word “behalten,” meaning “to keep” or “to remember.” (Background information supplied by the Amish and Mennonite Heritage Center.) Today the mural is still the main attraction at the Amish and Mennonite Heritage Center. The completed mural wraps around the mural room at 265 feet wide and 10 feet tall. For a small fee, visitors receive a 30-minute guided tour where they can view the mural and hear the story of the Amish and Mennonite people as they refused to give up their religious convictions despite persecution. “It’s a crash course in Amish and Mennonite history explaining how, when, where, and why they came to be here,” said the Amish staff member. A full explanation of the mural, which depicts over 1,200 people, would take 36 hours. The guide also explains how the history relates to the Amish and Mennonite way of life in Holmes County today. The heritage center also offers the opportunity for visitors to meet local Amish and Mennonite’s and ask them questions as the staff and volunteers are of the Amish and Mennonite faith. Visitors can also view a 15 minute video on Amish and Mennonite life in Holmes County. The Heritage Center is a wealth of Amish and Mennonite information with books on different aspects of the culture, a popular display on head coverings and wardrobes, and even handmade items made by the local Amish and Mennonite community. Outside, an old one-room school house, built in 1857, is used to “Behalt” continued on page 35

AMISH HEARTLAND

33


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34

10222198


“Behalt” continued from page 33

demonstrate what the Amish education system is like today compared to the traditional school system non-Amish are accustomed to. The heritage center is lucky enough to have some volunteers who were once Amish teachers lead discussions on Amish education. The old barn on the property was put up in 2002 with a true Amish barn raising and demonstrates to the public that a barn raising isn’t as television shows and movies often make them out to be. Inside the barn is a display of a Conestoga wagon which was used to make several trips in the 1800s as Amish and Mennonites made the journey from Pennsylvania to settle in Holmes County, Ohio. One of the more favored displays are the different buggies used by the Amish in the community. The volunteers and staff at the heritage center have found the people really enjoy sitting

in the buggies and getting their pictures taken. The Amish and Mennonite Heritage Center hopes to expand their collection of buggies to highlight the different communities in Holmes County as well as other States. (Outside tours are closed during the winter months.) The Amish and Mennonite Heritage Center is the perfect place to begin your journey as you navigate your way through this foreign culture. Even if you are a seasoned traveler to the area, you never know what kind of knowledge may have been waiting for you to discover. The mural itself is a site to behold and often moves visitors beyond words as they obtain a visual knowledge of the Anabaptist people. The Amish and Mennonite Heritage Centers is located at 5798 County Road 77, Berlin. Hours are MondaySaturday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. (Hours may vary during the winter months.) For more information call 330-893-3192 or 877-858-4634 or visit www.behalt.com.

AMISH HEARTLAND

35


Red Tomato Market STORY BY ABBY ARMBRUSTER • AMISH HEARTLAND CONTRIBUTOR PHOTOS BY CATIE NOYES • EDITOR

7

hough the store took about six months to complete construction from start to finish, the idea for the Red Tomato Market was about eight years in the making. Steve Swartzentruber and his wife Miriam had thought about opening a market in Mount Eaton over the last six or eight years, but last summer seemed like the right time to them to start moving on building the market. “Last summer, when this idea came up again, we discussed it and I told my wife that if (she) and the children would be interested in doing this, I would love to do it, but I (wasn’t) going to do it without their support,” Steve Swartzentruber said. With the support of his family behind 36


2QLWVZD\WREHFRPLQJDFRPPXQLW\IDYRULWH Above (Left and Right): Over 800 hours were put into the mural that overlooks the general grocery store at Red Tomato Market. The owners of Red Tomato Market, the Swartzentrubers, teamed up with the Mount Eaton Historical Society to come up with an appropriate homage to the village’s history.

him, Steve Swartzentruber decided to pursue the idea by opening the store on what was a vacant lot, located at 16000 E. Main St. in Mount Eaton. “We had initially thought about moving our furniture store here back in 2006,” Steve Swartzentruber said, as his family owns Green Acres Furniture. Instead of moving the furniture store, they decided to expand where their current location is so the vacant lot was still open for Red Tomato Market to be built. The Swartzentrubers broke ground May 14 of this year, and construction was on schedule ever since which led to its official opening Nov. 21. “So far ... we have had nothing but a positive response,” Steve Swartzentruber

said. Steve Swartzentruber said he wanted to make sure the store felt open, had wide aisles, was brightly-lit and could be a one-stop shop for residents. “We hope when we get done with this, it’s a market that people can come and do all of their shopping,” he said. “Everything from food to toothpaste.” The store has organic produce, bulk food items, a larger-than-most baking section, an entire aisle dedicated to spices, name brand foods and gluten-free items. “We have a beautiful building here, and we wanted to make sure we also had the right products in here,” Steve Swartzentruber said. AMISH HEARTLAND

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Part of the products featured in Red Tomato Market are part of their own private label, Red Tomato Market foods. “If you look at the area as a whole here in Wayne County, we don’t have a Troyer’s Market. We don’t have a Walnut Creek Cheese. All of our local people, if they want to go someplace like that, have to drive 15-20 miles,” Swartzentruber said. “There’s nothing like this in this area.”

To bring in the Mount Eaton community and history of the village, the Swartzentrubers turned to the Mount Eaton Historical Society to provide them with photos that signify Mount Eaton as part of a large mural that looks over the entire store. “The local people have really appreciated it because it’s all the things that they remember seeing, and obviously the out-of-town people like it because

(Above) The soup and sandwhich shop serves up breakfast, lunch and dinner and (below) the deli has more than 40 meat and cheese options to choose from.

38


:HKRSHZKHQZHJHWGRQHZLWKWKLVLW¡VDPDUNHWWKDW SHRSOHFDQFRPHDQGGRDOORIWKHLUVKRSSLQJ(YHU\WKLQJ IURPIRRGWRWRRWKSDVWH they can ask questions (about Mount Eaton),â€? Steve Swartzentruber said. “We’re really pleased with how it turned out,â€? Mount Eaton Historical Society member Elton Lehman said. Lehman said the historical society picked out photos of older businesses and more recent storefronts to bring the past and present together. All in all, more than 800 manhours of work were put into the mural with local artist Sue Kaufman and three assistants in charge of the painting. Under the mural is a full deli case with more than 40 meat and cheese options in the back of the store, as well as a soup and sandwich shop that serves breakfast, lunch and dinner that people can either have to go or eat in-store.

’’

Steve Swartzentruber credits his wife, Miriam, to creating the name of the store. “We talked about Green Acres Market, or Mount Eaton Market or whatever, and one day, I came home from work and my wife was like, ‘I got it. Red Tomato Market,’â€? Steve Swartzentruber said. Although the store has been open for about a month, the Swartzentrubers said they still can’t believe it is ofďŹ cially theirs. “I think we still pinch ourselves when we come in here every morning,â€? Swartzentruber said. “(Like,) ‘this is actually ours,’â€? Miriam Swartzentruber said. The winter hours for Red Tomato Market are Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

AMISH HEARTLAND

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PATCHWORK QUILT CONTEST

Rules for entry: Each edition of Amish Heartland will have a piece of a quilt like this one to the right. Collect all 12 issues of Amish Heartland and paste the patches together in the template above to make a complete quilt. Mail your completed quilt to: Amish Heartland Puzzle, 212 E. Liberty St., Wooster, OH 44691; Entries must be postmarked by January 31, 2015. One randomly selected winner with all 12 pieces correctly patched together will receive a quilted wall hanging from a local Amish quilter (pictures to come in a future edition.) 42


Mailbag When we ask people what their favorite part of the Amish Heartland is, we get comments on our magazine and the places we write about. Here is what some of them have to say this month: favorite part of Amish Heartland is “ My finding the buggy wheel. ”

-ANNA A. MILLER, DUNDEE

scenes from Amish country and “ The finding the buggy wheel. ” “ Food and handmade items.” pictures from the photo contest “ The winners, the recipes and the monthly events listed. ” “ The recipes and the stories.”

-CAROLE MILLER, RITTMAN

-REBECCA HUMRICHOUSER, POLK

-JANET ESKRA, OREGON

-JUDITH SHUPE, CANTON

beautiful views of Amish Country. It “ The is so realxing to see. I like the recipes and it is fun trying to find the buggy wheel. ”

enjoy the entire publication; the stories, “ Ilooking at the ads and planning the next trip, and the recipes. ” “ Stories of the Amish life and traditions.” recipes and photo contest and “ The recipes, pictures and stories. I like “Mythbusters: Amish Edition.” “ The ” all of it! ”

-SHIRLEY LIGHT, ASHLAND

-KELLI JACKOWSKI, SHADYSIDE

-LINDA WESTERMANN, SOUTHGATE, MI

-GEORGE ZURAVA, SILVER LAKE

-SHERI YODER, SUGARCREEK

WINTER PHOTO CONTEST Amish Heartland is having a winter photo contest. For the upcoming season put your photography skills to work and capture the beauty that is only found in our Amish country. Contestants can submit up to 10 of their best photos. The deadline for the Winter Photo Contest is MARCH 1, 2014. The top three winners will be announced in the April issue of Amish Heartland. Winners will receive a 6-month subscription to Amish Heartland and a gift from one of our local retailers. Send photos to Amish Heartland, 212 E. Liberty St., Wooster or via e-mail to AMISH HEARTLAND 43 cnoyes@the-daily-record.com.


Don’t’t miss a single issue of Amish Heartland

A H

Attractions • Events • Maps • Shopping

mish eartland

1 Yr. Subscription = $25 2 Yr. Subscription = $40 Order your subscription by sending your name, address, phone number and check (made out to Spectrum Publications) to Amish Heartland, 212 E. Liberty St., Wooster, OH 44691.

February 2014

Broad Run Cheese House

Amish Circle Letters “Chat lines” for the Amish Community

Find the Buggy Wheel Rules for entry: Somewhere in this issue you’ll find a buggy wheel, just like the one below. It may be tucked in an ad, in a picture or placed somewhere else on a page. It won’t be just any buggy wheel, but just like one of the wheels at the right. Clip the entry form below and mail it to: Amish Heartland Puzzle, 212 E. Liberty St., Wooster, OH 44691; Entries must be postmarked by Februrary 28, 2014. One randomly selected winner with the correct answer will receive a gift from one of our Amish Heartland advertisers. In last month’s issue the buggy wheel was hidden on page 30.

I FOUND THE BUGGY WHEEL ON PAGE ____________ NAME: __________________________________________________ ADDRESS:_________________________________________________ PHONE:________________________________ MY FAVORITE PART OF AMISH HEARTLAND: ____________________ __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ 44


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Amish Heartland, February 2014  

Amish Heartland is a monthly magazine looking at life in the world's largest Amish community, located in Wayne and Holmes counties in Ohio....

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