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® Global Companies Advancing Women in Leadership Summer 2019

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INSIDE THIS ISSUE Introducing Women Business Collaborative Knocking Down the Barriers to Gender Equity Insight Education Systems “Other versus Lesser” Why You Should Clean Up Your D&I Messaging, and How Point/Counterpoint: Unconscious Bias

18th Annual Women Worth Watching ® Edition

Lynn Jurich

CEO of Sunrun 2019 Woman Worth Watching


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PUBLISHER'S COLUMN All Things Diversity & Inclusion FOUNDER/CEO/PUBLISHER

James R. Rector VP OF OPERATIONS

James Gorman DESIGNER

Stephen A. Toth ASSOCIATE EDITOR

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

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Profiles in Diversity Journal® is a quarterly magazine dedicated to promoting and advancing diversity and inclusion in the corporate, government, nonprofit, higher education, and military sectors. For more than 21 years, we have helped to stimulate organizational change by showcasing the visionary leadership, innovative programs, and committed individuals that are making it happen. The views expressed in this publication are those of the authors and may or may not represent the views of the publisher. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. Registered in U.S. Patent Office

Congratulations to all 166 winners of the 2019 Women Worth Watching® Award! This year’s class is one of the largest in our 18-year history of collaborating with organizations to identify and recognize women in leadership. Congratulations to the organizations that invested time and resources to nominate one of their esteemed women leaders and to publicly acknowledge their talents, commitment, achievements, and leadership. The content in this issue is arguably unique and original. The 166 award recipients share their views on numerous topics dealing with the workplace—their individual experiences and prevailing wisdom. One common theme is a recognition just how important mentors are to career success. The awardees express their gratitude and talk about the impact mentorship can have on a woman’s professional growth. Our mission of showcasing outstanding women leaders, who in most cases qualify as C-suite candidates, has been 18 years in the making. We are energized toward continued efforts that focus on Women Worth Watching candidates in all areas of employment. The collaboration between organizations from around the globe and our magazine to feature these women is a tribute to, and public acknowledgement of, performance, character, and integrity. We appreciate Catalyst’s continued partnership with Women Worth Watching and want to thank CEO Lorraine Hariton for her inspiring introduction to the gallery of this year’s awardees on pages 18 to 19. We also draw your attention to articles in this issue by Michael Stuber, Janet and Gary Smith, and Steve Young and Barbara Hockfield. Their fine editorial contributions continue to enhance our understanding of diversity, inclusion, and equity. We also wish to spotlight the Women Business Collaborative feature on page 194. The WBC was formed to focus on women’s parity in business and promoting women in the C-suite. And high fives to our editorial, production, and IT departments for their continued commitment to excellence and their fine efforts in producing the Women Worth Watching Awards issue, currently a six-month production calendar. Our sincere appreciation extends to organizations that purchased space to publicly congratulate their Women Worth Watching. These organizations make it possible for Women Worth Watching to sustain and continue its important work.

James R. Rector Founder & Publisher Since 1999

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNERwww.womenworthwatching.com ®

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IN THIS ISSUE

01 | 05 | 16 | 18 | 20 | 194 | 210 |

PUBLISHER’S COLUMN EDITOR’S COLUMN ON THE COVER REMOVING GENDER PARITY BARRIERS WOMEN WORTH WATCHING PROFILES ARTICLES CORPORATE INDEX

Knocking Down the Barriers to Gender Equity

18 PAGE 16

On the Cover In our cover story, you’ll meet Woman Worth Watching Lynn Jurich and learn what makes Sunrun, her clean-energy company, a truly different kind of workplace.

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Knocking Down the Barriers to Gender Equity Introducing this year’s Women Worth Watching issue, Catalyst President and CEO Lorraine Hariton discusses the exciting progress being made toward gender equity, as well as the barriers that remain.

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Summer 2019

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


16th Annual International Innovations in Diversity Awards

Profiles in Diversity Journal’s 16th Annual International Innovation in Diversity Awards honor organizations and institutions around the world that are developing innovative solutions for today’s pressing workforce challenges in the areas of diversity, inclusion, and human equity. The awards showcase diversity success and discovery and are open across all industry sectors and geographical regions. The objective of the awards is encouraging ongoing development and enhancement of programs, projects, and practices for increasing diversity, creating inclusive environments, and fostering cultural and individual understanding. The goal is opening pathways so diversity becomes a strategic advantage worldwide.

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WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNERwww.womenworthwatching.com ®

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Introducing … Women Business Collaborative Learn how a new alliance called Women Business Collaborative is working to hasten the rise of women to the C-suite and boardroom, achieve gender parity, support women entrepreneurs, and more.

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Why You Should Clean Up Your D&I Messaging, and How Michael Stuber, European diversity engineer and a PDJ columnist for 2019, tells us why we should retool our D&I messaging, and how we can do it.

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Other versus Lesser These authors say that encountering otherness can be positive—interesting, even exciting—except when our biases cause us to see other as lesser.

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Point/Counterpoint: Given What We Know about the Impact of Unconscious Bias in the Talent Selection Process, Should We Use “Blind” Resumes? Point/Counterpoint: Are blind resumes good because they remove one barrier for job seekers? Or are they bad because they ignore the value of difference and do nothing to confront selection-process bias?

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WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


EDITORS'S COLUMN

“Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage.” –Anais Nin Well, we’ve put the 18th Women Worth Watching issue to bed. And there is something I noticed as I read the essays submitted by this year’s awardees. To a woman, they welcome new, even unexpected, challenges. They look for opportunities to stretch, to learn, to grow. They embrace their careers, and their lives, as adventures. And they thrive in today’s uncertain, ever-changing business environment. It’s clear that all of our Women Worth Watching Award recipients have talent, brains, ambition, discipline, and a passion for their work. But perhaps the most important quality each of them demonstrates is courage. What allows these women to fully express their other important and impressive abilities is that each one has summoned the courage to speak up, take risks, fail and learn and keep going, ask for what she wants and deserves, and meet the challenges that arise in every career and every life. Without courage, their considerable abilities, and even their passion and commitment, might not matter very much—and we might never have heard of them. It is their courage that has made them dive in and live their lives out loud. Some of them seem to have been born with a risk-taking bent. Some of them talk about having had to work at developing it. But all of them have found a way to say yes in uncomfortable and even scary situations. And that’s their secret. They have said yes when many other equally gifted and intelligent and passionate professionals have said no. These women have said yes to new and sometimes daunting challenges and opportunities. They have taken responsibility. They have succeeded sometimes, and sometimes failed. But each of them has always got up, dusted off, figured out what went wrong, and started again. Courage, more than any other single trait, has made these leaders our 2019 Women Worth Watching. We invite you to get to know them. You’ll be inspired. As always, thanks for reading. Teresa Fausey Associate Editor, PDJ

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNERwww.womenworthwatching.com ®

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Company and Executive 2019 Award Winners

ADM Fabiana Bianchi Vice President, Marketing & Global Growth....................................................20

ADM Manda Tweten Vice President, Customer Value Creation...............................22

Aflac Jamie Lee Senior Vice President and Chief Service Officer.......................................48

Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP Natasha Kohne Partner; Cybersecurity, Privacy & Data Protection Practice Co-Head; and Firm-wide Management Committee Member.......................................184

AMD Susan Moore Corporate Vice President, Government Affairs & Corporate Responsibility..............................183

AMD Pat Chew Finance Director..............................................186

AMD Mydung M. Pham Senior Director, Design Engineering........................................188

American Airlines Neisha Strambler-Butler Vice President, Compensation & Benefits..............................45

Anderson & Kreiger, LLP Carmen M. Ortiz Counsel................................................................101

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sandia.gov/careers

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ÂŽ


(company names in alphabetical order)

Arrow Electronics Lisiane Droal Vice President, Human Resources, EMEA...............................51

Arrow Electronics Dana Shinaberry Director, Global Supplier Management.......................................................53

Arrow Electronics Dana Zaba Director, Data Intelligence– North America....................................................54

Association of Black Women Attorneys Tanya N. Blocker President..............................................................50

ATHENA International Andrea Stevenson Conner President...............................................................52

Axinn, Veltrop & Harkrider LLP Tiffany Rider Antitrust Partner................................................55

Barilla America Kimberly Braithwaite Senior Human Resource Manager..............60

Burns & Levinson Deborah J. Peckham Partner & Co-chair, Intellectual Property.........................................59

Congratulations to Sasha Sanyal

Genpact believes inclusion and diversity creates more innovative, rewarding and transformational outcomes for our clients.

Burns & Levinson Ellen J. Zucker Partner...................................................................62

Catalyst, Inc. Julie Nugent Senior Vice President, Learning & Strategic Advisory Services..........................64

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNERwww.womenworthwatching.com ÂŽ

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Company and Executive 2019 Award Winners

Cathedral Capital Brooke Lively CEO and President............................................61

Cisco Systems Ehrika Gladden Vice President, Cisco Refresh/ Cisco Capital........................................................63

Corning Incorporated Christine M. Pambianchi Executive Vice President, People & Digital..................................................66

CVS Health Maly Bernstein Vice President, Beauty & Personal Care.....................................................96

CVS Health Karen S. Lynch Executive Vice President, CVS Health & President, Aetna Business Unit........................................189

CVS Health Mayra Boitel Vice President, Chief Merchant– Alternative Formats.........................................193

Day Pitney LLP Elizabeth (Beth) J. Sher Partner, Counsel, and Leader of the Complex Commercial Litigation Group.................................................24

Day Pitney LLP Susan R. Huntington Partner and Chair of Healthcare, Life Sciences, Technology & Practice Group......................185

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Dechert LLP Robin Nunn Partner...................................................................23

Del Frisco’s Restaurant Group Mia Meachem Chief Marketing Officer..................................179

Designated Driver Manuela Papadopol Chief Executive Officer..................................172

DiCello Levitt Gutzler Amy E. Keller Partner..................................................................174

EY Janet Truncale EY Americas FSO Assurance Managing Partner............................................158

Fannie Mae Elonda Crockett Vice President, Operations– Shared Services.................................................65

Fannie Mae Gina West Executive Manager, Community Investment & Engagement............................67

Dickinson Wright PLLC Leslee M. Lewis Member................................................................177

Fannie Mae Nancy Jardini Senior Vice President, Chief Compliance & Ethics Officer, and Chief Office of Minority & Women Inclusion Officer................................70

Diversified Search Julie Kanak Managing Director............................................57

Fish & Richardson Betty Chen Principal................................................................32

Diversified Search Denielle Pemberton-Heard General Counsel & Managing Director............................................58

Fish & Richardson Megan Chacon Principal................................................................78

Durham Regional Police Service Melanie Anderson Acting Superintendent, Executive Officer..............................................108

Durham Regional Police Service Holly Britton Acting Director, People, Culture & Learning..........................................109

Excellus BlueCross and BlueShield Lisa Y. Harris, MD Vice President & Chief Medical Officer, Commercial.......................176

Fish & Richardson Christina McDonough Principal................................................................84

Fish & Richardson Christina D. Brown-Marshall, PhD Principal................................................................87

FLEETCOR Chrystal Williams Chief Human Resources Officer..................82

Flexport Susanne Schöneberg Senior Director, Flexport.org..........................81

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


(company names in alphabetical order)

FordHarrison LLP Amy R. Turci Partner...................................................................56

GEI Consultants, Inc. Amber L. Ahles Senior Project Manager & Branch Manager.................................................85

Freddie Mac Dominica Groom Williams Vice President, Office of Inclusive Engagement....................................170

GEI Consultants, Inc. Ileen Gladstone Senior Vice President......................................90

Freddie Mac Jacqueline M. Welch Chief Human Resources Officer & Chief Diversity Officer................................175

Genpact Sasha Sanyal Global Business Leader, Insurance, Diversity & CSR............................44

Gibbons P.C. Kristen D. Sostowski Director, Employment & Labor Law Department; Leader, Higher Education Team..................................86

Golden Rule Technology Elaine Jeanne Harris Cultural Connectivity Architect & Founder........................................115

Goulston & Storrs Martha J. Nahil Frahm Director; Co-chair, Tax Group........................91

The singular power of diversity Dechert is a global law firm that achieves dynamic results by embracing diversity and innovation. At the core of our firm’s culture is a dedication to seeking and nurturing diverse viewpoints and experiences to develop the highest caliber of talent, leadership and service for our clients. Dechert congratulates our friend and colleague Robin Nunn for being named one of 2019’s “Women Worth Watching.” dechert.com/diversity

D

Diversity and Inclusion

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNERwww.womenworthwatching.com ®

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Company and Executive 2019 Award Winners

Goulston & Storrs Pamela M. MacKenzie Director; Co-chair, Corporate Group...............................................92

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Goulston & Storrs Amy Moody McGrath Director..............................................................100

Goulston & Storrs Jennifer Furey Director; Co-chair, Litigation Group.................................................97

Grace Global Capital, LLC Grace Vandecruze Managing Director...........................................95

Goulston & Storrs Michelle M. Porter Director; Co-chair, Private Client & Trust Group........................99

Greenberg Traurig, LLP Martha A. Sabol Co-Chair, Gaming Practice; Co-Chair, Global Women’s Initiative.........88

Summer 2019

Greenberg Traurig, LLP G. Michelle Ferreira Co-Managing Shareholder, San Francisco Office & Silicon Valley Office......................93

Greenspoon Marder LLP Michelle Martinez Reyes Chief Marketing Officer....................................21

Greenspoon Marder LLP Myrna Maysonet Partner & Chief Diversity Officer.................26

Greenspoon Marder LLP Nandini Nair Partner...................................................................46

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ÂŽ


(company names in alphabetical order)

HARMAN Michelle Epstein Taigman Senior Vice President, General Counsel & Secretary......................182

Honeywell Anne T. Madden Senior Vice President and General Counsel........................................28

Idaho National Laboratory Anne M. Gaffney Chief Science Officer & Distinguished Laboratory Fellow................40

Hayden Consultants, Inc. (a GEI Company) Rachel Hayden Vice President...................................................94

HP Inc. Lesley Slaton Brown Chief Diversity Officer.....................................114

Infoblox Norma Lane Executive Vice President of People & Places...........................................122

Haynes and Boone, LLP Jennifer Reddien Director of Diversity & Inclusion...............187

HireRight Elise Eidemiller Managing Director, Account Management & Canada...............98

Holwell Shuster & Goldberg LLP Priyanka Timblo Associate.............................................................25

Holwell Shuster & Goldberg LLP Nina Kanovitch Schiffer Associate..............................................................27

Honeywell Anne T. Madden Senior Vice President & General Counsel................................................28

Hoguet Newman Regal & Kenney, LLP Randi B. May Partner.................................................................190

Hoguet Newman Regal & Kenney, LLP Miriam Manber Associate............................................................192

Hughes Hubbard & Reed LLP Hagit Muriel Elul Partner..................................................................126

Humacyte, Inc. Sabrina Osborne Vice President of Human Resources.............................................121

Hunton Andrews Kurth LLP Susan Failla Partner..................................................................118

Hunton Andrews Kurth LLP Lorelie S. Masters Partner.................................................................120

Idaho National Laboratory Dr. Erin Searcy Director, Institutional Planning & Programs.......................................30

Innovative Learning Group, Inc. Lisa Toenniges Chief Executive Officer..................................124

International Paper Company Delaine Smith Associate General Counsel, Labor & Employment.....................................173

Jabil, Inc. Beth A. Walters Senior Vice President, Culture, Community & Employee Engagement.................................178

Jones Walker Aileen Thomas Partner..................................................................125

Kasowitz Benson & Torres LLP Jessica Taub Rosenberg Partner..................................................................127

Idaho National Laboratory Dr. Monica C. Regalbuto Director, Nuclear Fuel Cycle Strategy....................................................33

Kasowitz Benson & Torres LLP Lauren Tabaksblat Partner.................................................................130

Idaho National Laboratory Virginia L. Wright Energy Cyber Portfolio Program Manager.............................................39

Kelly Services Sam Smith Vice President & Global Practice Lead, Life Sciences........................128

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNERwww.womenworthwatching.com ÂŽ

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Company and Executive 2019 Award Winners

KORE Wireless Sue Holub Executive Vice President & Chief Marketing Officer.................................129

Markham Stouffville Hospital Lori Brady Director, Strategic Projects & Accountability...............................................102

KPMG LLP Fiona Grandi National Managing Partner, Innovation & Enterprise Solutions...............35

Mayer Brown LLP Michelle Ontiveros Gross Partner..................................................................132

Krungthai AXA Life Insurance Company Limited Sally O’Hara Chief Executive Officer..................................134

Krungthai AXA Life Insurance Company Limited Bubphawadee Owararinth Chief People Officer........................................136

LaSalle Network Maureen Hoersten Chief Operating Officer.................................143

Latham & Watkins LLP Nicole Fanjul Partner...................................................................131

Legislative Assembly of Ontario Mitzie Hunter Member of Provincial Parliament.................111

Lincoln Financial Group Jen Warne Krow Senior Vice President, Chief Talent Officer...........................................79

Living Abundantly, Inc. Dr. Kim R. Grimes Chief Executive Officer & Founder............138

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Meritor, Inc. Cheri Lantz Vice President & Chief Strategy Officer....................................180

Ministry of Health & Long-Term Care (Ontario) Michelle-Ann Hylton Director, Licensing & Policy Branch–Long-Term Care Homes Division................................................106

Ministry of Indigenous Affairs (Ontario) Karma Call Director, Negotiations Northeast & South...........................................103

Mitchell Silberberg & Knupp LLP Emily F. Evitt Partner...................................................................42

Nationwide Susan Gueli CIO & SVP, Infrastructure & Operations, Digital Transformation & Enterprise Applications.............................139

Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Melissa Foster Bird Partner & Chief Diversity Partner..............140

New York Life Natalie Lamarque Senior Vice President & Deputy General Counsel.................................37

Nike Elizabeth Jackson-Rietz Director, Global Retail Brand Concepts...............................................142

OMERS Adeola Adebayo Director, OMERS Capital Markets.................................................104

OneGoal Julie Hammond Managing Director, Legal & Compliance..........................................72

Mitchell Silberberg & Knupp LLP Alesha M. Dominique Partner...................................................................47

OSF Commerce Anna Petriv Vice President, Multicloud & Salesforce Alliance...........................................110

Moss Adams Carisa Wisniewski Managing Partner............................................135

Page 2 Communications Debra Pickett Principal Consultant.......................................144

NASA Lara Kearney Deputy Manager, Gateway Program............................................137

Pernod Ricard Amandine Robin Senior Vice President North America, Communications & Sustainability...............83

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


(company names in alphabetical order)

PGA of America Sandy Cross Chief People Officer.......................................146

Redgrave LLP Staci D. Kaliner Managing Director...........................................145

Robins Kaplan LLP Melissa D’Alelio Partner.................................................................150

Phillips Lytle LLP Lisa L. Smith Partner....................................................................71

Redgrave LLP Christine P. Payne Partner.................................................................148

Robins Kaplan LLP Denise Rahne Partner..................................................................152

RBC Wealth Management–U.S. Brooke McGeehan Senior Vice President, Branch Director/Financial Advisor.............68

Restoring Bodies & Minds LLC Patrice Shavone Brown Director, Mental Health Counseling Agency.........................................149

RTI International Teena W. Piccione Executive Vice President & Chief Information Officer...............................151

Redgrave LLP Mathea K. E. Bulander Partner...................................................................141

Richards Kibbe & Orbe LLP Margaret W. Meyers Partner..................................................................147

Rubicon Programs Dr. Carole Dorham-Kelly Chief Program Officer....................................154

One voice can change the whole discussion. At Day Pitney, we seek out diversity as an inexhaustible source of fresh ideas, innovative strategies and new approaches. With more than 300 attorneys of diverse backgrounds and unique experiences, we love the way difference adds depth and perspective to all we do.

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WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNERwww.womenworthwatching.com ®

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Company and Executive 2019 Award Winners

Sandia National Laboratories Dr. Ireena A. Erteza R&D Electrical Engineer, Distinguished Level...........................................38

Sandia National Laboratories Dr. Marcey Hoover Director, Quality Assurance............................41

Sanford Heisler Sharp LLP Saba Bireda Partner...................................................................113

Sigma Assessment Systems Inc. Julie Carswell Vice President.....................................................112

Squire Patton Boggs Elizabeth Ryan Partner, Global Public Policy........................153

Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation Lucy Cutting Executive Director, Global Trade Finance.....................................160

Sterne Kessler Goldstein & Fox PLLC Gaby L. Longsworth, PhD Director..................................................................73

Sterne Kessler Goldstein & Fox PLLC Deborah Sterling, PhD Director..................................................................76

Sullivan & Cromwell LLP Inosi M. Nyatta Partner & Co-Head of Project Development & Finance Group..................156

Sunrun Lynn Jurich Chief Executive Officer...................................116

Talent Path Melissa Peak Executive Director, Strategic Partnerships...................................155

Congratulations to Fabiana Bianchi and Manda Tweten on their successful careers--helping to lead and inspire women worldwide.

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WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ÂŽ


(company names in alphabetical order)

Terex Corporation Melissa Holobach General Manager, Oklahoma City..................................................123

Walmart Fiona Tan Senior Vice President, U.S. Customer Technology.............................77

UCLA Anderson School of Management Elizabeth Cercado 2019 EMBA Candidate & Engineering Manager (Boeing)..................164

Walmart Latriece Watkins Senior Vice President, General Merchandising Manager................80

Ulmer & Berne LLP Amanda Martinsek Partner...................................................................74

Warner Bros. Pictures Amy K. Castillo Vice President, Strategy & Brand Management........................................166

UnitedHealthcare Dr. Nicole Cooper Vice President, Social Responsibility........................................75

WilmerHale Amy Kreiger Wigmore Partner & Vice Chair, Litigation/ Controversy Department..............................165

University of Toronto Scarborough Maydianne C. B. Andrade Professor, Vice Dean of Faculty Affairs & Equity, Acting Vice Principal Academic & Dean............................................105

Wilson Elser Moskowitz Edelman & Dicker, LLP Angela Russell Managing Partner..............................................161

University of Vermont Wanda Heading-Grant Vice President, Human Resources, Diversity & Multicultural Affairs..................157

Venable LLP Lisa A. Tavares Partner..................................................................163

Walmart Monique Picou Senior Vice President, Supply Chain.......................................................34

WilsonHCG Lesley Taylor Vice President, Client Strategy, EMEA....................................167

Winston & Strawn LLP Kobi Kennedy Brinson Partner, Chair of Diversity & Inclusion Committee....................................191

World Education Services Shamira Madhany Managing Director–Canada, Deputy Executive Director...........................107

Xandr Lori Fink Chief Legal Officer............................................36

Xandr Antoinette Hamilton Vice President, Diversity & Inclusion.......................................168

Y Media Labs Marcela Lay, CCXP Head of Atlanta Office & Vice President, Client Services...................169

Yo Soy I Am, LLP Ivette Mayo CEO, Yo Soy I Am, LLP & Founder, Power on Heels Fund, Inc.................................................162

Not listed in this publication Wilson Turner Kosmo Robin Assaf Wofford Partner...................................................................119

Winston & Strawn LLP Linda Coberly Chicago Managing Partner, Chair of Appellate & Critical Motions Practice................................117

Redgrave LLP Karin Jenson Partner

Winston & Strawn LLP Julissa Reynoso Partner

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNERwww.womenworthwatching.com ÂŽ

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ON THE COVER

Lynn Jurich Leads a Different Kind of Company

L

ynn Jurich started Sunrun in 2007 because she believes that one of the best ways to fight climate change and replace fossil fuels is to expand access to solar and battery technologies to as many people as possible. Lynn and Sunrun cofounder Ed Fenster pioneered the “solar-as-a-service” business model. People can install home solar (and now a battery) with zero upfront cost, and a monthly bill that is often lower than their utility bill. In addition to greatly expanding access to solar, Lynn also wanted to make sure that Sunrun was a different kind of company—one fostering a culture that values and respects diversity and inclusion. That’s why she joined two leading diversity groups this year, CEO Action for Diversity & Inclusion and Catalyst CEO Champions for Change, signing on with many Fortune 500 companies in the pledge to advance diversity and inclusion as part of Sunrun’s culture. The energy sector is one of the least diverse industries in the world. The solar industry, in particular, has a 26 percent gender wage gap, which is larger than the national average. African Americans represent over 12 percent of the U.S. workforce, but only 7.6 percent of the people working in the solar industry, according to a joint study from the Solar Foundation and the Solar Energy Industries Association. Hispanic and Latino workers make up roughly 17 percent of the overall workforce, and that is true for

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the solar industry as well. Only one-third of solar companies even “track employee demographics and diversity,” according to recent data. Sunrun strives to identify and implement best practices to promote fundamental fairness for all workers. For example, to address one of the causes of the gender pay gap when people change jobs, Sunrun voluntarily stopped asking applicants for their salary history at the beginning of 2016, more than 18 months before this practice became law in California and New York City. Additionally, Sunrun signed the White House Equal Pay Pledge in 2016, and in 2018 became the first solar company to achieve 100 percent pay parity. Sunrun still has a long way to go on its diversity and inclusion journey, but today, 42 percent of Sunrun’s board of directors comprises women, and women make up half of the company’s senior executives. In an effort to help the company increase pay equity and diversity across the board, in 2019, Sunrun was one of the first solar companies to appoint a director of diversity and inclusion, George-Axelle Brousssillon Matschinga, who joined the company from L’Oréal. Under her leadership, Sunrun will be the first home solar company to attend the annual National Black MBA Association® Conference and Exposition this fall to hire more diverse talent. The company has also taken steps to expand access to solar energy for people

in low-income communities. These communities are often closest to dirty fossil fuel plants, which expose the people living there to dangerous pollution that increases asthma rates and to other health impacts that shorten people’s lives. Last year, Sunrun pledged to install 100 megawatts of solar on at least 50,000 affordable multifamily homes over the next ten years in California. This will help people generate clean electricity right where it’s used, and will help reduce the need for fossil fuel power plants. Across the Bay from Sunrun’s office in San Francisco, solar and batteries on low-income housing in Oakland and Alameda County will help to replace a retiring jet-fuel power plant located in West Oakland. The same communities who bore the brunt of this pollution for the past 40 years will now be part of the solution, and Sunrun plans to continue making these virtual power plant agreements throughout the United States. Across the country, Sunrun has more than 255,000 solar customers and more than 6,000 Brightbox customers. Under Lynn’s leadership, Sunrun is poised to continue leading our clean energy transformation. Lynn Jurich was born and raised in the Pacific Northwest, and she and her husband live in the Bay Area with their two children. She holds a BS in science, technology, and society from Stanford University, and an MBA from the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Diverse in Visions, Unified in Culture. Congratulations to all of the 2019 “Women Worth Watching”. Greenspoon Marder is a national full-service business law firm with 240 attorneys and 26 locations across the United States. The firm has been ranked amongst American Lawyer’s Am Law 200 as one of the top law firms in the U.S. since 2015. We serve Fortune 500, middle-market public and private companies, start-ups, emerging businesses, individuals and entrepreneurs nationwide. Greenspoon Marder is committed to diversity because it complements our core strengths and enhances our ability to serve our clients. Our differences unite us and allow us to become more resilient and adaptable, so that we best understand the varying needs of our clients and business partners.

888.491.1140 www.gmlaw.com

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WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNERwww.womenworthwatching.com ®

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Knocking Down the Barriers to Gender Equity By Lorraine Hariton, President & CEO of Catalyst

A

s President and CEO of Catalyst, a global nonprofit organization that works with some of the world’s most powerful CEOs and leading companies to help build workplaces that work for women, I am delighted and honored to introduce the 18th annual Women Worth Watching® issue of Profiles in Diversity Journal. The 166 accomplished women featured in these pages are an inspiration to me, and they are role models for colleagues in their organizations and communities.

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These women come from all industries and regions, and their profiles demonstrate the variety of skills, expertise, insights, and life experiences that have helped them achieve success. As I read through them, I am reminded why it’s so important to create inclusive workplaces where remarkable women like these can thrive. Many companies are making significant progress in cultivating inclusive environments at work, and some of them employ the women we’re celebrating here. For others, there’s work

yet to do before the playing field is truly level for all their employees. Unfortunately, the reflex to “think leader, think male” in the workplace continues to prevail. Antiquated notions about women, and especially women of color, continue to pollute our talent pipelines, our organizations, and our judgment, preventing us from seeing them as leaders. In fact, these ideas remain so pervasive that most of us never realize their negative impact on how we work and how we perceive women at work.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Catalyst research has identified three significant and insidious ways these perceptions hinder women in the workplace: 1. Stereotypes: Women are judged to be good at “taking care,” while men are judged to be good at “taking charge.” Despite multiple studies failing to support these perceptions, people tend to think of women as being compassionate and collaborative, while men are viewed as ambitious and aggressive. Together with outmoded ideas about desirable leadership qualities that dismiss the importance of emotional intelligence and communication, we can see how men are considered default leaders, even in 2019. 2. Unconscious Bias: We all have biases. These biases affect our day-to-day decisions and often insinuate themselves into our larger organizational cultures and systems. People in power naturally like and promote others who share similar qualities or remind them of a younger version of themselves, and they embed those qualities into company values and human resource

is a no-win situation. No matter what we do and how we act, we’re never “just right.” These barriers affect women in different ways, and women of color often find themselves dealing with yet another obstacle–the dreaded Emotional Tax. Catalyst researchers have found that many women of color report being highly “on guard” at work to protect themselves from slights related to their race or gender. Some of these slights appear benign, from observations about a woman’s hair or her tone of voice. Others may be more antagonistic, like not being invited to the meeting or not being considered for a high-profile opportunity or promotion. Cumulatively, these women experience a workplace very different from a white man, which can take its toll, from sleep deprivation to contemplating quitting. But momentum for equity is growing every day in organizations around the world. I know from my own conversations with corporate leaders that they are committed to removing barriers that limit women in the workplace, and to reengi-

representation; and holding themselves accountable. Profiles in Diversity Journal has featured more than 2,000 Women Worth Watching over the past 18 years, including several who have gone on to Fortune 500 CEO positions. They are proof that our efforts to advance women in the workplace continue to pay off and that broader cultural change requires persistence. The 2019 Women Worth Watching represent the best of who we are today, and who we strive to be. We are watching you and are excited to see where you’ll lead us next.

Many companies are making significant progress in cultivating inclusive environments at work, and some of them employ the women we’re celebrating here. For others, there’s work yet to do before the playing field is truly level for all their employees. functions. So it’s no surprise when the new crop of leaders looks a lot like the old guard, while others struggle to achieve basic inclusion. 3. The Double Bind: We’re all familiar with the story of Goldilocks and her search for a bed that wasn’t too hard, wasn’t too soft, and instead was “just right.” Women in the workplace experience this story in a different way: we’re always searching for how we can be “just right.” We’re found competent, but not likable, or likable, but not competent. This double-bind

neering their corporate cultures to accelerate women’s careers at all levels. They are being proactive as leaders, by sponsoring women into leadership; evaluating recruitment, promotion, and talent development systems for gender bias; setting and defining goals and targets for diverse

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNERwww.womenworthwatching.com ®

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Fabiana Bianchi Job Title: VP Marketing & Global Growth Education: PhD in International Law, Sapienza Università di Roma in Rome, Italy; Building on Talent program, IMD Business School in Lausanne, Switzerland Company Name: Archer Daniels Midland Company Industry: Agribusiness Company CEO: Juan Luciano Company Headquarters Location: Chicago, Illinois Number of Employees: 40,000 Your Location (if different from above): ADM Wild Europe GmbH & Co KG, Rudolf-Wild-Str. 107-115, 69214 Heidelberg, Germany Words you live by: Do what you say, say what you do. Personal Philosophy: Do not do to others what you do not want to be done to yourself. What book are you reading: Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg & Nell Scovell; Becoming by Michelle Obama What was your first job: HR assistant Favorite charity: Initiatives for the support and development of children Interests: travelling, hiking, music, and art Family: My husband and two boys

Turn “Can I?” into “I can!”

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hen I think back to the earlier stages of my career, it is with great pride that I see the rise in the number of women holding middle- and senior-management positions. Although gender equality still has a way to go—especially in the more traditionally male-dominated sectors—we are making progress. This is driven by better access to education, improved childcare support, and an increased awareness among employers of the importance of offering gender-equal opportunities. What’s more, as social and cultural changes continue to advance equality at home, women are finding themselves with the time and support required to pursue their professional ambitions. Over the years at ADM, I have come across many amazing women with true talents, acting as dedicated and passionate leaders, restless executors, and powerful team builders. Despite this, however, there is one question that women continually ask themselves when taking on new responsibilities: “Can I do it?” Female colleagues, who in many cases were more than capable or even overqualified to take on the new challenge, have asked me this question. What is

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driving this lack of confidence? Why do we doubt our capabilities? And more important, what can we do to overcome these insecurities? This hesitation and uncertainty is a key barrier we need to overcome if we want to succeed alongside our male counterparts. While awareness about the importance of gender equality can take us a long way, our ability to dare and take on more responsibility is something we need to find in ourselves. We need to work at it and help each other, whether by mentoring, coaching, or simply telling a colleague how well she does and how much more she is capable of. We must help ourselves and others understand that being successful does not mean making no mistakes or always over-performing. Instead, we must learn from the mistakes we make and have faith in ourselves, even if sometimes we deliver something that’s good enough, rather than perfect. Working together to build our confidence is the only way that we can truly begin to help women take the next steps in their careers, achieve gender balance across senior positions, and turn “Can I?” into “I can!”

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Michelle Martinez Reyes Job Title: Chief Marketing Officer Education: BA, Florida International University; MBA, Nova Southeastern University Company Name: Greenspoon Marder LLP Industry: Law Company CEO: Gerry Greenspoon and Michael Marder Company Headquarters Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida Number of Employees: 729 Words you live by: "Growth and comfort do not coexist" –Ginni Rometty, CEO, IBM Personal Philosophy: Life gives in chapters, take each one as it comes and make your own story. What book are you reading: How To Listen So People Will Talk: Build Stronger Communication and Deeper Connections by Betty Harling What was your first job: Telemarketer Favorite charity: Joe DiMaggio Children's Hospital Interests: Traveling, history, music, and anything involving the ocean Family: Fiancé, Art de la Nuez, and son, Madden Reyes; oldest of four sisters, daughter of immigrant parents from Cuba

Shaping a Collective Identity

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s a Hispanic woman in the workforce for more than twenty years, my biggest take away has been this: experience shapes perspective. With my Hispanic roots, I’ve realized that Hispanic communities lack a broader, unified identity, both in and outside the workplace, like a brand. Despite occupying 18 percent of the U.S. population, what it means to be Hispanic remains a vague notion at best. So often, people fail to see the vast cultural diversity within our community. By embracing, highlighting, and sharing our unique identities, we will shape a more collective identity and community overall. Likewise, identifying and cultivating diverse communities in our workplaces will greatly increase our opportunities for growth and change. There is certainly strength in numbers. Until we come together, we will continue to be outpaced—and defined—by the patriarchal and historical majority, which seems to be at the helm of socioeconomic power and influence almost everywhere. However, coming together is only the starting point. The next, and most critical, step relies on each of us investing in ourselves. A community is only as strong as the individuals it is composed of. That means we need to focus on developing the individual talents and skill sets that will set us apart from the crowd. We don’t need handouts to level the playing field. Education, opportunity, experience, and self-investment are what we need. Because when you’re one of the best at whatever you do, you’re valuable and needed. You don’t demand—you earn.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

While we can’t change history, we can stop it from repeating itself. Instead of endeavoring to break down patriarchal structures, we should endeavor to break into them and create new, more inclusive ones. By gaining seats in the figurative patriarchal boardroom, we can begin reclaiming power for ourselves and our communities. The key to breaking in is offering something they do not already have. How can you distinguish yourself ? Earn it. Work relentlessly. Realize you are not the only one fighting this fight. Make yourself better, smarter, and tougher than the rest. Don’t adopt the victim role, even though there may be times it feels justified. Face adversity head on. Let it remind you why you have chosen to become a master of your pursuits. Turn it into fuel: a source of strength, determination, and conviction—fill in the blanks as you go. And once you do secure a boardroom seat, realize all you have done was just a warm-up. Professional success is like paying rent; if you stop paying, you’re out and someone else is in. It’s the circle of life in business. People ask, “Are you Mexican, Colombian, Italian?” “A foreigner?” I’m none. I am multicultural, far more than just bicultural. I’m a whole lot of woman, a little Latin, a little Hispanic, ancestrally European, but also very much American, born and raised. Being American is…well, that’s for the next piece. Author’s note: I use the term Hispanic rather than Latinx (realizing they aren’t interchangeable) because it more broadly denotes an inclusive Spanish-speaking culture and avoids any adherence to geography. www.womenworthwatching.com

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Manda Tweten Job Title: Vice President, Customer Value Creation Education: Bachelor’s degree in marketing, University of North Dakota Company Name: Archer Daniels Midland Company Industry: Agribusiness Company CEO: Juan Luciano Company Headquarters Location: Chicago, Illinois Number of Employees: 40,000 Words you live by: People may not always remember what you said or what you did, but they will remember how you made them feel. A person who feels appreciated will always do more than what is expected. What book are you reading: Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World that Can’t Stop Talking by Susan Cain What was your first job: Grading potatoes on a local farm Favorite charity: March of Dimes Interests: Spending time with my family, traveling, being active (running, biking) Family: An amazing husband and two spunky young boys

Venture into New Territory

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lbert Einstein said: “A ship is always safe at shore, but that is not what it is built for.” This message strongly resonates with me as I reflect on the key milestones throughout my career. Embracing opportunities that require us to operate in unfamiliar territory can be daunting. The rewards and growth that live outside our comfort zone, however, are well worth the challenge. Over the last 19 years, I’ve had the good fortune of working for world-class organizations under inspiring leaders who supported my professional advancement into roles that often required a steep learning curve. Growth opportunities can surface in many different forms. Some scenarios require stepping into a role or area of the business in which you may have no prior experience, while others involve relocation. This can present professional, as well as personal challenges. Meanwhile, other situations are challenging with regard to their magnitude and scope of responsibility. It is my belief, though, that no matter what shape or form advancement opportunities take, we owe it to ourselves to consider embracing the next “uncomfortable” step, so we can reach our full potential. We’re often ready to conquer these situations, despite not always realizing it. While each transition is unique and offers its own set of learning experiences, there are a few common practices

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that I adopt to stay grounded during the onboarding process. • Embracing the “learner mode” period and resisting the urge to accelerate the process, using the early days as an opportunity to understand the business and talent within the team. This involves spending a disproportionate share of time observing and listening, as opposed to launching into action. • Operating with confidence and humility to build trust and rapport with the broader team. This approach creates an environment in which you can feel comfortable exposing all that you do not yet know or understand about the business. • Exercising patience with yourself and the process is important. A marathon mentality is more helpful than a sprint mindset to avoid burnout and neglecting personal priorities. As leaders, we are in a unique position to help positively influence others by creating healthy work environments, where our teams can be challenged and supported beyond their comfort zones. In turn, this fosters professional growth and positively impacts the bottom line. The best way to identify these opportunities is to understand the business needs, recognize the strengths of those around you, and promote team members into roles that allow for advancement while pioneering new ground.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Robin Nunn Job Title: Partner Education: JD, University of Chicago Law School; BA, Dartmouth College Company Name: Dechert LLP Industry: Legal Company CEO: Henry N. Nassau Company Headquarters Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Your Location: Washington, DC Words you live by: People are the only thing that matters, and they are the only thing you should think about, because when you get that part right, everything else works. Personal Philosophy: Always seek opportunities to promote the social good. What book are you reading: The Assassination of Fred Hampton by Jeffrey Haas What was your first job: Food server in my high school cafeteria Favorite charity: NAACP LDF Interests: Volunteering, reading, tennis, golf, surfing, and running

Family: My family means everything to me.

To reform the legal profession, diversity issues must not be seen as “women” or “minority” issues, but as organizational priorities in which everyone has a stake.

A Minority within a Minority

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aw is the least diverse profession in the nation. There is a diversity problem, especially with respect to black women lawyers, which seems to be a pipeline issue, ranging from law schools to law firm leaders. As tough as it is for female lawyers to rise to the top in legal arenas, it’s even tougher for black women lawyers. What I have learned while practicing law is that when women lawyers are disaggregated into distinct racial groups, the challenges confronting them are not always the same in nature or degree. There are common patterns of gender that unify women lawyers in their struggle for professional advancement, but not all women experience the struggle in the same way. For women of color, race is not merely an added layer that subjects them to additional obstacles, but rather a component of their identity that intersects with gender to expose them to unique challenges. This has been revealed in numerous studies of women of color in law firms. The studies find that women of color in the legal profession fare worse than white

women and men of color. Black women are a minority within a minority. For example, while 21 percent of law firm partners were women in 2018, only 2 percent of partners were women of color. Moreover, just less than one percent of partners at major law firms are black women. Being black and a woman in my profession has been both a challenge and a benefit for me. The number of black women partners at Am Law 100 law firms remains minuscule, and unconscious bias impacts adversely the advancement of women of color in the legal profession. But I strongly believe that many attributes I have, often characterized as black female attributes, make me a more effective attorney. All lawyers need to assume personal responsibility for professional changes in diversity in the legal profession. To reform the legal profession, diversity issues must not be seen as “women” or “minority” issues, but as organizational priorities in which everyone has a stake. Diversity is a challenge for the legal profession, and it is going to take everyone’s efforts to improve it.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

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Elizabeth (Beth) J. Sher Job Title: Partner, General Counsel, and leader of the Complex Commercial Litigation group Education: JD cum laude, New York University School of Law; BA summa cum laude, Brandeis University, Phi Beta Kappa Company Name: Day Pitney LLP Industry: Legal Company CEO: Thomas D. Goldberg Company Headquarters Location: Parsippany, New Jersey and Hartford, Connecticut Number of Employees: 587 Words you live by: “To thine own self be true.” –William Shakespeare Personal Philosophy: Nurture and sustain healthy relationships, and try to be present in every moment. What book are you reading: Washington: A Life by Ron Chernow (which is even longer than Alexander Hamilton) What was your first job: selling “men’s furnishings” in a local department store Favorite charity: The Jonah Maccabee Foundation, established to remember and honor a 19-year-old’s legacy and love for the arts and social justice Interests: American history, travel, reading, and most anything related to language Family: Two successful, independent daughters, an enlightened son-in-law, and a perfect grandbaby

Own Your Decisions

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ake the best decisions you can with the best information available, and don’t look back. My senior thesis was about presidential decision-making, focusing on Presidents Kennedy and Johnson, and the mess that was Viet Nam in the 1960s. I was fascinated by how powerful leaders, confronted by challenges large and small, were able to make important decisions that could have worldwide impact, without becoming paralyzed by fear of failure, insecurity, or information overload, when I had trouble at times making far less weighty decisions. Was their secret simply hubris? What I learned—and what I have tried to incorporate into my professional life as a lawyer and impress upon those I mentor—is that the most effective path to making good decisions and becoming a leader is to surround yourself with people you respect, listen attentively, question respectfully, gather enough information to understand your options, make the best-informed decision you can with the available information and guidance, and then move on confidently to the next one. And even though my examples 40 years ago were all men, I have seen that recipe be just as successful for women because, crediting a few stereotypes, it plays to our strengths.

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By all accounts, women should be natural leaders and worthy decisionmakers. Women instinctively initiate and nurture relationships. Women are good listeners. Women are willing to be analytical, but not at the expense of ignoring emotions. Women are willing to ask questions and are not afraid to take advice (directions, anyone?). Women prefer community to isolation and collaboration to competition. Women are willing to take the time to persuade rather than demand. And therein lie most of the ingredients for the recipe for successful decision-making, which leads to increased self-confidence, trust, and willingness to take risks and lead. Of course, the final ingredient must be to evaluate the consequences of our decisions, good or bad, not with regret but with purposeful improvement in mind. My hope is that women will choose to set aside fear, insecurity, doubt, and indecision, embracing instead those traits that play to our strengths. Surround yourself with supportive role models. Trust your village. Soak up knowledge. Don’t shy away from making decisions— even hard ones—and don’t beat yourself up if the results aren’t always what you had hoped. Growth is, after all, an iterative process.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Priyanka Timblo Job Title: Associate Education: LL.B./B.C.L., McGill University Faculty of Law; BA, University of Miami Company Name: Holwell Shuster & Goldberg LLP Industry: Law Company CEO: n/a Company Headquarters Location: New York, New York Number of Employees: 80 Words you live by: Destiny is not for comfort-seekers. Destiny is for the daring and determined who are willing to endure some discomfort, delay gratification, and go where destiny leads. –T.D. Jakes Personal Philosophy: You choose your thoughts, and there isn't one thing running through your mind that you don't allow to. What book are you reading: Educated by Tara Westover What was your first job: Math teacher, Breakthrough Collaborative summer program in Austin, Texas Favorite charity: Breakthrough Collaborative Interests: Hiking and gardening Family: My husband, Bryson, and my son, Orion

Take the chance that maybe you are good enough. Throw away the script. Be attuned to your audience, calibrate your tone, and speak with confidence from a deeply honest place. Leave no room to doubt yourself.

Leave No Room for Doubt

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live for those moments on the job when I have to think on my feet, when the reams of meticulous preparation recede into the background and I am forced to act and speak from a place of instinct. As a lawyer advancing in my career, these extemporaneous speaking opportunities hold increasingly higher stakes: responding to a judge’s question on the fly, cross-examining a witness on facts I just heard for the very first time. But to own those moments, I have had to suppress the messages I have been taught since childhood about how women should act: “Don’t speak out of

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

turn. Don’t speak at all unless you are sure you are right. When you do speak, make sure it’s from a carefully scripted answer, preferably vetted by someone with more experience than you.” These messages—well-meaning as they may be—cultivate an ethic of risk-averse perfectionism that holds as its premise, “You are not good enough as you are.” My advice: Take the chance that maybe you are good enough. Throw away the script. Be attuned to your audience, calibrate your tone, and speak with confidence from a deeply honest place. Leave no room to doubt yourself.

www.womenworthwatching.com

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Myrna Maysonet Job Title: Partner and Chief Diversity Officer Education: BA, University of Central Florida; JD, University of Minnesota Law School Company Name: Greenspoon Marder LLP Industry: Law Company CEO: Gerry Greenspoon and Michael Marder Company Headquarters Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida Number of Employees: 729 Your Location: Orlando, Florida Words you live by: Courage, perseverance in adversity, compassion, and tons of laughter Personal Philosophy: Speak up, nothing can change if you don’t speak up. Speak for others who cannot do so. A lot of people sacrificed so we can have a better future. We must remember that we have the responsibility to help others. Lastly, have a sense of humor, because life will always happen. What book are you reading: Anything Sesame Street related (reading with my girls) What was your first job: Torpedoman in the U.S. Navy Favorite charity: Winnie Palmer Hospital for Women & Babies Interests: Reading, traveling, and eating great food Family: Wife Rebeca, and Emma & Grace, identical twins who will be turning two this year

My Role Models Lift Me Up

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e are taught as children to identify things that don’t go together. It’s a process that helps us learn important concepts but also opens the gates for harmful assumptions about gender roles and the ability of women to excel, in particular, in fields dominated by men. I remember as a kid playing hospital with two of my then “best friends.” I wanted to be the doctor, but they told me that girls couldn’t be doctors, only nurses or wives. When you are five and have very limited experience, those pronouncements make sense. I joined the Navy when I was 17 and my parents got divorced. I went to a ship where the majority of the sailors where males. In my MOSS shop, I was one of the first females. It wasn’t very long before I learned some painful lessons about harassment and what happens when you speak out. However, I also recall how other women rallied behind me. Anything I have accomplished, I owe to strong female role models who paved the way and gave me hope and strength. My mother, Margarita Nunez, was one of my first role models. She came from Puerto Rico at the age of 43,

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divorced with four kids and nothing but hope that we could break the cycle. She cleaned parking lots and toilets, and taught us to fight for what we believe and take pride in whatever we do. My humanities teacher Ms. Eschbach didn’t laugh or try to discourage me when I said I wanted to be a lawyer, even though I didn’t fully understand the financial hurdles I would have to overcome to achieve my dream. She told me that I could do it, and I believed her. My beautiful and incredibly talented wife, Rebeca, showed me the power of being unapologetic for loving and has given me the most important gift, our twin girls, Emma and Grace. My work “sisters” are also my role models, as they constantly lift me up and challenge me to do better. Visibility is important and we need more women, and candidly, unconventional role models—even when it’s hard. I know that when my girls play hospital and one of them says, “I want to be a doctor,” the answer will be which specialty you want. Seeing people that look like us succeeding allows the imagination to thrive, and that’s how dreams come true.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Nina Kanovitch Schiffer Job Title: Associate Education: LL.M., Cornell Law School; Université Panthéon-Assas (Paris, France) Company Name: Holwell Shuster & Goldberg LLP Industry: Law Company CEO: n/a Company Headquarters Location: New York, New York Number of Employees: 80 Words you live by: "What, like it’s hard?" –Elle Woods Personal Philosophy: Never stop learning. What book are you reading: Girls Burn Brighter by Shobha Rao What was your first job: Babysitter Favorite charity: National Women's Law Center; Women's International Zionist Organization

From my mother, also an attorney: “Work hard, dot all the i’s and cross all the t’s, but don’t stress over things that are out of your control.

You Have Important Lessons to Share

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am lucky to count many strong women in my family, and among my friends and my colleagues. From them, I have learned many valuable lessons. From my mother, also an attorney: “Work hard, dot all the i’s and cross all the t’s, but don’t stress over things that are out of your control.” From one of my closest friends: “Don’t waste your time comparing yourself to others, it’s your career you’re building.” From the first partner I worked for as a summer intern: “You’re just as smart, competent, and worthy as the men you work with, and there’s no reason you can’t do the job wearing a dress or bright red nails.” As a young attorney starting out in a new city and a male-dominated workplace, I was grateful to have the support of these strong women. I felt capable of overcoming the challenges associated with my new work environment, knowing that my role models

had faced similar or greater ones in their careers. Despite their positive impact on my career, however, some of these bright women may never seek to mentor others, or even consider themselves role models, as they fail to recognize the value of their guidance. As women, we strive for perfection in all areas of our lives, but often minimize the importance of our achievements. As we focus on improving our performance in this or that area, we hesitate to take on the role of mentor, thinking that surely someone else is more successful and a better example for younger and less experienced women. But we need to recognize and celebrate our accomplishments, and those of the women we work with, for our own professional and personal development and for the women who think of us as their role models. When we do, we might realize we have a lot more stories to tell and lessons to share than we thought.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

www.womenworthwatching.com

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Anne T. Madden Job Title: Senior Vice President and General Counsel Education: AB, English/American literature, Brown University; MS, accounting and MBA, finance, NYU Stern School of Business; JD, Fordham University School of Law Company Name: Honeywell Industry: Software–Industrial Company CEO: Darius Adamczyk Company Headquarters Location: Morris Plains, New Jersey Number of Employees: 110,000 Words you live by: “Both a Leader and a Doer be.” (loosely adapted from William Shakespeare) Personal Philosophy: It’s important to care deeply about what you do every day … if you believe what you do matters, it will. What book are you reading: Grit by Angela Duckworth; Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari What was your first job: I worked as a copy editor for NBC Teletext, which was a precursor to internet news. Favorite charity: Lower East Side Girls Club Interests: Global politics, golf, floating on our electric boat on a sunny day, and LGBTQ rights Family: Husband of 25 years, daughter at NYU Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music

Sponsoring Away Fear

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ear of failure is undeniably a powerful thing. It can be a great motivator when channeled in a positive way. It also can be so destructive that it gets in the way of clear and logical thinking, which distracts some women from appropriate risk/reward determinations in the workplace. Being too fearful means acting too conservatively. Being too fearful means missing out on developmental experiences. Being too fearful becomes a vicious compounding cycle that is hard to break. I have seen far too many women, rife with insecurity and lacking faith in their value and contributions, fall victim to the “fear cycle.” This manifests itself in job opportunities seen as “too much of a stretch” or assignments perceived to be beyond their skill set. There is no question that when we are comfortable, confident, calm, and focused, we make the best decisions for ourselves and for our companies. And the demeanor that naturally comes along with that state of mind is one that others gravitate to. So how can women who struggle with fear of failure become more confident, self-assured, and courageous, so they can reach their true potential? My advice is to secure a sponsor. Not a friend or a mentor,

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but a true sponsor who will get to know and advocate for her, and tell the truth about her capabilities and potential. Sponsoring is a specific form of mentoring in which “the mentor goes beyond giving feedback and advice and uses his or her influence with senior executives to advocate for the mentee” (Harvard Business Review, September 2010). The sponsor would coach her on how to position herself and help her build a network so that she can develop. This kind of support can make a real difference for those who fear. I currently co-sponsor Honeywell’s Women’s Advancement Program, which links women to senior-level sponsors in a year-long program focused skill building, networking, and sponsorship. The sponsors help the women broaden their networks, develop their leadership skills, and advance their careers. They also help the women share what they stand for, how they get work done, what makes them unique, and what results people can expect from them. While the program is only five months old, feedback so far is that these women feel valued and, because they have this support, they are beginning to overcome any fears they may have of failing.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


THE FUTURE IS WHAT WE MAKE IT.

We are a company of thinkers, doers, dreamers and makers. And we’ve been innovating for well over a century, solving our customers’ greatest challenges by making the technology – and now the software – to change the way the world works. Honeywell congratulates Anne T. Madden, Senior Vice President and General Counsel of Honeywell, and all of the Women Worth Watching award winners, for their leadership and achievements in their businesses and communities.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

www.womenworthwatching.com

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Dr. Erin Searcy Job Title: Director, Institutional Planning and Programs Education: PhD, mechanical engineering, University of Alberta; MS, engineering, University of Manitoba; BS, engineering, University of Manitoba Company Name: Idaho National Laboratory Industry: Energy Research and Development Company CEO: Dr. Mark Peters Company Headquarters Location: Idaho Falls, Idaho Number of Employees: 4,500 Words you live by: “Be the change you wish to see in the world.” –Mahatma Gandhi What book are you reading: Quiet: The power of introverts in a world that can't stop talking by Susan Cain Interests: Hiking, tennis, cross country skiing, and baking

People love to give advice. Some of the most impactful words of wisdom I’ve received were from someone who has no recollection of the conversation: “Be careful who you take advice from.

You Deserve to Be Here

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eople love to give advice. Some of the most impactful words of wisdom I’ve received were from someone who has no recollection of the conversation: “Be careful who you take advice from.” I’ve been told by many well-meaning people over the years to keep pushing, do better, work harder, and of course, “Women have to work twice as hard as men to be taken seriously.” Message received! But it is the few that told me to be easier on myself that made the biggest difference. I’ve always been very driven, more from a fear of being the worst than from a desire to be the best. I know I’m not alone in this mindset, particularly among women, many who have heard the same well-meaning words that I have. I’ve been very fortu-

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nate to have had role models who took the time to listen, who supported and encouraged me, who gave me the confidence to be myself, who recognized that I was already pushing myself more than I needed to be pushed, and who had the humility to share their own struggles and failures. I remember arriving early to my doctoral thesis defense. I was alone in a conference room adorned with pictures of faculty members. It was an impressive group of accomplished researchers, none of whom looked anything like me. I remember getting choked up at the thought that I had made a terrible mistake—that my picture would always look out of place here. I’ll never forget the words of my adviser, “You deserve to be here.” I’m very glad I decided to listen.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Congratulations TO INL’S WOMEN WORTH WATCHING

Virginia L. Wright, Energy Cyber Portfolio Program Manager

Dr. Monica C. Regalbuto, Nuclear Fuel Cycle Strategy Director

Dr. Anne M. Gaffney, Chief Science Officer and Distinguished Laboratory Fellow

Dr. Erin Searcy, Institutional Planning and Programs Director

You continually inspire us with your leadership and vision. LOOKING FOR A NEW OPPORTUNITY? INL IS WHERE YOU BELONG! www.inl.gov/careers

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

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Betty Chen Job Title: Principal Education: JD, University of Texas Law School; BS, University of Southern California Company Name: Fish & Richardson Industry: Intellectual Property Law Company CEO: Peter J. Devlin Company Headquarters Location: N/A Number of Employees: 1,100 Your Location: Redwood City, California Words you live by: “A woman is like a tea bag; you never know how strong she is until she’s in hot water.” –attributed to Eleanor Roosevelt Personal Philosophy: Never take yourself too seriously. What book are you reading: 1-2-3 Magic: 3-Step Discipline for Calm, Effective and Happy Parenting by Dr. Thomas Phelan What was your first job: Nature camp counselor Favorite charity: Asian Law Alliance Interests: Snowboarding, hiking and finding new Trader Joe’s ready-to-cook meals Family: I have three kids: Jackson and twins Hudson and Parker.

It’s No Wonder, Woman

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o you ever wonder why you feel exhausted in this empowerment age when we (women) are told we can, and should, be conquering the world? If so, perhaps you’ll relate to one or more of my personal experiences. A few years ago, even though I had been on maternity leave that year, I made partner at my law firm Fish & Richardson, P.C., a 140-year-old firm that ranks No. 1 in all things related to litigation of intellectual property. (I had to give it a shout out. Got it made now, right?) I returned to work before my official maternity leave period expired because I was excited to try a jury case I had litigated over the four previous years. Initially, I thought I was blazing a path by showing what is possible. However, I inadvertently set a poor example for my new-mother peers—at least in some eyes—who understandably, wanted to take their full maternity leave. I later found myself sitting on a dirty bathroom floor pumping milk in a courthouse 1,000 miles away from my firstborn, learning the blessing and curse of pump-and-ship services like Milk Stork. Another day, I exited a client meeting only to realize that

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I had presented case strategy with baby poop on my right sleeve. I once typed a brief with my left hand (I’m right handed) so I could comfort my sick, vomiting toddler with the other. Beyond motherhood, when I devoted time to women’s groups and conferences, I faced criticism from those who said my professional accomplishments were largely attributable to “special” resources provided to women, but not to men. So, do I sometimes wonder why I’m doing this, where this will all lead, and if that place would be a good one? The answer, of course, is “yes.” But do I self-impose the pressure of being a “Wonder Woman” in all aspects of my life? The answer there is a resounding “No.” Neither should you. Not on yourself, and not on your colleagues, whether by words or deeds. Being comfortable in your own skin and owning your personal imperfect moments won’t necessarily deter the occasional naysayer, but it will position you, and those around you, to engage in a necessary conversation. One where we acknowledge that feeling not all together at work and home is a shared experience that can bring us all together.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Dr. Monica C. Regalbuto Job Title: Director, Nuclear Fuel Cycle Strategy Education: PhD, chemical engineering, University of Notre Dame; MS, chemical engineering, University of Notre Dame; BS, chemical engineering, Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM) Company Name: Idaho National Laboratory Industry: Energy Research and Development Company CEO: Dr. Mark Peters Company Headquarters Location: Idaho Falls, Idaho Number of Employees: 4,500 Words you live by: “I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” –Maya Angelou Personal Philosophy: There’s never the perfect time to do anything. Don’t wait to take a new opportunity until everything is perfect, because that day will never come. Live life, now. What book are you reading: The Costs of Decarbonisation: System Costs with High Shares of Nuclear and Renewables (Nuclear Energy Agency/Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development) What was your first job: Summer intern at CYDSA in Monterrey, Mexico Favorite charity: Organizations and efforts that encourage people to pursue education Interests: Spending time and having fun with friends and family Family: I am married and have three kids, a daughter-in-law, one grandson, and a kidney daughter (family friend who was the recipient of my daughter's donated kidney).

Stay focused on Your Goals

A

s a Hispanic woman working in engineering and research, people often ask me what it is like being a minority in fields long dominated by white males. My answer is that I have never known anything else, and my focus has been on who I am and what I want to accomplish, instead of what I am not. As a child, I loved math and science, and decided to pursue a degree in chemical engineering and computer science at the Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores in my hometown of Monterrey, Mexico. My family was extremely supportive, but not everyone was. I remember one of my dad’s colleagues saying, “I don’t know why she’s going to school if she’s just going to end up boiling beans for a guy someday.” I ignored the comment because it didn’t apply to me. I know what I am capable of, so I didn’t let it get to me. I learned that lesson early and have kept that philosophy throughout my career. That served me well when I decided to have children shortly after earning my doctorate. I wanted to work part time, which was a struggle in a research field. People thought I needed to either focus on my

career or have a family. I eventually found a position with Dr. Vandergrift at Argonne National Laboratory that enabled me to do both. That position taught me I could be a researcher, a mother, and a member of the community. I didn’t have to choose. It also taught me what it means to be a good employee, colleague, mentor, and manager, which helped me learn how to get things done. To successfully influence others and accomplish things, you need to build trust, be genuine, and be a role model for what you value in the workplace. To build trust, you need to respect people at all levels of an organization and listen to them. It’s also important to be genuine, and to take an interest in others and help them advance their careers. Finally, in order to influence others, you need to be a good role model by taking accountability for our own actions, persevering through hard times, and having the courage to do what is right. This is especially important at an organization such as Idaho National Laboratory, where we are working to solve the nation’s most challenging energy problems.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

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Monique Picou Job Title: Senior Vice President–Supply Chain Education: MBA, Florida Tech; BS, electrical engineering, Southern University Company Name: Walmart Industry: Retail Company CEO: Doug McMillon Company Headquarters Location: Bentonville, Arkansas Number of Employees: 2.2 million Words you live by: Failure is not an option ... problems create opportunities! Personal Philosophy: Facts are friendly! What book are you reading: Haben: The deafblind woman who conquered Harvard Law; A Memoir by Haben Girma What was your first job: Office assistant, American Red Cross Favorite charity: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Interests: Faith, family, finance, and travel Family: Married, with 3 children

Female STEM Role Models—Critical, but Scarce

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owerful female STEM role models are critically important, but scarce. I have worked in supply chain most of my career, apart from a developmental commercial role. I have had the pleasure of working in multiple locations in the United States, as well as spending six years in Europe. In all those years, I encountered very few C-suite STEM women, working in the Fortune 500.The glass ceiling for women in supply chain is very real. This presents a real challenge in developing a pipeline of future leaders. Navigating the layers of science, engineering, technology, and mathematics is filled with complexities not common to other functions. New-hire positions in manufacturing and engineering can require extended periods of solo travel and rotating shift work. Nearly all the interfaces (whether in the United States or abroad) are dominated by men. When you come across another female leader who is not in supply chain, the interests and perspectives will be different based on her background and experience. Of course, we always manage to forge productive relationships. However, this shortage of women leaders in STEM may influence us to consider other options. This creates

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coping mechanisms for women that sometimes involve leaving STEM for more rewarding opportunities. The few trailblazers that exist have a long list of women competing for their time, which can become exhausting. Women question the value of their work, when it is not producing favorable results. In the world of innovation and digitization, there are renewed efforts to encourage women to pursue careers in STEM. I applaud the effort, but there is more to do.This is a journey. We must develop and maintain the pipeline; progress the middle; and reward the competencies & technical diversification by delivering the “C” suite. Women in STEM are in great demand and the diversity of career choice is much broader than before. We need role models who can help our next generation navigate those options. They need to know that it is not necessary to leave this field to be successful. They need to know that they can be successful in more than one industry. Finally, STEM women need to know that their voices matter. They will have opportunities to earn a seat from shift team rooms to board rooms, and everything in between!

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Fiona Grandi Job Title: National Managing Partner–Innovation & Enterprise Solutions Education: BS, University of Colorado Boulder Company Name: KPMG LLP Industry: Professional Services Company CEO: Lynne Doughtie Company Headquarters Location: New York, New York Number of Employees: 31,262 Your Location: San Francisco, California Words you live by: “Don’t sweat the small stuff … and its ALL small stuff.” – Richard Carlson Personal Philosophy: Being authentic and showing up is sometimes more important than having all the answers. What book are you reading: Season of the Witch: Enchantment, Terror, and Deliverance in the City of Love by David Talbot What was your first job: I worked at a river rafting company in Lake Tahoe Favorite charity: Boys & Girls Club Interests: Live music & anything outdoors (hiking, biking, sailing) Family: An awesome hubby, a teenage daughter, a teenage son, two guinea pigs, a turtle, and a fish

Innovating for a Better World

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t KPMG, we innovate to propel our future and drive growth for our clients. We monitor the market, invest in our business, and develop strategies to help the organizations we work with achieve their goals. We also invest in improving our community; each KPMG professional has the same overarching purpose—to make a difference today, while making the world a better place for future generations. During my tenure at KPMG, I have seen our organization transform in the context of a broader global evolution. My teams and I have been confronted with change, complexity, and challenges. We have responded with collaboration, creativity, and commitment to persevere through each phase of transformation and achieve our goals. These six “Cs” have been the root of my professional inspiration and have supported my career advancement, while elevating innovation as part of KPMG’s core business strategy. • Change. The rate of change is exponential, especially with the emergence of new technologies. I’ve learned that it should be not feared, but embraced. Getting comfortable with the concept of change has kept me motivated by, and laser focused on, the work I do. • Challenges. I’ve observed that every challenge is actually an opportunity to thrive, not hide. Tackling challenges has

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

helped accelerate my own pace to reach professional goals, as well as KPMG’s innovation goals. • Complexity. Complexity shouldn’t, but often does, become overcomplicated. By taking a step back, I’ve realized that even the most complex problems can often be disrupted and solved with a little out-ofthe box thinking. • Collaboration. It isn’t always easy, but by working together we can develop the best approach to any problem. Each team member has a unique perspective to offer, which helps us develop the best solution. • Creativity. KPMG’s strength depends on more than a cross-functional, collaborative approach; we also capitalize on the creative thinking of our teams, which sets us apart from our competition and drives the best solutions for our clients. • Commitment. There is a higher purpose to innovation, and we help junior pioneers cultivate their existing passions and early ideas. For example, we work with Enactus, an organization dedicated to creating a better world, while developing the next generation of entrepreneurial leaders and social innovators. These concepts work together to ignite my fundamental professional passion and maintain my day-to-day inspiration to innovate for KPMG, our clients, and the greater good. www.womenworthwatching.com

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Lori Fink Job Title: Chief Legal Officer Education: JD, Washburn University School of Law; Bachelor of Arts, Western Illinois University Company Name: Xandr Industry: Advertising & technology Company CEO: Brian Lesser Company Headquarters Location: New York, New York Number of Employees: 1,600+ Words you live by: Make every day a good day! Personal Philosophy: When a door opens, walk through it; you may be surprised, but you needn’t be afraid. What book are you reading: 97 Orchard: An Edible History of Five Immigrant Families in One New York Tenement by Jane Ziegelman What was your first job: Pro se law clerk for the U.S. District Court, District of Kansas Favorite charity: The Wish Connection Interests: Antiques, travel, and baking Family: Favorite Aunt, eight nieces and nephews, two great-nieces, and one great-nephew

Breaking Barriers

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uilding a team is the greatest opportunity and privilege for a leader. It means putting aside your personal biases and looking out for the good of the team. A team built with diversity in both thought and composition is key to creating, innovating, and building the best solutions. It also sets a precedent for breaking barriers that were previously considered obstacles in the workforce, including gender bias. A team built with the right framework will instill confidence and encouragement in each member. We must always remember that we are better as a team than even the most talented individual member. If you know you have the power of the team behind you, it makes the path to follow much clearer, especially when you reach that fork in the road and a decision needs to be made. This is true in challenges involving diversity and adversity. It is so important to surround yourself with trusted advisors and team members who will pressure test your thinking and your approach. It may open your eyes to intentional or unintentional biases. Receive feedback and be open to new ways of approaching challeng-

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es. Embracing differences, and sharing how those differences have influenced and changed your course of thinking, is powerful. I like to focus on the progress and the many opportunities that are in front of us. Building a diverse team becomes an essential ingredient for these many opportunities. Finding ways to make sure barriers are being broken and that we give individuals the opportunity to have a strong and confident voice is paramount. This means that we find ways to have all voices at the table reflecting the diversity of thought and leadership. We all have choices to make, and we can make them in a narrowly defined swim lane or we can look across the sea of opportunity and the many people that can help shape that opportunity. When that door opens, as women leaders, we need to walk through it and be confident in our decisions. We should recognize the people that helped us along the way and find our own ways to help and support others. Empower your team and those around you to shine a light on the strength that comes from having a diverse team.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ÂŽ


Natalie Lamarque Job Title: Senior Vice President, Deputy General Counsel in the Office of the General Counsel Education: JD magna cum laude, Duke University School of Law; BA cum laude, public policy & history, Duke University Company Name: New York Life Industry: Insurance Company CEO: Theodore Mathas Company Headquarters Location: New York, New York Number of Employees: 11,320 Words you live by: “Your eyes make work. Sitting back and staring at a problem always makes it seem ponderous or insurmountable. Just jump in somewhere and get started.” –My Grandmother (in Haitian Kreyòl) Personal Philosophy: To whom much is given, much is required. (Luke 12:48) What book are you reading: A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life’s Purpose by Eckhart Tolle What was your first job: Receptionist at my mother’s medical practice Favorite charity: City Year New York

We Stand on the Shoulders of Giants

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here is one universal truth that women grasp intuitively—you can’t do it alone. Having the humility and foresight to ask for help is the key to having a long, fulfilling and meaningful career. Early in our professional journey, there is a tendency to equate asking for help with weakness. However, as we progress, we realize that attempting to have all the answers, or viewing successes solely through the lens of individual accomplishments, is short-sighted and harmful (both for us as individuals and for our respective teams). As more women take leadership roles, it is imperative that we keep cultivating support for one another and praising collective accomplishments, while still recognizing individual achievements. Women know that we all stand on the shoulders of giants. I can mark the milestones in my life and career by the giants that leaned down to let me climb upon their perch, so I could see further than my grounded perspective would permit. My first giant was my mother, who immigrated to the United States from Haiti in the 1970s. Although she was a trained surgeon in her home country, she

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

had to repeat her medical training to be licensed in the United States. Despite not yet speaking English, she was able to pass her qualifying exams by recognizing the Latin roots of the medical terms. I started my life on her shoulders, elevated by her drive, ambition, grit, and love. My career has been marked by the support of giants at virtually every step, and without them I would not be here. Women like the Honorable Ann Claire Williams, United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit (Retired) and Sheila K. Davidson, executive vice president and general counsel of New York Life, to name a few. While we all need to be grateful for those who support us along the way, it’s equally important to continue the cycle by lifting others, as we rise to develop the next generation of leaders. So my question is this: “Who is standing on your shoulders?” What I have learned watching my giants, and through my own experience, is that our shoulders are broader and stronger than we imagine. Every time you lift another, your career and your legacy are strengthened. Letting others stand on your shoulders is the only way to truly develop them; it is the hallmark of great leaders and great organizations.

www.womenworthwatching.com

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Dr. Ireena A. Erteza Job Title: R&D Electrical Engineer, Distinguished Level Education: PhD. & MS, electrical engineering, Stanford University; BS, electrical engineering, University of New Mexico Company Name: Sandia National Laboratories Industry: Research and Development Company CEO: Dr. Stephen Younger Company Headquarters Location: Albuquerque, New Mexico Number of Employees: 13,000 Words you live by: “To leave the world a bit better, whether by a healthy child, a garden patch, or a redeemed social condition; to know that even one life has breathed easier because you have lived—that is to have succeeded” –Ralph Waldo Emerson Personal Philosophy: Be kind, be honorable, be humble, work hard, and leave the world a better place. What book are you reading: Belichick: The Making of the Greatest Football Coach of All Time by Ian O’Connor; The Moment of Lift by Melinda Gates What was your first job: Graduate Research Program for Women summer intern, AT&T Bell Labs, Murray Hill, New Jersey Favorite charity: PCDH19 Alliance: raising funds to research and cure PCDH19 epilepsy Interests: Trail running, racquetball, crafting, and reading Family: Dr. Brian Bray (husband of 29 years and biggest supporter, met at Stanford, also Ph.D. EE) & Iliana Bray (amazing daughter, 23, PhD Candidate at Stanford in EE)

Shattering Technical Staff Glass Ceilings

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hile the “glass ceiling” has been discussed since the late 1970s, it is sadly still in full force 40 years later. The glass ceiling is defined as “the unseen, yet unbreachable barrier, that keeps minorities and women from rising to the upper rungs of the corporate ladder, regardless of their qualifications or achievements.”[1] A glass ceiling inequality is further defined[2] as a gender or racial difference that:

highest rungs of technical staff ladders also, but we are not. To fix this problem, we must target D&I representation throughout the technical pipeline (from entry level, through distinguished, fellow and CTO level). Companies must set goals, and management must be held accountable to meet D&I goals at all levels along the technical innovation pipeline. We must also demand rigorous analysis and transparency (as highlighted in McKinsey&• is not explained by other job-relevant Company’s report[3]). characteristics of the employee; While devoting my career to technical • is greater at higher levels of an outcome innovation through my R&D efforts in the than at lower levels of an outcome; national radar community, I have observed glass-ceiling inequality in technical pipe• affects the chances of advancement into lines firsthand in numerous organizations. higher levels, not merely the proportions Mentoring and outreach for D&I in STEM of each gender or race currently at those is still important to me, but my passion now higher levels; and is to shatter technical staff glass ceilings by • increases over the course of a career. bringing scrutiny to and raising corporate awareness of the D&I dearth throughout the In STEM-based businesses, management technical pipeline, and by encouraging the and technical staff pipelines diverge. Although use of scientific research principles to quantify much attention has been devoted to diversity and inclusion (D&I) in the management/corpo- this issue and to verify the progress of initiarate pipelines (ending in the C-Suite), very little tives meant to address it. [1]Glass Ceiling Commission. Solid has been done to keep women from bumping Investments: Making Full Use of the Nation's into the glass ceiling as they move along the rigorous technical pipeline. Often, glass-ceiling Human Capital. U.S. Department of Labor, inequality is dismissed as an inadequate supply 1995. [2]D. A. Cotter, et al. “The glass ceiling issue (not having enough women and minority effect” (PDF). Social Forces. 80 (2). 2001 STEM workers at entry level), but this is not [3]A. Krivkovich, et al. “Women in the reality. In the past two decades, women have Workplace 2018” (PDF). https://www.mckearned approximately 20-25 percent of bachinsey.com/featured-insights/gender-equality/ elor’s through doctoral engineering degrees. women-in-the-workplace-2018 We should be seeing these percentages on the

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WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Virginia L. Wright Job Title: Energy Cyber Portfolio Program Manager Education: Bachelor of Science, information systems and operations management, University of North Carolina at Greensboro Company Name: Idaho National Laboratory Industry: Energy Research and Development Company CEO: Dr. Mark Peters Company Headquarters Location: Idaho Falls, Idaho Number of Employees: 4,500 Words you live by: “Life is a banquet and most poor suckers are starving to death.” –Mame Personal Philosophy: “The very essence of leadership is that you have to have vision. You can’t blow an uncertain trumpet.” – Theodore Hesburgh What book are you reading: An Orchestra of Minorities by Chigozie Obioma What was your first job: Developing software for textile plant floor applications Favorite charity: P.E.O. International Interests: Reading, board games, lock picking, and teaching women to shoot handguns safely Family: My husband Jason is truly my “Mr. Right,” and my daughters Elizabeth (13) and Phoebe (11) teach me every day how to love deeply and live well.

See “No” as an Opportunity

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ybersecurity is a male-dominated industry. The 2017 Global Information Security Workforce Study assessed that men make up 86 percent of the cybersecurity workforce in North America and 89 percent, worldwide. As a result of this gender disparity, the culture of the cybersecurity workforce is permeated with assumptions and norms generated from hyper-masculine ideals. Everywhere I have worked, I’ve been one of the few women in computer programming or cybersecurity. As I’ve advanced in my career from programmer to program manager, I’ve had to decide when to be “one of the boys” and how to incorporate my femininity in what I do. I’ve learned a few things from that struggle: • Don’t let a fear of failure make you sell yourself short. Women are notorious for this, myself included. Develop a network of peers, both female and male, who will encourage you to leave your comfort zone. • Don’t let perfect be the enemy of good enough. A Hewlett Packard internal report showed that men applied for jobs when they met 60 percent of the qualifications, but women did not apply unless they met 100 percent. Take the chance before it is a perfect fit, and you may succeed.

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• Success is a team sport. Successful teams incorporate diverse talents and experience, and understand how to benefit from each other’s differences. If you can’t affect the hiring process directly, bring in interns who can increase the diversity on your team. • “No” is an opportunity for a conversation. I’m an innovator, always pushing my organization to accept new ideas. Whether it’s because I’m a woman or because I’m stretching their desire for change, I hear “no” a lot. Instead of letting it discourage you, interpret it as an opportunity to reconsider and develop a new approach. • Find mentors who can extend your own experience base. Don’t stop at one mentor, acquire several. Find a few mentors who have an alternate perspective, so that you can safely see the other side of an issue. My research at the Idaho National Laboratory will reduce the risk of a catastrophic cyber attack on critical infrastructure. I love having the opportunity to make such a key impact on the nation, and I'm determined not to let the challenges of working in a male-dominated field slow me down.

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Anne M. Gaffney Job Title: Chief Science Officer and Distinguished Laboratory Fellow Education: PhD, physical organic chemistry, University of Delaware; BA, chemistry and mathematics, Mount Holyoke College Company Name: Idaho National Laboratory Industry: Energy Research and Development Company CEO: Dr. Mark Peters Company Headquarters Location: Idaho Falls, Idaho Number of Employees: 4,500 Words you live by: Believe in yourself. Personal Philosophy: Reach for your goals. What book are you reading: Science in the Service of Mankind by George A.W. Boehm and Alex Groner What was your first job: delivered newspapers by bicycle on my own paper route the age of ten Favorite charity: United Way Interests: Science & engineering societies (volunteer in leadership roles), sports (tennis, skiing, hiking), mentoring, and traveling Family: married (husband, chemical engineer), daughter and son-in-law (biochemist and chemist, respectively), granddaughter, and grandson

Elevating Women in Science

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y personal essay has the overarching theme of mentoring and elevating professional women in the science and engineering fields. Having broken a number of glass ceilings during my professional career, it has been my motto to keep opportunities open for other women and to extend a helping hand. It was alarming to be the “first woman” in a number of impactful moments during my career: • I received my PhD in physical organic chemistry in 1981 from the University of Delaware; I was the first woman to ever do so and the first woman to have successfully passed the rigorous organic chemistry cumulative exam process leading to the PhD degree. • I joined ARCO Chemical Company, then a division of Atlantic Richfield, in 1981, and was the first woman PhD industrial chemist hired by the company. I became the first woman science & engineering manager in 1987 and senior technical advisor in 1994, all at ARCO Chemical Company. • I was the first woman recipient of the Philadelphia Catalysis Club Award in 1997.

In response to these experiences, I have made a concerted effort to reach out to fellow science and engineering women to make improvements and provide opportunities. The following are examples of my activities, past and present: • Founded in 1982 and chaired the ARCO Women’s Management Association • Active in the American Chemical Society’s Women’s Chemist Committee throughout my membership, 1976–present • Active in the Girl Scouts received the Take the Lead in Science and Technology Award For Outstanding Leadership from the Girl Scouts of Pennsylvania, 1993 • Established a new capability—transient kinetics—at Idaho National Laboratory in 2015, and hired a woman engineer to lead this capability • Engage in Idaho National Laboratory’s Women in Leadership Group • Actively mentor several of Idaho National Laboratory’s women scientists and engineers

It is my charter to continue to be a leader for women in the science and engineering fields. • I was the first woman recipient of the InIn closing, I take great pride on a dustrial Chemistry & Engineering, North personal level in having raised a bright American Catalysis Award in 2015. and caring daughter, who received a biochemistry degree from Cornell • I was the first woman recipient of the University and is now working toward the American Chemical Society Energy & Fuels Distinguished Researcher Award discovery of ovarian and other cancer fighting drugs in the pharmaceutical industry. in 2019.

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WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Dr. Marcey Hoover Job Title: Director, Quality Assurance Education: PhD & MS, mathematical statistics, Purdue University; BS, mathematics, Michigan State University Company Name: Sandia National Laboratories Industry: National Security (Government) Research and Development Company CEO: Dr. Stephen Younger Company Headquarters Location: Albuquerque, New Mexico Number of Employees: 13,000 Words you live by: Never Give Up Personal Philosophy: Inclusion and Engagement for Unprecedented Innovation What book are you reading: Making of a Manager by Julie Zhou What was your first job: Working at an archery store in rural Michigan Favorite charity: Big Brothers Big Sisters Interests: Biking, skiing, and cooking Family: Husband Phil and college-aged children: son, Kelden, and daughter, Quinn

Opening the STEM Club Doors

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ver the past century, the two trends with the largest global impact have been the women’s movement and the technological revolution. According to Pew Research, almost three-quarters of U.S. women now work outside the home, compared to just onehalf only 40 years ago. The workplace advances made by women have affected our economy to such a degree that I cannot imagine how our role in society could ever have been so narrowly defined. During that same time period, we have seen the influence of technology permeate every facet of our lives. Technology, and the scientists and engineers behind its expansion, drives our global economy and spark innovation in almost every field imaginable—from health, to finance, to education, to national security. While women have surely benefitted from the move toward equality, we have not achieved the same level of advances in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. Pew Research shows that employment in STEM occupations has increased by 79 percent since 1990, from 9.7 million to 17.3 million, outpacing overall U.S. job growth. However, in key STEM fields like engineering, the number of women has inched up only slightly, from 12 to 14 percent. And,

more shocking, the number of women in computer-based jobs—some of the highest paying and fastest growing STEM careers—has dropped from 32 percent to 25 percent. How can we improve these numbers? We must be generous with praise and quick to point out issues. Find a mentor or be a mentor. Insist on hiring and retention strategies that help your business resemble your community. Encourage young women to be curious, seek answers to tough questions, and commit to a lifetime of learning in science and mathematics. Shape company culture to listen to, respect, and empower women. At Sandia National Laboratories, diversity and inclusion are part of our short- and long-term strategic objectives, and we believe that hiring and maintaining a talented, motivated, and diverse workforce is essential to the success of our national security mission. I am proud to report that Forbes Media recently recognized Sandia National Laboratories as one of America’s Best Employers for Diversity in 2019. I am honored to have been selected by Profiles in Diversity as a Woman Worth Watching—but I am even more thrilled to stand among the inspiring women profiled in this issue who will help create a better and more inclusive future for us all.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

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Emily F. Evitt Job Title: Partner Education: JD with distinction, Stanford Law School; BA magna cum laude, Yale University; Phi Beta Kappa Company Name: Mitchell Silberberg & Knupp LLP Industry: Legal Company CEO: Chairman, Kevin Gaut; Executive Director, Tom Edwards Company Headquarters Location: Los Angeles, California Number of Employees: 285 Words you live by: Measure twice and cut once. Personal Philosophy: Sweat the small stuff. What book are you reading: How to Raise an Adult by Julie Lythcott-Haims What was your first job: Teaching tennis to kids Favorite charity: Planned Parenthood Interests: Spending time outdoors with my family and trying new cocktails— ideally at the same time at a backyard party Family: Husband Mark, daughter Josie (4.5 years old), son William (almost 18 months old)

Make Clothes Work for You

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’m five foot four on a good day, so I almost never wear flats to work. I’ll put on a pair of heels, even if the rest of my outfit looks like upscale pajamas, which is what I’d secretly like to be wearing to work. Women are certainly held to a different standard of appearance. When men dress down, they are presumed to be tech moguls. Indeed, in Los Angeles or Silicon Valley, there’s an inverse correlation between how sloppily dressed a man is and how important he is presumed to be. It’s not the same for women—we need to be well dressed, well coiffed, and well shod just to be taken as seriously as our male counterparts in their ripped jeans and Allbirds. And I suspect it’s even harder for younger women professionals: As a 36-year-old female law partner, I’m desperately trying to look more polished, more presentable, and more grown up. One recent week, I wore pearls almost every day, just so the summer associates would believe I was qualified to be the hiring partner. The harder question is whether this dual standard in the legal profession is unfair. Yes, society’s expectation for women’s appearances is fundamentally

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unfair. But my having to wear heels, while my male counterpart wears flats has never struck me as a core inequity of the legal profession. (In a still-maledominated field, there are plenty of others that rank higher on my list.) Rather, my female role models have taught me that clothing is power. My mom, a lawyer who grew up with parents in the garment industry, set an early example with the stylish suits she wore to run the moot court competition at Stanford Law School. My mentor Karin, who teaches “dress for the job you want,” has the perfect dress (and advice) for every occasion. Through clothing, I have bonded with them, and with countless other female attorneys. And for me, getting dressed for work is an opportunity to control the narrative of my day. Depending on what the agenda holds, I can add a blazer for more power, pick an A-line dress for more femininity, or put on my great-grandmother’s pearls in hopes of achieving gravitas. With heels, I can choose to be taller. And I can look my male counterparts in the eyes ... before I leave them in the dust.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Mitchell Silberberg & Knupp LLP

is proud to congratulate

Alesha Dominique

Emily Evitt

and their fellow honorees, for their inclusion in the

2019 “Women Worth Watching” list by Profiles in Diversity Journal

Breaking the Concrete Ceiling, Neisha Strambler-Butler. Congratulations are in order for Neisha Strambler-Butler, VP of Compensation and Benefits, for winning the 2019 Women Worth Watching Award. American Airlines honors the courage of our leaders who inspire us to constantly push the envelope, eliminate stereotypes, and break barriers. Thank you for your leadership and mentorship, for helping us and countless others see what matters most—your skills, talents and ambitions. Your success in the face of challenges makes you a woman worth watching and we are immensely proud of you.

American Airlines, the Flight Symbol logo and the Tail Symbol are marks of American Airlines, Inc. oneworld is a mark of the oneworld alliance, LLC. © 2019 American Airlines, Inc. All rights reserved.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

www.womenworthwatching.com

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Sasha Sanyal Job Title: Global Business Leader, Insurance, Diversity & CSR Education: Bachelor of Science, computer engineering, Southern Methodist University Company Name: Genpact Industry: Global professional services; IT/ITES sector Company CEO: “Tiger” Tyagarajan Company Headquarters Location: New York, New York Number of Employees: 87,000+ Words you live by: Just get on with it. Personal Philosophy: If you wear your passion on your sleeve, you will always come out ahead. What book are you reading: Factfulness by Hans Rosling What was your first job: Manager–IT Consulting, Ernst & Young, LLC Favorite charity: Udayan Shalini Fellowship, India Interests: Running, reading, and traveling Family: My husband (Samar Shivdasani), my daughters (Reyna (14) and Nylah (11), and my two dogs (Courage and Caramel)

I Don’t Shine if You Don’t Shine

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here is a special place in hell for women who don't help other women.” – Madeline Albright I read this quote many years ago, and it stuck with me. So, when I sat down to write a few lines on women in leadership roles, I let it inspire me. The world today understands the value of Diversity and Inclusion. Organizations strive to create a workplace that respects, celebrates, and advocates diverse perspectives. Yet for women, half the world’s population, a massive gap still exists. Only 20 percent of C-suite roles are held by women, and less than five percent of Fortune 500 company CEOs are women. As women leaders are we doing enough to improve these numbers? Because if not us, then who? Let us take networking as an example. Networking is easier for men. There are long-established men’s clubs, golf tournaments, and after-work meet-ups, which give them opportunities to connect. For women, there are limited opportunities to exchange ideas, and at-home responsibilities take precedence over after-work hangouts. So how can we as women leaders help solve this problem? Can we do lunch instead of dinner or encourage virtual networking instead of in-person

Summer 2019

meetings? These are simple things that help create a more inclusive environment for women. Have you heard of Shine Theory? Developed by Ann Friedman and Aminatou Sow, Shine Theory is a practice of mutual investment based on this simple premise: “I don't shine if you don't shine.” Female aides to former U.S. President Barack Obama came up with a winning strategy for making their voices heard in the White House using this principle. The women told the Washington Post that, at presidential gatherings, they began using “amplification.” That is, they repeated each other's suggestions to ensure that they were being heard, and credited one another to prevent others claiming ownership of their ideas. It worked brilliantly! Women supporting women is more than mentorship or sponsorship! Taking someone under your wing, establishing an open-door policy, ensuring that each voice is heard will create that much needed culture of support. Knowing that each of us is not alone goes a long way in tackling our individual challenges. I believe that when you help another woman shine, we all shine.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Neisha Strambler-Butler Job Title: Vice President, Compensation and Benefits Education: BBA, accounting and BBA, organizational behavior studies, Southern Methodist University; Master’s degree, organization development, Pepperdine University; MBA, Northeastern University Company Name: American Airlines Industry: Transportation Company CEO: Doug Parker Company Headquarters Location: Dallas/Ft. Worth, Texas Number of Employees: 130,000 Words you live by: All Things Are Possible! Personal Philosophy: “To whom much is given; much is required” –Luke 12:48; I am blessed, so my goal in life is to try and help others whenever and wherever I can. What book are you reading: Becoming by Michelle Obama What was your first job: Wienerschnitzel Favorite charity: Texas Women’s Foundation Interests: Traveling, reading, being a foodie, and working on interior design projects Family: I am married to Richie Butler and we have two beautiful children—Emily, who is 18 and will attend UCLA in the fall and Ford, who is 15 and will be a sophomore in high school in the fall.

The Concrete Ceiling

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’m frequently asked whether I believe minority women face more workplace bias than other groups. Based on my own experience, the stories of others, and the statistics on minority women in corporate executive roles, my answer has always been and continues to be yes. And here’s why: Let’s start with the statistics. Fortune magazine indicated that African American women represent 8 percent of the workforce, but only 1.5 percent of senior leadership roles. Similarly, Hispanic women represent about 6 percent of the workforce and only 1.3 percent of senior leadership roles. An April 2016 Huffington Post article referred to this lack of minority women in executive roles as the “concrete ceiling.” Though similar to the glass ceiling we’re all familiar with, the concrete ceiling only applies to minority women and, as the name suggests, is much harder to penetrate. What makes it difficult to break through the concrete ceiling? Several things, and here are a few: 1. Lack of mentors and advocates for minority women: The research is clear. White men and women are much more likely to mentor other white men and women, leaving far fewer executive mentors and advocates for minority women. Mentors and advocates are critical for

career growth, and the absence of them can be career limiting. 2. Stereotypes: African American and Hispanic women face all of the same stereotypes that white women face (e.g., too emotional, not career motivated, not as intelligent as their male counterparts, and hindered by family responsibilities). They are also impeded by the stereotypes associated with their race. For instance, African American women are often perceived as angry, aggressive, invisible, or inherently unqualified. The compounding effect of all of these stereotypes is a double minority tax that continues to negatively impact minority women with regard to their career progression and earning potential. I know these barriers are real because I’ve experienced them myself at different times in my career. Though I’ve felt frustrated by the stereotypes and lack of support, I’ve always vowed not to allow these types of impediments to hold me back. Instead of being suffocated by these challenges, I have sought out leaders who could see me, my skills, my talents, and my ambition—not just my gender or color. I feel blessed to have found great leaders who have ultimately helped me progress in my career. But, it hasn’t been easy. The concrete ceiling is very real; the good news is it can be penetrated!

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

www.womenworthwatching.com

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Nandini Nair Job Title: Partner Education: BA, The State University of New York at Stony Brook; JD, Albany Law School Company Name: Greenspoon Marder LLP Industry: Law Company CEO: Gerry Greenspoon and Michael Marder Company Headquarters Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida Number of Employees: 729 Your Location: Iselin, New Jersey Words you live by: Be the best person you can be—this is what I tell my children every day. Personal Philosophy: My personal philosophy begins and ends with kindness in all parts of life, not just with my family, but with my team and everyone around me. What book are you reading: How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents by Julia Alvarez What was your first job: Cashier in a supermarket at age 14 Favorite charity: American Cancer Society Interests: Besides work and more work, I really like to travel. I have a bucket list of places I want to visit, including China, Greece, Peru, Cambodia, etc. Family: Married, with two sons and one stepson

The Possibility of Dreams

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ole models in any form are critical for all human beings, but none more so than women. From an early age, women are taught to be a certain version of who the world wants them to be. If they dare to dip their toes outside those boundaries, they may get burned. That’s why women need other women, not only to provide strength, support, and a road map for a way forward, but also to be able to witness that their dreams are possible. Their dreams can be achieved because there the role model stands— a living example doing what they’ve always hoped to do. So to have a powerful female role model is critical for a woman’s sanity. It steadies the ship when she sees someone doing what she wants to do—making it happen, enduring, surviving, and rising from the ashes. The presence of a role model feeds the soul. On a personal level, it has been rare that I have found a female role model in

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my professional life. Most women that I have encountered are rarely giving of themselves to other women. Perhaps they see us as competition for the limited space available. I have found that as I grew professionally, I began to hide that part of my life from my girlfriends, as it seemed that my ambition was out of step with them. Countless times, when I took a step in a direction that was not the “traditional” norm, my actions were questioned by everyone, but especially by my female colleagues or friends. “Ambition” sometimes seems to be a dirty word among women. These experiences could have made me bitter, but instead they have created a fire inside me to do better. I strive in my everyday experiences and interactions to be the role model I wish I had in my professional life. I strive to be encouraging, understanding, thoughtful, honest, and above all, kind to everyone I meet. I am hoping it will go viral.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Alesha M. Dominique Job Title: Partner Education: JD, The George Washington University Law School; BS magna cum laude, mathematics, Howard University Company Name: Mitchell Silberberg & Knupp LLP Industry: Legal Company CEO: Chairman, Kevin Gaut; Executive Director, Tom Edwards Company Headquarters Location: Los Angeles, California Number of Employees: 285 Your Location: Washington, D.C. Words you live by: “Life is short, but wide” (the title of one of my favorite books by J. California Cooper) Personal Philosophy: Find a reason to laugh every single day. (Fortunately, my family makes that very easy.) What book are you reading: When Life Gives You Lululemons by Lauren Weisberger What was your first job: Making pizzas and “grinders” at a deli in my hometown of Jackson, Michigan Favorite charity: Comfort Cases, based in the Washington, D.C.-area, whose mission is to bring dignity and hope to youth in foster care. Interests: Baking and reading fiction—especially fiction with smart, witty female protagonists Family: I am married to my college sweetheart, and we are the proud parents of three smart, kind, and very funny boys!

Having Role Models Is Huge

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y mother was my first powerful female role model. Her early example of professional excellence and self-advocacy had a tremendous impact on my professional career. She spent the majority of her career in male-dominated engineering environments, where she was very often the only woman and the only African-American. I have been inspired and empowered by her personal courage to demand her well-deserved seat at tables of power, her unapologetic appeals for pay equity because she absolutely deserved it, and her constant words of encouragement when I chose to pursue a degree in mathematics and ultimately became an intellectual property litigator, neither of which are fields historically dominated by women. While my mother’s early example continues to influence me, over the course of my career as an attorney, I have been very fortunate to have a number of powerful female role models, both at the senior associate and partner level, whose self-confidence, leadership, and accom-

plishments have motivated and empowered me, and whose intentional mentorship has played a large role in my professional growth and development. By their example, I have learned not to hesitate to ask for the professional experiences I want to have, that there is not just one path to success (however you choose to define it), and that promoting and mentoring other women is always a part of the job. I am forever grateful for these incredibly dynamic and generous women. Unfortunately, finding powerful female role models in law firms, especially women of color, has not always been easy, given the shortage of women in the senior ranks of many law firms. That said, in my experience I have found that where these women do exist, they are a mighty force. And often, what makes them powerful is not only their own professional successes (which are certainly admirable), but their clear and unabashed commitment to promoting others, especially women and minorities. It is an example I hope to emulate.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

www.womenworthwatching.com

®

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Jamie Lee Job Title: Senior Vice President, Chief Service Officer Education: BBA, Columbus State University; ACS; FLMI Company Name: Aflac Industry: Insurance Company CEO: Daniel P. Amos Company Headquarters Location: Columbus, Georgia Number of Employees: 5,200 Words you live by: Relationships first, results second. Personal Philosophy: Your mindset makes you. What book are you reading: Redefining Operational Excellence by Andrew Miller What was your first job: Softball referee Favorite charity: Girls Inc. Interests: Cycling, tennis, mentoring/counseling, and spending time with family Family: Husband, Grady, and two sons, Ian and Austin (both 24)

Trust Your Inner Compass

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ow does a person’s dress attire reflect on how people perceive them? I remember the day well. I was just starting out in my career. I was young, ambitious, and wanted to succeed. I thought I had a good sense of style, but I was wrong. My supervisor advised me that there had been a complaint about my attire. My dress was too short. I was asked to go home, change, and return to work. I was embarrassed, then humbled, but I learned a valuable lesson. Since then, I’ve been passionate about helping other women understand the impact that things like appearance can have on their personal brand. There are three principles I share often: 1. You are not here to dress to impress; you are here to do a job. 2. If someone is overly focused on what you’re wearing, they are not listening to what you are saying. 3. Moderation—if you are questioning whether your attire is appropriate to wear, don’t wear it. Call me old-fashioned, but the workplace is not designed as a runway. As women, we want to be respected as professionals and therefore must recognize it is not a fashion show or popularity contest. I’ve worked with a number of women who, when they walked on stage,

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the audience was distracted by what they were wearing rather than focused on what was being said. You can lose your voice when this happens. Every day, we have a choice about what we wear and often question ourselves in the process. That “doubt” simply means “don’t.” Trust your inner compass—you already have the answer. Of course, women are held to a different standard. We can all relate to that, but if you are preoccupied with whether it is fair, you are doing yourselves and others a disservice. Leadership is influence, not a title. And your professional reputation is hard enough to build. So, let’s get people to focus on our substance and the rest will fall into place. Fortunately, I work for a company that values and prioritizes women in leadership. Aflac has given me many mentorship and leadership opportunities over my 28-year career—one that rewards getting the right results … the right way. This has helped me maintain perspective, and not lose sight of the role and responsibility I hold as part of the senior executive team. In fact, I've been asked a number of times: can a woman wear flats and find success at work? Without a doubt! But it is not about the shoes you wear, but the person wearing them.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Congratulates

Jamie Lee for being named to

Profiles in Diversity Journal’s 2019 Women Worth Watching list

Aflac herein means American Family Life Assurance Company of Columbus and American Family Life Assurance Company of New York. WWHQ | 1932 Wynnton Road | Columbus, GA 31999

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

www.womenworthwatching.com

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Tanya N. Blocker Job Title: President Education: Jurist Doctorate Company Name: Association of Black Women Attorneys Industry: Not-for-Profit Organization Company Headquarters Location: New York, New York Your Location: Jamaica, New York Words you live by: “To whom much is given, much more is required. To whom much is entrusted, much more will be asked.” –Luke 12:48 Personal Philosophy: “Do unto unto others as you would have them do unto you.” –Luke 6:31 What book are you reading: Becoming by Michelle Obama What was your first job: Taco Bell Favorite charity: Bottomless Closet Interests: Education, youth mentorship, global leadership, international travel, altruism, African hHistory, African-American history, and fashion Family: Father, James Blocker Sr.; mother, Wandra Blocker; sister, Tamara Blocker; brother, James Blocker II; nephews, Jamar Blocker and Denir Walker; nieces, Kayla Walker and Savage Walker

Changing the Narrative

S

isterhood and the curation of authentic relationships are concepts I have always been passionate about. However, throughout my career as a black woman attorney, I have realized that the sentiment of cultivating authentic sisterly bonds is often overshadowed by unhealthy competitiveness and opportunism. So when I was inducted as president of the Association of Black Women Attorneys (ABWA) in November 2017, I used my presidency as a platform to promote not only the eradication of the status quo, but also to bridge the gap between black women attorneys, both personally and professionally, creating an environment where such authentic relationships could flourish. Recognizing the importance of sisterhood and authentic relationships, I introduced the theme, Changing the Narrative, during the first portion of my presidency. From that theme, emerged the 2018 ABWA Empowerment Series: A Fireside Chat, entitled “A Woman’s Rise to Leadership,” hosted by Christian Louboutin, with Tracy Richelle High, the first black female partner at Sullivan and Cromwell LLP. Another fireside chat, entitled “Intersection of Gender, Age, and Power” with Baltimore City State’s Attorney Marylin Mosby and hosted by Essence, was included in this series. The series successfully created a safe space where ABWA members felt

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comfortable being vulnerable and having candid conversations. Subsequently, I expounded the theme during the second portion of my presidency by introducing Igniting Change. While this theme also built upon the curation of genuine relationships, it was geared towards motivating ABWA members to be more politically engaged. From it, emerged ABWA’s involvement in election protection programs, voter registration drives, and initiatives, as well a fireside chat entitled “Black Women and the Political Landscape: Black Women Uniting in a Fractured Political Era,” featuring Andrea Stewart-Cousins, the first black female counsel to the majority leader of the New York State Senate, as well as other dynamic female political leaders. As I had hoped, I successfully utilized my experience as an employment attorney as the perfect segue to bridge the gap between black women attorneys, personally and professionally. My efforts have constructed a stage for ABWA members to stand on and become more empowered and enthusiastic about cultivating a sisterhood. I plan to conclude my presidency by escorting 38 women across the globe, on a journey to Accra, Ghana, to “Reinforce Bonds and Connection with the Diaspora.” It is my belief that this will bring my themes of Changing the Narrative and Igniting Change full circle.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Lisiane Droal Job Title: Vice President, Human Resources, EMEA Education: Master’s degree, clinical psychology & pathology, Sorbonne- René Descartes University (Paris); Certificate, HR & organization development, Teacher’s College, Columbia University Company Name: Arrow Electronics Industry: Technology Company CEO: Mike Long Company Headquarters Location: Centennial, Colorado Number of Employees: 20,100 Your Location: Courbevoie, France Words you live by: Keep going! Personal Philosophy: The journey is (also) the reward. What book are you reading: All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr What was your first job: Clinical psychologist in a psychiatric hospital Favorite charity: Doctors Without Borders Interests: Discovering different cultures and places, diving, and environmental challenges Family: Married, with two teenage sons

Time to Leave the Stereotypes Behind

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rowing up, it never dawned on me that women could not do as much as men. Several generations of women before me had worked hard and given a lot to the world wars—losing children and brothers, while actively participating in their community, including preparing parachutes of supplies for the Resistance and hiding allied officers in their homes. Sometimes they were recognized for it, sometimes not. Women were heroes, just as much as men were. There are many such impressive examples across the world—numerous outstanding achievements by women and men alike, at all levels, in all fields. Yet, we still see inequity in career choice, career development, and pay in the workplace. Inequities start as soon as early school years. In our western societies, the gap tends to widen as girls become adults. Motherhood seems to be a time when the gap widens even faster. Comments, such as, “Too bad, she will be less focused on work now,” or “She will want to work part time,” or “She may not even

come back,” are all too common in the business world. Yes, returning moms may want to work part time. That doesn’t mean that they are any less committed, any less ambitious, or any less successful. A CEO of a German company once said to me, “I hire a lot of part-time moms, they focus on the essentials and get the workload of a full-time person done in less time.” There are cases where mothers want to focus more on raising their children, which is fine. But organizations must avoid assuming that is always the case. Getting rid of these stereotypes is a tough task. The good news is that we are seeing more and more examples in some of our more progressive countries of shared parental roles—where fathers and mothers alike work part time or take parental leave. I am confident that shared roles will enable us to move away from stereotypes, opening the door to more serene and fair career development for all, including mothers. It’s possible. I’m certain that my great grandmother, who was a mother of 14 and one of my heroes, would agree.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

www.womenworthwatching.com

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Andrea Stevenson Conner Job Title: President Education: MS, global leadership, Duquesne University; BA, economics, Edinboro University Company Name: ATHENA International Industry: Nonprofit–Women's Leadership Organization Company CEO: Andrea Stevenson Conner Company Headquarters Location: Cary, North Carolina Number of Employees: 4 Words you live by: Authentic leaders know their values and remain true to them. Personal Philosophy: Challenges are opportunities for a new lens to see the world, a new door to open, and a way to inspire others to ignite positive change. What book are you reading: Why Women–The Leadership Imperative to Advancing Women and Engaging Men by Jeffery Tobias Halter What was your first job: hostess at McDonald's in Erie, Pennsylvania Favorite charity: ATHENA International Interests: Golf, tennis, travel, reading, and supporting emerging leaders Family: Married to my best friend for 30 years; 2 sons, ages 26 and 28

The Power of the Gender Multiplier Effect

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o overcome the inequalities they face, I believe women need to lift up other women. And, I have experienced firsthand how employing the principles of the gender multiplier effect can systemize this advocacy narrative. While living as an expatriate, I witnessed many complex social, environmental, and economic challenges women face around the world, and came to understand the gender multiplier effect and its importance on achieving greater economic growth, healthier families, and the elimination of poverty. The multiplier effect describes what can happen in an economy or a community when what seems to be an irrelevant factor is changed and, consequently, an even greater change takes place. The economic empowerment of women is one of those factors. I met Connie Han in 2012, while working with a nonprofit organization whose mission was developing leadership capacity for university women in rural China. Connie had never been outside her province, one of the poorest in China. However, she knew moving to Shanghai would provide more economic opportunity. I offered to bring her to Shanghai for a job shadow experience where she embarked on many firsts— first flight on an airplane, navigating the world’s largest subway system, and visiting multinational corporations. This

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experience was a multiplier effect that resulted in her economic empowerment as the leader of a sales team covering India and Africa. Mentoring Connie inspired me to support more emerging women leaders. Working with the nonprofit, we formalized a program giving senior members the tools to pursue their passions and transition from university students to global leaders. All told, I mentored 40 emerging women, providing job-seeking skills, job shadowing experiences, and internships. I did not fathom that giving Connie her first experience outside her rural province would be so empowering and result in a sustainable program that still empowers Chinese women today. The “gender multiplier effect” that started with 40 women in China, if paid forward over 15 years, will impact more than 465,000 lives! I also use the “gender multiplier effect” at ATHENA International in supporting its vision to create a balance in leadership worldwide. If realized, strategies for creating a “gender multiplier effect” will be required. Already in place are multiple strategies that develop, support, and honor women leaders. I have the awesome responsibility to empower women as leaders from classroom to boardroom and carry out the organization’s vision. For me, it doesn’t get better than that.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Dana Shinaberry Job Title: Director, Global Supplier Management Education: BBA, Ohio University Company Name: Arrow Electronics Industry: Technology Company CEO: Mike Long Company Headquarters Location: Centennial, Colorado Number of Employees: 20,100

My advice to women is that if they find themselves in an organization that doesn’t value their contributions, they should understand their worth and find a new path.

Follow Your Own Path

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hen I was growing up, my mother told me over and over to be a doctor. This was so drilled into my head that I went off to college and chose to major in the traditional sciences to prepare for medical school. After two years at school, I told my mother I was really interested in economics and wanted to follow that as my path. Needless to say, she was disappointed in my decision. She said to me, “I wish you would change your mind and go with the easier path.” The reason my mother felt this way was she herself had worked in corporate America for 25 years or more at that point. She had built a successful and impactful career in an extremely male-dominated industry, but indeed it was hard.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

As I have developed in my career, I have had the support of my entire organization, which has allowed me to flourish. I have had the support of male leaders who believe in my potential and acted as both mentors and sponsors. My advice to women is that if they find themselves in an organization that doesn’t value their contributions, they should understand their worth and find a new path. In today’s workplace, we all face challenges, regardless of gender. While some of those challenges may manifest themselves differently, they are challenges nonetheless. Now, my role is to continue to pave the way for my daughter, and all the daughters who will come after me.

www.womenworthwatching.com

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Dana Zaba Job Title: Director, Data Intelligence, Arrow North America Education: BS, decision and information systems, University of Florida Company Name: Arrow Electronics Industry: Technology Company CEO: Mike Long Company Headquarters Location: Centennial, Colorado Number of Employees: 20,100 Words you live by: Life is short, live it. Love is rare, grab it. Anger is bad, dump it. Fear is awful, face it. Memories are sweet, cherish them. Personal Philosophy: Make each day better than the day before. What book are you reading: Girl, Stop Apologizing by Rachel Hollis What was your first job: First job out of college was a business development role, but my first job ever was at a pizza place Favorite charity: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Interests: Spending time with family and friends, traveling, cooking, yoga, and going to live music and sporting events Family: I have a husband, Jeff, an almost 3-year-old daughter, Sophie, and a dog, Ollie.

I believe women now have access to any leadership opportunity; however, it seems the eternal obstacle has to do with compromise and sacrifice. While everyone can relate to this obstacle, women tend to struggle with it more.

You Absolutely Can Do This

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t wasn’t long ago that being the only woman in a conference room full of men was common (and it still happens at times today, but nowhere near as often in my experience). We have come a long way. I believe women now have access to any leadership opportunity; however, it seems the eternal obstacle has to do with compromise and sacrifice. While everyone can relate to this obstacle, women tend to struggle with it more. They tend to have more guilt and more societal pressures put on them. Women also tend to have less confidence in themselves and second guess themselves more. I think the struggle of finding the right balance is a tricky one, but it’s also a personal one. I’m reading a book now called Girl, Stop Apologizing by Rachel Hollis, which is all about remembering that you don’t have to apologize for pursuing your

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dreams, your career ambitions, or about the decisions that are right for you. As Rachel says, “Stop making excuses, embody the behaviors and develop the skills you need, and ultimately believe in yourself.” Another obstacle to overcome is being afraid to ask for help. If you have kids, I’m sure you’ve heard the phrase, “It takes a village.” I find this to be true in my career as well. Without my village, I would not be able to tackle any of the obstacles in my way. I put a lot of focus on my village, and for me, this has meant building and leveraging my support network so that I have help at home, sponsors and mentors at work, and a peer group that is there to support me. And of course, it also means doing my part to support others as they build their own villages.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Tiffany Rider Job Title: Antitrust Partner Education: JD magna cum laude, Indiana University School of Law Company Name: Axinn Industry: Law Company CEO: Matthew J. Becker, Managing Partner Company Headquarters Location: New York, New York Number of Employees: 139 Your Location: Washington, DC Words you live by: “Our greatest glory consists not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall.” –Ralph Waldo Emerson Personal Philosophy: Growth mindset: You can grow through application, creativity, and hard work. What book are you reading: Small Fry by Lisa Brennan-Jobs What was your first job: Production Design Department for the Roseanne show Favorite charity: Legal Aid Society of DC Interests: Theatre and travel Family: Husband (engineer), 12-year-old daughter (budding scientist), and 9-year-old son (budding musician)

Cast Your Net Wide for Mentors

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entors are an integral part of achieving success and advancing in your career. Lawyers go through many stages, professionally and personally, and finding mentors along the way is important. While a formal mentoring program helps create a mentoring culture, it is the organic mentoring relationships that are most beneficial. Mentors come in all shapes and sizes. Great mentors are both relatable and inspiring. It is about developing a connection with a person that you can identify with in some small or large part, generally because you see that person further down a road on which you are heading. While it’s always great for women to find women mentors, the reality is that many of us find ourselves in situations where there are simply no women in the positions we aspire to reach. For that reason, it can be essential to proactively seek mentorship from men.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

I have had many mentors throughout my career—women, men, partners, associates, co-counsel, and even clients. Most of the time, my mentors have been senior to me, but not always. People have different strengths, and it is wonderful to be able to draw from and give to those around us. There are times, however, when it is crucial to be able to connect with women mentors. When it comes to biological demands, such as having children and nursing, finding women mentors can be crucial. Also, unfortunately, societal norms around childrearing or gender bias create situations in which male mentors are not relatable. This is when finding positive women, to serve as role models and advisors, is so important. By casting my net wide, I have managed to find such women in my career. It has not always been easy. That is why I try to make myself available to other women. In the end, I often get more out of these relationships than I anticipated.

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Amy R. Turci Job Title: Partner Education: JD, MBA, BA, University of Florida Company Name: FordHarrison LLP Industry: Legal Company CEO: Al McKenna Company Headquarters Location: Atlanta, Georgia Number of Employees: 270 Your Location: Jacksonville, Florida Words you live by: “Integrity is doing the right thing even when no one is watching.” –C.S. Lewis Personal Philosophy: Your first thought in the morning should be "thank you." What book are you reading: The Cadaver King and the Country Dentist by Radley Balko and Tucker Carrington What was your first job: Cashier at Kash n' Karry Favorite charity: March of Dimes Interests: Running, cooking, and reading Family: Husband Luca, son Alex (9 years), and daughter Sofia (6 years)

Mothers Must Make Choices Every Day

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s a defense attorney representing employers in labor and employment matters, my experience has shown me, and I truly believe, that employers do not intend to discriminate against women with children. Yet, as a professional with two darling children, I recognize that I make choices every day between spending time with my children and engaging in opportunities to further my position professionally. My decisions, thankfully, are made easier because I have an extensive support system that allows me, when I must be away from my children, to know that they are being cared for as I would. As background to the beginnings of that support, when I was 21 weeks pregnant with our first, we learned that my water had broken; I was admitted to the hospital, where I remained for two months, until Alex was born at 32 weeks. He stayed in the NICU for exactly one month, and when we brought him home, he was on an apnea monitor, which would alert us if he stopped breathing. Everyone at FordHarrison was incredibly supportive of me, and gave me every possible advantage. When it was time for me to return to work, I was

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fortunate not to have to make the hard decision to leave my fragile infant with a stranger for 10 hours a day; instead, my mother-in-law began flying from Miami every Sunday night to care for Alex during the week. When I became pregnant with our second child, my in-laws moved from Miami to Jacksonville, and now live next door. Additionally, my parents visit regularly from Gainesville and provide extensive support during school breaks. While my support system is made up primarily of relatives, many of my close friends rely on not only family, but also professional care givers whom they have grown to trust as family. They also have had the luxury of relying on others to provide for their children’s needs in order to allow them to focus on furthering their professional goals. So, no, I do not believe that employers discriminate against women with children. What I believe is that, if we as a society value women of all familial backgrounds in the workplace, we need to support policies that allow all women with children to consider working full time a viable option.

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Julie Kanak Job Title: Managing Director Education: MBA, Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University; BBA, University of Iowa Company Name: Diversified Search Industry: Management Consulting &; Executive Search Company CEO: Dale E. Jones Company Headquarters Location: Philadelphia, PA Number of Employees: 145+ Your Location: Chicago, Illinois Words you live by: Make a difference. Personal Philosophy: Strive to be your best, and help those around you to be theirs—but remember to always stand on your own two feet. What book are you reading: The Moment of Lift by Melinda Gates What was your first job: Hy-Vee's Drugtown, selling cameras and electronics Favorite charity: The Parkinson's Foundation and Noah's Rest Interests: Sports, reading, travel, and spending time with family and friends Family: … is what it's all about.

Why Is Pay Equity So Illusive?

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ay equity is a passion of mine. Often interpreted as equal pay for equal work, it is much more, with many variables coming into play and dramatic consequences for women. The wage gap most commonly reported has women averaging 80 cents for every dollar men earn. Reports also carry the optimistic note that the gap is narrowing. Hurray! But, upon closer review, it is clear that more action is needed to achieve true parity. The narrowing of the wage gap has slowed over the past 15 years, so we may be losing momentum. And, there is the unfortunate revelation that when measured by total earnings, as disclosed in a recent study for the Institute for Women's Policy Research, women over the long term earn 49 percent of what men earn. It is imperative to understand why. One of the earliest obstacles to parity women encounter is that they often start at lower pay. As a newly minted professional, who would expect to have to ask how her pay compares to her male peers? As women advance, other issues intervene. The most prominent being the penalty for time away from the labor

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force to rear children, care for an ill spouse/partner or aging parents, or cope with their own severe illness. Others, more subtle and nuanced but equally punitive, may involve networking, business referrals, introductions or informal sponsorships, visibility, and perceived need. Even as women rise to the top, pay equity remains a challenge. The transparency of public companies may help, but as noted by Andrea Johnson, senior counsel at the National Women's Law Center, “When you are talking about these higher level, professional employees, “the way pay is set for them, there are a lot of opportunities for bias to enter into that (pay).” She goes on to explain, "… with less of a standardized process for determining CEO pay, you start to see more bias come in, because of the discretion that’s allowed in setting the pay.” We must be mindful of what pay equity means for women in terms of childbearing, childcare, housing, education, health, elder care, and retirement. It is an issue that demands active management throughout women’s careers, as well as a loud and united voice.

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Denielle Pemberton-Heard Job Title: General Counsel and Managing Director Education: BA,Tufts University; JD, Case Western Reserve University School of Law; alumna, Columbia University Graduate School of Business Company Name: Diversified Search Industry: Management Consulting &; Executive Search Company CEO: Dale Jones Company Headquarters Location: Philadelphia, PA Number of Employees: 145+ Your Location: Washington, DC Words you live by: “To Whom Much is Given Much is Expected” –Luke 12:48 Personal Philosophy: Always try to do the right thing, and make people feel good about doing so. What book are you reading: Leadership In Turbulent Times by Doris Kearns Goodwin What was your first job: Packing textbooks and Bibles at Cambridge Books Favorite charity: DC Volunteer Lawyers Project in Washington DC which helps people and children exit abusive relationships Interests: Travel, home improvement projects, world religions, and skiing Family: Husband and two active and interesting college-aged children

Women of Color Deserve More Than Lip Service

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he late U.N. Secretary General Kofi Annan brought global business leaders together roughly 15 years ago to lay the foundation for today’s Environmental, Social, and Governance criteria—a set of standards for screening companies for ethical practices. That business must play a role in adhering to high standards of societal ethics is a concept that many corporations champion. But ESG, bold in concept and born of the best of intentions, has one flaw: It really hasn’t changed how businesses behave—especially when it comes to gender and racial parity. Businesses tout the ESG criteria for everything from community projects to business mergers, but the sustainable investing initiative has not managed well with respect to the human resource model. Equity, especially for women of color, has been less impactful. Leadership must open their hearts and minds to new peers, not as visitors to the establishment, but as individuals who will prepare corporations for the next phase of growth. ESG criteria and the value of racial and gender equity in corporate structures cannot be discounted. Women of color contribute heavily to corporate profits, yet there is a lack of hiring and promotion in the executive ranks. This leads us to ask: Does the ESG criteria take into

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account the realities of the world in which we live and do business? And, should the ESG criteria be a greater factor in building executive teams and corporate boards? White women are being promoted, and many corporations are satisfied that this advancement addresses the gender issue. But when it comes to women of color, ESG stumbles. While white women are adding their names to corporate ledgers and board rooms, some fear women of color are being teased with interviews that go nowhere. Sadly, for some, this signals a perceived difference. Gen X and millennial professional women aspire to rise through the ranks, but they still face societal pressures associated with childcare and caring for aging parents. Pioneering women have sacrificed a lot to wrest leadership positions from men and gain access to seats of power, but they grapple with preparing their daughters for a reality that hasn’t much changed since the 1980s. Women of color appreciate the advances of white women in corporate America— movement anywhere is a plus. But if corporations truly embrace the ESG criteria, women of color should be more than the topic du jour for media conferences.

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Deborah J. Peckham Job Title: Partner and Co-Chair, Intellectual Property Education: JD magna cum laude, Order of the Coif, Boston College Law School; AB cum laude, University of Michigan Company Name: Burns & Levinson Industry: Legal Services Company CEO: David P. Rosenblatt, Managing Partner Company Headquarters Location: Boston, Massachusetts Number of Employees: 261 Words you live by: It doesn’t matter what happens in life. What matters is how you react to what happens. Personal Philosophy: I remind myself constantly that every other person I encounter has a lifetime of experience, challenges, victories, and defeats that I cannot know, understand, or perceive without walking in their shoes. This helps me to remain empathetic, non-judgmental and (hopefully) able to focus on what we can achieve together. What book are you reading: Washington: A Life by Ron Chernow; When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing by Daniel Pink What was your first job: “Fry Girl” at McDonald’s Favorite charity: American Cancer Society Interests: I love dogs—they don’t ask for much, but they give a lot. I also adore travel, and one of my wedding vows was to visit Italy, in particular, regularly. Family: Married to my soul mate, Jacqueline Royer, a successful architect and healthcare planner

Even Good Guys Have Biases

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here are two issues that continue to hold women back from achieving real equality in the workplace. The most profound obstacle, in my view, is the persistent unconscious bias of male colleagues—even those who deeply believe their attitudes are gender neutral, and that they are great supporters of women. Ironically, navigating around and succeeding despite open gender bias from men is a skill most women acquire early. We know who you are and what you think, so we just work around you. One of the trickier challenges is convincing outwardly supportive men that their bias is still there and effectively holding us back. When you believe that you are supportive of the advancement of women, then naturally, you believe that women in your orbit will succeed because of your good thoughts and your full-throated support. Well-meaning male colleagues will always point to the few women in positions of leadership and claim victory for women (often taking credit for the achievement). The reality is that the women they are holding out as examples of equality are often in roles that are more figurehead than powerful. That is, unconscious bias is keeping women in supportive roles, still

just below that glass ceiling. The “mere appearance” of power and equality is misleading and often an impediment to achieving real gender equality in the workplace. Ameliorating this unconscious bias will take conscious and consistent effort. As women, we need to call out our supportive male colleagues when we see them talking one way, but acting another. All of this speaks to the continuing need for unconscious bias training and a lot of selfreflection—even (and perhaps especially) in organizations that outwardly seem to be making strides toward gender equality. The second issue that often holds women back is uneven or inconsistent mentoring from other women. Women need to lean in, bring each other along, and sponsor other female talent. That’s what the fellas have been doing since the Stone Age—helping each other along and introducing the next generation of men to networks of other like-minded men. And yet women often (consciously and otherwise) fail to look for ways to help others who follow them succeed. It really does take a village for any individual to succeed. We should all help each other more.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

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Kimberly Braithwaite Job Title: Senior Human Resource Manager Education: MS, career and human resource development, Rochester Institute of Technology; BS, business management (concentration in Human Resources), St. John Fisher College Company Name: Barilla America Industry: Food Manufacturing Company CEO: Claudio Colzani Company Headquarters Location: Parma, Italy Number of Employees: 8,000 Your Location: Northbrook, Illinois Words you live by: “I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” –Maya Angelou Personal Philosophy: “We rise by lifting others.” –Robert Ingersoll What book are you reading: The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership by John C. Maxwell What was your first job: Pharmacy technician Interests: Diversity and Inclusion within my community, travel, and volunteering Family: My support system

I strive to be the woman who fixes another women’s crown without telling the world it was crooked.

Success in Steel Toe Shoes

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woman wearing flats can be successful at work, just as a woman wearing steel toe shoes. When working in a food manufacturing environment, everyone has to wear the proper personal protective equipment (PPE)—hairnets, ear plugs, and steel toe shoes. Everyone looks the same, regardless of gender. There will always be unconscious bias related to appearance. However, when more women take on leadership positions the entire culture of an organization will change. I have been working in manufacturing for the last eight years with Barilla America, and for more than fifteen years during my career. In those experiences, there was gender pay equality, flexibility in the workplace, and the ability to climb the corporate ladder without wearing high heel shoes. Appearance is where the journey begins, but performance is what should be recognized and rewarded. In some industries, women are held to a different, unfair standard when it

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comes to appearance. Some companies are losing the war for talent if they are considering women for positions based on their appearance. I truly believe that leadership solves problems. Women should not be competing against other women. They should be lifting each other up, because there are plenty of open spots for great leaders and there is enough work to go around. My advice to women entering manufacturing would be to understand the business that you are in, select talented candidates who can bring difference to the team, share your opinions, let you voice be heard, and make sure you bring other women along with you. I strive to be the woman who fixes another women’s crown without telling the world it was crooked. I am proud to say that I am climbing the corporate ladder in flats (steel toe shoes) and look forward to continuing to share my experiences to uplift other women.

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Brooke Lively Job Title: CEO and Founder Education: MBA, corporate finance and investments, Texas Christian University; BA, international relations, Randolph Macon Woman's College; chartered financial analyst, CFA Institute Company Name: Cathedral Capital Industry: Finance Company CEO: Brooke Lively Company Headquarters Location: Fort Worth, Texas Number of Employees: 5 Words you live by: The person who says something is impossible should not interrupt the person who is doing it. Personal Philosophy: If opportunity doesn't knock, build a door. What book are you reading: The Go-Giver by Bob Burg What was your first job: Nanny Favorite charity: ASPCA Interests: Hiking, reading, and gardening

Give Yourself the Gift of Freedom

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reedom is the greatest gift we can give ourselves. It’s the reason I started my business. Creating a business that gives you freedom and profits takes the right financial insight and strategies. It’s been a journey for me to create it for myself and to discover the key elements of financial insight that create profitability. Once we’ve stepped out of the frying pan and into the fire, we’re now in charge. Once you become a business owner, you are introduced to a whole new host of challenges, such as cash-flow problems, profitability pitfalls, payroll stress, credit card debt, and tax issues. I know the feeling all too well! I left a cushy, secure job as a firm manager at my father’s law firm to venture out on my own. I soon found that creating a profitable business was not as easy as it looked. I invested a lot of money to promote my business, maxing out my credit cards and getting deep into debt. I was constantly running a loss, and this continued for eight out of twelve months my first year of business. With time, things finally got better. As they say, we teach what we need to learn.

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I began to see a pattern emerge in what determines profitability; from there, my book, 6 Key Numbers™ Every Entrepreneur Should Know, was born. Using the pattern I discovered, I was able to help our clients find profits to create a better lifestyle—more opportunities for them and their families, and quality experiences like concerts, camp, dream vacations, and new houses. They could hire new employees, so they could work fewer nights and weekends, and have a life outside work. Freedom! One of my clients went from $20,000 a month in revenues to $200,000 a month in just two years. That’s a 900 percent revenue increase. Freedom! Another client was making over half a million dollars a year, yet she couldn’t afford to pay herself. We created a customized pricing tool for her, leading to an additional $200,000 on her next deal. She could now pay herself an income and get out of debt. Freedom! However, most important, our clients get peace of mind knowing they have a business that is financially solvent. Cathedral Capital is their trusted advisor that helps them maintain their profitability and has their backs. Freedom.

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Ellen J. Zucker Job Title: Partner Education: JD, Boston College Law School; MS, political theory, London School of Economics and Political Science; BA, Wesleyan University Company Name: Burns & Levinson Industry: Legal Services Company CEO: David P. Rosenblatt, Managing Partner Company Headquarters Location: Boston, Massachusetts Number of Employees: 261 Words you live by: “When I dare to be powerful, to use my strength in the service of my vision, then it becomes less and less important whether I am afraid …. It is not our differences that divide us. It is our inability to recognize, accept and celebrate those differences.” – Audre Lourde Personal Philosophy: Be thoughtful, careful and listen well. But don’t let it stop there. Act. Be committed, persevere and move forward, even in the face of great challenge. But don’t let that consume you. Take a breath, enjoy the laughter and love family and friends, the compelling sound of music, the expanse of the ocean, the feeling of sand between your toes, or the beauty of the first star in the sky. Then go back at it. Infuse your life with meaning in this way. What book are you reading: These days, I read about politics. Every once in while I indulge myself and read poetry or the philosophy of the ancient Greeks. I imagine a time when I will finish the Edith Wharton novel I started years ago…but that is unlikely to be any time soon. What was your first job: High school English teacher Favorite charity: ACLU Foundation Interests: Politics, music, and long walks in the city or on the beach Family: Ellen Clegg (spouse), Jacob R. Zucker (son) and Jonathan Gagen (stepson), along with three brothers, many nieces and nephews, and a mother celebrating her 90th year

Don’t Let the Door Swing Shut

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walked past three wonderful colleagues a moment ago. All three wore the uniform of male success: crisp white shirts, dark pants, and voices deep with confidence. I am wearing flats and an oversized shirt, as I am in the office today negotiating on behalf of some high-powered women executives, strategizing about a case where I represent a surgeon marginalized for speaking out against unsafe practices, and writing a brief on behalf of a worker in need of justice. We exchanged pleasantries, and I smiled to myself, comfortable in knowing that I still do not quite fit in here, but also that I have worked to prove my value and surround myself with enough colleagues who reflect different realities in this world that this workplace has become home. I am quite fortunate. Growing up, I had in the matriarchs of my family models of kindness, strength, and the sort of intellectual firepower that took a second seat to no one. Then, in my professional life, I had women mentors who achieved at the highest levels, demanded excellence from others, and were unapologetically themselves. They doled out support and criticism without favor or bias.

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On a good day, I hope to approach some portion of the grace and grit I saw in these women. But not all women share my good fortune in terms of role models. While many women find support in colleagues who share a sense that the opportunities are not there for them in the same way they exist for male coworkers, too often they cannot change the stubborn power dynamics they confront. Other women do not find support; instead, they see senior women who slipped through the door to opportunity, but who didn’t keep that door open for others. I hear stories of those who have been shut out. Our challenge is to give voice to those who do not have the power of community or the ability to create the change that is needed. Those of us who have been lucky enough to crack the door open must make sure it does not swing shut. We must instead invite others to step over the threshold and create a room that welcomes their perspectives, hard work, and innovation. I believe—no matter how hard the work and how painful the setbacks—we can and will do this.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Ehrika Gladden Job Title: VP, Cisco Refresh/Cisco Capital Education: Bachelor of Arts, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill Company Name: Cisco Systems Industry: IT Company CEO: Chuck Robbins Company Headquarters Location: San Jose, California Number of Employees: 73,000 Words you live by: Have a point of view and the courage to share it. Personal Philosophy: Always be prepared to give. What book are you reading: The Sponsor Effect by Sylvia Ann Hewlett What was your first job: Cashier at CVS Favorite charity: Charities focused on women and diversity Interests: Sports, especially basketball and tennis; being with family and friends; and travel Family: Husband, Blayne Gladden

The best role models exhibit one key attribute—they continue learning how to improve every day.

Strong Roles Models Are the Key

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hroughout my life, I have had the opportunity to interact with strong role models from all levels, ages, ethnicities, and genders. As a result of each encounter, my horizons expanded and developed, with a depth of experience that I rely on today in my work and personal relationships. Role models let each of us see the traits we want as part of our own DNA. When I look at my life, I recognize the special role models that have been key guideposts for my personal and professional life. From the early days of my grandmother schooling me on the ways of relationships and the importance of respect, to the strong aspirations expected by my educator parents, role models have set me on a path of embracing the teachings that everyday activities provide. One of those activities was what I refer to today as “Debates at Dinner.” At the family dinner table, my parents would challenge me and my siblings on the cur-

rent day’s activities. They would always take the opposite stance, to challenge our thinking and knowledge level. This prepared me to look beyond the obvious and ask questions that get to the core of the why, what, and how. I believe if you look around, you will see examples of role models in a variety of areas—even those who exhibit behaviors you would not want to emulate. There can be as much value in learning which behaviors not to replicate as there is in learning which behaviors you wish to adopt. Identifying the attributes you desire in a coach or mentor, as you identify areas in which to focus, can be helpful, too. Today, I look for role models from every walk of life. I recognize how incredibly lucky we are to have so many people with strong convictions, dedication, and a willingness to share themselves. The best role models exhibit one key attribute— they continue learning how to improve every day.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

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Julie Nugent Job Title: Senior Vice President, Learning & Strategic Advisory Services Education: MA, New York University; BA, Ohio University Company Name: Catalyst Industry: Nonprofit Company CEO: Lorraine Hariton Company Headquarters Location: New York, New York Number of Employees: 95 Your Location: Cincinnati, Ohio Words you live by: Live in the moment because every moment counts. Personal Philosophy: Family first. What book are you reading: Kids books with my girls What was your first job: Selling concessions at a movie theater Favorite charity: Best Friends Animal Society; HART (Homeless Animal Rescue Team) in Cincinnati Interests: Yoga, baking, traveling, hiking, and relaxing Family: Married, with 2 amazing girls

You can achieve the best results and lead with empathy and understanding. They are not mutually exclusive!

You Have to Know Who to Call

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elationships matter in a career. We’ve all had those pivotal moments where you are offered new, bigger, higher-stakes role or “hot job,” and you have to figure out if it’s really what you want. Are you ready? Do you have the support to succeed—or at least to try—and if you fail, pick yourself back up again? There are those times when the answer is “no” or “not now,” and then there are times when you're just not sure what to do. In those moments, I know who to call. I call my trusted circle or my “personal board of advisors”—people I can rely on for advice, expertise, and help. Their perspectives and opinions matter to me. I welcome their feedback—even the difficult kind—as I know it is intended to help and lift me up. My earliest trusted advisors were my parents. They taught me early in my

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life that I could do whatever I set my mind to. Hard work, determination, and perseverance were critical ingredients for success. I also learned to be kind from them. I saw how they treated people with dignity and respect, and I knew I wanted to be like them. I believe in kindness and leading with compassion. You can achieve the best results and lead with empathy and understanding. They are not mutually exclusive! This is an important part of intentional and inclusive leadership. As a leader, I need to feel comfortable with my choices every day, and learn from my inevitable missteps. There will be important learning moments that will help shape future decisions and actions. And while I know that I’m not always going to always get everything right, my advisors are only a phone call or an email away.

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Elonda Crockett Job Title: Vice President, Operations Shared Services Education: Bachelor of Science, manufacturing engineering, Grambling State University Company Name: Fannie Mae Industry: Financial Services Company CEO: Hugh Frater Company Headquarters Location: Washington, DC Number of Employees: 7,400 Your Location: Plano, Texas Words you live by: “I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” –Philippians 4:13 Personal Philosophy: "I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel." –Maya Angelou What book are you reading: The First 90 Days: Critical Success Strategies for New Leaders at All Levels by Michael Watkins (I've recently taken on a new role); Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well by Douglas Stone and Sheila Heen (reading this with my leadership team and planning to share with all associates) What was your first job: Physicians’ after-hours answering service Favorite charity: Dress for Success Interests: Traveling, reading, and volunteerism Family: I am an only child and have the distinct honor of caring for my mother, due to her health issues

Feel the Fear and Do it Anyway

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ear is often described as False Evidence Appearing Real—emphasis must be placed on the words false evidence. The only way to fight fear of any kind is with action. It proves to you, by your own lived experience, that you can get past whatever you’re afraid of—even failure. I’ve learned over the years that fear of failure can be overcome with self-confidence and the understanding that failure offers lessons, even guidance, for how to act in the future. Sometimes there are internal conflicts that can challenge us, such as inadequacy, rejection, change, or judgment. What do you tell yourself ? What is your internal narrative? Those internal conversations can either feed your courage or fuel your fear. Don’t be afraid to examine what you are telling yourself every day and begin to change your internal narrative. It will produce courage. Here are four strategies to consider: 1. Do it afraid. Just because you’re afraid doesn’t mean you can’t do it. Even if you fail, you still win because you’ve pushed yourself beyond your comfort zone; so win or lose, you’ve exceeded your own expectations.

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2. Review your achievements. Let your accomplishments remind, comfort, and encourage you. You’ve already done things that others have not done or could not do. The current opportunity is no different. 3. Be fully self-aware. Understand your strengths and weaknesses. Overcoming your fear of failure means embracing all that you are personally and professionally, whether you are aligning to a job description, knowledge requirements, experience, or relationship or family responsibilities. 4. Seek guidance from your personal board of directors—people invested in your journey and success, who you can consult when you feel afraid or uncertain. Personally, my board comes from many sectors and networks: financial, spiritual, business—and there’s always a family member. While diverse and divergent in opinion, they collectively push me to purpose and do not allow me to stop trying. They force me to make courageous and informed choices.

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Christine M. Pambianchi Job Title: EVP, People & Digital Education: Bachelor’s degree, Cornell University, School of Industrial and Labor Relations Company Name: Corning Incorporated Industry: Manufacturing Company CEO: Wendell P. Weeks Company Headquarters Location: Corning, New York Number of Employees: 55,000 Words you live by: “Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It’s not.” –The Lorax by Dr. Seuss Personal Philosophy: Live each day to its fullest, and always give your personal best, treating others the way you would want to be treated. What book are you reading: A Woman of No Importance: The Untold Story of the American Spy Who Helped Win World War II by Sonia Purnell What was your first job: Swimming instructor, at age 13 Favorite charity: Mothers Against Drunk Driving; Autism Speaks Interests: Travel, history, photography, and physical fitness Family: Husband Mike, son Phineas (19), son Avery (18), daughter Sarah (16), and son Harry (12)

Paying it Forward—Women Mentoring Women

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believe so strongly in the importance of mentoring, especially for women, that in 2013 I called upon the top women leaders at Corning Incorporated to help me form an initiative specifically to facilitate and support these relationships. Our purpose is to help increase the number of women in leadership positions by sharing lessons learned with our colleagues who want to advance their careers. We named it the UP2 Initiative because it is “up to” us, Corning’s women leaders, to do our part to create opportunities for other women to join us in the top ranks of the company. Through UP2, the top 200 women of the company each mentor at least two other women, who in turn coach two other women, and so on, creating a powerful multiplier effect. We continually challenge women to take the UP2 pledge: I believe the world is a better place when women’s voices are heard. I believe companies are more successful when women are allowed to reach their full potential. I believe it is “UP2” us to identify, develop, and promote women in the workplace. I pledge to help women succeed at Corning.

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Throughout its 168-year history, women have made long-lasting contributions to Corning’s history. At first, they held secretarial or nontechnical manufacturing jobs, and then moved into more nontraditional roles during World War II. Today nearly 40 percent of our global workforce is made up of women working in engineering, science, manufacturing, finance, human resources, communications, administration, supply chain, and other roles. It’s up to us—the women leaders of Corning—to ensure that they have opportunities to contribute to the company’s mission and ascend to the highest levels of leadership as they build on our legacy as one of the world’s leading innovators. In just six years, the UP2 initiative has expanded rapidly, reaching thousands of women globally. Those who have engaged have learned that effective mentoring relationships can be personally and professionally rewarding for mentors and mentees. The women who work at Corning choose their career paths based on personal, job, and family goals. Every choice is valid, and every contribution is valued, as it takes all of us working together to help Corning succeed.

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Gina West Job Title: Executive Manager, Community Investment & Engagement Education: MEd, BA, Howard University; Certificate, CSR management, Boston College Carroll School of Management; Certificate, nonprofit development/ fundraising, Indiana University/Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) Company Name: Fannie Mae Industry: Financial Services Company CEO: Hugh Frater Company Headquarters Location: Washington, DC Number of Employees: 7,400 Your Location: Atlanta, Georgia Words you live by: “There is no exercise better for the heart than reaching down and lifting people up.” –John Holmes Personal Philosophy: If you are going to do it, do it well! What book are you reading: Dare to Lead by Brené Brown What was your first job: Restocking videos on the shelves at Erol's Video Club in Silver Spring, Maryland Favorite charity: Rebuilding Together DC • Alexandria Interests: interior design, ’70s music, and documentaries Family: Spouse, Eric; son, Cole (4 years old); and our dog, Biggie

We Can All Be Superheroes

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believe in superpowers. And while ordinary people may not possess abilities to fly or crush rocks with their hands, every day we each have the power to make one person’s world, or the entire world, better. As a corporate social responsibility professional, and the leader of the team at Fannie Mae that is dedicated to harnessing the power of our people to volunteer and help tackle such pressing issues as the lack of affordable housing, and the need for more sustainable and resilient communities in the United States, I can attest to the immense power of volunteer service. The smiles of children in a shelter grateful for the time my colleagues spent reading them a story, or the mother who hugged me with tears in her eyes when I handed her a pack of diapers, or the man who told me that my colleagues and I were the angels he prayed for when we came to rebuild his home after Hurricane Harvey, are all proof of the power of volunteer service to ignite a passion in you, as it did in

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me. It will change your life forever—and for the better. Some call the feeling that comes from giving back the “giver's glow” and others have called it the “helper's high.” No matter how you label it, there is no denying that volunteering is good for you, and that it can improve your life as much as the lives of those you help. Studies have shown that volunteers are happier and healthier, with a greater sense of purpose and fulfillment in their day-to-day lives. Even if you only have a little time to give, volunteering can reward you with a sense of purpose that comes from knowing that you are using your precious time to bring about positive change in the world. With so many people in need of a helping hand, so many challenges to overcome, and countless playing fields to be leveled, we need superheroes in our communities now more than ever. So, what are you waiting for? Grab your cape, get out there today and volunteer…you never know, it just might ignite the superhero in you too.

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Brooke McGeehan Job Title: Senior Vice President - Branch Director / Financial Advisor Education: Bachelor of Science, marketing, Clemson University Company Name: RBC Wealth Management–U.S. Industry: Financial Services Company CEO: Michael Armstrong Company Headquarters Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota Number of Employees: 5,000 Your Location: Princeton, New Jersey Words you live by: “You miss 100% of the shots you don't take.” “...the sky's the limit.” –Wayne Gretzky Personal Philosophy: “I'll sleep when I'm dead.” – Warren Zevon What book are you reading: The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo What was your first job: Swimming instructor and snack bar attendant at the local pool Favorite charity: Building Homes for Heroes and Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Interests: Family, running, attending my kids’ sporting events, and traveling Family: Husband, 2 kids, and one crazy dog

Paying it Forward

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ike most young kids growing up, I wanted to be a teacher, then a doctor, then a lawyer, then a movie star. Yet, somehow, I didn’t pursue any of those professions. Instead I became a financial advisor. I’d be lying if I said that being a financial advisor was my dream job, but now that I am one, I couldn’t be happier. It truly is the perfect career for me. Not only does my profession allow me to provide financial security and peace of mind to my clients, but it also allows me to be a mom—the most important job of all. My parents always knew that whatever I did with my life, I would be successful at it. In fact, my dad would often remind me, “Your future is so bright you need bigger sunglasses!” Failure was never, and is still not, an option for me. In addition to being a three-sport athlete, I also had many jobs throughout high school that shaped me into the businesswoman and leader I am today. Mentorship has also been paramount to my development as a financial advisor. It’s not an easy business to navigate, especially as a woman. I was, and still am, very fortunate to have several mentors

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who have helped pave the way for me. They encourage me to take risks, they challenge my doubt, and most important, they believe in me. Now, I am paying it forward as president of the Women’s Association of Financial Advisors at RBC Wealth Management. I mentor many female financial advisors and help them achieve success. But the most important mentoring role I play is to my children. I want them to be kind to others, confident in themselves, and above all else, happy. I believe that in life you need to be both lucky and good—lucky enough to meet the right people and good enough to seize every opportunity that comes your way. Recently, RBC Wealth Management promoted me to director of its Princeton, New Jersey, branch. One of only a few female branch directors in the financial services industry, I was honored, and of course, couldn’t say no. Life is a constant balancing act. I am incredibly grateful to have a one-ofa-kind husband, and together we just make it work. It’s not always easy, and sometimes my life resembles a three-ring circus, but I wouldn’t have it any other way!

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


There’s wealth in diversity We promote a diverse and inclusive corporate culture. At RBC Wealth Management, we recognize and value the many important contributions of women. Which is why we promote an environment where women can be successful and deliver programs and tools to help them create the futures they want. For their clients, for themselves and for the people they care about most. For more information, please visit rbcwealthmanagement.com. Congratulations to Brooke McGeehan for being named one of the Women Worth Watching by Profiles in Diversity Journal!

Brooke M. McGeehan, AWM, CFP® Senior Vice President – Branch Director, Financial Advisor www.brookemcgeehan.com Investment and insurance products: • Not insured by the FDIC or any other federal government agency • Not a deposit of, or guaranteed by, the bank or an affiliate of the bank • May lose value © 2019 RBC Wealth Management, a division of RBC Capital Markets, LLC, Member NYSE/FINRA/SIPC.

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A leader worth watching. Phillips Lytle congratulates Lisa Smith on being named one of the 2019 Women Worth Watching®. Lisa is a seasoned litigator who expertly handles complex product liability and mass tort cases, and is a committed advocate for diversity in the legal profession. We are proud to see Lisa recognized for her hard work and dedication.

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PHILLIPSLYTLE.COM EST. 1834 NEW YORK: ALBANY, BUFFALO, CHAUTAUQUA, GARDEN CITY, NEW YORK, ROCHESTER CLEVELAND, OH WASHINGTON, DC CANADA: WATERLOO REGION ONE CANALSIDE, 125 MAIN STREET, BUFFALO, NY 14203-2887 (716) 847-8400

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Nancy Jardini Job Title: Senior Vice President, Chief Compliance and Ethics Officer & Chief Office of Minority and Women Inclusion Officer Education: JD, Villanova University; BA, Chatham University Company Name: Fannie Mae Industry: Financial Services Company CEO: Hugh Frater Company Headquarters Location: Washington, DC Number of Employees: 7,400 Words you live by: “All you need is love.” –John Lennon Personal Philosophy: Details matter. What book are you reading: A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles What was your first job: Newspaper delivery (age 11) Favorite charity: Planned Parenthood Interests: My family: my husband, our 4 children, and our fur baby, Bruno Family: Husband, 4 children, and their fur baby, Bruno.

Great Role Models Are All Around You

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n essential leadership skill is the ability to lead diverse teams, while considering the importance of visibility. Being able to look around the organization and see examples of men and women leaders in action allows you to envision your own leadership potential. We know that female representation at the most senior levels is still a challenge in most organizations, and having powerful female role models is critical. Seeking out, appreciating, and learning from a member of your own gender important. At times in my career, strong female role models who were senior to me were hard to come by. As the first female leader of the Criminal Investigation Division of the IRS, everyone above me and most of my subordinates were male. Although I learned a great deal from them, examples of strong female leadership were lacking. Through this experience, I learned that mentors and role models do not have to be higher on the organizational ladder than you are. They can be peers, colleagues, and subordinates. For the last nine years I have had the privilege of managing compliance at Fannie Mae, reporting to both the board and CEO. Fannie Mae is an or-

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ganization that is committed to diversity, and we engage a vigorous strategy to focus on promoting diversity and fostering inclusion in our workforce, among our suppliers and vendors, and among our partners in financial transactions. We have strong women leaders and role models on our board, on our management committee, and at every layer of the firm. I have learned and drawn inspiration from these women leaders, confirming that the ability to learn from strong and talented women exists all around us. Throughout my career, I’ve been recognized for building diverse teams filled with strong leaders—both male and female. I have mentored and promoted these leaders for their skills and what they uniquely bring to the table, and because of what I can learn from them. Extremely astute emotional awareness, an outstanding network, inspired project management leadership, and strong legal knowledge are some of the skills my team members possess that exceed my own proficiency in each area. My role models are not only the senior leaders I encounter, but also are members of my own team. They inspire me, teach me, and set examples for me to follow.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Lisa L. Smith Job Title: Partner Education: JD, Case Western Reserve University School of Law; BS in biology, Grove City College Company Name: Phillips Lytle LLP Industry: Legal Services Company CEO: Kevin M. Hogan, Managing Partner Company Headquarters: One Canalside, 125 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203 Number of Employees: 407 Words You Live By: The Golden Rule Personal Philosophy: “People will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” –Maya Angelou What Book Are You Reading: The Lowland by Jhumpa Lahiri What Was Your First Job: Babysitting and working at a restaurant Favorite Charity: The Pink Pillow Project, a breast cancer charity I cofounded in memory of my mother Interests: yoga and hiking Family: Husband (John), daughter (Jane), and labradoodle (Teddy)

Suggestions for Success

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recently took the deposition of an expert witness, at which the expert witness and all five attorneys in the room were women. Earlier in my career, I took a deposition at which I was not only the only woman in the room, but opposing counsel greeted me in the reception area of his office by asking me if I wanted to read Cosmopolitan magazine until the deposition started. I politely declined. In thinking about lessons learned in the decades between those two depositions, here is some advice I would give any young professional: 1. Use What You Have. As a young litigator, I sometimes found myself in situations in which opposing counsel or witnesses underestimated me because of my youth (and perhaps, gender). Rather than taking offense, I used it to my advantage. The plaintiffs’ attorney, who offered me Cosmopolitan magazine, let his guard down because he was not expecting an attorney 30 years his junior to be deposing the plaintiffs. He also communicated to his clients that he did not take me seriously. As a result, I was able to obtain key concessions from his clients and, ultimately, win a

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lengthy trial of the case in federal court. 2. Identify What’s Not Working. Early in my career, I took on a leadership role within a bar association. The position entailed substantial, non-client work, as well as frequent meetings out of state. While my firm was very supportive of the role (and covered the cost of meeting attendance), once my daughter was born, I needed to prioritize my time and work-related travel for client matters. I did not renew my role with the bar association, which was the right decision at that time. 3. Cultivate Multiple Mentors. I have been fortunate to have multiple mentors serving in various roles. One mentor is my go-to on substantive issues, another is a brilliant clientmanagement resource, and another helped me navigate my work schedule when our first childcare provider left to take a job out of state. Most of my mentors are men, and they have provided invaluable advice for taking on leadership roles. My focus now is paying that forward by serving as a resource and mentor for more junior attorneys.

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Julie Hammond Job Title: Managing Director, Legal & Compliance Education: Juris Doctor, Brigham Young University, J. Reuben Clark Law School Company Name: OneGoal Industry: Nonprofit, college access and success Company CEO: Melissa Connelly Company Headquarters Location: Chicago, Illinois Number of Employees: 165 Words you live by: Be present and engaged. Personal Philosophy: Sometimes how you get something done is more important than what you get done. What book are you reading: A Big New Free Happy Unusual Life: Self Expression and Spiritual Practice for Those Who Have Time for Neither by Nina Wise What was your first job: harvesting potatoes in southeastern Idaho Favorite charity: OneGoal Interests: Yoga, swimming in Lake Michigan and Yucatan cenotes, hiking, biking, and perfecting grilled cheese sandwiches Family: Husband and 4 children, ranging from 9 to 17 years old

More and More, We’re Bringing Our Whole Selves to Work

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n a recent video conference call with the male president of OneGoal and two female colleagues, one colleague mentioned she was on her way to pick up her young daughter from daycare. As soon as she was home, she switched from phone to video conference, appearing with her young daughter on her lap. The group took a moment to welcome and celebrate her daughter, and then proceeded with the business of the call. This simple experience underscored for me one of the reasons I decided to join OneGoal. I chose this role because I was drawn to the way that the organization actively encourages authenticity, and understands that people do their best work when they also have the ability to attend to and nurture other important areas of their lives. This experience also illustrated a dramatic shift from what I experienced early in my career. As a fledgling associate twenty years ago at a large law firm, I quickly sensed that my personal life had no place at work. I felt that I was expected to show up as a one-dimensional character, only interested in the work,

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and willing to sacrifice my personal desires and obligations to advance my career. Unfortunately, this understanding was often reinforced by some of my female supervisors, who considered any expression of vulnerability as incompetence and expected that other women should be willing to “pay their dues” since they had made tremendous personal sacrifices to advance their careers. These pressures still persist for women today, but have been diminished by the chorus of voices advocating for a better way. Each in their own way, these voices have championed the notion that a woman’s competency in her professional life isn’t dependent on how much she pretends to not have a personal life or feelings. And as women, we have gotten better about being unapologetic about bringing our whole selves to work and proving over and over again that we are up to the task at hand. Even with the progress we have made, more change is needed, and my hope is that we will use our voices and actions to actively strive toward it.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Gaby L. Longsworth, PhD Job Title: Director Education: JD, Georgetown University Law Center; PhD, human genetics and molecular biology, Johns Hopkins University; BS, molecular biology, Florida Institute of Technology Company Name: Sterne, Kessler, Goldstein & Fox P.L.L.C. Industry: Legal Company CEO: Michael B. Ray, Managing Director Company Headquarters Location: Washington, DC Number of Employees: 347 Words you live by: Don't give up! Personal Philosophy: Be kind. Treat others the way you want to be treated. What book are you reading: The Lost Man by Jane Harper What was your first job: Cocktail waitress Favorite charity: Race for Hope Interests: Reading, travel, languages, and Tae Bo Family: Husband, two kids (18 and 15), and 1 talking Quaker parrot and 5 parakeets

Don’t Let Bias Push You off Your Path

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omen of color are historically underestimated and discounted until they have proven themselves. It is unfortunate, but women of color often have to work twice as hard to be taken seriously. In my experience, as a woman of color in the legal profession, the key is to get beyond the initial (somewhat) awkward moments, find something you have in common with a colleague or a potential new client, and build on that. Once you can get someone to appreciate the similarities (same school, hobbies, kids, etc.) and get to know you, the differences in skin color and gender fade from being a focal point, and the person is able to appreciate your qualifications and expertise. It is important to have a positive attitude and thick skin. If you anticipate the negative and aren’t able to handle criticism (warranted or not), it can be difficult to be successful in the workplace. You can never know someone’s story, by just looking at them. As an immigrant to the United States, the notion of racial and gender bias was at first completely foreign to me. I soon realized that many were not as “color-blind” as I was.

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Being born and raised in Suriname, a tiny country in South America, with a population of about 550,000 and Dutch as its official language, was an awesome experience. I am also the daughter of teacher parents with mixed ethnicity. In fact, Suriname is an incredible melting pot, with immigrants from India, Indonesia, China, Portugal, and Lebanon, as well as descendants of former slaves from Western Africa, predominantly Ghana. In my family alone, I have blond, blue-eyed Dutch first cousins on one side (dad), and dark chocolatebrown, half-Chinese first cousins on the other (mom). I grew up essentially “color-blind,” and was taught to value people for their character and attributes, not their gender or skin color. In addition, the highly educated "dark side" members of my family were mostly engineers and doctors, while my white dad was the first person in his family to attend college. Growing up, it simply never occurred to me that I could not accomplish what I set my mind to or that others would doubt my capabilities. I have learned that is not true, but it never took me off my path to reach my goals—a successful life and career that I am proud of and cherish.

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Amanda Martinsek Job Title: Partner Education: JD, Order of the Coif, New York University School of Law; BA, Oberlin College Company Name: Ulmer & Berne LLP Industry: Legal Company CEO: Scott P. Kadish, Managing Partner Company Headquarters Location: Cleveland, Ohio Number of Employees: 306 Words you live by: Loyalty, integrity, kindness, understanding, and resilience Personal Philosophy: Be kind. Do what is right and stand behind it—firmly, but courteously. Challenge the wrongs you see; otherwise, you are complicit. What book are you reading: Ladies Who Punch: The Explosive Inside Story of “The View” by Ramin Setoodeh What was your first job: Sorting boxes of address cards eight hours a day for a mail order company called Nutrition Headquarters in Carbondale, Illinois Favorite charity: Greater Cleveland Food Bank and the Cleveland Orchestra. One feeds the body and the other the soul. Both help to make Cleveland the special place it is. Interests: Mentoring less experienced lawyers and helping them to navigate real world challenges; hanging out with my sons; food and wine; being with my extended family and good friends; and performance: theater, music, comedy, dance, and the eccentric; I am also rather passionate about work. Family: Two sons: Thomas (27) and Paul (23); an amazing Aunt Laura, with whom I travel; and cousins and cousins’ children, who are always fun

If We Want Parity, We Must Stand Together

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ong ago when I was quite young, there was an effort to pass the Equal Rights Amendment (the ERA), which would have guaranteed women in the United States parity with men in all essential regards. It failed, not because of a lack of support from men in power, but due to opposition from a groundswell of conservative female voices like that of Phyllis Schlafly. Stated fears included that housewives would be disadvantaged, women would be subject to the draft, women would lose the right to alimony, and mothers would lose the presumption of custody in divorce cases. Here we are in 2019. We have housewives and househusbands. If there were a draft, women would almost certainly be drafted, even though a change in the Selective Service Act would be required. I and many other women now pay what is called spousal support. Shared parenting is now the default presumption in divorces with children. And, here in the United States, a woman without a bachelor’s degree earns 78 cents for every dollar

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a man without a bachelor’s degree makes, while a woman with a bachelor’s degree earns 74 cents for every dollar a man with a bachelor’s degree makes. Not passing the ERA was a bad call, an epically bad call. Pay inequity seems to be an intractable issue in this country. One of the reasons for that is the infinite variety of bases presented to justify such a blatantly unfair result. But another insidious basis for this ongoing economic discrimination is the inability of women to truly unite as a group behind simple principles that are clearly in their own and their daughters’ best interests. I am always troubled when women hesitate to stand up for themselves and other women. There are many reasons why women are less highly remunerated than men for the same or equivalent work. But for me, the most frustrating aspect to the issue is women’s consistent failure to pull together and force change. Until we all row with the same oar, not only will the poor always be with us, but underpaid women will staff positions all over the country.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Dr. Nicole Cooper Job Title: Vice President, Social Responsibility Education: Bachelor's degree (Phi Beta Kappa honors), Spelman College; Master of Public Health degree, University of Michigan; Doctor of Public Health degree, Harvard University Company Name: UnitedHealthcare Industry: Health care Company CEO: David Wichmann Company Headquarters Location: Minnetonka, Minnesota Number of Employees: 300,000 Words you live by: Mind over matter. Personal Philosophy: Be authentically you; everyone else is taken. What book are you reading: Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World by Anand Giridharadas What was your first job: Cook in a church daycare center Favorite charity: United Negro College Fund Interests: Cooking, taking walks, and traveling Family: Husband, Jonathan

The Unfinished Fight for Equality

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s a child living in a nearly all-black neighborhood in inner-city Washington, DC, I noticed my community, in many ways, was in crisis. Too many people faced sickness, disability, and lack of access to the basic things people need to lead a healthy life. I later learned that what largely ailed my neighborhood were pervasive health inequalities, caused by societal factors that put certain communities at higher risk for disease, stress, and premature death. Simply put, the health of my community was suffering, not because of people’s genetics, but because of their zip code. As a sophomore attending Spelman College, one of two historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) for women, I began studying public health issues and reflecting on my own health care experiences. At various points in my childhood, I had been without health insurance, received care at a local community health center, while covered by the Medicaid program, and had seen family members suffer and perish from preventable chronic conditions. It was through that reflection, and my educational experiences, that I first crafted my ambitious professional vision to improve the health of vulnerable U.S. communities and to become a national health care leader.

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Today, as vice president of social responsibility at UnitedHealthcare, my passion for improving health care infuses my efforts to lead the redefinition of care access and address the social determinants of health for communities across the country. Through UnitedHealthcare’s Empowering Health commitment, we strive to understand the challenges that exist for local communities, and have launched social-impact programs and initiatives to help transform the way we think about health, so that we fully consider the whole person. As I look into my future as a black female corporate leader, I gain deep inspiration from the many women I have encountered and watched from afar in my personal and my professional life, who have endured challenges and broken boundaries as they sought to push the possibilities. It will never be lost on me that women of color, in particular, throughout history have been undaunted by the unfinished fight for equality. I plan to use my voice to continue to advocate regarding the health inequalities that affect me deeply, and I am more committed than ever to drive community impact where it is needed most.

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Deborah Sterling, PhD Job Title: Director Education: JD, George Mason University School of Law; PhD, molecular and cellular physiology, University of Alberta; BSc first-class honours, biochemistry, Heriot-Watt University Company Name: Sterne, Kessler, Goldstein & Fox P.L.L.C. Industry: Legal Company CEO: Michael B. Ray, Managing Director Company Headquarters Location: Washington, DC Number of Employees: 347 Words you live by: It’s OK, nobody else knows what they are doing either. Personal Philosophy: Show up; be brave; be kind; rest; try again. What book are you reading: Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup, by John Carreyrou What was your first job: I worked the counter in a fish & chip shop Favorite charity: Lost Dog Rescue; Planned Parenthood Interests: Ceramics, running, mountain biking, and climbing Family: Wonderfully patient, supportive, funny husband; two fearless, loving, inspiring kids; and two rescue dogs, a rescue cat, and a hedgehog.

Own Your Inner Badass

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’d like to share the recent epiphany I had about being “badass.” I was flicking through my You’re a Badass calendar that a friend gave me. She told me that I am one, and that sometimes I need something to remind me—the calendar helps. But that got me thinking …. Why do we need to be reminded of our badassness? As women, often when we take on a new challenge—take that leap—negative thoughts of “What if I can’t…” run through our minds. They can quickly become overpowering and undermine our confidence. On the other hand, when we see other people achieve great things, we assume that that person has some ability that we don’t; we then pick ourselves apart based on our own insecurities. But what I’ve come to realize is that when I achieve great things, or even mediocre things, others think I am amazing. That came as a shock to me. I do my best with the tools I’ve got—my knowledge and experience. But sometimes, I feel like I’m winging it. Recently, I realized that I’m actually not winging it, I’m just a tad outside my comfort zone. I may be feeling insecure, but other people don’t know that.

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That was my epiphany; when I think someone has special abilities that let them achieve something amazing, they too may feel as exposed and vulnerable as I do. But they’re still trying new and scary things, and making it look effortless. Once I realized that, I began to use my epiphany to calm my swirling doubts and negative “what if ” scenarios by remembering what is true for almost everyone leaping into new challenges—you don’t know what is going to happen. By realizing that most of the time nobody else knows what they are doing either, and getting the courage to grab those new experiences, chase those new clients, take that new leadership role, and look like you’re a badass doing it (even if you think you are winging it), the leap gets a little easier. Today’s words of wisdom from my calendar are exactly on point: “Hurl yourself into the fire. Run face first toward your biggest fear. Take big, audacious action in the direction of your dreams, and don’t let the fact that you’re wetting your pants stop you.” That is badass, and I am too. And don’t forget, so are you.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Fiona Tan Job Title: SVP–U.S. Customer Technology Education: MS, computer science, Stanford University; BS, computer science and engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Company Name: Walmart Industry: Retail Company CEO: Doug McMillon Company Headquarters Location: Bentonville, Arkansas Number of Employees: 2.2 million Your Location: Sunnyvale, California Words you live by: Don’t make important decisions on an empty stomach Personal Philosophy: Be proactive. Challenge yourself, look for opportunities to learn and don’t be afraid to ask for help (nicely, of course) What book are you reading: An Art History: Europe 1300–1600 (course on Khan Academy) in preparation for an upcoming vacation What was your first job: Serving breakfast in the college cafeteria @$3.65/ hour. First nonpaid job: teaching tennis to 4 & 5 year olds in my dad’s junior tennis program Favorite charity: Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation; Children’s Miracle Network Interests: Tennis, running, and cooking Family: Daughter, Juliette (20), a rising senior engineering major at Harvey Mudd College, and son, Philip (16), a rising senior at Los Altos High School

The Key to Creating an Inclusive Future

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s the executive champion of Walmart’s partnerships with Girls Who Code, the Anita Borg Institute, and Path Forward, I am particularly passionate about encouraging more girls and women to consider a career in technology. The field of artificial intelligence (AI) continues to grow at a time when conversations around diversity are emerging. We’re still at an early enough stage in AI’s lifecycle that it’s not too late to begin talks around inclusion as part of the evolutionary process. There are so many amazing opportunities for women to get into this burgeoning field, to create exciting, new, and disruptive AI applications, and have an impact on the world at large—in industries, such as healthcare, manufacturing, energy, financial services, agriculture, and retail. Including women in the development of AI is not only important for business, but important for society. As technology becomes more ubiquitous, it is important that the people who are creating these technologies are representative of those who are using it. The gender gap starts early in STEM subjects. In high school, for instance, girls

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account for more than half of all Advanced Placement test-takers, but boys outnumber girls in computer science subject exams by a margin of four to one. At the university level, this imbalance continues; women only receive 18 percent of all computer science degrees and about 19 percent of engineering degrees. In the workforce, women occupy just 24 percent of the computing jobs. In order to ensure that AI is working toward the greater good for everyone, the female workforce developing AI applications needs to dramatically increase that 13.5 percent figure to something closer to 50 percent. There are ethical challenges ahead for AI developers, and luckily, we’re already asking the right questions. I’m proud to work in an environment that fosters equality, provides a voice for everyone, and encourages participation in this growing field. The key to creating an inclusive future, both in work and in life, is achieving diversity across careers in technology, so that we have a representative voice to shape the world of business.

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Megan Chacon Job Title: Principal Education: JD, Boston College Law School; BS, chemical engineering, University of Utah Company Name: Fish & Richardson Industry: Intellectual Property Law Company CEO: Peter J. Devlin Company Headquarters Location: N/A Number of Employees: 1,100 Your Location: San Diego, California Words you live by: Every day is another chance to do something great. Personal Philosophy: Always stretch and challenge yourself. That’s when growth happens. What book are you reading: Doing Justice: A Prosecutor’s Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law by Preet Bharara What was your first job: Sales associate at PacSun Favorite charity: Best Friends Animal Society Interests: Music and cooking

It’s Never Too Early to Mentor

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rofessional women have made great strides in advancing to the forefront of business and the law. We are leaders, we are powerful, and we have demonstrated time and again that we can generate results in fields traditionally dominated by men. But, we still have a long way to go. Part of the responsibility professional women have is not only being great at what we do, but also bringing the next generation of young female leadership with us to the top. One way we can accomplish this goal is by strengthening our commitment to mentorship. Mentoring young or inexperienced professionals is an investment in the future of our organizations and the success of the future workforce. It’s a way that we can influence the current culture of our organizations, and ensure that our workplace and our industry reflect our own values. We are all forging our own paths through the professional jungle, but not without the support of others. Along my journey, I have encountered new challenges—many of which have made me feel uncomfortable at the time and unsure of my ability to

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rise to the task. In those moments, my mentors have made all the difference in pushing me toward success. I have been, and continue to be, very fortunate to have mentors that take genuine interest in my growth as a patent litigator, the trajectory of my career, and my personal well-being and happiness. The next generation of young professional women is smart, tech savvy, and driven to succeed. But they will still need someone to show them the ropes, encourage them, and give them the tools needed to tackle the thorniest issues presented to them by clients or their organizations. That is why it is increasingly critical that female leadership commits to guiding junior women professionals toward success, and takes a larger role in “raising” the next generation of female leaders. The great thing is, it is never too early to start being someone’s mentor. As many of us continue our climb to the top, we have the opportunity to start making an impact by taking the time to guide those who come after us. Now is the time for all of us to pay it forward.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Jen Warne Krow Job Title: Senior Vice President, Chief Talent Officer Education: Bachelor of Arts, Temple University Company Name: Lincoln Financial Group Industry: Financial Services Company CEO: Dennis Glass Company Headquarters Location: Radnor, Pennsylvania Number of Employees: 10,000+ Words you live by: Trust your instincts. Personal Philosophy: See the best in others and ourselves. What book are you reading: Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup by John Carreyrou What was your first job: Recruiter with Towers Perrin (Now Willis Towers Watson) Favorite charity: Sarcoma Foundation of America Interests: Traveling with family and friends Family: Ethan (husband), Aidan (son), and Ashlyn (daughter)

Want to Succeed? Learn to Embrace Failure

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hen I think about the most successful people I’ve encountered, the one thing they have in common is that somewhere along the line they were willing to take on challenges where there was risk of failure. Failure is a building block to career success and to a fulfilling life. Granted, it’s not the ideal option. No one sets out to fail. But failure is something that everyone—especially women—must learn to embrace, with the recognition that the only real failure is not trying. Why embrace failure? For one thing, the pursuit of perfection is exhausting— and it can be detrimental to advancing your career. No risk, no reward. More important, fear of failure really does hold women back from realizing our full potential. When we question our capabilities, it can be immobilizing, resulting in complacency and preventing us from moving forward. Everyone fails. The difference between those who succeed and those who become crippled by a setback is that people who ultimately succeed know how to navigate that failure, learn from it, and improve. To best embrace and navigate your fear, do the following: • Look at failure through a different lens. If you expect perfection, failure is a lot

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

more likely. Instead, view failure as an opportunity to learn and develop. • Reflect on what’s really causing your fear. To address it, you need to understand it. And avoid the tendency to self-sabotage. • Scenario plan. Analyze the potential outcomes if things go wrong (worst case) and if things go right (best case). • Prepare for all the “what-ifs” you identified in your plan. • Take action. Do not procrastinate. • See feedback as a gift. Proactively seek out feedback. And, when you do receive feedback, see it as a gift and an opportunity to learn, not as failure. Full disclosure, I’m experiencing a healthy dose of discomfort as I type this. How will it be received? What will people think? It’s uncertain. What I do know is that I’m proud to work for a company that encourages me to take advantage of these opportunities, and there’s no doubt I’ll learn from my experience. Someone once said to me, you can certainly say no due to the fear of failure. But anything beyond no opens you up to a world of opportunities. Embrace failure. Go beyond no. There’s no telling where it will lead.

www.womenworthwatching.com

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Latriece Watkins Job Title: Senior Vice President, General Merchandising Manager Education: BA, political science, Spelman College; JD, University of Arkansas School of Law Company Name: Walmart Industry: Retail Company CEO: Doug McMillon Company Headquarters Location: Bentonville, Arkansas Number of Employees: 2.2 million Words you live by: “To whom much is given, much is required.” –Luke 12:48 Personal Philosophy: Act Up. What book are you reading: The Path Made Clear: Discovering Your Life’s Direction and Purpose by Oprah Winfrey What was your first job: Walmart—I started as an intern in the real estate group Favorite charity: Spellman College Interests: Tennis, writing, and being outdoors Family: Married, with a son (20) and a daughter (10)

I take leadership seriously; I believe there is power in the words you choose and matching actions you take.

Lessons in Leadership

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hen I joined Walmart more than 20 years ago as an intern in the real estate group, I knew I would learn a lot. But I never imagined just how many different roles I’d have, doing things I had never imagined. One constant, regardless of the role: the need to be a strong and authentic leader. I take leadership seriously; I believe there is power in the words you choose and matching actions you take. I hold myself to a high standard and am a constant learner. Each year, I capture and write down a leadership lesson from that year— one I know will make me a better leader. Regardless of what has happened, I only choose one, and I don’t allow myself to repeat lessons. I have one for each of my 20 years at Walmart. Here are few of these lessons: • Have Confidence in Your Decision: It sounds so simple, but it’s true that in order to get the support and confidence of others, you have to have confidence in yourself and in your own ideas.

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• Act Up: This means operating at least two levels above the job you have— how you communicate, the ability to articulate a clear vision. People will rarely elevate you to a role you haven’t demonstrated an ability to operate within. • Be Curious: It‘s easy to stay in your comfort zone. To grow as an individual and a strong leader, it’s important to seek out new information, meet new people, and generate new ideas. These are just some of the lessons that have not only helped me transform as a leader, but were key in helping to develop others and advance my career. For years, I have encouraged others to capture the good and bad lessons learned. It is one way of adding skills or tools to the leadership toolbox. Authenticity and leadership lessons are to be shared for personal growth and the development of others. Every generation of leaders can benefit from lessons already learned by others.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Susanne Schöneberg Job Title: Senior Director of Flexport.org Education: MB, University of California-Berkeley, Haas School of Business; BS, economics, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin Company Name: Flexport Industry: Logistics Company CEO: Ryan Petersen Company Headquarters Location: San Francisco, California Number of Employees: 1,110 Words you live by: “First principle: never let one’s self be beaten down by persons or by events.” –Marie Skłodowska Curie Personal Philosophy: No matter where you are on your journey, make sure to have your core values in your travel bag. Mine are appreciation and responsibility. What book are you reading: Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy by Cathy O’Neil What was your first job: Collecting roses from my parent’s garden and selling them on the street at the age of five; I’ve been taking on a variety of new opportunities ever since. Favorite charity: Delivering Good—an organization that collects new products from companies and distributes them to people affected by poverty and disaster (https://www.delivering-good.org/)

Good Business Makes for Great Careers

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hen deciding on career paths, people often pick “good work” for the world or “great careers” on paper. With Flexport.org, I carved out a niche that let me do good work I was passionate about without sacrificing career aspirations. During my time as a Flexport employee, I haven’t always been facilitating equitable trade or getting goods to people who need them most. As director of solutions, I coordinated the product development for the supply side of our business. But, throughout my time in this role, I had experiences that confirmed how valuable our technology was for solving social and environmental issues. This realization, paired with my previous experience as a counselor for children and young adults, made me wonder how Flexport could support humanitarian aid. At the end of 2016, Flexport partnered with a disaster relief nonprofit for the first time to bring medicine to Syrian refugees in Jordan and Turkey. After that experience, I started a small group that met to identify the ways that we, as a logistics technology company, could power social good through our business model. We piloted more programs and quickly gained traction. Flexport.org became an important

part of our company DNA and needed a committed full-time leader. While senior leadership was excited by this opportunity, there was some concern about me moving out of my position as director of solutions. I was personally concerned about what moving into the impact world would mean for my career. I asked myself, “Can I achieve professional success in a new, impact-centric venture? Or should I continue down a path with existing upward mobility?” Ultimately, I chose impact. I was passionate about it and knew it could drive business objectives like customer retention. Today, Flexport.org has gone from a passion project to a business unit with dedicated team members. Last year, our efforts helped offset more than 11,700 tons of carbon dioxide and unlock 20–25 percent in shipping savings for nonprofits. If you are passionate about creating an impact, it’s important to work with people and companies that recognize the value of good business, so your passion and professional ambitions can align. Without working on a topic that motivates me every day, I wouldn’t have been able to learn so much, so fast, and ultimately, be so successful. I am glad I followed my internal compass and would encourage everyone to do the same.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

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Crystal Williams Job Title: Chief Human Resources Officer Education: MBA, strategic management, The Wharton School at the The University of Pennsylvania; MA, human development, University of Maryland; BA, psychology, Davidson College Company Name: FLEETCOR Industry: Corporate payments Company CEO: Ron Clarke Company Headquarters Location: Peachtree Corners, Georgia Number of Employees: Approximately 8,000 Your Location: Atlanta, Georgia Words you live by: “Promise me you’ll always remember: you’re braver than you believe, and stronger than you seem, and smarter than you think.” (Christopher Robin to Pooh (Winnie-the-Pooh) –A.A. Milne Personal Philosophy: Be yourself, and always have the confidence to pursue your dreams! What was your first job: Human resources generalist at Cahners Publishing Favorite charity: Any charity that gives children the opportunity to thrive in this world of ours Interests: My family and volunteering (providing educational support, mentoring, and monetary support to organizations that support children) Family: Husband and children

Every Woman Needs a Senior Mentor

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any women have received the advice that, in order to advance their careers, they must work twice as hard as their male counterparts. However, following this adage does not always lead to senior positions and equal pay. Throughout my career in HR, I’ve seen that women who have strong advocates in the workplace not only grow, but are also empowered to reach back and pull others along with them. I believe that every woman should have a senior mentor in the workplace who can act as a sounding board, help navigate potential professional pitfalls, and assist with earning the proverbial “seat at the table.” I was fortunate to find an advocate in Judy Smith, whose career was the inspiration for ABC’s hit show Scandal (2012–2018). I first met Judy during my tenure at NBC, where she was the vice president of marketing and PR. I was relatively new to HR, and Judy was my client at the time. I was tasked with providing her with HR-related news so that she could control the external messaging. She quickly became my mentor. Over the years, she’s often shared her valuable perspective on what it’s like to be a woman—particularly an African American woman—in power, and

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how to set yourself up for success in industries that tend to be maledominated. Judy is far more than just a mentor, she was my sponsor. Sponsorship begins where mentorship ends. A mentor is someone who can give advice and guidance, but a sponsor actively helps promote a promising individual, even when he or she is not in the room. Judy not only gave me advice, but helped change the trajectory of my career by encouraging me to attend business school. She sponsored me by writing my business school recommendation, which gave me the confidence to further my education, which resulted in a step change in my career. It is imperative that we, as women, do not see one another as competition, but rather as supporters. We are strong individually, but together, we can push each other to new heights. At FLEETCOR, I often tell my team to use their resources wisely. This includes cultivating meaningful, mutually beneficial relationships. The result is a culture of collaboration that ultimately yields productivity, increased recruitment and retention, a more profitable business, and a pathway for many to achieve their version of the American dream.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Amandine Robin Job Title: Senior Vice President North America, Communications & Sustainability Education: Bachelor of Commerce Degree with honors, University of Ottawa, Canada and Reims Management School, France Company Name: Pernod Ricard Industry: Wine & Spirits Company CEO: Alexandre Ricard Company Headquarters Location: Paris, France (Pernod Ricard) and New York, New York (Pernod Ricard North America) Number of Employees: 18,500 Words you live by: You can achieve more than you think you can. Personal Philosophy: Anything is possible. What book are you reading: The Future of Management by Gary Hamel; Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg What was your first job: Event coordinator (internship, France) Favorite charity: Organizations that advocate for women in leadership Interests: Contemporary art, travel, reading, spending time with family, and shopping!! Family: My husband and I live in New York City, but my extended family is in France.

The Power of Female Role Models

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ur world would be a very different place with more diverse and female leaders in power. Complexity has exploded, and we need truly diverse leaders to connect with customers, consumers, and employees who today represent quite diverse backgrounds with distinct points of view. Our society needs leaders who manage without ego, invite collaboration, and prioritize achievement of the group over the individual. Female role models can help young women imagine what’s possible—whether reading about them in business or politics, seeing them on television or film, or experiencing them firsthand in the workplace. As a female leader on Pernod Ricard’s North America leadership team, I try to help other women by example and by offering the following advice: • Strive for balance. I make it a point to disconnect on weekends and vacations, and encourage my team to do the same. And, if work can be more easily accomplished outside of the office, great.

to the needs and expectations of our increasingly young and diverse workforce. • Trust your judgment. Don’t doubt your instincts because they’re different, or because you look different than the others seated at the table. Have faith in your thoughts and abilities. • Forget perfection. You don’t have to have all of the answers or fit the whole job description. You need only the confidence to pursue the opportunities you want and grow into them with time. • Find role models. One of my most valued role models is Vanessa Wright, Pernod Ricard’s VP of Sustainability and a longtime member of the group’s executive teams. I also admire Christine Lagarde, managing director of the International Monetary Fund, and Sheryl Sandberg of Facebook.

• Lead your way. Not all leaders are directive and tough; the world needs more managers who are attuned

I’m optimistic that we can become a better society with more diverse and female leaders in decision-making positions. I hope you’ll join me in looking to the role models of today and becoming the role models of tomorrow. It’s about time we make our voices heard and take our rightful seats at the table.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

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Christina McDonough Job Title: Principal Education: JD magna cum laude, Order of the Coif, Boston College Law School; BS, computer science and engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Company Name: Fish & Richardson Industry: Intellectual Property Law Company CEO: Peter J. Devlin Company Headquarters Location: N/A Number of Employees: 1,100 Your Location: Boston, Massachusetts Words you live by: Onwards and upwards! Personal Philosophy: When in doubt, just show up. What book are you reading: The Way of the Turtle by Curtis Faith What was your first job: Tennis instructor Favorite charity: Massachusetts Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Interests: Real estate, squash, and animal rescue Family: Love them!

I would encourage other women, whether they are junior attorneys or young executives, to be aggressive and passionate in seeking mentorship.

Find a Good Mentor Who Believes in You

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entorship has been invaluable throughout my career. I have been proactive in seeking out mentors and not simply waiting for great mentors to come to me. I have asked for help and asked questions. Lots of questions. I have been incredibly fortunate that the majority of my colleagues and peers have been gracious and generous enough to answer, to help, and to guide. I would encourage other women, whether they are junior attorneys or young executives, to be aggressive and passionate in seeking mentorship. For me—and for many of the most successful women I know—mentors have been both men and women. In a perfect world, every woman would have a strong female mentor and role model. But the reality is men still hold more positions of power than women, and women can benefit from male mentors and leaders who support their rise to the top. At the end of the day, having

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a good mentor who believes in you is what matters most. That being said, I do think it is important—and incredibly rewarding—to also have female mentorship, when it is organic and synergistic. Women face some unique challenges and hurdles. We need to support and mentor each other. For example, as a junior attorney, I was counseled by one of my female partners that I needed to do a better job in terms of “self-promotion”—both internally and externally. She told me that I was talented with an enormous skill set, but I had to let other people know this “… because if you don’t tell them, no one else will.” This is true. I took this to heart, and am eternally grateful for her advice. I think it is especially important for women, as oftentimes self-promotion may not come naturally to us—or to anyone really. Seek out mentors, male and female. It is important beyond words.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Amber L. Ahles Job Title: Senior Project Manager/Branch Manager Education: BS, civil engineering (minor in music), Worcester Polytechnic Institute Company Name: GEI Consultants, Inc. Industry: Engineering Consultants Company CEO: Ron Palmieri Company Headquarters Location: Woburn, Massachusetts Number of Employees: 801 Your Location: Cary, North Carolina Words you live by: Everything happens for a reason. Personal Philosophy: Do not let others define you, especially what success looks like to you. What book are you reading: Mindset by Carol Dweck; Crazy Rich Asians Trilogy by Kevin Kwan What was your first job: Babysitting; first job with a W2, front desk clerk at a hotel in the Catskills Favorite charity: Susan G. Komen Interests: Yoga, travel, cooking, and skiing Family: Husband, Daniel, and 2 crazy cats, Andre and Sadie

You Can Engineer a Great Career

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ot every engineering class, project, or construction trailer meeting was easy, but it never deterred me. At one of my first jobs out of college, I was told on numerous occasions I was too young, women were not supposed to be in construction, and I would never succeed in the AEC (architecture, engineering, and construction) world. I’d say that I have proved the naysayers wrong, and I have succeeded by finding my own voice and my own path. After all, I was told from a very young age that I could be anything I wanted when I grew up! I have been fortunate to have several female role models in my career. Each has provided me with different skills and no two have been alike. They have made me a better people manager and project manager through lessons of hard work, dedication, empathy, perseverance, and sometimes even failure. They took the time and guided me, but also expected me to put in the effort for every project, every promotion, and every role I have earned. I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention that some of my biggest supporters have been male senior leaders. I am currently a senior leader at GEI, and I think it’s just as important to show young women, as well

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

as young men, strong female leaders. We must all work together toward common workplace goals and career growth. Diverse teams generate leaders with the qualities you want to exemplify—dedication, hard work, and trustworthiness. I believe it’s important to have female role models so younger colleagues, regardless of gender, can envision themselves as engineers, construction managers, and scientists. We must continue to empower the next generation to grow into the leaders of tomorrow! We can succeed and excel on the roads that have been less traveled, but we have to choose to take those roads. We must believe in ourselves, create our own individual paths, strive for those goals and leadership positions that we think are out of reach, and most important, empower each other, no matter the obstacles. Bumps along the way only make us better. We must be strong, dedicated, and compassionate mentors to lead the next generation to their greatest potential, just as my role models prepared me and are still guiding me. Promoting diversity in leadership roles is vital to workplace growth and success. I am proud to play my part.

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Kristin D. Sostowski Job Title: Director, Employment & Labor Law Department; Leader, Higher Education Team Education: JD, Harvard Law School; BA with high honors, Swarthmore College Company Name: Gibbons P.C. Industry: Legal Company CEO: Patrick C. Dunican Jr., Chairman & Managing Director Company Headquarters Location: Newark, New Jersey Number of Employees: 295 Words you live by: “Deeds, not words.” –Emmeline Pankhurst Personal Philosophy: Lift as you climb. What book are you reading: Ruth Bader Ginsburg: A Life by Jane Sherron De Hart What was your first job: Day camp counselor Favorite charity: Community FoodBank of New Jersey Interests: Running, cooking, and my three daughters' activities Family: Spouse: Steve Herbes; Children: Catherine (14), Madeline (11), Sophie (8).

The Powerful Influence of My “Sisters in Law”

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n 1899, when American women could not vote, attend most law schools, or join the American Bar Association, 16 New York women attorneys founded the Women Lawyers Club, forging a sisterhood to support one another’s professional advancement and the rights of all women under the law. The Women Lawyers Club is now known as the National Association of Women Lawyers (NAWL), and I’m honored to serve as its president for 2019–2020. When I joined NAWL in 2007, my career challenges paled in comparison to those of our founding mothers, yet this powerful network has proven no less important in my career, lifting me up and pushing me forward at every critical juncture. As an associate attorney, I relied on more seasoned NAWL members to help ensure that I was on track for professional success, including partnership, and they helped me shape my plans to get there. In 2011, when I was a new Gibbons partner and mom of three daughters, the youngest only 4 months old, I was invited to join NAWL’s board. NAWL’s then-president never contemplated for a second that the timing would not be right for me. With the boost of her confidence in me, I stepped up to a leadership role,

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becoming the youngest member of NAWL’s board. My fellow NAWL members became great supporters in every area of my life. This included sharing their visions for making our profession more diverse and inclusive, dropping everything to take my calls when I faced professional challenges, and opening doors to new business opportunities. Recently published research shows that the powerful influence of my NAWL “sisters in law” in my career is not unique and should be replicated to advance greater numbers of women into leadership roles. A Harvard Business Review article, citing research by Brian Uzzi, Yang Yang, and Nitesh V. Chawla (“Men and Women Need Different Kinds of Networks to Succeed,” Brian Uzzi, February 2019), explains that women in particular benefit from close professional networks of female contacts to navigate career challenges and advance professionally, especially if their inner circle’s members are closely connected to one another, but have minimal overlapping contacts. In industries such as law, where women continue to have too few opportunities for sponsorship, the kind of peer network that NAWL provides is all the more critical to women’s advancement and leadership.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Christina D. Brown-Marshall, PhD Job Title: Principal Education: JD, Stanford Law School; PhD, chemistry, Stanford University; BS summa cum laude, chemistry, Phi Beta Kappa, University of Kentucky Company Name: Fish & Richardson Industry: Intellectual Property Law Company CEO: Peter J. Devlin Company Headquarters Location: N/A Number of Employees: 1,100 Your Location: Atlanta, Georgia Words you live by: You catch more flies with honey than with vinegar. Personal Philosophy: Always treat people well. Invest in other people’s success and seek out people who will invest in your success. Be brave and proactive when you see an opportunity for growth. What book are you reading: The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin (It is a great story about family ties and the agency people have in determining their fate.) What was your first job: I worked at a telemarketing research firm, conducting telephone surveys. Favorite charity: Kids In Need of Defense (KIND) Interests: Politics, running, yoga, and University of Kentucky basketball Family: My husband, our four-year-old son, and our dog (a Bouviepoo)

Instead of focusing on powerful female role models, I think it is more important to find a diverse group of accessible mentors to help guide your career.

We Also Need Everyday Mentors

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owerful female role models are important as inspirational examples of the great things women can achieve, but admiring these role models from afar can create a distorted sense of what it takes to get to their positions. If you only see these women from a distance, they can appear to be superheroes, which can make you doubt how you, a mere mortal, could ever make it to that position. You need to get to know these women to learn about the challenges they overcame to make it to where they are. However, it can be difficult if everyone is trying to gain access to the same small number of powerful women. Instead of focusing on powerful female role models, I think it is more important to find a diverse group of accessible mentors to help guide your career. In addition to people who inspire you, you need to find people who have some amount of additional experience

that they can share with you. You need both people who have reached senior positions and people closer to your position who can share advice from the vantage point of having recently been in where you are now. You also need someone who can serve as a publicist or champion to help promote your work within the organization and open doors for you. Finally, you need peers who can be sounding boards, and a sanity check, when life gets challenging. Establishing groups of accessible mentors is also advantageous because you do not have to wait until you have achieved “role model” status to start influencing the careers of the women around you. All of us can identify women who are junior to us, and actively find ways to provide advice and share our experience with them as they establish their careers. In this way, we can create a community that supports women at all levels of their careers.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

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Martha A. Sabol Job Title: Co-Chair, Gaming Practice; Co-Chair, Global Women's Initiative Education: JD cum laude, Loyola University Chicago School of Law; BS, University of New Hampshire Company Name: Greenberg Traurig, LLP Industry: Legal Company CEO: Brian L. Duffy Company Headquarters Location: N/A Number of Employees: 4,049 Your Location: Chicago, Illinois Words you live by: Be so good they can’t ignore you. Personal Philosophy: I create and am responsible for my own destiny. What was your first job: Waitress at Howard Johnson’s in Concord, New Hampshire Favorite charity: Susan G. Komen Interests: Traveling, walking, and the beach Family: Husband, Rick Sabol, amazing daughter, Kathryn Sabol, two big and protective brothers, Mark and Matt, and a village of great girlfriends who I call my sisters

You Can Follow Your Own Path to Success

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y best career advice would be to let what excites and interests you define your “career path.” A large issue for women—and men, frankly—is that in our careers we think we are unable to change direction. In reality, our careers are a journey and we are making the map. My first career was in contract outsourcing for the healthcare industry. While I was successful, I left my position to pursue a JD at the age of 36—talk about a change in direction! After graduating, my hat as an attorney would change a handful of times. It was through my experience as in-house counsel for Hyatt Gaming that I envisioned the role I have at GT today as co-chair of its Gaming Practice—creating a practice that can advise gaming clients in virtually every jurisdiction in which they are operating. Building a business community where we can share experiences and encourage others at any career stage is critical to enabling each of us to take the next step or chase a dream. It is helpful to have a support system that inspires you and hears you—especially for women. For me, having

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business experience and going to school a bit later in life has made all the difference in my success as an attorney. However, that is my path. As co-chair of Greenberg Traurig's Women's Initiative, we encourage women (and men) to share their experiences through the support and creation of local and national programming, professional and client development, and mentoring. Through the Women’s Initiative, in 2017, we launched the Good 2 Great coaching program, which provides up-and-coming women leaders at GT with individual and group coaching. The idea behind this, as with all our programming, is to expose our attorneys to as many perspectives and “career paths” as possible. You are making your map, but with support every step of the way. The program was so successful it’s in its second year. We can have it all, especially women. Embrace change and believe in your ability to accomplish whatever may lie ahead of you. Be comfortable delegating and don’t feel like you have to do it all to be successful. Share your story—build your support team and rely on it. It will take you where you need to go, I know mine did.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


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Leaders. Visionaries. Trailblazers. Greenberg Traurig congratulates our own Martha A. Sabol and G. Michelle Ferreira on their recognition as “Women Worth Watching” along with women everywhere who have made significant contributions to their professions. Their commitment has not only earned them well-deserved respect as leaders, but has also allowed them to positively impact their communities for generations to come.

ALBANY | AMSTERDAM | ATLANTA | AUSTIN | BOCA RATON | BOSTON | CHICAGO | DALLAS | DELAWARE DENVER | FORT LAUDERDALE | GERMANY¬ | HOUSTON | LAS VEGAS | LONDON* | LOS ANGELES | MEXICO CITY+ MIAMI | MILAN>> | MINNEAPOLIS | NASHVILLE | NEW JERSEY | NEW YORK | NORTHERN VIRGINIA | ORANGE COUNTY | ORLANDO PHILADELPHIA | PHOENIX | SACRAMENTO | SAN FRANCISCO | SEOUL∞ | SHANGHAI | SILICON VALLEY | TALLAHASSEE TAMPA | TEL AVIV^ | TOKYO¤ | WARSAW~ | WASHINGTON, D.C. | WEST PALM BEACH | WESTCHESTER COUNTY

G R E E N B E R G T R A U R I G , L L P | AT T O R N E Y S AT L AW | W W W. G T L AW. C O M The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our qualifications and our experience. Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome. Greenberg Traurig is a service mark and trade name of Greenberg Traurig, LLP and Greenberg Traurig, P.A. ©2019 Greenberg Traurig, LLP. Attorneys at Law. All rights reserved. Attorney Advertising. Contact: Martha A. Sabol in Chicago at 312.456.8400 or G. Michelle Ferreira in San Francisco at 415.655.1300 and in Silicon Valley at 650.328.8500. °These numbers are subject to fluctuation. ¬Greenberg Traurig’s Berlin office is operated by Greenberg Traurig Germany, an affiliate of Greenberg Traurig, P.A. and Greenberg Traurig, LLP. *Operates as a separate UK registered legal entity. +Operates as Greenberg Traurig, S.C. >>Greenberg Traurig’s Milan office is operated by Greenberg Traurig Santa Maria, an affiliate of Greenberg Traurig, P.A. and Greenberg Traurig, LLP. ∞Operates as Greenberg Traurig LLP Foreign Legal Consultant Office. ^Operates as a branch of Greenberg Traurig, P.A., Florida, USA. ¤Greenberg Traurig Tokyo Law Offices are operated by GT Tokyo Horitsu Jimusho, an affiliate of Greenberg Traurig, P.A. and Greenberg Traurig, LLP. ~Greenberg Traurig’s Warsaw office is operated by Greenberg Traurig Grzesiak sp.k., an affiliate of Greenberg Traurig, P.A. and Greenberg Traurig, LLP. 32872

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

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Ileen Gladstone Job Title: Senior Vice President Education: MS, civil engineering, University of Massachusetts, Amherst; BS, civil engineering, Cooper Union Company Name: GEI Consultants, Inc. Industry: Engineering Consultants Company CEO: Ron Palmieri Company Headquarters Location: Woburn, Massachusetts Number of Employees: 801 Words you live by: “Don't sweat the small stuff…” –Richard Carlson Personal Philosophy: Figure out what is important for work, family and yourself, and get that done. What book are you reading: Normal People by Sally Rooney What was your first job: Working as a waitress on the graveyard shift at Howard Johnson’s Favorite charity: WTS-Boston Charitable Fund, supports public art celebrating women in transportation Interests: Working out, cycling, hiking, movies, and jigsaw puzzles Family: Two sons, 26 and 22

The Power of Networking

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or almost 35 years, I have worked as an environmental engineer and consultant in what has been traditionally known as the male-dominated industry of Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC). Early on in my career, I’d often find myself the only woman in the room. But this has been changing over the years as more women have been encouraged into diverse careers, including STEM, and have been entering the AEC industry. At a recent eight-person meeting, I chuckled to myself when there was only one man at the table! Advancing my career at GEI required me to generate new clients and business. I found much of that success through women’s professional organizations and their connections. I met clients, peers, and future employees, and developed lifelong friendships that helped me along the way. Find those connections that will grow your career. Remember that strong ties with peers early on in your career will stay with you through the long term. These networks are great resources for the exchange of advice and key information, which is crucial for career advancement. Women’s networks can also help develop selfconfidence and establish your expertise.

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Look for opportunities to promote your expertise, such as speaking opportunities and publications, while participating in professional activities. Use the skills learned to network up, not only within those organizations, but also in other professional organizations with powerful colleagues or superiors. Network up to promote yourself, but also network down to inspire and uplift others. Inside GEI, as one of the senior women in the firm, I have tried to encourage, promote, and mentor younger women. Work to create new opportunities for women who aspire to lead, recognize their achievements, and challenge them to take risks that will benefit not only individuals, but also the organization. Provide natural mentoring and develop strong relationships with staff to support their advancement. Encourage your colleagues’ self-confidence, and make sure they know they have earned their successes. The advancement of women over the years is attributable to many factors, but we would not be where we are today without women supporting women. I can’t say it enough times: creating, nurturing, and promoting women’s networks are critical to your personal success and career advancement.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Martha J. Nahil Frahm Job Title: Director; Co-Chair, Tax Group Education: JD cum laude, Boston University School of Law; LLM, Boston University School of Law; BA, Tufts University Company Name: Goulston & Storrs Industry: Legal Company CEO: Martin M. Fantozzi and William H. Dillon, Co-Managing Directors Company Headquarters Location: Boston, Massachusetts Number of Employees: 402 Words you live by: You are only as good as your word. Treat others as you would wish to be treated. Personal Philosophy: It costs absolutely nothing to show kindness and it pays huge dividends. There is a sign in my kids’ elementary school that says: “Before you speak, ask yourself, is it true, necessary, and kind.” What book are you reading: Rogue Heroes by Ben Macintyre; Hedy’s Folly by Richard Rhodes What was your first job: Pharmacy clerk Favorite charity: The Lazarus House in Lawrence, Massachusetts Interests: Swimming, reading on the beach, gardening, and cooking and enjoying food with family and friends Family: Married, with kids

Be Generous with Your Time

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here is much discussion and focus today in the legal profession on increasing diversity and inclusion in private law firms, and rightly so. This awareness is reflected in firms creating affinity groups and various committees whose missions are to elevate awareness of unconscious bias, and gender and minority disparities. All of the resources and commitments that firms are investing in these institutional macro-level endeavors are a sign of a promising cultural and value shift that bodes well. Yet, no employer can afford to rest on their laurels after establishing these initiatives and committees to address a lack of diversity and inclusion. They are only a first step in creating a meaningful, sustainable shift. Personal day-to-day investment in the individual is an often overlooked element in attracting and retaining diverse employees. Hard work and being a “high-achiever” only takes one so far; team work and the ability to build and leverage relationships and critical in diverse talent development and retention. If we are committed to building a diverse and inclusive workplace, we need to demonstrate the power of leveraging relationships to create a

feeling of belonging and being valued. Building and modeling those relationships takes generosity of time and care. In looking back on my own development, it was the informal mentoring, friendship, care, and support that I received on a day-to-day basis, not just from my friends and family, but also from my colleagues that made a difference to me. It was the day-to-day generosity of people who gave their time to get to know me as a person, and to mentor and guide me, which enabled me to identify, evaluate, and take advantage of the opportunities that arose. Their generosity made me feel like a valued member of the group. Although my experience is anecdotal, in my role as co-chair of my firm’s Attorney Development Committee, which oversees the professional development and mentoring of associates and “off-track” attorneys, I have observed the feeling of being “included” as a necessary element in the development and retention of all attorneys, and especially attorneys from diverse backgrounds. I believe the best way we can all continue to promote diversity and inclusion is to extend the same generosity to others as we were fortunate enough to have received—or wish we had received.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

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Pamela M. MacKenzie Job Title: Director; Co-Chair, Corporate Group Education: JD cum laude, Order of the Coif, Boston College Law School; BA, Williams College Company Name: Goulston & Storrs Industry: Legal Company CEO: Martin M. Fantozzi and William H. Dillon, Co-Managing Directors Company Headquarters Location: Boston, Massachusetts Number of Employees: 402 Words you live by: Enjoy the little things; one day you may look back and realize they were the big things. Personal Philosophy: Don’t judge. You don’t walk in anyone else’s shoes. What book are you reading: Strength in What Remains: A Journey of Remembrance and Forgiveness by Tracy Kidde What was your first job: Selling concessions at an auction house in the Berkshires Favorite charity: The Fatherhood Project (MGH) and YouthBuild USA Interests: Making great breakfasts, photography, New England sports teams, board games with my boys, and craft beer Family: In addition to two wonderful teenage boys, I am lucky to live with my mom.

Remove the Stigma and Start the Conversation

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am proud and very lucky to work at a law firm that is full of broad-minded women and men who embrace inclusion and diversity. But… That doesn’t mean that there isn’t still work to be done, work for us all to do, in creating an environment in which every person experiences acceptance. In part, it is about each of us becoming more self-aware. Recently, our entire firm engaged in a series of inclusion, unconscious bias, and diversity seminars. The most important outcome of the sessions was a collective learning that unconscious bias is natural and not borne of intentional bigotry or ill will. You could palpably feel that once people began to hear this and accept it, the conversation changed. It became much more open, frank, and real. People were willing to admit to having certain ideas or biases that they were not previously aware of and certainly weren’t willing to own in public. There was a buzz in the lunchroom and at the hallway desks and in offices about the stories shared. We were all talking together—legal assistants, associates, paralegals, administrative leaders and staff, and partners.

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We had successfully set a baseline for the conversation of bias, and it made us realize together that we could do better. The revelatory lesson for me was that in a very good, supportive environment, where we believe we treat each other with respect, it is easy to miss that the experience is not the same for all. It is easy to fail to recognize the hard issues that do exist. Beginning, and then deepening, the conversation about unconscious bias is an imperative for all of us, and a first step, but a meaningful one, to breaking down unspoken barriers and creating true inclusion. So be a champion of dialogue. Don’t be afraid to delve in together, as women, as colleagues of color, as LGBTQ individuals, as men, as anything you hold dear that speaks to who you are. Talk about the unconscious bias we each bring to the table from all directions. If we open up and expand understanding one person at a time, we will be the change that we need in all of our respective organizations. Do not let the need for change get lost in the often right belief that you work in a good place with good and decent colleagues. Both can be true.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


G. Michelle Ferreira Job Title: Co-Managing Shareholder, San Francisco Office; Co-Managing Shareholder, Silicon Valley Office Education: JD, Santa Clara University School of Law; BS, University of California at Davis Company Name: Greenberg Traurig, LLP Industry: Legal Company CEO: Brian L. Duffy Company Headquarters Location: N/A Number of Employees: 4,049 Your Location: San Francisco & Silicon Valley Words you live by: Treat others as you wish to be treated. Personal Philosophy: Life is a gift. It’s easy to get lost in moving to next level but in doing so you forget to appreciate what is happening in the present. As I age, I have to be mindful to try to focus on and appreciate the present. Life is so much more fulfilling this way. What book are you reading: Courting Mr. Lincoln by Louis Bayard What was your first job: Blackjack dealer at Harrah’s Lake Tahoe Favorite charity: Planned Parenthood, the ACLU, and the Justice and Diversity Board of San Francisco Interests: Rowing, skiing, and Porsches Family: My son, Ryan (age 20), and my husband, Paul, are my world.

We All Need Strong Role Models

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hen I went to law school, law firm leadership was not my goal. I simply wanted to try cases and write passionate and persuasive briefs. Today, as a managing shareholder of global law firm Greenberg Traurig’s San Francisco and Silicon Valley offices, and a member of the firm’s executive committee, I’m thrilled and honored to be in a leadership role. That is in large part because I have the opportunity to help break barriers that women in the legal profession face. When I chose to leave my job in government (I was a trial lawyer at the IRS) and enter private practice, I wanted a firm that valued diversity. Greenberg Traurig instantly stood out as a firm that fostered a diverse environment because of the gender make up of partners and associates, the actions and words of leadership, and its unique history. The firm’s founders formed Greenberg Traurig in 1967 because they could not get legal positions because they were Jewish. Their empathy towards historically disadvantaged groups was one of the reasons I joined the firm. Throughout my career, powerful female role models have been important to me, as have male role models. Upon entering private practice, I had the same con-

cerns of young women today: “How will I manage a family and advance in a law firm? Will I see my children or will they be cared for by a nanny? Will I receive career building cases or will those be given to the men? Will men value my opinion? Do I have what it takes to be a mother and a partner in a law firm?” I grappled with these insecurities, but the faith and trust I received from men and women alike helped me quickly advance in my career. Women need strong role models, male and female, throughout their careers. Firms need to show their commitment to diversity in the workplace by expanding relationships with diversity organizations, offering flexible work-life career paths, implementing inclusive succession plans, working with diverse attorneys to design career advancement plans, introducing diverse attorneys to major clients, and formalizing diversity plans that include accountability and training. The obstacles women face in the legal profession are still present, but I am encouraged things are changing for the better. I believe my own career is proof— having women in positions of leadership proves to junior, diverse lawyers the firm’s commitment to gender diversity for staff, lawyers, firm vendors, and clients.

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Rachel Hayden A GEI Company

Job Title: Vice President Education: BS, civil engineering, Texas A&M University Company Name: Hayden Consultants, Inc. (A GEI Company) Industry: Engineering Company CEO: Ron Palmieri Company Headquarters Location: Boston, Massachusetts Number of Employees: 900 Your Location: Dallas, Texas Words you live by: Keep your word. What book are you reading: Dare to Lead by Brené Brown What was your first job: Snack bar at swimming pool Favorite charity: Nexus Recovery Center, Inc., Dallas, Texas Interests: Playing guitar, travel, and gardening Family: Husband, David (married 27 years); Children: Alexandra (age 24) & Carter (age 21)

Things Have Changed So Much since Mad Men

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bout 10 years ago, when my daughter was 14, she and I were watching the first episode of Mad Men together. For those of you unfamiliar with Mad Men, it is a series about advertising executives in Manhattan in the ’50s and ’60s. As you can imagine, the way women were treated in an office environment in that era was appalling to my 14-year-old daughter. When I said something about how much I enjoyed the show, my daughter was incredulous. She could not believe that I actually liked a program with such blatant sexism. I explained that to her that those women who braved the office environment in that era played a part in paving the way for me to have the rewarding professional career that I have. We owe a tremendous debt of gratitude to them, and that program made me appreciate how far we have come. That said, having spent my entire 30-year career as a professional in the male-dominated field of engineering, I have experienced gender bias from both men and woman. Charlotte Whitton’s famous quote, “Whatever women do they must do twice as well

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as men to be thought half as good,” has held true at certain times in my career. As a young engineer I remember preparing for meetings and knowing that my colleagues would not take me seriously if I did not show them that I had technical mastery of the subject I was presenting. My male counterparts did not feel that same pressure. But times have changed, and I have seen a shift in that mindset. I started my own engineering firm 19 years ago, and I am proud to say that over 50 percent of our 40 employees are women. I would like to take credit for this but it was not an intentional effort on my part; the majority of the women at my company approached me and were the most qualified candidates for the positions I had available. I believe that people gravitate toward supervisors they can relate to. They see a woman who happens to be an engineer, a business owner, a mom, and a wife, and maybe those are all roles that they have or would like to have. I always strive to be that positive role model for future generations of both men and women in engineering and business.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Grace Vandecruze Job Title: Managing Director Education: MBA, finance, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania; BBA, accounting, Pace University Company Name: Grace Global Capital, LLC Industry: Consulting Company CEO: Grace Vandecruze Company Headquarters Location: New York, New York Number of Employees: 3 Words you live by: Passion, impact, inspiration, and gratitude Personal Philosophy: The Time for Courage is now. Courage is climbing a mountain of fear and knowing that your footsteps will leave a legacy of inspiration, empowerment, and achievement. What book are you reading: AI Superpowers: China, Silicon Valley and the New World Order by Kai-Fu Lee What was your first job: Financial auditor at EY Favorite charity: Cristo Rey New York Corporate Work Study Program Interests: Mountain climbing, hiking, classical piano, and travel Family: Second of seven children and third of 52 grandchildren

A Seat at the Table

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here is a Chinese proverb which states, “Women hold up half the sky,” and it certainly resonates in 2019. We account for almost 85 percent of financial decisions. It is expected that $30 trillion of wealth will be transferred to women in the next three to four decades. Also, women are a major driving force of the $2 trillion insurance industry. We comprise over 60 percent of the workforce. However, in the leadership ranks, and specifically the boardroom, women occupy only 19 percent of board seats, the lowest of any industry. In August 2015, I was appointed as the first woman, and first African American director, of a major insurance company. I earned my seat, having advised over $5 billion of insurance acquisition and capital raising transactions. It was a Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner moment. The boardroom is a vital leadership frontier, where the seats at the table have long been reserved largely for white men. As the financial services industry undergoes a most dramatic technology transformation, progress toward gender parity and diversity remains painfully slow. Even if we doubled the rate of women on the boards at this pace, it would take 40 years to reach parity.

Therefore, the business imperatives for diversity are compelling. Studies consistently demonstrate that diversity significantly improves innovation, decision making, and financial results. Diverse boards perform better because they mirror their customer and client bases. In a world where companies are working to enhance employee engagement, a diverse board sends a signal to women employees that company diversity programs are meaningful and have advanced beyond public relations platitudes. I am honored to sit on two insurance company boards. It is my deep belief and conviction that I should continue to use my voice and vote to appoint women to board seats, whenever the opportunity arises. As Maya Angelou stated, “I come as one, but I stand as 10,000 to the 10th power.” Every time I step into the boardroom, I bring the goals and aspirations of the many qualified, talented women leaders with diverse expertise. I sit on the advisory board of Diverst, which provides the software and tools to enable corporations to further their diversity goals. Now is the time to expand the depth and breadth of expertise of our boards to better reflect the driving force in the insurance industry and beyond.

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Maly Bernstein Job Title: Vice President, Beauty and Personal Care Education: MBA, Harvard Business School Company Name: CVS Health Industry: Health care Company CEO: Larry J. Merlo Company Headquarters Location: Woonsocket, Rhode Island Number of Employees: 295,000 Your Location: West Newton, Massachusetts Words you live by: What if …? Personal Philosophy: Dream. Dare. Deliver. What book are you reading: If I Built a House by Chris Van Dusen What was your first job: I started my retail career in the book industry, and as a result I learned early, “it’s not the product you sell, but the story you tell.” Favorite charity: Various educational institutions Interests: Playing outdoors, exploring, cooking, reading, and building with my guys Family: Married to the person who inspires me most, Ethan Bernstein, and together we have two boys (or balls of energy!)

#mompower

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hen you Google the definition of “man•pow•er,” you get “the number of people working or is available for work or service.” Building on that definition, I believe in “mom•pow•er”—that is, the number of mothers working in executive positions and actively raising multiple children and proudly championing their partner’s careers and, in some cases, still finding the energy to volunteer and, in other cases, still finding time for themselves and somehow still finding a way to rinse and repeat! And, I believe that the world could benefit from more of us. Why? Because mothers in executive positions can meaningfully shape the culture, set the bar for productivity, and diversify the ideas at work to describe a few of the ways we can impact growth. • Culture: When I took an extended maternity leave for my second child and breastfed for a little over a year while working, I agonized about what my intermittent presence would do to my team’s engagement. Instead, it soared. My team shared that one of the reasons they were so much happier at work was because my commitment to family and work liberated all of the mothers and fathers to prioritize their personal and professional needs as well. Our team now proudly declares that we come to work for our customers,

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our shareholders, and our families; and we treat each other like family too. It’s a much more empathetic workplace as a result. • Productivity: My mother-in-law once asked me, “How do you survive being the first one up (to take care of the baby) and the last one to bed (to complete work) at home?” America might run on Dunkin’®, I run on love. Love for my family and my work. I carry over a similar devotion, a similar pride, a similar set of aspirations for my kids and for my husband into my job. This positive energy helps me believe anything is possible—and a lot is possible. I am both overwhelmed and inspired by all that working mothers are able to accomplish. • Ideas: My boys teach me every day to be more patient, listen better, and appreciate and run with their ideas, including co-creating Halloween costumes like an astronaut in a rocket. They also challenge me to get more creative with my own ideas. What if…? They continually ask. What if...? We continually ask. Like Helen in the Incredibles 2 movie, let’s aim for more heroines who are moms! #mompower #reallifeheroes @ cvspharmacy

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Jennifer Furey Job Title: Director; Co-Chair, Litigation Group Education: JD cum laude, Boston College Law School; BA summa cum laude, Providence College Company Name: Goulston & Storrs Industry: Legal Company CEO: Martin M. Fantozzi and William H. Dillon, Co-Managing Directors Company Headquarters Location: Boston, Massachusetts Number of Employees: 402 Words you live by: “Be brave and be kind.” –Cinderella (film) Personal Philosophy: “Shoot for the moon. Even if you miss, you will land among the stars.” –Norman Vincent Peale “Don’t complain that rose bushes have thorns; rejoice that thorns have roses.” – Alphonse Karr (paraphrase) What book are you reading: Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens What was your first job: Assistant tennis instructor Favorite charity: The Women’s Bar Foundation, which is dedicated to ensuring access to justice for low-income women. I am proud to serve as the president of the WBF Board of Trustees. Interests: Tennis, golf, and skiing Family: My husband, Alex; and my children, Sam (16) and Kate (13)

Your Bravery Can Lead to Your Success

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mantra that I often repeat to my teenage children is this: “Be brave and be kind.” Straight from the modern movie version of Cinderella, it is the advice imparted to Cinderella by her mother immediately before her mother passed away. In my experience, compassion comes naturally to most women. I also believe that women are naturally brave in a lot of areas in their lives. However, numerous sources report that women take fewer career risks than their male counterparts, and a fear of failure often plays a role in that phenomenon. A friend of mine who is an executive at an elite private high school recently told me that while she was serving on the hiring committee for a new school athletic director, she noted an interesting gender trend. Specifically, she noticed that the female candidates uniformly met all of the stated job qualifications, while all of the underqualified candidates were male. Despite being underqualified, the male candidates were willing to take a risk that something on their resume would resonate with the committee and help them secure the position. I like to think that I have an entrepre-

neurial spirit and, as a result, am willing to take on more risk. However, like many women, I simultaneously hear a voice in my head warning me of failure and encouraging a less risky path. The times in my life when I have ignored that voice and embraced an opportunity for which I was not an obvious fit have been the most rewarding. A few years ago, I was asked to appear as a legal correspondent on a live television sports show. I love to play and watch sports, but as my teenage son would confirm, my knowledge of sports is not extensive. In addition, many of the legal issues presented on the show were criminal in nature, and my expertise is in intellectual property and commercial litigation. And, most important, I had no television experience whatsoever. Nonetheless, I convinced myself to give it a try. Fighting through nerves before the first show, I found that I really enjoyed the experience—so much so that I served as the show’s regular legal correspondent for over a year. Although the role did not directly alter my career, it did serve as an important personal lesson, further confirming that being brave can lead to unexpected and rewarding opportunities.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

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Elise Eidemiller Job Title: Managing Director, Account Management & Canada Education: Bachelor of Arts, international studies, Rhodes College Company Name: HireRight Industry: Pre-employment background screening Company CEO: Guy Abramo Company Headquarters Location: Irvine, California Number of Employees: 3,000+ Your Location: Boston, Massachusetts Words you live by: Success is the result of hard work, persistence, and learning from experience. Personal Philosophy: Your mountain is waiting, so get on your way. What book are you reading: Principles: Life and Work by Ray Dalio What was your first job: Intern at the Idaho Dept of Commerce, International Trade Division Favorite charity: Habitat for Humanity Interests: Hiking, mountaineering, and traveling Family: Husband, Jeff

Pivotal Moments and Lessons Learned

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ust go for it! After college I had a great job in Idaho. But my goal was to move to San Francisco and see what opportunities awaited me there. I slept on the couch of a gracious friend until I landed a job. Was I nervous and intimidated, and not sure how I was going to make ends meet? For sure, but as women we need to push ourselves more and be okay with being a little uncomfortable and taking risks to open up new opportunities and growth. If you come across it, let skepticism be a powerful motivator. One of the biggest doubters I experienced in my career became my most impactful mentor, and he had a profound effect on my journey. Do not lose confidence in your capabilities or be afraid to have your voice heard or to propose solutions, especially when working in a mainly male-dominated environment. Mentors and role models are extremely important. I have been fortunate to have many excellent ones and continue to benefit greatly from this crucial component. One key lesson learned is that driving your career, and learning as much as you can from your managers, is your own responsibility.

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Ask your managers for advice on how to handle tricky situations, and why or how they do something the way they do. Observe how they lead and handle challenging situations, and think about how you would lead or handle similar situations if you were in their shoes. A second notable lesson is this: Make sure you find and build a relationship with a mentor outside of, or at least a couple levels above, your direct reporting line. Beyond the obvious gains, she or he can open doors for you when you need it the most. At one point, I was not challenged enough in my role. I asked my mentor for advice and if any potential opportunities were available that would offer learning in a challenging environment. Two days later he called with one that was completely different from anything I had done before, and I had no idea where to begin. However, I immediately said yes and dove in. Purposefully seek out stretch assignments as they can become the most pivotal moments in your career. It has come full circle for me today, as one of the most rewarding things I do is help guide and mentor women inside and outside my organization.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ÂŽ


Michelle M. Porter Job Title: Director; Co-Chair, Private Client & Trust Group Education: JD, Notre Dame Law School; BA, College of the Holy Cross Company Name: Goulston & Storrs Industry: Legal Company CEO: Martin M. Fantozzi and William H. Dillon, Co-Managing Directors Company Headquarters Location: Boston, Massachusetts Number of Employees: 402 Words you live by: Enjoy the little things, because one day you may look back and realize they were the big things. Personal Philosophy: Same as above. What book are you reading: Heartland: A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke by Sarah Smarsh What was your first job: Dental receptionist Favorite charity: One Love Foundation Interests: Family, reading, running, and golf Family: Married, with two sons

We need to accept that at times we will fall short and that with each of these failures there is an opportunity to learn, grow, and build confidence for the next endeavor.

Push Through Your Doubts to the Next Level

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believe that self-confidence is one of the most important strengths needed for career success and that it is often something women struggle with. We work hard to do a great job, to be experts in our fields, to satisfy client demands, and to be mentors to associates. But often, it still feels like we are not doing enough. No matter how much we accomplish in a day, we still feel like we are falling short. We have that voice in our head that says we need to be smarter, more efficient, more thoughtful, and more assertive. I have talked with many women who say they feel like “imposters”—not worthy of their success and unsure of their abilities. Unfortunately, this lack of confidence and drive for perfection can undermine professional success. We can be reluctant to speak up in meetings, voice our opinions, promote our accomplishments, take risks, and push outside of our comfort zones. Of course, it’s not only women who struggle with confidence. Men do, as

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

well. However, in my experience, we women doubt ourselves more and allow these doubts and insecurities to impact our success. That is why we must consciously decide to step through our doubts and work on building (or at least projecting) confidence and self-assurance. I think it is important to pay attention to the small wins and not be so quick to downplay our accomplishments. We need to avoid minimizing our role or being self-deprecating when we describe our accomplishments to others. We can’t be afraid to push back and not apologize for our opinions. Importantly, professional growth requires pushing through your limits to get to the next level. So seek out those complex projects and push to work with the big, complicated clients. Finally, let go of perfect. We need to accept that at times we will fall short and that with each of these failures there is an opportunity to learn, grow, and build confidence for the next endeavor.

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Amy Moody McGrath Job Title: Director Education: JD, Boston College Law School; BA, Colby College Company Name: Goulston & Storrs Industry: Legal Company CEO: Martin M. Fantozzi and William H. Dillon, Co-Managing Directors Company Headquarters Location: Boston, Massachusetts Number of Employees: 402 Words you live by: Be yourself. Personal Philosophy: Don’t take yourself too seriously, and especially, make sure to laugh at yourself. What book are you reading: Educated by Tara Westover; Life Will Be the Death of Me by Chelsea Handler What was your first job: Working in my father’s accounting firm, answering phones and filing Favorite charity: Animal Rescue League Interests: Costa Rica, animals, and anything my children are doing. Family: My husband, Michael; my 15-year-old daughter, Anna; and my 13-year-old son, Michael Jr.

The more risks established women leaders take—even if they are micro risks—the easier it could and should be for women leaders to be themselves.

It’s Important for Leaders to Take Risks

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n my opinion, one of the obstacles facing women in leadership in today’s world is that women feel they need to sanitize their views and their presentation styles, so that they can keep their positions in leadership. Often in a meeting, board room, or other situation, there will be only one woman in the room. In these situations, women can find themselves unconsciously (and sometimes consciously) sanitizing their style of presentation and their opinions or recommendations in a way that they believe men will find more palatable. Women in leadership positions have worked hard to get there and, often times, need the income from their employment. It can feel like a risk to voice an opinion that may differ from those expressed by the

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men in the room. And it can feel like a risk to just be oneself in interactions with the men. Diversity of ideas should mean that everyone can feel comfortable taking risks, and not feel that their positions, which they have worked so hard to obtain, are at risk if they do. As women leaders, we should do a gut check when we are in a meeting, a board room, or other situations—especially when there are younger women present. Are we being authentic in our interactions? Are we being true to ourselves and to what we are trying to accomplish? Or are we taking a safe route? The more risks established women leaders take—even if they are micro risks— the easier it could and should be for women leaders to be themselves.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Carmen M. Ortiz Job Title: Counsel Education: George Washington University Law School Company Name: Anderson & Kreiger LLP Industry: Legal Company CEO: David S. Mackey Company Headquarters Location: Boston, Massachusetts Number of Employees: 50 Words you live by: Make every day count! Personal Philosophy: Live every day to the fullest because you don't know what tomorrow will bring. What book are you reading: A Gentlemen in Moscow by Amor Towles What was your first job: Assistant in Children's Room Library Favorite charity: Pan Mass Challenge (PMC) Interests: Traveling, reading, and spending time with my family and friends Family: Have always provided a lot of love and support to help me achieve my dreams!

Hoping Response to Sexual Harassment is Different This Time

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hen news broke about allegations of sexual harassment by Harvey Weinstein two years ago, and the #MeToo movement exploded, I found it difficult to believe how little has changed over the last three decades. As we continued to learn about sexual misconduct by notable and “reputable” men from not only Hollywood, but also academia, corporate America, government, medicine, sports, law, and other industries, the voices of the #MeToo movement grew louder and stronger. The question is, how effective will the movement really be in eradicating this social plague? More than 25 years ago, I was part of an investigative team looking into allegations by sports reporter Lisa Olson. She claimed that a number of players had sexually harassed her in the New England Patriots locker room. After our investigation confirmed that Ms. Olson had been sexually harassed, and that management had failed to respond appropriately, the National Football League fined both the organization and the players involved. A year later, during Senate Judiciary Committee hearing considering Judge Clarence Thomas for a seat on the U.S. Supreme Court, Professor Anita Hill described how she had been sexually harassed by Thomas when he was her super-

visor at the Equal Employment Commission. Again, there was a media frenzy and laws were passed requiring employers to implement sexual harassment policies and conduct employee training. All these years later, we see that their efforts were largely ineffective. So, what’s different now? In working with employers and speaking on this topic, I have found that the impact of recent revelations of sexual misconduct at work has been significant. Powerful and famous men have been fired or forced to resign, and wealthy business owners have been pressured to step down. Claims of harassment and abuse are being taken far more seriously. And finally, anti-harassment policies and training are focused on establishing a work environment that emphasizes respect, values, safety, and employee empowerment. The important lesson from 25 years ago is this: We cannot assume the #MeToo movement will have the lasting impact it should. I hope that this renewed focus will lead to significant progress, and that both women and men will continue to speak up to ensure that we do not repeat this cycle. I believe and hope that changing demographics and the expectations of our younger generation will result in a change in attitude and work culture… and this time, one that will last.

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Lori Brady Job Title: Director, Strategic Projects and Accountability Education: Bachelor of Arts with honors, kinesiology, University of Western Ontario; Master of Science, physiotherapy, McMaster University; Master of Health Science, University of Toronto Company Name: Markham Stouffville Hospital Industry: Higher Health care Company CEO: Jo-Anne Marr Company Headquarters Location: Markham, Ontario, Canada Number of Employees: 2,000 Words you live by: “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world. The power of education extends beyond the development of skills we need for economic success. It can contribute to nation-building and reconciliation.” –Nelson Mandela Personal Philosophy: “Personal development is essential and ongoing. It is the belief that you are worth the effort, time and energy needed to develop yourself.” –Denis Waitley What book are you reading: Becoming by Michelle Obama What was your first job: Laboratory summer student intern at Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario Interests: Reading, learning, and exploring new places Family: I'm blessed to have in my life, my husband Greg, and three boys, Ethan, Andre, and Tyson.

Seeing Your Future Self in Others: the Importance of Powerful Role Models

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t is crucial for aspiring leaders to connect with role models with whom they can identify. These themes were front and center in my mind as I entered middle management six years ago. I was specific in my search for a female role model, and after a year, I found such a leader—a seasoned health care professional who had evolved from the front lines to a senior leadership role. I was able to access knowledge cultivated over years of experience, and her counsel on being true to oneself in appearance, speech, and demeanor was powerful. This advice from a mentor who closely reflected me and my past experiences was an important factor in helping me feel comfortable with standing out. My second tactic was to align with a female leader within my organization. This permitted me the luxury of a local mentor who could help me navigate our internal socio-political landscape. I regularly saw her in action in our work setting and leveraged frequent informal conversations with her. The presence of this mentor was invaluable, since she allowed me the flexibility to learn by observing and in do-

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ing so, refine my ability to influence internal decision-making. My final strategy was to remain balanced in my approach in seeking mentors. I wanted to connect beyond the traditional lines of gender, race, and sexual orientation, and looked for a role model with whom I shared core values (courage, compassion, and kindness). This journey was the most difficult, as it required time and effort to unearth similar value systems in an established male leader. However, his viewpoint has been invaluable, enabling me to ensure that my messaging is well received by all audiences. In summary, access to role models has been crucial to my personal and professional growth as a leader. I deliberately surround myself with positive female mentors, but also learn from the trajectory of others who are aligned with a common value system. In doing so, I’ve found ways to see myself in others when female role models have been difficult to come by. My advice to aspiring leaders would be to find your future self in those positive role models available to you, and to be patient in letting their input nourish your leadership journey.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Karma Call Job Title: Director, Negotiations Northeast and South Education: Master of Public Policy, Simon Fraser University; BAH, University of Guelph Company Name: Ministry of Indigenous Affairs Industry: Government Company CEO: Deborah Richardson, Deputy Minister Company Headquarters Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada Number of Employees: 150 Words you live by: Life is too precious to spend time on things that aren't meaningful to you. Personal Philosophy: If you have to carry baggage, keep it to a backpack. What book are you reading: I recently finished This is Day One: A Practical Guide to Leadership That Matters by Drew Dudley; The Good Girls Revolt: How the Women of Newsweek Sued their Bosses and Changed the Workplace by Lynn Povich What was your first job: Cashier in a bakery Interests: I love to play hockey, garden, cycle, read, and cook.

Family: I have an amazing husband and daughter (age 11).

Know what you have to offer, and when you have doubt, critically examine its source. Sometimes doubt is an important indicator subconsciously telling us we overlooked something important.

Wear Your Favorite Footwear and Kick Doubt to the Curb

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an a woman wearing flats find success at work? My cheeky answer is “I sure hope so, because I'm not putting my 5’2” self in heels.” Life offers enough stress on its own. I don’t need to invite more in by undermining my own confidence worrying about my footwear. Another not-so-secret: I don’t wear makeup. The deeper question is: Why does that matter? Truthfully, I don’t refuse to wear makeup as part of my micro-rebellion against patriarchy (although I do encourage those). I grew up in a makeup culture, and I dabbled with it in my youth, but it never became part of my external-facing persona. I feel more self-conscious with it than I do without it, so I choose not to use it. I recognize that wearing flats and not wearing making makeup affect how others perceive me, and this has the potential to

make it harder to succeed at work. It may even mean that I have to work extra hard in other areas to compensate. Does that amount to an unfair double standard? Probably. Any time you can substitute the word “man” for “woman” and have the sentence sound ridiculous, you are dealing with a double standard (“Can a man wearing flats find success at work?”). Some women wear heels and makeup because it makes them feel confident—and that is great. When we project confidence, we project competence. Stay focused on the confidence gap. Know what you have to offer, and when you have doubt, critically examine its source. Sometimes doubt is an important indicator subconsciously telling us we overlooked something important. Sometimes it's the insidious nature of cultural gender norms telling us we are violating the unwritten rules. Use whatever footwear you like to kick that doubt to the curb.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

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Adeola Adebayo Job Title: Director, OMERS Capital Markets Education: MBA, finance, Leeds University Business School, England Company Name: OMERS Industry: Pension fund Company CEO: Michael Latimer Company Headquarters Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada Number of Employees: 3,000 Words you live by: Live out your legacy daily, faith and patience, attitude matters! Personal Philosophy: Hard work, people first; Use feedback, positive and negative, to continue to strive for excellence both on a professional and personal level. What book are you reading: The Collective Wisdom of High-Performing Women: Leadership lessons from The Judy Project, edited by Colleen Moorehead What was your first job: Summer Intern at Royal Dutch Shell Favorite charity: Toronto City Mission Interests: Reading, fitness, travel, food, adventure, and music Family: Married to Muyiwa Adebayo, with two children: Toni and Titomi

Be Bold, Dream Big, Take Risks

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migrating to Canada as a young adult to pursue a dream of becoming a portfolio manager, finding great assets and making great investment decisions, was a bold move. I had never visited Canada, had no job lined up but only believed, and had a mindset that it was indeed possible to achieve this dream with grit, hard work, and passion. While it would have been much easier to remain in the UK with a strong support system, coming to Canada to further my career and embrace all the country had to offer was far more exciting. Many talented women have developed a fear of failure, which has prevented them from stepping out of their comfort zone, taking an exciting opportunity in a new city or country, asking for a stretch assignment, being innovative and creative, or even speaking in public. This fear may have developed as a result of previous negative experiences, background, negative feedback given by others (bosses or those held in high esteem) in the past, or even the fact that they don’t know anyone who has achieved that particular goal. Failure is not as fatal as we think, as

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long as we can rise up, learn from the experience, move on, and not remain discouraged. As Mike Jones of Discover Leadership Training puts it, “Winners lose more than losers lose.” It’s better to have failed while trying out a new idea or strategy you believe in than not to have tried. I believe the fear of failure starts in the mind, as your thoughts precede your actions. In order to overcome this fear, visualizing the achievement of your goals or dreams in your mind, writing them down and reading them aloud from time to time, learning from others in similar positions you would like to attain, and seeking out other leaders who can be honest about their failures—and how they overcame them—would be beneficial. As I reflect on my own journey and the blessing of doing what I have always dreamed of doing, I continue to mentor and encourage many young women and men inside and outside my organization to be bold, to dream big, to take risks, and to not let the fear of failure prevent them from achieving career success.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Maydianne C.B. Andrade Job Title: Professor; Vice Dean Faculty Affairs & Equity; Acting Vice Principal Academic & Dean Education: PhD, Cornell; MSc, University of Toronto Mississauga; BSc, Simon Fraser Company Name: University of Toronto Scarborough Industry: Higher education Company CEO: President Meric Gertler Company Headquarters Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada Number of Employees: 21,000+ Words you live by: “I'm no longer accepting the things I cannot change. I am changing the things I cannot accept.” –Angela Davis Personal Philosophy: Hopeful pessimism: expect the best, prepare for the worst. What book are you reading: The Stone Sky by N.K. Jemisin What was your first job: Rides operator in Kiddieland at the Pacific National Exhibition Favorite charity: Plan International Canada Interests: Nature, fantasy & post-apocalyptic literature Family: I live with my husband and our two children.

Grant Me the Courage

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y grandmother had a number of framed, inspirational prints on her wall. These texts likely represented her views, and those of many, on how to live a good life. There was one that I read repeatedly as a child, and heard or saw again many times as an adult. Even before Facebook and other social media platforms adopted the inspirational saying as a meme, this was one of the most clichéd of messages. It said, “Grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.” For many, this can become a mantra. Particularly for people who have chosen a career in which they are underrepresented, it can feel like an essential part of succeeding or at least, of persisting. One must learn to float serenely above those things that are subtly but cumulatively unfair, above those things that are challenging to your self-esteem and self-confidence, and even above those things that are overtly racist, sexist, ableist, transphobic, homophobic, islamophobic, anti-black…. One must learn to float above them.

As a biologist who happens to be a black woman, I took this approach for most of my early career. My focus was on science, on teaching, and on mentoring my students. These are things I had spent 12 years in post-secondary education preparing to do. I still think this is a reasonable approach, and it is one I highlight as a path for those who, like me, are often “the only one in the room” in their chosen field. Do what you need to do to be happy, to succeed, and to cultivate the connections that help you to be resilient. But now as a full professor, I have started to question whose wisdom tells us that we cannot change certain things. My path is now centered in the risk inherent in speaking out, and in helping others to see and work with me to correct disadvantage. I agree with Angela Davis, who took the serenity prayer as an invocation to passivity. Davis morphed it into something powerful, saying, “I’m no longer accepting the things I cannot change, I’m changing the things I cannot accept.” As a leader, it is my goal to live this sentiment, and to allow my serenity to wait until after our collective courage has affected change.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

www.womenworthwatching.com

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Michelle-Ann Hylton Job Title: Director, Licensing and Policy Branch–Long-Term Care Homes Division Education: BSc, psychology, York University; Masters of Public Health, City University of New York Company Name: Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care (Ontario Public Service) Industry: Health care Company CEO: Brian Pollard, Assistant Deputy Minister, Long-Term Care Homes Division Company Headquarters Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada Number of Employees: 350 Words you live by: “It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement; and who at worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.” –Theodore Roosevelt Personal Philosophy: I am born to win. What book are you reading: Becoming by Michelle Obama What was your first job: Writer for a community newspaper Favorite charity: The United Way Interests: Travel, politics, and international development Family: Energetic parents, successful brothers, and a basketball team of nephews

Looking for a Role Model? Don’t Let Perfection Impede Possibility

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ver the course of my career, I have mentored many young women who have had difficulty in identifying role models. For immigrants and women of color, like me, it can be difficult to find powerful female role models who look or sound like us. If we are lucky enough to find one, she is oftentimes inaccessible. However, my experiences have taught me a few things about finding powerful female role models. First, I have learned that when a woman defines the word powerful for herself, her search for a powerful female role model will be significantly easier. For some, powerful may reflect the position a woman holds in society, and a Nancy Pelosi or Kathleen Wynne may fit the description. Others may associate power with social influence and opt for the likes of an Oprah Winfrey or Beyonce. The second lesson I learned is this: No single role model will possess all the traits we seek, and that women from very different walks of life can serve as exemplars. Taking the limits off what a role model should look or sound like, and focusing instead on who they are, how they define themselves, and how

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they live their lives, can introduce us to powerful women whose lives can teach us a great deal. Re-defining the word powerful for myself and thinking more broadly about who could serve as my role model led me to finding one in the most unconventional, yet unsurprising place—my own family. While I have identified celebrities, elected officials, and senior executives as role models, I am lucky enough to have been raised by the most influential exemplar and a powerhouse in her own right—my mother, Vienna Hylton. My mother shattered glass ceilings and battled social norms to chart her path, maximize very limited resources, and defy the odds. In her own way and on her own terms, she built a life that represents who she is and in keeping with her personal values. How much more powerful can one be? So, as you embark on or continue your journey, remember this: Don’t allow perfection to impede possibility. Clearly define the characteristics you seek. And remove self-imposed limitations and biases. You may be surprised how many powerful female role models cross your path every day!

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Shamira Madhany Job Title: Managing Director, Canada; Deputy Executive Director Company Name: World Education Services Industry: Nonprofit Company CEO: Esther Benjamin Company Headquarters Location: New York, New York Your Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada Personal Philosophy: “Incredible change happens in your life when you decide to take control of what you do have power over instead of craving control over what you don’t.” –Steve Maraboli What book are you reading: Lean Impact: How to Innovate for Radically Greater Social Good by Ann Mei Chang What was your first job: Employment counselor, COSTI Immigrant Services Favorite charity: Windmill Microlending, which provides low-interest loans to help immigrants re-start their careers in Canada, and the Heart and Stroke Foundation Interests: Reading, volunteering, and spending time with family and friends

What matters to me, and what ignites my passion, is knowing that through my work I’ve made other people’s lives better.

Driven to Make a Difference

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o begin with, I would like to express my gratitude to Profiles in Diversity Journal for this great honor. I feel proud—and a little awestruck—to be among leaders who brought real, positive difference to their workplace and beyond. And I feel lucky that, throughout my career, I have found many women who inspire me. Recently I’ve looked to Indra Nooyi, former CEO of PepsiCo. As a woman and visible minority leading a Fortune 500 company, she did more than boost the bottom line—she transformed the culture, with her strong moral compass, passion for communicating, and devotion to advancement and lifelong education for every member of her team. My family came to Canada when I was a young teenager. In Kenya, my dad had been a successful businessman, but in Canada, despite his fluent English and accounting background, lack of Canadian experience kept him out of all but the most menial jobs. He even took a job cleaning washrooms at a golf club to support our family. Even at that early age, I knew there was something wrong—that people shouldn’t have to struggle so hard to give their best

to their new country. But I didn’t realize I could change things until one of my university professors told me the way to make change was to influence the policies that determine how newcomers are treated. My career began on the front lines, as an employment counselor, helping newcomers facing the same challenges as my parents. But it was when I joined the Ontario Government that I really began to feel I could make a real difference. In fact, the achievement that’s closest to my heart was the creation of Canada’s first-ever international bridging program, which is designed to bridge the gap between skilled newcomers and the Canadian job market. Ontario’s bridging program has become the model for similar programs across Canada and beyond, and I still take great pride in that. Making a difference is still a driving force for me at World Education Services Canada. In a way I’ve come full circle. Once again, my focus is on helping newcomers reach their full potential as professionals. What matters to me, and what ignites my passion, is knowing that through my work I’ve made other people’s lives better.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

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Melanie Anderson Job Title: Acting Superintendent, Executive Officer Education: Bachelor of Arts, policing, Charles Sturt University Company Name: Durham Regional Police Service Industry: Municipal Policing Company CEO: Chief Paul Martin Company Headquarters Location: Whitby, Ontario, Canada Number of Employees: 1,350 Words you live by: “The people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world, are the ones who do.” –Steve Jobs Personal Philosophy: Always stretch and challenge yourself and always act from personal integrity. What book are you reading: Out Standing in the Field: A Memoir by Canada’s First Female Infantry Officer by Sandra Perron What was your first job: Newspaper route Favorite charity: Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD Canada) Interests: Running marathons, golfing, and traveling Family: Husband (also a police officer), son (14), two step-daughters (22 & 25) and one poodle (7)

Double Bind: Being a Female Leader in a Police Organization

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s I enter the final phase of my policing career, I am hopeful women in law enforcement will continue their forward momentum in obtaining specialized designations and access to leadership roles. Progress in this area has been positive within the Durham Regional Police Service, where trailblazing female officers challenge institutional and cultural norms to equalize gender disparities in both rank and influence. Milestone assignments include detectives in our homicide and drug units, use of force instructors, duty inspectors, and deputy chief of operations. As our Service and industry continue to evolve and integrate, however, further reconciliation is needed to correct for common disparities that continue to challenge female police leaders. As in most industries, women in policing typically operate in a dichotomous environment. Those projecting a masculine exterior—one of toughness—are often rewarded with advancement and opportunity. But it is their nurturing and kindness that earn the approval of their colleagues, peers, and supervisors. In my 25 years of policing, this dichotomy has been the most challenging. Gender stereotypes keep women from establishing a strong and credible command presence. Typically, women are either respected or liked, but rarely both. Gender biases have rooted a number of mutually exclusive expectations in defining what it

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means to be a woman and, separately, what it takes to be a leader (Zheng, Kark, & Meister, 2018). Women in policing face two choices: Be assertive and risk being judged and socially outcast; or conform to gender-based behavior expectations and risk leadership attainment. Zheng, et all (2018) demonstrates this industry-transcending double bind, recognizing four balancing acts that female leaders must confront: • Paradox 1: Demanding, yet caring • Paradox 2: Authoritative, yet participative • Paradox 3: Advocating for themselves, while serving others • Paradox 4: Maintaining distance, yet remaining approachable We as police leaders need to recognize these gender-based tensions and work to expel them. Only then, will the benefits of gender diversification be realized. It is critically important to address this dilemma for a great many reasons—equality being the most obvious. Beyond equality, however, we must accept the reality of the double bind as a barrier to inclusion and an impediment to authentic human equity valuation. As we continue to grow as individuals and as a profession, we have the opportunity to empower women to lead authentically, but this requires a culture shift that empowers their counterparts to follow authentically.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Holly Britton Job Title: Acting Director, People, Culture and Learning Education: BA, Trent University; Certified Human Resources Leader (CHRL) Company Name: Durham Regional Police Service Industry: Municipal Policing Company CEO: Chief Paul Martin Company Headquarters Location: Whitby, Ontario, Canada Number of Employees: 1,350 Words you live by: Happiness comes from within. Personal Philosophy: Start each day with a grateful heart. What book are you reading: No Ego: How Leaders Can Cut the Cost of Workplace Drama, End Entitlement, and Drive Big Results by Cy Wakeman What was your first job: Department store clerk Favorite charity: Trish’s Wish Foundation Interests: Fitness, reading, and gardening Family: Married to Jeff, with two children, Ryan and Jayde

It’s Time to Ask, “How Can I Help?”

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s I have progressed in my 18-year career, the need to have a strong awareness of the state of my mental health, and the effects of my job and personal life on it, has become increasingly apparent. The demand that women balance work and life is well known. However, what is lacking in the workplace is support and awareness for women dealing with mental health issues. The World Health Organization reports that women are twice as likely to be diagnosed as suffering from depression as men. Additional research is needed to determine why this is the case. The intent of this article is not to understand why, but to expand on the need to appropriately respond when issues arise. Women in the workforce need to recognize the importance of maintaining good mental health and promoting it in each other. As women progress in career and life, their realities often become increasingly complex, with an ever-increasing variety of demands. Becoming aware of the state of our own mental health and recognizing when our coping skills are becoming overwhelmed can have a profound effect on our personal and professional lives. As I have taken on additional personal and professional roles and responsibilities,

my mental health has fluctuated. Marriage, children, complex family situations, and career growth and changes have been stressors I have enjoyed, but which have also caused me frustration and anxiety. During these difficult times, some of the best help I received came from other women who reached out to talk and listen. The stigma surrounding mental health issues remains prevalent, and my experience in the workplace is that we have failed to utilize our greatest assets—each other. Peer support provides the opportunity to receive emotional encouragement and tangible aid from individuals who have gone through similar situations. There is strong evidence that peer support can help maintain wellness. No longer can we ask each other, “Are you okay?” and hope for a quick response, because we are too busy or struggling in our own situation. We owe it to ourselves and others to follow that question with this one: “How can I help?” It’s time to bring additional perspective and curiosity to the situation. Colleagues, when another woman is wringing her hands or you notice she is overly distracted, do yourself, her, and others a favor and offer her your genuine support.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

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Anna Petriv Job Title: VP, Multicloud & Salesforce Alliance Education: Master’s degree, computer science, Master’s degree, Finance, and Bachelor’s degree, applied linguistics, Lviv National Polytechnic University Company Name: OSF Commerce Industry: Information technology and services Company CEO: Gerard Szatvanyi Company Headquarters Location: Quebec, Canada Number of Employees: 1,000+ Your Location: Boston, Massachusetts Words you live by: “Genius is 1% talent and 99% hard work.” –Albert Einstein Personal Philosophy: “A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.” –Lao Tzu What book are you reading: The Great Alone by Kristin Hannah What was your first job: Assistant to the management board at the bank Favorite charity: Charities that focus on finding effective treatment & cure for childhood diseases Interests: Running, foreign languages, and exploring new cultures

Things might not always go the way you planned, and you might not get everything right the first time, but you can't let the fear of striking out keep you from playing the game.

Don’t Let Fear Keep You Out of the Game

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hen was the last time you failed? Chances are, if you've achieved success in your professional life (and I think you have if you're reading this), you can think of a few occasions. You'd probably say it made you stronger. You learned a lot about yourself. You wouldn't go back and do anything differently. But for those of us who are not natural risk-takers, failure can often be enough to deter us from following our dreams, applying for a new role, or asking for that welldeserved raise or promotion. When I first started my career, I worked tirelessly to avoid failure. As I progressed, I worked hard because it was what was required to be successful in my role. Now—a few years, a few countries, and a few industries later—I work hard because I love what I do—with all the failures and successes along the way.

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I firmly believe that fear kills more dreams than failure ever will—and being afraid to fail is not a trait exclusive to women. So why do we only apply for a job when we meet every qualification? Men apply for jobs when they meet just 60 percent. Is it because women tend to be perfectionists—a trait that can fuel our success and fear simultaneously? Maybe. Or maybe it’s just human nature to fear the unknown. Regardless, women and men shouldn’t shy away from a challenge—personal or professional. The only thing to be afraid of is not trying at all. Things might not always go the way you planned, and you might not get everything right the first time, but you can't let the fear of striking out keep you from playing the game. Have faith in yourself, learn from your mistakes, lean on your support system, and take the leap.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Mitzie Hunter Title: Member of Provincial Parliament, representing the Toronto riding of Scarborough–Guildwood Company: Legislative Assembly of Ontario (Government of Ontario) Education: BA, University of Toronto at Scarborough; MBA, University of Toronto Rotman School of Management

We have a responsibility to create a world in which women from all backgrounds are able to thrive and reach their full potential.

Don’t Wait to Be Invited

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unning for public office and putting your name on the line is a commitment that requires courage, support, and determination. Documentaries like Knock down the House, and podcasts like No Second Chances, make it clear that women are no longer waiting for doors to be opened—we’re forcing them open ourselves. History does not define us, and now more than ever, diverse representation is what we need in order to make strong, inventive policy decisions that serve the most vulnerable populations. Before running for office, I encountered many individuals from the public and private sectors—many of whom became my mentors. They believed in me, inspired me, and supported me personally and professionally. Working with these mentors, and working with the government in a collaborative way, made me realize that being at the table often makes the biggest difference. You can lead from behind and you can lead from beside. But sometimes you have to lead from out front. And so, six years ago, I decided to run for public office. More women involved in politics leads to more informed transformational policymaking. It is the job of elected representatives to engage in dynamic change-making, shift cultural norms, and ensure that the

door is opened for the diverse populations we claim to represent. Norms shift when those in power take bold action towards equality, and when marginalized groups hold seats at the decision-making table. Greater female political participation results in increased responsiveness to citizen needs, improved collaboration across ethnic lines, and a more equitable future. These tangible gains impact us all by creating a space where all voices are heard. Policy changes that advance equality are not just beneficial for women. For example, equal parental leave in workplaces means that both men and women are able to share childcare responsibilities, and that men are able to spend more time at home with their families. Equal opportunity policymaking offers greater flexibility for all genders. We have a responsibility to create a world in which women from all backgrounds are able to thrive and reach their full potential. I am proud to be a woman of color in politics and hopeful that I will see governments across the country move closer to accurately reflecting the diversity of the amazing people and communities we represent. Now, more than ever, women must enter the political space—even when they are not invited.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

www.womenworthwatching.com

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Julie Carswell Job Title: Vice President Education: PhD, University of Western Ontario Company Name: Sigma Assessment Systems Inc Industry: Management consulting Company CEO: Charles Jackson Company Headquarters Location: London, Ontario Canada Number of Employees: 20 Words you live by: Be kind. Personal Philosophy: Don't wait for opportunity to come knocking, create your own opportunities. What book are you reading: Digital Minimalism: Choosing a Focused Life in a Noisy World by Cal Newport What was your first job: Research assistant Favorite charity: Canadian Cancer Foundation Interests: Running and yoga Family: Husband and 3 kids (2 boys, 20 and 15, and a daughter, 7)

To Grow, Stretch. To Lead, Connect

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s I was trusted with more challenging assignments, I realized that my capabilities stretched beyond my limited perception of myself. As I reflect on my career and my educational journey, I’m grateful to have connected with strong, kind, and generous mentors early on. In working alongside these individuals, I was provided with two priceless gifts. First, the gift of respect and patience, which helped me to replace my initial impostor syndrome with the belief that “I am enough.” Second, a model of conscious, effective leadership that I would later seek to mirror in my own career. During my PhD studies, my supervisor was a woman who had completed her degree years earlier at Stanford under the guidance of a famous psychologist responsible for ground-breaking work in the area of personality, assessment, and impulse control. I was somewhat intimidated, given her academic lineage, but she was incredibly kind, generous, and patient with me. Her leadership style epitomized what Ed Schein refers to as Humble Inquiry: “The fine art of drawing someone out, of asking questions to which you do not know the answer, of building a relationship based on curiosity and interest in the other person.” Early in my academic career, I also had the opportunity to work under the supervision of a young psychologist who was incredibly brilliant and driven. From her I learned the value of hard work and

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accountability. She believed in me when I didn’t believe in myself. As I was trusted with more challenging assignments, I realized that my capabilities stretched beyond my limited perception of myself. I’d be remiss if I didn’t acknowledge important male mentors who have also supported me during my career. Their encouragement led me to the understanding that professional growth is often achieved by stepping outside our comfort zone. My experiences with these mentors shaped my own leadership style and have underscored the importance of collaboration, humility, and vulnerability—qualities that are critical to learning and growing, both personally and professionally. As Vice President of Sigma Assessment Systems, I now have the privilege of mentoring several young women and men in our business. I strive to emulate the qualities of my own mentors. I’d sum them up as follows: • To nurture your team’s selfconfidence, show confidence in their abilities. • Be humble. No matter how accomplished you are, there is always room to learn. • Encourage others to take on assignments outside their comfort zone. This builds competency, humility, resilience, and confidence.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Saba Bireda Job Title: Partner Education: JD, Harvard Law School; BA, English and political science, Stanford University Company Name: Sanford Heisler Sharp LLP Industry: Law Company CEO: David Sanford Company Headquarters Location: New York, New York Number of Employees: 85 Your Location: Washington, DC Words you live by: “It's never too late to be what you might have been.” –George Eliot Personal Philosophy: Every day is an opportunity to be a better person, learn something new, and come closer to reaching my goals. I try to make the most of every minute! What book are you reading: Little Bee by Chris Cleave What was your first job: Middle school English teacher Favorite charity: Education Law Center (Pennsylvania) Interests: Reading with my son, entertaining, personal finance, Orangetheory®, and volunteering Family: I am married to Emanuel Ryan, and we have one son, Nahom.

The Gender Pay Gap Is Still All Too Common

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s a lawyer who regularly represents women in pay discrimination cases, I can say that, unfortunately, the answer is that employers still have not done enough to close the pay gap for women in the workplace. There has certainly been progress in the level of attention being paid to the issue of pay equity. And that has translated into policy changes, such as strengthening state equal pay laws and laws prohibiting employers from asking employees about their salary history, a practice we know can perpetuate pay disparities between men and women. In my work, however, I continue to see many employers still engaging in practices that, at best, inadvertently create barriers to pay equity, and at worst, contribute to the gender pay gap. Employer policies and practices that encourage pay secrecy undoubtedly disadvantage women who may have no idea that they are being underpaid in comparison to their male colleagues. I represent a group of women at a state agency who didn’t realize they were being underpaid until a reporter published all of the agency’s employee salaries in the local newspaper! Employers may think pay secrecy creates a more collegial and noncompetitive environment, but in actuality, having transparent and open conversations about

compensation will go much further in making all employees feel they are being treated fairly. I’ve been encouraged by the pay transparency laws passed in California, Maryland, and Massachusetts that seek to codify these best practices. Frankly, I believe gender bias and discrimination continue to fuel the gender pay gap. I’ve heard countless stories of the work, expertise, and experience of women being undervalued in comparison to their male colleagues. Many of the companies and firms sued by my law firm justify pay disparities through the use of hard-to-measure factors that favor male employees who have long-standing relationships with male leadership. Pay, promotions, and other opportunities often are bestowed on those who look like and have the most in common with those in positions of power. While many employers have made great strides in developing flexible schedules and benefits for working mothers, women continue to be penalized for taking time off for family-care duties or striving to maintain a real work-life balance. My clients are not only fighting to be paid fairly, they are also fighting the damaging stereotypes and biases that work against gender equality in the workplace and beyond. I’m proud to be a part of this movement to end the gender pay gap!

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Lesley Slaton Brown Job Title: Chief Diversity Officer Education: Bachelor of Arts, communications, Boise State University Company Name: HP Inc. Industry: Information Technology Company CEO: Dion Weisler Company Headquarters Location: Palo Alto, California Number of Employees: 55,000 Words you live by: If not you, then who? If not now, then when? Personal Philosophy: Live authentically. Be intentional. Be BOLD. What book are you reading: Educated: A Memoir by Tara Westover; Small Great Things by Jodi Picoult What was your first job: Babysitting in grade school; first job on payroll was at a women's clothing store Favorite charity: I co-founded an organization called Curated Pathways to Innovation (https://ywca-sv.org/curated-pathways-to-innovation/), a virtual coach that helps students access personalized learning in STEM. Interests: Reading, organic gardening, hiking, and spending time with family ... and LAUGHING Family: Married, with one daughter and one smart dog!

Powerful women are playing for the good of the team—you’re creating space and opportunities for others who will come along.

Playing for the Good of the Team

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trong, brilliant, and powerful women have not been difficult to come by for me. I’ve always been surrounded by amazing female role models. Both of my grandmothers were exceptional women. One reinvented herself at the age of 56—she earned her master’s degree in education and became a high school teacher. The other, a single mother of four, managed her home, worked full-time, was an active member in her local church, fed and helped clothe anyone who needed food or clean clothes, managed to bake fresh donuts, cakes, and cookies for her family and friends regularly, and never missed a Sunday family dinner! My mother was a young mom, and with the support of my father and grandparents, was able to attend college. Once I started school (I was

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the youngest of five), she went to work and rose quickly as a director in her agency. My mother shared with me her bumps and bruises along the way. She demonstrated the importance of family-first and self-care, and the need to dust yourself off and stay in the game when adversity came. She also reminded me that powerful women are playing for the good of the team— you’re creating space and opportunities for others who will come along. In addition to role models in my family, I also had phenomenal teachers, and even managers, along the way. They showed me how you can be powerful, have your voice heard, and be a disrupter and change agent, yet still be kind, respect all people, hold firm to your values, and show up as your authentic self. I’m forever grateful for all these wonderful women in my life.

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Elaine Jeanne Harris Job Title: Cultural Connectivity Architect & Founder Education: MBA, Stanford Graduate School of Business; SB, chemical engineering, MIT Company Name: Golden Rule Technology Industry: Consulting Company CEO: Elaine Harris Company Headquarters Location: Lanham, Maryland Number of Employees: 1 Your Location: Washington, DC Words you live by: Treat others the way you want to be treated. What book are you reading: The Little Book of Restorative Justice by Howard Zehr What was your first job: Engineering Intern at DuPont Favorite charity: My church Interests: International travel, photography, and cooking Family: Single, no children; Immediate family, sister (Pauline Francis) and mother (Doris Harris)

The intersectionality of multiple sources of discrimination also contributes to the challenge organizations have in developing more inclusive practices and behaviors.

Bringing Innovation to Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

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hen I think of the challenges associated with achieving, or even just advancing, diversity, equity, and inclusion in organizations, I’m constantly surprised by how infrequently tools for problem analysis, design-thinking innovation, and organizational change, are applied. My problem-solving mindset and strategic approach to the aforementioned, likely stem from my early days as a chemical engineer. People issues are complex and dynamic. We may identify with being impacted by one or multiple “isms” on any given day, not to mention a barrage of imagery and messaging from myriad channels. The intersectionality of multiple sources of discrimination also contributes to the challenge organizations have in developing more inclusive practices and behaviors. But that doesn’t mean that the same analytical rigor applied to solving organizational problems can’t be brought to bear.

At the heart of true problem solving is properly defining the problem, which means understanding its impact and magnitude from multiple perspectives. This is where design thinking and hackathons with diverse teams are so powerful. Organizational visibility and the ability to track progress are also essential to the change process. Tech-based tools, like Diverst’s dashboards and other digital supports, illuminate metrics that help an organization understand and track its progress in terms of diversity and inclusion, which are different metrics. And in the very near future, tools like virtual reality will be used to tell stories in a uniquely engaging and impactful way to support behavior change. This is what excites me: integrating my skills and experience, adapting existing tools, developing new ones, and leveraging technology, where appropriate, to have a positive impact in advancing diversity, inclusion, and equity. I see this as an ethical, societal, and business imperative.

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Lynn Jurich Job Title: CEO Education: MBA, Stanford Company Name: Sunrun Industry: Solar, storage and energy services Company CEO: Lynn Jurich Company Headquarters Location: San Francisco, California Words you live by: I commit to living in appreciation, integrity and abundance, being the resolution of a win for all. I see everyone as my ally. Personal Philosophy: If it’s hard, make it easy. What book are you reading: The Medici: Power, Money and Ambition in the Italian Renaissance by Paul Strathern What was your first job: Statistics role at a mental hospital Favorite charity: GRID Alternatives Interests: Sports, nature, philosophy, and fiction Family: Married, mom of two

100% Pay Parity—a Bright Spot in the Solar Industry

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co-founded Sunrun twelve years ago with a simple mission: to create a planet run by the sun. Today, my company has become the leading national home solar, battery, and energy services provider. As a leader, we set an example in Diversity and Inclusion, especially to advance women into leadership and provide equal pay for equal work. That’s why in 2018, Sunrun was the first solar company to achieve 100 percent pay parity. It was a key milestone, as I strongly believe that fair and equal pay is a fundamental right and integral to the Sunrun ethos. It is critical for more businesses to step up and change the status quo. In the United States, one of the wealthiest and most advanced countries in the world, women are paid 80 cents on average on the dollar compared to men, and only 74 cents on the dollar in the solar industry. Taking real action to address the issue was necessary for our business. On April 1, 2019, Sunrun took the California Equal Pay Pledge, developed as part of the partnership between the California Commission on the Status

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of Women and Girls and the Office of California First Partner Jennifer Siebel Newsom. By doing so, we aimed to influence all businesses across the state and beyond to join this movement. Sunrun’s commitment ensures that not just women, but all employees are being compensated fairly within their organization, creating a more inclusive and equitable work environment for everyone. While obstacles remain on the road to creating an open, diverse, and fair solar industry, Sunrun has taken great strides in changing its workplace culture and providing equal opportunities for brilliant careers to all. With women making up 50 percent of its senior management team and 38 percent of its board of directors, Sunrun is a model for other tech companies. Sunrun recently hired its first director of diversity & inclusion, George-Axelle Broussillon Matschinga. She is leveraging her years of experience and expertise in diversity management to develop a vision and strategies to advance the company’s progress, including focusing on hiring talent from underrepresented groups, such as women, people of color, and veterans.

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Linda Coberly Job Title: Chicago Managing Partner and Chair of Appellate & Critical Motions Practice Education: JD, University of Michigan; BA, Princeton University Company Name: Winston & Strawn LLP Industry: Law Company CEO: Tom Fitzgerald, Chairman Company Headquarters Location: Chicago, Illinois Number of Employees: 2,000 Words you live by: Life is rich. Don't miss it. Personal Philosophy: The secret to professional happiness is doing good work with good people. What book are you reading: Daring Greatly: How the Courage to Be Vulnerable Transforms How We Live, Love, Parent, and Lead by Brené Brown What was your first job: Filing clerk in an employee benefits office Favorite charity: Heartland Alliance for Human Needs & Human Rights Interests: Music, cooking, exercise, and photography Family: Two daughters, ages 19 and 16

How I Learned to Let Myself Love My Career

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hen my girls were small, my days were often a struggle. I worked part time, attempting to maintain my career, while also managing things at home. My husband was a lawyer as well, and we chose together to have me spend more time with the kids, while he focused full time on his career. In retrospect, this was not a true choice for either of us; in 2000, it would have been a non-starter to switch roles. So, I took on the role of primary caregiver for a time—a choice comfortably in line with everyone’s expectations, including my own. Where do these expectations come from? A hundred different directions. On one particularly difficult day, I was venting to my mother about how I felt torn between two spheres, and she said, “I know it’s hard, but you KNOW what is most important.” She meant well, but this was worse than unhelpful. It confirmed what I already knew: it is fine for a mother to be ambitious and committed to a career, as long she does it in her spare time. Soon, though, my girls began to grow, and I wanted them to have different

choices. I learned that there are many ways to be a wonderful mother, not all of which require being home after school or doing all the things my own mother did. And I learned to give up the overworked, underslept, beleaguered persona that I had acquired as a young lawyer with small children. Even more critical, though, I stopped feeling disloyal to my family when I had a good day at the office, and I began to allow myself to love my work. This last piece—allowing ourselves to love our professional lives—is critical in combating the constraints of outdated expectations. I once heard a young woman say that senior women in my profession have failed their successors in a critical way: We talk openly about the “cons” of life in Big Law, but not enough about the “pros”— the satisfaction of doing good work, our relationships with clients, the spark of a vibrant workforce, financial success and independence, and the opportunity to make an impact in the world. This was wise advice. I strive every day to show the younger lawyers in my firm—and my own daughters—what it looks like to have and love a satisfying career.

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Susan Failla Job Title: Partner Education: JD, Pace School of Law; BS, New York University Company Name: Hunton Andrews Kurth LLP Industry: Legal Company CEO: Walfrido Martinez (Managing Partner) Company Headquarters Location: Richmond, Virginia Your Location: New York, New York Words you live by: Solve the problem. Personal Philosophy: It's not just about the destination, it's also how you get there. What book are you reading: Never Caught: The Washingtons' Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge by Erica Armstrong Dunbar What was your first job: Babysitter Favorite charity: Malala Fund Interests: Snow skiing, water skiing, scuba diving, and cooking Family: Husband and 13-year-old twins

The Shalane Effect: You serve as a rocket booster for the careers of the women who work alongside you, while catapulting forward yourself.

The Power of the “Shalane Effect”

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read an article in the New York Times a year and a half ago about Shalane Flanagan, who had just won the New York City Marathon, becoming the first American woman to win in 40 years. That feat alone was impressive enough, but what impressed me even more was her journey to reaching that goal and what she did along the way. She joined a mostly male running club in Portland and recruited other women runners to join. She provided guidance, support, and mentoring to these women to keep them running, rather than burn out. As a result, she helped elevate them to levels they couldn't have achieved by themselves, ultimately outperforming the male members of the club and sending 11 women to the Olympics. Shalane wasn't intimidated by their success, she was enriched by it. She was able to draw strength from them and their experiences, receive support and encouragement, and achieve her own

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goals. She believed that helping others improve would help her improve. The author of the article, Lindsay Crouse, called it the "Shalane Effect: You serve as a rocket booster for the careers of the women who work alongside you, while catapulting forward yourself." These words have been an inspiration to me and are a model for women in leadership, regardless of the forum. Achieving success in many professions can be challenging for women, often involving solitary and lonely paths. I have been fortunate to have been boosted by successful women throughout my career, sometimes without even realizing it at the time, and my goal is to do the same for others. Opening doors, building relationships, and providing encouragement when facing challenges are some of the things that we women can do for each other. And in turn, these efforts create a platform that allows all of us to reach new heights.

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Robin Assaf Wofford Job Title: Partner Education: JD, Pepperdine University School of Law; Graduate Management Degree, North East London Polytechnic; BA, University of California–Los Angeles Company Name: Wilson Turner Kosmo Industry: Legal Company CEO: Joel L. DeVos Company Headquarters Location: San Diego, California Number of Employees: 59 Words you live by: Be anxious for nothing and grateful for all things. Personal Philosophy: Realize that everyone you meet has value, and if you treat them with honesty, respect and kindness, you will allow them to meet their potential and make this world a better place. What book are you reading: The Speed of Trust: The One Thing that Changes Everything by Stephen M. R. Covey What was your first job: Newspaper delivery girl Favorite charity: Shatterproof Interests: Sports, travel and reading Family: Husband, Don, and 2 children, Morgan and Michael

It Is Not Your Gender that Matters, but Your Ability to Ignore Stereotypes and Be You

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fter 31 years of practicing law, managing a law firm, working on various boards, and raising two children, I have finally realized the secret to success. Ignore stereotypes—they create fear and hesitation. Stop thinking there are things men can do better than women, or women can do better than men, and just do what you want to do. Stop thinking women should behave in a certain way, dress a certain way, and speak with a certain tone. Instead, cancel out all the noise society brings, be confident in yourself, and ask two very simple questions: Who do I want to be, and how can I achieve that while always helping others? All my life, I have been called different, but I never understood why. When I was in high school and college, I never thought of myself as a woman trying to get into a man’s world. I was just me. I have always been filled with energy, grateful for life, and interested in people. What I now realize, after speaking with my 27-year-old daughter, is that I was different because I was confident enough in

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myself not to conform to other people’s views of what I should be, how I should act, or who I should associate with. Rather, I decided what I wanted to be, who I wanted to help, how I could lead, and then, I just did it. I did it without thinking about whether I would ruffle feathers, upset the men, or make my girlfriends envious. I did not think of myself as a woman who needed to break through the glass ceiling, but rather as a talented, caring human being, striving to achieve something, ignoring stereotypes, and overcoming the barriers that held me back. I succeeded because I never considered being a woman an impediment. It was not always easy, but I was blessed with a support system of family, friends, and colleagues who encouraged me to believe in myself. So, my words of wisdom on fear of failure and overcoming that fear are these: We are all created equal, and when you believe in yourself and the goodness in others, you will find fulfillment and success.

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Lorelie S. Masters Job Title: Partner Education: JD, University of Notre Dame Law School; AB, Georgetown University Company Name: Hunton Andrews Kurth LLP Industry: Legal Company CEO: Wally Martinez (Managing Partner) Company Headquarters Location: Richmond, Virginia Your Location: Washington, DC Words you live by: Fairness, open-heartedness; civility, and charity Personal Philosophy: Be your own best advocate, and make your mom proud. What book are you reading: American Ulysses by Ronald Shaw; Grant by Ron Chernow; Chocolate City by Derek Musgrove; Votes for Women!: American Suffragists and the Battle for the Ballot by Winifred Conkling What was your first job: Cleaning stables Favorite charity: Human Trafficking Legal Center, DC Appleseed, and National Women’s History Museum Interests: Horses, bike riding, reading history, needlepoint, and updating my two legal treatises on insurance coverage and arbitration Family: Husband, Jack Rose; son Ian Rose; and stepson Dave Countryman and his wife Yan; and my first grandchild, Chloe Mei

Time for (Radical) Change—Now!

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rom decades of law practice, I know that diversity is a deliberate act. For more than a decade, women have comprised about 50 percent of law graduates. Minorities and people with disabilities make up about a quarter. Despite those facts, the number of women and minorities in senior leadership in our profession has barely budged. We need change. Now. We turn our backs on the demographics of the talent pool at our peril. Clients demand diversity, now. Research shows that diverse teams lead to better decision-making and results. We need to banish myths that women simply “go home” to raise children, and diverse attorneys simply choose to go elsewhere. ABA research shows that many women leave the profession not early in their careers but at their peak. Why? They make a rational choice: “If I am going work this hard, I want the same chance to succeed as the male (or majority) lawyer next door.” Too often, believing that is not the case, they vote with their feet. Our profession needs to work, intentionally, to ensure equal opportunity for all, by doing the following: 1. Tracking diversity statistics in hiring, compensation, and promotion, systematically, across the organization.

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Share these statistics with group and firm leaders, and demand accountability. 2. Leading from the top. For too long, we have expected women, and people of color, to fix this problem, and assumed we have done enough. Diversity efforts need not just support, but also personal leadership, from the top. 3. Using objective criteria and processes to drive hiring, compensation, and promotion. Use intentionally diverse teams to make such decisions; recruiting from diverse applicant pools. “Business as usual” will not make change. 4. Shining a light on unconscious bias. While diversity is intentional, lack of diversity is often unconscious. Identifying implicit biases about women and minorities in hiring, compensation, and promotion helps effect change. 5. Addressing aspects of compensation and succession planning that inhibit the advancement of women and minorities. As baby boomers retire, we need to ensure that all have equal chances to inherit the significant client relationships that guarantee success for law-firm partners. “Follow the money.” Making change is hard work. However, as Nelson Mandela said, “It always seems impossible until it’s done.” Let’s do it. Now.

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Sabrina Osborne Job Title: Vice President of Human Resources Education: BA, psychology, University of South Carolina; Global Professional in Human Resources Certification (GPHR), Senior Professional in Human Resources Certification (SPHR), Professional in Human Resources Certification (PHR), and Certified Professional Coach (CPC) Company Name: Humacyte, Inc. Industry: Biotechnology Company CEO: Jeffrey H. Lawson, MD, PhD Company Headquarters Location: Durham, North Carolina Number of Employees: 140 Words you live by: Choose happy. Personal Philosophy: All paths lead to where we’re supposed to be. What book are you reading: Billion Dollar Whale: The Man Who Fooled Wall Street, Hollywood, and the World by Tom Wright and Bradley Hope What was your first job: Food Service employee for Ray’s Hotdogs when I was 13 years old Favorite charity: Special Olympics Interests: Partnering with employees to guide, develop and empower them to be their best; finding new and innovative solutions; making memories with my family, from paddle boarding to taking long walks and zipping around the neighborhood on our Segway® Personal Transporters! Family: I married my high school sweetheart, and this year marks 29 fantastic years together. We have one teenage son who is turning 18 years old this year.

Together, We Can Do Better

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he role of women in top management and business ownership has evolved significantly. I get a great sense of fulfillment in seeing that about 45 percent of Humacyte’s executive leaders are women—a statistic that would be foreign in the 1990s. Although the number of women in C-suite and senior-management roles has increased in recent decades, there is still plenty of work to be done in encouraging the upward mobility of future female leaders. And this work starts at the top. Companies must prioritize developing their female leaders by employing a strategy that utilizes a diverse set of internal programs to develop employees and continue to embrace women at the top. Additionally, they should facilitate this strategy by identifying and eliminating biases against recruiting women during the hiring process—gender should never enter the equation when making a hiring decision. It is important to remember that D&I in the workplace is more than a gender issue. I strongly believe that organizations need to establish a culture that ensures

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there are opportunities in the workplace that are not just aimed at women, but ALL people, regardless of their gender, race, ethnicity, and religion. Most organizations know that diversity is a powerful driver of innovation, but they can’t expect diversity to happen by osmosis or chance. Company leaders must establish deliberate initiatives to seek out, embrace, and promote diverse voices. Being a leader in a diverse world means one has to be willing to open her or his mind to different viewpoints, respect that all people are entitled to their own beliefs, and lead by example in celebrating our collective diversity. I believe that every company has an obligation to create an environment where all employees are empowered to be their true, authentic selves, while also respecting that right for their colleagues. A company’s success and competiveness depends on the competency and creativity of those who lead and work in their organizations. The corporate world has made significant progress in achieving greater equality, but together, we can do better.

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Norma Lane Job Title: EVP of People and Places Education: MPA, University of San Francisco; Advanced Management Certification, University of California, Berkeley; BS, human resources & organization, University of San Francisco Company Name: Infoblox Industry: IT Company CEO: Jesper Andersen Company Headquarters Location: Santa Clara, California Number of Employees: 1,200 Words you live by: Rejection is simply a re-direction. Personal Philosophy: The best way to predict the future is to invent it. Write your own story. What book are you reading: Daring Greatly by Brené Brown; When Smart People Fail by Carole Hyatt What was your first job: Selling shoes at JC Penney Favorite charity: Dress for Success Interests: Hiking, wine pairing, and spending time with family Family: Three children—twins and my older son

Courage to Write Your Own Story

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was raised in a large traditional family where the definition of success for girls was to marry a nice man and have many children. Education and career weren’t important. This was perceived as an act of selfishness that would minimize male dominance. That never set well with me. Of course, I wanted to be married to a nice man, and have children. But I also wanted a career I loved. Why couldn’t I have both? Fortunately, I had a grandma who believed in me. She would secretly tell me “You can be anyone you want to be. Go out there and write your own story.” I carried her words throughout my life, and today, I can say I succeeded at that. I’ve written my own story. However, the journey hasn’t been easy. Early in my career I focused on working hard and following directions. I had great ideas, but I didn’t have an independent voice. I was submissive. This felt comfortable to me. I delivered great results in the format requested. I stood on the side lines, waiting to be noticed for my good work. And I was rewarded with promotions. I was on my way … until I was rejected for a senior leadership position.

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Wait… What? I was told that I wasn’t strategic. I was shocked. It took a lot of soul searching to understand the rejection. As I look back, I realize I wasn’t ready for a promotion to senior management. There’s a point in every career when mastering trade skills just isn’t good enough. What got me here wasn’t what would get me there. I took the most important step in my career. I asked for help. I enlisted a coach who helped me overcome my shortcomings and envision what could be. Over time I stepped out of my comfort zone and built enough confidence to speak up, have an independent voice, and challenge the status quo. I gained a great appreciation for anticipating business needs, interpreting data points, building alliances, and influencing change. I took risks, pushed the boundaries, and jumped into that arena with both feet and a different mindset. I rebranded myself as a strategic leader. That senior leadership role did come my way again and this time I was ready. Every rejection is simply a redirection. I’m still learning and writing my story.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Melissa Holobach Job Title: General Manager, Oklahoma City Education: Master of Science, industrial engineering, Northwestern University; Bachelor of Science, industrial engineering, Kettering University Company Name: Terex Corporation Industry: Heavy Equipment Company CEO: John L. Garrison, Jr. Company Headquarters Location: Westport, Connecticut Number of Employees: 11,000 Your Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Words you live by: Be intentional; be curious. Personal Philosophy: Make clear communication a priority. Poor communication is the root cause of most issues/problems. What book are you reading: Farsighted: How We Make the Decisions that Matter Most by Steven Johnson What was your first job: Part-time office work for an insurance company (high school) Favorite charity: Heifer International Interests: Reading, problem solving, people, and needlework Family: Married 30 years, no kids

Always Keep the Glass Balls in the Air

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ne afternoon I found myself struggling with setting priorities. My personal objectives and professional goals seemed to be so intertwined that they were choking each other. My department head noticed the conflict in my face and pulled me into her office. She shared the visualization below, which I live by to this day. While simple to understand, it is difficult to master: “We all have things we juggle for our time and attention. Think of them as balls a juggler would juggle. Some are glass—if you drop them they break. Some are rubber—if you drop them they bounce and roll away to be picked up some other day. The secret is to know which balls are glass and which are rubber. Always keep the glass balls in the air.” My department head was a woman worthy of respect. Her words set the stage for my personal and professional development. She took the time to notice me, and to sit and share in a way that helped me to organize my emo-

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tions, time, and goals. She was my first mentor. Over the years, I have learned to juggle more balls. Some additional glass balls have been added, along with many rubber balls. I have perfected dropping and picking up balls. I have had many mentors through the years who added dimension and color to what I have learned to juggle. They helped me identify and keep my glass balls in the air. They helped me recognize when rubber turned to glass and vice versa. Through mentors, I learned that juggling is an art perfected through practice. Women mentors are essential in that they bring affirmation and they instill confidence. However, a good mentor is anyone with strong listening skills, discernment, and openness to share (men or women). Communication is the key to a good mentor/mentee relationship. Early on, my mentors gave me confidence and courage. Mid-career, they grounded me in business principles and helped me find my voice. Now, they help me to be a better mentor.

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Lisa Toenniges Job Title: Chief Executive Officer Education: Bachelor of Arts, Michigan State University; Master of Education, Wayne State University Company Name: Innovative Learning Group, Inc. Industry: Training and Performance Improvement Company CEO: Lisa Toenniges Company Headquarters Location: Troy, Michigan Number of Employees: 19 Words you live by: Drive. I’m always looking ahead and “driving” to what is next. Personal Philosophy: Many people over think things; I try to keep it practical and just add value to the world. What book are you reading: Millennials, Goldfish & Other Training Misconceptions: Debunking Learning Myths and Superstitions by Clark N. Quinn What was your first job: Teaching piano and babysitting when I was a teenager Favorite charity: On My Own of Michigan Interests: Outdoor activities such as water skiing, boating, and hiking Family: Husband Jeff and two daughters, Alex and Kit

Let’s Do Great Work Together

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nowing what Innovative Learning Group (ILG) does to help people and organizations be successful is a major influence in what ignites my passion. ILG provides learning and performance support solutions to employees of Fortune 1000 companies. Every day we help people acquire new skills and knowledge that help them do their jobs better and progress in their careers. If people can thrive in their careers and better provide for themselves and their families, they can improve the quality of their lives. This is a pretty cool component of what we do as a company. Additionally, actually running ILG is another professional passion. I attribute my success to hard work and taking a practical, hands-on approach to leading. I’m very clear about what I’m good at and what I’m not so good at; therefore, I make it a point to surround myself with talented people. It’s natural for me to set a goal, determine the steps I need to get there, and then work the plan every day. When I was growing up, I played musical instruments and sports. I learned you can’t start the recital piece the day before the concert or get in shape the day

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before the big game. You have to show up and practice every single day with intense focus and commitment to the task at hand. My standards are always high. While I’m pleased with the 96 percent that is right, I’m intensely focused on the 4 percent that isn’t quite there yet. I live in the future and am very comfortable with delayed gratification. I’m in the business for the long haul and able to take a long-range view as I identify strategies and make decisions. ILG’s culture is one of collaboration, accountability, and respect. Roles are defined, people have the skills to do the job, and they want to do the job. Expectations are set, the right tools are provided, rewards are aligned with desired performance, and opportunities are available for employees to build new skills. Part of our vision reads, “Attract talented people who want to work with us, do good work, and enjoy what they do.” And this is my goal—to create an environment where employees, freelancers, and clients want to come every day, have fun, and do great work together.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Aileen Thomas Job Title: Partner Education: JD, Mississippi College of Law; BA, Belhaven College Company Name: Jones Walker LLP Industry: Legal Services Company CEO: Bill Hines, Managing Partner Company Headquarters Location: New Orleans, Louisiana Number of Employees: 700 Your Location: Jackson, Mississippi Words you live by: “I alone cannot change the world, but I can cast a stone across the waters to create many ripples.” –Mother Teresa Personal Philosophy: Plan for tomorrow, but live for today. What book are you reading: Women Talking by Miriam Toews What was your first job: Camp counselor Favorite charity: Habitat for Humanity Interests: Travel and reading Family: Husband, David, and children Timothy, Leah, Emma, Brenna, Trey & Analise

Take the Risk … Success Is often Built on Failure

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orking women, no matter our profession or industry, still face enormous challenges when it comes to achieving parity with our male colleagues. We know this, just as we know that many of these challenges are cultural and institutional, and will therefore require united effort to overcome. As a member of my law firm's board of directors, it is work that I take very seriously, particularly when mentoring associates just starting to establish themselves in the legal profession. That said, I am equally interested in how we, as individual women, can have a positive impact on our own professional development. Over the years, I have come to recognize that our fear of failure, our aversion to taking risks, and our concerns about the judgments of others can have negative effects on our potential success (however we define success for ourselves). I would like to be clear, up front: my focus on risk aversion and risk taking is not about blaming the victim. There are external factors, double standards, and

a raft of mixed messages and real-world repercussions that contribute to why girls and women often fear failure. We, as leaders, can't ask young women to risk making mistakes if we're not willing to offer support when things don't go as planned. As we work together to remove extrinsic barriers and create lasting change, each of us must also do the hard, internal work of facing—and overcoming—the things that scare us most. For some, acting with confidence may mean choosing a career in a traditionally male-dominated field. For others, it may mean speaking up—even offering contrasting opinions—in meetings with colleagues or organizational leaders. For still others, it may mean showing up to work every day despite what can feel like overwhelming challenges in other areas of life. I can't tell any woman what courage should look like or mean to her. All I can do is encourage her to risk failure. Virtually every great success has been built on a hill—if not a mountain—of failed attempts.

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Hagit Muriel Elul Job Title: Partner Education: JD cum laude, Columbia University School of Law; BA, University of California, Berkeley Company Name: Hughes Hubbard & Reed LLP Industry: Legal Services Company CEO: Theodore V.H. Mayer (Chair) Company Headquarters Location: New York, New York Words you live by: “Never give up. Never surrender.” –Galaxy Quest Personal Philosophy: Failure is not an option, but success has many definitions. What book are you reading: As usual, a mystery novel What was your first job: A flower shop—I was surrounded by blooms all day. It was a life changer. Favorite charity: ACLU Interests: Slow jogging, art, and fabrics and textiles Family: Yes

A Band of Sisters

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graduated from Columbia Law School 20 years ago with a class that was half women, and the idea of a glass ceiling seemed antiquated to me. Gender barriers were alien. The future was mine. Yet two weeks ago, I went to court and found I was the sole female attorney in a courtroom of 27 lawyers. I am a female partner in a law firm that counts 20 percent of its partnership as female—roughly on par with the AmLaw trend. When I point out this imbalance, I am often told that the practice of law is incompatible with women having children. As a mother of three children myself, with female colleagues who also mother young children, this explanation does not comport with my experience. I know the actual barriers for women’s career advancement are a lack of mentorship, career-building opportunities, confidence in women’s skills and talents, and work/life flexibility. These challenges are real. And, yes, it is frustrating that they still exist in 2019. At the same time, in the 20 years I have been practicing law, something surprising happened. I became part of a band of sisters—a community of like-minded female lawyers, practicing at the highest echelons of their field and simultaneously enjoying a rich and rewarding life.

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We started out as optimistic young women, unaware that there was anything other than a level playing field ahead of us. Over the years, we supported each other to make sure our voices were heard and our achievements recognized. We lift each other up and reach behind us to lift other women up. We are all too familiar with the indignities that can come with being a female lawyer: being mistaken for the secretary or the court reporter; male opposing counsel telling you to smile in the middle of a deposition; the mediator “joking” that you achieved a favorable settlement for your client by offering sexual favors to your male adversary; and the judge admonishing male counsel against “ganging up on a little girl” when you walk into a settlement conference. We know that when we walk into a room we have earned our place at the table. When asked when will there be enough women on the Supreme Court, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg famously said, “When there are nine.” If that fantastical dream were to ever happen, I know it will only be possible because of the band of sisters that came before us, that strives alongside us, and that will rise after us.

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Jessica Taub Rosenberg Job Title: Partner Education: JD, Fordham University School of Law; BA summa cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa, Emory University Company Name: Kasowitz Benson Torres LLP Industry: Legal Company CEO: Marc E. Kasowitz, founding and managing partner Company Headquarters Location: New York, New York Number of Employees: 449 Words you live by: She who laughs, lasts. Personal Philosophy: Every decision in life has pros and cons, so there is no “right” choice. Having an open mind and learning from others is instrumental to success. What book are you reading: Pachinko by Min Jin Lee What was your first job: Waitress at East Bay Diner Favorite charity: The Arc Westchester’s Children’s School for Early Development, which provides educational, social, and support services for children (from birth to age five) and their families Interests: True crime podcasts, the beach, modern art, and I couldn’t live without time with my friends Family: Lucky mother of two incredible boys (we call them Pickle and Giggy) and thankful for my amazing husband, Josh

You Really Can Manage it All—Here’s How

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riends often ask me, “How do you manage it all—long hours and demanding clients, the stress of highstakes litigation, plus the daily commute, all while raising two children?” I always answer the same way: “It’s hard. Anyone who says it’s not is lying.” But I’ve found a few tips that have helped me: First, love what you do. I have real passion for solving problems for clients, crafting legal arguments, and winning cases. It drives me to get up every day and tackle the next challenge. I still get excited when a new case comes in, and I work at a firm where colleagues share that passion and enthusiasm. While growing up, I saw that both my parents loved their careers, talked about interesting matters they worked on, and instilled in me from a young age that hard work is a virtue. Second, let the little things go—mainly because there isn’t time to think about them! That also means other people’s judgments. Get comfortable doing things your way. Do what works for you, and hold yourself to no one's standards but your own. For me, I prioritize taking time for myself. A colleague recently asked me

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how I had time to read fiction and I responded, “I don’t want a life where I can’t read a book for fun.” Yes, when work is intense, I’m not getting through my novel, but then I reset and schedule and include time for myself. Third, accept that you will occasionally disappoint people. There is only one of you, so at some point your son or your adversary or a friend is going to feel that you didn’t respond quickly enough, or give them the attention they asked for. This is a hard one, but you have to get comfortable that you are doing your best across the board, and you will get back to them tomorrow. Finally, ask for help. At work, rely on colleagues and staff to handle matters and delegate whenever you can. If you micromanage everyone, you will never allow those around you to grow and develop professionally, and you will always feel like you don’t have support. Ask questions of mentors and don’t be scared to admit you don’t know the answer. At home, you need family, friends, and loving babysitters to make it work. So lean on others and get the support you need.

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Sam Smith Job Title: Vice President, Global Practice Lead, Life Sciences Education: No. 1 School of Engineering, Royal Air Force (RAF)–Halton Company Name: Kelly Services Industry: Workforce solutions (staffing, employment) Company CEO: Peter Quigley Company Headquarters Location: Troy, Michigan Number of Employees: 1,100 (corporate headquarters); approx. 6,800 (global network) Your Location: London, England, UK Words you live by: Intent, purpose, friendship, and trust Personal Philosophy: Know who you are and show up as that person. Every time. What book are you reading: A Woman of No Importance by Sonia Purnell What was your first job: Petrol pump attendant, paper girl, and taxi radio operator Favorite charity: Marie Curie Interests: Sports, current affairs addict, and music lover Family: Married, with a son

A Passion for Empowerment

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he military, engineering, and infrastructure are where my early career was spent. Male-centric environments gave me an education beyond the classroom, and built foundations for work environments that were challenging, horrifying, glorious, brilliant, and difficult in equal measure. I left school and continued my education in the military, where every team I was assigned to was previously 100 percent male. They were not impressed to be handed a “girl” or a burden, and likely thought they would surely lose against their competing all-male teams. And on occasion they did. On other occasions they did not. We won. My early experiences were preparation for the world of work that stretched ahead of me. Those experiences would also open me to uncharted waters, which—aided by my ability to understand priorities, along with the art of humor, silence, compliance, and challenge, in no particular order—I was equipped to navigate. In reality, for me to be considered equal, I needed to outperform my peers. From time to time, I look back and consider that not much may have changed, but at the same time, so much has changed.

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I am encouraged by female leaders who recognize they are laying the groundwork for other women to follow in their footsteps. However, we cannot expect that path to be smooth. We must acknowledge our role as a generation of women who extend a helping hand to others around us, bring them on the journey with us, and wherever we can, push them ahead of us. Women often find themselves competing against history, against other women, and against men in a field that does not look fair, even, or navigable. My call to action for women is to lead and, when you have your goal within reach, allow others with fresher legs to run ahead and continue the journey. You will still reach your goal. For every woman we enable, empower, and support beyond our own goals, we pave the way for the generations to come. We extend our reach and close the gap. There is so much more to be done, so many female managers, directors, and CEOs to be appointed, and so many women to be applauded, if we shine a light on each other, then they shall be harder to miss.

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Sue Holub Job Title: Executive Vice President & Chief Marketing Officer Education: Executive education, University of Michigan, Ross School of Business; BA cum laude, public communication and Spanish, American University Company Name: KORE Wireless Industry: Wireless/Internet of Things Company CEO: Romil Bahl Company Headquarters Location: Alpharetta, Georgia Words you live by: Treat others as you would like to be treated. Personal Philosophy: Enable, empower, then get out of the way. What book are you reading: It Worked for Me by Colin Powell What was your first job: Account coordinator at a Top-5 global public relations firm Favorite charity: Global Rights Campaign; St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Interests: My family, swimming, the beach, a visit to a spa Family: Married, with a son

The Intrinsic Value of Women in Leadership

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n my 25 years of experience, I have encountered many of the obstacles that plague women in leadership— assumptions regarding lesser competence, pay inequality, and leading with emotions, to name a few. Yet, I have found that being a female executive affords both unique and compelling advantages for success—high emotional quotient (EQ) and team orientation, resilience and perseverance, and the innate desire to excel at whatever we do. Honing your EQ serves you well, both personally and professionally, despite the pervasive talk track that emotion in the workplace is synonymous with weakness. In my opinion, if you can read your friends’ and family’s moods, you can read your colleagues’ moods, which makes you equipped to adapt to them and anticipate, rather than feel the need to dominate. It is amazing what you can achieve when you enter a dialogue without concern for being right or receiving credit. Think of EQ as an authentic path to passion, teamwork, and diversity—a beacon for culture-building among employees, customers, and influencers. Where EQ does not prove to be useful, resilience and perseverance will— and that is something women have in spades. Being a female leader requires

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thick skin, without a doubt. Frankly, you need thick skin in leadership, regardless of gender. There will be undermining, backstabbing, and scapegoating. There will also be individual and team victories, company milestones, and achievements you will anchor on for the rest of your career. Resilience and perseverance get you to those moments. As the wise Wayne Dyer once said, “Always remember that every obstacle is a test and an opportunity.” Finally, women in leadership must embrace their inherent desire to excel at anything they put their minds to. This is essential, no matter your industry, profession, or seniority. The great equalizers in business are performance and results orientation. If you are going to spend eight or more hours at a job every day, away from home and family, be world class at what you do—both in leadership and execution. Everyone wants the A-player on their team, and being an A-player is a combination of both what you deliver and how you deliver it. Women in any field have the unique opportunity to not just raise the bar, but also change the perspective. It’s not about why organizations should have more women in leadership. It’s about what they’re sacrificing if they don’t.

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Lauren Tabaksblat Job Title: Partner Education: JD, New York University School of Law, Articles Editor, NYU Environmental Law Journal; BA cum laude, Barnard College Company Name: Kasowitz Benson Torres LLP Industry: Legal Company CEO: Marc E. Kasowitz, founding and managing partner Company Headquarters Location: New York, New York Number of Employees: 449 Words you live by: The harder you work for something, the greater you will feel when you achieve it. Personal Philosophy: Every experience is a learning experience. You can learn just as much from your mistakes as you do from your successes. What book are you reading: The Year of Yes by Shonda Rhimes What was your first job: Summer camp counselor at sleep-away camp Favorite charity: American Committee of Shaare Zedek Medical Center in Jerusalem Interests: Spinning, cooking, and cheering on my three kids at their respective sports games Family: Married, with two sons and a daughter

There’s No One Blueprint for Juggling Career and Family

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was promoted to partner at a top law firm eight months after returning from maternity leave following the birth of my youngest child. It was my third maternity leave in six years; my first child was born two years after I graduated law school. My impression was that many women in the male-dominated world of complex commercial litigation opted to wait until later in their careers to have children, often until after they were elected partner. Making partner on the same track as my peers after having three children was virtually unheard of. I am fortunate to work at a firm, and have mentors, who recognized my hard work and the important contributions I have made to my cases. I was raised and live in an Orthodox Jewish community, where women traditionally marry and have children early. Many choose to stay at home full time, and those who do work outside the home generally opt for part-time careers with flexible schedules. I wanted a career I was passionate about, while remaining committed to my family and community. There was no blueprint for juggling family and community involvement with my sixty- to eighty-hour workweek. At work, I had to demonstrate to my firm

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and our clients that I was committed to winning cases. At home, I needed to be available to my husband and children, and active in my community. I’m a multitasker by nature, so I’ve learned to prioritize what’s most important, while working with my colleagues and husband to balance the rest. Finding my appropriate balance of career, family, and community has not been without obstacles. As an associate, I missed an opportunity to argue an important motion, when a hearing was rescheduled for the week my second child was born. Recently, I missed a family vacation during the trial of a case that I had spent ten years working on. The trial, which resulted in a jury verdict in favor of our client, has been one of the highlights of my career, and something that my family is immensely proud of. The definition of and path to success is different for everyone. I hope my journey shows other women that there is no one-size-fits-all solution, and that it can serve as a model for the next generation of women who want to build rewarding careers, without losing sight of the importance of family and community.

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Nicole Fanjul Job Title: Partner Education: JD, Harvard Law School; BA, Duke University Company Name: Latham & Watkins LLP Industry: Legal Company CEO: Richard Trobman Company Headquarters Location: N/A Number of Employees: 5,000+ Your Location (if different from above): New York, New York Words you live by: Don’t be afraid of a challenge. Personal Philosophy: Be grateful for the many blessings in your life each day. What book are you reading: Becoming by Michele Obama What was your first job: Restocking cards at a Hallmark store after school Favorite charity: Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Interests: Baking, fitness, and travel

Set Your Own Priorities … or Someone Else Will

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am a woman of color, a first-generation professional, a mother, and a finance partner at Latham & Watkins. Being true to myself and my priorities has been a critical element of my career development, and has helped define my success. When I decided to begin my law career, I felt that I might be at a disadvantage because I did not fit what I perceived as the traditional mold of a “BigLaw” associate. Early on, I wanted to find a balance between fitting into my new work environment and maintaining my identity. In fact, I chose Latham because I felt comfortable here being myself. I was not willing to waste any mental energy pretending to be someone other than myself. One defining challenge for me was the decision to start a family while I was an associate. I knew I wanted to have kids, even before I knew I wanted to be a lawyer. As a younger lawyer, I watched several of my friends and colleagues struggle as they tried to balance work and family. Some would leave their firm to go in house, or leave the professional world altogether. I wanted to stay at my firm and find a way to make it work.

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Very fortunately, I had partners and firm leaders around me who were parents, so they understood the competing demands of parenthood and partnership, and juggled them successfully. My practice group was extremely supportive when I decided to start a family while continuing to pursue my professional goals. I have never been shy about the demands of my child; his photos are all over my office. I hope this signals to associates on my team that their children and families are legitimate parts of their lives, and that we want them to be open about who they are. I have watched women take on unreasonable workloads to the detriment of their families and their well-being because they were afraid of being labeled as unreliable or missing an opportunity their male colleagues would take. I try to say yes, rather than no. If I need to stretch to make it work, of course I do. But if you don’t ever try to find a balance, it will never happen. Balance doesn’t happen by accident. If you don’t express your priorities, others will set them for you, and probably not in the way you want.

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Michelle Ontiveros Gross Job Title: Partner Education: JD, Columbia Law School; BS, Stanford University Company Name: Mayer Brown Industry: Legal Company CEO: Paul Theiss Company Headquarters Location: N/A Number of Employees: 3,660 Your Location: Palo Alto, California Words you live by: “The price of success is hard work, dedication to the job at hand, and the determination that whether we win or lose, we have applied the best of ourselves to the task at hand.” –Vince Lombardi Personal Philosophy: Know your personal and professional true north, and follow it. What was your first job: Scooping ice cream at Braum’s Ice Cream & Dairy Store; it was love at first sight Favorite charity: Girls on the Run, an organization that inspires girls to be joyful, healthy and confident using a fun, experience-based curriculum which creatively integrates running Interests: I love healthy athletic competition. No matter the day, I’d always rather be in workout clothes doing something athletic. Family: I'm married to an awesome husband (also a lawyer), and we have a four year old, a 14 month old, and I am three months pregnant with our third child.

We Have a Right to Say, “I’m Tired.”

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s I write this essay, I am three months pregnant with my third child. I am thrilled to be blessed with a third child on the way, but I am also exhausted. And I can’t help but regularly ponder the notion that we, as a society, simply ask too much of women. As is the case with most working women while pregnant, there is an expectation that I continue successfully performing my job until I am officially on maternity leave. For the last three months I have been nauseous 90 percent of each day, and I have been struggling to stay awake. I have had to dig deep to do the minimum at my job and, no matter how hard I work, I feel like I am underperforming. My husband once said that it seems when women won the fight for rights in the workplace, we really won the right to a second job (albeit a paid one). According to a recent Forbes article, women are eight times more likely than men to take time off from work to care for sick children or manage their children's schedules. Despite this obvious inequity, as

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women, we often work tirelessly to not appear distracted by family obligations or otherwise less than fully committed to our professions. When I think back to how far professional women have come, and how much women have fought for the rights that many of us now take for granted, I am so proud. But I also think that long history has provided us with another often unrecognized right: the right to say, “I’m tired. I’m tired of wearing heels. I’m tired of spending countless hours styling my hair and finding the “right” clothes to wear. I’m tired of being assumed to be the primary caregiver. And I’m tired of pretending that this pregnancy is not completely exhausting me.” I personally am more than committed to my job and my family. I love being a lawyer and I love being a mom. But I am also human, and the expectations and standards to which we hold women are unacceptably heavy. It is time for women to stand up and proudly say, “We are tired!”

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Ms. Sally O’Hara Job Title: Chief Executive Officer Company Name: Krungthai AXA Life Insurance Company Limited Industry: Life insurance Company CEO: Sally O’Hara Company Headquarters Location: Bangkok, Thailand Number of Employees: 1,096 Words you live by: “Just living is not enough… one must have sunshine, freedom, and a little flower.” –Hans Christian Andersen Personal Philosophy: Take your career seriously, but don’t take yourself too seriously. What book are you reading: A bestselling novel, a business-related book, a home décor book, and a travel guide for the next remote destination on my bucket list What was your first job: Graduate trainee in finance at Siemens Australia Favorite charity: Wild Women On Top Coastrek; charities that empower women and protect our environment Interests: Tennis, exploring remote destinations, movies, and relaxing with my kids Family: Two sons, aged 13 and 16, and a super-cute, 2-year-old Corgi

It’s Fear, not Failure, that Destroys Dreams

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top worrying about what others think,” “trust your instincts,” and “know your strengths” are some words of wisdom that come to mind when I am advising young women starting their careers. Throughout my own career, in which I have held a variety of leadership roles, I have made mistakes and experienced failure. While tough to accept at the time, I recognize now that these situations served as important building blocks in expanding my knowledge and experience, which has ultimately made me a better leader. Everyone is afraid of failure on some level. It’s human nature. However, the fear of failure tends to hold women back more than their male counterparts. Women are particularly hard on themselves and can take rejection more personally. Hence, women often resist applying for senior positions until they’re certain of the outcome and are more than qualified for the job. This becomes difficult to manage in a world where technology and business models are rapidly changing. It’s impossible to know everything, so spending too much time trying to achieve perfection risks derailing a woman’s career rather than strengthening it. What’s most important is for women to trust their ability to quickly learn and adapt, to believe in

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themselves, and to embrace opportunities to grow. As leaders, we need to show young women that trial and error encourages, rather than impedes, learning and innovation. We need to instill the importance of taking calculated risks and retaining self-belief. Earlier this year, AXA unveiled a new campaign, “Know You Can,” which encourages its customers, including women, to believe in themselves, realize their ambitions, overcome their fears, and achieve their goals. Krungthai-AXA Life Insurance in Thailand is committed to diversity and inclusion and proud to have 60 percent female representation at the executive level. We are particularly focused on equipping our female employees with the confidence they need to become leaders in the industry by empowering them and fostering a learning culture. If women want to overcome fear, they first need to recognize it and commit to moving through it. I encourage women to get comfortable with accepting potential failures. What’s important is to acknowledge the failure, learn from it, and move on. Finally, trust your instincts and remember that fear will destroy more dreams and ambitions than failure ever will.

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Carisa Wisniewski Job Title: Managing Partner Company Name: Moss Adams LLP Industry: Professional services Company CEO: Chris Schmidt Company Headquarters Location: Seattle, Washington Number of Employees: 2,852 Your Location: San Diego, California Words you live by: Do hard things. Personal Philosophy: It is not about being great it is about striving for greatness. What book are you reading: Smart Collaboration by Heidi Gardner What was your first job: Worked at a gym, before gyms were a thing Favorite charity: Girl Scouts Interests: Dirt bike riding and Jeeping Family: Husband, Andy, and sons Theo (24) and Hayden (22)

Each Person, Each Voice, Each Idea

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hroughout my 30 years of accounting experience, I’ve seen companies increasingly rely on diverse, multidisciplinary teams of women and men, people of different ethnicities and background, and younger and older workers. This diversity creates a valuable dynamic, increasing opportunities to individuals and profitability to business. It’s more important than ever to learn and create awareness of inclusion. I believe in having a purpose and creating value in everything I do because it takes energy, deliberate effort, and continued assessment to create and maintain an inclusive culture. Early in my career, I saw the power of taking the time to make personal connections, and understand what makes each individual unique and what value looks like to them. Showing an open mindset, being curious, and listening without judgment create an environment where all backgrounds and ideas count and contribute to personal and professional development. And I thrive on helping individuals professionally grow and succeed. Through the understanding gained from these connections, I feel a responsibility to support networking and mentoring opportunities to leverage relationships that will benefit the individual’s growth. I credit my personal and professional coaches and mentors over

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the years for offering advice and direction. They empowered me to identify my uniqueness, giving me the confidence to join the boards of directors of nonprofit organizations in my 20s, becoming a partner in my 30s, and holding leadership roles at a great firm in my 40s and 50s. I’ve also had the good fortune to work with extremely talented colleagues. Collaboration with inclusion is one of the most compelling lessons I’ve learned—it’s not one or the other. The result is high-performing teams that create exceptional client experiences because they are connected and engaged. This, in turn, drives continued learning and development, which advances opportunities. And, while recognizing team success is important, acknowledging each member by name and thanking them for their specific contribution is a critical characteristic of inclusive leadership—as it perpetuates an inclusive culture where each voice counts. What I’ve learned is that inclusive leadership is the key to fostering a culture that values each person, each voice, and each idea. With an increasingly diverse workforce, I believe everyone should strive to be an inclusive leader, and I plan to continue to help and inspire others to value and use their strengths to treat others respectfully and fairly, promoting a sense of value and belonging.

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Ms. Bubphawadee Owararinth Job Title: Chief People Officer Education: Bachelor’s degree, political science with honors, Thammasat University; Master’s degree, public administration with honors, Academic Excellence Award, National Institute of Development Administration (NIDA) Company Name: Krungthai AXA Life Insurance Company Limited Industry: Life insurance Company CEO: Sally O’Hara Company Headquarters Location: Bangkok, Thailand Number of Employees: 1,096 Words you live by: “People will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel” –Maya Angelou Personal Philosophy: Dare to dream, and strive to make the dream come true. What book are you reading: HR megatrend book, a business-trend book, and a research-related book What was your first job: Consulting analyst in a HR consulting company Favorite charity: Scholarships for underprivileged students seeking support with HR degrees Interests: Collecting vinyl, playing musical instruments, DJ, dancing, and food & drink Family: Single, but I spend a lot of time with my wonderful 5-year-old nephew

Gender Equality Is Better for Everyone

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omen’s role in the workplace has certainly come a long way in the last few decades. However, female leaders are still scarce and largely overlooked, when it comes to senior executive positions in the industry. Why is this? It’s most certainly not due to lack of expertise or intelligence—research has proven this—but more a result of traditional values and customs, outdated thinking, and obstacles that women have to face over their male counterparts. One challenge is that more women than men end up taking a back seat in their jobs to raise a family. It shouldn’t be a case of kids or career, but women are often still left with this difficult decision and challenging balancing act. The obstacles for female executives don’t exist just because of their individual choices. There are greater forces in play, ingrained in biases against female leaders who don’t fit the style of the people who led before them. The MeToo movement has helped to reveal the entrenched discrimination some face at work, but the prejudice and unconscious bias still remains. Women leaders may also be held to higher standards and have often to prove themselves more than their male

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colleagues. This issue centers on the reluctance of women to self-promote or to ask for what we want. As the number of female leaders increases, this will hopefully become less of a barrier. KTAXA takes diversity very seriously, and I’m immensely proud that our group CEO has recently signed the UN Global Compact’s Women’s Empowerment Principles, which are intended to improve gender parity. Overall, more organizations are taking action and putting structures and processes in place which support women who are aspiring to senior leadership roles. These include extended parental leave, leadership programs, and flexible work schedules. Women should position themselves to benefit from these diversity initiatives. Although opportunities are certainly increasing, actual change will only come from addressing bias at a more fundamental level and changing a company’s culture and the way they think about female leaders. Investment in change is certainly worth the effort, as gender equality is better everyone—better for business, better for families, and better for our country—because the more diverse the pool, the more talented our leaders will be.

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Lara Kearney Job Title: Deputy Manager, Gateway Program Education: BS and ME, biomedical engineering, Texas A&M University, Executive MBA, Naval Postgraduate School Company Name: NASA Industry: Aerospace Company CEO: Jim Bridenstein, NASA Administrator Company Headquarters Location: Washington DC Number of Employees: 180 Your Location: Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas Words you live by: Always keep learning, growing, and reaching. Personal Philosophy: Personal integrity and kindness are everything. What book are you reading: Built to Last: Successful Habits of Visionary Companies by James C. Collins and Jerry I. Porras What was your first job: Human factors engineer in the Biomechanics Lab at Johnson Space Center Favorite charity: Assistance Dog Institute, which trains service dogs for military veterans Interests: Fitness, running, and spinning Family: Husband, Don, son, Brendan (21), and daughter, Erin (18)

With Leadership Comes Great Responsibility

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eing a female leader in a highly technical, visible organization is a true honor. Every day, I have the privilege of working with amazing, smart, dedicated people, all striving toward the common goal of advancing human spaceflight and sending people back to the moon and on to Mars. The farther I progress in my career, the more I realize that with that honor comes great responsibility. I am in a position to influence and guide the next generation of female leaders. I now understand that I am always being watched by women and young girls, both inside and outside NASA. I am often asked to represent NASA and our human spaceflight programs at external conferences and various educational outreach events. Inevitably, I am approached by women and young girls who tell me how motivated they are by seeing another woman in a leadership position in a technical organization such as NASA. By my simply being there, they recognize that they too can play an important role and excel in whatever field excites them. I take these opportunities very seriously and always make time to visit with them, encourage them and to wish them well.

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Inside NASA, I am able to set a positive example for women through my everyday actions. I show them that respect and recognition are earned simply by doing your job consistently well, not by demanding it. I show them that a female leader can be tough, while also being compassionate. She can work extremely hard, while also prioritizing her family. She sets high expectations for her people, while she does everything in her power to make them successful. She can sit next to her male colleague and be equally educated, competent and influential. And she pays forward all of the opportunities that were afforded to her by empowering, guiding, supporting, and developing those who follow her. I truly believe that empowered women empower women, whether we work together, or we cross paths at a conference or in our personal lives. Confident female leaders are not threatened by other rising female leaders, but support, encourage, and open doors for them. Yes, my professional passion is seeing the first woman and the next man walk on the moon, but it is also seeing strong, confident, empowered women take their place among the leaders that will help get them there.

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Dr. Kim R. Grimes Job Title: CEO & Founder Education: Doctor of Strategic Leadership, Regent University; Master’s degree, management, Troy State University Company Name: Living Abundantly, Inc. Industry: Health and wellness Company CEO: Dr. Kim R. Grimes Company Headquarters Location: Newport News, Virginia Number of Employees: 1 Words you live by: Integrity, clarity, and transparency Personal Philosophy: Own your greatness! What book are you reading: The Bible; Crushing It by Gary Vaynerchuk What was your first job: Administrative assistant for an insurance company Favorite charity: Living Abundantly Youth Vision Interests: Traveling, speaking, coaching, and dancing Family: Married 23 years to LTC (Retired) Lionel T. Grimes

You Can Stand in Greatness

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uccess is what we make it. As women, we get to choose what success looks like as it pertains to our dreams, goals, and ambitions. However, far too many women define success without truly knowing who they are and without including an important ingredient—failure. I am certain that the fear of failure keeps women from boldly walking in their greatness and standing in their brilliance—or said another way, stepping out of their comfort zone and playing full out regardless of the outcome. Not knowing who you are leaves the door wide open for the fear of failure to creep in, which ultimately leads to mediocrity. God created each of us as unique beings. Our uniqueness sets us apart and buried in it is our greatness, our gifts, and our talents, all of which can be used for the purpose of serving the world. Knowing who you are requires you to be crystal clear on your abilities, skills, and expertise. When women become clear in these areas, success is inevitable, even if failure plays a part in the process. Instead failure being feared, it will be embraced and seen as a stepping stone to the next

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achievement or accomplishment. If you are a woman who is allowing the fear of failure to keep you away from your potential greatness and success, you must first start by falling madly, madly, madly, in love with who you are. This will require you to dig deep inside yourself and uncover those aspects that will allow you to be your most authentic self. Below are four statements that every woman should be able to complete about herself in order to ensure she is standing in her greatness. Ask yourself the question, complete the statement, and then say it out loud, without repeating an answer. 1.) What I like about myself is… 2.) What I appreciate about myself is… 3.) What I admire about myself is… 4.) What I love about myself is… I can guarantee that every successful woman’s journey has not been achieved without her having experienced failure. That success did not come without it, nor did it come without her knowing how to stand in her greatness. Without failure as a main ingredient, there is no true way to measure success.

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Susan Gueli Job Title: CIO, SVP Infrastructure & Operations, Digital Transformation & Enterprise Applications Education: Bachelor of Science, business administration, computer science, The Ohio State University Company Name: Nationwide Industry: Insurance Company CEO: Steve Rasmussen Company Headquarters Location: Columbus, Ohio Number of Employees: 30,000 Personal Philosophy: Strive every day to become a better version of myself. What book are you reading: Little Black Stretchy Pants by Chip Wilson What was your first job: Receptionist for my father, who was a small business owner Favorite charity: Children's Hunger Alliance, I love their mission & currently serve on the board Interests: Nonprofit board work, biking, yoga, travel, and spending time with family & friends Family: Husband of 23 years and our son, Anthony

Don’t Let Fear Stop Your Success: 3 Traps to Avoid and Strategies to Embrace

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ur fears can sometimes cause us to fall into common career traps if we’re not careful. Here are three to avoid and key strategies to adopt that I’ve accumulated throughout my career: Trap 1: Following someone else’s vision for you There are many things in our lives that influence how we see ourselves— family heritage, amazing role models, the expectations that others have of us, and so much more. With my father being born and raised in Sicily, my heritage could have influenced me to lessen my career ambition, simply because I’m female. However, I saw my father creating his own success, reinventing his business over time, and having a fulfilling career. Watching him overcome his own challenges gave me the courage to create a bold vision for myself, to break the mold so-to-speak for what women in our family could expect of their careers, and to follow my passion. Strategy to embrace: Create a bold vision for yourself. Trap 2: Always playing it safe As you build your experience, skills, and credibility in a specific area, there’s

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a temptation to stay there—to not move out of your comfort zone. In my career, I have consistently wanted more from myself and the teams I’m a part of. I’ve seen that believing you are not yet at your “very best” drives a mindset and an attitude that forces you to focus on your development no matter where you are in your career, to be a continuous learner, to look for new experiences, and to strive for continuous improvement. Strategy to embrace: Be pleased but never satisfied. Trap 3: Relying exclusively on your internal confidence I believe we all understand the significant role our confidence plays in how we come across as leaders. We work to build our self-confidence by investing in learning, stretching ourselves, and practicing new skills. Beyond our internal source of confidence, I believe there are also external sources of confidence, and I have used them throughout my career. It may be as simple as the kind, encouraging look you receive from a colleague when you’re presenting to your team. Strategy to embrace: Lend your confidence to others and borrow it from those around you.

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Melissa Foster Bird Job Title: Partner and Chief Diversity Partner Education: JD, Ohio State University; BS, Miami University Company Name: Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Industry: Law Company CEO: James K. Lehman Company Headquarters Location: Columbia, South Carolina Number of Employees: 1,620 Your Location: Huntington, West Virginia Words you live by: Ethics, compassion, ferocity, optimism, respect, joy, and openness Personal Philosophy: Embrace being the woman in the room. What book are you reading: Where’d You Go, Bernadette? by Maria Semple What was your first job: Roller skating teacher Interests: Cooking, exercise, and watching kids’ sports Family: Son, Luke (14), and daughter, Winnie (12)

Everybody Needs Multiple Role Models

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he notion that powerful female role models are in short supply requires limited thinking—limited by the idea that only one role model will be wanted or needed throughout a career; limited by thinking that your role model must be in the same profession, must have traveled the same path and had the same experiences; or limited by the belief that the person must be in a position to which you ultimately aspire. I was fortunate to be born to my primary role model. Nothing in my mom’s resume would get her the job as a role model for a law firm partner. She had a high school diploma, married a ne’er-do-well, alcoholic husband, lived on a dirt road in a single-wide trailer, and necessarily sent her two kids to one of the smallest and academically lowest-ranked schools in the state. Yet, because of her leadership, her attitude and her work ethic, my brother and I did not know we were “disadvantaged.” We believed that we could do anything we chose to do with education, work, and grit—characteristics that she modeled.

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Anyone who has mastered a particular issue can be a role model. For example, my mother could not model a successful business development plan. A different mentor was needed, and in my circumstances, that was a Caucasian male. That same male was not a good role model for finding a path for being a successful working mother; he didn’t have that skill set. It did not benefit me to ask my sponsor, who had been an equity partner for many years (and had the career to which I aspired) about the specifics of moving from associate to partner because the requirements and circumstances for that move had changed. Role models are examples of best practices. The belief that one person can model the best practices for all issues, in a best-case scenario, limits the pool of examples; and in truth, likely doesn’t exist. Targeted thinking about objectives and goals, along with expanding thinking about people who have successfully achieved them, opens a new world of potential diverse and powerful role models.

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Mathea K. E. Bulander Job Title: Partner Education: JD cum laude, William Mitchell College of Law; BA, Macalester College Company Name: Redgrave LLP Industry: Legal Company CEO: Victoria Redgrave, Chair, Executive Committee Company Headquarters Location: Chantilly, Virginia Number of Employees: approximately 60 Your Location (if different from above): Minneapolis, Minnesota Words you live by: Be kind. Be kind. Be kind. Personal Philosophy: Stay Present. What book are you reading: The Year of the Runaways by Sahota Sunjeev What was your first job: Waitress at a tiny French bistro Favorite charity: Joyce Uptown Food Shelf Interests: Time outdoors, yoga, and creative pursuits Family: Husband Kris, and children, Sovleig (11) and Kalle (8)

A Lawyer’s Voice

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hen a woman working in a field where positions of power skew male is told to find her “voice,” her snap reaction might be to question herself, to feel pressure to speak before she is ready, to presume she needs to speak over others in order to appear more forceful, or to try and code switch and speak in a manner that is more, in a word, masculine. The truth is, however, this question of developing a “voice” is not just about aping the style of men. I have found that my own voice has grown considerably over my career; a process that has taken some unexpected turns along the way. While I have had to learn to assert my positions directly, with confidence and authority, I have also cultivated a distinct tone and style in dealing with colleagues and clients that is true to my experience. This includes how I approach professional matters, but also the language I employ in addressing the everyday issues that are part and parcel of practicing law at the highest level. I cannot imagine what my career would be had I not been encouraged to speak

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out and develop this voice. I have been fortunate to live and work in environments where this has been possible. For years, I have volunteered as an attorney for the Children’s Law Center of Minnesota, an organization devoted to giving a voice to some of the most vulnerable members of our society— foster children. These children are regularly required to appear in court, ostensibly to advocate for their own best interests within a system that can be intimidating even for accomplished professionals, and many of them feel voiceless. The small part I am able to play in rectifying this is very meaningful for me. However, the work of cultivating the voices of others—particularly women, and particularly women in law—is a constant commitment. This commitment has undeniably paid off for me, and I have full faith that it has paid off as well for my colleagues and clients. A lawyer’s voice is the client's voice, after all, and a lawyer who knows her voice inside and out is invaluable.

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Elizabeth Jackson-Rietz Job Title: Director, Global Retail Brand Concepts Education: MBA, UCLA Anderson School of Management; MA, University of Edinburgh (Scotland) Company Name: Nike Industry: Athletic footwear, apparel, and equipment Company CEO: Mark Parker Company Headquarters Location: Beaverton, Oregon Number of Employees: 75,000 Your Location: Portland, Oregon Words you live by: “What we know matters, but who we are matters more.” –Brené Brown Personal Philosophy: “What we know matters, but who we are matters more.” –Brené Brown What book are you reading: Educated by Tara Westover What was your first job: I worked at Starbucks during high school. Favorite charity: Planned Parenthood Interests: Time with family, food, and wine & travel Family: My husband, Jon, and 3.5-year-old daughter, Grace

Driving Gender Parity and Real Cultural Change

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n America today, women arguably have more agency and opportunities than any generation before. From the Women’s March and #MeToo movement, to Time’s Up and renewed momentum for the Equal Rights Amendment, feminism has become fairly accepted in mainstream culture. Yet, there is still much work to be done before gender parity is reached in the workplace, particularly around inclusivity and intersectionality. For efforts to advance diversity in the workplace to be truly meaningful, we need to better understand the concept of intersectionality. Intersectionality is a term which was created by scholar and activist Kimberlé Crenshaw, and is defined by Merriam-Webster as “the complex, cumulative way in which the effects of multiple forms of discrimination (such as racism, sexism, and classism) combine, overlap, or intersect, especially in the experiences of marginalized individuals or groups.” While feminism is generally understood as advocacy for women’s equality, intersectional feminism considers the ways in which women's experiences of discrimination are influenced by their overlapping identities (particularly around race, gender, sexual-orientation, ability, and ethnicity). Diversity isn’t just about gender; it’s also about diversity of back-

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ground and experience. We learn more, do better work, and drive better business outcomes when we are interacting with people who think differently than we do. In fact, a 2018 study by the Boston Consulting Group found that companies with more diverse management teams produce 19 percent higher revenue, proving diversity is indeed good for business. So, how can we be more intentional about intersectionality in our approach to supporting women in the workplace? To me, being an advocate for intersectional feminism means vulnerability, curiosity, and conscious effort. It’s mentoring women who do not look like me or come from a similar background. It’s encouraging women and people from underrepresented groups to go to top-tier business schools, so they are well positioned for senior leadership roles in their fields. It’s also being purposeful in creating inclusive conversations where women can share their own experiences, as discrimination plays differently for each individual. We must step back and listen to ensure voices that have historically been marginalized are heard, ultimately helping to drive real cultural change. Thank you to Profiles in Diversity Journal for this prestigious award and to UCLA Anderson for nominating me. It’s an honor to be recognized and to have a platform to help further this conversation.

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Maureen Hoersten Job Title: Chief Operating Officer Education: Bachelor’s degree, University of Iowa Company Name: LaSalle Network Industry: Professional services Company CEO: Tom Gimbel Company Headquarters Location: Chicago, Illinois Number of Employees: 200 Words you live by: Smile and laugh. Life is too short. Personal Philosophy: Smile and laugh. Life is too short. What book are you reading: I prefer podcasts; I listen to the Joe Rogan podcasts What was your first job: Bus girl at a pizza place Favorite charity: Make-a-Wish Foundation® Interests: Traveling, cooking, and spending time with my family Family: Two beautiful girls, Elle and Libby, and my husband, Eric

Life Is Short. Enjoy What You Do and Who You Do it With

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rowing up, I was the youngest of seven kids. I came from a large Irish Catholic family, and that experience shaped me into the person and professional I am today. I had to speak up to be heard. I was forced to fight for what I wanted—attention, food, and time on the court. I had to learn how to stand up for myself, develop a thick skin, and persevere. My siblings were bigger, stronger, and smarter than me (if only due to life experiences) and I had to learn to compensate in different ways. Fast forward to my first job out of college …. I started as an entry-level sales person for a small staffing and recruiting firm in the suburbs of Chicago. My dad was in sales, and I thought it would be a good fit. Because the company was a small startup, the founder and CEO was extremely involved. He knew sales would be crucial to the growth of his business, and he was tough. I sat next to him and made cold calls all day long. He listened to my calls,

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talked in my ear, and coached me on what to say to the prospect on the other end of the line. I would hang up the phone, and he would say, “Pick up the phone, call again.” He was relentless. Many times, I thought I would quit, but I knew even if I wanted to, my family wouldn’t let me. Sixteen years later, I’m really glad I stuck it out. I grew my career, expanded my horizons, made incredible friends, and helped build a business. I love what I do, and I’ve learned so many lessons along the way. You have to be true to yourself. You have to enjoy what you do. You have to stick with it through the tough times to see the good times. You have to laugh. And most important, you have to work hard. If you want something, speak up and ask for it. Surround yourself with people who challenge you, support you, and push you to be your best self. Life is short. Enjoy what you do and who you do it with.

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Debra Pickett Job Title: Principal Consultant Education: BA and MA, University of Pennsylvania Company Name: Page 2 Communications Industry: Public relations Company CEO: Debra Pickett Company Headquarters Location: Chicago, Illinois Number of Employees: 8 Words you live by: “Do the best you can in every task, no matter how unimportant it may seem at the time. No one learns more about a problem than the person at the bottom.” –Sandra Day O’Connor Personal Philosophy: “Clean as you go,” which I learned as a waitress at TGI Fridays What book are you reading: Chesapeake Requiem by Earl Swift What was your first job: Correspondent for the Somerset Spectator in Somerset, New Jersey Favorite charity: Chicago Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Interests: Politics, literature, gourmet food, and travel Family: Married, with three sons

The Leaders We Need

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e often speak of our life’s work in terms of a career “path,” implying that there exists for us a single route in the sole direction of “up.” Modern careers don’t work this way of course—a lesson many mid-life workers have learned all too late, in the direst of circumstances, like the disruption of a once-stable industry. As women, though, we have long been accustomed to disruptions in various forms and we’ve often had to make sharp turns and take long pauses on our professional journeys. The key to our success—and we are succeeding, albeit entirely too slowly— is that we don’t stop moving. In my early years as a strategic advisor to law firms, I watched many talented women leave law firm jobs for in-house counsel positions and opportunities with start-up firms, perceived to offer them a better quality of life. Perhaps in theory, there was no ceiling blocking these women’s advancement at the big firms, but the requirements of that steep, upward path from associate to partner felt, to many, impassable at that moment in their lives. A decade on, some of those women are now general counsels at corpora-

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tions—and they’re coveted as potential clients by some of the same firms that failed to accommodate their desire for better work-life balance. Others are leading boutiques that are competing, and winning against their former firms in fast-growing practice areas. They might not have shattered the ceiling, but they found ways to continue their journeys. The skills women have had to develop and rely on at those moments when we’ve found our progress thwarted—blazing new trails, discovering ourselves as entrepreneurs, and inventing new jobs for ourselves and new ways of working—are the very skills most vital to success in today’s global economy. Major corporations, big law firms, and large enterprises of all kinds are realizing that they need leaders who are nimble, creative, passionate, and resilient. They need leaders who are highly skilled at communicating and multitasking. They need leaders who see a world that is changing and embrace that change as an opportunity rather than fighting it off like a looming defeat. They need leaders, in other words, who are women.

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Staci D. Kaliner Job Title: Managing Director Education: BS magna cum laude, Syracuse University Company Name: Redgrave LLP Industry: Legal Company CEO: Victoria Redgrave, Chair, Executive Committee Company Headquarters Location: Chantilly, Virginia Number of Employees: approximately 60 Your Location: Cleveland, Ohio Words you live by: The best minute you spend is the one you invest in someone else. Personal Philosophy: Always be willing to do whatever you expect from others, no matter the level of the task or action. What book are you reading: Radical Candor by Kim Scott What was your first job: I started my own window washing business in high school. Favorite charity: National Multiple Sclerosis Society Interests: Skiing, mountain biking, kayaking, hiking … basically anything outdoors

I Prefer Lifting Others Up and Succeeding Together

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y career began at a Big Four accounting firm, where one of the immediate challenges of starting out in the highly competitive, and then male-dominated environment, was to avoid getting lost in the crowd. In their desperation to stand out, I found many of my female colleagues avoiding collaboration because they believed that gathering knowledge solely for their own use would help them get ahead. This approach, naturally, breeds competition and instills an ethos of self-interest within any organization. Luckily for me, I quickly found leaders with an alternative attitude toward this rigorous work; one that did not view collaborating as a threat, but as a foundation for long-term success. As it happened, it was a group of smart, driven women, forging their path by championing collaboration as their approach to partnership, in stark contrast to their self-focused colleagues. When I studied the styles of those up-and-coming women, I found vast differences. Some focused on doing what was right for them, aligning their actions with their own goals, and focusing on

their own success and path to promotion. Others were just as successful building relationships with team members above and below them. They took the time to understand strengths, and found ways to share knowledge and expertise, build trust, and listen to and even laugh with their team members. Both sets of women rose through the ranks. However, the second style is what resonated with me. I began to find that spending the time to lift others up was far more impactful than stepping over them to get ahead. As I have moved through my career and into leadership roles, I have strived to carry this code with me. My desire for my job to align with that code led me to joining a unique law firm, where the nature of the work we do requires innovation, collaboration, and teamwork to design the best solutions for our clients’ challenges. Where the law field traditionally is dominated by men, I am proud to sit on a leadership team that is 50 percent women. I continue to try to live each day not using others as stepping stones to success, but instead, lifting others up so we all are successful.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

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Sandy Cross Job Title: Chief People Officer Education: MA, sport administration, Kent State University; BA, Legal Studies, University at Buffalo Company Name: PGA of America Industry: Sports and entertainment Company CEO: Seth Waugh Company Headquarters Location: Palm Beach Gardens, Florida Number of Employees: 285 Words you live by: Live simply. Give completely. Personal Philosophy: Others first. What book are you reading: Simplify Work; Crushing Complexity to Liberate Innovation, Productivity, and Engagement by Jesse W. Newton What was your first job: Newspaper carrier Favorite charity: HospiceBuffalo Interests: Fitness, golf, reading, and professional development Family: Husband, Scott, and working K-9, Swagger

I have consistently found that the opportunities which scared me the most, but which I embraced and pushed through, were the ones where my biggest personal and professional growth came.

If an Opportunity is Both Amazing and Terrifying, Take the Leap

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ear can paralyze you or it can propel you. Choosing not to act out of a place of fear is a decision unto itself. I have consistently found that the opportunities which scared me the most, but which I embraced and pushed through, were the ones where my biggest personal and professional growth came. I often tell young professionals that if something is both terrifying and amazing, then they should pursue it. I believe nothing but growth and development is on the other side of that. When you take a leap, you build your wings on the way down. Anything worth your time should scare the heck out of you. We are here to be awesome. When fear arises, it is invaluable to be able to turn to trusted resources and confidants. Every woman should build her very own personal Board of Advisors; individuals who have your best interests—personal and professional—at heart, and bring different perspectives

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and experiences than your own. These individuals will be honest and forthright with you, and provide a guiding light at the many crossroads of your career journey. Carla Harris, author of Expect to Win: 10 Proven Strategies for Thriving in the Workplace, does a beautiful job outlining the distinct difference between a mentor, a sponsor, and an adviser, along with the value of having them all on your team. I have been truly blessed to benefit from all three of these types of individuals on my personal Board of Advisors. They have guided me, and continue to guide me, through decisions big and seemingly small, but ones that I know can change the trajectory of my career and my life. And, once you’ve assembled your Board of Advisors, please don’t forget to pay it forward by helping raise up other women and girls in business and in life. There is absolutely room for more than one woman at the top.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Margaret W. Meyers Job Title: Partner Education: JD, Columbia Law School; AB, Harvard College Company Name: Richards Kibbe & Orbe LLP Industry: Legal Company CEO: N/A Company Headquarters Location: New York, New York Personal Philosophy: “Saying ‘yes’ doesn’t mean I don’t know how to say no, and saying ‘please’ doesn’t mean I am waiting for permission.” –Amy Poehler (from Yes Please) What book are you reading: Silence of the Girls by Pat Barker What was your first job: Paralegal in Paris Favorite charity: Planned Parenthood Family: Husband and two daughters (ages 4.5 and 2.5)

Rather than pitting colleagues against each other for recognition and praise, developing a strong team fosters a sense of shared responsibility to produce excellent work.

Proud to Be Part of a Rising Tide of Collaboration and Teamwork

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n college, I was on the varsity rowing team—a sport that requires both individual and collective strength. Each rower in the eight-person boat has to be in peak physical condition, row with technical precision, and pull as hard as she can with every stroke. But if the eight athletes do not also synchronize their efforts to move as an integrated machine, they will not achieve their full potential. From rowing, I learned at an early age the importance of collaboration and leadership from within a team, which I have sought to bring to my professional work. As a partner at a mid-size law firm, Richards Kibbe & Orbe LLP, I frequently team up with my colleagues to achieve the best outcome for our clients. I value my colleagues’ opinions and seek their input regarding case strategy, goals, and execution. Similarly, I make myself available to brainstorm ideas, and I happily volunteer when others are in a time crunch to meet an important deadline. When we put our heads together and consider many viewpoints, we can solve intractable problems creatively and efficiently. In this way, we

share our successes and can celebrate them together. Collaborative leadership also has the benefit of encouraging individual development, while minimizing unnecessary rivalry. When colleagues work together effectively, issues like seniority and credit fall away. Rather than pitting colleagues against each other for recognition and praise, developing a strong team fosters a sense of shared responsibility to produce excellent work. As a mentor to junior lawyers in the firm, I strive to create an environment where they can take on more challenging roles with the strength of the team behind them. I encourage them to volunteer for new opportunities, because they know that if they struggle, others will be there to help them. Thus, by leading from within the team, I can help encourage individuals to excel and reach their full potential. Long after hanging up my oar, I am thrilled to be part of the rising tide of strong women leaders who are lifting others to professional success through collaboration and teamwork.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

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Christine P. Payne Job Title: Partner Education: JD with honors, University of Texas at Austin School of Law; BA cum laude, University of Colorado at Boulder Company Name: Redgrave LLP Industry: Legal Company CEO: Victoria Redgrave, Chair, Executive Committee Company Headquarters Location: Chantilly, Virginia Number of Employees: approximately 60 Your Location: Chicago, Illinois Words you live by: Kindness is everything. Personal Philosophy: Life is short—be kind. What book are you reading: We Were Eight Years In Power by Ta-Nehisi Coates What was your first job: Making copies at my dad’s law firm Favorite charity: Boys & Girls Club of the Austin Area, I'm a proud member of the board Interests: Chips & queso Family: Two awesome kids; Ty is 10 and Addie is 8

I’ve also had wonderful mentors, both women and men, whose faith in me has inspired me to fight on, but also to slow down when that was the right answer.

You Don’t Need to Save the Day, Every Day

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omen in law tend to have thick skin. Over the course of my career, however, I’ve really had to wrestle with whether that’s always a good thing. It often means taking on too great a burden, and tolerating more than we should. If thick skin becomes expected at all times, then those who offer a more sensitive perspective can get left behind. I remember the year before I made partner in BigLaw. I had a toddler, was nursing an infant at home and working full time, and decided to take on a teaching position at the University of Texas School of Law. My memories of that year are a blur; I just knew that I could handle it. Since then, I have learned that having the ability to bear the load does not always mean it’s a good idea. I will be forever grateful to the first woman colleague to tell me that I didn’t need to save the day, every day. Since then, I have learned to set boundaries and manage my energy—all part of being a working mom. I have also

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seen the good that a law firm can do in supporting women who are in the middle of a heavy lift. It’s hard to know when to reach out to a colleague, and when to respect her privacy. Offering help at a crucial moment could be the key to keeping more women in the game, progressing toward partner. What does she need? It might be more than just time off or help at work. Personally, I relied on a family concierge called Enriched Family that arranged summer camps for my kids, planned my meals, outsourced my errands, and bought and shipped birthday gifts all over the country. Bless that company, truly. I’ve also had wonderful mentors, both women and men, whose faith in me has inspired me to fight on, but also to slow down when that was the right answer. Now, as a partner at Redgrave LLP, I find myself once again at a firm that is supportive of all its employees, of all genders, parents and nonparents alike. I am so lucky.

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Patrice Shavone Brown Job Title: Director of Mental Health Counseling Agency Education: Bachelor’s degree, psychology, Master's degree, forensic psychology, Argosy University Phoenix Company Name: Restoring Bodies And Minds LLC Industry: Health and wellness Company CEO: Patrice Shavone Brown Company Headquarters Location: Henderson, North Carolina Number of Employees: 3 Words you live by: If you don’t have a plan, you have nothing. Personal Philosophy: Work first, play later; in order to be successful you have to prioritize your life based on the goals you dream of accomplishing. What book are you reading: Becoming by Michelle Obama What was your first job: McDonald’s, and summer job doing clerical work at New Hope Elementary School and Vance County Department Of Social Services Favorite charity: Salvation Army Interests: Music, acting, modeling, vacations, concerts, and expanding my mental health business

Don’t Let Others’ Misconceptions Dictate Your Self-Worth

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hroughout our lives, society dictates what is and what is not socially acceptable with regard to one's physical appearance. Watching models with perfect bodies dominate TV, and commercials offering ways to achieve the perfect plastic-factory body, sent the message that I was too fat and ugly. And while society encourages everyone to believe that being fat deviates from the norm for being attractive, and promotes an image impossible for anyone to attain, I did not let these misconceptions dictate my self-worth and self-confidence. Rather, I learned to embrace my body and live my life fat, free, and fabulous! While also losing weight. I have not only learned to love myself through this journey, but have inspired and motivated other “fat girls” to do the same. At the root of my professional pursuits—as a mental health counselor and life-transformation coach for more than 10 years, anger management specialist, and founder of Restoring Bodies and Minds in 2011, a mental health counseling group located in Henderson, North Carolina—lies a purpose: to provide individuals with tools that emphasize their intrinsic beauty.

My vision is to provide those who feel that they do not have a voice with valuable life lessons to inspire positive mental and emotional change. A key to this success is prioritizing self-care, meaning that individuals need to choose themselves first, remove negative beliefs, and understand their worth and potential to truly be themselves in the world. The recognition of one’s true essence is especially important for women today, as they are continually recognizing their worth and breaking down societal roadblocks that promote negative selfperception. In my most recent book, A Fat Girl’s Confidence, I'm Fat So What?, I use my expertise to help women struggling with weight develop a level of confidence and truth within themselves and become proud fat girls. I also started The Fat Girl’s Confidence Movement, which uses my personal journey to encourage women to take a pledge of self-worth, and set goals for mental, emotional, and physical health, with the support from a community of other Fat Girls. To learn more about The Fat Girl’s Confidence Movement and take the pledge, visit https://www.patriceshavone. com/a-fat-girls-confidence.

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Melissa D’Alelio Job Title: Partner Education: JD, Northeastern University School of Law; BA, Mount Holyoke College Company Name: Robins Kaplan LLP Industry: Legal Company CEO: Ronald Schutz Company Headquarters Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota Your Location: Boston, Massachusetts Words you live by: Be kind. Work hard. Stay humble. Smile often. Stay loyal. Keep honest. Travel, when possible. Never stop learning. Be thankful, always. And love. Personal Philosophy: “She believed she could. So she did.” –R.S. Grey What book are you reading: The Light Between Oceans by M.L. Stedman What was your first job: Waitress at Denny's Favorite charity: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Interests: Reading, traveling, music, theatre, and cooking Family: A big, loud Italian family, with my husband and I raising three under four

Owning Our Truth and Silencing the Guilt

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omeone once said, “We expect women to work like they don’t have children and raise children as if they don’t work.” In the last five years, I’ve had three children and elevated to equity partner at an exceedingly supportive law firm with an excellent parental leave policy. Still this quote stings with truth. I’ve spent countless hours torn: Present at the conference or be home for Mother’s Day? Attend the preschool graduation or participate in that major pitch? Cover the dispositive hearing or stay home with a sick baby? I don’t claim to have consistently made the “right” choices. Indeed, the problem is I don’t always know what they are. Every decision is accompanied by guilt—the wretched feeling of delinquency, iniquity, and wrongdoing— because with every decision, working mothers lose. Often our male colleagues aren’t faced with the same challenges, or perhaps they simply don’t experience the same level of judgment or trigger the same repercussions. Even with amazing employers who are generously flexible so long as we get the job done, the challenge remains: It’s getting the job done, and doing it to the same high level that is so important to us. Getting the job done requires giving so much of ourselves to our job, while already giving so much of ourselves to motherhood. Working mothers often exist straddling two worlds, holding our breath and feeling the weight of the

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mental load of inevitable conflict. We are often left exhausted and depleted, all the while hiding the chaos of our lives behind an “I’ve got this” smile. I invite us working mothers to own our truth. Let’s be open and honest about the conflicts and tensions, and bold and brave enough to challenge ourselves and our professions to expand the space where working mothers’ personal and professional lives overlap. That is where we will find our more comfortable stance. As I’ve begun to move forward in my career with more candor about the challenges of being a working mother in a demanding profession, I’ve found that most clients and colleagues appreciate it. They, too, are facing similar challenges. We are defying traditions and finding new space for ourselves: Instead of the golf course, we are networking at the playground. Colleagues understand my hard stop to manage school pickup. The guilt has certainly not disappeared. It continues to rear its head, almost instinctually. But I do my best to let it go as quickly as I can. It has no place in the over-complicated worlds of working mothers, nor does it serve a purpose. The strain is not a working mother’s, alone, to feel, excuse, or organize. It belongs to society at large. Let us own our truth, silence guilt, and work together to find the space to more peacefully manage the complicated, demanding, yet beautifully rich lives we live.

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Teena W. Piccione Job Title: Executive Vice President & Chief Information Officer Education: Masters Certification in Project Management, George Washington University; BA, journalism, Georgia State University; Harvard executive program, Harvard Business School Executive Education; Media Training, FleishmanHillard; Nano Business Data Science Degree, Udacity Company Name: RTI International Industry: Nonprofit Research and Development Company CEO: E. Wayne Holden, PhD Company Headquarters Location: Triangle Park, North Carolina Number of Employees: 5,000 Words you live by: Pack your own sunshine 86,400 seconds a day! and “Whatever your life's work is, do it well. A man should do his job so well that the living, the dead, and the unborn could do it no better.” –Martin Luther King, Jr. Personal Philosophy: Be a passionate, curious learner who strives to make the path better than you found it! Learn your job and do your job better than anyone else, and keep learning! What book are you reading: Leadershift by John C Maxwell What was your first job: I worked my way through college at UPS Favorite charity: JDRF (Juvenile Diabetes), American Heart Association, Rewriting the Code, and Girls Who Code Interests: Working with students to inspire them to do more and start them along path to success Family: Husband of 30 years, Paul (a stay at home dad), two girls, Laura (18) and Jennifer (17); and one dog, Bandit

Igniting My Professional Passion

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he key to success on every journey is to take that first step. In this digital age, businesses that do not make advancements fall behind—and fast. Truth is, my career path has been like a winding road, with my first step directing me to the music industry. My foray into technology has been like that of an orchestra conductor, who first masters each instrument, then uses that knowledge to successfully lead the band. To deliver the best business solutions, I start with an understanding of the business need. Then I apply that information to enable its success. I’ve learned to trust my instincts. I am resilient and I dig in with grit, determination, and passion. I believe in ensuring that my relationships are beneficial, and I am an advocate of creating a solid network of professionals of varied backgrounds and experiences from cross-functional industries. My advice: Grow and nurture your network; they will be your lifeline. They challenge me, stretch me, and offer diverse viewpoints and perspectives. Never compromise on integrity, and always strive to know more. Invest in

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learning every aspect of the task at hand, and be open to lateral moves and promotions. Seek to understand your business goals and then exceed each of them. We are all gifted with 86,400 seconds per day. How we use this gift is what makes the difference. Each of our steps helps or hinders those on the journey with us, makes the path better than we traveled, smoothes out the bumps, and repaves and fills in the potholes for others. Pack your own sunshine for the journey ahead! I am hopeful that women’s roles in the male-dominated technology field will continue to evolve. As one of a few female leaders in this field, I am frequently asked if I have ever relied on my gender to land a job—and if I have to wear high heels. My response? Being a woman might have gotten me an interview, but what I know and how I perform is what keeps me in the seat. I dress on my own terms; comfort is top priority. I wear tennis shoes and cowboy boots. The more women enter this field, the more we can work to change stereotypes about women in the workplace and close the pay gap.

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Denise Rahne Job Title: Partner Education: JD, William Mitchell College of Law; Med, secondary English education, University of Minnesota; BA, English, University of Minnesota Company Name: Robins Kaplan LLP Industry: Legal Company CEO: Ronald Schutz Company Headquarters Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota Words you live by: Most problems have a solution. Personal Philosophy: Hundreds of millions of people have done this before us; we can probably get over ourselves a bit. What book are you reading: The Metaphysical Club by Louis Menand What was your first job: Non-professionally, I made and sold very amateurish piñatas; professionally, I was a high school English teacher. Favorite charity: I work with multiple charitable groups on boards and otherwise. Don’t make me choose! Family: Husband, Thomas (T.J.) Reinartz Jr.

Outdated Notions Regarding “Women’s Duty” Are Hurting Us All

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think a lot about the challenges and opportunities presented by notions of women and “duty.” I have recently read, and not yet fully comprehended, Margaret Fuller’s 1845 essay entitled, The Wrongs of American Women; The Duty of American Women. Without going into the complexity of the dated but oddly still relevant text, I will say that it makes me think so much about the double-edged sword of cultural and maybe, instinctive ideas of duty that could inure to the benefit of women, but that in the professional world frequently become a soundless and limiting burden. Duty in its general sense invokes a deep ethic and the level of responsibility that we expect of our leaders at the highest levels. I will risk the proposal that when we think of duty in men it conjures images that tend toward the political, the military, and as it relates to guardians and defenders. And yet in this country (and others), it is sometimes difficult for us to see the idea of duty in women in quite the same way. I can’t help but wonder whether we don’t continue to default to what Margaret Fuller observed in 1854―seeing dutiful women most easily as supporters rather than leaders. She references

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what we think of as the “helping professions” specifically, and seems to encourage a more expansive range and quality of available cultural contributions for women. With all of our general progress, I have wondered how far we’ve evolved with this concept. We all know women whose dutiful willingness to do the dirty work, support others, and take on the same self-effacing persona we admire in soldiers results in professional lives lacking authentic gravitas and influence. This may be part of the complexity of duty as it is applied to gender. If the default notion of a woman’s duty is helpfulness and support, as opposed to responsible, intentional, and deeply impactful leadership, we are losing out. This is a shared challenge. Organizations need to think harder about what leaders and influencers look like and what they might be missing given the vast number of exceedingly qualified women in their midst. And women need to uncomfortably press the bounds regarding what they have to offer—frankly, out of a sense of duty. There is a lot of important work out there to be done and the opportunity to do it better together.

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Elizabeth Ryan Job Title: Partner, Global Public Policy Education: JD, George Mason University School of Law; BA, University of Virginia Company Name: Squire Patton Boggs LLP Industry: Legal Company CEO: Mark Ruehlmann Company Headquarters Location: Cleveland, Ohio Number of Employees: 1,500 lawyers Your Location: Washington DC Words you live by: “Caminante, no hay camino, se hace camino al andar.” –Antonio Machado (poet I discovered while living in Spain.) Personal Philosophy: You've got this. What book are you reading: The Moment of Lift by Melinda Gates; Measure What Matters by John Doerr What was your first job: Intern, U.S. Congress Favorite charity: Mountain Humane

There are no rules on who can be a mentor—at its best, mentoring is a sphere, not a ladder.

There Are No Rules on Who Can Be a Mentor

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racticing at the intersection between law and public policy has afforded me the opportunity to work with clients around the world on complex global policy and regulatory challenges. In today’s rapidly-evolving legal and policy environment, this means there is no set playbook for my job. To succeed, we must be both highly strategic and exceedingly technical, which makes it fun. Developing the wide-ranging skill set needed to become the international lawyer and leader I am today has meant taking every opportunity and experience—even the hard ones—and learning from, and being inspired by, a sphere of valued mentors. Support from those trusted relationships has made all the difference in my career, and I feel both a privilege and a responsibility to pay that forward.

As co-chair of the firm’s mentor program, I encourage young leaders to be expansive in how they define and recognize “mentoring.” In my experience, mentoring comes in many different forms, beyond the traditional top-down model. As one of only two women partners in my department, I have been fortunate to find female mentors and role models among my clients and peers, many of whom are in senior leadership and general counsel positions in what were traditionally male-dominated industries. At the same time, junior colleagues expose me to an array of new perspectives and learning opportunities. The fact is that someone in your network has faced down the same challenges you are tackling today. So take the opportunity to learn from them. There are no rules on who can be a mentor—at its best, mentoring is a sphere, not a ladder.

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Dr. Carole Dorham-Kelly Job Title: Chief Program Officer Education: PhD, counseling psychology, University of Oregon Company Name: Rubicon Programs Industry: Nonprofit Company CEO: Jane Fischberg Company Headquarters Location: Richmond, California Number of Employees: 120 Words you live by: Try your best and forget the rest. Personal Philosophy: It could’ve been me, but for God's favor, grace, and mercy. What book are you reading: Becoming by Michelle Obama What was your first job: Receptionist at tax office Favorite charity: American Diabetes Association Interests: Dancing, outdoor concerts, hiking, family gatherings, and kids’ sporting events Family: Husband of 12 years, Marchael; as well as Maleya, 10; Cameron, 8; and my mother, Carol

Everywhere there Are Women, there Are Leaders

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here was a time in my career when I believed that being a mother would limit by professional advancement. In my first career job as a nonprofit manager, I worked for a woman leader who reinforced this belief. I tried to hide and minimize my home demands, so that I would not be penalized when evaluated for advancement. My beliefs at the time paired with my work environment, and bred resentment, health challenges, relationship strain, and professional burnout. Reconciling my attitudes and beliefs about myself, women, family, and career facilitated my recovery from burnout. I no longer pursue career advancement from a place of shame, fear, or deficit related to my womanhood. In less than two years, I was promoted to the position of chief program officer at my current agency. In this positive work environment, the commitment, dedication, flexibility, and multitasking associated with motherhood, are embraced, not shunned. It is a fact that women fulfill critical leadership roles at home. It is a fact that women fulfill critical leadership roles at work. It is also a fact that these critical

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roles can coexist! Unfortunately, it is not yet a majority opinion in most career environments. To successfully dismantle the beliefs that have been ingrained in most people across generations, we need all women to be in accord. We have to resist the temptation to perpetuate competition between mothering and non-mothering women. We must realize that outdated beliefs in the workplace hinder us all. My hope is that someone reads this issue and is reaffirmed and encouraged in her own professional journey. Perhaps, she may be experiencing isolation and self doubt, while navigating professional spaces with inequitable systems that perpetuate penalties for women. I hope that women in leadership read this issue and are motivated to lift up the women around them. I believe women in leadership have a responsibility to challenge old adages, empower women professionals earlier in their careers, and share our own experiences and triumphs, in the service of mentoring. As a black woman in leadership, I embrace opportunities to mentor, empower, and affirm women, and in particular, women of color.

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Melissa Peak Job Title: Executive Director, Strategic Partnerships Education: MBA, John Sperling School of Business; Executive Education, strategy and innovation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Company Name: Talent Path Industry: Strategic Talent Solutions Company CEO: Kip Wright Company Headquarters Location: Houston, Texas Number of Employees: 120 Your Location: Goshen, Kentucky Words you live by: Soli Deo gloria. (Glory to God alone.) Personal Philosophy: “It always seems impossible, until it's done.” –Nelson Mandela What book are you reading: The CEO Next Door, by Elena L. Botelho; Dare to Lead by Brené Brown What was your first job: Delivering newspapers and Sears catalogs in Canada, where I grew up Favorite charity: Kid’s Cancer Alliance and Women Business Collaborative Interests: Spinning, gardening, and meeting inspiring people everywhere I go Family: My husband, Michael, and I are proud to be raising our 5 children (ages 2–12).

Take Your Seat

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o you ever feel overwhelmed by the noise? So many opinions …. No one else will make things quiet and calm for us. We must draw a line in the sand and take a stand. We must start to say NO. NO. I will not succumb to the delusional concept that I must (or should) be all things to all people. NO. I will not accept that I must decide between a thriving family and a thriving career. NO. I will not listen to the pessimistic voice saying most men want me and my female peers to fail. NO. I do not choose a path that brings emotional isolation because I am the ONLY one experiencing something and I have pulled out of a community of others who can relate to my situation. NO. I do not accept that because I was a first-generation college student, and learned many lessons on the battlefield of life, I am in some way inferior to anyone—male or female. NO. I do not accept that my five children will experience the same type of biased behavior that I have experienced and observed in my career.

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I DO accept that I was born with a purpose. My purpose, in business, is to lead: First, lead myself; second, lead others; third, lead thriving companies; and fourth, inspire more leaders For the past 20 years, I have worked with hundreds of companies to equip them to strategically invest in acquiring, equipping, and promoting talent. Thousands of hours spent with leaders from every functional area led me to the realization that the potential barriers to an individual’s success, when managed wisely, are exactly the qualities that can become the catalyst for true, authentic leadership—leadership that wins short-term business battles and builds thriving careers. Quarterly earnings, strong balance sheets, great strategy, relentless execution, effective communication, team buy-in … Those are the building blocks of an effective business. But those blocks will fall if leaders aren’t acting “leaderly.” If hesitation is born out of insecurity and fear instead of wisdom, the team suffers. So, take your seat. If you are a woman who is ready to take on the challenge and responsibility of true leadership, we need you. Your voice and perspective are essential. Your input is a gift to those around you. Your courage inspires us. And we are behind you.

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Inosi M. Nyatta Job Title: Partner, Co-Head, Project Development & Finance Group Education: BCL,The Faculty of Law, University of Oxford; LLM, New York University School of Law; LLB, University of Nairobi Company Name: Sullivan & Cromwell LLP Industry: Legal Services Company CEO: Joseph C. Shenker Company Headquarters Location: New York, New York Number of Employees: 875+ lawyers Personal Philosophy: Explore as much as possible. Favorite charity: The Nature Conservancy, an organization dedicated to conserving the planet’s land and water resources Interests: Spending quality time with family and traveling to new destinations Family: My husband and an energetic 9-year-old son

You never know whose advice or encouragement will prove to be instrumental at different points in your career.

Learn All You Can from Your Mentors … then, Pay it Forward

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entorship is only valuable if you are willing to invest your time and energy into the things that you are passionate about. You only get as much out of it as you put in. For me, it has played an integral role in my career development. Growing up, I was fortunate to have people who were willing to contribute their time, knowledge, and resources to guide me on my journey. From these experiences, I learned firsthand about the power of mentorship and how it can impact individuals in their professional and personal lives. As co-head of Sullivan & Cromwell’s global Project Development & Finance Group, my schedule keeps me very busy helping clients across many time zones. However, I have always tried to find balance and believe in the importance of carving out time for things that are important to me. Mentorship is one of those things. It is particularly important for me to be involved in mentorship opportunities for other women in the field. While a

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lot has changed in recent years, there is still much that needs to be done in helping women advance. Having a network of support has helped me in so many ways, and I think it is time that other women feel like they are not alone and know that they have places to turn. I try not only to focus on opportunities to mentor within my practice, but also look for opportunities to provide mentorship outside my day-to-day. I find that I learn a lot both from my mentors and when providing mentorship to others. Everyone needs support at some time or another in their personal or professional lives. In the professional context, women should look for opportunities to cultivate a wide range of relationships they can tap into from time to time for professional feedback and support. You never know whose advice or encouragement will prove to be instrumental at different points in your career. Above all, be open to learning as much as you can, and if you have the chance, pay it forward.

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Wanda Heading-Grant Job Title: Vice President for Human Resources, Diversity and Multicultural Affairs Education: EdD, educational leadership and policy studies, BA, University of Vermont; MSW, Adelphi University; PGC, women leadership, Yale University; PGC, education management, Harvard University Company Name: University of Vermont Industry: Higher education Company CEO: Suresh V. Garimella, PhD Company Headquarters Location: Burlington, Vermont Number of Employees: 4,186 Words you live by: Be brave. Be brilliant. Be bold! Personal Philosophy: However, you define success, happiness, and equity, if it doesn’t come to you, go and get it without doing harm to others. What book are you reading: Black is the Body: Stories from My Grandmother's Time, My Mother's Time, and Mine by Emily Bernard What was your first job: Dressing room attendant Favorite charity: Ronald McDonald House Interests: Watching thriller, suspense, and action movies; bike riding; and cooking Family: Husband, Jarvis, and children, Whitney and twins, Reisha and Shane

Every Step of the Way

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was recently told by someone that I have gravitas, tenacity, and spirit. I began to wonder why these particular words were bestowed upon me. Were these sentiments deserved? If so, what was it about my evolution as a woman in leadership that led to such a compliment? Like many people, my journey began years ago when words like diversity, equity, and inclusion felt more foreign than familiar, and gender bias and racism were more common than condemned. I spent my formative years observing the dichotomy that existed in many communities between those who allowed the undercurrent of racism, sexism, and inequality to squash their prospects and those who gained inspiration to turn the tide. This motivated me to pursue a career spent in service to others. The road that led me to become the first vice president for human resources, diversity and multicultural affairs at the University of Vermont, crisscrossed some rough terrain, especially for a woman of color. Taking the time to study the landscape around me, being tenacious, and clarifying my priorities through my life experiences helped me navigate my professional journey. Creating my own internal mantra—Be brave. Be brilliant. Be

bold!—gave me the courage to share my talents and welcome new ones. Over time, my aptitude to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion grew. I believe my success is deeply rooted in my relationship with my family and the special people, particularly women, who not only mentored, but sponsor me. I believe working hard to master my skills and increase my knowledge helped me gain respect in my field and become a person of influence. My gravitas and spirit have resulted in salient partnerships, the development of practices that unite people instead of dividing them, and innovative opportunities that support greater diversity, equity, and inclusion at my institution and beyond. Through it all, I have remained true to myself and built long-lasting relationships. I have a loving family and supportive friends, and I work for a remarkable higher education institution, the University of Vermont, where I can focus on what I have been told I do best—lead, innovate, engage, transform, empower, and pay it forward. My advice to other women is to discover what inspires you, create an internal mantra, and repeat it continuously on your own professional journeys every step of the way.

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Janet Truncale Job Title: EY Americas FSO Assurance Managing Partner Education: MBA, Columbia Business School; Bachelor’s degree, The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania Company Name: EY Industry: Financial Services Company CEO: Carmine Di Sibio Company Headquarters Location: London, United Kingdom Number of Employees: 270,000 Your Location: New York, New York Words you live by: Rallying together; running towards disruption; no sharp elbows; be bold Personal Philosophy: Get comfortable with the uncomfortable. What book are you reading: Becoming by Michelle Obama What was your first job: EY Favorite charity: Women’s World Banking Interests: Travel and sports Family: Married 24 years to Fred Truncale, we have 3 children Gabrielle (21), Noah (18) and Freddy (16).

My Mentor’s Bold Move

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arly in my career in professional services, female role models were scarce. I often felt conscious of being the lone woman in a room filled with men. The women I did meet at work and in the financial services industry, however, helped me feel more comfortable speaking out about what I needed on a personal level from my organization and from my colleagues. One of my earliest mentors was a female Ernst & Young LLP (EY) partner who profoundly impacted my life and career. Her strong personality and ability to build relationships with the client earned her a seat at the male-dominated table. When I joined the firm full time in 1992, I watched as she navigated being the first EY partner to have a flexible work arrangement, allowing her the opportunity to be her best self at work and at home with her kids. I remember thinking that was a bold move, and it was a signal to her female colleagues that we could do the same. We could have children and our dream careers— the two were not mutually exclusive. Fortunately, women like my early role model helped to make this mindset much more common today. In fact, I’m

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very proud of the diversity and female representation at EY’s partner level. It’s tremendous that we now have our first female CEO for EY Americas, which sends the message to our rising talent that there is no limit to what they can achieve at EY. I don’t take this diversity for granted, however. We still have a long way to go, and as a female partner in a leadership role, I consider it a responsibility to pass on the values I learned from my female mentors to my mentees today. To that end, I talk about my family openly and I’m transparent about both my professional and personal responsibilities. I want my teammates—men and women—to know that I didn’t give up a quality family life to get where I am today. And they don’t need to either. Representation is a critical step to achieving gender parity, as it helps create a sense of belonging. If female leaders continue to keep an open dialogue with their teams, the next generation of women won’t feel conscious of their gender in the workplace. When they look around, they won’t be alone. The views expressed by the author are not necessarily those of Ernst & Young LLP or other members of the global EY organization.

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What’s possible when she feels she belongs? At EY, we’re committed to creating a flexible and inclusive environment, where all people can feel a sense of belonging and thrive both personally and professionally. We’re pleased to congratulate Janet Truncale for being recognized as one of Profiles in Diversity Journal’s 2019 Women Worth Watching. It’s an achievement that helps drive us all forward. © 2019 Ernst & Young LLP All Rights Reserved. ED None.

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A LEADER WORTH WATCHING Wilson Elser salutes our colleague, Baltimore Regional Managing Partner and Diversity & Inclusion Committee Chair, Angela Russell on being recognized among this year’s Women Worth Watching. Long a leader within our firm, the legal profession and the community at large, Angela richly deserves this honor. She sets an example for all with whom she interacts, defines strong leadership and exemplifies admirable character. Committed to accomplishing much more − personally and professionally – she undoubtedly will succeed. Just watch!

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Lucy Cutting Job Title: Executive Director, Global Trade Finance Education: BA, Hobart and William Smith College; junior year abroad, Waseda University Company Name: Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation (SMBC) Industry: Finance Company CEO: Hiro Hyakutome Company Headquarters Location: New York, New York Number of Employees: 3,000 Words you live by: Inspiration comes through connecting with people and cultures. Personal Philosophy: Support friends and family; live life to the fullest What book are you reading: The Great Unknown by Kristin Hannah What was your first job: Product development at Maurbeni America Corporation Favorite charity: Nature Conservancy Interests: Skiing, tennis, and sailing Family: Taking care of my elderly mother, and supporting nieces and nephews

How You Can Be an Instrument of Change

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y passion for supporting women started early in my career, while I was working for Marubeni, and continued to develop throughout my time with General Electric (GE) and Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation (SMBC). I became aware of the glass ceiling that faced women from my first day on the job, but I understood it even more when traveling to Japan for business. At GE, I realized that the unconscious bias I experienced in Japan was a global challenge, which led me to my passion: Supporting working women. I volunteered for GE’s Women’s Network, and later became one of its network leaders. After I joined SMBC, I leveraged Prime Minister Abe’s focus on supporting working women in Japan as a catalyst to build a women’s network within SMBC, using GE’s best practices and lessons learned. I engaged management and inspired senior women to support the Women’s Inclusion Network at SMBC. We now have a successful women’s network, which has led to the creation of our mentoring program, raised awareness of gender issues, provided networking and development opportunities for women, and highlighted diversity and inclusion opportunities. I have been part of expanding diversity and women’s empowerment globally across SMBC by partnering with colleagues

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to develop similar diversity initiatives in Europe, Latin America, and Asia. Refocusing and changing organizations to focus on gender parity and diversity is beneficial for strong organizations, but comes with opportunities and challenges. I’ve shared several thoughts about what it took to inspire an understanding of and focus around diversity at SMBC: 1. Believe in what you are trying to do and, remember, change is daunting. Be an instrument of change, seize the opportunity to inspire, and use this to support your career. 2. You can’t do it all yourself. Teamwork is critical for success around diversity: Have the right teams and management support. Leverage your internal networks, and inspire executives, as well as all employees, to get involved and support the initiative. 3. Get data to show where there are improvement opportunities to tell you that you are not alone; also get data to indicate that what you’re doing is successful. 4. Wake up every day with a positive feeling, as this is the key to inspiring others. With one step forward, be prepared to take five steps back. You will feel like you’re hitting your head against the wall or ceiling, but remember, you are making a difference.

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Angela Russell Job Title: Managing Partner Education: JD, University of Maryland School of Law; BA, Hobart and William Smith Colleges Company Name: Wilson Elser Moskowitz Edelman & Dicker, LLP Industry: Legal Company CEO: Daniel McMahon (firm chairman) Company Headquarters Location: N/A Number of Employees: 850 Your Location: Baltimore, Maryland Words you live by: With each day comes new strength, new inspiration, and new opportunities. Personal Philosophy: Leap, and the net will appear. What book are you reading: Becoming by Michelle Obama What was your first job: College dorm monitor Favorite charity: American Heart Association Interests: Running, reading, and travel Family: Husband, Ewert Russell, daughter, Ashley Russell (19), and son, Adrian Russell (16)

The Enduring Importance of Role Models

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nspiration can be found all around us—in books, newspapers, and even our smartphones. We are constantly being inundated with images and information that shapes our philosophies, outlook, and actions. Influence also comes from friends, family, and professional colleagues. For women lawyers, studies show that having strong role models and mentors, of both genders, is critical to their success. In my career, I am fortunate to have been inspired and guided by individuals who were committed to helping me become the best lawyer I could be, while teaching me to navigate law firm life as a woman of color. These role models, mentors, sponsors, and supporters were, fortunately, not hard to find, as I have always welcomed and sought out the input of others. My role models have also encouraged me to embrace the next generation of lawyers to ensure that women from all backgrounds, who aspire to become leaders in law firms, corporate legal departments, the public sector, or bar associations are not limited by structural challenges, unfair perceptions, or personal doubt. According to a recent ABA study, more women are enrolling in law school than men, which is having a significant impact

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on the legal profession. For example, women often represent 50 percent or more of attorneys in private law firms. Despite this encouraging increase, women still only represent 20 percent or less of the leadership in law firms. I am optimistic, however, that as more women join the legal profession, the number of women who serve as leaders and role models in this field that has been so rewarding to me, will continue to grow. Individuals who have touched my life also have stressed the importance of “horizontal leadership,” which focuses on teamwork and common goals. My philosophy is that leadership has less to do with titles and more to do with ensuring that everyone feels part of a team that is working together for the common good. From my mother, who prioritized her family and a full-time career my entire life, to the first African American female judge in Minnesota, for whom I clerked, to the women and men I work with every day at my current law firm, who provide me with unyielding support—the influence of mentors has inspired and motivated me to challenge myself and others to reach for the stars and bring others along!

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Ivette Mayo Job Title: CEO of you Soy I Am, LLC - Founder of Power On Heels Fund, Inc. Education: San Diego State University Company Name: Yo Soy I AM, LLC Industry: Professional development Company CEO: Ivette Mayo Company Headquarters Location: Houston, Texas Number of Employees: 2 Words you live by: I can make a difference every day! What book are you reading: Pivot: The Art and Science of Reinventing Your Career and Life by Adam Markel What was your first job: Grocery store clerk Favorite charity: Power On Heels Fund, Inc. Interests: I love to travel and eat my way through cultures. I love art and museums. Family: Married to Michael Mayo; mother to two daughters, Leah and Danielle; grandmother to Lola

Empowering Latinas to Succeed

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n 2019, there are all kinds of daily challenges women face that men simply don't have to deal with. As much progress as the fight for gender equality has made over the course of decades, women's rights still have a long way to go. Women are almost half of the workforce. They are the sole or co-breadwinner in half of American families with children. They receive more college and graduate degrees than men. Yet, on average, women continue to earn considerably less than men. The reality is that women are still fighting for fair and equal pay. An American Association of University Women (AAUW) analysis of newly released U.S. Census Bureau data indicates that women working full time on average still make 80 cents compared to every dollar men make. Among women of color, the pay gap is even larger, especially among Latinas, who make on average 56 cents. At the current rate of progress, women will not receive pay equity until the year 2119. To make matters worse, change is creeping forward for Latinas, who will have to wait until 2124 for equal pay. As I facilitate training and speak on stages across the country, I come across women who struggle with the daily reminder of how pay gap inequities are

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impacting them. They are not able to invest in their career growth, small business, or educational needs. In 2018, I founded Power On Heels Fund, Inc., a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization focused on the advancement of Latinas in the marketplace and limiting the impact of pay-gap inequities. We provide specialized training programs, mentorship, and scholarships designed to enhance earning potential, accelerate professional growth, and cultivate future leaders. Our mission is to lead, advance, and support the growth of Latina business owners, corporate professionals, and students by minimizing the impact of paygap inequities. Power On Heels Fund, Inc. partnered with the University of Houston– Downtown and the Tejano Center’s charter school, the Raul Yzaguirre School for Success, to bring our programs to the next generation of young Latina leaders. Power On Heels Fund, Inc. brings awareness to marginalized Latinas regarding opportunities to succeed. On November 1, 2019, Power On Heels Fund, Inc. will provide scholarships that allow award recipients to apply the funds for professional development courses, trade school, business certification, or college education. Our key aim is improving the economic empowerment of Latinas.

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Lisa A. Tavares Job Title: Partner Education: LLM, Georgetown University Law Center; JD, Boston College Law School; BA, Spelman College Company Name: Venable LLP Industry: Legal Company CEO: Stuart P. Ingis (Firm Chair) Company Headquarters Location: Washington, DC Number of Employees: 1,500+ Words you live by: You define your career through perseverance. Personal Philosophy: Your character speaks volumes. What book are you reading: American Spy by Lauren Wilkinson What was your first job: Summer camp counselor Favorite charity: March of Dimes Interests: Community service Family: Husband and two young children

No One Should Be “the Only One”

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am a partner at Venable LLP, a national law firm, where I focus on employee benefits and executive compensation. I advise both private and public employers on all types of retirement plans, along with health and welfare plans and executive compensation arrangements. After five years with the Internal Revenue Service, Office of Chief Counsel, one of my primary goals when I began looking to join private practice was not to be “the only one”—the only woman, the only minority, the only African American in the room. I specifically chose Venable because it has a reputation as a firm where a person’s ethnicity is not a factor that will inhibit success. As an African American attorney with few peers in my industry, I have found that the journey to becoming partner at a major law firm is not always smooth. I made a determination early in my career, however, to focus on perfecting the craft of lawyering. By persisting with the work and striving for excellence, I was able to get exposure; this allowed me to grow my client base and forge lasting relationships that advanced my practice. In fact, a long-term client advocated for me to be promoted to partner and, more important, created

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opportunities for me as she advanced in her own career. I serve as co-head of Venable’s Diversity and Inclusion Initiative, and as chair of the Venable Success Network (VSN), the firm’s African American affinity group. Through my work with VSN, I have made it my personal goal to cultivate and retain African American talent. To this end, we have conducted in-depth training to help minority associates develop the personal and professional skills necessary for their elevation to partner. The Initiative is focused on creating a firm-wide strategy for minorities, LGBTQ , and women. Recently, the Initiative brought in a consultant to conduct implicit-bias and inclusion training for all firm leaders, as well as for lawyers who work on firm committees related to hiring and retention. I think that the Initiative’s work will really move Venable to the next level on diversity and inclusion efforts. Although African Americans are still underrepresented at the partnership level across law firms, we are making strides. My hope is that one day no young attorney of color will ever have to worry about being “the only one.”

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Elizabeth (Liz) Cercado Job Title: 2019 EMBA Candidate/Engineering Manager Education: BS, mechanical engineering, University of Texas at El Paso; Systems Engineering Fundamentals Certificate, CalTech; Executive MBA, UCLA Anderson School of Management Company Name: UCLA Anderson School of Management EMBA Program; The Boeing Company Industry: Higher education–aerospace Company CEO: Gonzalo Freixes, EMBA Dean & Dennis Muilenburg, Boeing CEO Company Headquarters Location: Los Angeles, California & Chicago, Illinois Number of Employees: 142 & 153,000+ Your Location: Lake Stevens, Washington Words you live by: Trust the timing of your life. Personal Philosophy: I believe that good people doing great things deserve to be celebrated and reminded of how amazing they are. What book are you reading: Business School case studies and Harvard Business Review; The Maxwell Daily Reader: 365 Days of Insight to Develop the Leader Within You and Influence Those Around You by John C. Maxwell What was your first job: Part-time employee at Capshaw Olivas Music in El Paso, Texas Favorite charity: Initiatives serving underrepresented demographics in STEM Interests: Learning, dancing, traveling, music, supporting causes and people, naps, and good food & drink Family: My parents were born in Mexico (Sergio and Maria Elena); my older brother (Sergio), older sister (Maria), and I were born in El Paso, Texas.

Be Who You Are Meant to Be, not Who You Are Supposed to Be

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have always felt an expectation to do more: to help others, to be a leader, and to turn weaknesses into strengths. Great role models have shown me that it is possible to do more: to go to school and work; to serve on nonprofit boards and celebrate family events; and to run a clean household and workout. What can I say? I am lucky to know such rock stars. Yet, thinking about societal expectations of who we should be, what careers we should pursue, and what success looks like is exhausting. I have spent a notable amount of time worrying about what I did not have yet: a master’s degree, a sexy car, a husband, kids (talk about first world problems…). When I look to our future, I would like more focus on well-being, happiness, and purpose. I want us to remove stigmas around failure and mental health issues, and to challenge the stereotypes of what we think people are capable of. How great would it be if we unlocked each person’s potential in being their best authentic self ? What if we changed the boundaries of what people think is possible by providing access to opportunities and serving as their

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champions? That future gives me hope, and I look forward to playing an active role in that future of endless possibilities. In a few weeks, I will be graduating from the Executive MBA Program at UCLA Anderson. I am focusing my energy toward my well-being, happiness, and purpose, as defined by me. It looks different than I expected, and in some ways, better than I dreamed. I am fortunate that my loved ones are alive and in relatively good health, and that I have a roof over my head and food on the table. I am making a conscious effort to help underrepresented people achieve their Big Hairy Audacious Goals (BHAGs) too. It is a matter of knowing what is important to you, having the discipline to stay true to your values and priorities, and then pursuing those BHAGs unapologetically. You can do it, and when you think you can’t or you hit rock bottom, please reach out for help. You do not need to tackle life challenges alone. Surround yourself with good people who encourage you and support you in your highs and lows. Be who you are meant to be, not just who you are supposed to be.

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Amy Kreiger Wigmore Job Title: Partner & Vice Chair, Litigation/Controversy Department Education: JD, Harvard Law School; BA, University of Massachusetts, Amherst Company Name: WilmerHale Industry: Legal Company CEO: Susan Murley & Robert Novick, co-managing partners Company Headquarters Location: N/A Number of Employees: 2,005 Your Location: Washington DC Words you live by: “Life moves pretty fast. If you don’t stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.” –Ferris Bueller (Ferris Bueller’s Day Off) Personal Philosophy: Take pride not only in where you end up but how you get there. Embrace teamwork: it leads to better results and much more fun along the way. Challenge yourself. Stay calm and do your best, no matter what challenges you confront. Be grateful, and pay it forward. What book are you reading: Beartown and Us Against You by Fredrik Backman What was your first job: I was a lifeguard and swimming instructor. Favorite charity: The Sister Mary Hart Children’s Program, which supports educational opportunities for youth in Roxbury, Massachusetts. Interests: Running, swimming and boating on the Chesapeake Bay; I’m also an avid hockey mom. Family: My husband, Mike, is partner at Vinson & Elkins. My step-daughter Erin works in Boston in the field of public health, and my son, Jack, is almost 14 and heading to high school in the fall.

There is no Substitute for Seeing other Women Do the Job Well

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y practice focuses on trials and IP litigation, areas in which women traditionally have been underrepresented. Not just early in my career, but also more recently, I have looked around the courtroom or key meetings to find that I am the only woman in sight. This can be a daunting situation that continues to confront many women in the legal profession. Notwithstanding this gender imbalance in my field, I am very fortunate to have worked with several clients who have outstanding female lawyers in very prominent roles, including Laura Schumacher, vice chairwoman, external affairs and chief legal officer of AbbVie; Sandra Leung, executive vice president and general counsel of BMS; Linda Friedman, general counsel, senior vice president and secretary of Astellas; and Noreen Krall, vice president and chief litigation counsel at Apple. The opportunity to work with these highly successful women leaders has had an immeasurable impact on my career. First, they have served as role models. As a woman lawyer, there is no substitute for seeing other women effectively manage

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highly complex and high-stakes matters for their companies. Second, these women understand and promote the value of diversity on trial and case teams and appreciate that enhancing diversity leads to better work product and results. I am grateful to have had these excellent women role models to help guide my career. Seeing them in action has made me a better lawyer and given me the confidence to set my goals and expectations even higher. But in my experience, male lawyers also play a critical role in the advancement of women in the industry. For example, my partners Bill Lee and Howard Shapiro, both highly esteemed trial lawyers, have taken an active interest in my career and helped me pursue opportunities that have been critical to my development as a trial lawyer. I have had the good fortune to benefit from powerful female role models and terrific male mentors who have helped guide my career. I am committed to paying it forward by dedicating my time and efforts to the development of the upcoming generation of trial lawyers.

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Amy K. Castillo Job Title: VP, Strategy and Brand Management Education: MBA, UCLA Anderson School of Management, BS, Cal Poly Pomona Company Name: Warner Bros. Pictures Industry: Entertainment Company CEO: Toby Emmerich (Interim CEO) Company Headquarters Location: Burbank, California Number of Employees: 10,000+ Personal Philosophy: A rich career is a journey, not a destination. What book are you reading: Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson What was your first job: Working in my father's catering business, King Richard's Favorite charity: American Red Cross Interests: Anything with my family, camping, hosting parties, reading, and exploring. Family: Husband and two children, ages 8 and 11

To the women starting their careers or striving to take their careers to the next level, know that your path is uniquely your own and that you can do both—fill buckets AND master your craft.

Never Let Anyone Make You Choose

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here was a time, early in my career, when I received dueling advice from two very sage executives, both of whom I greatly respect. One advised me to pick one thing and be the very best at it, to master my craft and take it as far as I possibly could. The other advised me to fill buckets along the way, to gather experience that would prepare me for a leadership role. Equally valid paths, both of which can lead to success, but it crystallized for me that I wanted to be BOTH a bucket filler and a master at my craft. Never let anyone make you choose between this and that. Each of the roles I’ve held at four different Fortune 500 companies, has been wildly different, but with one commonality: I was at the heart of the organization, working on the core competency of the company. I started as a consultant for Accenture, one of the most successful global consulting firms. When I decided to pursue brand management, I went to work for The Walt Disney Company in corporate brand and franchise man-

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agement. At Warner Bros., I work in theatrical marketing at the heart of the studio. If you want to be the best, learn from the best. And always be learning. A rich career is a journey, not a destination. I had my first child while working for Disney and attending business school at UCLA Anderson. My pregnant belly went with me from board rooms to classrooms. There were plenty of opportunities to feel overwhelmed, exhausted, and inept. There still are. Working for large organizations requires resilience, perseverance, and a great deal of trust that the seeds you are planting will one day bloom. Focus on your circle of control and your circle of influence will grow. To the women starting their careers or striving to take their careers to the next level, know that your path is uniquely your own and that you can do both—fill buckets AND master your craft. When you get to the board room, know that you deserve to be there. Know that you can and will have an impact.

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Lesley Taylor Job Title: Vice President, Client Strategy, EMEA Education: HND, applied biology: plant physiology, pathology and protection, University of West London Company Name: WilsonHCG Industry: Human resources Company CEO: John Wilson Company Headquarters Location: Tampa, Florida Number of Employees: 1,000+ Your Location: Marsh Gibbon, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom Words you live by: Learn something new every day. Personal Philosophy: Be yourself and not who you think people want you to be. What book are you reading: Five conversations: How to transform trust, engagement, and performance at work by Nick Cowley and Nigel Purse What was your first job: Experimental assistant in entomology Favorite charity: Macmillan Cancer Support Interests: Traveling to see the world; I like to see new places properly and understand new cultures. Family: A husband and two sons, James (26) and Christopher (24)

The Gender of Role Models Shouldn't Matter, but it Does

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here isn’t a rule that says role models need to share your gender. And, as the mother of two sons, I wanted to be a role model for them. I wanted them to be as proud of me as I of them, and worked hard to dispel any stigma that women are not as good as men in the world of work. Studies* show that girls are more likely to have male role models than boys are to have female role models. Why is this? In my opinion, women rate themselves less favorably than men, and without having female role models they’re less likely to see their potential and the opportunity ahead. Men have always had a plethora of role models to choose from; many racing car drivers, politicians, entrepreneurs, and inventors are male. Yet, despite the global gender split being roughly 50/50, women don’t have as many. This needs to change. Female role models help to inspire young girls. When they see a woman doing a job in a male-dominated sector, be it technology, law, or manufacturing, it gives them the belief they too can do it. Women need to see it to believe it. I was disappointed to learn that the FTSE 100 had just six female CEOs in 2018**, down from seven in 2017. And,

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in my opinion, the presence of women in leadership positions and the opportunity to network with them is vital to help motivate women to advance in their careers. Women need to build connections with each other and push one another to reach for more. I have been fortunate throughout my life to have access to strong female role models, the first being my mother. She overcame racism and discrimination from both the family she married into and the community she lived in. And, now, I’m empowered by the fantastic women I work alongside at WilsonHCG. One of the best parts of my job is being able to offer support and advice to clients to help them address diversity and inclusion in their companies. I believe organizations are stronger with women in their workforces than without them. I hope the number of female role models continues to grow, so we can persuade more young girls to take up roles in whatever sector—traditionally male-dominated or otherwise—they wish. *https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/ fpsyg.2018.02264/full **https://www.cranfield.ac.uk/som/expertise/ changing-world-of-work/gender-and-leadership/ female-ftse-index

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Antoinette Hamilton Job Title: Vice President, Diversity & Inclusion Education: Bachelor’s degree, Hampton University Company Name: Xandr Industry: Advertising & technology Company CEO: Brian Lesser Company Headquarters Location: New York, New York Number of Employees: 1,600+ Words you live by: Stay Focused. Personal Philosophy: Share vulnerability to show no one needs to be perfect. What book are you reading: Political Risk: How Businesses and Organizations Can Anticipate Global Insecurity by Condoleezza Rice and Amy B. Zegart What was your first job: INROADS intern at Prudential Favorite charity: The New York Women’s Foundation Interests: Skiing and knitting Family: Two nephews and a global group of friends

How Strong Role Models Help Us Break Barriers “

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ou can’t be what you can’t see,” is a popular phrase expressed by many and attributed to Marian Wright Edelman, an American civil rights activist and founder of the Children’s Defense Fund. This expression has always resonated with me, as I feel it exemplifies the need for powerful role models. My mother is the leading female inspiration in my life and the person who taught me to believe in myself, be excellent in what I attempt, and seek lessons in failures. While these words were shared in my personal life, I apply them professionally every day. I’ve always found that female role models help shift the paradigm for underrepresented groups, who may be unsure or hesitant to explore career paths because they don’t see many people that look like them in a particular field or industry. As I work to embed best practices across recruiting, employee development, and business processes at Xandr, the role female leaders play in creating collaborative teams is becoming more evident. While I’ve made this observation in my own experience, it’s also backed by research from McKinsey, which found that there is a statistically significant correlation between a more diverse

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leadership team and financial outperformance. According to their research, companies in the top quartile for gender diversity on their executive teams were 21 percent more likely to have aboveaverage profitability than companies in the fourth quartile. McKinsey’s findings support the idea that we need female role models. Going back to Marian’s quote, new generations need to see women in leadership roles— tangible proof that anything is possible. Over the course of my career, these role models have not been difficult to identify. However, I have had to get creative in how I have sought them out. Beyond the walls of corporate hierarchy, I have found female role models in my family (my mom), in history (Sojourner Truth), and among peers. As a female leader, I make it a priority to think about the impact each of these women have had on me and always consider their actions and thought processes when approaching challenging decisions or tasks. Perhaps the most important lesson learned from my mother is that I have the power to break barriers. This mentality has led me to where I am today, and it’s something I hope to instill in other women during, and beyond, the span of my career.

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Marcela Lay, CCXP Job Title: Head of Atlanta office and Vice President of Client Services Education: Bachelor's degree, business administration with hospitality management, Externado de Colombia Company Name: Y Media Labs Industry: Technology Company CEO: Ashish Toshniwal Company Headquarters Location: Silicon Valley, California Number of Employees: 300+ Your Location: Atlanta, Georgia Words you live by: A true exceptional leader creates a vision for who she wants to be, creates a growth plan, and doesn't compromise on her values. Personal Philosophy: “Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.” –Mahatma Gandhi. What book are you reading: Leadershift by John C. Maxwell What was your first job: Front desk at a hotel Favorite charity: CARE Interests: Biking, traveling, painting in acrylics, reading nonfiction books, enjoying quality time with my daughter, and multiplying women in leadership Family: Married to a wonderful man, John Lay; blessed with an amazing daughter, Isabella; and fortunate to live with my caring mom, Martha

There Is So Much More Work to Do

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s a minority and as a woman in leadership, I’m energized to see the accelerating wave of women across industries becoming a force for empowerment and gender equality. Each time the ranks grow, we are one step closer to a new status quo where women at the top will be the norm. It is even more exciting to see how many male colleagues are interested and ready to help bring female voices to the table; they just wish they knew how to help, which is an opportunity I'm passionate about enabling. My years of experience have proven and led me to appreciate the fact that making a radical change requires an effort from all of us. Gender equality should not be a fight by women for women. Gender equality should be an initiative where both genders work together to unlock a better future. Our job as female leaders is not to lose focus on creating equal opportunity for everyone on our teams. Under our gender equality movement, we need to remember that as we are asking for more respect, we should ensure we give it too by equally balancing women empowerment, gender equality, and inclusion. Men want to be part of the conversation, so let’s invite them to support our efforts regarding empowerment, equality,

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and inclusion initiatives; to understand the challenges female colleagues face day after day; and how collectively we can take the right steps to create a healthier and more desirable workplace environment. At Y Media Labs, we've made strides toward making this a reality by doing the following: • Offering equal pay for our employees • Creating a Women Initiative (WIN) to empower women and men in areas that matter most, when it comes to gender equality and inclusion • Breaking apart gendered silos where “bro culture” often festers • Growing the next generation of leaders • Successfully hiring an even split of females to males in our Atlanta office in 2018 And we see those initiatives as only the beginning. There is so much more work to do. As a leader, and as a mother, I will continue to strive for an inclusive environment where gender equality is clearly reflected. An environment I hope our next generations will look to as just being the status quo.

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Dominica Groom Williams Job Title: VP, Office of Inclusive Engagement Education: Bachelor’s degree, University of Michigan Company Name: Freddie Mac Industry: Financial services Company CEO: David Brickman Company Headquarters Location: McLean, Virginia Words you live by: “You don’t have to see the whole staircase, just take the first step.” –Martin Luther King, Jr. Personal Philosophy: “Be the change you wish to see in the world.” –Mahatma Gandhi What was your first job: Mentorship Program Student Coordinator at the University of Michigan Favorite charity: Habitat for Humanity Family: Wonderful husband, parents, and extended family!

Leveraging an Inclusive Mindset for Continued Growth

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t Freddie Mac, we’ve been keenly focusing on the “I” in “D&I.” By further cultivating a culture of inclusion, we can better engage the diversity of our employees, suppliers, and community partners to deliver on our mission of making home possible. We call our approach inclusive engagement—establishing meaningful connections with people unlike yourself. This concept resonates with me, particularly, as I’ve leveraged an inclusive mindset throughout my career to continuously push myself to explore and embrace new opportunities. In fact, it’s in spaces of unfamiliarity that I’ve often grown and developed the most. It’s also why some of my career advice to others has been to embrace an inclusive mindset as they seek to evolve, grow, and prosper. As an African American woman, I’ve always been conscious of representation and why all types of diversity are important and valuable. I became more acutely aware of the importance of an inclusive mindset during college when the Supreme Court was hearing an affirmative action case at a leading university. In a nutshell, the university was accused of providing preferential treatment to diverse individuals over the majority.

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I very clearly recall an encounter with a fellow student, a Caucasian male, in the lobby of one of our main buildings. He was hosting a bake sale where items being sold at a higher price to the majority were priced noticeably lower for minorities. His argument—affirmative action gives minorities an unfair advantage in the admissions process, reducing opportunity for the “qualified majority.” I disagreed with his argument and asked to sit down to discuss further, where we each shared our informed arguments. As the discussion progressed, his rationale dwindled, while mine strengthened. My concluding point was that limited mindsets can lead to a narrow view of the world. What could have been a moment of tension was a teaching moment for us both, which ultimately led to a meaningful connection that we leveraged to drive change and foster inclusiveness across the campus. Throughout your career, you’ll encounter people with different ideas, ways of thinking and more. An inclusive mindset is a powerful way to best position yourself to leverage and embrace diversity to ignite innovation, outcomes, and success.

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It’s all about bringing more humans to the table at Freddie Mac. We actively engage the differences of our employees, suppliers and community partners to further drive our mission of making home possible. We call it inclusive engagement. In that spirit, we congratulate Freddie Mac leaders Jacqueline Welch, CHRO and CDO, Dominica Groom Williams, VP, Office of Inclusive Engagement and all the other Women Worth Watching recognition recipients.

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Manuela Papadopol Job Title: CEO Education: BS, marketing, James Madison University, Bucharest Romania; post-graduate certifications, public relations and business development, University of Washington; patent, voice-activated acquisition of non-local content Company Name: Designated Driver Industry: Automotive Company CEO: Manuela Papadopol Company Headquarters Location: Portland, Oregon Number of Employees: 10 Words you live by: Don’t try to be more like a man, be more like a woman instead of a girl. Personal Philosophy: Be humble, be honest, be generous and be curious. What book are you reading: Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage by Alfred Lansing; Artificial Unintelligence: How Computers Misunderstand the World by Meredith Broussard What was your first job: Internship at BMW Favorite charity: POW (Protect Our Winters) Interests: Snowboarding and backpacking Family: Husband

It’s Not an Ideal World—Yet

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am honored to be named one of Profiles in Diversity Journal’s 2019 Women Worth Watching. It is humbling to be recognized alongside other organizational leaders from all industries, who are clearly excelling in their respective fields. We have come a long way in recognizing leadership, but we still have much farther to go. The fact that, in 2018, less than five percent of the Fortune 500 CEOs were women, is a case in point. Sadly this number was even lower than in 2017. Also, we are still experiencing tremendous gender pay gaps, and solving this fundamental issue will take action from individuals, employers, and policymakers. As women continue to fight for a seat at the table, I want to share my honest thoughts: In an ideal world, the award we all should be receiving would be called “Leaders Worth Watching,” and men and women would be evaluated on equal footing. (For the record—and I checked—there is no award out there called “Men Worth Watching.”)

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In an ideal world, we wouldn’t be called out because of our gender, nor would we be asked to discuss the battles we had to fight to be considered an equal. Our achievements would be measured by our overall business acumen: the revenue we generated and number of deals we closed for our companies. Our overall success would be gauged by the health of our organizations; the happiness of our employees, customers, and partners; and by the impact of our contributions on our respective industries. I have worked my entire professional career in the extremely male-dominated automotive industry. I have lived in Europe and the U.S., and have always tried to speak the language of the country I was in. I have surrounded myself with people that saw potential in me and encouraged me to push my limits, but also gave me incredible opportunities. I will always follow this piece of advice from one of my former managers: “A people hire A people. B people hire C or D people”—no matter what gender or background they are.

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Delaine Smith Job Title: Associate General Counsel, Labor & Employment Education: JD, University of Memphis; BA, University of Tennessee Company Name: International Paper Company Industry: Packaging, paper & pulp manufacturing Company CEO: Mark Sutton Company Headquarters Location: Memphis, Tennessee Number of Employees: 53,000 Words you live by: Do my choices reflect what I say my priorities are? Personal Philosophy: No one succeeds all by themselves. In team success, there is individual success. What book are you reading: Called: How One Couple Served a City by Sheridan Hill; Make Today Count by John Maxwell What was your first job: Draftsman at my father’s construction company Favorite charity: DeNeuville Learning Ctr. and Neighborhood Christian Ctr. in Memphis Interests: Family, painting for fun and relaxation, and avid sports spectator Family: Two awesome rescue mutts, Lily and Ziggy; fortunate to still have my mom and lots of extended family around, too

Failures Are Just Part of the Journey to Success

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he greatest mistake we make is living in constant fear that we will make one,” said John Maxwell. Fear of failure leaves us resistant to change, unable to take risks, and powerless to reach goals. Instead, we have to view change as inevitable, risks as invigorating possibilities, and failure as a vehicle for learning, growing, and succeeding. The truth is that failure provides learning opportunities that one simply cannot get from an easy path to success. We must be willing to make an ambitious plan, set stretch goals, and dream big, realizing that there will be mistakes and missteps along the way. But we cannot let those missteps prevent us, or derail us, from setting plans, goals, and dreams. And, in order to learn from failures, we must first take responsibility for them, then let them teach us, and finally, work heartily not to repeat them. While no one relishes the experience of failing at something, I’ve learned over the years that failing to embrace the challenges of career and life is much more limiting than failing at any one task or project.

Once you view failures as learning opportunities, it takes the fear out of moving confidently forward. Without question, you should always give each task or opportunity your all, but acknowledge that mistakes are inevitable and stop fearing the things that you cannot change. Leaders can’t take credit for their successes until they’ve taken ownership of their failures, too. And as leaders, we must give others room to fail, with the understanding that the biggest mistake is not to learn from them. When team members do fail, their leader should have their backs and be the one who helps guide them through the learning opportunity and back to the road to future success. I love the words of Eleanor Roosevelt, “Do one thing every day that scares you.” We all face tasks that feel daunting, but we can embrace that feeling and turn it into anticipation by asking ourselves, not “what if we fail?” but “even with a few missteps along the way, how awesome will it be when we succeed?” Failures are just part of the journey to success!

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

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Amy E. Keller Job Title: Partner Education: JD, The John Marshall Law School; BA, University of Michigan Company Name: DiCello Levitt Gutzler Industry: Legal Company CEO: Mark A. DiCello, Adam Levitt (Co-Founding Partners) Company Headquarters Location: Chicago, Illinois Number of Employees: 18 attorneys Words you live by: Do well by doing good. Personal Philosophy: Demonstrate empathy, both personally and professionally. What book are you reading: Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty What was your first job: Lead livestock specialist at PetSmart (at age16) Favorite charity: The Public Justice Foundation Interests: Yoga, my Peloton bike, my three dogs, architectural preservation, and theater Family: I am engaged to be married in September. My parents and brother live in Michigan.

“Women Attorneys” Are Attorneys

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’m fortunate to be building my career and reputation at a transformative time in the legal profession. Women now outnumber men in law schools, and about a third of attorneys are women. And judges—particularly federal judges—are appointing qualified women to important case leadership positions. But we still have far to go. Female litigators are defined by their gender—a “woman lawyer” or “female attorney.” They are still fighting to be paid the same as their male counterparts. Men still outnumber women in leadership positions at the country’s top law firms. And, while the universe of female role models is expanding, it has been historically limited by inherent biological issues and social stigmas. Maternal care responsibilities, for instance, remain a problem, despite the efforts of many businesses to implement career flexibility. So, women are forced to make an unfair choice: career or children—not both. As plaintiff’s co-lead counsel in several of the nation’s largest consumer class action lawsuits, I am required to focus primarily on serving my client’s needs. So, while my partner and I want to have children, we have chosen to wait. It’s a choice that I, like many young litigators, have had to make.

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I am honored to be selected by Profiles in Diversity Journal as a Woman Worth Watching®, and hope that someday, I can serve as a role model for other female attorneys, as these the following inspirational women—all of them mothers— have for me: Elizabeth Cabraser champions justice as a named partner at one of the county’s top law firms. She has taken on some of the largest companies for corporate misconduct, with a quiet tenacity and patience that can be jarring to those accustomed to scorched-earth litigation. Laurel Bellows began her practice by representing women who could not otherwise find legal representation, eventually making a name for herself and becoming president of the American Bar Association. Congresswoman Kate Porter, representative for California’s 45th congressional district, is a tough-as-nails cross examiner, who has no problem taking ill-prepared officials to task for not doing their jobs. Elizabeth, Laurel, and Kate demonstrate that women can be successful in “a man’s world” by maintaining their authenticity and never downplaying their intelligence or credentials. These women, along with countless others, have paved the way for younger litigators, like me, to continue to fight for gender equality.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Jacqueline M. Welch Job Title: Chief Human Resources Officer and Chief Diversity Officer Education: Master of Science, human resources management, Milano Graduate School; Bachelor of Arts, English, Syracuse University Company Name: Freddie Mac Industry: Financial services Company CEO: David Brickman Company Headquarters Location: McLean, Virginia Words you live by: You can quietly know. Reserve your energy for things you can impact. Personal Philosophy: Leave people and things in better condition than you found them. What book are you reading: If I Live to be 100: Lessons from the Centenarians by Neenah Ellis What was your first job: Cashier at Burger King; after college, a buyer trainee with Lord & Taylor. Favorite charity: Habitat for Humanity Family: I am wife to Tarik Welch and a mother to two young men, James and Jackson. I am also a mom to fur baby, Benjamin Bones.

Take along a Coach, a Mentor, and a Sponsor on Your Career Journey

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here is an African proverb that says, “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.” This proverb speaks to many things, including the importance of relationships and the value of cultivating an inclusive mindset. In terms of relationships, research has proven that there are three critical relationships you need to grow your career: coach, mentor, and sponsor. Often conflated, they are, in fact, three different concepts. The Coach The coach helps you up-skill and take your performance to new levels. The relationship is relatively transactional, focused, and within defined parameters—you need to improve your performance, and a coach uses her or his expertise to help you learn the skills necessary to achieve the desired outcomes. For example, if you are a tennis player who desires to improve your stroke, you hire a tennis coach to improve your technique. At work, if you desire to better understand the fundamentals of your organization’s balance sheet, you might enlist support from someone in Finance. Data suggests that underrepresented groups tend to not feel comfortable in coaching relationships because of the transactional nature. Consequently, we run the risk of wasting precious time in the development journey because we do not sufficiently leverage coaching as a development platform. Get over the discomfort. Figure out where your development needs are. Break those needs down to manageable components. Scan the environment for people who are good at what you want to be good at. Make the ask.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

The Mentor Mentors tend to have a more comprehensive view of who you are on and off the job. They use that knowledge and holistic viewpoint to help you think through your various career choices. For example, when I was evaluating Freddie Mac as my next career destination, I consulted with a former boss with whom I’ve maintained a relationship for two-plus decades. Because of our history, he was able to help me think through all the nuances of accepting the new adventure. Research shows that women and underrepresented groups tend to over-mentor, as we feel more comfortable with the make-up of the relationship. Have a mentor or two for sure, but, not at the expense of or as replacements for coaches and sponsors. The Sponsor A sponsor is generally a senior person willing to use her or his reputational capital and influence on your behalf. The sponsor is someone privy to the proverbial closed-door meetings and in a position to speak favorably of you and advocate on your behalf. Research has shown that sponsorship is one of the differentiators that help women and other underrepresented groups break through the glass ceiling. The best way to secure a sponsor is to consistently do good work—and talk about it. Along your career journey, it’s imperative that you leverage each of these relationships, as each one plays a role in helping you reach your career goals. www.womenworthwatching.com

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Lisa Y. Harris, M.D. Job Title: VP and CMO Commercial Education: MD, Morehouse School of Medicine; BS, neurosciences, University of Rochester Company Name: Excellus BlueCross and BlueShield Industry: Health insurance Company CEO: Christopher C. Booth, Esq. Company Headquarters Location: Rochester, New York Number of Employees: 3,705 Words you live by: If God said it, He will do it. Personal Philosophy: Be true to yourself. What book are you reading: If Beale Street Could Talk by James Baldwin What was your first job: Cashier at Burger King Favorite charity: Educational Advancement Foundation, United Way, and Urban League of Rochester Interests: Sewing, skiing, time with family, travel, and knitting Family: Husband, Torye (RCSD educator), son, Brandon (chaplain at Georgetown), and daughter, Christian (studying for a PhD in biomedical sciences)

Unleash the Diva: Overcoming Gender and Ethnic Bias in the Workplace

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omen of color have all encountered and expressed bias. People exhibit implicit bias when they make assumptions about each other based on dress, ethnicity, gender, race, or speech. If a woman is assertive, she is labeled a negative name for a female dog. If she wears her hair natural, too ethnic. If she congregates with other women or other African Americans, she is a separatist. Inflections of speech are referred to as not sounding black enough or sounding too black. Women of color are often placed in the position of seemingly being the sole source of information regarding the entire race. Overlooked and underutilized in the workplace, reacting to the implicit bias that is woven into the fabric of our society, we sometimes become our own worst enemy. If one and only one woman is allowed, we fight to maintain that position of achievement, denigrating our own in an effort at self-preservation. Don’t get me wrong, women of color have come a long way since the birth of equal rights for women and minorities. Yet, we still experience glass ceilings, pay inequities, and outright discrimination. I would assert that is not only the bias, but our response to it.

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We can overcome by unleashing the Diva. The Diva is not the petulant, temperamental, difficult to please individual, but rather, as the Urban Dictionary describes her, “the one who exudes great style and personality with confidence.” She is the one who is comfortable in her excellence, and demands excellence of those around her. Women such as Shirley Chisolm, Maya Angelou, and Michelle Obama, for me are examples of such Divas. Divas, are expert in deflection, reversing the direction of a negative comment to the sender. In other words, I don’t need to own your problem or negativity. I choose whether and how to react. A Diva does not need to cut herself to break through the glass ceiling. A Diva steps outside and builds a ladder to the rooftop. She creates a network of true friends and colleagues that are willing to give and receive constructive criticism. The Diva is true to herself. She knows who she is. She takes time to develop her interests, strengths, and personal style. The Diva cultivates mentors and mentorship. Unleash the diva and rise above the pettiness of bias to your full potential.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Leslee M. Lewis Job Title: Member Education: JD, Notre Dame Law School; BA, Alma College Company Name: Dickinson Wright PLLC Industry: Legal Company CEO: Michael C. Hammer Company Headquarters Location: Detroit, Michigan Number of Employees: 896 Your Location (if different from above): Grand Rapids, Michigan Words you live by: “Your life is an occasion. Rise to it.” –Suzanne Weyn (from Mr. Magorium’s Wonder Emporium) Personal Philosophy: God is in every creature and in their needs. Love God by loving and helping the people He puts in your life and your work. What book are you reading: My Grandmother Asked Me To Tell You She’s Sorry by Frederik Backman What was your first job: Teaching swimming Favorite charity: West Michigan Learning Disabilities Foundation Interests: Parks, museums, art, literature, hiking, kayaking, paddleboarding, and swimming Family: Husband of over 25 years, Andrew, and three wonderful kids: Cale, Whit, and Brooke

Envision Something Better

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y heroes are Mother Teresa; a few authors, poets, and cherished colleagues; and my grandma—especially Grandma. Why? These are people whose lives tell a story. They not only believe in something greater than themselves, but they do something about it. What good is it to have high ideals and sit on the sidelines? Part of our calling as leaders is to recognize the dignity and hope in others, to feel their pain, loss, and humanity. Then, together, envision something better and start anew. My grandma did not believe in sitting on the sidelines. When she saw a need, she went straight to work (maybe whether you liked it or not). All her young employees knew her motto: “If you have time to lean, you have time to clean.” But a lot of good, clean lives were launched there, steeped in those humble ideals. No one doubted that she cared. I am blessed to work with a lot of nonprofits and businesses whose dayto-day work and ideals are one and the same. Thousands of people feel their lives have meaning because they work for these companies. I do, too. That is one of my great joys in life.

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When I chose a law firm, I sought one thing: opportunity. I wanted to know that if I worked hard, I would have the same chance as any man—no more, no less. I was not looking for a handout. A handout implies that I am less able, less intelligent, or less hard-working than my colleagues. I was given that chance and more—teaching, compassion, friendship, challenge, mercy, advocacy, and occasionally a good, hard shove in the right direction. I will always be grateful for that. Now, it is my turn to give. In 2016, I was in a serious car accident. Immediately one thought crystallized in my mind: Not one thing I own or have earned matters. It is all worthless. But my relationships with God and people are priceless. What we believe, who we love, and how we invest our lives in others does matter. Mother Theresa said, “We can do no great things, only small things with great love.” I will never change the world or create lasting world peace. But today, I will listen to someone’s problem and invite them to see how we can make it better, together.

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Beth A. Walters Job Title: Senior Vice President, Culture, Community & Employee Engagement Education: MA, University of Hawaii; BA, American University Company Name: Jabil, Inc. Industry: Manufacturing Company CEO: Mark Mondello Company Headquarters Location: St. Petersburg, Florida Number of Employees: 210,000 Words you live by: Start each day with a grateful heart. Personal Philosophy: Start each day With A Grateful Heart. What book are you reading: Imagine It Forward by Beth Comstock What was your first job: Babysitting Favorite charity: LiFT Academy in St. Petersburg, Florida Interests: Travel, cultures, reading, biking, walking, and wine Family: Husband, Michael Babich, son, Taylor, and daughter-in-law, Leah

Inspiring, Elevating, and Empowering Women

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ix years ago, I had an “aha” moment. For all my career success, I realized that I was so focused on the here and now I had not noticed that I was the lone woman in the executive ranks at Jabil. I also suddenly realized I could help others. The task was daunting, given that Jabil has 200,000 globally dispersed employees, but my commitment to help women trumped my trepidation. My mission: Inspire, elevate visibility, and empower Jabil’s female workforce in our male-dominated global manufacturing industry. It was a considerable challenge, given dramatic cultural differences across the 30+ counties in which Jabil operates. I had to create a program that would grow from the bottom up because I had no budget and zero staff dedicated to the mission. Success did not happen overnight, but day by day, event by event, leader by leader, I was able to bring colleagues on board. I had AMAZING support from leadership, including our passionate CEO, Mark Mondello, who is extremely visible and vocal with his support. Always a fan of alliteration, I named the program Jabil Joules (a joule is a unit of energy and pronounced “jewel”). And I based the program on four principals: 1. Voluntary engagement. Employees join the initiative because they recognize the value of diversity and inclusion; a top-down approach

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would have been counter to Jabil’s culture. 2. Embrace cultural diversity. The characteristics of empowerment are unique to different cultures, and empowerment may manifest in different ways. 3. Management support is a must. Jabil’s strong culture and commitment to our global workforce led to endorsement across the C-Suite. 4. Internal recognition and external visibility are vital. Our Jabil Joules blog celebrates female leadership, and I built a partnership with The Manufacturing Institute’s STEP Ahead program, an annual award recognizing the achievements of women in manufacturing. (Eight Jabil Joules have been recognized since 2015.) In the last 18 months, I’ve worked with local steering committees to hold ten events in China, Hungary, Mexico, Ukraine, and the United States. Being on the ground is critical to understanding country by country cultural issues and building a sense of excitement and enthusiasm. Senior leadership has embraced these events, and many have traveled halfway around the world to participate. Jabil Joules appears unstoppable. And for me, the time and commitment it took to get here is every bit as rewarding as the momentum we built along the way.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Mia Meachem Job Title: Chief Marketing Officer Education: MBA, Duke University; BA, University of California Los Angeles Company Name: Del Frisco’s Restaurant Group Industry: Restaurant & Hospitality Company CEO: Norman J. Abdallah Company Headquarters Location: Irving, Texas Number of Employees: 125 Words you live by: Be curious, never stop learning! Personal Philosophy: Always, always be yourself. What book are you reading: The Power of Moments: Why Certain Experiences Have Extraordinary Impact by Chip Heath and Dan Heath What was your first job: Working for Land Rover North America, Inc. during the brand’s early days in the U.S. Favorite charity: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital; I am also involved my son’s school and on the board at Booker T. Washington School for the Performing and Visual Arts. Interests: Travel, reading, and supporting my son’s activities Family: I am the mother of an amazing 10-year-old boy.

Empowering the Next Generation

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hroughout my career, I have had the privilege of leading the marketing and brand functions at multiple luxury lifestyle brands and simultaneously, building a substantial track record of success. Through these experiences, I have developed a passion for creating and driving brand awareness, defining and enhancing brand positioning, and reinvigorating brands through innovation. Having worked with both emerging and established brands, I get most excited about celebrating the uniqueness of each brand and making a deep emotional connection with the consumer. Engagement with both internal and external audiences, coupled with a carefully crafted marketing and brand strategy, is central to a company’s success. Having the opportunity to lead teams to do just this is personally and professionally rewarding, and what has shaped me into the leader I am today. A past project that was especially meaningful to me was Neiman-Marcus’s Make Some Noise campaign. The campaign was an important shift for NeimanMarcus, as the brand focused on the next generation of consumers. The Make Some Noise campaign was a celebration of

women using their voices to lead the way forward. This project was so important, because it was all about championing women and connecting with both the core customer and the next generation. While there are many functions that exist within the marketing department, and thus a wide array of talent, I strive to create an entrepreneurial and collaborative environment and approach to business initiatives, ensuring that my team feels connected to the mission and greater goal of the company. It has been my personal goal to support the growth and development of my team. I work to foster an environment that encourages team members to share results, successes, and learnings to ultimately make everyone feel respected and valued. Throughout the years, I have learned that behind every great leader is a team of smart, dedicated individuals, and I have been fortunate to have incredible teams at each stop in my career. I am extremely passionate about my role as a female leader. It is really important to me to pave the way for more female leadership, so I am empowering and cultivating the next generation of female leaders. I consider it a privilege to do so.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

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Cheri Lantz Job Title: Vice President and Chief Strategy Officer Education: MBA, Ross School of Business, University of Michigan; Master of Science, manufacturing engineering and Bachelor of Science, chemical engineering, University of Michigan Company Name: Meritor, Inc. Industry: Commercial vehicle industry Company CEO: Jay Craig Company Headquarters Location: Troy, Michigan Number of Employees: 8,600+ Words you live by: “My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive; and to do so with some passion, some compassion, some humor, and some style.” –Maya Angelou Personal Philosophy: Always deliver. What book are you reading: Loonshots by Safi Bahcall; Hamilton by Ron Chernow What was your first job: Ice cream shop server Favorite charity: Hole in the Wall and Food Gatherers Interests: Travel, reading, water sports, and amateur vehicle modifications (wrenching) Family: Married, three children

Creating More Women Leaders

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believe that creating, nurturing, and celebrating strong female leaders will help lay the foundation for a more diverse and powerful set of business and world leaders. Today, there aren’t enough women at the top of our organizations to offer insight into business issues and how they impact consumers representing half the planet’s population. Fewer than seven percent of Fortune 500 CEOs are women, and the number of C-suite woman executives in the tech and industrial sectors is disappointingly low. Even when individual female leaders receive just as much exposure as male counterparts, collectively they are less visible. Our challenge is to bridge this gap by helping others see that strong women are leaders who make high-impact changes. We should fight stereotyping that prompts many women to believe they must defer to male peers or apologize for tough or unpopular decision-making—even when they are right—by showcasing their authentic leadership styles and positioning them as decisive and direct. Celebrating female leaders is important because women often don’t do it themselves. When I watched the movie RBG, I was struck by how Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg—an amazing, smart,

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fierce, powerful woman—relied on a strong male champion, her husband, to call out her accomplishments and eventually fight for her spot on the court. Some of the most successful and capable women are humble and understated about their victories. They win gently, by making others see the light as they steer organizations to success. As women continue to face internally and externally driven challenges, I think about those who influenced me. Instead of one perfect role model, my patchwork leadership vision is built from leaders in different walks of life. I was influenced by an empathetic nurse, a tough gymnastics coach, a resilient and intellectual mother, a fearless sister, and other women who showed me at least one value or nuanced skill set that helped me become the leader I am today. Equally important are excellent male leaders with pure mastery of strategic fundamentals, an unwavering commitment to objective analytics, and the ability to communicate a palpable vision in a way that makes others want to follow. Women and men alike can and should find opportunities to sponsor and mentor women rising to leadership. We can all learn from each other and build stronger organizations that are more representative of global markets and the world at large.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


RUN WITH THE WOMEN WHO ARE SHAPING THE FUTURE Meritor Salutes Cheri Lantz

We’re known for our innovative and industry-leading products, but it’s the people of Meritor who drive our success. That’s why we’re proud to have Cheri Lantz among the women who power our company. Their leadership and excellence help to attract, retain, and develop our diverse workforce of 8,600 employees in 18 countries across the globe. Run with the company committed to exceptional people, outstanding opportunity, and ongoing success. Learn more about career opportunities at meritor.com Cheri Lantz Vice President and Chief Strategy Officer

©2019 Meritor, Inc.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

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Michelle Epstein Taigman Job Title: Senior Vice President, General Counsel, and Secretary Education: JD, University of Michigan Law School; BA, political science, University of Michigan Company Name: HARMAN Industry: Technology Company CEO: Dinesh C. Paliwal Company Headquarters Location: Stamford, Connecticut Number of Employees: 24,000+ Words you live by: “What may initially seem like an insurmountable obstacle could ultimately put you on a better path.” –Ryan Holiday Personal Philosophy: Keep perspective. Although I will admit I fail at this as often as I succeed! What book are you reading: The History of Love by Nicole Krauss Favorite charity: JVS Detroit, a human services agency that provides counseling, training and support services to people with disabilities, job seekers, seniors, and others in need Family: A husband who has been a true partner at home and in his support of my career, and understanding children who have added their support as they have become adults

Female Role Models Are Still Rare in STEM

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owerful female role models are undeniably important because they provide the next generation with authentic examples of what is possible for women in the workforce. While women have made significant progress in the 25 years since I graduated from law school, for a number of reasons, including societal pressures, they still tend to gravitate toward certain disciplines and remain underrepresented in several industries, especially STEM and politics. While I am less frequently the only woman in the room today than I was at the start of my career, that situation still occurs. I am almost always still very much in the minority. Many companies are making strides in the workplace by establishing mentor programs and women’s networking groups as a means to provide better solutions and support for female employees. However, these resources only fill part of a much larger need. Where women’s networks and mentoring groups tend to provide peer-to-peer support, or focus on what it is like to exist as a woman within a company, a powerful role model has the potential to prove how individuals—who just happen to be women—can succeed within an organization’s structure. The benefits of women’s groups are abundant

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and should not be diminished in any way, but I believe it is equally important to witness women functioning in leadership roles. From my perspective, powerful female role models do remain difficult to come by, simply because they remain small in number. Despite the progress made over the past decades, a significant gender gap still exists in the talent pipeline. Studies show that women are less likely than men to be hired into manager-level jobs and even less likely to be promoted into them. This trend goes all the way to the top: as of May 2019, there are only 33 female CEOs in the Fortune 500 index. While this number is a record high, it only represents a tiny fraction of the group as a whole. A recent report by McKinsey & Company found that women are less likely to aspire to be top executives than men, and are more likely to think their gender will make it harder for them to move forward. It’s my hope that the next generation of female leaders will not be held back by the same discouraging sentiments, and instead, will have the opportunity to turn to multiple female role models to help them succeed.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Susan Moore Job Title: Corporate Vice President, Government Affairs & Corporate Responsibility Education: JD, Baylor University; BA magna cum laude, University of Texas at Arlington Company Name: AMD Industry: Semiconductors Company CEO: Lisa Su Company Headquarters Location: Santa Clara, California Number of Employees: 10,000+ Your Location: Austin, Texas Words you live by: Define yourself by getting up, and not by falling down. Personal Philosophy: Life is an adventure. What book are you reading: Apples Are from Kazakhstan: The Land that Disappeared by Christopher Robbins What was your first job: Working at an ice cream parlor at age 14 Favorite charity: Austin Community Foundation; Lifeworks Interests: Exploring the world Family: Two children

What Advice Would You Give Your Younger Self?

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recently spoke to a graduate class, and as my remarks were winding down, I was asked, “If you could share career advice with yourself thirty years ago, what would you say?” After thinking for a few moments, I smiled and coached my younger self to do the following: 1. Listen to “gut instinct.” We each have that innate ability to feel an invisible hand on our shoulder guiding us in a particular direction. Honed by experience and knowledge, that sense of judgment is core to our being. When I find myself in trouble, often I realize that I have ignored my gut instinct due to tiredness, lack of time, or perhaps laziness. If your lament begins with “I wish I had…,” then there’s a good chance you’ve ignored your gut instinct. 2. Listen before talking. While not always easy to do if time is limited, force yourself to start meetings with a short, open-ended question. This habit physically settles me into the meeting’s presence, and transitions me mentally into a listening mode. 3. Learn more from mistakes than from success. No one likes to make mistakes, particularly you. Errors can be painful and embarrassing, and might even disappoint others. These

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raw emotions help transform mistakes into learning memories. While we certainly don’t aspire to making mistakes, accept them for what they are. They often occur when we most need to learn something. 4. Explore the world. Within the next thirty years, I predict you’ll visit more than thirty-five countries and be exhilarated by the sense of adventure. But realize you can also explore your world by speaking to the stranger standing next to you or joining in community service. Venturing out into the world illuminates not only differences in cultures, languages, and views, but also, and more importantly, similarities shared. 5. A brand is built, but a reputation is received. Building my brand—what I want to be known for—is a continuous career exercise in shaping how I spend my time, voice, and talent. Don’t be afraid to think about brand, but also don’t mistake your efforts as building reputation. Your reputation can’t be built, but can only be given to you by others. As I finished my remarks that day, I felt a quiet sense of joy and gratitude; joy for the good moments yet to come, and gratitude for those that have already been.

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Natasha Kohne Job Title: Partner; Cybersecurity, Privacy and Data Protection Practice Co-Head; and Firm-wide Management Committee Member Education: JD cum laude, Harvard Law School; BA summa cum laude, Columbia University Company Name: Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP Industry: Legal Company CEO: Kim Koopersmith, Chairperson Company Headquarters Location: N/A Number of Employees: 1,765 Your Location: San Francisco, California Words you live by: The Golden Rule Personal Philosophy: Conscious living, with an edge What book are you reading: The Art of Learning: An Inner Journey to Optimal Performace by Josh Waitzkin What was your first job: I can’t remember whether it was Knott’s Berry Farm or Blockbuster Video, but I do remember I was paid $4.35/hour. Favorite charity: Make-a-Wish and my daughter’s girls school Interests: Wellness, sociology, and contemporary music Family: Husband and two children

Be Ready to Leap, Reinvent … and Show Your Grit

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any women of my generation were raised to believe they could do anything they wanted to; that we could “have it all.” It was only after graduate school I realized life was way more complicated. After law school, I started attending “women’s events” and the motto quickly shifted to, “You can do it all, just not at the same time.” It was a tough realization, and only later did I realize what that meant— thanks in part to several hugely important individuals who have influenced and helped me along the way. Several related lessons stand out: • Forge your own path: First, in a profession that holds fast to traditionalism, I’ve consistently resisted the traditional path. When the opportunity to open Akin Gump’s Abu Dhabi office emerged, I leaped. And when I was offered the chance to co-lead my firm’s cybersecurity, privacy, and data protection practice, I leaped again. In this, I was emulating an even bigger leap made by my mother, who moved to the United States from Jamaica when she was 18 years old to attend college and forge a new life. • Reinvent: Second, reinvention is critical. As a privacy and cybersecurity lawyer, I work at the cutting-edge of emerging technology and the law,

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in the context of one of the most significant public policy issues of our time. But responding to new technology, while shaping the policy debate to develop new and better laws, only happens if lawyers are willing to embrace and effect meaningful change. • Persevere: Third, don’t focus on being “perfect.” Striving for perfection has its merits, but the latest social psychology research compellingly documents that “grit” is the most critical element in one’s career. I watch my nine-year-old daughter’s grit and perseverance, her focus on “practice makes progress,” and I know my career is no different. However many male-dominated environments you encounter, “grit” is essential to withstanding the journey and making an impact. I realize I’m also supported by where I live. Of all the places I’ve seen, women in San Francisco are by far the most serious about advancing other women. The expression, “We are our own worst enemy,” is less prevalent here. And I’m immensely grateful to my friends, colleagues, and clients, who believe not only in what I can accomplish, but that my presence at the table enhances critical decision-making and the broader business environment.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Susan R. Huntington Job Title: Partner and Chair of the Healthcare, Life Sciences and Technology practice group Education: JD cum laude, Georgetown University Law Center; BS with Honors, University of Wisconsin Company Name: Day Pitney LLP Industry: Legal Company CEO: Thomas D. Goldberg Company Headquarters Location: Parsippany, New Jersey & Hartford, Connecticut Number of Employees: 587 Your Location: Hartford, Connecticut Words you live by: You do you. I do me. Personal Philosophy: In both your personal and professional life, treat everyone with dignity and respect and be yourself. What book are you reading: Becoming by Michelle Obama What was your first job: During high school, I worked summers driving a forklift in a bookbinding factory in Wisconsin. It was a union job that helped pay for college. Favorite charity: Heifer International, a nonprofit that provides animals to underdeveloped countries. Heifer supports Guatemala, where my daughter was born, and she enjoys choosing animals to donate. Interests: Family, travel and art in all forms. My two children are dancers, and my son is also a classical musician, so you can often find me in the audience. Family: I am in the “sandwich generation”—a single mother with a 30-year-old son and 16-year-old daughter, and coordinating health care services for my elderly parents.

Don’t Let Others Define Who You Are

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ttitudes about women in the workplace have, thankfully, evolved since my entry into the workforce. Having spent the first twelve years of my career as a physician assistant, before becoming a lawyer, I’ve seen these changes not only in the legal industry but also in healthcare. There are a number of parallels between the challenges faced in these two industries that traditionally have been male dominated, such as gender pay disparities and lack of women in leadership positions. Because of these inequities, some women colleagues believed they needed to be very assertive and act “more like a man” in order to avoid being left behind or overlooked. In my view this seems to be a generational phenomenon that has evolved. Younger generations of professional women appear to feel comfortable being assessed on their intellectual capacity and work product. Similarly, more junior and mid-level professionals appear to be more comfortable taking full advantage of parental leave, where in earlier generations, there was always pressure to return to work as soon as possible to reclaim your seat at the table. Such outdated attitudes aren’t gone, but they are noticeably less pervasive.

Likewise, concern about a woman’s productivity because she has family obligations has become much less of an issue. In fact, I believe working mothers are entitled to extra credit because they know how to effectively manage their time, prioritize, and get things done. Women have also blazed the trail for law firms to become more flexible in terms of working remotely, arranging flexible work schedules, and establishing reasonable parental leave policies. These changes help all employees, regardless of gender. Each of us has the ability and obligation to change outdated attitudes by not giving them credence. I give similar guidance to my son, who is gay and endures many stereotypes. We can prove misperceptions wrong by not giving them the energy to keep them alive. The same goes for my Latina adopted daughter. People make assumptions about external attributes and we should not give those assumptions life by internalizing them. We all have the ability to do the same—don’t take on these stereotypes, don’t internalize, and don’t feed into outdated attitudes. Don’t let others define who you are. And be the change agent who makes things better for those who follow.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

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PC Chew Job Title: Finance Director Education: Bachelor’s degree, computer science Company Name: AMD Industry: Semiconductors Company CEO: Lisa Su Company Headquarters Location: Santa Clara, California Number of Employees: 10,000+ Your Location: Penang, Malaysia Words you live by: Laughter is the best medicine. Personal Philosophy: Doing something that you are passionate about is awesome, but if you don't, do the best that you can. What book are you reading: Graphic novels What was your first job: IT analyst Favorite charity: UNICEF Interests: Organizing fun events Family: Husband and 2 sons (14 & 20 years old)

Just Be Yourself—Adjust as Needed

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hen I started work, I was excited. I did not fear what others said about me. I did, said, and acted however I wanted. As time went by, I realized people were watching. I became very conscious of my behavior. It eventually changed me. The fear of being judged stopped me from being the “excited” me. I feared if I said something wrong, others would think negatively of me. I feared if I joked too much, they would think I was a clown. I feared if I spoke up, I might ask a stupid question and would be judged. I became somebody I wasn’t. When someone said I needed to act a particular way, I changed to behave exactly like that. When someone else said I needed to speak a certain way, I did that. It was torture. I felt miserable. What was my turning point? I went to a party and saw this guy who stood at a corner, drinking his coffee and enjoying every moment of it. He would look around the room once in a while but continued to stir his coffee. I noticed that every 15 minutes (more or less), he moved out of his cozy corner and

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started networking and mingling with the rest of the folks. Then, he moved back to the corner to enjoy his quiet moments. I went over to talk to him. He said he is an introvert and likes to have quiet moments for himself. But, since he was the host of the party, he made it a point to network and mingle. He did not force himself to take center stage just to fulfill his role as host. Lesson learned: You don’t have to become someone else in order to blend in; you just need to adjust occasionally to fit in. If you feel a situation is overwhelming, get out and come back when you’re ready. Give yourself space to catch your breath. “Adjusting” is much less stressful than “changing,” as it gives you space to adapt and acclimate. Adjusting lets you take a small step, while still maintaining the balance of who you are. Making slight adjustments to your frame of mind or your actions creates an expanded version of you that can lead to a more efficient way to achieve collaborative solutions. Just be yourself—adjust as needed.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Jennifer Reddien Job Title: Director of Diversity and Inclusion, Haynes and Boone, LLP Education: JD, University of Michigan Law School; MBA, University of Notre Dame; BA, Duke University Company Name: Haynes and Boone, LLP Industry: Legal Company CEO: Timothy Powers Company Headquarters Location: Dallas, Texas Number of Employees: 991 Words you live by: “No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.” –Eleanor Roosevelt Personal Philosophy: Normal is boring. What book are you reading: I am re-reading Crucial Conversations by Kerry Patterson, Joseph Grenny, Ron McMillan, and Al Switzler. It’s an oldie, but goodie. What was your first job: Swim instructor and lifeguard at a day camp Favorite charity: PAWS (Progressive Animal Welfare Society) Interests: Watching college and professional sports (Duke Basketball, and Michigan and Notre Dame football), Mah Jongg, and trying new adventurous activities (such as skydiving) Family: Immediate family: Sarge (Brussels Griffon dog) and Moxie (calico kitten); also parents, an older brother and sister, three nieces who live in France, and another niece or nephew on the way

Build a Network and Your Self-Confidence

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recently had a discussion with a female friend who is a practicing attorney. She mentioned that she believes she would be more successful in her career if she were thinner. She confided that some of her typical daily concerns include whether there will be places to sit at various locations, such as client sites or court rooms, and whether the chairs will have arms, which may require her to squeeze into the chair. This conversation left me disheartened and led me to reflect upon my professional career. I recall the anticipation, anxiety, and preparation for interviews as I contemplated my professional appearance. Society and the legal profession dictated that I should wear a black skirt suit, nude pantyhose, black pumps, and a string of pearls. My nails should be a natural color, so they would not be distracting to others. My lipstick should also be natural and not too colorful. I spoke with more of my professional female friends, in all age ranges and from diverse backgrounds, and I noticed that most of us had received the message early in life, from society, family, etc., that as women, we should be perfect. We should appear and act a certain way, whether it

was our weight, clothes, or hair. We should carry our gender with us everywhere, including boardrooms, courtrooms, and trading floors. Based on these conversations, I concluded that women are likely to experience internalized anxieties related to their gender and physical appearance, which can create underlying stress that contributes to self-doubt, lack of self-confidence, and ultimately, a fear of failure (this conclusion does not contemplate other significant research surrounding these issues that may potentially also lead to a fear of failure, such as the imposter syndrome). A fear of failure may discourage risk-taking, and arguably, without taking risks, it may be difficult to achieve success. Indeed, many professionals that society deems successful have experienced failure. In light of this conclusion, it is important for female professionals to cultivate relationships with other female professionals with whom they can be vulnerable and have an open and honest dialogue regarding these internal anxieties. This network can provide professional women with the tools needed to build self-confidence and thus, reduce their fear of failure, which can lead to additional success.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

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Mydung N. Pham Job Title: Senior Director, Design Engineering Education: BSEE, University of Vermont Company Name: AMD Industry: Semiconductors Company CEO: Lisa Su Company Headquarters Location: Santa Clara, California Number of Employees: 10,000+ Your Location: Austin, Texas Words you live by: Don't let setbacks discourage you from moving forward. Personal Philosophy: Nothing is unattainable when you give your all. What book are you reading: The Future of Capitalism by Paul Collier; Grit by Angela Duckworth What was your first job: Verification engineer at IBM Favorite charity: Hope for Viet Orphans (H4VO), works to improve the wellness of Vietnamese orphans Interests: Boot camp, travel, and learning about cultures and meeting people around the world Family: Married, with 3 boys

An Open Mind: A Catalyst for Growth and Success

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o be successful in today’s fast-changing business environment, I truly believe that you must be flexible, adaptable, and willing to continuously learn. Throughout my career, I have had the opportunity to take on a variety of roles—from design engineering and engineering operations, to project management and business transformation, and everything in between. I managed diverse teams on a local and global scale. The challenging opportunities that I took on became the stepping-stones of my career growth. The accumulation of a variety of experiences unknowingly prepared me for something new and different, and all I needed to do was seek it out. I have learned change is uncomfortable and unpredictable, and it does not follow the desired career path that I planned for myself. However, every position I took broadened my skill set, and sharpened m business and analytical acumen. These experiences enabled me to see the company holistically and inspired me to develop a better understanding of how things work. If I can give advice to young women starting their careers, I would say hone

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your skills in the role that you have, but don’t limit yourself to only focusing on those skills. You have other skills that may be helpful in future roles. As you navigate your career, and as opportunities arise, be curious about the possibilities ahead. You can take small steps by taking roles that are adjacent to what you know and then reach for different and more challenging roles that are outside your comfort zone. Don’t fall into the trap of trying to check every box on a job description. Shoot for 75 percent and take the leap. You may face occasional setbacks because of your inner doubts or external roadblocks you encounter along the way. Despite this, don’t be discouraged. Keep marching, and believe in yourself and your capability. Show anyone who doubts you exactly what you’re capable of and be persistent. A career is much more than what you studied in school or what you or someone else perceived the ideal role to be; it is a journey of growth with ups and downs and setbacks. To have a long and satisfying career, don’t be afraid to take risks, continuously challenge yourself, and have an open mind as you consider and approach each new adventure.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Karen S. Lynch Job Title: Executive Vice President, CVS Health and President, Aetna Business Unit Education: Bachelor's degree, accounting, Boston College; MBA, Boston University Company Name: CVS Health Industry: Health care Company CEO: Larry Merlo Company Headquarters Location: Woonsocket, Rhode Island Number of Employees: 295,000+ Words you live by: Live your life, professionally and personally, like there's no tomorrow. Personal Philosophy: Stay true to yourself, refuse to settle, and let your passions lead you. What book are you reading: What Customers Crave by Nicholas Webb What was your first job: Cashier at Big Y grocery store in Ware, Massachusetts Favorite charity: The Quell Foundation, a nonprofit organization run by my husband, focused on changing care and treatment of people who suffer from mental illness. Interests: Staying active and being outside keeps me motivated and refreshed, whether it is with an after-work run, a family bike ride on the weekend, or a walk with my dog, Kaymus.

Family: Kevin Lynch, husband; Kaymus, dog

To overcome fear of failure, be willing to take chances; say yes to stretch roles that provide productive discomfort and allow you to evolve your skill set.

Trust Yourself and Say Yes to the Curves in Your Career

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n a business world still dominated by men, it’s no secret that women often have extra hurdles to overcome. Some of these hurdles are real, others are perceived; women tend to second guess or shortchange their qualifications, rather than pursue new professional opportunities with confidence. The times when I’ve learned the most have always started with a difficult challenge or uncharted territory. Early in my career, I left a position as an auditor to focus on health care. Though I had no direct industry experience, I felt an intense desire to help people navigate a complicated and sometimes daunting industry. Instead of being hindered by my fear of the unknown, I allowed my passion and curiosity to lead me. It’s difficult to take risks when there’s a possibility of falling short, or failing completely, but I knew that I couldn’t grow if I stood still.

The diversity of my roles throughout my career is what has allowed me to grow as a health care leader. I am a strong believer in being proactive and raising one’s hand for new opportunities when they arise. I also believe that being pushed out of your comfort zone is the fastest way to grow. Anything new brings uncertainty, but embracing risk and being open to the unfamiliar are essential for any woman with ambition and an appetite for progress. To overcome fear of failure, be willing to take chances; say yes to stretch roles that provide productive discomfort and allow you to evolve your skill set. If fear threatens to paralyze you, talk to a mentor or trusted advisor who can help you navigate your way through it. Like life itself, careers rarely run a linear, logical course. Embrace the curves or detours in your career, and trust yourself and your ability to achieve.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

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Randi B. May Job Title: Partner Education: JD, Brooklyn Law School; BA, Spanish, SUNY Albany Company Name: Hoguet Newman Regal & Kenney, LLP Industry: Legal Company CEO: N/A Company Headquarters Location: New York, New York Number of Employees: 32 Words you live by: Believe. Personal Philosophy: Be the most proud of the greatest challenges. What was your first job: Waiting tables at a diner Favorite charity: Dress for Success Interests: Travel, decorating, and cooking Family: Two beautiful sons and a supportive husband

Powerful female role models are critical to our professional success. Without them, it would be a challenge to believe that we also may be able to attain the same confidence, leadership, and accomplishment.

We Really Can Accomplish Anything

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owerful female role models are critical to our professional success. Without them, it would be a challenge to believe that we also may be able to attain the same confidence, leadership, and accomplishment. The most influential female role models are those who are relatable. I have been extremely fortunate to have had not only one, but two inspiring female role models, who also mentored me. My women-owned law firm, Hoguet Newman Regal & Kenney, was co-founded more than 20 years ago by three lawyers, two of them women: Laura Hoguet, who was the first woman ever named a litigation

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partner at her former firm, White & Case; and Dorothea Regal, a nationally prominent insurance recovery litigator. They launched HNRK at a time when the only image of an elite litigator was a man at a large firm. Through their courage, they proved to me that women can really accomplish anything. We can launch, manage, and grow our own firms. We can litigate and win cases. We can command board meetings. We can conduct sexual harassment investigations. We can advise general counsel of any size organization. And, among many other things, we can do it all while still being devoted daughters, mothers, and grandmothers.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Kobi Kennedy Brinson Job Title: Partner and Chair, Diversity & Inclusion Committee Education: JD, Harvard University; BA, University of North Carolina Company Name: Winston & Strawn LLP Industry: Law Company CEO: Tom Fitzgerald, Chairman Company Headquarters Location: Chicago, Illinois Number of Employees: 2,000 Your Location: Charlotte, North Carolina Words you live by: If you didn't come to be amazing, why did you bother showing up? Personal Philosophy: I am not successful despite my authenticity, passion and empathy. I am successful because of them. What book are you reading: Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens What was your first job: Brioche maker at The Fresh Market Favorite charity: The Arts Empowerment Project, a conduit for arts funding to support at risk children Interests: Being a poetry/soccer/golf mom, travel with my family, relaxing with girlfriends, and Audible books. Family: Husband, Ron, daughter, Emory, son, Carter, and dog, Mike the Dog

There Is Reason for Optimism

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want to be known for delivering results for clients, increasing revenue for my firm, and creating opportunities for associates and partners of every color, whether man, woman, or gender fluid. But as I approach my thirtieth year of practicing law, I am both dubious and optimistic regarding the status of African American women in the legal profession. The percentage of African American women associates has decreased in the last ten years, according to the National Association of Law Placement (NALP) 2018 Report on Diversity. Worse, the percentage of black female partners at major law firms in the United States is an abysmal .68 percent. The hard truth is that corporate clients, regardless of gender and/or minority status, are much more likely to hire white male lead litigators than lawyers of color, which is aggravated for women of color when gender biases are considered. Retention by clients leads to increased financial success, due to the compensation models of most firms, and increased business success because the more you get hired, the more you get hired. As a former in-house attorney, I know the value of reliance on tried-and-true outside counsel.

But one must get hired to be tried, and hired again to be true. In any other situation, it would be acceptable to rely on organic change to inch toward some level of parity, but conscious and unconscious biases prevent the natural evolution of our profession. Fortunately, this is the age of disruption and reality checks, so I find myself grasping at optimism, shored by the incredible changes I have seen at my own firm in just four short years. Winston & Strawn, LLP, is taking a hard look internally and acting intentionally with our external clients to revolutionize how we regard one another as colleagues and leaders within the firm, and how we can more successfully promote our colleagues to clients. We are joined in our efforts by other great firms who are engaged in change-making processes. But for me as a former in-house lawyer, the most important change is that our corporate clients are increasingly led by leaders who recognize that their hiring patterns today dictate how the profession will look tomorrow. Because doing the same thing and expecting a different result is insanity, but doing the same thing and pretending to expect a different result is futility.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

www.womenworthwatching.com

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Miriam Manber Job Title: Associate Education: JD, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law; BA, Barnard College Company Name: Hoguet Newman Regal & Kenney, LLP Industry: Legal Company CEO: N/A Company Headquarters Location: New York, New York Number of Employees: 32 Words you live by: Don’t judge your insides by other people’s outsides. Personal Philosophy: Try anything once! What book are you reading: Shrill by Lindy West What was your first job: Waitress at a pizza shop Favorite charity: Barnard College Interests: Music and theater

I’m hopeful that the current generation of attorneys will, like my firm, encourage young women to speak up and build skills.

You Should Smile More ….

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rowing up, it never occurred to me that there were things I couldn’t do or couldn’t become because of my gender. Attending a women’s college only solidified my confidence. I was encouraged to speak my mind and argue passionately and persuasively. Even better, I was surrounded by other ambitious women who served as a support network and as my teachers outside of the classroom; the women I met there forced me to challenge my assumptions, think bigger, and reach higher. When I decided on a career in the law, sexism seemed like an antiquated notion, a historical footnote highlighted in period pieces like Mad Men, along with rotary-dial telephones. Unfortunately, I was wrong. It started in law school, where I relished the opportunity to learn hands-on litigation skills by participating in moot court and trial advocacy programs. Professors lobbed the now-familiar critique at me and other women (but never men): Smile more. I didn’t think it was appropriate for me to smile while delivering an oral argument premised on a grisly criminal law hypothetical, but I did it anyway, because otherwise, I was told, I would come off as “cold” and “unlikable.”

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After these experiences in law school, I wasn’t dissuaded from pursuing litigation, but I chose carefully when deciding where to practice. I chose to join a woman-owned law firm, where the partnership is seriously dedicated to mentoring and teaching its associates, regardless of gender. Unfortunately, not all firms are like mine, and I’m still trying to figure out how to navigate the casual sexism that seems to be endemic to the profession. I’ve often been the only woman in a room full of men. I’ve had opposing counsel try to intimidate me by threatening to call the judge in the middle of a deposition, continually ask to speak to the (male) partner on the case instead of me when calling the office on a matter for which I was responsible, and even ask why I was “allowed” to speak in court when a male partner was sitting next to me. My firm has always been squarely in my corner in these situations. I’m hopeful that the current generation of attorneys will, like my firm, encourage young women to speak up and build skills. The more commonplace we become, the more we can begin to dismantle the stereotypes used to try and hold us back.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Mayra Boitel Job Title: Vice President, Chief Merchant–Alternative Formats Education: Registered Pharmacist degree, St. John's University College of Pharmacy Company Name: CVS Health Industry: Health care Company CEO: Larry Merlo Company Headquarters Location: Woonsocket, Rhode Island Number of Employees: 295,000+ Your Location: Miami, Florida Words you live by: Think positively, and positive things will happen. Personal Philosophy: Never give up, you can do anything you set your mind to. What book are you reading: A Long Walk to Water by Linda Sue Park What was your first job: Salesperson at Sterling Optical Favorite charity: Children's Cancer Research Fund Interests: Exercising, jogging, biking, and skiing Family: Married for 35 years to Art Boitel; two sons, Daniel (29) and Andrew (24)

The most important thing is to always be yourself and to find the confidence and determination to succeed, regardless of the obstacles you encounter.

Believe in Yourself and You’ll Be Amazed at What You Can Achieve

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hen I was growing up as one of three daughters in my family, my mother always told us, “Don’t sell yourself short. You can do anything, and don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.” Even now, more than 30 years into my career, her words are the philosophy I have always lived by and the attitude I try to bring with me to work each and every day. Now more than ever, it is important for women to remember that it is important to believe in themselves, no matter what they do—in the workplace, at home, or out in their local community. If you set your goals high, you will have a much better chance of accomplishing whatever you’ve set your mind to, and you will be amazed at what you can achieve. I am often asked for career advice and am always reminded of this quote from Bill Cosby: “Your desire to succeed should

be greater than your fear of failure.” If you believe that you will fail, you very well may. I know that it is easy to fear failing or not being taken seriously in the workplace, but I truly believe that having a positive attitude and positive intentions is the first step to overcoming those fears. There are no secrets to success. The most important thing is to always be yourself and to find the confidence and determination to succeed, regardless of the obstacles you encounter. The best way to gain respect in the workplace, whether you are a woman or a man, is to do your job well. Nothing comes easy, regardless of gender. But, if you can prove that you are worthy and capable of added responsibilities, you will gain the respect and influence of those around you, and be well on your path to the life and career that you’ve dreamed of.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

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Introducing …

Women Business Collaborative

By Edie Fraser, CEO and Lin Coughlin, WBC Board Member

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omen Business Collaborative (WBC) is an unprecedented alliance of women’s business organizations, corporations, trade associations, researchers, and the media accelerating: • The advancement of diverse female representation in C-suites and boardrooms; • The achievement of gender diversity and parity in the workplace; and • The growth of women-owned businesses and their access to sources of capital. WBC Is an “Accelerator Organization” WBC leaders are dedicated to building a movement to rapidly change the numbers. Our coordinated actions to connect, unite, convene, plan, educate, and communicate as a trusted and trusting community produce outcomes greater than the sum of the parts toward the full partnership of men and women leaders. We are #WBCFasterTogether. Organizations committed to advancing diverse representation in C-suites and board-

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rooms, and the support of women-owned business growth, have proliferated. Each has a distinct mission and value proposition, but all are aligned around the achievement of gender and diversity parity in C-suites, boardrooms, and for many, access to capital for women business owners. Despite the work of the many pioneering organizations, it has been estimated that, at the current rate of growth, it will take decades to reach gender parity in C-suites and boardrooms, and for women-owned businesses to gain equal access to capital as they scale their businesses. Some Sobering Facts • The number of female CEOs at Fortune 500 companies stands at 6.6%. WBC asks, “Could that number be 10% by 2025?” • 20% of C-suite positions are held by women (ISS Analytics, 2018). WBC asks, “Could there be complete parity by 2030?

• Women of color make up 4% of the C-Suite (World Economic Forum). WBC asks, “Could that number be 10% by 2025?” • Nearly 80% of women executives are concentrated in finance, legal, and HR, not in operating roles that lead to CEO roles (ISS Analytics). WBC asks, “Could the ratio be reversed to 80% of women in line roles by 2030?” • White women constitute 16% of computing roles; women of color hold less than 10% (NCWIT). WBC asks, “Could women and women of color constitute 25% and 8% respectively of leaders in the high-tech industry by 2025?” • The number of corporate board seats held by women in the 2018 Russell 3000 Index stands at 17.7% (2020 Women on Boards, 2018 Gender Diversity Index) WBC asks, “Could that number be 35% by 2025?”

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• The percentage of 2018 F500 board seats occupied by African American and Hispanic women was 3% and 8% respectively. WBC asks, “Could those numbers grow to 25% by 2030?” • The percentage of venture capital accessed by women founders stands at 2.3%. WBC asks, “Could the number double in five years?” WBC Imperatives ACT: Together, we have pledged to change the numbers of diverse female executives and entrepreneurs. CONNECT: We share like-minded organizations’ best practices and best ideas. COLLABORATE: We convene organizations to achieve accelerated results.

The nine Action Initiatives are as follows (platform descriptions appear later in this article):

AGGREGATE: We leverage resources and build unity.

1. Women in the C-Suite and Executive Leadership with P&L Responsibility

COMMUNICATE: We spread information and results.

2. CEO Leadership and Sponsorship

CELEBRATE: We tell the stories and share outcomes.

4. Gender Parity

Women Business Collaborative’s Agenda for Change WBC’s leadership mobilized in early 2019 to establish and convene highly collaborative founding partners with more than 25 of the top women’s business organizations (see Founding Partner Organizations list below). Leaders of those organizations have pledged to galvanize, advocate, and educate to change the numbers and to create goals—as part of nine Action Initiatives—that call for the accelerated advancement of women entrepreneurs, and gender and diversity parity, in C-suites and boardrooms. WBC’s partners are, together, aggregating existing best practice tools and building solution-focused strategies companies will be invited to deploy in support of the nine Action Initiatives. The “how-to’s” will be communicated via an omni-channel outreach, beginning in the fourth quarter of 2019. Driven and enlightened men and women leaders and their organizations will be publicly honored and celebrated for their successes in advancing the numbers.

• C200 • Catalyst • Information Technology Senior Management Forum (ITSMF) • LATINA Style, Inc • Latino Corporate Directors Association

3. Women in the Boardroom

• National Association for Female Executives (NAFE)

5. Diversity and Inclusion

• National Association of Corporate Directors (NACD)

6. Women in Technology 7. The Voice of Entrepreneurs and Access to Venture Capital 8. Learning and Development

• Paradigm for Parity Coalition • The Executive Leadership Council (ELC) • Diversity Best Practices

9. Strategic Communications and Media WBC’s leadership welcomes likeminded individuals and organizations to be part of a growing group of supporters of the first ever collaborative action agenda, moving faster together, to advance diverse and equitable female representation in C-suites and boardrooms, and in support of diverse female entrepreneurs. Join with WBC in supporting accelerated change.

• Diversity Woman Media • Enterprising Women Magazine and Foundation • Golden Seeds Venture • Hispanic IT Executive Council (HITEC) • theBoardlist • Thirty Percent Coalition • U.S. 30% Club • Watermark • Women Corporate Directors

WBC Founding Partner Organizations

• Women in the Boardroom

• 2020 Women on Boards

• Women Presidents’ Organization

• ATHENA International

• Women Unlimited, Inc.

• Bloomberg’s Gender-Equality Index (as resource partner)

• Women’s Forum of New York • Working Mother Media

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNERwww.womenworthwatching.com ®

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Making More Women CEOs a Reality By Lorraine Hariton, President & CEO, Catalyst & Chair, Women Business Collaborative Action Initiative on CEO Leadership As chair of the Women Business Collaborative’s CEO and Sponsorship Action Initiative, I’m joined by leaders from WBC founding partner organizations, C200 and Women’s Forum of New York in advocating for increasing the number of women CEOs leading Fortune 500 companies.

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f you look at the leaders of the Fortune 500 today, you’ll see that 33 CEOs are women and only three of them are women of color. To some, that may seem like a lot—and historically, it is. While it’s a slight improvement since 2014, when there were 24 women including two women of color, those numbers simply aren’t good enough, especially when you consider that women make up close to 50 percent of the U.S. workforce. Equal representation is long overdue. At Catalyst and the Women Business Collaborative, we see a huge opportunity for corporate America—a chance to finally make gender equity a reality at all levels of leadership. Catalyst has been researching the barriers working women face for decades. We’ve found that entrenched unconscious biases and stereotypes force women into a double bind where they are never just right for top jobs. We know that women lack powerful sponsors who can help them get coveted assignments and opportunities. And we’ve seen over and over again how leaders are chosen from “the usual suspects”—people who remind the current leaders of themselves. All these issues are amplified for women of color. But we don’t just uncover barriers. We also formulate and test solutions, and advise corporate leaders on making real change. The fundamental requirement for change is senior leadership’s

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commitment to building a diverse and inclusive workforce—from entry level to board level. Change happens when leaders understand that their organizations will be more successful with a wide variety of perspectives and experiences, and they are vocal and visible about building teams that embody and leverage that diversity. Close to 94 percent of Fortune 500 CEOs are men, as well as 77.5 percent of Fortune 500 board directors. We need these men in leadership to champion gender equity at their companies. When they stand up as role models, other men will follow. Lastly, the pipeline to CEO is long—and you have to focus on all of it. For example, P&L responsibilities are usually required, which means that early in a woman’s career she needs to have opportunities and be encouraged to take line roles where she can gain that core experience. That way, when succession planning is happening, there are women ready to rise to the next level—including to CEO. Some companies are already doing these things. For example, Accenture has been working on gender diversity for years, and Julie Sweet (a committed member of Catalyst’s Board of Directors) has just been promoted to CEO. But we need more companies and leaders to accelerate change. When women succeed, we all succeed.

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Advance the C-Suite: Involve More Women in P&L and Operational Roles By Subha Barry, President, Working Mother Media & Chair, Women Business Collaborative Action Initiative on C-Suite Leadership

I write as chair of the Women Business Collaborative Action Initiative focused on Women in the C-Suite and Executives with P&L Responsibility. I am joined by WBC partner leaders from C200 and ATHENA International. We are emboldened by WBC’s accelerator goals to achieve the following: • Full gender parity in the C-suite by 2030 (20% currently) • 10% women of color in the C-Suite by 2025 (4% currently) • 8% women occupying the C-Suite, with or having had substantial P&L responsibility by 2025 (5% currently)

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espite decades of corporate initiatives to advance women, progress is virtually stalled, especially in the leadership ranks and particularly for women of color. New research by The Working Mother Research Institute shows the reasons women aren’t getting to the C-suite. The national survey of more than 3,000 women and men of all races/ethnicities at junior and senior levels in corporate America entitled The Gender Gap At the Top offers solutions to closing these gaps. We have been asking ourselves why these gaps have existed for years. Our research shows that time after time, women’s and men’s perceptions and realities are very different: 64 percent of men vs. 37 percent of women said their company provides information on career paths to executive

positions. Men are twice as likely as women to aspire to be CEO (20% vs. 9%). Interestingly, black and Hispanic women are more likely than white and Asian women to want to be CEO. We found that women have difficulty securing operating roles because they don’t have equal access to information about how to move onto a P&L track. Forty-eight percent of men said they have received detailed information on career paths to P&L jobs in the past 24 months vs. just 15 percent of women— and 46 percent of men were encouraged to consider operating roles vs. 14 percent of women. Far more men than women recognize the critical importance and benefits derived from networking, mentoring, and sponsorship in elevating one’s personal profile;

developing one’s brand and finding allies to help one move up. It takes solid relationship capital for women to be considered and exposed to line management roles. Men simply get this more than women. We’ve identified several solutions, including ways organizations can be transparent about what jobs are available and how to get to them, succession planning for key positions, creating opportunities for women to move from staff roles to line roles, and helping women find the right mentors and sponsors. Leaders must be accountable for identifying high-potential women, especially multicultural women, and provide them with visibility, stretch assignments, and mentoring at critical points in their careers.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNERwww.womenworthwatching.com ®

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Women on Boards: Momentum Is Building but Not Fast Enough By Ana Dutra, CEO, Mandala Global Associates & Chair, Women Business Collaborative Action Initiative on Boards Leadership

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ack of diversity on boards is not a new issue. While we have made a lot of progress over the last years, particularly when it comes to placing more women on corporate Boards, there’s still a long way to go. According to the 2019 Deloitte Missing Pieces report, overall, women and minorities made more progress in board representation for the Fortune 500 between 2016 and 2018 than during the previous five years combined. This increased rate of change, while still slow, is encouraging. A concerted effort to increase board diversity comes from several different sources. Increasingly, executive search firms provide board nominating committees with more gender-balanced candidate slates, and most top business schools now offer board-ready training programs and certifications focused on preparing women to become effective board candidates and directors. Consulting firms are also doing their part, whether through their research centers or board institutes, showing a high correlation between diverse boards and good governance, and higher business performance and results.

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Lack of diversity on boards is not a new issue. While we have made a lot of progress over the last years, particularly when it comes to placing more women on corporate Boards, there’s still a long way to go.

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Over the last 30 years, a number of organizations were founded whose core mission—and in some cases, only mission—is to increase the representation of women on corporate boards. Women Corporate Directors, 2020 Women on Boards, Thirty Percent Coalition, the 30% Club, and Women in the Boardroom are some of the organizations focused on increasing the success of female directors. In addition to those organizations, we have to acknowledge Latino Corporate Directors Association, C200, Catalyst, IWF, Equilar, ELC, Ascend, and others who are advancing minorities and women in so many different ways. Finally, we have organizations that focus primarily on developing better directors and corporate governance, such as NACD, ACCD, and Private Directors Association. As part of WBC’s Board Initiative, 2020 Women on Boards, C200, Women in the Boardroom, Thirty Percent Coalition, Latino Corporate Directors Association, Women Corporate Directors, theBoardlist, NACD, and the 30% Club came together to harness the energy, knowledge, best practices, and relationships that all these

groups bring to the table, with the goal of raising our presence and voices in corporate governance. Together, we committed to do the following: • Share each organization’s membership criteria to increase awareness and support the achievement of individual goals • Develop a board-ready and current female directors comprehensive database • Compile developmental and training resources for first-time directors • Advocate for, oversee, and highlight legislation Our collaboration is already showing results, as we learn more about and support each other’s organizations. Concerted advocacy and awareness efforts with legislators, regulatory agencies, proxy advisory firms, and institutional investors are under way. While we have already reached the goal of women holding 20 percent of the seats on public company boards, we are aiming at 30 percent, both in public and private companies, in the next three years. We are ambitious, motivated, and ready.

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Getting to Full Gender Parity in the Workplace Jewelle Bickford, Co-chair, Paradigm for Parity® Coalition& Chair, Women Business Collaborative Action Initiative on Parity

I write this as chair of the Women Business Collaborative’s Action Initiative on Gender Parity in the Workplace, and am joined by leaders of WBC founding partner organizations, Catalyst, Culture at Work (a division of Working Mother Media), and the National Association of Female Executives (NAFE, a division of Working Mother Media).

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here are strong signs that the future workforce will be predominately female. Women’s participation in the workforce has steadily risen over the last several decades. And this year, women will likely make up the majority of the collegeeducation workforce for the first time. While this is a turning point in history, gender inequality is still entrenched in corporate America, especially in executive positions. Women account for 45 percent of the S&P 500 labor force, but hold only one in four executive-level or management positions. Women of color—who face compounding biases—are the most underrepresented, holding only one in 25 C-suite positions, and being far less likely to be promoted than white men or white women. While gender parity is sometimes discussed in a social justice context, it is a fundamental business issue. A McKinsey study found that companies in the top-quartile for gender diversity on executive teams were 21 percent more likely to outperform on profitability.

Women Business Collaborative seeks to move with force and focus to reverse these trends through an unprecedented partnership of C-suite leaders and women’s business organizations, for economic reasons and for the benefit of society. The Paradigm for Parity® coalition—one of WBC’s partner organizations—was founded by C-suite female executives from every sector of business to accelerate the pace at which equity for their daughters and for all women is achieved. The Paradigm for Parity® coalition created the following 5-Point Action Plan, which defines specific actions that, taken together and simultaneously implemented, can catalyze corporate culture change and increase the number of women of all races, cultures, and backgrounds in leadership positions: 1. Minimize or eliminate unconscious bias 2. Significantly increase the number of women in senior operating roles

3. Measure targets at every level, and communicate progress and results regularly 4. Base career progress on business results and performance, not on presence 5. Identify women of potential and give them sponsors and mentors While this 5-Point Action Plan aims to help all women in the workplace, we must address the intersectionality of women of different backgrounds. We must work toward a common goal of inclusivity to uplift the least represented women and achieve gender parity. In sharing parity indexes, supporting companies on their commitment to gender diversity, and collaborating in this goal, we are steadfast in our commitment to close the gender gap in corporate leadership and level the playing field for all women. Ripa Rashid ceo Culture@work and Beth Kent Ex Dir of P4P are co-chairs as of August 30.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNERwww.womenworthwatching.com ®

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Women of Color in Leadership: A Dismal State of Play with Unlimited Opportunity By Dr. Sheila Robinson, Publisher and CEO, Diversity Woman Media & Chair, Women Business Collaborative Action Initiative on Diversity and Inclusion

I write as chair of the Women Business Collaborative’s Diversity and Inclusion Action Initiative. I’m joined by leaders from WBC Founding Partner organizations, ATHENA International, Diversity Best Practices, and The Executive Leadership Council (ELC).

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ccording to the U.S. Census Bureau, women of color make up 39 percent of the nation’s female population and 20 percent of the entire U.S. population. According to the global nonprofit research firm Catalyst, women of color will be the majority in the workplace by 2060. Given these demographics, it is shocking that today less than two percent of Fortune 500 companies are led by women of color, none of whom are African American. The Women Business Collaborative (WBC), Diversity, Inclusion, and Women of Color Group is determined to change this, with its “25% INITIATIVE.” The goal of the initiative is to drive workplaces to commit to 25 percent women of color in executive roles and serving on boards. WBC’s 24 partner organizations have enthusiastically

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endorsed the initiative, and the goal will be integrated into the work of the seven other WBC Action initiatives that are described in this article. In order to help workplaces reach the 25 percent threshold, the WBC is providing tool kits and resources to guide organizations in eliminating unconscious bias and other barriers that prevent women of color from advancing. It is also recommending that companies create a CEO and board accountability scorecard. The obstacles women encounter on the path to the C-suite include isolation, relationship deficits (men have a much higher likelihood of forming business networks and mentoring and sponsorship relationships), a history of risk aversion, and insular perceptions (women are less likely to receive hon-

est feedback from which they can grow). All these factors are magnified for women of color. No wonder the glass ceiling that all women encounter has been called the “concrete ceiling” for women of color. According to Working Mother research, 30 percent of women of color say they aspire to an executive position at their current company, while 50 percent hope to become an executive during their career. The mission of the WBC Diversity, Inclusion, and Women of Color Action Initiative is to ensure that those aspirations can be realized by challenging leaders (together with their boards) to issue a clarion call for the development and advancement of women of color to 25 percent of senior-level appointments, to celebrate their successes, and to hold them accountable when results are not achieved.

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Women in Technology: Closing the Gap By Sherrie Littlejohn, President, Littlejohn Leadership Coaching & Consulting and Viola MaxwellThompson, President and CEO, Information Technology Senior Management Forum; Co-Chairs, Women Business Collaborative Action Initiative on Women in Technology

We write as co-chairs of the Women Business Collaborative Action Initiative focused on Women in Technology. We are joined by WBC partner leaders: The Executive Leadership Council (ELC), Diversity Best Practices, Diversity Woman, Information Technology Senior Management Forum (ITSMF) and Hispanic IT Executive Council (HITEC). We also honor and celebrate the work of Anita Borg, WITI, and NCWIT.

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ighty percent of jobs require tech skills, and companies are counting on tech for transformational change. Therefore, it is imperative we have more women in leadership positions, contributing to the conversation and serving on corporate boards. The Women Business Collaborative represents a strong advocacy to collaborate and engage business CEOs to set accelerator goals to increase the representation of women in C-suite tech positions (CIO, CTO, CISO) to 25 percent by 2025, with 8 percent, women of color. Women in the tech industry encounter more gender inequality than in any other workforce population. That said, India has the highest number of women in tech, with 35 percent—the U.S. lags at 20 percent— according a 2018 study. The number of computing degrees awarded to women of color has declined by 40 percent over the

past decade (from 7 percent to 4 percent), according to Forbes. As of 2015, 17 percent of CIOs were women. While 25 percent of computing jobs are held by women, these tend to be execution roles rather than creative roles, which do not effectively prepare them for P&L and C-suite responsibilities. Additionally, while white women hold 16 percent of computing roles, women of color hold less than 10 percent, according to NCWIT. Pew Research and Code.org both provide data to support a shortage of graduates to fill the job opening in this growth industry. Participation rates by women can directly affect their career opportunities, economic security, and financial compensation. And yet, NCWIT reports that women are twice as likely as men to leave their high-tech jobs. Simply put, the U.S. tech sector is not building pathways fast enough for women to succeed in technology. According to

NCWIT, women of color continue to be unrepresented and computing roles for women in tech have been on a steady decline over the last 25 years. It is particularly grave for women of color, who hold merely 10 percent of technical roles in tech companies, and are nearly completely absent from senior leadership roles, with zero African American or Latina women CEOs. Various roadblocks and biases impede progress for women pursuing technology careers or aspiring to more senior executive roles, especially for women of color who become marginalized in their careers. CEOs can affect a different outcome by acknowledging biases and changing the conversation. The commitment to include more women in our technology revolution will yield more women in the pipeline, role models for the desired change, and a greater number of high-performing organizations.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNERwww.womenworthwatching.com ®

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Accelerating Entrepreneurship: More Women-Owned Firms Over $10M, More Venture Capital for Women Founders, and More Women Partners in Venture Firms By Monica Smiley, Editor and Publisher of Enterprising Women & Chair, Women Business Collaborative Action Initiative on Entrepreneurship and Venture Capital

As chair of the Women Business Collaborative’s Entrepreneurship and Venture Action Initiative, I am joined by WBC founding partner organizations C200, the Women Presidents’ Organization, and Golden Seeds Venture, and supported by the Women’s Business Enterprise National Council, and the National Association of Women Business Owners.

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e have set three accelerator goals as follows:

• To increase the number of women-owned firms with revenues above $10 million by 20% by 2024

• To increase the percentage of venture capital available to women founders from 2.3% to 5% by 2024 • To increase the number of women partners in venture capital firms from 11% to 15% by 2024 All Raise, an organization whose mission is to accelerate the success of female funders and founders, has set targets to double the percentage of female partners in 10 years from 9 percent to 18 percent at U.S. tech venture firms with a fund size of greater than $25 million,

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and to increase the percentage of venture funding going to companies with female founders from 15 percent to 25 percent. WBC supports and celebrates All Raise’s initiative. Women entrepreneurs are the driving force behind the growth in the economy, with nearly 13 million women-owned businesses and more than 1,800 new women-owned firms started daily. Women of color start 64 percent of those companies. There has been a 3,000 percent surge in women-owned firms since 1972. The Women Presidents’ Organization, founded more than 20 years ago, has been instrumental in helping more than 2,000 women-owned firms scale their businesses, with the average revenue of members exceeding $17 million annually.

Venture capital funding in the United States for women-owned or co-owned businesses is increasing, but the pace has been alarmingly slow. The recent creation of several women-led funds and incubators focused on female founders will help move those numbers, as will pressure from institutional investors who invest capital in venture funds to have more diverse investment teams and fund more female-founded businesses. Funds like Golden Seeds have helped make important inroads for women entrepreneurs seeking capital. Working together, we can move the needle in a significant way to increase the number of women scaling their businesses to more than $10 million in revenues, and open doors to more women accessing venture capital to grow their companies.

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Training and Development: A Critical Path Strategic Imperative to Advancing Women in Leadership Dr. Rosina L. Racioppi, President and CEO, Women Unlimited, Inc. & Chair, Women Business Collaborative Action Initiative on Learning, Training, and Talent Development

As chair of the Women Business Collaborative’s Learning and Development Action Initiative, I am joined by WBC founding partner organizations ATHENA International and Watermark.

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ondoleezza Rice and KMPG Chairman and CEO elect Lynne Doughtie were interviewed by Sheinelle Jones of The Today Show, who asked if the two leaders thought they could be their authentic selves as they moved up as leaders. Rice said, “Leadership requires different approaches as you go up the ladder. Yes, I’m my aut hentic self, but sometimes your authentic self can use some help.” They talked about the importance of being adaptable in responding appropriately to different situations. A Korn Ferry study titled Women CEO’s Speak found that 65 percent of women believed they could become CEO when someone told them they could versus 12 percent who had this as a career goal for a long time. This finding points to specific needs in the consideration of talent management strategies. How do we identify key experiences needed to ensure readiness for the C-Suite?

Other research suggests that women are less likely to raise their hands for bigger roles, and that they are more likely to be passed over in favor of men whose potential is perceived to be greater, even when the women are better qualified. To achieve gender parity, organizations need to embrace development strategies that remove bias, provide women with access to mentors and sponsors, position and train women for visible P&L roles, and create plans for sustainable parity. WBC will leverage the talent and expertise of its 24 partner organizations to increase the number of women in the C-Suite. The following is a list of WBC goals for talent management, training, and development: • Bias Elimination: Provide resources for senior leadership development that go beyond awareness to shifting company practices to ensure there is parity

in feedback, guidance, and opportunities for women. • Operating Responsibility: It is essential to begin training women— especially women of color— early in their careers to take on and advance with P&L responsibility; 90% of newly appointed CEOs have, or have had, significant line management experience. • Strategic Relationships: Provide women access to key relationships (mentor, sponsors, strategic network); these relationships help women obtain required feedback and guidance. • Succession Planning: Enough women and women of color in the pipeline must be developed and advanced so that full gender parity in the C-Suite is achieved by 2030, to include 25% women of color in the C-Suite.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNERwww.womenworthwatching.com ®

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Learn, Share, Join the Conversation … WBCollaborative.org By Lorena Fimbres, Director, Strategic Programs & Communications, Women Business Collaborative

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WBCollaborative is the go-to place for individuals and organizations who want to be part of a movement with a mission to accelerate the advancement of women in leadership—especially women of color.

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hen we first envisioned WBCollaborative we were sure of one imperative: It had to be THE movement that would bring major women’s business organizations, business, and media, among others, together to accelerate the pace at which women move into the C-suite and board rooms, women-owned businesses grow, and full parity in the workplace is achieved. It is that vision that undergirds the buildout of the WBC communications platform. Its components are designed to aggregate, communicate, educate, and empower its users. Central Hub: WBCollaborative is the go-to place for individuals and organizations who want to be part of a movement with a mission to accelerate the advancement of women in leadership—especially women of color. The website (www.WBCollaborative. org) will be a central repository of research,

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strategies, best practices, tools, and resources offered by our partner organizations and other interested parties in support of each of our nine Action Initiatives. Thought Leadership: WBC’s ability to connect and enable collaboratively considered action is central to the advancement of our mission. Our partner organizations bring preeminent thought leadership that will be widely shared. As change and history makers, they are experts at what they do, and their commitment to the cause is palpable. We also collaborate with media partners that represent business, professional associations, industry associations, the significance of diversity and inclusion, and the voices of female entrepreneurs, to name a few. Media: We are proud to be collaborating with numerous media organizations, including three major women and diversity magazines and business media. Our

social media presence will be significant on LinkedIn and Twitter (@WBCollaborative). It will be focused on disseminating news and updates relevant to our mission and the strategic priorities of our partners. Be sure to follow us, and join the conversation and action. Recognition: WBCollaborative aims to recognize and celebrate occasions that signal the numbers moving forward, e.g., the appointment of women CEOs, to Csuite roles, and boards. We will recognize organizations that are setting themselves apart, as they develop and implement best practices that are leading to the advancement of women to top corporate roles, and as entrepreneurs. We insist on and celebrate the achievement of gender and diversity parity. Have news to share? Reach out to us. Join the conversation. Be part of history in the making! PDJ

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Why You Should Clean Up Your D&I Messaging, and How

Michael Stuber, the European D&I Engineer, becomes a PDJ columnist for 2019

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t is simple and easy to say that D&I is good for business and also the right thing to do. This combined rationale is believed to cater to different audiences that are more receptive to moral, socioethical messages or to utilitarian arguments related to different, proven business contributions respectively. However, increasing backlash in recent years, and harsh dispute over group-focused attention, shows clearly that things are not converging so smoothly. A new scientific study from Norway, a country with consistent high rankings in gender-gap or equality indexes, examines whether the reasoning an organization provides for their diversity strategy affects individual perceptions of fairness, as well as attitudes toward, and willingness to support, the effort. Are mixed messages or say-do gaps dangerous? The research builds upon previous analyses that found that social-justice and business-focused arguments may be competing or even incompatible. Previous findings also suggest that gender, age, and education can influence the perception of D&I, as well as context (e.g., industry), and that rationales are sometimes used as a pure rhetoric, rather than manifesting themselves in strategies, or that implementation is at times out of synch with the proclaimed reasoning.

Personal positive experience is most impactful—justice adds little value The research found that one of the control variables, positive contact quality with diversity, had a more positive effect than the different rationales given. For these, attitudes towards D&I were significantly more positive if a business case or a combined rationale was given (compared to fairness only or no reasons). Similarly, combined or business-only storylines had significant effects on the willingness to implement D&I. (Education and being a woman, but not age, were positively related with perceived fairness, attitude, and willingness to support.) Tailoring, streamlining, and practicing are your biggest levers The results provide more insight than what the numbers alone seem to tell. The study confirms societal dynamics where attitudes towards diversity are more positive when people are actually exposed to and interact with others different from themselves (and negative when not). This tells us that contact quality must be one of our foci. In order to facilitate this, a robust focus on consistent business-related framing is most effective. Experience shows that high-level business case statements, such as “good for innovation,” are no longer enough to frame D&I. It needs to be tied to current priorities and challenges, which may vary by entity or geography!

Michael Stuber’s company hosts a D&I knowledge blog called DiversityMine, which contains more than 1,900 articles. He contributed an article on the future of D&I to the fall 2017 issue of PDJ and wrote about diversity and group think for the magazine’s fall 2018 issue.

Target group focus can be toxic—and actually has been already Research has shown that the low to no value that justice arguments add to your positioning create the perception that unfair advantages are given to a target group, or that members of that group might have lower competences. One consequence should be to change formerly focused programs to become authentically inclusive—not just proclaimed to be. The related messages must build upon the existing business agenda instead of prevailing inequalities, which should be used as success measurement criteria rather than main objectives. The success of divisive, populist, or post-truth campaigns, and backlash like the Google memo case, have already provided evidence of the need to re-engineer D&I. Future success will increasingly rely on our ability to change our approach to D&I in much the same way we require our audiences to change. PDJ To learn more about this topic, visit: http://en.diversitymine.eu/category/ business-case/

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Other versus Lesser

By Stephen Young & Barbara Hockfield, Insight Education Systems

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ne of the most touted missions of the D&I discipline is to avoid behaviors that cause people to feel like an “other.” How often have I heard someone say to a colleague, “Shame on you! How dare you allude to that person’s difference and make them feel like an other?” This scolding has become a near ubiquitous chastisement. In today’s HR vernacular, other carries a negative connotation—but why? More importantly, should it? Why do we caution our colleagues to not address the differences that distinguish us? Is such acknowledgment truly negative? Or, does avoidance support or counter the true diversity and inclusion objective? Other simply means different. In fact, the term other actually supports one of the most fundamental messages of the diversity mission. It’s time for an evolution in terminology. The primary inclusion mission is to create a workplace that brings together the beautiful mosaic of our many differences to achieve greater productivity and innovation, and raise individual and team performance. This is the mantra we have all consistently heard over the past decade and one that most of us aspire to and support. But how can we ever appreciate those differences if we don’t acknowledge their existence? Failing to do

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so would pretty much write us into a new chapter of The Emperor’s New Clothes. The rhetoric doesn’t match the reality.

There is a vast ocean of difference between other and lesser. As workplace culture continues to evolve, other will be an expanding pillar for great collaborative asset. My “otherness” truly makes me a part of the proverbial and powerful mosaic of corporate culture that we claim to so deeply value. The term is synonymous with providing innovative perspectives and heightened value. It is only when acknowledgment of someone’s otherness shifts from making them different to making them lesser that a problem arises. Other is good, lesser is bad. Let’s use the right term to achieve the right message and outcome. There is an ocean of difference between the two terms in the ways we find ourselves taking action. When a remark makes someone feel “lesser,” it’s quite obvious that this will cause that person to feel excluded and directly influence their participation, perceived value, growth and performance. If the objective is to alert people to exclusionary behavior that impairs the performance and contribution of their colleagues, then it’s time to jettison the term other and replace

Stephen Young is Senior Partner and Barbara Hockfield is the Executive Managing Director at Insight Education Systems. it with lesser as the more precise term for expressing the perceived value of a person’s difference. Let’s change the landscape and begin enforcing a new perspective and desired outcome.

There is absolutely nothing wrong with being different. As I travel the world, my otherness is frankly invigorating and invites great discussion and discovery. However, I have experienced being treated as both, an other and a lesser. As an American, I have been made to feel excluded, even ostracized, solely based on my nationality. It’s not the sort of thing that’s hard to detect. Once someone hears my English dialect, some of the feelings of the “ugly American” are conjured and manifested in a tone of indifferent distain. The impact on me was palpable. The treatment I received was not based on simply being different or not speaking Japanese. I was being judged based on my affiliation with a specific group or national profile for which they held disapproval. That otherness became the conversion point in becoming lesser. Unfortunately, these

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conversion points are almost always without logic or merit. It became evident that the lesser messages were based on those preconceived judgments. There was a very unattractive elephant in the room and the only way to evict him was to first place him squarely in the center of the table and address his presence directly. I paused the meeting and redirected the discussion to the unspoken issue, using a Socratic approach. I simply said, “I couldn’t help but notice I seem to be getting different messages than the ones I’ve observed being sent to others in our meeting.” Of course, they feigned blindness to the difference in treatment. So, I moved to the next stage, identifying the specific behaviors observed in unemotional, tangible, and clear terms. I pointed out the differences in eye contact, tone of voice, questions that were not asked of me, and conclusions reached without explanation. Most important, I described how all of these were done differently toward me than toward others in the group. This kind of direct challenge tends to facilitate meaningful discussion. It is rare that one needs to move to Stage 3, which calls out the group’s reticence as yet another likely symptom of the problem. The responses by those called out in Stage 2 rarely acknowledge the guilt one might hear in the local confessional. People are too embarrassed or timid to admit to the unjustified bad behavior. But, by simply making others aware of the unspoken, the elephant makes its way to the door and leaves the building—and in this case, it did. The meeting proceeded in the professional tone it should have. The problem was mitigated, and my DEFCON status moved back from lesser to simply other. Let’s introduce an additional dimension to our sequence of terms. If other implies good and lesser implies bad, then what does better imply, and how does it fit into the equation? In examining the term better, it’s important to recognize it is a corollary to the term lesser and is equally—if not more—damaging. The difference is only who becomes the damaged party? When a remark makes someone feel lesser, it is quite obvious that it causes them to feel excluded and withdrawn, and directly influences their growth and performance. Typically, only the recipient of the behavior is directly affected. When we send messages that cause one individual to feel better than the rest (when not directly related to their specific performance), it negatively affects

everyone else observing it. In simple terms, this is the manifestation of favoritism. As focus on culture becomes a more integral a part in leading an organization, it is critical that leaders learn how to steer clear of stepping in the quagmire of unclear terms that obfuscate meaning. There is a reality we must acknowledge and step up to. There are many cultural groups that have been marginalized because of their difference. They have been the routine receivers of exclusionary behavior. This is particularly the case for those at risk of deportation, or who share that group’s heritage. Merely having a Spanish accent in a U.S. border city could spark a call to ICE to have that person investigated. Being an African American stopped by the police is a difference that sometimes goes beyond other and slides down the slippery slope into lesser, potentially putting that person in harm’s way. For Sikhs, flamboyant gay men, transgender individuals, and many others who have developed a heightened sensitivity to being labeled as lesser solely based on their being other, these differences, in and of themselves, carry no qualitative value. Yet, the current state of our human psyche causes many to instinctively convert those differences from being mere distinctions to taking a qualitative leap toward assessment as lesser or better. One particularly sensitive question for Latinos might be, “Where are you from?” This could either be interpreted as an interest in getting to know someone, with their culture being merely one aspect of building that rapport. Or, it could be interpreted as this lesser message: “You sound like you might be here illegally. Tell me what I need to know to decide whether I should report you.” The first is a message of interest and a desire to reach out and build a connection, while the second carries a nefarious, accusatory undertone. Same four words, “Where are you from,” yet, vastly different meanings. I was recently in a restaurant with a family member. She observed my casual banter with our server, who had a strong accent. His English appeared to have traces of Russian or some other eastern bloc influence. After a few exchanges of playful banter about the menu, I went with his recommendation for my entrée. Being curious, I asked where he was from originally. With a proud smile, he said, “Slovakia.” He told us he had been in America for six

years, and shared some details about what brought him here and his dream of becoming a film producer one day. The exchange was reminiscent of countless conversations I’ve had over the years with people who seemed to be nonnative speakers. It was a marvelous model of what we claim diversity should truly be all about—welcoming and appreciating the richness of our many cultural differences and experiences. Culture, being on the forefront of everyone’s mind, my millennial dinner companion challenged the appropriateness of my question. She told me she was surprised that, as an expert in culture and inclusion, I would ask such an inappropriate question. I was chided for my insensitivity. She pointed out that asking people where they’re from causes them to feel like an other—assuming that being an other was a bad thing. Without question, the server did feel like an other, but in the best possible way! My connotation transcended any uncertainty as to the purpose of my inquiry. He clearly understood that my curiosity was an expression of my valuing his differences. Pay close attention to the denotation of your questions versus their connotation. Connotation always rules. That server read my micro-messages perfectly. He knew through my connotation that I was genuinely interested and respectful of his difference— and we were good. These types of exchanges fall within a new concept called “ping communications.” Like sonar, ping words and expressions convey acceptance and respect. They are small bursts of audible and inaudible messages that bounce off those around us and identify where people stand within the group. People interpret connotation through micro-messages of tone, nuance, inflection, inference, syntax, and the framing of words that reveal the true meaning of our messages and intent. Denotation pales by comparison. It is in the connotation that we understand the true meaning of a message. And, in the world of other and lesser, the micro-message they hear either forges respectful engagement or results in alienation and exclusion. Clarity of expression is a cornerstone of great leadership. People are always deciphering the underlying meaning of a message. Don’t leave it unclear and force others to decode the intent of your message (other vs. lesser). Sending a clear message that recognizes someone’s difference as an asset enables them to perform to their fullest potential. PDJ

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Point/Counterpoint: Given What We Know about the Impact of Unconscious Bias in the Talent Selection Process, Should We Use “Blind” Resumes? By Janet Crenshaw Smith and Gary A. Smith Sr., PDJ columnists for 2019

U

nconscious bias. We all have it. And the more we discuss it, the more we understand its impact on sourcing and retaining talent and customers. More than 15 years ago, University of Chicago professor Marianne Bertrand and Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Sendhil Mullainatha shared results of their groundbreaking study in a paper titled, Are Emily and Greg More Employable than Lakisha and Jamal? A Field Experiment on Labor Market Discrimination. They found that employers may be selecting or overlooking prospective job candidates for interviews based on their potential race as suggested by names.

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Since then, scores of other researchers have published similar resume bias studies on race and other diversity dimensions, including gender, religion, ethnicity, and geographic locale. It is now common knowledge that, when it comes to evaluating resumes, “names matter.” So it makes sense that, as we explore the impact of unconscious bias on our ability to source candidates, our clients ask us a perfectly reasonable question: “Should we use ‘blind’ resumes to source candidates? Should we then use voice scramblers for the phone interviews so we can’t identify gender and accents?” Interestingly enough, Gary and I have

Janet Crenshaw Smith and Gary A. Smith Sr. are the cofounders of Ivy Planning Group, a 29-year-old consulting and training firm. Ivy won Profiles in Diversity Journal‘s 2018 Innovations in Diversity Award. Profiles in Diversity Journal has also named Gary and Janet Diversity Pioneers and Diversity Leaders.

different and opposing opinions, as we respond to clients on this matter.

POINT (Janet): YES, use blind resumes. To quote a few clients, “The fact that we even have to ask the question is offensive, and it ticks me off!” “I’m mad as hell, and I’m disappointed. If we do this, then it is an admission that we are incapable of being fair.”

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I understand the concerns, but I don’t live in La La Land. So my view is, YES, use blind resumes. The data and my experience show that unconscious bias gets in the way of “seeing”—and therefore, hiring—talent. When we cannot see the talent, we miss out on the opportunity that diversity brings. So let’s focus on getting the opportunity and remove the identifying information. Scrub identifying information from the resumes; then select the best candidates for the job. Unconscious bias research has proven to all of us an important fact: We all have bias. Through training, we can introduce models in an attempt to mitigate the bias. But we also need to adjust, change, and disrupt the systems that allow the bias to impact our organizations. One of the first

diversity and inclusion work for a living. In some ways, I know too much. I know that people have good intentions. They want to do the right thing—to hire qualified people who are different, who bring innovation, creativity, and difference. But they also are full of preferences and biases—some conscious, some unconscious. So what did I want for my son? A fair chance. A fair chance to get in the door based on his skills, ability, and potential. You already know what I said. I said, “Take the doggone earring out! After you get through the door, and they get to know you for who you are, then you can wear the earring again. Don’t miss out on an opportunity because a recruiter or hiring manager is unable or unwilling to assess your skills due to the fact that you’re wearing an earring.”

the harm encountered in the overall design. I understand the issues. I know them well. But if you must do the blind approach, you’re only postponing the inevitable. You’re going to know at some point the identity of the candidates. Why get people in the door and THEN discriminate against them? Ultimately, a blind process ignores the statement being made to the candidate. Your merit only matters if we can’t see you. Having a blind process is a demonstration that difference equals less than. Why would more talented people choose to demean themselves by going along, by pretending they aren’t better, that they must be invisible in order to have value? The candidate is told that the evaluation process couldn’t be fair and objective on the merits, so we did this.

Demographic changes and progress have filled our colleges and universities with fabulous diversity of all dimensions: gender, race, ethnicity, LGBTQ, disabilities, and more. Yet, when it’s time to sort through resumes, somehow all of that diversity falls through the cracks.

systems is the sourcing and hiring process. If we cannot get difference through the door, we don’t even get a chance to nurture it, include it, and benefit from it. Demographic changes and progress have filled our colleges and universities with fabulous diversity of all dimensions: gender, race, ethnicity, LGBTQ, disabilities, and more. Yet, when it’s time to sort through resumes, somehow all of that diversity falls through the cracks. Diverse people are making the grades, graduating from college, and attempting to enter the workforce. Let’s help decision-makers on their diversity and inclusion journeys by removing the information that is unconsciously clogging up their ability to make unbiased decisions. Let’s help them hire the best talent. I remember when my son was in his senior year of college. He was preparing for job interviews and asked Gary and me an interesting question, “Should I remove my earring for my interviews?” Wow. That was a tough one for me. Particularly, since I do

So, you also know what my husband (and business partner) Gary said.

COUNTERPOINT (Gary): NO, do not use blind resumes. You cannot use blind resumes. It doesn’t embrace diversity, it harms it. It invalidates the very notion that there’s value in difference. How do you benefit from something if you can’t “see” it? The other problem is that the blind approach ignores the bias that exists in the selection process. Not the bias of the person who is evaluating the candidate, but the bias of the system itself. It was designed by someone. It has inherent preference built into the selection process (years of experience, preferred schools, the definition of the “right” answer). Who calibrates and determines the qualifications? Their bias is potentially influencing the outcome. How does blinding the middle of the process fix the bias at the beginning and at the end? Smoothing the road in the middle ignores

By the way, there’s another audience that’s terribly harmed by this approach. What should we think of all the people selected originally, before we went to a blind approach? Were they all unqualified, second place finishers? Should we look at them as just not good enough? Only chosen by equally unqualified evaluators who didn’t know “good” when they saw it? Ultimately, talented people will avoid these organizations like the plague. They will thank them for being honest and step over them on their journey to truly exceptional and fair organizations. Here’s what I told our son: “Keep the earring in, because you don’t want to work for a company that doesn’t want you as you are. Before you knew it, you would be removing whole parts of yourself as you commuted to work. You wouldn’t recognize yourself by the time you arrived to the parking lot.” So there you have it. Point. Counterpoint. What do you think? PDJ

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNERwww.womenworthwatching.com ®

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CORPORATE INDEX ADM...................................................................................................................................................................... 14, 20, 22 Aflac........................................................................................................................................................................... 48, 49 Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP.............................................................................................................................................. 184 AMD.............................................................................................................................................................................................. 183, 186, 188 American Airlines..................................................................................................................................................... 43, 45 Anderson & Kreiger, LLP......................................................................................................................................................................... 101 Arrow Electronics......................................................................................................................................................................... 51, 53, 54 Association of Black Women Attorneys........................................................................................................................................... 50 ATHENA International.............................................................................................................................................................................. 52 Axinn............................................................................................................................................................................................................... 55 Barilla America........................................................................................................................................................................................... 60 Burns & Levinson................................................................................................................................................................................ 59, 62 Catalyst.............................................................................................................................................................................................. 18–19, 64 Cathedral Capital........................................................................................................................................................................................ 61 Cisco Systems.............................................................................................................................................................................................. 63 Corning Incorporated............................................................................................................................................................................... 66 CVS Health...................................................................................................................... 96, 189, 193, Inside back cover Day Pitney LLP................................................................................................................................................... 13, 24, 185 Dechert LLP................................................................................................................................................................. 9, 23 Del Frisco’s Restaurant Group............................................................................................................................................................. 179 Designated Driver..................................................................................................................................................................................... 172 DiCello Levitt Gutzler............................................................................................................................................................................... 174 Dickinson Wright PLLC........................................................................................................................................................................... 177 Diversified Search...................................................................................................................................................................................... 57 DiversityMine............................................................................................................................................................................................ 205 Durham Regional Police Service............................................................................................................................................... 108, 109 Excellus BlueCross and BlueShield.................................................................................................................................................... 176 EY............................................................................................................................................................................. 158, 159 Fannie Mae..................................................................................................................................................................................... 65, 67, 70 Fish & Richardson................................................................................................................................................................ 32, 78, 84, 87 FLEETCOR.................................................................................................................................................................................................... 82 Flexport.......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 81 FordHarrison........................................................................................................................................................................................ 56, 58 Freddie Mac.................................................................................................................................................... 170, 171, 175 Genpact........................................................................................................................................................................ 7, 44 Gibbons P.C.................................................................................................................................................................................................. 86 Golden Rule Technology......................................................................................................................................................................... 115 Goulston & Storrs......................................................................................................................................................... 91, 92, 97, 99, 100 Grace Global Capital, LLC....................................................................................................................................................................... 95 Greenberg Traurig, LLP..................................................................................................................................... 88, 89, 93 Greenspoon Marder LLP ............................................................................................................................. 17, 21, 26, 46 HARMAN...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 182 Hayden Consultants, Inc. (a GEI Company)..................................................................................................................... 85, 90, 94

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BOLD DENOTES ADVERTISER BLUE PAGE NUMBER OF AD

Haynes and Boone, LLP.......................................................................................................................................................................... 187 HireRight....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 98 Hoguet Newman Regal & Kenney, LLP.................................................................................................................................... 190, 192 Holwell Shuster & Goldberg LLP...................................................................................................................... 25, 27, 29 Honeywell.................................................................................................................................................................. 28, 29 HP..................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 114 Hughes Hubbard & Reed LLP............................................................................................................................................................... 126 Humacyte, Inc.............................................................................................................................................................................................. 121 Hunton Andrews Kurth LLP.......................................................................................................................................................... 118, 120 Idaho National Laboratory................................................................................................................... 30, 31, 33, 39, 40 Infoblox......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 122 Innovative Learning Group, Inc........................................................................................................................................................... 124 Insight Education Systems........................................................................................................................................................ 206–207 International Paper Company.............................................................................................................................................................. 173 Ivy Planning Group...................................................................................................................................................................... 208–209 Jabil, Inc....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 178 Jones Walker LLP...................................................................................................................................................................................... 125 Kasowitz Benson & Torres LLP.................................................................................................................................................... 127, 130 Kelly Services............................................................................................................................................................................................. 128 KORE Wireless........................................................................................................................................................................................... 129 KPMG........................................................................................................................................................... 35, back cover Krungthai AXA Life Insurance Company Limited............................................................................................................... 134, 136 LaSalle Network........................................................................................................................................................................................ 143 Latham & Watkins LLP............................................................................................................................................................................. 131 Legislative Assembly of Ontario (Gov. of Ontario)....................................................................................................................... 111 Lincoln Financial Group........................................................................................................................................................................... 79 Living Abundantly, Inc............................................................................................................................................................................ 138 Markham Stouffville Hospital............................................................................................................................................................... 102 Mayer Brown........................................................................................................................................................... 132, 133 Meritor, Inc.............................................................................................................................................................. 180, 181 Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care (Ontario)....................................................................................................................... 106 Ministry of Indigenous Affairs (Ontario).......................................................................................................................................... 103 Mitchell Silberberg & Knupp LLP..................................................................................................................... 42, 43, 47 Moss Adams LLP....................................................................................................................................................................................... 135 MUFG Union Bank, N.A........................................................................................................................ inside front cover NASA............................................................................................................................................................................................................. 137 Nationwide.................................................................................................................................................................................................. 139 Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP........................................................................................................................................ 140 New York Life............................................................................................................................................................. 10, 37 Nike................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 142 OMERS......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 104 OneGoal......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 72 OSF Commerce.......................................................................................................................................................................................... 110

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CORPORATE INDEX

BOLD DENOTES ADVERTISER BLUE PAGE NUMBER OF AD

Page 2 Communications........................................................................................................................................................................ 144 Pernod Ricard............................................................................................................................................................................................. 83 PGA of America........................................................................................................................................................................................ 146 Phillips Lytle LLP....................................................................................................................................................... 69, 71 RBC Wealth Management–U.S............................................................................................................................... 68, 69 Redgrave LLP............................................................................................................................................................................ 141, 145, 148 Restoring Bodies & Minds LLC............................................................................................................................................................ 149 Richards Kibbe & Orbe LLP................................................................................................................................................................... 147 Robins Kaplan LLP........................................................................................................................................................................... 150, 152 RTI International......................................................................................................................................................................................... 151 Rubicon Programs.................................................................................................................................................................................... 154 Sandia National Laboratories............................................................................................................................. 6, 38, 41 Sanford Heisler Sharp LLP...................................................................................................................................................................... 113 Sigma Assessment Systems Inc........................................................................................................................................................... 112 Squire Patton Boggs LLP....................................................................................................................................................................... 153 Sterne Kessler Goldstein & Fox PLLC.......................................................................................................................................... 73, 76 Sullivan & Cromwell LLP......................................................................................................................................................................... 156 Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation (SMBC)........................................................................................................................... 160 Sunrun..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 16, 116 Talent Path................................................................................................................................................................................................... 155 Terex Corporation..................................................................................................................................................................................... 123 The Boeing Company.............................................................................................................................................................................. 164 UCLA Anderson School of Management........................................................................................................................................ 164 Ulmer & Berne LLP..................................................................................................................................................................................... 74 UnitedHealthcare........................................................................................................................................................................................ 75 University of Toronto Scarborough................................................................................................................................................... 105 University of Vermont............................................................................................................................................................................. 157 Venable LLP................................................................................................................................................................................................ 163 Walmart........................................................................................................................................................................................... 34, 77, 80 Warner Bros. Pictures............................................................................................................................................................................. 166 Women Business Collaborative................................................................................................................................................ 194–204 WilmerHale.................................................................................................................................................................................................. 165 Wilson Elser Moskowitz Edelman & Dicker, LLP................................................................................................ 159, 161 WilsonHCG.................................................................................................................................................................................................. 167 Wilson Turner Kosmo............................................................................................................................................................................... 119 Winston & Strawn LLP...................................................................................................................................................................... 117, 191 World Education Services..................................................................................................................................................................... 107 Xandr..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 36, 168 Y Media Labs.............................................................................................................................................................................................. 169 Yo Soy I am, LLC....................................................................................................................................................................................... 162

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Maly Bernstein

Mayra Boitel

Karen Lynch

Congratulations to the 2019 Women Worth Watching Award Winners

®

CVS Health would like to congratulate all of the 2019 Women Worth Watching® Award Winners with a special recognition to: • Maly Bernstein – Vice President, Beauty and Personal Care • Mayra Boitel, RPh – Vice President, Chief Merchant-Alternative Formats • Karen Lynch – Executive Vice President, CVS Health and President, Aetna Business Unit At CVS Health, we are committed to promoting and supporting women in leadership as well as across the organization at all levels. We are committed to building an environment of inclusion and belonging that values diversity. All of our colleagues share a clear purpose: helping people on their path to better health. Through our health services, plans, and community pharmacies, we’re pioneering a bold new approach to total health. Making it simple, accessible, and more affordable, to not only help people get well but help them stay well in body, mind, and spirit.

Learn more at cvshealth.com


Innovation stems from a variety of ideas. We’re proud to cultivate a culture of inclusion and diversity.

At KPMG, we believe our people must be as diverse as the clients and communities we serve and that their unique backgrounds, experiences, and talents are essential to our success. We’re proud that at every level of our firm, our professionals take ownership of creating a diverse and inclusive culture. Congratulations to KPMG’s own Fiona Grandi, National Managing Partner, Innovation & Enterprise Solutions; and to all of Profiles in Diversity Journal’s 2019 Women Worth Watching. Learn more at KPMG.com/us/careers.

Anticipate tomorrow. Deliver today.

©2019 KPMG LLP, a Delaware limited liability partnership and the U.S. member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. Some of the services or offerings provided by KPMG LLP are not permissible for its audit clients or affiliates. NDPPS 892278

Profile for Diversity Journal

Women Worth Watching 2019  

Profiles in Diversity Journal's Women Worth Watching 2019 Issue. Global companies advancing women in leadership. Promoting women executives...

Women Worth Watching 2019  

Profiles in Diversity Journal's Women Worth Watching 2019 Issue. Global companies advancing women in leadership. Promoting women executives...