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速 All Things Diversity & Inclusion

JAN/FEB 2014 $5.95

HEROES AT WORK: Veterans in the Workplace LINDA SINGH

Managing Director at Accenture and Brigadier General, U.S. Army Reserve

25 of the Most Influential Organizations for Veteran Hiring Black Heritage Month: A Legacy of Leadership

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260,000 employees and no two alike. At Citi, your career is defined by what you can do. That’s why we look for talent above all else. We believe a disability should never get in the way of pursuing something you love.

To learn more about a career at Citi, visit www.careers.citigroup.com

© 2013 Citigroup Inc. Citi and Citi with Arc Design are registered service marks of Citigroup Inc.


| PUBLISHER’S COLUMN

Since 1999

®

All Things Diversity & Inclusion

Women Worth Watching…just keeps getting better

CEO/PUBLISHER

James R. Rector EDITOR IN CHIEF

Kathie Sandlin

R

ecently, PDJ Editor in Chief Kathie Sandlin and I attended a very special ceremony and celebration at Parker Hannifin’s global headquarters here in Cleveland, Ohio, where friends and coworkers were on hand to applaud the accomplishments of their Women Worth Watching honoree for 2014, Vice President of Customer Support Bonnie Peat. Each year, Profiles in Diversity Journal publishes its Women Worth Watching issue in order to recognize the accomplishments of outstanding women from across the professional spectrum. The honorees include women who have broken barriers, made key contributions, and truly left their mark in their respective fields. Bonnie is Parker Hannifin’s fifth Women Worth Watching honoree in as many years—and each time we’ve been happy to share in their celebration. PDJ has been celebrating women who have shattered the glass ceiling and become leaders in all areas—including the C-suite and the boardroom—since 2002. In that first Women Worth Watching issue, we featured 14 courageous trailblazers who were leaving an indelible imprint on their industries; the next year, we featured 44 equally remarkable women. Since then, we’ve never looked back. In all, PDJ has celebrated more than 1,200 amazing women, many of whom have gone on to earn top spots in their respective organizations. In fact, 46 women currently hold the position of CEO at Fortune 1000 companies. And over twenty percent of those 46 dynamic leaders were recognized by Profiles in Diversity Journal as exceptional professionals long before they took the helm at their various companies. Odds are good that the up-and-coming women you read about today in PDJ will be leading organizations tomorrow! During the coming year, we’re planning some exciting additions and enhancements to our publication that will help us better serve and celebrate women who are making waves—and making their mark—as professionals in a wide variety of disciplines. We hope you’ll join us as we continue to develop more exciting and innovative ways to support and highlight the diversity and inclusion efforts of our corporate partners. PDJ James R. Rector, CEO & Publisher profiles@diversityjournal.com

COPY EDITOR

Teresa Fausey VP OF OPERATIONS

James Gorman ART DIRECTOR

Paul Malanij HUMAN RESOURCES

Vicky DePiore EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT

Elena Rector CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Noëlle Bernard Boyer Raquel Harrah Nikki Hunt Alanna Knapp Simone Morris LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

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January/February 2014

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| CONTENTS

JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2014

FEATURES 54

22

25 TOP COMPANIES

38

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PDJ’s Top 25 Most Influential Companies for Veteran Hiring are organizations that are out in front when it comes to providing support for returning veterans. See how they’re using new technologies and old-fashioned outreach to help veterans find success and feel at home in the civilian workplace.

HEROES AT WORK Learn how companies and their veteran

employees, along with nonprofit groups, are helping to ease the transition from the military to the civilian workforce. 38 Accenture’s Operation: Employment 40 Many Hills to Climb: The story of Lt. La’Shanda Holmes 42 Workplace Readiness–F. Chase Hawkins 46 Leader Prototypes and Assimilation–Col. Robert M. Mundell, U.S. Army 52 Collaborative Effort, Amplified Progress: U.S. Chamber of Commerce

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A LEGACY OF LEADERSHIP It’s Black Heritage Month, and PDJ is celebrating the achievements of some outstanding African-American professionals who have followed Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s exhortation to find a way to “keep moving forward” no matter what. Their powerful stories of commitment and purpose will inspire you.

FOLLOW US AT: twitter.com/diversityjrnl scribd.com/diversityjournal twitter.com/mentorings

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Since 1999

VOLUME 16 | NUMBER 1

®

DEPARTMENTS 10

88

All Things Diversity & Inclusion

THOUGHT LEADERS 82 | Simone E. Morris shares

8 valuable pieces of advice for would-be ERG leaders.

84 | Helen Turnbull asks tough questions and sheds light on the illusion of inclusion, in Part 1 of her 5-part series. 14 PUBLISHER’S COLUMN 01 | Publisher James R. Rector

celebrates the success of PDJ’s Women Worth Watching, and looks to the future for even bigger and better things.

NONPROFIT 14 | Teach For America puts the

power of returning vets to work in the classroom.

16 | Mental health professionals

EDITOR’S NOTE 04 | Editor in Chief Kathie Sandlin

step up to “Give an Hour” to counsel veterans.

BULLETIN 06 | Who’s on the move, what’s on the

business leaders to ease their transition to civilian careers.

horizon, and more diversity news.

HIGHER EDUCATION 10 | Diversity helps make CUNY’s York

86 | Ede Warner explains why creating a personal brand through speech is key to success. PERSPECTIVE 88 | Partners in Progress finds

“quarterbacks” who can lead disparate groups to reach shared goals.

CORPORATE INDEX 90 | Index of organizations appearing

18 | ACP connects veterans with

in this issue of Diversity Journal

20 | Hollywood and veterans groups

WORKPLACE 92 | What did Catalyst’s annual

team up to bridge the military-civilian gap.

Fortune 500 Census find? After years of no progress, still no progress.

College an exceptional educational experience.

January/February 2014

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| EDITOR’S NOTE

Celebrating Those Who Keep Moving Forward “If you can’t fly then run, if you can’t run then walk, if you can’t walk then crawl, but whatever you do, you have to keep moving forward.” –Martin Luther King, Jr.

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t’s been a little over 50 years since the historic March on Washington. And yet, these words resonate as deeply and profoundly today as they did in 1963. This year, in honor of Black Heritage Month, Profiles in Diversity Journal is pleased to turn our spotlight on a group of corporate trailblazers who have found ways to “keep moving forward” throughout their lives—sometimes in the face of economic injustice, institutional racism, or unconscious bias. Between the covers of this issue of our magazine, more than 60 African-American professionals share stories of strength, inspiration, passion, and perspective. You’ll learn how these accomplished professionals give back to their communities and pass on their acquired wisdom to a new generation. We invite you to read their stories—we think you’ll be heartened by them—and join us in celebrating the drive, the integrity, and the irrepressible spirit of these outstanding AfricanAmerican corporate and community leaders. Also in this issue, we're taking a look at another courageous

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and committed group—returning veterans—and how employers and other organizations are supporting their success. You may be surprised to learn that what most veterans really want is the opportunity to take on a new challenge and find meaningful ways to continue to serve. Get to know our picks for the Top 25 Most Influential Companies for Veteran Hiring— organizations that are out in front when it comes to starting the conversation, creating new programs, and providing the kind of support that helps level the playing field for returning veterans. See how these companies use new technologies, along with oldfashioned outreach and support, to help veterans find success and feel at home in a civilian workplace setting. You’ll also read about some amazing nonprofit organizations, founded and run by passionate people with vision who saw a need and decided not to wait for someone else to fill it. The nonprofits are special in that they seem to grow almost like living organisms, fed by the desire of individuals to get involved, give January/February 2014

back, pay it forward, or simply to help someone. You’ll learn how thousands of mental health professionals provide free therapy to members of the military and returning veterans in towns and cities across the U.S.; how veterans are bringing their leadership skills into some of America’s most underserved schools; and how the entertainment industry joined with veterans groups to create messaging that helps the rest of us understand that America’s veterans are looking for new challenges and new ways to serve. I was truly inspired by the people and organizations I got to know while putting together this issue of PDJ. So don’t miss a single story, because I’m sure you will be too. PDJ

Kathie Sandlin, Editor in Chief ksandlin@diversityjournal.com


Thanks to you, this family can celebrate a strong past and a healthy future. As we celebrate Black History Month, we realize the diversity of our organization goes beyond the walls of our business. WellPoint is dedicated to diversity and inclusion. Our accomplishments motivate us to continue building an organization of people who reflect the diversity of our customers and communities, and fostering an inclusive workplace where we can all thrive.

Better health care, thanks to you. For more information, visit: www.wellpoint.com/careers

® Registered Trademark, Diversity Inc Media LLC. ® Registered Trademark, WellPoint, Inc. © 2014 WellPoint, Inc. All Rights Reserved. EOE. M/F/Disability/Veterans.


| BULLETIN Kaiser Permanente Earns National Exceptional Immigrant Integration Award for its Provision of Linguistically and Culturally Appropriate Care The Migration Policy Institute (MPI) announced today that Kaiser Permanente is the recipient of its 2013 E Pluribus Unum Prizes’ Corporate Leadership Award for its exceptional dedication to providing linguistically and culturally appropriate health care and its leadership role in encouraging the healthcare industry to follow suit. “The E Pluribus Unum Prizes program, established in 2008 by MPI’s National Center on Immigrant Integration Policy with generous support from the J.M. Kaplan Fund, seeks to encourage the adoption of effective integration practices and inspire others to take on the important work of integrating immigrants and their children so they can join the mainstream of U.S. society. More than 25 million U.S. residents—immigrant and U.S.-born alike,—are limited English proficient (LEP); federal law requires that healthcare providers receiving federal funds provide meaningful healthcare access for LEP individuals. With millions of previously uninsured Americans, including many immigrants, eligible for health coverage as the Affordable Care Act takes fuller effect, provision of culturally and linguistically appropriate care will become a growing issue for U.S. providers. Through its National Linguistic and Cultural Programs (NLCP), Kaiser Permanente focuses on advancing health equity and the elimination of racial and ethnic healthcare disparities through innovative, replicable, and effective language access strategies. By working internally across the enterprise and with the community, NLCP proactively addresses the cultural and linguistic

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Left to right: Dr. Ronald Copeland, senior vice president of National Diversity Strategy and Policy and chief diversity and inclusion officer for Kaiser Permanente; Gayle Tang; Peter Davidson and Brad Davidson, trustees of the J.M. Kaplan Fund that provides support for the E Pluribus Unum Prizes; Dr. Ted Eytan and Dr. Maia Jackson, both of Kaiser Permanente; and Marcos Pesquera, executive director of the Adventist HealthCare Center on Health Disparities.

needs of patients, families and communities; it also serves to integrate the principles and practices of linguistically and culturally appropriate care into the Kaiser Permanente healthcare delivery system. Kaiser Permanente has developed the Qualified Bilingual Staff (QBS) model and program, an industryleading training, testing, and certification process for its multilingual staff who serve as healthcare interpreters, as well as for the physicians who speak with patients in languages other than English. “Kaiser Permanente has worked since the 1990s to identify, train, test, and certify thousands of our physicians, nurses, and other staff to interact with our clients in culturally and linguistically appropriate ways, and to provide key communications in multiple languages,” said Gayle Tang, senior director of national diversity and inclusion at Kaiser Permanente. “Recognition of our many years of work by the E Pluribus Unum Prizes is very meaningful to us. Moreover, this award emphasizes the vital role that organizations play in developing January/February 2014

patient-member-family-centered care for full integration in our systems and society, as well as achieving total health for all.” The other 2013 winners of the E Pluribus Unum Prize are the Carlos Rosario International Public Charter School, a Washington, D.C.-based, adult-focused charter that provides adult basic education and workforce training to more than 3,000 immigrants and refugees annually; the Massachusetts Immigrant and Refugee Advocacy Coalition (MIRA), whose Integration Institute has become a national model for bringing together stakeholders from government, immigrant and refugee communities and the private and nonprofit sectors to improve integration research, policy analysis, advocacy, and system capacity; and Neighborhood Development Center, a St. Paul, MN community development organization that connects immigrant and native-born ethnic communities to revitalize inner-city neighborhoods in the Twin Cities. All three will receive a $50,000 award.


WHO ... WHAT ... WHERE ... WHEN Lee Hecht Harrison Named a Kennedy Vanguard Leader in Leadership Development Consulting Lee Hecht Harrison (LHH), the global talent mobility leader, announced today that Kennedy Consulting Research & Advisory, a leading analyst firm, has named Lee Hecht Harrison a global leader in leadership development consulting. Peter Alcide, president & COO at LHH, stated, “The Vanguard rating from Kennedy for leadership development consulting is a tremendous endorsement for Lee Hecht Harrison’s leadership development services. LHH has partnered with many organizations across multiple industries to develop their leaders and help them achieve corporate objectives. LHH’s reputation for leadership development expertise leads the market.” Alcide noted, “The Kennedy report confirms that LHH has one of the largest forces of leadership development consultants in the market. Built on a solid infrastructure that supports consistent delivery and project management, and informed by local and regional insights, our clients value the open and collaborative approach we offer and the results achieved. Kennedy’s recent report on the Leadership Development Consulting market addresses the growing demand for strategic, integrated consulting services and the increased need for new leadership competencies to respond and lead effectively in an environment of continuous change and global interconnectedness. The Kennedy research report states, “LHH has particular strengths in coaching, a strong competitive advantage in a market where the prevailing trend is to develop an enterprise-wide leadership

Darden Restaurants Scores 100 Percent on the Human Rights Campaign 2014 Corporate Equality Index Darden Restaurants has announced that the company scored 100 out of 100 on the Human Rights Campaign (HRC) 2014 Corporate Equality Index (CEI) for its business practices and policies toward its lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) employees. A record 303 businesses achieved the top rating of 100 percent. “At Darden, we embrace diversity and inclusion as business imperatives that are critical to our success and future growth,” said Samir Gupte, senior vice president of culture for Darden. “We believe that understanding and embracing our unique differences enriches our Led by the Pride Employee Resource corporate culture and enables us Group, Darden employees turned to be a stronger, high-performing purple to take a stand against bullyorganization.” ing and to show their support for the A total of 934 businesses were LGBT community as part of GLAAD’s rated in the 2014 CEI, including National Spirit Day in October. the entire Fortune 500. Companies are rated on 40 specific policies and practices, including having fully inclusive equal employment opportunity policies, providing equal employment benefits, demonstrating organizational LGBT competency, evidence of their commitment to equality publicly, and exercising responsible citizenship. The HRC’s CEI report, released each fall since 2002, provides an in-depth analysis and rating of large U.S. employers and their policies and practices pertinent to LGBT employees. It is the premier national benchmark for LGBT workplace inclusion. Businesses rated 100% are recognized as “Best Places to Work for LGBT Equality.” The full report can viewed at www.hrc.org/cei. Darden’s long history of diversity and inclusion dates back to 1938, when company founder Bill Darden welcomed anyone as a guest in his first restaurant during an era of racial segregation and discrimination. Today, diversity remains at the core of Darden’s culture. The company’s diversity initiatives reflect its guiding principles to attract and retain a workforce that mirrors its diverse customer base, provide opportunities for diverse suppliers, and contribute to the well-being of the communities it serves.

culture.” “Today, organizations are seeing the value of developing leadership cultures—cultures where leadership competencies are developed, promoted, and encouraged throughout the entire company and at all levels,”

said Alcide. “It’s a more collaborative, participative approach that taps potential and empowers individuals. Organizations are reaping both short-term and long-term results in productivity, performance and engagement.

January/February 2014

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| BULLETIN

Sedgwick Announces New Leadership for Inclusion and Diversity Committee and Women’s Forum Sedgwick LLP announced new leaders of the firm’s Inclusion and Diversity Committee and Women’s Forum. Los Angeles partner David Humiston will join HUMISTON Fort Lauderdale partner Tanya Lawson as cochair of the firm’s Inclusion and Diversity Committee. Humiston succeeds Los Angeles partner KAROS Craig Barnes, who led the committee with Lawson for the past several years. Barnes will continue to cochair the firm’s African American Lawyers Forum MARKOVICH affinity group alongside Washington, D.C. partner Susan Watson. Humiston, who is co-chair of the firm’s Healthcare practice group representing health plans and managed care liability organizations for several decades, also serves as chair of the firm’s Asian Pacific Islander Lawyers Forum affinity group. “We are grateful for the unwavering dedication and countless contributions Craig has made to the firm’s inclusion and diversity efforts for

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more than 15 years,” said Sedgwick Chair Michael Tanenbaum. “We are thrilled to have David join forces with Tanya as co-chair of our Inclusion and Diversity Committee. David’s breadth of experience and unique perspective will both complement and enrich our existing inclusion and diversity efforts.” The Sedgwick Women’s Forum, which launched in 2004, will be led by Dallas partner Maria “Kiki” Karos as chair and New York partner Laura Markovich as vice chair. Karos and Markovich will succeed San Francisco partner Lillian Stenfeldt, who has served as chair of the Women’s Forum since 2006. “We would not be where we are today if not for Lillian’s leadership and commitment to the advancement of women within the firm,” said Tanenbaum. “Using our existing foundation as a framework, I am confident that our new Women’s Forum leaders will continue to raise the bar through their dedication to the cause and demonstrated ability to effect change within the firm.” Karos, who focuses her practice on high-stakes catastrophic injury cases and complex business litigation matters, previously served as the Women’s Forum representative for Sedgwick’s Dallas office. Markovich, who represents clients in directors and officers and other professional liability matters, currently serves as editor of Women Connect, the firm’s Women’s Forum newsletter. She has also served as the Women’s Forum representative for the firm’s New York office. Sedgwick’s Inclusion and January/February 2014

Diversity Committee comprises partners and special counsel from each office, including members of the firm’s Management Committee and the chair of the firm. The firm’s commitment to inclusion and diversity comes from a belief that attorneys and staff from diverse backgrounds and experiences, working toward a common goal, offer the best opportunity to deliver the superior legal services that our clients expect.

Fannie Mae Appoints New CDO Yuri Brown-Cruzat has been named Vice President and chief diversity officer at Fannie Mae. As Chief Diversity Officer, Yuri will lead the development of Fannie BROWN-CRUZAT Mae’s corporate diversity and inclusion strategy, policies, and programs. Yuri has broad business experience, with a combined background in diversity and inclusion, organizational design, finance, and business analysis. Prior to joining Fannie Mae, Yuri led a human capital and diversity consulting firm where she supported clients with defining, building, and implementing diversity and inclusion strategies, and integrating those findings into core business initiatives. Yuri will lead Fannie Mae’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion, and the company’s efforts to further its commitment to diversity and inclusion in the workforce, the workplace, and the marketplace. PDJ


Inclusion is the difference MWV is a global leader because our people are different. We embrace diverse backgrounds and perspectives — fueling innovation and driving business results. When unique individuals join together as one, we can do extraordinary things.

@mwvpackaging mwv.com


| HIGHER EDUCATION

York College:

A CITY’S TRANSFORMATIVE FORCE No other learning organization creates a wider scope of opportunity for New Yorkers every year than York College. One of the eleven senior colleges of the City University of New York (CUNY), York occupies 50 acres in the heart of Jamaica, Queens. The school’s student population mirrors the rich ethnic diversity of the surrounding community. Today, York students come from more than 100 countries and speak more than 50 languages.

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ccording to York president Dr. Marcia Keizs, it is this diversity that drives the programs, operations, and environment, that make this institution so unique. “This college was built on the premise of serving the urban core community. You’ll find a continual theme here—a shared goal—in that we try to level the playing field and give every student the opportunity to excel. “Our goal is to truly make York a transformative urban institution and cultural hub.” It is a goal that is being realized in its student population every day. “Our graduates and their subsequent careers and successes are very reflective of our values here at York. Many have chosen social professions—educators, lawyers, and physicians—in order to ‘pay forward’ the opportunities they’ve been afforded. Many take a personal interest in our students, offering internships or mentoring to give them the real-world understanding and skills they’ll need to compete. Others have contributed over a half million dollars in sacrificial donations to help students with things they often can’t afford, like medical

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school entrance exams. “Our mission is to everyone a chance to succeed. And our strong alumni network donates time, talent and capital to advance that mission.”


FOUNDATION FOR SUCCESS

York College is the only CUNY senior college in Queens offering baccalaureate degrees in nursing, aviation management, pharmaceutical science, information systems, and physician assistant studies, as well as a BS/ MS in occupational therapy. The school offers more than 40 majors, with programs in health, business, and psychology being the most popular. York also benefits from partnerships that enhance the classroom experiences. For example, the Northeast Regional Office of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) has its investigation center offices and state-of-the-art laboratory on campus. The FDA/York College partnership offers students and faculty the unique opportunity to engage in joint collaborative activities, such as sponsored research, fellowship, and internship programs. Another unique partnership is reflected in York’s Aviation Institute. Working with the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, and several major airlines, the Aviation Institute helps students of the School of Business and Information Systems step into roles in an industry historically out of reach for diverse students.

Corporations also take part in programs that provide insight into concepts like networking that students of color often overlook as part of preparation for a career. And graduates who now work in a wide range of disciplines and industries find ways to help students “fine tune” their personal presentations in order to succeed. One alumnus, for example, mentors students in the art of the lunch meeting and other scenarios that they may encounter in a work environment. “Many of the skills students learn at York can’t be learned in books,” said Keizs. “Our students are extremely well-prepared. Once they get into their careers, our students must compete against graduates from America’s top colleges; we have seen them do just as well.”

HELPING TO BUILD A LEGACY

York College is on a clear path of growth, and generating support for its operations, financial aid, and talent acquisition initiatives is always among its priorities. In November, the school announced the addition of three new members to the York College Board of Directors: Michele Chow-Tai, Hank Sheinkopf, and Edson Edwards.

January/February 2014

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| HIGHER EDUCATION

York diversity at a glance

Sheinkopf and Chow-Tai are no strangers to York College. tudents at Both are alumni and, like many York College current students, faced many enjoy a dynamic and supportive challenges on the road to their environment where careers. Their for the York expethey can collaborate rience, as well as their expertise with faculty and in their respective fields, make academic peers them ideally suited for these imwhose backgrounds portant roles. are distinctly Michele Chow-Tai, recently different from their elected Foundation Chair, own. Located in the earned a Bachelor of Science Queens borough of from York College in The City New York City, the University of New York and student population holds credentials in business represents 100 countries and speaks 50 languages. Only 6 percent of the student population is white non-Hispanic. Because many York students hold jobs or administration and finance. She support families while attending school, the average student may take longer is an institutional relationship than the traditional four years to earn his or her degree. More than half of those manager at TIAA-CREF, a leadattending are first generation college students, making York a truly transformative ing financial services organizaforce in the community. tion. In the position, she helps to design and manage financial The third new member of the board, Edson Edwards, services and retirement plans for colleges and universiserves as Internal Actuary and investment analyst at the ties, helping them to drive successful Federal Reserve Office of Employee outcomes for their employees. Benefits, and brings his knowledge “As a proud alumnus of York in investment strategies for pension College, I cannot wait to begin my plans, an expertise that is invaluable new role,” said Chow-Tai. “York has to the college. Unlike Sheinkopf and given me many opportunities and Chow-Tai, Edwards is not a York opened so many doors. I am proud College alumnus but found the to be named Foundation Chair and CHOW-TAI opportunity resonated with him for be given this chance to give back to EDWARDS many reasons. my alma mater.” “Like many of these students, I am among the first Hank Sheinkopf, CNN correspondent and former generation in my family to attend college. Programs Clinton advisor, graduated from York College in 1973. similar to those sponsored by the Foundation made it Already an active alumnus, Sheinkopf possible for me to do so. I understand many of the chalhas helped raise funds for York’s lenges these students face to get the level of education political science scholarship that they need in order to succeed. bears his name. His comprehensive “I am humbled by the opportunity to join the York understanding of the political proCollege Board of Directors,” said Edwards. “Moving cess makes his presence on the York forward, I am committed to building York’s ability to Board a tremendous asset to the sustain financial security. Together, we will continue to CUNY institution. SHEINKOPF open doors for the next generation of achievers.” PDJ “York College opens the doors of opportunity for thousands of New Yorkers,” said Sheinkopf. “The Board’s job is to keep it that way, and I To learn more about CUNY's York College, please visit: http://www. intend to help in every way so that it can.” york.cuny.edu/

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You’re unique. We’re unique. Let’s work together. We believe that diversity encourages collaboration and innovation. We respect and appreciate our employees’ varied backgrounds and skills. And what this variety does for our culture. Schwab looks for talented people who share our inclusive values. If you’d like a career with a unique company where you can learn and grow with your colleagues, Schwab could be the place for you.

BUILD YOUR CAREER AT SCHWAB. http://www.aboutschwab.com/careers

©2013 Charles Schwab & Co., Inc. All rights reserved. Member SIPC. CS18682-03 (0413-2612) ADP72661-00 (04/13)

Visit aboutschwab.com/careers.


| NONPROFIT

Veterans Find a NEW WAY TO SERVE

Teach For America puts the power of returning veterans to work in our nation’s classrooms. By Teresa Fausey

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n the U.S., millions of children growing up in poverty don’t have access to the kind of rich learning experiences, high expectations, and ongoing opportunities that would enable them to succeed in school. As a result, only about 10 percent of the poorest students graduate from college compared with 54 percent of their middle- to highincome peers. And many educationally underserved children become adults who remain caught in a cycle of poverty.

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LEVELING THE FIELD

Teach For America (TFA) was created to help eliminate that educational inequity by providing intensive training and ongoing support to help would-be teachers understand, and meet the needs of, America’s most underserved students. In return, corps members agree to teach for two years at one of many high-need locations across the country. An amazing 11,100 TFA corps members will reach more than 750,000 students this year alone. The program has lived up to its

January/February 2014

founders’ expectations. Recent national studies, as well as statewide studies in Louisiana, North Carolina, and Tennessee, concluded that Teach For America corps members are as or more effective than other new teachers. Many of the more than 32,000 TFA alumni continue to work in the classroom, school administration, policy and politics, and other areas to ensure that all of America’s children receive an excellent education. TFA was recently named one of FORTUNE’s Best Companies to Work For. This is the fourth straight


year TFA has made the cut, and why more than half of its employees are alumni who have chosen to stay with the organization.

A NEW KIND OF SERVICE By 2009, Teach For America had been recruiting and training teachers for nearly two decades, and Shaun Murphy had been on active duty with the U.S. Army for eight years. While this highly decorated staff sergeant was thinking about the next step in his career, his girlfriend at the time—a TFA corps member—told Shaun he should take his leadership skills into the classroom. Her words set him on a new path. He joined Teach For America and spent two years teaching at Prestige Academy Charter School in Wilmington, Delaware. Once his classroom commitment had been met, Shaun asked whether there was a position available that would enable him to bring more veterans into the classroom. There wasn’t. But just one year later, TFA was ready to create such a position and launch a whole new initiative. When Shaun heard of TFA’s plans, he put together a proposal that included the creation of a national campaign to reach this largely untapped audience. A short time later, Teach For America named him their new manager of professional re-

SERGIO SANTIAGO (D.C. Corps ’13)

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fter a five-year stint with the U.S. Marine Corps, where he served as a signals intelligence operator and analyst, Sergio Santiago earned his bachelor’s degree in education at Penn State. He wanted to teach where he was needed most, so he joined Teach For America. Now he is a second grade dual language teacher at Powell Bilingual Elementary School in Washington, D.C., where he teaches reading and writing in English and Spanish. “As a Marine, I was serving my nation,” says Sergio. “In many ways, this job is similar—my students and my family depend on me. The consequences of my actions are just as critical and the rewards are just as great…and I have to work just as hard.” Sergio lives in the neighborhood where he teaches (and coaches soccer), which helps him build strong relationships with not only his students, but also their families. And when he’s not teaching, coaching, or spending time with his own family, Sergio attends George Mason University, where he is earning his master’s degree.

cruitment for the military sector. “I threw my full weight into recruiting veterans and convincing them of their value as teachers,” says Shaun. “Many veterans told me that teaching is something they’d always wanted to do, but never thought they’d have a chance to do. Now, we have nearly 200 veterans who have gone through the program since 2008.”

WINNERS ALL AROUND

Since “You Served For America, Now Teach For America” was launched in 2012, the initiative has been successful in recruiting, training, and sending veterans into some of the nation’s highest need schools. And all indications are that students are benefiting from their exposure to this group’s experience, leadership,

January/February 2014

and desire to continue to serve. Of course, the students aren’t the only ones who benefit. Teach For America is part of a broader effort to help returning veterans find their next opportunity. Initiative partners include Joining Forces, Got Your 6, Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, Troops To Teachers, and the Corporation For National and Community Service. In 2013, more than 100 teachers with military experience served as Teach For America corps members. By 2015, the program expects that up to five percent of its incoming corps members will be veterans. PDJ

Learn more about Teach For America at www.teachforamerica.org/

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| NONPROFIT

THE POWER OF A SINGLE HOUR: How an Army of Volunteers is Helping Veterans Deal with the Psychological Effects of Combat Barbara Van Dahlen didn’t start out to found a new organization, lead a movement, receive scads of citations and awards, or be named one of TIME magazine’s 100 Most Influential People in the World for 2012. By Teresa Fausey

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hat she did want to do was find a way to help members of the military and returning veterans deal with the mental health issues that often result from deployment to a war zone. She says she simply “saw a need and tried to fill it.” After earning her PhD in clinical psychology from the University of Maryland, Dr. Van Dahlen built a very successful clinical practice in the Washington, D.C. area. Over the next two decades, she specialized in the diagnosis and treatment of children, which often meant interacting with and coordinating services in large systems like school districts and mental health clinics. For several years, she was also an adjunct professor at George

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Washington University, where she trained and supervised developing clinicians. So what made her decide to take on a project like Give an Hour™? “One morning as I was dropping my five-year-old off at school, I heard that a plane had flown into the towers,” said Barbara. As the fighting in Afghanistan and Iraq escalated, she says “the idea was bubbling around inside my head” that people deployed there would require help dealing with the psychological effects of the experience. But what really spurred her to act was this simple, but important, question posed by her older daughter, who noticed homeless veterans on a Washington D.C. street one day: “Mom, we’re the richest country in the world. Why are all these vets homeless?” “That was it,” said Barbara. “I had to do

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Barbara Van Dahlen, PhD, founder and president of Give an Hour

something!” And she did. In 2005, Dr. Barbara Van Dahlen founded Give an Hour, a network of mental health volunteers that provides services to U.S. troops and veterans, as well as their families and communities. The idea is to “give an hour” of psychological counseling free of charge to someone who needs help, but is having difficulty accessing services through the VA or

other programs. “At first, there was some suspicion of and resistance to the effort, but as people came to understand what we do and who we are, the response has been overwhelmingly positive,” says Barbara. “The network currently includes approximately 7,000 mental health volunteers from across the country who have provided more than 104,000 hours of counseling.” In addition to making services more available,


One Hero’s Story “Asking for help is a sign of strength, not weakness. I encourage anyone, especially anyone coming back from war, to ask for help if they need it.” Justin Constantine Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Marine Corps

A Lieutenant General and Mrs. William E. Ingram Jr., Director– Army National Guard; Dr. Barbara Van Dahlen, President–Give an Hour; and Lieutenant General Patricia D. Horoho, Surgeon General and Commanding General–United States Army Medical Command celebrate the launch of an association with Give an Hour which expands mental health services to National Guard members and their families

Justin Constantine, U.S. Marine Corps veteran–Operation Iraqi Freedom, Give an Hour client, and board of directors member (left), and Jorge Calixto, Give an Hour volunteer (right), build a garden bed for a Give an Hour-hosted community project.

Give an Hour also works to remove the stigma that psychological counseling still carries in many quarters—a stigma that may keep many members of the military and returning combat veterans from reaching out for help that could improve their personal and professional lives. Although the main focus of Give an Hour remains

military personnel, veterans, and their families, the organization has broadened its scope and responded whenever a special need arises. For example, after the shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut, Give an Hour opened its network to victims, first responders, and others affected by the shootings. Some

fter earning his law degree at the University of Denver in 1998, Justin Constantine joined the U.S. Marine Corps where he served as a judge advocate until 2004, when he transitioned from active duty to Marine Reservist. In 2006, Justin volunteered to serve in Iraq, and while on a routine patrol there, he was shot and seriously injured. In addition to his physical injuries, he was left with post traumatic stress disorder. When the VA was unable to provide counseling sessions that fit his work schedule, Justin reached out to Give an Hour. “It was an easy process,” says Justin. “My counselor is great, the schedule is flexible, and I can come for as long as I want. My wife says she notices the difference when I haven’t had a session in awhile. My life and my relationships have really benefitted.” Entrepreneur, published author, and frequent speaker, Justin heads The Constantine Group and serves as a senior advisor for the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. The Honor Graduate of his class at the Marine Corps Command and Staff College, he is currently completing a Master of Laws program at Georgetown University and serves on the boards of directors of Give an Hour and the Wounded Warriors Project™.

providers came from across the country at their own expense to help people in that community deal with the horrific events of December 14, 2012. Today, in addition to the 7,000 mental health professionals who volunteer their time, about 800 non-mental-health volunteers—graphic designers, event organizers, communications professionals, and others—help Give an Hour continue to grow and evolve. And partner-

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ships with organizations such as the American Psychiatric Association, American Psychological Association, National Association of Social Workers, Team Rubicon, Got Your 6 campaign, Clinton Global Initiative, Wounded Warrior Project™, and others are helping Give an Hour reach even more people in need. PDJ Learn more about Give an Hour at www.giveanhour.org/

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| NONPROFIT

RECONNAISSANCE MISSION American Corporate Partners Clears the Path to a Successful Transition by Connecting Veterans to Business Leaders

Navigating today’s job market is difficult enough. But when you’re also making the transition between a military and civilian career, it can be even tougher.

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rmy Reserve Staff Sergeant Sam Nichols says he was “pretty fresh” to the job market when returned from his last two years on active duty in Iraq. “When my first job wasn’t a good fit, I honestly didn’t know what to do. There was no support, and I was blindly trying to figure out my job. I didn’t

WHEN I TOOK MY FIRST POSITION, I DIDN’T CHOOSE IT BY THINKING ‘I WANT TO GO INTO MANUFACTURING.’ I JUST STARTED DOING IT. THEN I REALIZED I HAVE A LOT OF SOFT SKILLS AND PEOPLE MANAGEMENT SKILLS THAT WEREN’T BEING UTILIZED. RANDY HELPED ME NAVIGATE THE MARKET, EXPLORE MY OPTIONS, AND SEE HOW THOSE SKILLS CAN BE RELEVANT IN A DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENT.

Sam Nichols Custom Machining Team Manager at Cummins Inc. Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army Reserve

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know if I should look at a different industry to find the right culture fit. I wasn’t even sure how to go about resigning. I felt like I was perpetually swimming upstream.” “Eventually, you need to raise your hand and say, ‘Give me a better way to do this.’” Nichols found the guidance he needed with American Corporate Partners (ACP), an organization that connects veterans with mentors from top companies like GE, IBM, Johnson & Johnson, MetLife, and many more to work on topics ranging from résumés and interviewing to industry specific professional development. Over the course of a year-long mentorship, ACP’s mentors provide customized career development and networking assistance to those seeking to work in any field, from finance to human resources, engineering to manufacturing. Mentors are located all across the country, and paired to fit professional experience and area of specialty. Nichols was paired with Randy Schwalich, principal engineer for codes and product safety/ refrigeration at Whirlpool. Recently retired from the Navy Reserve, there was much of Nichols’s story Schwalich could relate to. “When I left my active duty service in 1986, I didn’t have the kind of support and insight that this type of program provides. There were coworkers that trained me in my job, but no one


mentors like Schwalich, the effort is indeed satisfying. “When Sam told me he had taken some advice and it provided some tangible results, it was extremely gratifying,” he says. “As a hiring manager, I view that as an asset of a good employee to be able to recognize when they need help and have the courage to ask for it. Our veterans are motivated to do so.” ACP also hosts an online business Q&A community, ACP AdvisorNet. which connects veterans and their immediate family members with business leaders across the country. Through an interactive and easy-to-use interface, veterans can ask questions about career development, employment, and small business; follow Q&A threads; and message users to initiate private conversations. The site is open to all current and former service members and their immediate families. Business leaders nationwide, looking to share their expertise and advice, can sign up as advisors. All users are able to see the professional and/or military backgrounds of other users, promoting an environment of accountability and trust. PDJ

I RELATED TO THE APPROACH SAM TOOK TO THINGS BECAUSE I HAD THE SAME EXPERIENCE FRESH OUT OF THE SERVICE. BECAUSE WE’VE MADE THIS CONNECTION, I CAN TELL HIM ‘THIS IS WHAT I’VE LEARNED’ AND SHARE VIEWPOINTS TO A SITUATION HE MAY NOT HAVE CONSIDERED. IT MAKES OUR RELATIONSHIP A POWERFUL CAREER TOOL.

was there to help me realize the pace is much slower or that decisions were made differently. There’s a lot of room for ad hoc collaboration and that isn’t the military model, so I wasn’t connecting well. That first year, I was physically anxious because I felt I should be doing more, connecting better. It affected my ability to say ‘I’m happy here.’ “When the protégé can relate to your personal story, they take what you offer to heart.” When ACP launched in 2008, they had six corporate partners. Today, the organization has approximately 50 participating institutions supporting the program. From each supporting organization, mid- to senior-level professionals, some who are, themselves, veterans, volunteer to take on a protégé for the full year. Program participants like Nichols and Schwalich, who live and work in different states, meet via regularly scheduled calls and on occasion when there’s a question or acute need. “Sometimes the first call can be a little awkward,” says Schwalich. “But after that, it’s very easy to connect. These vets are reaching out because they recognize they need some help. Sam and I connected quickly, and we set three early goals. We’ve already reached one, and we’re nearing the end of the second already.” “Working with Randy has been extremely helpful,” says Nichols. “When I was transitioning jobs, he gave me a lot of good advice on how to test the waters. I had simple questions, too, like how do I write a resignation letter and who do I give it to. It’s frustrating when you don’t have a handle on things like that. I’m confident that I know I’m in the right position now.” “Today, we’re working toward other goals. To me, success means being as effective as possible as a manager and leader. Eventually, I want to be able to develop entry-level managers and we’ve been talking through how to get there and the timeframe for making moves that will lead to that. We have the same values and same approach to workforce management.” More than 3,000 veteran protégés have benefited from ACP mentorship so far. For

Randy Schwalich Principal Engineer for Codes and Product Safety/Refrigeration at Whirlpool U.S. Navy Reserve, Retired

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| NONPROFIT

BUILDING BRIDGES:

How the entertainment industry and veteran-focused nonprofits are sending a positive message about returning vets “I’ve got your six,” a phrase coined by American fighter pilots in World War I, simply means “I’ve got your back.”

Got Your 6 Storyteller, Jake Harriman

By Teresa Fausey

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ot Your 6 is a campaign uniting the entertainment industry with veteran-focused nonprofits to bridge the civilianmilitary divide and start a new conversation that will ensure that veterans and military families are seen as leaders and civic assets. The campaign is aimed at the rest of us—the civilians who don’t always get that returning veterans are looking for new opportunities to serve, and that they are more than qualified to do so. The same willingness to step up and get things done in combat makes them able leaders and assets to their communities at home. Strong relationships with more than 60 nonprofit organizations, government departments and agencies, and companies help Got Your 6 focus on Six Pillars of Veteran

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Reintegration: Jobs; Education; Health; Housing; Family; and Leadership. Here are a few of the organizations the campaign is currently coordinating with as they work to reach their goals by the end of 2014: 1. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation’s Hiring Our Heroes program is engaging the business community in an initiative to hire 500,000 veterans or spouses of veterans. (236,000 veterans hired as of 12/01/2013) 2. Student Veterans of America, the Pat Tillman Foundation, and partners will collect pledges from 500 colleges/universities to implement or enhance resources, programs, and policies that support student veterans. (145 institutions pledged as of 12/01/2013) 3. Give an Hour and its partners are leading an effort to educate

January/February 2014

100,000 mental health undergraduate and graduate students. (12,500 students trained as of 12/01/2013) 4. The 100,000 Homes Campaign and its partners (including the Department of Veterans Affairs and over 189 participating communities) are leading an effort to house 20,000 chronically homeless veterans. (21,328 housed as of 12/01/2013) 5. Blue Star Families, the Military Child Education Coalition, and partners will provide reintegration tools/training to 300,000 military families and 100,000 school teachers. (10,000 tool kits received and 93,559 teachers trained as of 12/01/2013) 6. The Mission Continues and its partners will engage veterans in 5,000,000 hours of volunteer community service. (1,500,000 hours of service as of 12/01/2013)


TIM NORMAN: Director of Overhead and Technology Recruiting–DreamWorks Animation, Steering Committee Member– Got Your 6, and U.S. Army veteran, first Gulf War

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s an Army veteran, a talent recruiter at DreamWorks Animation, and someone looking for an opportunity to get more involved with veterans’ issues, Tim Norman is in the perfect position to help Got Your 6 develop a strategy and produce messaging that will present veterans in a positive light and spark a new kind of conversation in America. In 2012, he attended a meeting with Got Your 6 leadership to help them devise such a strategy—one that would portray returning veterans as leaders who want to find new ways to serve, rather than as victims in need of help. These days, along with his job at DreamWorks, Tim is a member of Got Your 6’s steering committee. DreamWorks continues to be a major force behind the awareness component of the campaign. Along with the other major entertainment companies, DreamWorks continues to provide direction and resources, such as public service announcement creation, celebrity engagement, script integration, in-kind support, technical services, fundraising, and leveraging unique business platforms. Got Your 6 also helps veterans and employers in the entertainment business connect by partnering with studios like DreamWorks and supporting organizations like Veterans in Film & Television, a nonprofit that provides networking opportunities, mentoring, a sense of community, and more to veterans interested in working in the entertainment industry. “We’ve been able to bring together virtually all of the really powerful studios in support of what Got Your 6 is trying to do,” say Tim. “It’s gratifying to see how everyone we talk to wants to be part of this effort—they’re coming from a very passionate place.”

CHRIS MARVIN: Managing Director– Got Your 6, Veteran of the War in Afghanistan, and Retired U.S. Army Captain

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hris Marvin’s involvement with veterans organizations, including Got Your 6, grew out of his experience as an Army helicopter pilot who was seriously wounded in Afghanistan in 2004. “One of the greatest frustrations during my recovery,” says Chris “was the feeling that people viewed me as a charity case. I wanted to be challenged. I think that’s common among veterans. It’s an attitude that the public often misunderstands. Got Your 6 tries to correct this mistaken public perception. That’s why I want to be involved.” Chris worked with The Mission Continues for two years after his recovery, leaving that role to complete his MBA at Wharton. But instead of using his new degree to land a high-paying corporate job, he became director of civilian-military partnerships at Service Nation. And it was while he served in that role that Chris helped found Got Your 6, where he now serves as managing director and helps form nonprofit partnerships, build civilian awareness, and create events like Storytellers hosted by Google, where vets are able to talk about how they’re serving—and changing—their communities. (Visit gotyour6.org to view Storyteller videos.) PDJ Learn more about Got Your 6 at www.gotyour6.org/

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of the

MOST INFLUENTIAL COMPANIES for Veteran Hiring In the past five years, organizations across the country have made a commitment to put our veterans to work. We’ve identified 25 of the organizations that are influencing the conversation, developing programs and best practices, creating or advancing new tools, and providing the philanthropic support that is helping to level the playing field. Engaging Like-Minded Organizations Some of the most influential corporations in America today have helped to create transformational programs in the business community that are impacting lives and bringing together communities in support of our service members and their families. These organizations have a deeply rooted commitment to supporting like-minded organizations in their efforts to help veterans make the transition to a civilian workforce. Their efforts have helped to promote promising new approaches, create innovative tools and garner support for best practices more quickly, so that the entire business community can benefit.

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JPMORGAN CHASE

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n March 2011, JPMorgan Chase and 10 other founding corporations launched the 100,000 Jobs Mission with a goal of collectively hiring 100,000 veterans by 2020. Since then, the coalition has grown to 133 companies that represent almost every industry in the American economy. Each company has committed to hiring veterans, reporting their hiring number on a quarterly basis, and sharing best practices. Together, the 100,000 Jobs Mission companies have already hired 117,439 veterans, surpassing the coalition’s original goal seven years earlier than planned. This year, the 100,000 Jobs Mission has doubled its commitment. In total, the companies plan to hire a total of 200,000 veterans by 2020. “One of the keys to the success of this mission is that companies leave business competition at the door,” says Managing Director, Military & Veterans Affairs Maureen Casey. “The focus is on the issue of veteran employment from a national viewpoint—not just how do we get them in our company but how do we position them for success.” It is very much a collective effort and a place


where all organizations can share lessons learned and best practices with each other— and with the broader public. “It is truly unique. There is no charge to be part of the program and there are no hiring quotas. We merely ask each organization to make the commitment to share what is learned and be accountable for progress made, because it keeps us all moving toward our goal.” The program’s online portal, JobsMission.com, provides employers and veterans alike the tools to make connecting easier. For veterans, the 100,000 Jobs Mission Veteran Talent Exchange (VTX) delivers job announcements from 100,000 Jobs Mission member companies, as well as tips and tools to optimize their job search. For employers, it offers leading practices that employers can use as guides when building or enhancing veteran hiring programs. At JPMorgan Chase, the initiative is being embraced across all lines of business and generating some innovative ideas. “For example,” says Casey, “our corporate investment bank recently developed an eight-week veteran internship program. Some might think that investment banking would not be a good fit for that type of program, but our people did their homework and figured it out. At the close of the internship, all 18 veteran interns were offered positions,” she says. “And in a month or two, the program may make its way into a leading practice. “Service members bring value to the table. If we teach them the rules of the game and the technical stuff they need to know, they will exceed our expectations. That’s what we’re trying to accomplish with 100,000 Jobs Mission. “If we do our part, the world should open up for them.” “The focus is on the issue of veteran employment from a national viewpoint—not just how do we get them in our company but how do we position them for success.” Maureen Casey Managing Director, Military & Veterans Affairs

WALT DISNEY COMPANY

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upporting the U.S. Armed Forces has long been a Disney tradition, and Disney’s Heroes Work Here continues that proud legacy with a company-wide initiative to hire, train, and support military veterans. Disney introduced the program in March 2012, with a commitment to hire at least 1,000 veterans by 2015. Having exceeded that goal in the first year alone, the company announced last March that it would create opportunities for another 1,000 former service members over the next two years. Disney’s Heroes Work Here initiative also features a public awareness campaign to encourage employers across the U.S. to hire former military service members and to connect with Joining Forces, the White House initiative to serve our military and their families. Last year, this campaign included a complimentary daylong workshop at Walt Disney World called the Veterans Institute, designed to help companies build effective veteranhiring programs of their own. The event featured experts from Disney’s Heroes Work Here, January/February 2014

Ret. Col. Kevin Preston Director, Walt Disney Company Veteran Initiatives

“One of the most important things I tell transitioning service members is to start early. Get to know people that work within organizations you admire. Take the time to f ind out where your passion lies and what excites you. Because it’s that passion plus your experience and background that makes you an asset to any organization.”

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of the Most Influential Companies for Veteran Hiring government officials, veterans, and nonprofit veterans service organizations who shared their experiences, best practices, and tips for making a successful transition from the military to the civilian workforce. Kevin Preston, director of Disney’s Veterans Initiatives, and the initiative’s first veteran hire in 2012, is a retired Army colonel with almost three decades of experience in human resources for the military. Kevin’s excitement for both Veterans Institute—and the initiative as a whole—is palpable. “One of the tenets of Heroes Work Here is encouraging other companies to hire veterans,” Kevin explains, “Through our Veterans Institute, we could teach companies everything we had learned and provide them the tactics to put their own program into motion. First Lady Michelle Obama, our CEO Robert Iger, and an array of military and veterans affairs experts, including Mike Haynie of the Institute for Veterans and Military Families and Col. Rich Morales of Joining Forces, volunteered their time to speak with 500 participants representing hiring organizations from across the nation.” “We also heard from veterans and learned, first-hand, about the challenges they faced in learning a new (civilian) working culture. Questions like ‘what’s business casual?’ and ‘what goes on a resume?’ or even ‘what job should I apply for’ might sound elementary, but to a veteran, they can create a profound stumbling block.

DELOITTE

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lthough significant resources are available to aid military members in the transition to civilian life, most focus on finding and se-

“Deloitte’s mission-driven environment makes it ideal for those with a military background. Working alongside others in a project environment… it’s analogous to what I lived in the military. It’s also a good example of how we pull in team members with different competencies to create a blended approach to solving our client’s most pressing problems.” Mark Goulart, principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP Lead Client Service Partner, Department of Veterans Affairs Partner Champion for Veteran Hiring and Retention Efforts Former U.S. Army Field Artillery Officer

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curing employment. At Deloitte, the need for a broader approach was recognized early. “For this reason, our recruitment and retention efforts start in prehire and continue throughout the employment lifecycle,” says Mark Goulart, principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP and Partner Champion for Deloitte’s veteran hiring and retention efforts. “What do veterans understand of us when they look at our website; look at who we are and what we do? What do we learn from our first set of discussions and the interview process? How do we deploy them to their first consulting role? Or their second? We looked at it like an internal consulting project and identified 18 steps to our assimilation process; from there we could identify gaps, benchmarks and areas of improvement.” This is all part of the holistic approach Deloitte takes within its overall veterans strategy with the goal to advance military and veteran causes that promote emotional prosperity—which includes physical health and recreation, emotional health, and family strengthening—and career prosperity, which includes education, employment and community reintegration. “We have distinct areas of focus at in the


front end of the process—making the right skill match, ensuring they’re ready, and making sure the environment and culture matches desires. On the back end we have support in place, such as our Armed Forces Business Resource Groups (BRGs), and action plans vetted through the talent directors and hiring managers to make sure we do it right on our end. It’s the continual connection that makes it successful.” One of Deloitte’s signature programs is its Career Opportunity Redefinition & Exploration (CORE) Leadership Program, which was launched at Deloitte University this past fall. Deloitte invited 50 current and former armed services men and women to an intensive 3-day experience designed to help them learn how to translate their military skills and experiences into business environments. The curriculum focused on four important areas: developing a personal brand and building a professional network, communicating effectively, understanding corporate functions and industries, and adjusting to a corporate culture. Veterans from Deloitte and other organizations were an integral part of the sessions, answering panel discussion questions and facilitating simulation exercises. CORE is part of Deloitte’s commitment to the White House’s Joining Forces initiative; as part of this initiative, last spring Deloitte announced its commitment to setting a goal of doubling its veteran hiring numbers over the next three years.

CAPITAL ONE

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apital One partnered with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation’s Hiring Our Heroes program to create a national campaign called “Hiring 500,000 Heroes,” designed to engage the business community in committing to hire 500,000 veterans and military spouses by the end of 2014. Capital One’s three-year, $4.5 million commitment to the National Chamber Foundation and the Hiring our Heroes program, will fund the Hiring 500,000 Heroes campaign and the efforts of the Chamber to support job fairs and workforce training initiatives across the United

States. These initiatives focus on connecting service members and military spouses with local small-business owners. Hiring 500,000 Heroes is just part of a national workforce development initiative formed by Capital One, focused on helping to match job seekers—including returning veterans—with higher quality jobs and to train and retrain workers to compete for jobs based on local community demand. They have also partnered with Easter Seals in support of the organization’s Veteran Staffing Network(VSN), a nonprofit staffing agency exclusively for veterans and their families. The VSN will provide comprehensive, wrap-around support services to both the veterans transitioning to civilian life and the businesses seeking to hire military servicemen and women. These wrap-around services provide access to programs designed to meet additional needs that may impact employment access and retention.

Engaging Veterans and Communities The success of corporate organizations in attracting and engaging veterans cannot happen in a vacuum. It takes organizations that continuously engage the military community—and careful reminders to the public at large—to stoke our success. Yes, every organization on our list of Influential Companies has a hand in raising awareness of the issues—and of the efforts being made to meet them. However, there are those whose unique position in the market makes them ideally suited to lead the way. And corporations that share their commitment to supporting our service members know they’re lucky to have thoughtful organizations like these in their court.

USAA

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t is not hard to understand why USAA is one of America’s most influential organizations for veteran hiring. As a company dedicated to providing members of the military and their families with the tools for greater financial growth and stability, USAA knows military life—and the challenges facing transitioning service members and their families—better than anyone else. Since 2005, USAA has employed more than 7,000 veterans and military spouses. It was an early adopter of leading practices in the January/February 2014

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of the Most Influential Companies for Veteran Hiring

recruitment and retention of veterans, and is one of only four companies that have appeared on G.I. Jobs Top 100 list of Military Friendly Employers every year for the past ten years. This experience has positioned USAA well to blaze the trail in the development of recruitment strategies, in-house mentorship programs, transition tools, and take-to-market programs, for customers transitioning to a civilian role. USAA is a regular participant in U.S. Department of Defense-sponsored workshops and career events for transitioning service members. In this capacity, USAA is able to highlight its Junior Military Officer Program, “Combat to Claims” program, and other specialized training programs for both veterans and spouses considering careers in the financial sector. In 2013, USAA was awarded the Lee Anderson Veteran and Military Spouse Employment Award by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce for its work in addressing the employment challenges of veterans and military spouses. “What UnitedHealth Group and the military have in common are the expectations of their force. The military expects you to exceed the standards in order to fulf ill the mission and, in my opinion, UnitedHealth Group has the same desire. Both organizations do much to develop staff so that they can meet and exceed those standards.”

UNITEDHEALTH GROUP

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n its work with the U.S. Department of Defense and U.S. Department of Veteran

Shanterra Greene Corporate Recruiter, UnitedHealth Group Former United States Air Force, Airman First Class, Security Police

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Affairs, UnitedHealth Group helps provide medical benefits and services for members of the U.S. military throughout the course of the service member’s career—from enlistment through retirement. Through business units within its health-services platform, Optum, it manages “mission critical” programs that contribute to the timely medical processing of military applicants, ensures reservists’ physical and mental readiness for duty or deployment, and assesses reservists’ health upon their return. It also provides clinical disability exams to military veterans in five regions of the U.S. encompassing 31 states. UnitedHealth Group has been extremely active in promoting associations that raise public awareness of issues that concern the health and well-being of our service members and their families. The organization most recently formed a strategic partnership with the Paralyzed Veterans of America, focused on helping individual veterans navigate the complex landscape of finding jobs, and supporting the entire community of service members leaving active duty in the coming year. The partnership’s initial step was to launch a national ad campaign, “United for Our Veterans,” that acknowledges veterans’ service and fosters an appreciation for the diversity of talent and leadership now entering or reentering the civilian workplace. Last fall, the UnitedHealth Foundation became a nationwide sponsor of the National Military Family Association Spouse Education Program, and will provide scholarships to 25 military spouses seeking careers in the field of mental health. UnitedHealth Group also works with other organizations like the 100,000 Jobs Mission, Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve, and G.I. Jobs. The company has been named among the top employers for veterans by G.I. Jobs and U.S. Veterans magazines and has been recognized for its military support benefits by ESGR (Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve).


CenturyLink values diversity. A diverse workforce is one of our greatest strengths in a competitive global marketplace. We are committed to fostering a culture that honors mutual respect and collaboration which results in our best work to improve lives. See how we connect at www.centurylink.com and our careers page at centurylink.jobs.

See how we connect at centurylink.com.

Š 2014 CenturyLink, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The name CenturyLink, the pathways logo, and the CenturyLink brand sub-graphic are trademarks of CenturyLink, Inc.


of the Most Influential Companies for Veteran Hiring

COCA-COLA COMPANY

The Coca-Cola Company has a longstanding history of support for our nation’s Armed Services, dating back to 1941 when then-President of the Company Robert W. Woodruff pledged to place Coca-Cola within arm’s reach of desire wherever U.S. troops were stationed around the world. That same year, Coca-Cola made a commitment of support to the USO that it continues to this day. For over 70 years, Coca-Cola’s engagement with service members—both former and current—has been as diverse as it has been continuous. From creating and supporting community exercise programs like Troops for Fitness in Chicago and San Antonio, to funding veteran scholarships at community colleges in 10 states, Coca-Cola finds unique ways to keep their commitment to service members top-of-mind with the public. To connect military veterans with opportunities at Coca-Cola, it implemented a recruitment strategy designed to identify and acquire military talent at all levels. It includes specialized training for recruiters and hiring managers, partnerships with the U.S. Department of Defense, participation in key military career events, and development of a targeted website that provides service members the tools and information they need to succeed.

Walton, served proudly during World War II. And today, our workforce includes more than 100,000 veterans and another 150,000 associates who are military family members. “These associates have been integral to our success as an organization. Our Welcome Home Commitment invites the next generation to come shape the future of our business.” Walmart recruits veterans into positions that best match their skills and professional goals, from immediate jobs in stores and clubs to long-term careers. The company expects its commitment to result in the hiring of more than 100,000 veterans over the next five years.

WALMART

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y virtue of its size and position in the retail market, it is no surprise that Walmart leads the charge. Its Welcome Home Commitment is arguably one of the most publicly recognized military hiring initiatives in the country. Launched on Memorial Day, 2013, Walmart’s Welcome Home Commitment pledged to offer a job to any honorably discharged veteran within his or her first 12 months off active duty. To date, more than 26,000 veterans have been hired. “Our company’s respect and appreciation for the military runs deep to the roots of our history,” says Gary Profit, Senior Director of Military Programs. “Our founder, Sam

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Gary Profit, Senior Director of Military Programs Retired Brigadier General, U.S. Army

“One of the internal support programs we’re excited about is our Veteran Champion Program. It is based on experiences common to all veterans. As a young soldier, when I took on my f irst assignment at the Pentagon, or my f irst overseas assignment, a sponsor guided me through those things I could not have known. Our Veteran Champion Program provides such a sponsorship. It’s a formal, institutionalized onboarding process that—early on—positions our new associates for success, and makes them conf ident in us and in their ability to succeed in the work environment.”


“We’re finding that former service members join us for a multitude of reasons,” says Profit. “Some are looking for a ‘landing spot.’ They are unsure of their career aspirations, and may use their time with us to measure their options, build their personal brand, and identify ‘gaps’ and how to fill them. They might be with us for three months or six months, but it is critical to their transition and we’re proud to play a role in it. Others have a better sense of their career aspirations and how their personal brand relates. They may find their career home here and be Walmart associates 25 years from now. “No matter where you are coming from in your transition to the civilian workforce, our commitment is simple: if you served, you shouldn’t have to fight for a job when you get home. We know that everyone doesn’t want to work in retail or wholesale, but if you do, there is a place for you at Walmart.”

STARBUCKS

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tarbucks plans to hire at least 10,000 military veterans and active-duty spouses by 2018 as part of a global expansion plan that will more than double today’s workforce. The organization’s multi-year hiring and career development strategy will focus on establishing an internal infrastructure dedicated to matching the transferable skill sets of veterans and military spouses with the specific talent needed across the Starbucks enterprise. It will also build upon and expand the specialized mentoring programs provided in conjunction with the Armed Forces Network (AFN), Starbuck’s employee resource group for veterans, reservists, military dependents, and supporters. One of the most innovative community engagement tools in Starbuck’s arsenal is the Community Store. Each Community Store the company opens works directly with a trusted nonprofit that offers services aimed at meeting the needs of that individual community. A portion of the proceeds from each transaction goes directly to that nonprofit. This unique funding model creates a reliable stream of resources for the nonprofit organization, raises awareness of their work, and creates a space for

community dialog and engagement. Starbucks recently announced that five new and existing U.S. Starbucks cafes on or near military bases will become Community Stores. Starbucks will donate 10 cents from every transaction, with a minimum annual gift of $100,000, to nonprofit organizations that help veterans re-enter the workforce. The first Community Store, located near Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington state, was officially transitioned on November 1. A portion of the proceeds from every sale at this store will go to benefit Tacoma Goodwill Mission and their “Operation: Goodjobs” program, which prepares and places transitioning veterans across Pierce, Thurston, and South King County into the civilian workforce. Starbucks has opened three Community Stores to date, which have generated nearly $800,000 for community revitalization programs focused on education, safety, housing, health, and employment.

WALGREENS

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algreens has a long history of supporting American troops and veterans, from providing a store in the Pentagon beginning in the 1940s, to decades of donation and product drives, and extending company benefits to employees called to active service. In addition to working with the Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve (ESGR), Walgreens works closely with numerous key veteran service organizations to raise awareness and support for military members, their spouses, and qualified veterans. Like other organizations that provide “Above and Beyond” support to complement military coverage— such as providing pay differential to offset the loss of wages, and extending health care benefits while their employees are mobilized— Walgreens knows well the value of hiring military talent and supporting their transition to the civilian workforce. The company’s founder, Charles R. Walgreen, Sr., was a veteran of the Spanish American war. He credited the training and experience he gained in the service for his success, and for the formation of the prinJanuary/February 2014

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of the Most Influential Companies for Veteran Hiring

ciples that guide the company to this day. “Transitioning to civilian life can be challenging for many returning service members,” says Glen Williams, a decorated Navy veteran and community recruiter, Disability and Military Outreach for the Walgreen Co. At Walgreens, he is charged with creating and executing the military and disability strategy and outreach efforts for the company’s 7,700 stores, 20 distributions centers, and corporate office. “Walgreens shares many of the same values that were instilled in the military. Because of those aligned values, Walgreens has a longstanding interest in employing those who have served our country. It’s why we’re so committed to improving the service member’s experience through programs such as our Transition Assistance education, military-friendly benefits, and enhanced EAP support.” Williams said there are opportunities at Walgreens corporate headquarters, distribution centers, store operations, and Take Care Clinics, just to name a few. Job opportunities span all levels of professional experience and include sales positions, IT, e-commerce and technicians at the company’s many distribution centers.

CHARLES SCHWAB CORPORATION

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harles Schwab’s veteran’s hiring initiative, Forward March: Taking the Next Step with Schwab, was launched in 2012 to aggressively pursue veteran candidates. “We really put a premium on finding people who have a devotion to serving others,” says Ryan Kosowsky, Schwab’s managing director of talent acquisition who oversees the initiative. “It’s why we want to be known as an employer of choice in the military community.” “It’s easy to create a program that simply propels your brand, but at the end of the day, the question is ‘are you serious about hiring?’” Ryan Kosowsky Managing Director of Talent Acquisition Major, Arizona Army National Guard

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Kosowsky, who left active service in the U.S. Army as a major in 2012, has had a 15-year career in the military and today serves in the Arizona Army National Guard in addition to his role at Schwab. It is the culture and vision of the organization, he says, that makes it such a draw for former service members. “Personally, I joined Schwab because it aligned well to the principles I held sacred as a service member,” says Kosowsky of his own transition. “I didn’t have a high opinion of corporate America at the time, and I really wasn’t looking at the private sector.” He initially applied only for federal government work, but when he saw an ad in for the company that simply quoted from veterans employed there, he knew he had found his career home. “I was really impressed,” Kosowsky says. “You can put anything in ad copy, but I was looking for a value-oriented organization, and that’s exactly what they spoke to. It inspired me at least to check their website out.” Five months later he joined the company in his HR role and has been instrumental in the design and implementation of Forward March. “Even during the interviewing process, they were interested in my perspective. It’s easy to create a program that simply propels your brand, but at the end of the day, the question is ‘are you serious about hiring?’” Schwab puts an emphasis on retaining veterans too. According to Kosowsky, the company’s Military Veterans Network, a grass-roots employee resource group, helps connect veterans in offices across the country. “We don’t just want to bring veterans into Schwab, we want to keep veterans at Schwab.” Schwab is a member of the 100,000 Jobs program and has been named among the top organizations for military-friendly recruiting practices by Military Times Edge magazine, G.I. Jobs, and U.S. Veterans Magazine. Their Chicago and Austin offices have also been recognized as military-friendly workplaces by The Chicago Tribune and Austin AmericanStatesman, respectively.


Deploying New Tools There are many organizations keeping us on the cutting edge: developing and launching new tools, embracing and deploying new technologies, and helping us communicate better with the military service members we hope to be able to serve.

TOYOTA

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f you’re a U.S. veteran who’s returning home and looking to enter the civilian workforce, how do you express—in a one-page resume— that the strengths, skills, and character you’ve displayed while in service to your country can be of real value to a civilian employer? Not so easy, is it? That’s why Toyota partnered with Medal of Honor recipient Sgt. Dakota Meyer and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation on their Hiring Our Heroes program to assist with the creation of tools and resources to help veterans do just that. The Personal Branding Resume Engine is a first-of-its-kind online tool that takes the entirety of a veteran’s military experience and translates it into a strong, civilian-friendly resume and 90-second elevator pitch. The Personal Branding Resume Engine also helps streamline a veteran’s path to meaningful employment with an employer search feature that allows veterans to add their completed resumes to a database where employers can find qualified veteran candidates, completely free of charge to both veterans and employers. To see the Personal Branding Resume Engine, visit resumeengine.org.

VERIZON

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arlier this year, Verizon and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation launched the Hiring our Heroes app, a mobile one-stop shop developed to help veterans, transitioning service members, and military spouses search for employment. The app includes a resume tool to help veterans better brand themselves, a job portal to search for employment opportunities, and a virtual mentorship program. The app organizes resources found on the web into the phases of a typical job search: Build Your Brand; Search for Jobs; Interview

& Follow Up; and Mentorship Programs. The Verizon Foundation has funded various programs that help returning veterans transition back into civilian life and into the private workforce. Verizon also has a number of external partnerships to further advocate the hiring of veterans, including Employer Support of Guard and the Reserves, Military Spouse Employment Partnership, Hiring our Heroes, Wounded Warrior Project, and the John Jay College Veterans Roundtable.

BNY MELLON

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NY Mellon is one of a number of forwardthinking organizations that have invested heavily in their career site, and in making it easy for former military personnel to be able to “identify” with jobs in their organization. An important tool included in the site is the Military Jobs Transcoder. The jobs transcoder allows veterans to align their military experience and training with opportunities within the organization. Using the service member’s prior MOS, MOSC, rating, or designator as a starting point for application, the transcoder allows the veteran to apply confidently to positions that would be a known fit. These job translators and transcoders interface directly with the applicant tracking system to demystify the application process and create a seamless connection that elevates the candidate experience.

ACCENTURE

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ccenture’s Military Career Coach is an online tool developed with the assistance of LinkedIn to help veterans with resume development, job searching, interviewing, and building an online profile. The app walks veterans through the steps needed to create the right social media presence to encourage successful networking and improve their online fluency, so they can gain equal access to opportunities in today’s recruitment market. It also offers instructional content and videos in areas such as career planning, resume writing, interviewing, and more. Read the full story on page 38. January/February 2014

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of the Most Influential Companies for Veteran Hiring

Driving Best Practices There are many organizations that help us continually raise the bar by creating and promoting new programs and services, and by developing responsive benefit offerings and practices. While it would be impossible to outline all of the outstanding efforts these organizations make to support our service members and their families, many of their programs and practices demand special recognition. Adopting these benchmarkable practices help all corporations more fully engage this talent audience.

BOOZ ALLEN HAMILTON

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ike other organizations that work extensively with government and defense agencies, Booz Allen Hamilton greatly values the unique knowledge and experience that former military service men and women bring to the table. And, with approximately one-third of the employee base self-identified as having a military background, the organization has developed hiring and retention practices that are a true reflection of its culture and absolutely best in class. Booz Allen is an organization that is leading the way. It’s commitment to preparing, employing, and advancing talented veterans and military spouses is demonstrated well by internal support practices that speak to the distinct needs of veterans and service members, including a proactive disability accommodation program, generous military leave and return policies for reservists, and targeted training and development programs to help veterans convert skills they learned in the military into skills they can use and market at Booz Allen. The firm has been recognized by the National Guard and the Reserve, the Disabled American Veterans organization, and—again and again—publications like G.I. Jobs for its outstanding support practices. Of particular note is the organization’s concerted effort to recruit and retain military spouses. The firm offers flexible work schedules and the opportunity to work remotely to accommodate spouses who may be required to move while employed there, and supports

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military spouses employed at the firm with resource groups, mentoring circles, and education and leadership programs. Booz Allen is an active participant in the Hiring Our Heroes Military Spouse Career Forums and helped launch the MilSpouse online mentoring program with Hiring Our Heroes and Academy Women. The mentorship portal offers military spouses personalized career guidance, advice, support, and inspiration from more experienced military spouses, career mentors, and military spouse-friendly employers. Booz Allen received the Military Spouse Employment and Mentoring Award from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce in 2012.

NORTHROP GRUMMAN

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orthrop Grumman’s award-winning Operation IMPACT (Injured Military Pursuing Assisted Career Transition) initiative provides career transition support to severely injured service members and their families. Established in 2005, Operation IMPACT identifies opportunities for wounded veterans to gain meaningful post-military employment. The program meets with external organizations to inform them about the program and to solicit candidates. It provides accommodations and training to help veterans succeed in their post-military employment and facilitates post-hiring support. Operation IMPACT also offers career support to a member of an injured individual’s immediate family who will act as the primary wage earner. The program is run independently of the company’s standard recruitment process. In 2009, Northrop Grumman expanded its commitment to public service by creating the Operation IMPACT Network of Champions, a group of companies who share the same commitment to assisting our wounded warriors. With prior approval from the candidate, Northrop Grumman will share his or her resume with these partner companies in order to provide a wider network for employment opportunities. Northrop Grumman has contacted more than 400 wounded veterans and hired more


than 50 veterans through Operation IMPACT. The program has been identified as a “best practice” by the U.S. Department of Labor and the Department of Veteran Affairs.

UNION PACIFIC

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ccording to Sandy Suver, manager of yard operations in Council Bluff, Iowa, the benefits afforded former military and their families at Union Pacific are “the ultimate show of support and appreciation.” But organizations that institute progressive policies and practices that address the unique challenges of veterans and service members see a tremendous benefit themselves. “There are really no words to describe how deeply they have positively affected my family and my loyalty to this organization,” says the former Navy air traffic controller. Now in her 15th year at Union Pacific, she learned about the railroad’s progressive reservist policy firsthand when her husband, an Army Reservist, was deployed in 2001. Union Pacific’s reservist policy compensates all employees for any difference between military and company pay when employees are called to duty and continues to provide health plan benefits for dependents when employees are deployed. The policy is just one example of how Union Pacific supports its reserve, active duty, and veteran employees, and their families. “I was so stunned. Who does that?” she asks. “In the midst of an economic downturn, and your family is upside-down and facing the unknown, it’s encouraging to know that your company is looking out for you.”

Overall, veterans comprise approximately 20 percent of Union Pacific’s workforce, and 24 percent of Union Pacific’s hires in the last five years have been veterans. Last year alone, Union Pacific hired nearly 800 military veterans, including 91 disabled veterans. “When you first come back from active duty, you feel like no one understands. People may empathize, but they don’t fully understand,” says Suver. “What I heard at Union Pacific was ‘we’ve got your back.’ There’s a tre-

“Much like the military, Union Pacif ic is a 24-hour operation; in fact, they share a lot of similarities in operational structure. But Union Pacif ic believes in balance, and uses technologies to our advantage, so we can be home when we need to be. In return, Union Pacif ic gets a work ethic that’s second to none.” Sandy Suver Manager of Yard Operations Former Navy Air Traffic Controller January/February 2014

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of the Most Influential Companies for Veteran Hiring

mendous support system here.” An integral part of Union Pacific’s support system is UPVETS, an employee resource group devoted to attracting, developing and retaining employees who are military veterans. In 2014, UPVETS will initiate a veteran mentoring program to be part of the onboarding process for new employees and a support resource throughout their careers. Formerly available solely to employees at the company’s Omaha headquarters, UPVETS rolled out field chapters in 2013 and is working to have a chapter in each of the company’s 23 service unit locations by the end of 2014. Union Pacific received the inaugural Hiring Our Heroes Award for Post 9/11 Veteran Employment and Internships from the National Chamber Foundation, and the company is continually named among the top militaryfriendly employers by publications such as G.I. Jobs, and Military Times EDGE. The company is a past recipient of the Freedom Award and the Military Officers Association of America Distinguished Service Award.

3M COMPANY

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3M ADVERTISEMENT FOR HIRE OUR HEROES

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M Company’s Military Support Network was originally formed to recognize and support 3M employees and their family members who had been called to serve, and to provide support to those affected by the deployment of these service members. The effort was spearheaded in 2007 by 3M employee Sandy Masterson to honor her son, Corporal Conor G. Masterson, who was killed in action in Afghanistan while participating in Operation Enduring Freedom. 3M’s chief executive officer and president personally requested to be the executive sponsor when the network was founded.

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“Its initial focus was support of 3M service members and their families” says Joe Banavige, Director of Strategy & Business Development for 3M’s Defense Markets Division and Co-Chair of the 3M Military Support Network. “At the time, we were still ramping up in Iraq and Afghanistan and many of our families and employees were affected by that surge.” Today the popular employee resource network is expanding to create a foundation for veteran hiring and professional development activities in addition to community support and outreach initiatives across the organization “Our Military Support Network drives the overall vision and mission,” says Banavige.” Individual initiatives, though, are also designed and implemented at the divisional level within 3M, where, by design, they can better address the needs of specific customer and employee bases. It’s these grassroots efforts that really make our commitment veterans come to life.” One such initiative is the 3M Hire Our Heroes campaign, spearheaded by 3M’s Automotive Aftermarket Division in partnership with the Collision Repair Education Foundation, the National Auto Body Council, and Operation Comfort. In 2013, the campaign raised $250,000 to support education and increase employment in the collision repair industry for America’s returning veterans. In 2014, the program will again have a target goal of $250,000 for grants and scholarships to help cover the tuition, classroom materials, and tools and equipment needed to launch a career as a qualified collision repair specialist. Monica Bastien, Co-Chair of the Military Support Network and member of the Automotive Aftermarket Division says, "The men and women that have served our country deserve our respect and an opportunity to use their skills and passion in a rewarding career. We are so pleased and honored to be a part of one of these opportunities.”


BANK OF AMERICA

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upporting the military has been a focus of Bank of America for more than 90 years. This includes partnerships with military organizations; efforts to hire and develop military service members and veterans; and products and services for more than two million active and retired military households, and a Military Overseas Division. Bank of America has two distinct groups within the organization whose work supports veteran recruitment and retention internally, and the reintegration of service members into the civilian workforce at large. Bank of America’s Military and Veterans Affairs Team is the internal team that focuses on members of the U.S. military transitioning into the civilian workforce through education, employment, wellness, and housing. “It is with this dedicated team that we are able to more effectively engage all aspects of the military community through hiring and employee engagement, dialogue with governmental agencies, philanthropic outreach, partnerships with key military service organizations, and financial products and services,” says Jeff Cathey, Bank of America senior vice president and managing director of Military and Veterans Affairs Team. A retired Navy captain, Cathey also oversees Military Bank Overseas Division. Bank of America’s second military-focused organization, the Military Support & Assistance Group is a network of employees that support military coworkers by creating opportunities for advancement and leadership development through networking, volunteerism, mentoring, and information forums. “The group comprises 25 chapters throughout the United States and one in the UK. Former service men and women represent 60 percent of the group’s 5,000 members, but all members have an affinity and share the desire to help our new employees succeed,” said Cathey. The bank currently employs more than 6,500 veterans, reservists, and active-duty service members among its more than

240,000 employees. “Our Military Support & Assistance Group is integral to our onboarding and retention efforts,” says Cathey. “It helps build one-on-one connections that are important for keeping new hires from feeling overwhelmed—after all, this is a big bank with a lot of businesses to learn. The group is also a resource that helps us identify future leaders and employee development opportunities.” Bank of America has been recognized on a national level as a top "Military Friendly" employer by a number of organizations, and was a 2013 Secretary of Defense Employer Support Freedom Award recipient in recognition of its support of employees who serve in the National Guard and Reserve.

AMAZON

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ver the past few years, the fulfillment centers for online-retailing giant Amazon have become a magnet for veterans, service members, and military spouses. And it’s no wonder. The similarities between Amazon’s leadership principles and the fastpaced, dynamic environment found in today’s armed forces make many military veterans feel at home. The company has been hiring veterans on a regular basis since 1994 as part of the strategy for building the company. Today, Amazon employs hundreds of self-identified veterans in its 40 U.S. fulfillment centers. Last year alone, Amazon employed over 1,200 veterans and spouses in full-time jobs across the nation through its Amazon Warriors Military Talent Partnership program. Amazon offers its veteran employees access to mentoring and career support to help them develop their skills into long-term careers at Amazon. It also offers a number of benefits to support those on active duty, including salary differential and extended medical coverage during deployment. Amazon’s new Virtual Contact Center enables employees to provide customer service support while working from home. The company actively recruits military spouses and January/February 2014

Jeff Cathey Senior Military Affairs Executive Former Navy Captain

“We’re seeing young and seasoned veterans that have the talent, the attitude, and the leadership skills to take their careers far. The military is a great place to develop as a leader—there are positions that you’ll be in where they really give you a lot of rope. What you do with it is up to you. When you combine opportunities like that with other hard and soft skills you attain in the military and some great support, you have a formula for lasting success.”

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of the Most Influential Companies for Veteran Hiring

People Practices Two of the most lauded and successful organizations for veteran recruitment invest people, time, and capital to making the personal connection.

CACI INTERNATIONAL

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n an era of electronic communication and online job applications, CACI proudly provides one-on-one support through a team of Military

Hiring Specialists dedicated to providing real-time live assistance with resume writing, the job application process, answering questions, and providing status updates on applications to open positions. These are professionals who have first-hand knowledge of the U.S. Armed Forces and deep expertise in helping relate a transitioning soldier’s military skills and experience to positions of interest.

“When you join the military, you remain part of it, and it remains part of you, even after you leave the service. So when you come into a civilian company, you immediately look to be part of a team, to be part of something familiar. That’s why we work hard to f ind ways to connect that veterans can identify with and participate in—like mentoring programs and support groups. I’ve been both a mentor and protégé at CACI. I can’t tell you how appreciative I was for the extra and personal support.” Denyse Gordon Senior Manager, Veteran Support & Inclusion MSgt, U.S. Air Force Reserve

wounded warriors to fill those roles. Amazon has been recognized by G.I. Jobs for its military-friendly environment, by U.S. Veterans Magazine as a Top veteran recruiter, and by Military Spouse Magazine for its recruitment and support practices. Amazon is a member of the 100,000 Jobs Mission.

EDWARD JONES

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dward Jones is nationally recognized as a leader in offering employment and topquality training programs. One of its most successful training programs—FORCES —prepares transitioning service members for success as Financial Advisors. A comprehensive, 26-week training and onboarding program, FORCES not only provides military veterans the training they need to transition into a professional career, but has also proven effective in recruiting highly skilled financial advisors who can provide world-class service to clients. Research conducted by the

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LOCKHEED MARTIN

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ockheed Martin is another of those rare employers who takes the initiative to regularly talk to prospective job seekers about the opportunities, the application process, and more, but uses a posted Virtual Chat schedule. Live virtual chats are regularly scheduled for topics pertaining to transitioning military and wounded warriors; however, chats are also scheduled for questions about roles for new graduates or specific disciplines. Lockheed’s virtual chat program provides transitioning service members a satisfying way to connect with military relations managers in real time. New chats are added every month with dates and times posted on the company’s career site, lockheedmartinjobs.com.

firm shows that individual investors are drawn to financial advisors with military experience based on transferable characteristics such as, discipline (77 percent), goal-orientation (73 percent), and integrity (72 percent). Edward Jones has a long history of hiring veterans as financial advisors,—their most mission-critical role. In fact, more than 11 percent of the firm’s financial advisors come from a military background. The FORCES Program is just one example of how Edward Jones supports veterans to help them succeed in the financial advisor role. Currently, there are more than 1,300 men and women with military backgrounds who now proudly serve as Edward Jones financial advisors. In 2013, the firm was named a Most Valuable Employer (MVE) for Military® by CivilianJobs.com, a Military Friendly Employer by G.I. Jobs, and a Best for Vets employer (No. 43 on the list) by Military Times EDGE. PDJ


Engaging

Š3M 2013. All rights reserved.

Diverse Perspectives Ideas as diverse as the people behind them. 3M innovations are born from the contributions of many. Along with more than 88,000 employees in 71 countries, you can share your ideas and shape the future.

Be part of what’s next 3M.com/careers-diversity


VETERANS

CAREER GUIDANCE SYSTEM

Online Networking Tools are Part of Accenture’s Operation: Employment

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eturning military veterans face many obstacles to finding employment, from communicating transferrable military skills on their resumes to learning how to connect at networking events and in interviews, and using social media in job searches.

Creating a tool that would provide more veterans with relevant and impactful job search information was the goal when Accenture created its Military Career Coach. A robust online tool developed with the assistance of LinkedIn, Military Career Coach offers instructional content and videos—many of them featuring Accenture recruiters with military experience—to coach returning service members in areas like career planning, resume writing, interviewing, and networking. The app also walks veterans through the steps needed to create the right social media presence, to encourage successful networking, and to improve their online fluency, so they can gain equal access to opportunities in today’s recruitment market. In many cases, veterans face employers unfamiliar with how military skills can translate and add value to their business. Accenture’s coaching tool can assist a veteran in learning how to best sell him or herself in an interview in a corporate style. “Overall, it’s difficult for both military and nonmilitary professionals to understand how a veteran’s skill set can translate and how they can make an impact,” says Rebekah Hanks, “Accenture is great at understanding, and helping translate, the skills veterans bring from the f ield to the off ice. Leadership, discipline, organization, teamwork, and just doing what it takes to get the job done in general, are some of the areas in which military experience directly applies to our work.”

Linda Singh Managing Director, Accenture Brigadier General, U.S. Army Reserve

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a business analyst at Accenture and U.S. Air Force Reservist, who spent her last seven years of active duty as a Chinese cryptologic linguist. “Many of the military roles may not seem nontransferable to those of the civilian workforce. It’s understandable to think, for example, that the skills of a surface warfare officer on a submarine would be difficult to transfer to a corporate role. Aspects, however, like leadership and work ethic as well as skills in technology, supply chain/procurement, program management, and finance and accounting, are highly transferrable. If companies can learn to identify translatable military skills, they can tap into a great pool of employees and future leaders. “During my time in the U.S. Air Force, I was taught discipline and determination,” says Hanks, “and this has set me apart in my career. I gained the experience of working with people from different backgrounds, interests, and levels of education, which, in turn, taught me to be patient and understanding while working with others. Additionally, and because of the linguistics skills I gained from the military, I get opportunities at Accenture to work on projects in which speaking and translating Chinese is necessary.” Military Career Coach is just one of the many efforts that are part of Accenture’s Operation: Employment military outreach program. Through Operation: Employment, Accenture works not only to draw candidates from this talented pool, but to equip veterans with the skills they need to transition to the civilian workforce. In partnership with organizations like the Veterans Administration and Student Veterans of America, Accenture hosts workshops specifically for military veterans, to help them create corporate resumes, learn about interviewing and start a job search as they transition to civilian life. Accenture collaborates with outside organizations, such as the 10,000 Jobs Mission and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation’s Hiring Our Heroes program, to both share and learn industry-leading practices. The company is a member of the SAP Veterans to Work initiative, which aims to

help U.S. veterans acquire the skills and certifications they need for IT careers. Accenture also partners with a wide network of local and national nonprofits, schools, and government agencies, including the Institute for Veterans and Military Families (IVMF), to provide guidance and resources for veterans as they transition. A critical component of Operation: Employment’s success is the Military Employee Resource Group. “The most challenging aspect for any veteran is, and will continue to be, adjusting to an organizational culture different from the military,” says Linda Singh, Managing Director at Accenture and Brigadier General in the U.S. Army Reserve. “In many cases, a veteran’s role and the work that she or he does will be somewhat ambiguous. Finding a niche or leveraging strengths based on prior experience may not come naturally. For all veterans—to different extents—this will be something that they have to work at. “For me, being able to continue to contribute to the success of my clients associated with public service is one of the best ways to continually give back every day. I feel that I make a significant impact by continuing to mentor and coach our young people and help them become better leaders.” Accenture has been designated a Military Friendly Employer by Militaryfriendly.com and G.I. Jobs and has been named one of the top employers for veterans by Military Times. PDJ “It’s important for veterans to join groups in the workplace that can help ease the transition from the f ield to the off ice. Accenture has many internal networking groups, including a Military Employee Resource Group (ERG). The Military ERG has helped me connect with fellow veterans at Accenture, and that’s really been helpful.”

Rebekah Hanks Business Analyst, Accenture U.S. Air Force, Staff Sergeant, Chinese Cryptologic Linguist

January/February 2014

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VETERANS

MANY HILLS TO CLIMB Lt. La’Shanda Holmes is a Study in Perseverance

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By Noëlle Bernard Boyer

t. La’Shanda Holmes first made headlines nearly three years ago for becoming the first African-American female helicopter pilot in the U.S. Coast Guard. We met her in 2012 at the height of her recognition and praise from the nation for refusing to let her struggles define her life’s course.

Lt. La’Shanda Holmes, the U.S. Coast Guard’s first AfricanAmerican female helicopter pilot

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Today, she continues to inspire her friends and community as she advances in her career. Holmes openly speaks about fighting adversity from a young age, when she lost her mother to suicide, was adopted into an abusive home, and then shuffled around the foster care system. Today, as a volunteer at Tomorrow’s Aeronautical Museum’s Aero Squad After School Program in Compton, California, the MH-65 Dolphin Helicopter pilot draws on those life experiences in her work with at-risk youth in her community. “The program strives to introduce underserved youth to aviation, math, and science. Children and young adults, ages 8 to 21, engage in educational and in community service activities in exchange for flight lessons,” said Robin Petgrave, founder and executive director. “This program has the ability to change kids’ futures and write U.S. history and world his-

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tory for the accomplishments that we’re able to do with kids,” he said. “That’s what La’Shanda Holmes is a part of.” Holmes has volunteered with Tomorrow’s Aeronautical Museum once a month for the past three years. According to Petgrave, if there is an event or a need, Holmes often drops what she’s doing to help. “From her background and what she went through as a kid, La’Shanda has a soft spot for our kids,” Petgrave said. “She comes down here and she volunteers. Her ethics and commitment are infectious.” “That’s the kind of effect La’Shanda has on inner city kids in particular, especially girls, because of what she’s been able to accomplish and how humble and how real she is.”

Tackling Another Summit

On October 18, 2013, the Coast Guard promoted Holmes from a first pilot to aircraft commander, an upgrade granted only to standout pilots who are ready to take on the full responsibility of flying missions. “It feels good because when you’re trying to


COMPANY AND EXECUTIVE

2015 AWARD WINNER

Profiles in Diversity Journal is proud to name Lt. La'Shanda Holmes our first Woman Worth Watching for 2015.

upgrade you often feel like you’re under constant scrutiny and evaluation and you feel like you can’t make any mistakes,” Holmes said. “Once I made aircraft commander it was like a huge weight lifted from me. My stress level probably went down at least 50 percent.” In the Coast Guard, pilots fresh from flight school are naval aviators unqualified in their aircraft of service. They must endure a sevento eight- week transition course to prepare for a determined aircraft. After the course is complete, a pilot is designated as a qualified copilot, which is more of a “watch and learn” platform. Once the Coast Guard deems a pilot ready, the next upgrade is to first pilot, where certain flight restrictions are implemented. Next, after six months to a year, pilots are looked at to be aircraft commanders. The aviation track in the Coast Guard does not promise all pilots a smooth transition from one designation to the next. Designations are not to be confused with military rank promotions, as the two are entirely separate. According to Holmes, not every pilot makes first pilot or aircraft commander. Many do,

but some are weeded out early on or decide that flying is not for them. However, if a pilot does not make aircraft commander within a certain timeframe, his or her career could be negatively affected. Despite all of Holmes’s achievements, she admits to a giving into a heightened sense of pressure to prove herself to onlookers because she began gaining media attention when she was not yet a fully qualified pilot. “Whenever I have a challenge or maybe a bad flight, or if things are not happening in a time frame that I think the should be, I put even more pressure on myself and then I get anxiety about it, because I can’t mess this up,” Holmes said. “I feel like I cannot fail, because doing so would not only be a failure to myself, but to the many other people—young and old—who are counting on me to win. I know people are watching, especially young people and some that are underprivileged or underserved in their communities, so I think of them as well before giving up. They are as much an inspiration to me as I have been to them.” “Nelson Mandela once said, ‘After climbing a great hill, one only finds that there are many more hills to climb.’ There have definitely been stresses, challenges, and hills over the past couple of years but I know I’m such a better woman, and even a better pilot for it,” Holmes said. “It’s all been worth it. Those challenges early on were necessary to get me to this point, to appreciate it, and to have the strength and courage to tackle the next hill. If the journey were too easy there wouldn’t be much to value—there wouldn’t be much growth.” PDJ January/February 2014

“I know people are watching, are counting on me to win—especially young people and some that are underprivileged or underserved in their communities—so I think of them as well before giving up. They are as much an inspiration to me as I have been to them.”

HOLMES

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VETERANS

WORKPLACE READINESS

Creating the Right Environment to Support our Veterans

W

By F. Chase Hawkins

ith approximately 22 million former service members in the U.S. today (U.S. Department of Defense), Veterans represent an enormous pool of potential candidates for corporate American jobs. Many companies in the United States have made significant progress in terms of hiring veterans (U.S. Department of Labor Statistics, Employment Situation of Veterans Summary, March 2013), but far too many have stopped there, failing to put into place the infrastructure to support the successful transition of veterans into the mainstream workforce. To create this infrastructure, we must first understand that while we use the term “veterans” generically to describe anyone who has served in a branch of the military, there are actually two distinct veteran populations that we need to focus on:

Sobering Statistics

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ccording to the Department of Veteran Affairs, for every one soldier who is killed in conflict in Iraq, Afghanistan, and nearby areas, at least eight, and as many as 16, are wounded or disabled.

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1. Those individuals who were already in work environments, were called up for active duty, and are now attempting to return to the work place; and 2. Career military individuals who have never worked in corporate environments To be sure, there are needs common to these two groups that enable us to build, in part, a successful infrastructure of support. But there will also be needs that are specific to each identity that must be met to give each group the necessary level of support to ensure their success. Let’s take a look at those areas of common need first: • A network of support for the veteran, including but not limited to clinical, emotional, and psychological facets that proactively reach out to the veteran to support his or her integration or reintegration into the workplace. Research shows time and time again that a large majority of veterans will not actively seek out support, despite experiencing symptoms ranging from seeing the world through


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Veterans and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

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urrent statistics put the number of returning soldiers with PTSD at 50 percent, a figure that many consider to be a conservative number, because it is only based on those veterans who have sought support and are diagnosed with PTSD. It does not take into consideration the number of soldiers who suffer from PTSD, but don’t take action to get help.

a battlefield-charged lens, to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Employee Assistance Programs that have robust veteran services, as well as Veteran Employee Resource Groups, are a good start but they aren’t, by themselves, enough. Integration should take a structured approach, with delineated milestones that help the veteran adapt to the workplace in comfortable stages, rather than dropping the new hire into a role and assuming that integration will occur organically. • Education for colleagues working with the veteran that will increase their depth of understanding of the veteran’s experience, the kind of behaviors they may encounter, and especially, what kind of supportive behaviors they, themselves, should demonstrate on a consistent basis. For example, many veterans come away from a battlefield experience with a heightened startle reflex and may require significant time to overcome their survival programming. If a coworker is not aware that this can occur, encountering this behavior in a veteran collegue may make them uncomfortable, and may consciously or unconsciously cause them to avoid the veteran. This can cause a veteran to be isolated from, rather than integrated into, the workforce. By being prepared, their own personal reaction will be minimized, and they will have been coached in terms of what response is needed to minimize the veteran’s discomfort.

With those structural components as a foundation, we should address the needs of the two separate identities we highlighted previously: 1. Veterans returning to previous positions in the workforce These individuals must come to terms with their view of life being forever altered—especially for those who experienced combat/battlefield duty. In fact, a large proportion of the individuals deployed in Iraq were members of the National Guard or military reservists. Culturally,

Bring your talent and passion to a global organization at the forefront of business, technology and innovation. Collaborate with diverse, talented colleagues and leaders who support your success. Help transform organizations and communities around the world. Sharpen your skills through industryleading training and development, as you build an extraordinary career. As a military veteran, your strong work ethic, commitment to excellence and attention to detail mirror many of the same core values we live at Accenture. And, with our wide range of career opportunities for military professionals, you can transfer these values – and the lessons you’ve learned – to the work we do. We are proud of our vibrant community of Accenture military employees. Join Accenture and discover how great you can be.

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VETERANS

Rhode Island: “How Will We Welcome Them Home?”

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hrough the development of an interagency coalition, the State of Rhode Island has created The Rhode Island Blueprint: Addressing the Needs of Returning Soldiers and Their Families. This document represents strategic investments for individuals, families, and communities most affected by the consequences of combat that provide our workplace communities with invaluable guidance on how we can support our veterans. Download your copy at http://pdjrnl.com/RI_Vets

there are significant differences between this group and career military veterans: • Unlike active-duty soldiers, these individuals are civilians who are not steeped in military culture • They reside in the community instead of on military bases • They did not volunteer for full-time service • They did not expect to be serving in a war zone • These individuals may suffer adverse reactions to unexpected consequences of deployment, such as traumatic stress, or disruption of marriages, families, and work life In a paper published by The Hartford insurance company, sponsored by Booz Allen, strong recommendations were made that corporations support these “workplace warriors” by: • Establishing a military leave and return policy • Evaluating the effectiveness of their Employee Assistance Program (EAP) in specifically supporting veterans • Using good general disability management practices • Obtaining commitment from senior management to ensure that programs are given strong support and a cultural presence

Home, but Vulnerable

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ccording a 5-year study conducted by the American Armed Services, there are a significant number of veterans who died post-homecoming. Out of these, nearly 30 percent passed away within the first 30 days, and 63 percent within the first six months. The vast majority of the deaths involved privately owned vehicles. The prevailing theory is that veterans may return from combat with a sense of “invincibility,” and thus take more risks behind the wheel. This merely underscores the urgent need to provide our veterans with support they need.

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• Delivering sensitivity training to managers, supervisors and coworkers • Providing mentoring programs to link returning civilian soldiers with veterans in the workforce

This is by no means an exhaustive list, but concrete recommendations such as these provide us with a starting place where we can begin to provide the necessary support infrastructure. But what about the second group we identified earlier? 2. First-time engagement of career veterans into workplace environments There are many reasons “culture shock” is experienced by career veterans moving between the military culture that they have become accustomed to and the corporate culture whose dynamics are wholly unfamiliar to them: • Chain of Command dynamic. Soldiers are often trained to salute and carry out an order without question; in a corporate environment, we try to encourage innovative thinking that may, in fact, challenge the status quo. • Less disciplined. Regardless of how rigidly structured, the corporate environment will never be able to approximate the level of discipline and singular focus that a military culture breeds. • Workforce lexicon. Any of us who have changed industries during our careers know very well the dynamic of having to learn the language of our new workplaces. But imagine if we had never had any exposure to corporate speak; it is truly learning an entirely new way of communicating. • Translating military skills into civilian skills. The challenge of translating the tasks they have been performing and the roles they have inhabited into a civilian workplace set of competencies is often seen as nearly insurmountable. More on page 91


At BAnk of the West, We vAlue the individuAl.

Different perspectives generate fresh ideas. That’s why at Bank of the West, we value diversity and equal opportunity for all our employees. We’ve grown stronger thanks to our unique blend of people. After all, in today’s competitive banking environment, it is our employees that keep us a step ahead of the rest. For career opportunities, visit us online at bankofthewest.com. Bank of the West and its subsidiaries are equal opportunity/affirmative action employers. Member FDIC. ©2012 Bank of the West.


VETERANS

LEADER PROTOTYPES AND ASSIMILATION:

A Challenge to the Promise of Diversity

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By Colonel Robert M. Mundell The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the Army, Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government.

xcerpts from “Leader Prototypes and Assimilation: A Challenge to the Promise of Diversity,” a study of the U.S. Army’s cultural challenges and recommendations that will help maximize the power of their diverse workforce. See the full study online at diversityjournal.com

The U.S. Army’s emphasis on diversity and inclusion has proven effective in enabling the Army to maintain a competitive future advantage. Strategic outreach programs that increase minority representation and enable the Army to better reflect and represent American society, combined with an emphasis on broadening assignments as an integral part of leader development allow the Army to benefit from two positive outcomes of diversity and inclusion. Socially, an inclusive Army is a positive manifestation of the nation’s espoused commitment to equality, and is particularly important while forward deployed, because the Army

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represents America abroad. Functionally, cognitive diversity gained by exposing leaders to different experiences better enables the Army to accomplish missions in cross-cultural environments and operate more effectively with joint, intergovernmental, interagency and multinational (JIIM) partners. The Army’s efforts along these two fronts (i.e. inclusion and broadening) are impressive; however, institutional norms used to assimilate new members into Army culture, combined with embedded leader prototypes in many ways undermine the promise of diversity by suppressing individual identity. Two problems result

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from this dynamic. First, individuals perceived as contrary to leader prototypes are judged less favorably and are often dismissed, and second, these individuals will either reject the Army, or modify

their identity to fit in. These problems prevent the Army from benefiting from diversity, because salient organizations like the Army influence and constrain personal identity alternatives that would


otherwise remain dominant in guiding thought and behavior.

The importance of identity

Identity influences how individuals and organizations behave, what is important to them, how they make sense of the world, and how they make decisions. These four factors represent choices and are important to consider within the context of diversity leadership and management. Two important dimensions of identity formation (i.e. social and personal) provide clarity in understanding how and why individuals make choices. Social identity refers to a social category or group of individuals marked by a label, and distinguished by a set of characteristics, features, attributes, and rules that govern the group. Personal identity includes those distinguishing characteristics, values, and beliefs that people take pride in, and is in many ways unchangeable and socially consequential. Personal identity also develops from an array of factors, ranging from biological and physical attributes, to learned value and belief systems derived from cultural norms, to memberships in social groups and matters of personal style that allow individuals to distinguish themselves from others,

and that are essential to self-esteem. These two interconnected dimensions of identity combine to create essential properties of self-concepts, and as individuals assimilate into Army culture, some of these properties (aspects of identity) warrant change, while the retention of others allow the Army to benefit from individual differences. For example, an individual nurtured in a social setting where lying to law authorities to prevent the imprisonment of a close friend or family member is commonplace and considered honorable, should be convinced to abandon this practice as they assimilate into an organization where these types of choices threaten good order and discipline. Conversely, an individual nurtured in a social setting where the ability to cooperate and compromise are valued cultural norms, could begin to suppress those dimensions if they were embedded in a competitive culture, particularly if individual achievement and worth is attributed to how competitive or assertive they are. These two diametrically opposed examples of personal choices and preferences are heavily influenced by identity. Therefore, it is important for Army senior leaders to consider how assimilation

and prototypes suppress individual identity, and adjust their behavior to leverage individual differences.

The Influence of Prototypes and Assimilation on Individual Identity

Attributes and competencies conveyed in Army doctrine, coupled with enacted leader behavior, shape and develop prototypical leaders. Army Doctrine Reference Publication (ADRP) 6-22 explains the relationship between identity and leadership by noting that identity influences how leaders learn, and how others perceive them, and notes that effective leadership begins with developing and maintaining a leader identity. It provides a comprehensive framework that articulates what the Army desires in leaders by describing the type of character, presence, and intellect (attributes) a leader must possess to lead and develop individuals and organizations, and achieve results at all levels. The publication emphasizes adherence to Army values; being empathetic, disciplined, physically fit, and mentally agile; and possessing expertise as important attributes. These attributes allow leaders to apply competencies such as building trust, fostering esprit de corps, creating effective unit climates, and getting results. January/February 2014

While the attributes and competencies described in doctrine provide a foundational base for effective leadership, leader behavior, institutional feedback mechanisms, and organizationally endorsed certification and credentialing emerge as the three most significant factors that primarily influence subordinate perceptions of Army leader prototypes. These three factors combine to embed and reinforce organizational assumptions of effective leaders. As an organization matures, these assumptions create self-perpetuating cycles that have lasting effects on organizational norms, particularly as junior leaders use these assumptions to construct their own leader identity. In essence, assumptions create prototypes that constitute a social reality grounded in consensual views that are repeatedly reinforced. Edgar Schein, a leading scholar on organizational culture, notes that one of the most decisive ways beliefs and norms are embedded in an organization is through visible patterns of observable behavior. Behavior patterns have a profound effect on subordinates in distinct and subtle ways. For example, if a senior leader in an organization demonstrates a propensity for assertive and dominating behavior when interacting with sub-

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VETERANS

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ordinates and the organization consistently accomplishes assigned missions, this type of behavior will have a distinct effect on shaping subordinate perceptions of effective leader prototypes. Similarly, if subordinates observe a senior leader routinely dismiss and marginalize other subordinates that don’t exhibit similar tendencies, this type of behavior will subtly begin to influence assertive and dominating tendencies in subordinates, even if this type of behavior is contrary to a subordinate’s individual identity. Too often, existing leader prototypes in the Army are influenced by leader behavior that fails to acknowledge or value perspectives and character traits that are dissimilar from perceived norms. Leader prototypes are reinforced in the Army through institutional feedback mechanisms, such as promotion and evaluation processes, and through organizationally endorsed credentialing and certification. These two factors reinforce embedded assumptions of desirable prototypes because they imbue desirable qualities on a leader, mark them with a degree of greater ability and influence, and ultimately facilitate favorable value judgments. They can also distort individual perceptions, while influencing attributions and

LEADER PROTOTYPES ARE REINFORCED IN THE ARMY THROUGH INSTITUTIONAL FEEDBACK MECHANISMS, SUCH AS PROMOTION AND EVALUATION PROCESSES, AND THROUGH ORGANIZATIONALLY ENDORSED CREDENTIALING AND CERTIFICATION.

predictions pertaining to performance and potential. In a coherent, distinct, well-structured, and high performance oriented organization like the Army, this assertion is significant. In the article, “A Social Identity of Leadership,” author Michael Hogg suggests that group identification, as self-categorization creates or constructs an ideal leader prototype that highlights the most prototypical members with the appearance of having influence in an organization. The legitimacy of the prototype becomes a reality through a depersonalization process that compels individuals to comply with norms and beliefs that are valued. This cognitive process (depersonalization) results in individual members suppressing or shedding their uniqueness to assimilate or conform to group norms. In some cases, depersonalization benefits an organization, because it aligns individual behavior with important prototypical qualities, like being physically fit and disciplined, and possessing technical and tactical

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knowledge. Salient organizations like the Army in many ways benefit from depersonalization, because common traits among soldiers and leaders enable mission accomplishment. In other cases, prototypes can influence members to make choices and act in ways that are contrary to their deeply embedded personal belief systems. A very relevant and illustrative anecdotal example of this type of circumstance is captured in an account of a senior female military leader’s comments made during a discussion on leadership. When asked how her identity changed when placed in positions of authority in the military, the officer stated, “I felt as if I needed to be much more assertive in leadership positions if I wanted to be effective…if I wasn’t assertive, the unit wouldn’t take me seriously.” The above account represents a questionable portion of a belief system associated with the type of prototypical leader deemed effective, and is consistent with several theories pertaining to injunctive norms in organizations.

Similarity Attraction and the Assimilation Process

Individuals affected by depersonalization go through three interrelated processes as they attempt to assimilate into organizational culture. First, they place value judgments on themselves based on expectations associated with defining traits and characteristics of the group they belong to (in-group prototype). Next, they cognitively and behaviorally assimilate these defining traits and characteristics, and begin to develop stereotypic perceptions, attitudes, and behaviors. Finally, they begin to view others, both in-group and out-group individuals, not as unique individuals, but through the lens of features that define relevant in-group and out-group membership, which creates implicit and explicit likemindedness in organizations. Similarity attraction subjectively shapes perceptions of what a leader is, and must do, and can have a significant impact on evaluation and promotion selection processes in the


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VETERANS

Army because it creates an unconscious bias in senior leaders. Unconscious bias refers to the instinctive use of social stereotypes and stigmas about certain types of people or groups to judge an individual’s worth in the absence of any other relevant information. Under the influence of unconscious bias, individuals activate irrational forms of prejudgment when they encounter someone that is similar or different—for example, prejudging an individual solely based on their credentials and or certifications, or based on their service in similar units and duty positions. This unconscious bias results in discrimination against organizational members based on their identification with a group that is not similar. This is a natural tendency particularly in a meritocraticbased organization, because meritocracies promote and award members based on alignment and compliance with organizational norms. Similarity attraction may have some influence on the current profile of U.S. Army general officers (four stars). Of the fifteen (all male) current general officers, twelve were commissioned through West Point, and only three are nonManeuver Fires and Effects (MFE) officers. Likewise, in this history of the Army, there has only been one non-MFE chief of staff of

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the Army. Highlighting these facts does not devalue the accomplishments or worth of these senior leaders. Rather it questions the prototype. Are the common qualifications of these senior leaders central to success at the highest levels of senior leadership, or are there other credentials and certifications, along with different career experiences, that make others just as capable? The demographic profile of Army generals represents a belief system in the Army influenced by institutionally legitimized prototypes that acknowledge MFE assignments as a significant discriminator in selecting the Army’s most senior leaders. At times, this belief system is disparaging based on similarity attraction, and perhaps represents a prevalent unconscious bias deeply rooted in Army culture.

Adjusting Leader Beliefs and Behavior

Overcoming the negative effects of leader prototypes and assimilation requires leaders to effectively lead and manage diversity by leveraging individual differences to create unit climates and an organizational culture that allow the Army to transition from simply tolerating diversity to valuing and maximizing the promise of diversity. Adjusting senior Army leader beliefs and behavior will require senior Army

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leaders to place greater emphasis on enhancing the influence of minority and divergent perspectives. These types of perspectives are often dismissed, particularly in an organization heavily dependent on assimilation and conformity like the Army. However, livelier discussion occurs when divergent perspectives are fostered and constructive conflict is welcomed. Unfortunately, recent feedback from junior officers reveals that a lack of leader innovation is one of the most significant areas in need of improvement in the Army. The same survey similarly indicates that only 40% of junior leaders feel that their superiors actually implement good ideas presented by subordinates. These two organizational issues are impediments to building trust and establishing cohesive teams. Innovation often emerges from ideas and concepts not aligned with prevailing norms or majority influenced ideas. Reluctance to embrace counterinsurgency doctrine early on during Operation Iraqi Freedom and initial insti-

tutional resistance to the development and fielding of the Mine Resistant, Ambush Protected vehicle (MRAP) serve as salient examples. Embracing and leveraging the minority perspective in the Army represents a paradigm shift due to institutional norms that result in organizational members conforming to majority perspectives and norms in an attempt to assimilate. Individual conformity to organizationally sanctioned norms and behaviors is not simply a matter of superficial compliance; rather this cognitive transformation represents internal change. As a result, the legitimacy of a prototype in a salient organization like the Army becomes crystallized and embodied in personal belief and value systems. Therefore, senior Army leaders must model the type of behavior that values and enhances individuality, facilitates open and honest dialogue, enables trust and the development of cohesive teams, and ultimately allows the Army to benefit from the promise of diversity. PDJ

Colonel Robert M. Mundell is a faculty instructor in the Department of Command Leadership and Management, United States Army War College, and has served in this capacity for three years. He is a 2009 graduate of the Army War College, and has two combat tours in Afghanistan, most recently as Commander, Regional Support Command North, NATO training Mission Afghanistan. He is a career infantry officer, and has served in an array of command and staff positions, to include Deputy Brigade Combat Team Commander, and Infantry Battalion Commander.


REAL WOMEN, REAL CAREERS. Learn more about our careers for women at http://jobs.halliburton.com/diversity

Further Faster


VETERANS

Collaborative Effort, Amplified Progress

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By Eric Eversole, Vice President, U.S. Chamber of Commerce Executive Director, Hiring Our Heroes, U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation

n March 2011, we launched Hiring Our Heroes because we recognized a fundamental problem affecting our military community and an opportunity to help.

Indeed, in 2011—a decade after the devastating September 11 attacks— the men and women who had volunteered to serve during this time of distinct danger and uncertainty were facing an unemployment rate of 12 percent. For veterans under the age of 25, the rate more than doubled to 30 percent, and one in four military spouses was without work. Still, businesses across America were reporting a skilled workers shortage in fields ranging from manufacturing to engineering to energy. There seemed to be a systemic problem in connecting these two groups—top military talent and growing businesses—due to both limited resources and limited networks. Given our unique position as a program of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation at the crossroads of private and public interests, we saw an opportunity to unite the two. Hiring Our Heroes was truly formed with collaboration in mind, and the relationships we continue to build at the national and local levels are the true strength of our program. Over the last three years, our job fair model and suite of free digital tools developed with our public, private, and nonprofit partners have helped more than 250,000 veterans and military spouses find work.

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PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

Some examples of the progress spurred by collaboration include: 1. Hiring 500,000 Heroes In March 2012, through a partnership with Capital One, we launched a national campaign called Hiring 500,000 Heroes to encourage businesses to commit to hiring half a million veterans, transitioning service members, and military spouses. Thus far, we have secured 361,000 commitments toward our goal and have confirmed 247,000 hires. 2. Guide to Hiring Veterans This comprehensive tool is a joint effort of Hiring Our Heroes, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, and the U.S. Department of Labor to provide employers with the resources they need to recruit and retain veterans, transitioning service members, and military spouses. The guide includes numerous resources and business incentives in one free and accessible place to help employers of every size and industry establish stronger veteran hiring campaigns. 3. Goodwill Career Services At the start of 2014, we announced the launch of a partnership with Goodwill Industries who will now offer free vocational services to veterans and military spouses who participate in Hiring Our Heroes job

fairs and programs. In addition to offering individual training opportunities, Goodwill will also lead several employment workshops and provide in-kind event space for fairs and networking events across the country. The positive trends in veteran and military spouse employment since these collective efforts began are evident and encouraging. Indeed, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that unemployment continues to decline in virtually every segment of the veteran population. Still, the task is far from complete. In the coming years of the drawdown from Afghanistan and leaner defense budgets, America will see an unprecedented 280,000 to 300,000 service members transition out of the military every year for the next four years—a 30 percent increase above the average rate. This estimate does not include the hundreds of thousands of military spouses who also will need jobs in an America where dual-income households are now the norm. Every step of our journey, Hiring Our Heroes has worked hand-inhand with valued, proactive partners, because for us, it is all about building the right team. Only together can we drive momentum on this important issue and connect talented veterans, transitioning service members, and military spouses to the meaningful employment opportunities they deserve. PDJ

Eric Eversole has shown a strong commitment to the military and the men and women who serve. He first entered military service in 1994 as an enlisted security specialist in the Indiana Air National Guard. Eversole accepted a commission in the United States Navy JAG Corps in 1998. Currently, he is executive officer of one of the largest units in the Reserve JAG Corps and holds the rank of commander. He is a recognized expert in military justice. January/February 2014


every dream has a starting point You’ve always kept the dream alive. Today, you keep the faith. That’s why AT&T is proud to support “A Legacy of Leadership”.

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BLACK HISTORY MONTH

A LEGACY OF LEADERSHIP

DECHERT LLP

Vernon L. Francis Partner OUR GREATEST CHALLENGE

We need to work on getting every child the kind of education needed to succeed in this knowledge-based economy. More funding needs to go to urban public schools. As long as Brown’s promise remains unfulfilled, there will never be true equality in this country.

GIVING BACK

The African-American business leaders we recognize today could easily be considered trailblazers—blacks are still severely underrepresented in American corporate leadership. But because these individuals are also known as mentors, philanthropists, and role models, their impact on the future will truly be significant. They are, in effect, building a legacy of leadership. During Black Heritage Month, we invited a select group of individuals to share their perspectives on leadership, giving back, and the challenges facing the African-American community today. From vice presidents and board members to community activists, these talented leaders have pushed the limits of their chosen fields, both in the spotlight and behind the scenes. See how they are shaping the future; read their full interviews online at diversityjournal.com/bhm 54

PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

January/February 2014

I try to stay involved in efforts that will increase opportunity for the next generation of diverse young people—especially those aimed at increasing the number of diverse lawyers. For example, I’ve been heavily involved in the Philadelphia Diversity Law Group, a group of law firms and corporate in-house legal offices dedicated to increasing diversity in Philadelphia area law offices. We have sponsored programs for lawyers and law students.

LESSONS LEARNED

Stand up for the things you believe in and don’t be afraid to question the prevailing wisdom. Know when to follow the script and when to do rewrites. Also, every experience can teach you something if you’re open to it.


B LA CK HI S TOR Y M ONT H

ROCHESTER INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

ACHIEVA

Kevin G. McDonald Vice President & Associate Provost for Diversity & Inclusion

Kimberly M. Jackson, member of the board of trustees for Achieva, PNC Bank Vice President

MY GREATEST STRENGTH

OUR GREATEST CHALLENGE

Having the ability to personally connect with people in ways that are meaningful and intentional is probably my greatest strength. Relationship building and maintenance is extremely important in higher education, because on any given day one may find oneself working with faculty, staff, students, alumni, and local community members.

MY INSPIRATION

Freeman Hrabowski III, president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, inspires me, because he is an authentic and transparent leader who has a wonderful ability to deeply connect with people and integrate transformative approaches into every aspect of organizational functioning.

HOW I MOTIVATE OTHERS

I try to lead by example and model the behavior I’d like to see in others. Specifically, I stress the importance of interpersonal relationships and try to live a life that exemplifies that. I also stress the importance of allowing creativity and innovation to interact in order to achieve an enhanced result. Most important, I take a great deal of time to develop team members into the leaders they desire to become.

LINER ENTERTAINMENT GROUP LLC Dianna Liner Founder/CEO OUR GREATEST CHALLENGE

The greatest issue in the African-American community is, without question, the fact we stab each other in the back. We do not support one another! We continue to pull one another down with negative remarks and disrespect. We must become a race of people that works together to support our individual and collective success.

GIVING BACK

Liner Entertainment is currently forming a nonprofit organization that will raise funds by putting on concerts and events to give back to schools, underprivileged children, higher education, and more.

FINDING BALANCE

I maintain a healthy balance with relaxation, meditation, and plenty of rest.

CAREER ADVICE

If you are starting your career or business, it is necessary to be patient; keep an open mind; and be a good listener and a good follower. In order to be a good leader, you must be able to follow.

I think that the greatest issue facing the African-American community today is the growing educational gap between AfricanAmerican children and their white counterparts in the public school system. Because the quality or lack thereof is essentially determined by zip code, too many AfricanAmerican children are at a disadvantage with respect to the educational resources and the quality of the educators in their school districts. Lack of a strong educational foundation in the basics of reading, writing, and arithmetic contributes to a growing divide as these children progress through the school system. They are ill-equipped to compete in today’s growing STEM (science, technology, education, and medicine) industries because they do not possess basic educational skills.

INSPIRED TO LEARN

My parents inspired in me a love of learning, and provided me with a solid foundation built on a strong educational, emotional, and moral code. The process of acquiring a new skill still holds endless fascination for me. I enjoy reading and learning new things. Additionally, my parents provided me with the emotional fortitude to believe in myself and my capabilities. However, this self-reliance was not to be at the expense of others. While recognizing that the nature of work can be competitive with respect to individual performance, I compete fairly and honestly. Finally, my parents instilled in me a robust moral code. As a result, I strive to be honest and thoughtful in all my dealings with everyone and volunteer my time to help others.

HOW I GIVE BACK

Because I recognize that reading is a critical educational component, I have been a tutor in an adult literacy program comprising mostly African Americans, and served as a reading tutor for children at Martin Luther King elementary school in Pittsburgh. Through my leadership and participation in PNC Bank’s African-American Employee Business Resource Group (AA EBRG), I have been able to give back to the African-American community in a number of ways.

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UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE

Joshua D. Colin Vice President, Area Operations MY CAREER ADVICE

My advice is this: Treat people the way you want to be treated; have a goal and a plan in mind for your career; and take on the tough assignments to gain professional exposure. We have to be 100 times better all the time. We have to keep driving—pushing ourselves to be much smarter than the competition.

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WELLPOINT

AT&T SERVICES, INC. Cynthia Marshall Senior Vice President, Human Resources MY GREATEST STRENGTH

My interpersonal skills are my greatest strength. I am smart and nice! People, internally and externally, respond to “nice.” When they like you, they want to do business with you.

GIVING BACK

Katherine (Katy) Blomeke Vice President, Insights & Analytics HOW I MOTIVATE OTHERS

We learn differently, communicate differently, come from different backgrounds, and contribute differently. I think that recognizing what people are good at and encouraging them to excel at what they do best is the most effective motivation. I often think of it like a basketball team. Not everybody is a LeBron James or a Dwayne Wade or a Chris Bosh, but each member of the team has something valuable to offer. And when everybody works together, great things can be accomplished.

Time, talent, and treasure. It’s important to give back and “go” back. Adoption, education, and domestic violence causes get quite a bit of my personal attention. And because diversity and inclusion are very important to my company, I get to help communities of color through AT&T initiatives related to hiring, philanthropy, procurement, and mentoring.

LESSONS LEARNED

People don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.

ANDREWS KURTH LLP

OUR GREATEST CHALLENGE

Education. According to the 2012 Department of Education statistics report, only 66% of African Americans graduate from high school, compared to 83% of white and 94% of Asian students. The unemployment rate for people who don’t finish high school is nearly 27%, as compared to an unemployment rate of 7.3% for college graduates. In order to continue the strides we’ve made toward creating a more diverse workforce, we need to figure out a way to keep our kids in school and encourage them to obtain an education.

GIVING BACK

My husband and I are active supporters of the United Negro College Fund (UNCF). I was fortunate to be able to go to college, and I want to lessen the financial burden for those who want to further their education. I truly believe that “a mind is a terrible thing to waste.”

CAREER ADVICE

Be open-minded and patient with yourself when you begin a new job or start a new career. You’re not expected to know everything the first day.

Gene L. Locke Partner MY GREATEST STRENGTH

During my days in the civil rights movement, I learned that advocacy, coupled with passion, can transform the ideas held by others. Advocacy and passion have served me well throughout my legal career, as a small firm “people’s lawyer,” city attorney for the City of Houston, and counsel for large government bodies.

OUR GREATEST CHALLENGE

Change is inevitable. But our complacency, in the midst of change, will help move the needle backwards. Today, those historic achievements of prior years are being threatened. We must protect and exercise our fundamental right to vote. We must participate in the applicable process to ensure a fair and objective judiciary. We must ensure access to quality education, affordable healthcare, and well-paying jobs. Internal to our community, we must recognize class divisions and work to prevent an “us” versus “them” mentality. Finally, we must build coalitions with all people of good will to ensure fairness for all, regardless of race, religion, sex, or sexual orientation.

LESSONS LEARNED

Patience. Yes, patience is a virtue. This is true in politics, business, and personal relations. I may want to see rapid change, but circumstances and conditions that have existed a long time will take a long time to change—especially if we want that change to be sustainable. I have learned that patience and passion can live in the same person without conflict.

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BAKER BOTTS LLP

BASF CORPORATION

Joe Robert Caldwell, Jr. Partner

Erika M. Peterman Vice President-Global Marketing, Pigments & Performance Additives

OUR GREATEST CHALLENGE

Too often African Americans are required to have stronger credentials than non-African Americans to get the same opportunities and to prove to colleagues and adversaries alike their capability, while facing the steady drumbeat of unconscious bias. In my view, institutionalized unconscious bias against African Americans in business is the strongest barrier to success we face.

GIVING BACK

None of us in the African-American community has succeeded without standing on the shoulders of those who preceded us. Giving back is the opportunity to say, “Thank you.” I have served in state, local, and federal governments; tried discrimination cases for the NAACP Legal Defense Fund and Washington Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights; served as chair of the board of Big Brothers Big Sisters of the National Capital Area, and as a Big Brother myself; served on panels of organizations speaking to and mentoring young African-American lawyers and law students about advancing their careers; and have been active in Democratic politics as chair of the National Lawyers Council of the DNC.

LESSONS LEARNED

There undoubtedly is a way to achieve your objective. If you do not achieve your objective with your first effort, stick with it and find another way. It will happen if you persist.

HOW I MOTIVATE OTHERS

To motivate others, I create an environment of openness, trust, confidence, and cooperation. This allows the whole team to talk openly about any topic. Showing an interest in the individual contributions of team members and focusing on driving results via employee empowerment are also crucial to motivating people.

LESSONS LEARNED

Above all else, keep your values intact. If you do not come to work every day and do the absolute best you can to make a positive difference in your business and work environment, you will eventually not be able to sleep at night. Be courageous, state your opinion and be steadfast in what you believe during difficult situations. In business, most topics are really not personal, and it is the diversity of perspectives that makes all business teams stronger.

CAREER ADVICE

Being a productive member of our workforce means you have earned your place in the business community. Be proud and remain creative. The perspective you bring to the table will be easily recognized through your contributions. As long as you enjoy what you do and continue to both work hard and play hard, people will notice.

BAKER, DONELSON, BEARMAN, CALDWELL & BERKOWITZ, PC Charles K. Grant, Shareholder OUR GREATEST CHALLENGE

A public education system that all too often fails to adequately educate children so that they can transcend poverty and the hopelessness that comes with it. While I have seen and been inspired by many success stories (including those of former felons who have rebuilt their lives), I also have seen the hopelessness of children and young people who simply do not believe they can change their circumstances. That is why I am such a staunch believer in ensuring educational and mentoring opportunities.

GIVING BACK

I am the board chair for Project Reflect, which sponsors Smithson-Craighead Academy, Nashville’s first charter school for low-income, at-risk children, over 95% of whom are black. In order for all of our children to have a chance to succeed, they must have strong educational options. My pro bono work has focused heavily on helping former felons regain the franchise through litigation and lobbying our state legislature. Disenfranchisement has had a particular impact on the black male population. I also work to further minority opportunities in the legal profession through my service on the Nashville Bar Association Board, through my service on our firm’s diversity and recruiting committees, and through mentoring. On December 6, 2013, I was installed as the first AfricanAmerican president of the Nashville Bar Association since its inception in 1831. So many have helped me along my journey, giving back is of the utmost importance to me.

CAREER ADVICE

Work very hard. Seek good mentors and learn from them. Maintain your integrity. And show appreciation to those who help you along the way (especially your secretary, if you are lucky enough to have a great one).

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KAISER PERMANENTE

Ronald L. Copeland, MD, FACS Senior Vice President, Chief Diversity & Inclusion Officer WHO INSPIRES ME

I am most inspired by people, famous or common, who, based on a relentless commitment to improve the human condition, demonstrate the ability to succeed against amazing odds, by virtue of their faith, resilience, personal courage, and tireless work ethic.

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AIO WIRELESS

ANTI-RACIST ALLIANCE Mary Pender Greene Anti-Racist Cofounder OUR GREATEST MOMENT

Teresa Ward-Maupin Director of Digital Experience WHAT I’VE LEARNED

I try to approach all business challenges with an entrepreneurial spirit. This enables me to come up with unique solutions that lead to the transformation of existing operations, and in some cases, the formation of impactful new business units. Along the way, I’ve learned the following:

The most important lesson I’ve learned in my career is the value of networking and the sense of community. We are at our greatest moment when we work together and help each other. People need people. A united and organized front is powerful and absolutely necessary. I feel helping and mentoring others is my job. It is how I give back. It is my life. There was a time when I thought racism was merely individual mean-spirited acts. Through my work with the Anti-Racist Alliance of New York, I have realized the structural and institutional nature of racism. I give back to the African-American community by educating and facilitating an understanding of structural racism. In collaboration with other organizations, the Anti-Racist Alliance hosts “Undoing Racism” workshops on a regular basis.

FACING THE CHALLENGE

The greatest challenge facing the African-American community today may be the focus on individualism and the resulting loss of a sense of community and collectivism. Trauma, including historical trauma, is another challenge. To make a difference in our African-American communities, we need to understand the impact of historical trauma on the African-American community, face the reality of it, and develop strategies to address these issues. Of course, as we at the Anti-Racist Alliance believe, organizing is the first step. “Let the healing begin.”

∫ It’s okay to make mistakes as long as you use them to build future successes. By setting this example, I can empower others to try new things and not be afraid of failing. This freedom to take smart risks will enable them to achieve greater success in the long run.

AVIS BUDGET GROUP, INC.

∫ How to say “no” and when to say “yes.” I am also trying to give my personal objectives the same priority I give my career objectives. Making sure that I allow myself time to support both is the key. Maintaining this balance is easier said than done, but I’ve made some great improvements in achieving this over the last 10 years.

MY INSPIRATION

∫ There are very few obstacles you can’t overcome if you are able to conquer your fear of the unknown.

BEST CAREER ADVICE

Seek out opportunities and always try to be the go-to person that others think of first when faced with a challenge. Never turn down an assignment just because it doesn’t align with your job description. And always be willing to take a special assignment—it can be a great way to learn and get exposure.

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Michael K. Tucker, Executive Vice President, General Counsel & Chief Compliance Officer I am inspired by people who struggle to overcome significant challenges in their lives with integrity—and then, use their success to pull others along. These include not only famous historical figures like Gandhi, King, and Mandela, but also people I know personally who have helped to motivate me in dealing with my personal challenges and inspired me to pay their support forward in assisting others—people like Charisse Lillie (President, Comcast Foundation), Jim Breedlove (General Counsel, Praxair, Inc.), and Winston Lowe (Managing Partner, Lowe & Associates).

HOW I MOTIVATE OTHERS

First, I use my best efforts to lead and motivate by example, which means setting and striving to achieve my own personal and professional goals. Second, I make time to listen, share my experiences, and offer a new perspective on the challenges faced by others.

LESSONS LEARNED

Integrity is the most important value you can have in business. Though maintaining your personal or professional integrity may be difficult at times—and sometimes may even cost you or your company money—the advantages of acting with, and having a reputation for, integrity will dwarf the few times when it may conflict with your goals. And the cost of repairing a damaged reputation is often much higher than the shortsighted gain associated with a breach of integrity.

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CACI INTERNATIONAL INC.

BETTER HOMES AND GARDENS REAL ESTATE Mark Foreman Senior Vice President Business Services and Operations MY GREATEST STRENGTH

Paul G. Patton, Colonel, USAF (Ret.) Senior Vice President MY INSPIRATION

My mother convinced me that I could be anything I wanted to be if I was willing to work for it. She would say shoot for the stars and even if you come up short, you can get to the moon. I remember her telling me as a child that I was going to go to college before I really knew what college was. Going to college was quite a stretch for a kid from the “hood” but she insisted that I was going and indeed, I went. She inculcated her strong work ethic in me and it has stayed with me all of my life. Despite the ill treatment she frequently received as a black woman and a single parent, she taught and motivated me to treat all people with respect, regardless of who they actually were or thought they were. I attribute my interpersonal skills in large part to her mentoring in this area.

HOW I MOTIVATE OTHERS

I frequently start with my own story: If a black kid, the son of a janitor, who was raised in the “hood” in a single parent family, can do the things I have been blessed to do, surely you can excel. I place a high value on mentorship and use my leadership skills to mentor and motivate others. I encourage them to place a high value on academic achievement, stress the importance of hard work, and exhort them to exploit their areas of excellence. We are all good at something and we need to capitalize on our assets. I also stress the need for and value of being passionate about what you do. I remember my mother’s admonition that whatever you do, strive to be the best at it whether you are a garbage collector or a heart surgeon.

CAREER ADVICE

The most important job in the world is the one you have now. It is important to plan for the future and take the actions that will position you to progress—additional education, certifications, etc.—but no matter how well you prepare for the future, if you fail to excel at the job you have now, you may forfeit your opportunities to progress.

Since I started in the real estate business in 1987, I have had the opportunity to gain experience in almost every facet of the industry, including serving in volunteer leadership positions for the local, state and National Association of Realtors. This has served to help me better understand the needs of our customers and identify ways to improve the level and quality of service that we provide to help agents grow their businesses.

MY INSPIRATION

My parents have always been the individuals who have inspired me the most. Both are immigrants to this country, with limited formal education but an unbelievable work ethic. Despite the fact that they did not attend college, my parents worked very hard to ensure that all of their seven children would and did obtain a college education.

HOW I MOTIVATE OTHERS

I have always felt that if I work hard enough I can achieve anything, and I try to help others understand the same for themselves. I focus on listening to others, giving them opportunities to stretch their skills, and being their biggest supporter when an opportunity arises. Above all else, their work reflects who they are and that is the bottom line for all of us.

BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD OF MICHIGAN Ronald Wood Vice President, Underwriting MY GREATEST STRENGTH

I am pretty good at building strong relationships with others, which is critical in business. No one person can do it alone and working in teams can produce better outcomes. I love bringing people together who have different thoughts and ideas that I alone may not have. The synergy that a team approach generates can yield some very positive fruit.

GIVING BACK

I am a cofounder of the Organization of Black Alumni at my alma mater, Wayne State University. Through this organization, we developed mentoring programs and scholarship opportunities for young men and women pursuing educational opportunities at the university. I am also a strong supporter of the African American Employee Resource Network called Blue ACTS (African Ancestry Committed to Success) at Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan. My role as an ambassador and advisor to ERN leadership is not only supportive, but also very rewarding and energizing for me personally.

CAREER ADVICE

My advice to young men and women starting their careers is to work hard, listen carefully, ask questions, be respectful and welcoming of everyone’s thoughts and ideas, and don’t be timid about expressing yourself.

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COMED

CINCINNATI CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL MEDICAL CENTER Leslie Ayensu-Coker, MD, Director, Pediatric & Adolescent Gynecology Fellowship Program Director, Oncofertility Program Assistant Professor, Division of Pediatric & Adolescent Gynecology, Department of Obstetrics/Gynecology, Pediatrics and Surgery GIVING BACK

Kevin B. Brookins, Senior Vice President of Strategy and Administration MY GREATEST STRENGTH

My greatest strength is my versatility. I believe this has afforded me the opportunity to perform in diverse roles throughout my career. I am a broad, long-term thinker who also understands the details of today. I have a combination of technical and business backgrounds—my college education includes a BS in electrical engineering and an MBA. My work experience has been similarly diverse. I have led teams in engineering, construction and maintenance, and operations, as well as merger integration, customer service, strategy, communications, and marketing. My varied education and work experience also helps me relate to people of many different backgrounds.

I co-lead medical mission trips to Ethiopia and Ghana where specialized care is not readily accessible. Being of Ghanaian descent, this is a special way for me to give back. My division is collaborating with local doctors in Ghana to develop a pediatric and adolescent gynecology center, as there is a lack of medical care for young girls until they become pregnant. Locally, I focus on the prevention of STDs, pregnancy, and infertility to reduce the health disparities in our community. I want black female adolescents to know that I encourage and support them. I make myself available to all of my patients outside of the office in order to cultivate trust and reinforce our clinic discussions.

LESSONS LEARNED

The most important lessons I have learned in the course of my career are (1) to define myself according to my passions and beliefs, and (2) to push myself beyond my comfort zone. I have grown tremendously from seeing many challenging experiences through to completion.

CAREER ADVICE

Identify a mentor as early as possible and know that a mentor does not need to be of the same ethnicity or gender. A mentor should be someone who shares similar values and has qualities worth emulating. Many times, the best mentor is one who comes about through a natural working relationship in an area of mutual interest.

CHRISTIAN AND SMALL LLP Kenneth O. Simon, Partner, Executive Committee

MY INSPIRATION

Many people have been role models for me in different ways, including my parents and members of my extended family who motivated me to get a good education, use sound and principled judgment, and treat people well. In terms of civic leaders, Thurgood Marshall has been inspirational for me. Most refer to him as the first black associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. But most important, Thurgood Marshall was the principal architect of the legal strategy and the leader of the team that ended segregation in the United States, well before he wore a robe. In fact, he argued more cases before the U.S. Supreme Court than anyone else in history and won 29 of 32 cases. My definition of a good leader is someone who can get people to accomplish something extraordinary and Justice Marshall certainly meets that definition. I vividly remember watching his response to a question at the news conference that announced his retirement on how he wanted to be remembered. He said that he wanted to be remembered this way: “That he did what he could with what he had.” This is such a simple and succinct statement, particularly from and for such a giant of a leader. But, I can’t think of a better tribute. And I reflect on that statement quite often.

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LESSONS LEARNED

I’ve learned that the tools of reason, analysis, and persuasion are the way forward. Early in my career at University of South Alabama, the debate coach invited me to join the team. I was terrible—in fact, I was awful. But I stayed with it and my two years of struggle gave me the fundamental tools of lawyering. Debate taught me how analysis, reason, and persuasion could be used to serve the greater good. And it created the expectation that people who possessed these skills would in fact use them in service to the community. Today, I find that reason, analysis and persuasion are useful in resolving disputes— whether through litigation or mediation. They serve, along with faith, as the foundation of success in every area of my life.

CAREER ADVICE

On my desk, where I see it every day, is a note that says, “Be Aware. Understand. Take Action.” This is my advice to anyone. I tell young people that success means realizing your potential and I share with them my own guiding principles. Be Aware: Set goals and have a sense of mission and purpose. Have a strategy, but recognize the importance of adapting that strategy as life has a way of throwing the occasional curveball. Have a source of inspiration—for me it was my mother and my English 101 professor. Understand: Develop a value system, a means of determining right from wrong and gauging conduct. And understand the importance of self-esteem and self-confidence. Take Action: Take initiative—growing up and reaching maturity happens when we become self-starters. Remember that we must serve others. Public service is part of the glue that holds our society together. Recognize that every one of us has the power to make a difference through our time or talent.

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BLA CK HI S TOR Y M ONT H

SODEXO

Vivian Smith-Del Toro Vice President of Operations HOW I LEAD

I believe that as a leader you must first be motivated to lead. Then, you must support your team by showing respect, giving them opportunities to be responsible and accountable, praising effort, creating and celebrating success, communicating clearly and frequently, involving them in decision-making, getting to know them, building a diverse team, and supporting a healthy work/life balance.

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DUANE MORRIS LLP

ACCENTURE

Nolan N. Atkinson, Jr. Partner and Chief Diversity Officer MY INSPIRATION

I’m inspired by anyone who has overcome great adversity in fighting for equal justice. Their stories have motivated me to strive to improve myself and to work to better the lives of others—especially those who have talent, but need instruction and guidance as they enter adult life.

GIVING BACK

I give back by mentoring and sponsoring AfricanAmerican talent of the next generation. As a young lawyer, I had the good fortune of having several mentors and sponsors who guided me in overcoming barriers to building a successful law practice. Having many senior colleagues and friends, whom I respected greatly, guide and advocate for me was invaluable. Helping the next generation find opportunities for success is a major focus for me.

CAREER ADVICE

Life is a marathon. There will be “ups and downs.” Try and maintain a steady and positive attitude each day.

CORE NATIONAL FOUNDATION FOR WOMEN & FAMILIES, INC. Chandra Diggs Small President and CEO MY GREATEST STRENGTH

My greatest strength is the ability to discern talent in others. I pride myself on recognizing that talent, and planning programs that are mutually beneficial to the team and the business.

OUR GREATEST CHALLENGE

The greatest issue facing the African-American community today is the lack of commitment to nurturing and growing strong families. Family is the foundation of everything we do as humans. A solid family support system builds confidence and strengthens our young people to become leaders in the community and around the world.

GIVING BACK

I’ve always had a heart for low-income women and the families they support. I started helping poor families when I was ten years old by feeding and bathing neighborhood kids that had no running water in their home. My heart hurts for people when I see them hurting—and I have to take action.

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Martin William Rodgers Managing Director MY INSPIRATION

I often say that I came to Washington, D.C. to work for my heroes and sheroes (to borrow a term from Dr. Johnetta Cole), and I was honored to work for two amazing leaders: Dr. Marian Wright Edelman and Senator Harris Wofford. Both are legends of the civil rights movement, having worked with the Kennedys and Martin and Medgar, and they have dedicated their whole lives to social justice, to education and children…to the idea that people—especially young people—can change the world. They have been a part of the struggle and been fighting for ideas and for ideals for over 40 years. These inspiring individuals have taught me that who gets credit doesn’t matter, that the struggle is hard but necessary, and that in the end (as Martin King paraphrased Theodore Parker) “the arc of the moral universe is long but it bends toward justice.” So, in both small and big ways, I hope to “bend the arc” and be part of the struggle—from helping to create Americorps to working to turn the MLK, Jr. Day into a National Day of Service, and from serving the poor on Native American reservations and in inner-cities to serving on nonprofit boards, to helping large, nonprofit enterprises become highperformers and to advancing inclusion and diversity and corporate citizenship at Accenture and beyond.

I STRIVE TO INSPIRE OTHERS

By being myself, by being committed to the people I mentor and motivate, and to the ideas and ideals that inspire me,and by believing—without question—in the ability and responsibility of each of us to create positive change for our families, for our clients, for our communities, and throughout the world.


B LA CK HI S TOR Y M ONT H

EY

U.S. FISH & WILDLIFE SERVICE Hannibal Bolton, Assistant Director– Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Programs (WSFR) MY INSPIRATION

My father. My dad helped me expand my world view, and see the world differently. His talks helped me learn to be more malleable and open to guidance. That fundamental support helped me get to college and get ahead in my career. In college, the dean of the school of agriculture guided me through my educational career and propelled me toward my career goals. My first employer also saw my openness and willingness to be guided, and helped me ascend the career ladder.

GIVING BACK

Charles K. Marful Director, Canada’s Talent Team–Assurance GIVING BACK

Working with the BBPA (Black Business and Professionals Association), our firm has supported a leadership program for African-Canadian high school students for several years, and I have always participated in that. I speak at churches about career and education issues that concern young people. I counsel many college and high school students, and their parents, on a regular basis. And I participate in many community panel discussions on education and career issues.

LESSONS LEARNED

One of the most important lessons I’ve learned is to consider what I have been asked to do as a privilege, and to do the best job I can. I try to get other people’s input and advice in resolving issues. Most people are willing to assist when asked. And including their advice usually results in better solutions.

CAREER ADVICE

Dare to dream. Envision how you can contribute and serve. Obtain all the technical and professional skills relevant to your career. A champion or mentor is always helpful. Your credibility will surpass your skills. Your spouse will influence your career far more than you might imagine. And paying attention to the last three is as important as the first two.

I give back to the African-American community through my fraternity, Kappa Alpha Psi, and have been doing so for 45 years. I work with young African-American men, teaching them to work with community elders, family, and mentors to be responsible and accountable to themselves and our community. My fraternity also offers numerous programs to help teenage boys and young men succeed, including Guide Right and Kappa Kamp. Each of these programs provides mentorship and guidance in STEM careers. Kappa Kamp incorporates a weeklong opportunity in the outdoors to learn about science, technology, and survival. I currently serve as chairman of my chapter’s scholarship endowment. Each year, we sponsor 10 young men who have recently graduated and are attending college. Each award recipient gets $2,000 a year for four years.

LESSONS LEARNED

There is one lesson I live by: Responsibility lies totally with me. I can’t wait for or depend on someone else to do things for me. Whether I succeed or fail, it is my responsibility to give it my best.

FISH & RICHARDSON Taj Clayton, Attorney MY GREATEST STRENGTH

While I take pride in my work ethic, communication skills, and reasoning ability, my greatest strength is my ability to exercise good judgment. In the legal profession, and in life, good judgment is an invaluable asset that enables those who have it to maximize opportunities and minimize problems. As a lawyer, major corporations rely on my judgment when the stakes are extremely high. In many instances, I have to make difficult decisions in the absence of perfect information, while under tough time constraints and intense pressure. Good judgment allows me to make sound decisions which lead to positive results for my clients on a consistent basis. This engenders a significant amount of trust, which is essential to healthy and enduring attorney-client relationships.

OUR GREATEST CHALLENGE

From my perspective, the greatest issue facing the African-American community today is our society’s collective inability to truly understand the complex, systemic issues facing black Americans with depth and nuance. The problems facing our community today are vast and varied. Some of the problems I face as a black professional in corporate America are very different from the problems I faced as a black teenager growing up in a working class community, and different from many of the problems facing black women on a regular basis. Too often, I hear people misdiagnose, under-diagnose, and oversimplify what these problems are. There are no silver bullets. Instead, we all need to develop a more comprehensive and thorough understanding of what these issues are and take personal accountability for fixing them in rational and thoughtful ways on both macro and micro levels.

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ELI LILLY AND COMPANY

Monique Hunt McWilliams, Chief Diversity Officer OUR GREATEST ISSUE

One of the greatest issues facing the African American community today is that we need to understand our greatness and potential. It’s easy to forget our history and the challenges those before us faced. We have to constantly reflect on that. We now have generations of young people who’ve not experienced those tough times, so it’s hard for them to understand that even when you’re in the middle of something challenging, you don’t give up. Young people have to understand that there is a whole history of people—our ancestors—who worked through something even more difficult. Our ancestors didn’t stop. And we can’t stop now.

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BURR & FORMAN LLP

GIBBONS P.C.

Kermit Kendrick Partner and Diversity Committee Chair

Robert Johnson Corporate Department Associate

WHAT I’VE LEARNED

MY GREATEST STRENGTH

The most important lesson I’ve learned in my career is that there are no short cuts. One of the most inspirational books I’ve ever read is Outliers by Malcom Gladwell. In chapter two, he talks about the “10,000 hour rule” that essentially says it takes 10,000 hours to be proficient in a certain field. “There are no shortcuts” to becoming good at anything. I have found this to be especially true in the practice of law. For me, there is really no other career path that allows me to do the things that I do as a litigator. Every time I stand in front of a judge or jury and make an argument on behalf my client, I know I am in the right profession. Some of the best advice I’ve ever been given, and which still holds true today is: “Whatever career you choose Be All In. Do your job as if there is no plan B.”

MAINTAINING BALANCE

Everyone perceives “balance” differently. Am I there for my children? Am I there for my wife? Am I able to care for my aging mother? Am I spending time with the network of friends and family that I have developed over the course of my life? I not only ask myself these questions, I also ask the people in my life. So far the answer is yes. If someone wants to be balanced in his or her career and personal life, it has to be done intentionally, vigilantly, and attentively.

My work ethic is my greatest strength. A strong work ethic can help an individual overcome any disadvantages or deficiencies. In my profession, I am confronted with complex issues that aren’t easily understandable at first impression. However, my willingness to spend the time and effort it takes to decipher and resolve these issues is essential to the successful practice of corporate law. It has helped me advance in my career.

OUR GREATEST CHALLENGE

There are several issues that negatively affect the progress of African Americans, including unemployment, single parent homes, and the adherence of our impressionable youth to negative stereotypes portrayed in pop culture. However, the most critical issue, in my opinion, is the lack of focus on education by those in lower socioeconomic circumstances. Education is one of the most important tools for social advancement.

CAREER ADVICE

For those embarking on careers as corporate attorneys, I would suggest they choose a specialty area within the general corporate law practice. Once they have selected a specialty area, the next step is to develop a relationship with a partner who also specializes in that practice area, in order to learn the nuances particular to that specialty.

ACE HARDWARE FOUNDATION Jimmy Alexander Senior Vice President, Human Resources, Communications WHAT I’VE LEARNED

My parents inspired me with their tremendous work ethic. They both had low paying jobs but were tremendous savers. They motivated me to be a good person, and to treat people like you want to be treated, and help pull someone up with you. I also learned not to take myself too seriously. It’s all about people, or the next person, it’s not about me. I also, as they say, try not to sweat the small stuff. I’ve learned that your personal integrity is extremely important. Be humble, be honest, and be respectful. We are all people with diverse ideas, and we should respect that.

ON MOTIVATION

I motivate others by developing a strong level of trust, and building strong relationships, while providing clarity and direction. I make sure to establish clear objectives and goals with input from the team. The teams are empowered to drive results. I think my greatest strength is my ability to communicate and connect with people on all levels. This involves the ability to be a good listener, and understand people on a personal level.

BEST CAREER ADVICE

Have patience. Learn as much as you can in any role that you have. Be willing to take a couple of risks as it relates to promotional opportunities early in your career. Integrity, commitment, and humility are important keys to growth in a career.

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PEPCO HOLDINGS, INC. (PHI)

Kenneth J. Parker Senior Vice President of Government Affairs & Corporate Citizenship MY PERSONAL WISDOM

I wake up each day knowing that today is a blessing—a precious kind of moment. I look back at this journey and think, “Who have I helped along the way?” I think harder about things like: Is the house in order? Is my family secure? If today were my end, did I try to make a difference? What would people say? Those questions drive my day.

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GREENBERG TRAURIG

GIRLS INC.

Ernest LaMont Greer Vice President; Atlanta Managing Shareholder BEST CAREER ADVICE

True success requires hard work and dedication, but it also requires passion. Without passion for what you do and strive to be, you will not be happy. Set your sights high and never underestimate your own ability to achieve your goals. And, finally, be yourself—be successful on your terms and always feel comfortable letting those around you know who you are and what you are about. Being unique and being comfortable is entrepreneurially relevant. I am motivated and driven by my passions in life: family, work and community. I am passionate about my work and enjoy coming into the office every day knowing that I work with great entrepreneurial individuals. Likewise, I am with my wife and two daughters, and always enjoy spending time with them. At the same time, I am passionate about community and love to invest time and effort in making the world a better place. Having three passions, all of which are at your fingertips, creates challenges to maintaining a balance. It is very difficult and I struggle with that every day.

ADDING LIFE VALUE

Everyone can add value, and I believe that each day presents an opportunity for me to help people understand and communicate that value in their lives. I make a personal effort to ensure that any role I play—whether as a husband, father, business professional, or community steward—is focused on motivating others to live their dreams. And more important, I do whatever I can to support their dreams.

INGERSOLL RAND Tony Norwood Vice President—Human Resources Power Tools ON MOTIVATION

For teams I lead, I attempt to set clear goals; provide honest feedback; reward good performance; followthrough on consequences; and actively engage in their professional development. For colleagues and peers, I try to give as much as I receive. I also believe in encouraging words when warranted and transparency to build trust. The greatest strength you can bring to a business is to value the perspectives of colleagues and stakeholders. My belief is that the best solutions can come from building upon ideas that come from people who are closest to a situation. A couple of principles I require my teams to live by are ∆ speak up and advocate for your point of view; and ∆ suspend assumptions and really seek to understand the other person’s point of view. I try to be a good listener, and I ask my team to do the same.

WHAT I’VE LEARNED

Bernice Humphrey Associate Director, Program and Training Services COMMUNITY AND LEGACY

I think one of the most important issues facing the African American community today is health—and I’m not talking just about our bodies, but our minds and spirits as well. We do so many things that are destructive to us as individuals and as a community, even while we put so much effort into looking good or a certain way. How one respects and appreciates oneself is the foundation of our health—and issues that we at Girls Inc. address with girls in numerous ways, through programming in areas such as health and sexuality and media literacy, and by making sure that our staff and volunteers can be effective mentors and role models for girls. I work with a great team of folks to use many strategies to give and reinforce positive experiences and messages to girls about who they are, who they can be, and what they are capable of doing.

WHAT INSPIRES ME

Professionally, I’m inspired by the girls that Girls Inc. serves to provide our affiliates with the best, most relevant programming to address the challenges today’s girls and young women are facing as they pave their way to productive adulthood. These girls have dreams and often don’t have the support or means to realize their potential. This is a lot of what the Girls Inc. experience provides. Personally, and at the risk of sounding cliché, my parents inspired me to make the most of my talents and to not make excuses. Like many other baby boomer parents— especially black parents—they sacrificed a great deal to make sure that I could grow up safe and achieve more than they had dreamed possible for themselves.

“Build trust through consistency. Follow through on the things you say you are going to do.” In that vein, the best career advice I could give anyone is to understand that others have all the say when it comes to your reputation. It is important to treat everyone with respect—the security guard, the CEO, and everyone else matters. You must consistently deliver results. Last, but not least, be an expert at trust building. You must excel in building trust with your teams, peers, and bosses. January/February 2014

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ZIONS BANK

KAYE SCHOLER LLP

Chad D. Witcher Vice President, Department Portfolio Manager of the National Real Estate Group MY INSPIRATION

My dad, Billy R. Witcher, inspires me to build on his legacy of achievement. Thinking about his humble beginnings as the son of a sharecropper, and about what he has accomplished in his life, has always inspired me to give my best and taught me what it means to be an honorable man and a good father. Along with being married to my mom for 43 years (and still going strong), he had an honorable career in the United States Air Force, put my mom through nursing school, and is active in his church and community. He joins with my mom in always preaching the importance of education. Their sacrifices—so that I could focus on my education and be the first in my family to graduate from a university— have been the difference in my life. My dad’s example has driven me to capitalize on the opportunities that have come my way.

LESSONS LEARNED

Ambition is a poor substitute for honesty, integrity, and a solid work ethic; people without the latter qualities will not succeed in the long run.

CAREER ADVICE

First, follow your passion—life is too short to spend most of it doing something you do not enjoy. Second, if you want to succeed, you cannot be afraid to fail—victory is often found on the bleeding edge. Third, never become so focused on your goal that you forget to enjoy the journey.

LEGG MASON GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT Dionne Spencer Vice President MY INSPIRATION

My mother has always inspired me to go beyond what is expected. She taught me at an early age to be a critical thinker—to listen, to question, and to be prepared for what is next. These skills have helped me achieve success in my career and my relationships.

GIVING BACK

I am honored to sit on the advisory board for the Earl Graves Honors Program at Morgan State University. As a member of the board, I support the program’s mission of providing a well-integrated, rigorous course of study with both academic and experiential components that prepare students to reach their potential as leaders in outstanding organizations. Being on the board also has provided me opportunities to speak to African-American youth from the perspective of an African-American woman in a corporate leadership role. I encourage them to stay focused on obtaining a good education. I have also mentored high school and college students to help them achieve their short-term and long-term goals.

LESSONS LEARNED

The most valuable lesson I have learned in the course of my career is the importance of being a person of integrity. In 2011, I was honored to receive the Legg Mason Chairman Award in recognition of my professional contributions.

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Sheila S. Boston, Partner, Product Liability; Member and former Chair, Recruitment and Diversity Committees; Co-Chair, Pro Bono Committee ON LEADERSHIP AND MOTIVATION

I sincerely enjoy leading teams, because it gives me the opportunity to motivate others. I do not hunger for the power to manipulate others for my own personal gain. Rather, I strive to be a leader by engaging and challenging team members to become the best they can be and encouraging them to excel in their particular roles, so that the whole may be stronger and more prosperous. I have had the pleasure and good fortune to serve in many different leadership positions during my career as an attorney, I have found that the best way to motivate people is simply to exhibit a sincere respect for them. Respect is only a seven-letter word, but includes so much—listening to people, encouraging them when they are frustrated or down, offering constructive criticism, teaching others, appreciating their strengths and contributions, and refusing to allow personal biases to impact one's treatment of others. Respect also encompasses recognizing that no one person is better than another. Each one of us has strengths and weaknesses; despite differences, all of us have something valuable to contribute to the whole. Hence, one who is a committed motivator respects the time and efforts of others and will roll up his/her own sleeves in order to demonstrate true commitment and willingness to give as much as, if not more than, that which they are motivating others to do. This is my leadership philosophy, and I try to embody that model. As a “the glass is half full” kind of person, I have been blessed with and try to exhibit many of the most important intangible aspects of life—such as joy, peace, and love—that are infectious and motivate others in profound ways to work hard, exude confidence, treat others with respect, and give their best in the workplace.


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MICHELIN NORTH AMERICA

PRAXAIR

Herb Johnson, Jr. Vice President/Chief Diversity Officer MY INSPIRATION

Beyond my parents, Martin Luther King, Jr. continues to motivate me to fight for the least among us.

OUR GREATEST CHALLENGE

Black-on-black crime, followed closely by undervaluing the power of an education.

GIVING BACK

First, I give back through my church. Then, by volunteering with the UNCF, the United Way’s African American Leadership Council, and other organizations. I also tutor a fourth-grade African-American boy at a local Title 1 public elementary school.

Vanessa Abrahams-John Global Director, Diversity, Inclusion, Talent Acquisition

LESSONS LEARNED

MY INSPIRATION

Success is not measured by how smart you are, or your position. But, by how you respect people and value the diverse perspectives of others.

LINCOLN FINANCIAL GROUP Karla Munden Senior Vice President, Chief Audit Executive MY GREATEST STRENGTH

I am inspired by leaders who are not motivated by fame or fortune, but by an intrinsic desire to seek equality and freedom for all, regardless of personal sacrifice. In my life, Nelson Mandela is the greatest example. This is a leader, who in the face of adversity, and decades of oppression and imprisonment, responded with forgiveness, reconciliation, and love to ensure that freedom and equality were achievable for all people in his country, not just his own community. Mandela has helped me understand that the success of a country, or even a corporation, is built upon a foundation of ensuring diverse groups have equal opportunities and access. This ideal of advancing an inclusive environment, in which all people can thrive and succeed, is what has driven me throughout my career.

My greatest strengths are persistence and strategic thinking. I don’t give up. I always plan for multiple scenarios and outcomes. If Plan A does not work, I don’t panic. I have another plan. This allows me to be very rational and not react emotionally. This philosophy goes back to my college years at William & Mary. It was a very challenging academic environment, and I was surrounded by a very intelligent peer group. I learned the importance of strategic planning. Additionally, as a woman in the Navy, this lesson was reinforced.

GIVING BACK

GIVING BACK

FINDING BALANCE

I consider it both a privilege and a responsibility to give back to my community. I serve on two not-for-profit boards that focus on providing educational opportunities to youth in urban communities. Education, in my view, is the one thing that levels the playing field when it comes to opportunities to be successful.

I serve on the boards of several not-for-profit organizations. I also take advantage of opportunities to speak with African-American students of all ages about my experience in corporate America. I like to provide guidance and share resume practices and interview skills with the older students. Additionally, my family and I donate school supplies, clothes, and other items to those in need. Giving back is important to me, because I know I am not where I am today based solely on my own merit. Many people have positively impacted my life and my career, and I hope to do that in some small way for someone else. This “pay it forward” mentality is something I try to pass down to my daughters.

CAREER ADVICE

Maintaining balance is critical to achieving a successful career and living a happy life. I focus on three areas: Finding mental balance through regular spiritual devotion and exercise in my faith community; devoting at least one day each week to being completely present with my family; and seeking physical balance through a healthy diet and regular exercise.

Be dedicated to your craft. I also share the same advice my parents gave me, “No matter what you choose to do, be the best.” However, it’s important to remember that there is a price to be paid to be the best, and you must be prepared to make sacrifices.

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AMERICAN EXPRESS

PLAY-PLACE FOR AUTISTIC CHILDREN Shell Jones President and Founder MY INSPIRATION

Maya Angelou has always been my inspiration! She epitomizes the art of eloquence. Her ability to sculpt her thoughts and experiences with such precision, detail, and affect has been the cornerstone of my business purpose, programming, and design. I aim to impact the world with the same shine through service and creativity.

Suzan B. Kereere Senior Vice President & General Manager, National Client Group WHO INSPIRES ME

I am deeply inspired by remarkable people like Harriet Tubman, whose extraordinary courage and ability allowed her to work with other remarkable human beings (specifically white women). Together, they created the “Underground Railroad,” a network of escape routes and safe houses along which Ms. Tubman personally led upwards of three hundred slaves from the American South to freedom. The unsung heroes of this extraordinary work were the white women who, at great personal sacrifice, opened their homes as “stations” or safe houses. This story is significant in at least one respect: When our humanity transcends our differences, we accomplish extraordinary things together.

LESSONS LEARNED

The most important lesson I have learned in the course of my career is projection: of confidence, intelligence, and perseverance. In order to sell your vision, you have to radiate passion, leadership, and entrepreneurial spirit. Those are magnets of success.

CAREER ADVICE

My advice to someone just beginning his or her career is to be extra thorough, be inquisitive about everything, and be patient. The key: “Don’t fit in, stand out.”

NEWELL RUBBERMAID INC. Mark W. Johnson Vice President of Legal Affairs, Home Solutions, Government Affairs and Latin America

GIVING BACK

I am very proud of my role as mentor to a lot of young women of African descent who currently attend numerous colleges and universities around the United States. The sponsoring organization for this mentoring activity, Zawadi, was founded in 2002 by a very close childhood friend of mine, Dr. Susan Mboya Kidero. Zawadi sponsors young women through college with the goal of creating strong women leaders for the future.

LESSONS LEARNED

I have learned two critical lessons during my career: First, in the context of a rapidly changing business environment, it is important to develop new skills constantly; and second, do not underestimate the value of creating and maintaining relationships. Relationships create the types of strategic partnerships that drive business success.

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LESSONS LEARNED

I have learned that effective leaders can communicate differing opinions without being disagreeable. I believe successful organizations foster environments that encourage constructive debate and finding creative solutions to problems. Skilled leaders can voice opposing perspectives in these environments while maintaining the respect and trust of their colleagues.

FINDING BALANCE

Focusing on my family helps me keep perspective. Maintaining balance is a constant objective for me. I believe you have to identify areas of your life that you want to make your priorities, and then work just as hard at succeeding in those areas as you do at succeeding in your professional life.

CAREER ADVICE

You are ultimately responsible for managing your own career path. Be aggressive in seeking out new challenges and learning opportunities. You have to be willing to venture outside your comfort zone to grow. I work at a company that is creating larger, more challenging roles for its employees. Taking on increased responsibility or tackling a more diverse scope of work can seem daunting, but it’s incredibly satisfying. Meet these opportunities head on.

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BOOZ ALLEN HAMILTON

Chris Foster Vice President MY GREATEST STRENGTH

Two strengths that I rely heavily on are my imagination and my curiosity. In my current role, I manage business activities and lead the development of innovative solutions for our clients. My ability to tap into my curious nature, never settle for the status quo, and challenge myself to reimagine the future helps me to achieve success in this position and in my career.

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WELLS FARGO

PRUDENTIAL FINANCIAL, INC.

Lisa Frison African American Segment Leader

Ronald K. Andrews, Vice President, Head of Human Resources, Prudential U.S. Businesses

OUR GREATEST CHALLENGE

MY INSPIRATION

Financial empowerment and advocacy. Much has been documented about the AfricanAmerican community’s increasing buying power juxtaposed with declining wealth. We have tremendous economic power and influence that doesn’t always make its way back to our communities and our own pockets. Through a combination of education and better decision making, we have an opportunity to harness that power and move increasingly along the continuum from being spenders to savers to owners to investors to philanthropists, and to claim more of an ownership stake in securing our financial future.

GIVING BACK

I’m blessed to be in a role and work for a company that allows me to give back every day by working with national partnerships and community organizations to provide financial education and guidance to the African-American community. This year, we created a national tour of The Kinsey Collection, showcasing African-American art and history. Additionally, I’m the board chair for KIPP Charlotte, a free open enrollment college preparatory charter school. I’ve served on the board for nearly six years in several capacities and have mentored two students at the school, because I believe strongly in our promise to open up a new future for our students by getting them to and through college.

LESSONS LEARNED

All of my history, experiences, and knowledge combine to give me a unique perspective. I have both a right and a responsibility to own my voice and use it responsibly, generously, and unapologetically.

As corny and clichéd as it may sound, I have to say my mom is my inspiration. What always inspires me about her is that she’s done so much with so little. Her grit and her tenacity to raise her family through all kinds of challenges are very remarkable. She raised three kids. She did it alone. And she got an education while doing it. She made clear value commitments about what she and we would and would not do. She worked hard and gave us amazing opportunities that have shaped how my siblings and I see the world and operate in it. On the flip side, I’ve also been motivated by the haters. I grew up in Newark, New Jersey, as a little black kid who attended suburban schools with people constantly telling me what I could not do. That really motivated me to succeed academically and athletically. My goal was to prove to them just how wrong they were. I took the positive examples that my mom exhibited at home and modeled them in my life outside of home. Today, I look at my kids and what they’ve accomplished in their lives for inspiration. I’m proud and humbled by the fact that all three of my children are Ivy League graduates—Columbia, Yale and the University of Pennsylvania. And, now my son is studying at Cornell Law. They make me want to do and be better.

GIVING BACK

Giving back to the community is important to me. That’s why I am board chair and head of the HR Committee at Integrity House, a New Jersey treatment facility that takes a therapeutic approach to helping people with all forms of addiction. Integrity House works with all people—rich, poor, and members of all races—but most of the residents are people of color. My work with Integrity House is part of my commitment to helping those guys get back on their feet and turn their lives around.

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA Pamela Petrease Felder Lecturer, Graduate School of Education, Higher Education Division MY GREATEST STRENGTH

One thing I find to be a constant part of my daily practice is reflection. Journal writing, meditation, and spending some quiet self-reflective time have been useful in supporting my interactions with colleagues and constituents.

MY INSPIRATION

Individuals who achieve their goals with odds against them. They motivate me to continue on my journey in search of strategies to best support people challenged by adversity.

GIVING BACK

I give back to the African-American community through my research and mentorship.

CAREER ADVICE

My advice would be to find a career where you will be able to love what you do. Opportunities will come and go. But doing what you love to do will transcend these opportunities in ways that will sustain you.

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SAP

RBC WEALTH MANAGEMENT

Pamela Chance Vice President, Consulting Services Delivery Operations

Wanda Brackins Head, RBC Wealth Management Global Diversity

MY INSPIRATION

My greatest strengths are collaboration and engagement. I can’t be effective in my role if I’m not collaborating with and engaging key stakeholders around the organization and in the community.

MY GREATEST STRENGTH

My parents are my greatest inspiration. They have been amazing role models—loving and motivating. When I was younger, they were constantly reminding me that I could achieve anything.

MY INSPIRATION

My father, who passed away a few years ago, was and continues to be my inspiration. He always instilled in me and my siblings the knowledge that we could accomplish anything we set our minds to.

GIVING BACK

I give back to the African-American community through community service activities, including the North Texas Food Bank and Attitudes and Attire (an organization dedicated to women seeking self-sufficiency). I serve on SAP’s Corporate Social Responsibility grant committee which makes decisions regarding the company’s charitable contributions. I also enjoy mentoring others.

CAREER ADVICE

Don’t shy away from opportunities that provide new and different challenges, regardless of the project scale. Every new challenge should be viewed as an opportunity to broaden your skill set. Also, be willing to make a move, whether it is to a new job, new organization, or even a new city or state. Opportunities for advancement won’t always be in your backyard.

LESSONS LEARNED

The most important lesson I have learned in the course of my career is that I need to continue to seek opportunities and experiences that will allow me to grow and make a positive impact on other people and on business success.

R.J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY

CAREER ADVICE

The advice I give young professionals is this: Find a profession that you enjoy and then be extraordinary—striving for success in everything you do. It is important to always do your best, build your network, get out of your comfort zone, and learn as much as you can.

Tommy L. Hickman Senior Vice President–Operations MY GREATEST STRENGTH

My ability to anticipate issues and initiate actions to prevent problems. It is too easy to wait on problems to occur and go into corrective mode. Anticipating and preventing problems is where you can benefit your business.

LESSONS LEARNED

The most important lesson I have learned is to be less focused functionally and more company driven. I spend as much time as I can learning about functions and departments in the company that do not report to me.

CAREER ADVICE

My advice would be to be patient and focus more on the effort at hand. It is less about the job and more about the effort. Irrespective of your job assignment, you want to be known as the difference maker. That is usually the person that anticipates and prevents problems. Not so much the person that fixes problems.

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STATE STREET CORPORATION Doreen Rigby Executive Vice President

Kenneth E. Coleman Senior Vice President and Chief Information Officer

MY GREATEST STRENGTH

I believe my greatest strength is my ability to understand and leverage team dynamics. Everything I do in the business arena requires collaboration and an ability to achieve together. Understanding what motivates the team and explaining each person’s contribution to the success of the whole is a critical factor in my success.

MY INSPIRATION

Michelle Obama inspires me. She is an African-American woman who came from a relatively humble background and used education and hard work to advance. In addition to this, she seems to understand how to balance family values and needs against external demands. I continuously strive to create a good balance between my family’s needs and the demands of my career.

LESSONS LEARNED

The most important lesson I have learned in my career is to work hard and be patient. I am a strong believer that even though African Americans might face many barriers as they try to advance their careers, their first focus should be excelling in their performance. The reason I point to this area is that high performance gives you the right to have the conversation about advancement. Gaps in performance can create a distraction from the real conversation and cause delays. That’s why my goal has always been to keep my performance at a level that gives me opportunities to discuss advancement with confidence.

ROBINS, KAPLAN, MILLER & CIRESI L.L.P. Yakub Hazzard Partner and Co-Chair, Entertainment and Media Litigation Group MY GREATEST STRENGTH

I consider my calm demeanor and level-headedness to be among my greatest strengths. Whether I am representing a client during an adversarial hearing, participating in a contentious meeting, or delivering a difficult message to a client, I try to remain focused on the issue at hand and offer practical solutions and approaches to the situation. These traits benefit my business on all levels, whether I’m interacting with my fellow partners, collaborating with firm management, or listening to and providing advice to my clients.

OUR GREATEST CHALLENGE

I believe that the plight of the African-American male is the greatest issue facing the African-American community today. As one of four brothers, and with two sons of my own, I have a vested interest in seeing that black men are given an opportunity to succeed in society, and that those of us who are fortunate enough to prosper actively mentor the next generation.

PERSONAL WISDOM

Over the years, I have learned that I can do almost anything if I devote the necessary time and energy. The only limits that exist are those that I impose on myself.

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GIVING BACK

I give back in a number of ways, but primarily through youth activities. I helped start a leadership academy in Montgomery, Alabama. And since I’ve been in Atlanta, I have coached sports, mentored youth through various programs, worked with a local internship program for inner-city kids, and participated in several initiatives aimed at helping develop our young people through the local chapter of the 100 Black Men of America.

LESSONS LEARNED

Building relationships is important to success. No one can be successful solely on his or her own. Over the course of my career, there have been a number of individuals, including my peers, who have helped me— from giving me wise counsel to helping me find business opportunities, and everything in between.

CAREER ADVICE

Don’t be afraid to take calculated career risks. Many successful people I know were willing to accept a significant challenge at some point in their career. They chose to tackle a difficult business problem, relocate to a new city, accept a role in an area outside their particular expertise, or start a business. Be the one who volunteers for difficult tasks. People will notice.


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CBS CORPORATION

Josie Thomas Executive Vice President and Chief Diversity Officer WHAT I’VE LEARNED

The most important lesson I have learned in the course of my career is that you must be flexible in your approach to solving a problem or achieving a goal. It is often not the first strategy that is effective, but the second or even the third. So you must remain focused on the desired outcome rather than a specific approach.

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CVS CAREMARK

COMPASS CONSULTING SERVICES, LLC Tameka L. Taylor, PhD, CDE, President MY GREATEST STRENGTH

My faith is one of my greatest strengths. It allows me to step back, analyze a situation calmly, problem solve, and utilize the resources around me to handle my business and the people that I work with as I pray constantly. My business has been built on faith and was the biggest leap of faith that I have taken. It was a very calculated risk that was lessened because of my faith. While I am strategic and intentional about most of what I do as a business owner, it is my faith that guides me every day.

MY INSPIRATION

David L. Casey Vice President, Workforce Strategies and Chief Diversity Officer GIVING BACK

The demands of my personal and professional lives never allow me to give back as much as I would like, but I do make the time to give back to youth and health-related programs and organizations. I think it’s vitally important that youth come into close and credible contact with professionals who can shine a light onto the paths they may soon be taking themselves. I frequently serve as a mentor, volunteer, and board member for organizations with a focus on youth or health care for underserved communities. I currently serve on the Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts and Year Up Providence boards.

My Mother has always served as an inspiration to me and still does, even though she passed away many years ago. I watched her raise my brother and me as a single mother on a teacher’s salary. No matter how tough it got, she always looked at things from a positive perspective, including during her 12-year battle with breast cancer. She exposed us to as many experiences and diverse people as she could to help us to grow and develop. She also encouraged us to think of others and how we could make their lives better. She was a super parent, woman, friend, humanitarian, and Christian.

GIVING BACK

I give back in a couple of different ways. The Lord has blessed me in so many ways I feel I must give back. I do this by volunteering through my church, sorority, and other community groups. I also serve on two boards of organizations that assist people in need and mentor high school and college students, as well as young professionals. Mentoring allows me to directly impact their lives and assist with their unique needs and concerns. It also helps me grow. When I am unable to give of myself and my time, I try to contribute financially to the community, even if it’s a small amount. Every little bit makes a difference.

THE LIFETIME HEALTHCARE COMPANIES, INC. Wheeler Coleman, Senior Vice President and Chief Information Officer

PERSONAL WISDOM

I’ve realized that I’m not perfect—I can’t do it all, and I have to cut myself some slack for that. I’ve held leadership roles the majority of my professional life. In my earlier years as a leader, I was very paternalistic. I felt I had to know and provide all of the answers for my teams. Over the years, I’ve learned there are a lot of people out there smarter than me. The best way for me to lead is to hire good people, set them up for success, get out of their way, and let them do good things.

CAREER ADVICE

Don’t just take inventory of your skills and abilities, but also be clear about your passions. You may not always be able to align those two at every step of your career, but you should strive to keep them in balance as much as you can. There may be a lot of things you CAN do, but you should live your life with no regrets by also focusing on doing the things you WANT to do and enjoy doing. As Stephen Covey once said, “Don’t spend your whole life climbing the ladder to only realize once it’s too late, that it’s leaning against the wrong wall.”

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MY INSPIRATION

My high school-educated dad worked 13- to 16-hour days, to raise six kids and put us through college. Today, at age 84, he’s still working 14-hour days. His commitment to family and his career inspires me to get out of bed every morning.

GIVING BACK

I didn’t get where I am today without the help of others, so I believe that I need to give back. I do it by contributing my time and money to not-for-profit organizations that support efforts to make a difference in society—not just for African Americans, but for all. I contribute to organizations that benefit inner-city kids and serve on not-for-profit boards to assist the disadvantaged and others. Being a role model is another way I give back, using the success I’ve achieved and the lessons I’ve learned to demonstrate what is possible and inspire others.

CAREER ADVICE

Never give up. Throw yourself into reaching your goals and try as hard as you can. In one of his speeches, Martin Luther King, Jr. said, “If you are behind in a race, you must run faster than those in front of you or forever remain behind.” That quote motivated me in college and through the early days of my career. It still motivates me to this day. Recognize and acknowledge that there will always be those who have more talent than you. But no matter what your disadvantage is, where you started, or what obstacles are in front of you, you can overcome it all if you work harder than those ahead of you.

January/February 2014


B LA CK HI S TOR Y M ONT H

WILMERHALE

SULLIVAN & CROMWELL LLP Inosi M. Nyatta Partner MY GREATEST STRENGTH

Adaptability and tenacity. The landscape around us is constantly changing and those who succeed must be able to adapt to address new requirements and demands, and not give up when they are faced with a new challenge.

MY INSPIRATION

Andre Owens, Partner MY GREATEST STRENGTH

I try to keep an open mind on issues, whether professional or personal. It’s not always easy to do, but when I am successful, I find that doing so allows me to think through whatever the matter may be more fully. Professionally, this approach helps me see all sides of a regulatory issue, which is important in coming up with solutions for clients. Closely related, I try to give people the benefit of the doubt whenever possible. This, too, is not always easy, but when I can do it, it helps me hear and assess the arguments and concerns of others most productively. This typically leads to better outcomes in terms of my advice, regardless of the other person’s ultimate motivations. I’ve found that these characteristics also impact how people communicate with me.

The people around me who work hard to help their families and communities in the face of sometimes insurmountable odds—particularly those who do so with a positive attitude—inspire me. My family is filled with people who do this daily. They have been a tremendous support to me during my life and have helped me get to where I am today. I hope to be able to follow in their example and help others achieve their full potential.

OUR GREATEST CHALLENGE

The African-American community is a treasure trove of talent and ability on every level. Our greatest task is finding ways to unlock this talent and ability on a wholesale basis by ensuring that educational opportunities, quality health care, and positive role models are available to the younger generation.

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS INCORPORATED David W. Thomas Vice President, Worldwide Facilities

HOW I MOTIVATE OTHERS

Here, too, I try to give people the benefit of the doubt, and that includes evaluating their abilities. With junior associates in particular, I often assign them a project that I recognize will be a stretch for them, but one where they know that I am available for questions and guidance. Showing confidence in these associates goes a long way toward helping them own the project. The result is usually great for the client and boosts the associate’s confidence. It’s important for young lawyers to know that they can do the work, and that the main difference between us is not smarts, but experience.

CAREER ADVICE

Position yourself to be as helpful as possible, whether to your boss, your colleagues, or your clients. Professions and industries are more competitive than ever, and adopting a service-oriented and outward-focused approach to your job will not only help you succeed, it also will likely set you apart from others that are just focused on the next steps for advancement. Most important, don’t sell yourself short in terms of your ability. You may lack experience at the outset of your career, but whatever you’ve done to secure a job likely will serve you well in the future.

MY GREATEST STRENGTH

My greatest strength is my ability to build and lead organizations to achieve higher levels of performance through shared vision, trust, and collaboration. In 2001, I was responsible for consolidating several information technology (IT) teams into a single organization that would support all Texas Instruments product designers and software developers worldwide. In 2009, with no previous facilities-related experience, I was asked to lead the TI Worldwide Facilities organization in becoming a truly global organization, supporting all aspects of TI’s business. To meet this goal, I reorganized to create a structure that would establish clear boundaries, role definition, execution, and trust; brought in the right leaders to set the tone and establish a new culture of trust and collaboration; and created a unifying vision to help my team understand where the organization was headed and increase confidence in leadership. As a result of these actions, our key stakeholders have given our organization its highest performance ratings in more than 10 years, and our company is able to operate more reliably, safely, and efficiently.

CAREER ADVICE

As a senior leader at TI, I am often asked to speak to large groups of employees and share my career advice. One recommendation that I frequently give is to “think at the next level.” I tell people that to excel in their current role, and prepare for their next opportunity, they constantly need to think like their manager. How would their manager answer a question, solve a problem, or communicate with a higher level manager? Demonstrating this ability helps show that the employee is ready for more responsibility and challenge.

January/February 2014

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PNC FINANCIAL SERVICES GROUP, INC.

Eddie Meyers Regional President, Georgia MY GREATEST STRENGTH

Persistence and stubbornness. I never let someone else define me and what I can or can’t accomplish. That attitude has led to all of the success that I have achieved in sports, the military, banking, and life.

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believe We

in the power of diversity and inclusion to help companies and organizations realize their full potential.

Competing in a global economy and the never-ending quest for talent make your D&I efforts toward equity that much more important. Share your achievements and success with Profiles in Diversity Journal, now in its 16th year of publishing.

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www.womenworthwatching.com

www.diversityjournal.com Š2014 Rector Inc. All rights reserved.


| THOUGHT LEADERS

8 THINGS I Wish Someone had Told Me ABOUT BEING AN ERG LEADER By Simone E. Morris, MBA

Organizations follow various approaches for selecting talent for Employee Resource Group leadership (ERG) roles. Some organizations look to their high-potential employees or go through a rigorous interview selection process to fill the role; others allow members of the community to “raise their hands.”

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o matter how your organization selects its ERG leadership, it is not often that you will find someone jumping up and down at the chance to embrace the role or take on the additional workload required. In a work world where many of us struggle to find a satisfactory balance between work and life, the benefits of ERG leadership need to be better marketed in order to get people interested and willing to take on this opportunity. Many years ago, I was an ERG member that attended meetings and waited for change to happen. The change was slow to come, so when the opportunity came along to take on a more active role, I raised my hand and volunteered to share the leadership of the group as a co-chair of the group. I’m sure you can guess what happened next. So as chair of the ERG—rather than a co-chair—I began my service. Of course, it would have been easier with some sort of guidebook

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for success, but there was none. You simply had to roll up your sleeves and learn while in the role. As I look back, I realize there are several things I wish someone had told me before I took on the role, including the following: 1. Review, then plan. Assess your ERG’s current position. Then, consider your skill set and where you will need the most assistance. This will help you craft both your plan for the coming year and the leadership team you’ll need to get you there. When you propose your plan, allow your team to buy in by raising challenges or providing builds. This can increase the time it takes to create a strategy, but it is well worth the investment. 2. Develop a variety of solutions. You may very well find that your directors, and above, aren’t sold on the benefits of investing time in the ERG, and see it more as a constant pull on their time. Flex deliverables January/February 2014

to allow attractive opportunities for both senior and junior community members to participate. 3. Think like a business unit leader. As an ERG leader you will be leading a group and collaborating with senior leaders from the various functions in your organization. Being able to clearly articulate your ideas and ask for support is a necessity. I’ve come across ERG leaders who are fearful of the organization’s response to their request for time or support and therefore, limp along with what the organization doles out. Think big, and come with a plan to achieve your goal. Managers value employees who are resourceful and able to bring solutions to the table. Wouldn’t you want someone like that on your team? 4. Create a win-win partnership with your executive sponsor. Be sure to nurture the relationship so it can grow and bloom over


time. For example: your executive sponsor is likely very busy with a small window of time available for meeting with you. Be flexible with your schedule and be sure to keep your connection points regular, so you are both benefitting from the relationship. Working with an executive sponsor can be extremely advantageous to both of you. You can learn successful business strategies that you can’t get from any textbook, and your sponsor can gain cultural awareness he or she may be lacking. If you are successful, you may be surprised at the champion you’ve created. Being a champion for you and your cause is the role of an executive sponsor; it is quite different from the role of mentor. While your mentor may be able to share valuable lessons, he or she may not have the ability to create opportunities or remove roadblocks for you. Should your relationship have more of a mentorship vibe, invest the time to grow it into a sponsor relationship. These types of relationships can help take your career to places you haven’t imagined. 5. Don’t avoid risk. Be careful not to stifle your creativity, and stay away from feedback that says your idea won’t work. Very often, we listen to others, fear impact to our positions, and aren’t willing to risk doing things that may rock the boat. Put on your life vest and take some Dramamine, because you could just be what the organization needs.

6. Celebrate your success. Talk is good, but being able to show results will go farther in building your credibility as an ERG leader. Do not be quiet about your successes. Tooting your ERG’s horn subtly toots your own! Find communication vehicles like internal newsletters or intranet portals that can spread your message. 7. Be patient. There are people who won’t want to get on the bandwagon. While you are going around sharing that your ERG is the greatest thing since sliced bread, others may not want the perceived stigma of being associated with an ERG, or may not be convinced that the organization is capable of change. They may tell you to “take them off the mailing list” or simply not show up when you need them. This can be disheartening. Don’t try to figure out why these individuals think this way. It is instead more beneficial to focus on the people who are supporters. You will be surprised that people do change their minds over time. They may just want to hang out and see what happens before they stick their necks out. 8. Be an influence. As an ERG leader, you have to influence volunteers to take time out of their jobs and work on things that they may not get credit for. You have to influence execu-

tives to support your vision and approve solutions. You have to influence business stakeholders to leverage employees to help solve their problems. You have to win over line managers to allow their teams to participate. It is indeed a big job to be an ERG leader. The rewards are incredible if you allow yourself to embrace the opportunity instead of running from the responsibility. I can tell you that for me, being an ERG leader raised my credibility and visibility in the organization. In fact, I remember being recognized by Diversity Best Practices and that the leadership team in my department took time out for me to address the team by sharing what I was doing in the diversity space. Wow! I don’t know that I would have been allowed the platform to speak on diversity challenges in the organization or be seen as an expert without being an ERG leader. Today, there are many resources available that set ERG leaders up for success and allow them to be true intrapreneurs of the organization. That is what ERG leaders are–intrapreneurs who change the culture of an organization and create legacies we can be proud of. Are you doing that in your day job? If you’re not, I’d suggest you raise your hand and take advantage of this underutilized opportunity. This may just be your opportunity to grow and shine. PDJ

Simone Morris served as an ERG member, co-chair, chair, and advisor to Employee Resource Group leaders. She has been recognized for her exemplary Employee Resource Group leadership skills by her previous employer Diageo North America, Diversity Best Practices, and Diversity MBA Magazine. You can follow Simone on Twitter at @jubileetown. January/February 2014

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| THOUGHT LEADERS

The Illusion of INCLUSION By Helen Turnbull, PhD

What is the big deal about inclusion? It is easy to include others. All you have to do is make sure you actually notice people, smile at them, acknowledge them, say hello, make them feel good about themselves, include them in your conversation, seek their opinions, reassure them that you like them, actively demonstrate you are listening to them, help them to feel validated, and reassure them that their ideas have value … hmm!

T

his is beginning to sound challenging! If you are like me, then perhaps there are people in your life for which you can easily check every “inclusion” box. Then there are others in your peripheral vision that you simply don’t see, and some you choose not to see, and some you don’t want to see, or even some you wish didn’t exist. OK, so let’s admit it; being human really means that being inclusive has caveats. It is easy to be inclusive if I like you; it is easy to be inclusive if I agree with you, or more important, if you agree with me; it is easy to be inclusive if I have some affinity with you; it is also easy to be inclusive if I need something from you or if you need something from me that I am willing to share. See? This is getting messy and we haven’t even scratched the surface. As well-intentioned people, we all want to believe that we are inclusive of others and that we would conceptually support the idea of becoming more inclusive. Diversity and Inclusion The words “Diversity” and “Inclusion” are often used in the same sentence as if they are inextricably linked, but, in fact, diversity is the mix and inclusion is the effort that it takes to make the mix work. You may have the right ingredients to bake a cake, but that does not guarantee the cake will be edible. Likewise,

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having a diverse workforce does not guarantee that you understand how to make that mix work or how to unlock its full potential. Creating an inclusive environment is complex. It requires effort and that we first unpack the complexity before we can begin. Let’s return to my cake analogy. If I hand you a carton of sugar, a bag of flour, a couple of eggs, and a stick of butter, you may intuitively figure out that you could bake a cake. On the other hand, they may stay in your mind as separate and disparate objects with no vision that a cake is possible. If I hand you a box of unsalted


black beans, two eggs, cocoa powder, coconut milk, and agave nectar I suspect it would not be so intuitively obvious that you could make a chocolate cake. If I then added two ripe avocados, coconut water, unsweetened cocoa powder, and a bottle of vanilla essence, my guess is that you would look at me strange, and would never be able to imagine that these ingredients would make a divine chocolate mousse, which could be eaten alone or spread over the black bean chocolate cake. These alternative recipes offer new and exciting possibilities for creativity, but only if we are open to allowing differences to flourish. What are we missing when we maintain the status quo…when we remain stuck in old paradigms…when we operate from a mode of assimilation…when we allow our blind spots and unconscious biases to block our vision of a more inclusive organization? Over the years of working in the field of global inclusion, diversity, and unconscious bias, I have noticed an interesting phenomenon. When I ask people if their leaders contribute to creating an inclusive environment, the results typically look like this:

When I ask people about their personal contribution to creating an inclusive environment, the results typically look like this:

It seems that we all think we are doing better than everyone else at being inclusive. That is our first blind spot. If we believe it is other people and not us, we will always be waiting for others to see the light, while not seeing the impact of our own unconscious biases and shortcomings. Catching our propensity for affinity bias, controlling our ego needs, admitting our resistance to change, and managing our own blind spots are all part of the journey. No one gets to be a phenomenological exception; we all have a piece of the story. So let me leave you with a few questions to ponder: • How inclusive are you really? • How do your personal biases impact your ability to be inclusive? • How do your blind spots impact the quality of your day-to-day decisions? • How do you know that you are really being objective? • Who is in your In-Group? • Who do you not notice at work? • How do you know when someone is a “good fit”? • What criteria are you using? • What do you mean when you say “We have a meritocracy”? • How can you be sure there is a meritocracy? In the next edition of this five-part series, I will begin to fill in the blanks on the Inclusion Complexity Model and reveal the intricacies and dynamics that might be getting in the way of us achieving our professed goal of creating an inclusive workplace. PDJ

Dr. Helen Turnbull is the CEO of Human Facets LLC and a world recognized thought leader in global inclusion and diversity. She is a member of the Academy of Management, American Psychological Association, American Sociological Association and American Society for Phenomenology; The NeuroScience Institute for Leaders and the OD Network. Her latest book is “Blind spots: A conversation with Dr. Turnbull about Unconscious Bias”. In May 2013, she spoke at TEDx on “The Illusion of Inclusion” and has recently developed a new model on the complexity of embedding an inclusive workplace culture. January/February 2014

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| THOUGHT LEADERS

DEVELOPING NATIONAL ASSETS Teaching Veterans to Create and Project a Personal Brand Through Speech By Dr. Ede Warner

Any audience starts with three assumptions or questions when someone speaks in any setting about any topic. The listener wants to know: Why is this person speaking about this topic; why are they qualified to speak on it; and finally can this person say anything to change what I already think or know about the topic?

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ver the last three years, no matter the subject of my courses, they all start the same way. Think of it as building different types of houses—they all start with the same foundation. A student’s first assignment is called the inventory speech. They are asked to write four paragraphs, the first three starting with the words ‘I am” and the fourth starting with the words “I am not.” The second assignment is called the “asset” speech. After reflecting on their inventory, students must construct an “asset” either from one or more of their “I am’s” or from some aspect of their identity they omitted. They are encouraged to be creative. Your asset should be something that defines you, that you feel you are successful at, and that you have had a lot of experiences with that you can talk about. No matter what the content or assignment may be for the rest of the

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course, students will be required to use their asset in some way. Why? Because the student has identified a personal strength from of a series of characteristics that define them, and it becomes an anchor for their “speech.” In technical terms, it becomes the foundation for the type of house he or she wants to build. In public speaking and persuasion, this foundation is a person’s ethos. Influencing others is a process that starts with ethos—the place where one finds his or her passion, knowledge, interest, etc. Only when the ethos is found and cultivated, can one produce other types of Aristotelian appeals—emotional and logical—in ways that can influence audiences. When we think, speak, and act, we have a set of personal experiences that we are uniquely qualified to talk about, relate other ideas to, and guide our personal decision making. Our experiences have the potential to “brand” us in the January/February 2014

communication process. So in my classes, students are invited to first define, then “invest” in their asset, in the same way a business invests in people, ideas, or materials. Investing in National Assets Of the hundreds of assets students have selected, a unique amount of data has been cultivated. Some assets are completely unique: a linguistic dreamer, a world traveler, a story addict, or a wild child. Other assets are more common and personal: a parent, a child, a sibling, a student, a gamer, or a dedicated or hard worker. A third category of assets are intimate and powerful levels of self-disclosure: cancer survivor; organ donation recipient; or domestic abuse survivor. Many of my students define themselves by a common experience: their military experience. I call these veterans the “national” asset of my classes. They are usu-


ONLINE

S

can this code to see Army veteran Nathan Davis discuss the first day he spent on military assignment in Germany, and his lessons learned about the value of cultural sensitivity.

ally older, nontraditional students who don’t fall into the statistical 75% of Americans that are apprehensive about speaking in public. Generally, they are comfortable, disciplined, organized, and wellrespected by their younger peers and classmates. In other words, in a class that teaches leadership through speech, they often provide a strong student example that visualizes what a comfortable student speaker looks like, while growing in class like other students by learning the technical aspects of more formal speech. While their experiences vary, the topics chosen by this select group are often eye-opening. While they certainly have given speeches on the more run-of-the-mill topics, I’ve heard speeches about things like Post Traumatic Stress Disorder; administrative issues at the Veterans Administration; respect for cultural difference; and hungry, homeless, and unem-

ployed veterans. While there may be nothing surprising about that, the credibility of each of these speakers is amazing. One veteran student, Nathan Davis, exhibited some of the strongest leadership skills I could imagine. His relatability to a group of classmates almost twenty years younger was outstanding. In fact, one day, I asked the students to have a conversation about the class, asked Davis to facilitate the conversation, turned on a video camera, and left the room. Not only did Davis explain the value of the asset in terms that were more powerful than any I had used (using the example of everyone in class giving a speech about celery), but he unknowingly persuaded one student to give an

impassioned off-the-cuff speech about her personal experiences. Until that moment she had been reluctant to share her personal experiences as part of the speech assignment, simply accepting the reduction of points for that portion of the grading. But attributing a comfort and understanding to his earlier words, she chose to convey the evolution of her public speaking fears and triumphs in a powerful way, as it related to a volunteerism trip to Africa just after high school. What brings credibility to a speaker and a leader is his or her unique life experiences. That identity has the potential to shed new light on the facts, and bring a unique context that helps create a solution to any problem given. PDJ

Dr. Ede Warner, Jr. is president and principal of Greater Decisions Consulting LLC. His identity-based communication model increases personal comfort and personal connection with others, and provides a better test of ideas and evidence. January/February 2014

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| PERSPECTIVE

ADVANCING THE QUARTERBACK MODEL Citi Foundation and Low Income Investment Fund Launches $3.25 Million Initiative to Promote Community Development Efforts Nationwide

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he Citi Foundation and the Low Income Investment Fund (LIIF) today announced the launch of the Partners in Progress (PIP) initiative to bolster the ability of 13 organizations around the country to increase economic progress in lowincome communities. With $3.25 million in funding from the Citi Foundation, administered by LIIF, the support is part of an effort to transform the field of community development by advancing the community “quarterback” model. The model leverages the capacity of high-performing local organizations to lead and coordinate across sectors and stakeholders to achieve shared goals. Through a one-year grant of $250,000, each PIP grantee will initiate or deepen their efforts to become community quarterbacks by aligning objectives and coordinating efforts among local organizations and residents to improve neighborhoods and create pathways to economic opportunity. PIP organizations will lead the development or expansion of local stakeholder networks to improve places—the physical environment of a com-

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Pamela Flaherty, President & CEO of the Citi Foundation.

munity including housing, transit, and safety—and create opportunities for people, such as jobs, child development, education, and health. The impetus behind the PIP initiative came from Investing in What Works for America’s Communities, a book LIIF co-published in 2012 with the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, which asserts that flexible and dynamic community quarterbacks could transform local community development efforts that are often fragmented and duplicative. The Citi Foundation supported LIIF’s work on the original book, and the PIP initiative now aims to advance the community quarterback model in 10 regions across the nation. “Recognizing that there is no ‘one size fits all’ solution to improving economic opportunity, we know the quarterback model works to align smart approaches with


BRIDGE Housing Corporation, Los Angeles and San Francisco, CA

Jubilee Housing, Inc., Washington, D.C.

improve the quality of life in our communities.” PIP funding will enable grantees to engage and align an expanded range of partners, share knowledge, and use data to drive project design. In addition, grantees will participate in a learning community that will include coaching and skill building. Throughout the year, LIIF and the Citi Foundation will share grantee progress and lessons, as well as make tools and resources available to participating organizations. The 13 grantees have different levels of experience using the community quarterback model, as well as varying community needs—from linking affordable housing and health care in Los Angeles, to planning for integrated community service delivery near a new transit hub in Dallas, Texas, and creating new immigrant-driven approaches to community development in Queens, New York. Other grantees aim to build coalitions, develop governance and operating structures, set strategic goals, or map and analyze critical data. Grantees at more advanced stages will use the funds to strengthen, deepen, or 13 New Community Quaterbacks Take the Field accelerate their activities. PDJ

smart financing,” said Nancy O. Andrews, president and CEO of LIIF. “Through Partners in Progress, we hope to build a movement. By creating a network of quarterbacks, we can promote learning and formalize a strategy that will fundamentally change our field for decades to come. The Citi Foundation is a uniquely innovative funder to invest in this idea that is aimed at nothing short of transforming neighborhoods and lives across the country.” “The Partners in Progress initiative is focused on identifying and supporting organizations that have the credibility and potential to be local community development champions,” said Pamela Flaherty, president & CEO of the Citi Foundation. “Too often, well-intentioned community development efforts suffer from a lack of leadership, efficiency, and coordination. By bolstering the role of a local cross-sector quarterback, the Citi Foundation and LIIF are aiming to eliminate obstacles to effective communication and collaboration, all in an attempt to

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he 13 recipients of PIP Initiative funding will become community quarterbacks to coordinate efforts to improve neighborhoods and create pathways to economic opportunity. They include: ∆ Asian Americans for Equality, Flushing, NY ∆ BRIDGE Housing Corporation, Los Angeles and San Francisco, CA ∆ CASA de Maryland, Langley Park, MD ∆ Chicago Community Loan Fund, Chicago, IL ∆ Community Solutions/Brownsville Partnership, Brooklyn, NY ∆ East Bay Asian Local Development Corporation, Oakland, CA ∆ Fairfield County Community Foundation, Bridgeport, CT ∆ Frazier Revitalization, Inc., Dallas, TX ∆ Jubilee Housing, Inc., Washington, D.C. ∆ LINC Housing, Los Angeles, CA ∆ Little Tokyo Service Center, Los Angeles, CA ∆ Neighborhood Housing Services of South Florida, Miami-Dade County, FL ∆ Youth Policy Institute, Los Angeles, CA

January/February 2014

WHAT IS THE COMMUNITY QUARTERBACK MODEL? To see a brief video, use your mobile phone to scan this code or view on your desktop at http://bit.ly/qbmodel. To learn more about the PIP program, visit www.partnersinprogressproject.org. Follow PIP on Twitter, @PIPCommunities, and like the PIP Facebook page: https://www.facebook. com/partnersinprogressproject.

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| CORPORATE INDEX 3M Company ............................. www.3m.com ............................... 34, 37 Accenture .............................www.accenture.com ............. 31, 38, 64, 43 Ace Hardware Foundation.... www.acehardware.com............................... 67 Achieva....................................www.achievacu.com................................. 55 AIO Wireless..........................www.aiowireless.com................................ 60 Amazon.................................... www.amazon.com................................... 35 American Express Company ..... www.amex.com..................................... 72 American Corporate Partners.... www.acp-usa.org................................... 18 Andrews Kurth LLP..............www.andrewskurth.com.............................. 57 Anti-Racist Alliance............ www.antiracistalliance.com............................ 60 AT&T Services............................www.att.com................................ 53, 57 Avis Budget Group, Inc..... www.avisbudgetgroup.com............................ 60 Baker Botts LLP..................... www.bakerbotts.com................................. 58 Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC....www.bakerdonelson.com............................. 58 Bank of America..................www.bankofamerica.com............................. 35 BASF Corporation....................... www.basf.com...................................... 58 Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate...........................www.bhgrealestate.com.............................. 61 Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan................................ www.bcbsm.com.................................... 61 BNP Paribas Group............ www.bnpparibas.com............................... 45 Booz Allen Hamilton ................www.bah.com......................... 32, 73, 90 Burr & Foreman LLP....................www.burr.com...................................... 67 CACI International, Inc................ www.caci.com................................ 36, 61 Capital One............................ www.capitalone.com................................. 25 Catalyst .................................... www.catalyst.org.................................... 92 CBS Corporation.................www.cbscorporation.com............................. 77

CenturyLink......................... www.centurylink.com............................... 27 Charles Schwab & Co........... www.schwab.com............................ 13, 30 Christian and Small LLP........ www.csattorneys.com................................ 62 Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center.................www.cincinnatichildrens.com.......................... 62 Citigroup Inc.............................. www.citi.com.....Inside Front Cover, 88 Coca-Cola Company................ www.cokecce.com.................................. 28 ComEd....................................... www.comed.com.................................... 62 Compass Consulting Services, LLC............www.compassconsultingservices.com................... 78 Core National Foundation for Women & Families, Inc..........www.corenational.org................................ 64 CVS Caremark..................... www.cvscaremark.com............................... 78 Darden Restaurants.................. www.darden.com..................................... 7 Dechert LLP..............................www.dechert.com................................... 54 Deloitte......................................www.deloitte.com................................... 24 Duane Morris LLP.................www.duanemorris.com............................... 64 Edward Jones....................... www.edwardjones.com............................... 36 Eli Lilly and Company................... www.lilly.com....................................... 66 Ernst & Young LLP........................www.ey.com....................................... 65 Fannie Mae............................ www.fanniemae.com................................... 8 Fish & Richardson..........................www.fr.com........................................ 65 Gibbons P.C........................... www.gibbonspc.com................................. 67 Girls Inc......................................www.girlsinc.org.................................... 69 Give an Hour.......................... www.giveanhour.org/................................ 16 Got Your 6................................www.gotyour6.org/.................................. 20 Greater Decisions Consulting LLC.................. www.greaterdecisions.com............................ 86

Work that makes a difference. Teammates who value individual aspirations and experiences. At Booz Allen Hamilton, our people provide clients with inspired thinking—to help solve some of today’s most important and complex challenges and achieve success in critical missions. We believe unique perspectives contribute to innovative ideas, which drive better results not only for our clients, but for the world around us. At Booz Allen, diversity is central to who we are and what we do. Our commitment to an inclusive environment means facilitating understanding and awareness, and creating initiatives to improve the quality of work life for staff. If you’re looking to do work that makes a difference at a firm that’s committed to helping you achieve your professional and personal goals, Booz Allen could be what’s next for you. To find out more, visit boozallen.com/careers to create and submit a profile.

www.boozallen.com/careers We are proud of our diverse environment, EOE/M/F/D/V.


BOLD denotes Advertiser Greenberg Traurig, LLP...............www.gtlaw.com..................................... 69 Halliburton............................www.halliburton.com............................... 51 Human Facets LLC.............. www.humanfacets.com............................... 84 Ingersoll Rand...............www.company.ingersollrand.com....................... 69 JPMorgan Chase................ www.jpmorganchase.com............................. 22 Kaiser Permanente............ www.kaiserpermanente.org....................... 6, 59 Kay Scholer LLP.................... www.kayescholer.com............................... 70 Lee Hecht Harrison...................... www.lhh.com......................................... 7 Legg Mason Global Asset Management...........................www.leggmason.com................................ 70 Lincoln Financial Group.................www.lfg.com....................................... 71 Liner Entertainment Group LLC....................www.linerentertainmentgroup.com...................... 55 Linkage ................................ www.linkageinc.com ... Inside Back Cover Lockheed Martin................. www.lockheedmartin.com............................. 36 Low Income Investment Fund.....www.liifund.org..................................... 88 Michelin North America............ www.michelin.com.................................. 71 MWV........................................... www.mwv.com...................................... 9 New York Life...................... www.newyorklife.com.............................. 49 Newell Rubbermaid Inc.... www.newellrubbermaid.com........................... 72 Northrop Grumman.......... www.northropgrumman.com........................... 32 Pepco Holdings, Inc............ www.pepcoholdings.com............................. 68 Play-Place for Autistic Children.............................. www.autisticplayplace.org............................. 72 PNC Financial Services Group, Inc.....................................www.pnc.com...................................... 80 Praxair....................................... www.praxair.com.................................... 71 Prudential Financial, Inc..........www.prudential.com................................. 74 R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company.......................................www.rjrt.com....................................... 75 RBC Wealth Management................. www.rbcwealthmanagement.com....................... 75 Robins, Kaplan, Miller & Ciresi, L.L.P....................www.rkmc.com..................................... 76 Rochester Institute of Technology.....................................www.rit.edu........................................ 55 SAP..............................................www.sap.com...................................... 75 Sedgwick................................. www.sedgwick.com.................................... 8 Sodexo, Inc...............................www.sodexo.com................................... 63 Southern Company...........www.southerncompany.com........................... 76 Starbucks.................................www.starbucks.com................................. 29 State Street Corporation......... www.statestreet.com................................. 76 Sullivan & Cromwell LLP..........www.sullcrom.com.................................. 79 Teach for America............... www.teachforamerica.org/............................ 14 Texas Instruments Incorporated.....www.ti.com........................................ 79 The Lifetime Healthcare Companies, Inc..........................www.lifethc.com.................................... 78 U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.........www.fws.com...................................... 65 Union Pacific.................................www.up.com....................................... 33 United States Postal Service.......www.usps.com..................................... 56 UnitedHealth Group............www.unitedhealthgroup.co............................ 26 University of Pennsylvania......... www.upenn.edu.................................... 74 USSA............................................www.ussa.org...................................... 25 Verizon.......................................www.verizon.com................................... 31 Wal-Mart Stores, Inc................. www.walmart.com................................... 28 Walgreen Co. ........................ www.walgreens.com................................. 29 Walt Disney Company................www.thewaltdisneycompany.com...Back Cover, 23 WellPoint, Inc........................ www.wellpoint.com............................. 5, 57 Wells Fargo.............................www.wellsfargo.com................................. 74 Wilmerhale.............................. www.wilmerhale.com................................ 79 York College.............................www.york.cuny.edu.................................. 10 Zions Bank..............................www.zionsbank.com................................. 70

VETERANS Continued from page 44

Civilian Soldiers “Civilian soldiers,” who were members of the Reserve or National Guard, are part of the largest deployment of civilian soldiers since World War II. In addition, more than 20 percent of these “workplace warriors” have been deployed more than once since 2001, so they make the transition from warzone to workplace repeatedly. This puts them at a higher risk for PTSD.

What can we do for these individuals to help them overcome these hurdles? We are fortunate enough to have resources that we, as corporate workplace stewards, can draw upon to support our veterans. One such resource is the Wounded Warrior Project’s Warriors to Work program that helps individuals recovering from severe injuries received in the line of duty connect with the support and resources they need to build a career in the civilian workforce. It can be tough to transition into civilian life. It’s even tougher to adjust to life after a serious injury. There are also states—such as Rhode Island— that are leading the way in providing structured actions that communities and corporations can take to help ensure that our veterans receive the support they need to be successful in life and in our workplaces. The delayed effects of the war experience will be felt in the workplace for decades to come. To assist and retain returning soldiers, and benefit from their knowledge and experience, will require a long-term response from employers that addresses, at a minimum, employee health and real-time workplace integration challenges. The good news is that we have research and resources that we can turn to, to support our efforts. With help, we can welcome veterans into the workplace, show them their service was appreciated, and provide them with the supportive infrastructures that their unique situation requires to ensure their personal success and the success of our companies. PDJ F. Chase Hawkins is the CEO/Founder of Superior Workforce Solutions in San Jose, California, an organization dedicated to developing inclusive environments to increase employee engagement, retention, and business relationship efficiency and effectiveness. Learn more at superiorworkforce.com January/February 2014

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| WORKPLACE

Look, Ma! NO By Catalyst

PROGRESS!

E

very year, Catalyst unveils its annual Fortune 500 Census. And every year we try to find a new headline for the same old news. This year it’s, “Still No Progress After Years of No Progress.” Last year it was, “No Change for Women in Top Leadership.” In 2011, “Women’s Leadership” was “Still Stalled in Corporate America.” And as of 2010, women were “Still Not Scaling the Corporate Ladder.” This year’s Catalyst Fortune 500 Census reveals that women held 16.9% of F500 board seats and 14.6% of executive officer positions in 2013—no significant change since 2012. They held 8.1% of executive officer top earner positions—exactly the same as last year. And women of color held just 3.2% of all board seats. How can this be? FORTUNE 500 BOARD SEATS HELD BY WOMEN (PERCENT)

FORTUNE 500 EXECTIVE OFFICERS POSITIONS HELD BY WOMEN (PERCENT)

Just as worldwide efforts to expand gender diversity are heating up, progress for US women in business is at a standstill. Action is being taken around the globe to increase gender diversity in the corporate world, and the United States can’t afford to be left behind: • Following the UK’s setting of voluntary targets in 2011, women’s representation on FTSE100 boards has risen from 12.5% to nearly 19% in just two years.

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PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

January/February 2014

• After passing quota legislation in January 2011, women’s representation on boards in France grew from 12.7% in 2011 to 18.3% in 2013. • Canada’s Ontario Securities Commission has proposed adopting a “comply or explain” approach to diversity on boards and in executive ranks. • In Germany, companies must begin setting “binding goals” for increasing women’s representation on boards, management, and executive positions in 2015. Starting in 2016, 30% of publicly traded companies’ non-executive board seats will be allotted to women. The good news is that we know US businesses can catch up—and it’s easier than it looks. One-fifth of F500 companies have 25% or more women executive officers. These companies aren’t just talking about advancing women; they’re showing other companies how to do it. And they’re reaping the significant benefits of gender-diverse leadership in the process. Catalyst offers several key resources to aid companies in capitalizing on women’s talents: • A wide array of research, tools, and replicable practices, including our annual F500 Census and biennial FP500 Census. • The Catalyst Corporate Board Resource, which connects qualified women to opportunities for board service. CEOs of Catalyst member companies personally sponsor women executives they feel are ready for board service by adding them to our directory. It’s time for US companies to stop seeing women’s exclusion from corporate leadership as a challenge. Scaling Mt. Everest is a challenge; increasing the presence of qualified women on boards and in executive leadership has never been easier. Let’s write a new headline in 2014: “What Glass Ceiling?” To learn more about the Catalyst Fortune 500 Census, visit http://bit.ly/CatalystCensus. PDJ

Founded in 1962, Catalyst is the leading nonprofit organization expanding opportunities for women and business. Find out more at www.catalyst.org.


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Linkage’s Institute for Leading Diversity & InclusionTM helps you link D&I to business results through: • Pre-Institute assessments for D&I professionals and line leaders • A competency model and learning sessions • Best practice sharing • Peer learning • Access to a year long virtual program T:11”

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Profile for Diversity Journal

Diversity Journal - Jan/Feb 2014  

Veterans in the Workplace

Diversity Journal - Jan/Feb 2014  

Veterans in the Workplace