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Building a great career is like building great vehicles. It starts with technological innovation is matched only by our belief in the

We are 45,000 strong— a diverse collection of research, development, and experience. At Chrysler, our history of experiences, ideas, and progressive people that drive us forward. See how you can principles working together to passpart our planet on to the become of a movement of the future. It’s as bright as you make it. next generation in better shape than we inherited it. It is diversity of thought that keeps Waste Management at the forefront of innovation and sustainability. We need great people to join us. Find out more at wm.com/careers/index.jsp.

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publisher

point of view It’s Time to Honor CEOs Committed to Diversity

James R. Rector

PUBLISHER/CEO

John Murphy

MANAGING EDITOR

Damian Johnson

MARKETING DIRECTOR

I

T GIVES ME great pleasure to showcase in this issue of Profiles in Diversity Journal 33 CEOs whose personal involvement with diversity sets an example for other CEOs in every industry. As winners of our 2011 Leadership in Action Award, these men and women set themselves apart from the best of the rest. As the title of the award suggests, we intend to make this an annual tradition. We invited CEOs to share their stories with us, and the response was tremendous. Many were reluctant to participate in this feature by contributing a personal essay, mainly because CEOs rarely trumpet their own achievements. They just aren’t built that way. Yet, these 33 knew that taking a public stand on diversity is what leadership is all about. I suspect many other top executives will come forward in subsequent years to acknowledge their own passion to make diversity an integral part of their business and to show exactly how they do it. Why does recognizing CEOs matter? Why did we turn our attention to them? The reason can be found in a concept that diversity practitioners have been writing about in the pages of this magazine for more than a decade; namely, that for diversity to gain any traction in any organization, it has to come from the top. Show me a company at which diversity initiatives founder and I’ll show you a CEO whose attention is elsewhere. Sadly, there are many such companies around. Conversely, a CEO’s rock-solid commitment to diversity provides energy that flows through the organization, often resulting in a culture where failure is just not acceptable. We hear this time and time again: It all starts at the top. So if diversity is important – and it is – and if the success of diversity is dependent on having a committed CEO, then why not thank those CEOs who are at the forefront of the movement? Since I began this magazine in the ‘90s, I have been proud to say that our focus is on people. We’re like the People magazine of diversity. Being able to honor the very top diversity CEOs in North America is extraordinarily gratifying and exciting. I hope that next year, even more CEOs will step forward to contribute their thoughts and share their secrets for making diversity such a priority at their companies. In today’s economy, their leadership is desperately needed. Congratulations to this year’s winners. Your hard work is an inspiration to us all! James R. Rector Publisher/CEO 2

PRO F ILES IN D IVERSIT Y JOURNA L

M A R C H / A P R I L 2 0 11

Paul Malanij

ART DIRECTOR

James Gorman IT DIRECTOR

Matt Hoffman

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

Laurel L. Fumic

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Carlton Yearwood CONSULTANT

Elena Rector

EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT

Alina Dunaeva

OVERSEAS CORRESPONDENT CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Pamela Arnold Donald S. Prophete Gibor Basri MSG. Steven M. Przyzycki Scott Conking Craig Storti Luis J. Diaz, Esq. Nadine Vogel Linda Jimenez Mark Wagar Tisa Jackson April Watkins Marilyn Nagel Col. Bart Weiss Ana Duarte McCarthy Trevor Wilson Marie Philippe, PhD LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

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EDITORIAL:


Making every d ay a better day


issue

table of contents [ f e a t u r e s ]

MARCH / APRIL 2011 Volume 13 • Number 2 www.diversityjournal.com

[on the cover] 18 CEO Leadership in Action It gives us great pleasure to present the Profiles in Diversity Journal 2011 CEO Leadership in Action Award to the organizations featured in the pages that follow. The CEOs being recognized do not seek recognition for their work. In fact, all of them are eager to give credit to others. That’s the nature of leadership.

26

ABM INDUSTRIES Incorporated, Henrik Slipsager, President and CEO

28 AFLAC Incorporated,

56

30 Army and Air Force Exchange Service, MG Bruce A. Casella, Commanding General and CEO

32 BNY MELLON, Bob Kelly,

Jeffrey A. Joerres, Chairman and CEO

Douglas H. Brooks, President, CEO and Chairman of the Board Don R. Knauss, Chairman and CEO

40 DELOITTE & Touche llp,

Alan MacGibbon, Managing Partner and CEO

42 DICKSTEIN SHAPIRO LLP, Michael Nannes, Chairman

44 FRASER MILNER CASGRAIN LLP, Christopher E. Pinnington, CEO

58

LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY, Michael R. Anastasio, Laboratory Director and LANS, LLC President

62 MANPOWER INC.,

Chairman and CEO

38 THE CLOROX COMPANY,

Chairman and CEO

LOCKHEED MARTIN CORPORATION, Robert J. Stevens, Chairman and CEO

Dan Amos, Chairman and CEO

34 BRINKER INTERNATIONAL INC.,

54 KPMG LLP, John B. Veihmeyer,

64 MGM RESORTS INTERNATIONAL, James Murren, Chairman and CEO

66 MILLERCOORS, Leo Kiely, CEO 68 MINISTRY OF LABOUR, Government OF ONTARIO, Cynthia Morton, Deputy Minister

70 NEWELL RUBBERMAID,

Mark Ketchum, President and CEO

72 Northrop Grumman

Information Systems, Linda A. Mills, President

46 GIBBONS P.C., Patrick C. Dunican Jr., 76 PITNEY BOWES INC., Murray D.

Chairman and Managing Director

Martin, Chairman, President and CEO

50 INTERPUBLIC GROUP, Michael I. Roth, 78 ROCKWELL COLLINS, Clayton M. Chairman and CEO

Jones, Chairman, President and CEO

52 KEYCORP, Beth Mooney,

80 Sodexo, Inc., George Chavel,

President and CEO Elect

4

Profi les i n Di vers ity Jo urna l

President and CEO

M A R C H / A P R I L 2 0 11

82 TELUS, Darren Entwistle, President and CEO

84 TORONTO POLICE SERVICE, William Blair, Chief of Police

86 UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN,

R. Peter MacKinnon, Q.C., President and Vice-Chancellor

90 UPMC Health Plan,

Diane P. Holder, President and CEO

92 US AIRWAYS, Doug Parker,

OTTAWA 45°25'

Chairman and CEO

94

WASTE Management, Inc., David P. Steiner, President and CEO

SERVI

96 WELLMARK BLUE CROSS AND OTTAWA 45°25 BLUE SHIELD, John D. Forsyth, Chairman and CEO

98 WELLPOINT, INC., Angela F. Braly, Chair, President and CEO

100 XEROX CANADA,

OTTAWA

FIN

OTTAWA 45°25'14

Mandy Shapansky, President and CEO


The letter of the law comes in all shapes and sizes. Winner of Canada’s Best Diversity Employers 2011

MONTRÉAL 47°14'N 84°39'W | TORONTO 43°39'N 79°20'W | OTTA

INSOLVENCY | RESTRUCTURING | INSOLVENCY | BAN

VANCOUVER 49°17'12.03''N 123°6'47.56''W | OTTAWA 45°25'14.25''N 75°42'0.41'W | TORONTO 43°38'52.42''N 79°22'56.54'

INSOLVENCY | RESTRUCTURING | EMPLOYMENT & L

DIVERSITY | OUT ON BAY STREET | BEST EMPLOYER FOR N

CORPORATE COMMERCIAL | TECHNOLOGY | PRO BONO |

OTTAWA 45°25'14.25''N 75°42'0.41'W | TORONTO 43°38'52.42''N 79°22'56.54''W | MONTRÉAL 45°30'5.72''N 73°34'6.32''W

PRO BONO | DIVERSITY | WOMEN’S EXECUTIVE NET

'14.25''N 75°42'0.41'W | TORONTO 43°38'52.42''N 79°22'56.54''W | OTTAWA 45°25'14.25''N 75°42'0.41'W | TORONTO 43°38'52

INNOVATIVE | RESPONSIVE | CLIENT-FOCUSED | INCLUSION | TEAMWORK | E

OUT ON BAY STREET | BLACK BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATION NATIONAL SCHOLARSHIP | TO

ICE | NATIONAL SCOPE | DIVERSITY | SERVICE | EXPERT

5'14.25''N 75°42'0.41'W | EDMONTON 53°32'33.55''N 113°29'39.96''W | CALGARY 51°2'41.87''N 114°4'1.49''W | VANCOUVER 49°17

DIVERSITY | BEST EMPLOYERS FOR NEW CANADIANS | PRIDE AT WORK

A 45°25'14.25''N 75°42'0.41'W | TORONTO 43°38'52.42''N 79°22'56.54''W | MONTRÉAL 45°30'5.72''N 73°34'6.32''W | OTTAWA

NANCIAL SERVICES | UNITERRA: LEAVE FOR CHANGE

4.25''N 75°42'0.41'W | TORONTO 43°38'52.42''N 79°22'56.54''W | MONTRÉAL 45°30'5.72''N 73°34'6.32''W | OTTAWA 45°25'14

fmc-law.com/diversity Fraser Milner Casgrain llp

RESTRUCTURING | INSOLVENCY | FINANCIAL SERVICES | LITIGATIO

OTTAWA 45°27'N 75°42'W | TORONTO 43°39'N 79°20'W | MONTRÉAL 47°14'N 84°39'W | OTTAWA 45°27'N 75°42'W | VAN


[ d e p a r t m e n t s ] [ c o l u m n s ] 102 THOUGHTLEADERS With travel to seminars and conventions being curtailed, we recognize that you still may not be able to get to the seminars and conventions this year. We bring eleven diversity thought leaders to you. • April Watkins, SPHR Burger King Corporation • Marilyn Nagel, Cisco • Ana Duarte McCarthy, Citi • Luis J. Diaz, Esq., Gibbons P.C. • Donald S. Prophete, Ogletree Deakins • Gibor Basri, UC Berkeley • Tisa Jackson, Union Bank N.A.

• Master Sgt. Steven M. Przyzycki, The United States Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs • Col. Bart Weiss, The United States Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs • Scott Conking, Vanguard • Mark Wagar, Empire BlueCross BlueShield

[ p e r s p e c t i v e s ] [ r e g u l a r s ] 08 MOMENTUM Diversity Who, What, Where and When.

120 CATALYST Storti

JIMENEZ

WILSON

10 CULTURE MATTERS

Cultures, for a variety of reasons, tend to fall into one of two camps: the internalists and the externalists. Storti compares the two and examines the implications for diversity. By Craig Storti, Communicating Across Cultures

12 From My Perspective

How do you know, and what are you doing to keep your finger on the pulse of your industry, your employees, your customers, and your marketplace? By Linda Jimenez, WellPoint, Inc.

14 Human Equity™

Profi les i n Di vers ity Jo urna l

vogEl

philippe

16 Viewpoint

What's culture got to do with diversity? Plenty! Building and sustaining a strong culture takes time, effective leaders and engaged employees. By Pamela Arnold, AIMD

124 My Turn

Disability & LGBT – Similarities and Difference and How to Support Them in the Workplace. By Nadine Vogel, Springboard Consulting LLC

128 LAST WORD

African forms of conflict resolution are appearing in the West. Both Gacaca and Ubuntu are concepts based on practical wisdom. By Trevor Wilson, TWI Inc.

6

ARNOLD

Grooming both allies and champions has huge paybacks for organizations. Champions of diversity must be from a diversity of champions. By Marie Philippe, PhD, The Lifetime Healthcare Companies

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An Assessment of Talent Management Systems.

126 corporate index

Names and Web Sites of Participating Companies.


MEET THE

MAD MEN

NEW

TODAY, the pace of innovation is faster, and the media landscape is more dynamic and diverse than ever. At Interpublic, we believe an eclectic collection of talent is the key to delivering the big ideas our clients need in this new age of marketing communications.


momentum National Grid’s Nereida Perez Joins SHRM Foundation Board

National Grid Vice President for Inclusion and Diversity Nereida “Neddy” Perez has been appointed by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) Foundation PEREZ to the Board of Directors. The SHRM Foundation is a nonprofit organization that provides funding for research projects that advance the human resource profession. The Society for Human Resource Management Foundation is a leading funder of human resource research. During the past three years, the foundation has awarded more than $1.5 million in grants to fund rigorous, original academic research with practical implications for human resource management practice. The Foundation awards $170,000 annually in education and certification scholarships to professional and student SHRM association members and doctoral students. Perez leads National Grid’s Inclusion and Diversity efforts in fostering a more inclusive workplace. She is the founder of the Association of Employee Resources Groups (AERG), an organization that provides companies and employee network groups with consulting services and resources that support the implementation of corporate diversity initiatives.

National Grid’s Judy Hirsch Joins NYC Business Leadership Network Board

National Grid Senior Equal Employment Opportunity and Diversity Specialist Judy Hirsch has joined the New York City Business Leadership Network 8

Profi les i n Di versit y Journa l

who…what…where…when

Catalyst Honors Initiatives At Kaiser Permanente, McDonald’s Corporation, And Time Warner Inc. With The 2011 Catalyst Award NEW YORK—Kaiser Permanente, McDonald’s Corporation, and Time Warner Inc. are the recipients of the 2011 Catalyst Award, the annual award honoring exceptional initiatives from organizations that support and advance women in business. “This year’s dynamic winning initiatives reflect the power and reach of Catalyst’s mission: ‘Expanding opportunities for women and business,’” said Ilene H. Lang, president and CEO of Catalyst. “They represent the future of diverse, agile organizations eager to strengthen their position in a tough global economy and serve as models of inclusive workplaces that improve the lives of employees and their families and communities.” Catalyst Award-winning initiatives are evaluated in a rigorous year-long process against a robust set of criteria: business rationale, senior leadership support, accountability, communication, employee engagement, innovation, and measurable results. Kaiser Permanente’s initiative, Achieving Our Mission and Growing the Business Through the National Diversity Agenda, makes diversity and inclusion central to the organization’s competitive advantage and its ability to deliver culturally competent health care to its 8.6 million members. The initiative demonstrates that an investment in diversity and inclusion can yield continual improvement for women and men. McDonald’s Corporation’s strong commitment to inclusion led the company to build on its successful and longstanding diversity work in the United States by creating Freedom Within a Framework: Global Women's Initiative. Since its inception in 2006, outcomes to advance women globally have been achieved, most notably in Asia-Pacific, the Middle East, and Africa (APMEA), Europe, and the United States. Time Warner Inc.’s initiative, Creating a Unified Culture: Investing in Our Women Leaders, has resulted in a critical mass of powerful senior women role models. Using a compelling market-oriented business case for diversity and inclusion as a foundation, the initiative sought to formalize employee development policies, unify the silo culture, and accelerate the development of leaders, including the substantial pipeline of women. Kaiser Permanente, McDonald’s Corporation, and Time Warner Inc. presented indepth discussions on their initiatives at the 2011 Catalyst Awards Conference at The Waldorf Astoria in New York in March.

Board of Directors for 2011-2012, and will serve as the organization’s treasurer. The network strives to increase employment of people with disabilities in New York City and Long Island. Hirsch oversees National Grid’s affirmative action programs, serves as a consultant on equal employment opportunity matters and facilitates various training classes including her Diversity Dialogues sessions, which bring awareness and appreciation of

M A R C H / A P R I L 2 0 11

the range of diversity employees provide the workplace. She has a 30-year career in EEO, affirmative action, and diversity and inclusion in both the private and public sectors. The New York City Business Leadership Network’s mission is to provide organizational support, awareness, education and other resources to area businesses to assist employers with hiring and retaining people with disabilities. It is the newest of 60 af-


updates filiates to the U.S. Business Leadership Network, which is the national disability organization, representing over 5,000 employers across North America. National Grid is an international energy delivery company. In the U.S., National Grid delivers electricity to approximately 3.3 million customers in Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York and Rhode Island. It is also the largest distributor of natural gas in the northeastern U.S., serving approximately 3.4 million customers.

Chrysler Group Plant Manager Receives National Award

Tyree Minner, Plant Manager - Sterling Heights Assembly Plant, Chrysler Group LLC, on left. Brian Harlow, VP, Head of Powertrain Operations, Chrysler Group LLC, on right.

U.S. Black Engineer & Information Technology magazine awarded its 2011 Black Engineer of the Year President’s Award to Tyree Minner, plant manager at Chrysler Group’s Sterling Heights Assembly Plant in Sterling Heights, Michigan. Minner and other 2011 recipients were honored at the 25th Black Engineer of the Year Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Global Competitiveness Conference and Awards Gala on Feb. 19 in Washington, D.C. Minner was appointed to lead the Sterling Heights Assembly Plant, where he directs the production of

Johnson Controls Honors 13 Suppliers

MILWAUKEE, Wisc.—Johnson Controls (NYSE: JCI) honored 13 suppliers recently at its corporate Supplier Excellence Recognition Event held at the Milwaukee Club in Milwaukee. Awards in the categories of Excellence in Execution and Leadership were given to suppliers of the company’s Building Efficiency, Power Solutions and Automotive Experience businesses. The Excellence in Execution award recognizes supplier achievements in the areas of quality, delivery, service and cost. The Leadership award honors suppliers for their contributions to innovation, sustainability, continuous improvement, global growth, customer satisfaction, shareholder value and quality. “Our suppliers are integral to our success as a global growth company,” said Steve Roell, chairman and chief executive officer, Johnson Controls. “These 13 suppliers have demonstrated a strong commitment to excellence and leadership throughout this year and we are proud to recognize their outstanding contributions.” The theme of the event was based on Johnson Controls’ 125th anniversary – honoring our past, inspired by our future. Recipients of the Excellence in Execution awards were: • Xiong Wei Precision Machinery Works (Wuxi, China) • Atlas Steel (Twinsburg, Ohio) • KW Plastics (Troy, Alabama) • Automatic Spring Products (Grand Haven, Mich.) • Hornschuch (Wiessbach, Germany) Recipients of the Leadership awards were: • Innovation: Entek International, LLC (Lebanon, Oregon) • Sustainability: SKF (Goteborg, Sweden) • Continuous Improvement: Hazelett Strip-Casting Corp. (Colchester, Vermont)

the all-new Chrysler 200 and Dodge Avenger vehicles, in April 2010. The Chrysler Group historically has been a leader in promoting diversity throughout its enterprise. The company was named one of the “100 Best Companies for Working Mothers” by

• Global Growth: Pacific Rim Capital (Aliso Viejo, California) • Customer Satisfaction: Tamarana Metais Ltda. (Tamarana, Brazil) • Shareholder Value: Constellation New Energy Inc. (Baltimore, Maryland) and Manufacturers Industrial Group (Lexington, Tenn.) • Quality: W.E.T. Automotive Systems (Windsor, Ontario)

Working Mother magazine 12 times and has been recognized five times by the Human Rights Campaign Foundation as one of the country’s leading corporations supporting diversity and inclusion. continued on page 122

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9


Culture Matters

Every Cloud Has What? By Craig Storti

C

Consider the fol- things aren’t very good, doesn’t interest Americans; they lowing exchange between prefer to see things the way they could be. If optimism is an American and a German: your starting point in life—always looking on the bright SUSAN: Did you see the fourth side, the glass is half full, and every cloud has a silver linquarter sales figures yet? ing—then naturally people like Horst, who are merely HORST: Yes. Rather bad; down realistic, will come across to you as pessimistic. And true a third from last year. pessimists will no doubt strike you as downright cynics. SUSAN: We really took a beating. Let’s consider how Americans got this way. A good HORST: Yes. We did very poorly. part of the explanation deals with a concept we have SUSAN: Oh, well. We might discussed earlier in this space, locus of control. Locus as well look on the bright side; of control deals with issues of cause and effect and who things can only go up from here. or what is ultimately responsible for what happens in HORST: I’m not so sure; the figures could go either way. life. Cultures, for a variety of reasons, tend to fall into SUSAN: Sure, but no point in being gloomy though, one of two camps on this issue: the internalists and the is there? externalists. Some typical sentiments of these two camps HORST: What do you mean? are laid out below: Horst is taken aback by being called “gloomy,” since there is clearly INTERNALIST EXTERNALIST no basis in fact —or in the figures— Activism, interventionism. What happens Fatalism, stoicism. Some things are just for that characterization. Gloomy in life is primarily up to you; the individual not meant to be, no matter how hard you would mean he’s being negative, looktry. The individual can influence/control is in control in most cases; things happen ing at the situation as worse than it is. many situations, but there are other things because you “make” them happen, and if they But he’s not. are not happening, then you “do something” you can’t do anything about and must just The situation isn’t very good— accept. Sometimes failure is unavoidable about the situation; there is never any real excuse for why something can’t be done in spite of your efforts; some limits are real Susan herself says “We really took a and not self-imposed; sometimes your luck (except laziness or you just gave up). The only beating”—and both speakers agree limits to what you can achieve are internal, is good, sometimes not; some problems do the figures could go either way. The those you impose on yourself; failure means not have a solution; that’s just how it is. only fair reading of this exchange, Possibilities are circumscribed; you don’t you didn’t try hard enough; there’s no such then, is to say Horst is being realistic, thing as luck; you make your own luck. Fate always get another chance. Life is in part objective—describing the situation as and destiny can be transcended by individual what happens to you. will and determination. Life is what I do. neither better nor worse than the figures suggest. If you’re going to accuse Horst of something, you could accuse him of being a realist, but you can’t accuse him of being a While individuals in a particular culture can end up pessimist, which is why he’s surprised to be labeled gloomy. anywhere along the continuum, it is possible to plot the Although there are no facts to support Susan, most position of national cultures. I have asked people from American readers would probably agree with her, for one all over the world in training events to do just that for very simple reason: Americans are not realists. In fact, their society in general, and the results have been remarkthey’re unabashed and unapologetic optimists. There’s ably consistent. Typically, the cultures of the Middle nothing wrong with being an optimist, of course, but East, southern Europe, and Latin America tend to be optimists should never be relied upon to see things the medium to strong externalists, while North Americans way they are. The truth is the way things are, especially if and most northern Europeans tend to be medium to 10

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strong internalists. The Germans, In their book The Seven Cultures of such as our friend Capitalism, Trompenaars and HampdenHorst, usually fall Turner report on a survey wherein responsomewhere in the dents were asked whether they agreed with middle. statement A. or B. in the following pairs: A. It is not always wise to plan too far If you read the ahead because many things turn out to internalist para be a matter of good or bad fortune. graph closely, it’s B. When I make plans, I am almost easy to see why certain I can make them work. these folks would tend toward op A. Many times I feel that I have little influence over the things that happen timism. If what to me. happens in life B. It is impossible for me to believe that is basically up to chance or luck plays an important role in you, and if you can my life. always do something even about A. Most people don’t realize the extent to which their lives are controlled by those things that accidental happenings. are not up to you, B. There really is no such thing as “luck.” then there is no excuse not to be Out of the 12 countries surveyed*, more positive and optiAmericans (68 percent) agreed with statemistic. If anything ment B than any other nationality. unfortunate hap*Austria, Belgium, Canada, France, pens, then just do Germany, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, something about Singapore, Sweden, United Kingdom, USA. it. Indeed, people who don’t do anyHampden-Turner, Charles and Trompenaars, thing about their Alfons. 1993. The Seven Cultures of Capitalism. New York: Doubleday, p. 65. unfortunate circumstances, who simply lament, are widely regarded as whiners, people who would rather complain than act, and they get very little sympathy from most Americans. If you are ultimately in control of your destiny and you don’t like the destiny you’ve landed in, then take matters into your own hands. “The American attitude to life,” Bill Bryson has observed, “is remarkably upbeat and lacking in negativity.

The Luck Factor

* Bill Bryson, 1999. I’m A Stranger Here Myself. New York: Broadway Books. pp287-88

If you informed an American that a massive asteroid was hurtling toward earth at 125,000 miles an hour and that in twelve weeks the planet would be blown to smithereens, he would say: ‘Really? In that case, I suppose I’d better sign up for that Mediterranean cooking class now.’”* Back to Susan and Horst. Germans tend to be a combination of internalist and externalist which makes them neither especially optimistic nor pessimistic. They believe it’s very important to be objective, analyzing all aspects of a situation with cool detachment and a generous dash of skepticism to be on the safe side, since things are almost never as good as they look. And voila: Horst the Gloomy. In the American workplace, realists don’t fare all that well; they’re “negative,” “skeptical,” “defeatist,” they “bring everybody down.” They’re always looking at why something won’t work instead of figuring out how it could work. Go to an American boss with a problem, and she’ll ask you what the solution is. And if you don’t have one, you’ll be made to feel foolish. In many business cultures, identifying a problem is a significant contribution to the enterprise, whether or not you’ve got a solution. But in a can-do culture like America, we actually don’t have problems; rather, we have opportunities, challenges, and issues. A problem sounds too much like something intractable, a situation that can’t be resolved and just has to be accepted. So what are the implications of all this for today’s workplaces? Just this: People are judged by the prevailing norms. If you work in an environment where the prevailing norm is to be optimistic, such as many U.S. worksites, and you happen to be a realist, be prepared for taking some flack and even being branded as defeatist or negative. If you work in an environment where the prevailing norm is to be realistic and you’re an optimistic American, you may not be seen as trustworthy, and your views may be discounted. PDJ

Craig Storti, a consultant and trainer in the field of intercultural communications, is the author of seven books. His latest, Speaking of India, describes the common cultural flashpoints when Indians work together with North Americans and western Europeans. He can be contacted at: craig@craigstorti.com or learn more at his website: craigstorti.com.

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FROM My perspective

A Front Row View of Leadership By Linda Jimenez Chief Diversity Officer and Staff Vice President – Diversity & Inclusion WellPoint, Inc.

T

The flame of revolution in the Middle East that began in Tunisia and toppled the leader of Egypt has now spread to Bahrain and Libya. There are rumblings that China may be next. We have a front row view of leadership, and we must be cognizant of this picture because the same forces that are reshaping the leadership of nations around the world may also touch upon management in corporate organizations. The facilitators of change were a few individuals, fueled by the Internet and social networking services such as Twitter, Facebook, Skype and YouTube, and they provided us with a new evolution of revolution. Egypt shut down the Internet inside the country, but the revolt and our connection and view of the events taking place continued unabated. What we learned is that people can organize and express themselves in ways that were inconceivable a few years ago. Egypt’s struggle for relief from the oppression of the Mubarak regime could have ended very differently but it didn’t. When an attempt was made to crush the revolution by force, “connecting technologies”—as Secretary of State Hillary Clinton referenced them—allowed world opinion to intervene and rebuke these efforts. For corporate organizations, this front row view of leadership has heightened leaders’ responsibility to be more aware of the challenges posed by a digitally connected world, and the opportunities that world presents to us. The Internet as a commercial phenomenon is about two decades old. Within our organizations today many techniques for digital insight and learning within

corporate communications, operations and training are already well grounded. We can be certain that digital connectivity will become more pervasive. Blocking it is not an option – just ask Hasni Mubarak. Social media has provided a megaphone that is giving voice to the aspirations of millions. What does the story in Egypt and Libya tell us? From my perspective, we must recognize that leaders are defined by those who choose to follow. Power expressed through coercion, dictatorship, and strongarm tactics are short-term leadership strategies that are destined to fail. Leaders need to be able to live with, cope with and learn from dissent, as long as it is properly motivated. This requires emotional intelligence, superior listening and communication skills, and the maturity of an open heart. What revolutions are brewing in your organization? How do you know, and what are you doing to keep your finger on the pulse of your industry, your employees, your customers, and your marketplace? Our front row view of Middle East transformation makes it clear that successful leaders lead not by oppression, but rather with open dialogue, the courage to fail and a culture that doesn’t involve retribution. The fundamental lesson from the Middle East and recent events is that revolts seldom explode overnight. Great leaders must be willing to listen, engage, influence and ultimately lead change. And, the power of “connecting technologies” cannot be ignored. PDJ

“Leaders need to be able to live with, cope with and learn from dissent, as long as it is properly motivated.”

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Linda Jimenez is a native of San Antonio, Texas, and attended the University of Texas at Austin where she received her BA with honors. She is also a graduate of the University of Texas School of Law and has spent 20 years specializing in labor and employment law.


Spark Opportunity Developing the leaders of tomorrow. Providing opportunities to learn, grow and advance. Making a difference in our community.

At Walmart, diversity is the doorway to opportunity, growth and excellence. Inclusion is the key that unlocks that door. Visit us at www.walmartstores.com/diversity to learn more.

The “Spark� Design (

), Walmart and Save Money. Live Better. are marks and/or registered marks of Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. Š2011 Wal-Mart Stores, Inc., Bentonville, AR.


HUMAN equity ™

African Forms of Conflict Resolution Are Appearing in the West By Trevor Wilson Author and Global Human Equity Strategist, TWI Inc.

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In Rwanda there are approximately 120,000 murderers waiting to stand trial for massacring a million people in the 1994 genocide. It has been estimated that it would take over 120 years to bring these murderers to trial using the western judicial system. The solution chosen by the new Rwandan government is based on an ancient African concept known in that country as Gacaca. The system has evolved from communal law enforcement which was traditionally employed to settle village or familial disputes. Not only has this system proven to be a more expeditious method of delivering justice, but it is also designed to promote healing and moving forward from the crisis. Could this be a more productive way of resolving the traditional differences addressed by diversity programs? Our divisiveness has been highlighted by terms such as white guilt, male privilege and recovering racist. One of the most public examples of the issues we face has been the call by African Americans for reparations due to the injustices of slavery. Could there be a more healing and productive way of solving our problems; a way based on what Aristotle used to call practical wisdom? When I first visited South Africa in the mid ’90s I heard about the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. As I understood it, the idea was to invite the thousands of people who created and nurtured Apartheid to confess their crimes in exchange for total amnesty. I watched as South Africans of all backgrounds came forward to share the horror of their experience, tell the truth, ask for forgiveness and begin the long process of healing. In his book No Future without Forgiveness, Archbishop Tutu writes: Our country opted for a way [which] was consistent with a central African feature that we know in our 14

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“The great powers of the world may have done wonders in giving the world an industrial and military look, but the great gift still has to come from Africa – giving the world a more human face.” – Steven Biko, 1970, South African freedom fighter languages as ubuntu…it speaks of the very essence of being human. We say “my humanity is caught up, is inextricably bound up, in yours.” We say, “A person is a person through other persons.” This enlightened form of conflict resolution is beginning to appear here in the west. Books are being published on Ubuntu, blockbuster movies like Avatar have borrowed from the Ubuntu language, and even President Obama has reflected the Ubuntu spirit in some of his comments about bridging the racial divide in America. He has said, “I believe deeply that we cannot solve the challenges of our time unless we solve them together – unless we perfect our union by understanding that we may have different stories, but we hold common hopes; that we may not look the same and we may not have come from the same place, but we all want to move in the same direction.” Both Gacaca and Ubuntu are concepts based on practical wisdom, which is the combination of knowing the right thing to do with the moral skill to figure out how to do it. This type of wisdom is required whenever we are relating to others, especially in the world of work. This type of wisdom is based on character, virtue and humanness. As Steven Biko says in the opening quote, this is the real gift Africa may contribute to our small global village that has so far been obsessed with economic, political and industrial affairs. PDJ In 1996 Trevor started TWI Inc. to specialize in the area of equity and diversity as a business issue. In the same year, Trevor published a highly acclaimed book titled Diversity at Work: The Business Case for Equity. The firm’s clients include some of the most progressive global employers. TWI’s Human Equity™ approach was instrumental in catapulting Coca-Cola’s South African division to the top performing division worldwide. Visit www.twiinc.com for more information.


At KPMG LLP, we believe that diversity is a business imperative, and that our ability to leverage the diverse experiences, talents, ideas, and perspectives of all our people is absolutely linked to our success. Our goal is to continually attract, retain, and develop high performers from all backgrounds. We’re proud that our Chairman and CEO John Veihmeyer is providing the leadership we need to make that goal a reality. kpmgcareers.com

KPMG. A great place to build a career.

© 2011 KPMG LLP, a Delaware limited liability partnership and the U.S. member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A. The KPMG name, logo and “cutting through complexity” are registered trademarks or trademarks of KPMG International. 23594NSS

Diversity and inclusion: woven into everything we do.


viewpoint

What’s Culture got to do with Diversity? What’s Diversity got to do with Culture? By Pamela Arnold President American Institute for Managing Diversity, Inc.

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Last week I attended a panel discussion on corporate culture. The conversation included the topic of diversity and how it was a part of an organization’s corporate culture. The panelists described culture as a living part of the company that changes over time and is reflected in values that include trust, respect and integrity. Culture was never specifically defined, but the characteristics for each company were discussed and included examples of how the culture is played out on a daily basis. Throughout the conversation, the panelists confirmed that diversity and inclusion initiatives were a core part of the company culture. How do we define culture? Organizational culture can be described as all the knowledge, values and behavior shared by an organization. It can be described as the mood or tone of the work environment. Every organization has its own culture with values and symbols that represent it. The mood can be set by various symbols—the color of the furniture, the wording in the mission and vision statements, and business-casual dress versus professional attire, work environment, company norms, and diversity and inclusion programs. Organizational cultures can stay the same or change over time. Employee orientation programs include sessions on the company’s culture because of the importance of connecting employees to the work environment and to a culture that is positive and engaging. The selection, interviewing and hiring process includes inquiry into how potential employees will fit into the culture of the company. Behavioral interviewing was introduced in the 1970s to better identify how the potential employee would contribute to the success of the company. All of these steps validate the importance of a strong culture in an organization. 16

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“A fish discovers its need for water only when it is no longer in it. Our own culture is like water to a fish. It sustains us. We live and breathe through it.” – Excerpt from Riding the Waves of Culture, by Fons Trompenaars and Charles Hampden-Turner. Characteristics of a strong culture include: • Clear philosophy on conducting business • Investment of time communicating values, norms and beliefs • Existence of value statement • Shared values & norms • Defined process for selection of new employees. Building and sustaining a strong culture takes time, effective leaders and engaged employees. Recruiting, retaining and sustaining the diverse workforce and weaving it into the foundation of the company benefits organizations of all types. Diversity management and inclusion embedded into the company culture produces long-term innovation and creativity, increases talent selection and retention, creates unity, reduces turnover and improves productivity and profitability. Organizations with diversity initiatives and programs built into the culture show employees that their contributions to the organization are welcomed, encouraged and appreciated by management and the leaders. This integration helps organizations ensure that the culture is inclusive and reflects the dynamics of a diverse workforce. A strong organizational culture with a diversity thread as part of the foundational fabric leads to engaged employees who are productive and have a desire, passion and ability to add to the bottom line. PDJ Pamela W. Arnold is President of the American Institute for Managing Diversity, Inc. The organization is a 501(c)(3) public interest nonprofit dedicated to advancing diversity thought leadership through research, education, and public outreach. AIMD works to strengthen our communities and institutions through effective diversity management. For more information, please visit www.aimd.org.


CEO │ Leadership in Action 2011 AWARD WINNERS

Patrick C. Dunican Jr. Gibbons P.C.

Michael I. Roth Interpublic Group

Jeffrey A. Joerres Manpower Inc.

Leo Kiely MillerCoors

Michael Nannes Dickstein Shapiro LLP

John D. Forsyth Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield

Henrik Slipsager ABM Industries Incorporated

Doug Parker US Airways

Dan Amos Aflac Incorporated

Darren Entwistle TELUS

Christopher E. Pinnington Fraser Milner Casgrain LLP MG Bruce A. Casella Army and Air Force Exchange Service

Linda A. Mills Northrop Grumman Information Systems

Robert J. Stevens Lockheed Martin Corporation

George Chavel Sodexo, Inc. Mark Ketchum Newell Rubbermaid R. Peter MacKinnon, Q.C. University of Saskatchewan Mandy Shapansky Xerox Canada

Don R. Knauss The Clorox Company

Clayton M. Jones Rockwell Collins Alan MacGibbon Deloitte & Touche LLP

Diane P. Holder UPMC Health Plan Douglas H. Brooks Brinker International, Inc.

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James Murren MGM Resorts International

Michael R. Anastasio Los Alamos National Laboratory

Bob Kelly BNY Mellon

Murray D. Martin Pitney Bowes Inc.

David P. Steiner Waste Management, Inc.

John B. Veihmeyer KPMG LLP

Beth Mooney KeyCorp Angela F. Braly, WellPoint, Inc. (not pictured)

William Blair Toronto Police Service

Cynthia Morton Ministry of Labour, Government of Ontario www.diversityjour nal.com

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 SPECIAL CEO IN Action GATEFOLD

SEE IN US

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t gives us great pleasure to present the Profiles in Diversity Journal 2011 CEO Leadership in Action Award to the organizations featured in the pages that follow.

Presenting the 2011 CEO Leadership in Action Recognizing 33 CEOs who fully support theIR organization’s Diversity & Inclusion initiatives.

WHO YOU ARE

The CEOs being recognized do not seek recognition for their work. In fact, all of them are eager to give credit to others. That’s the nature of leadership. But we honor them because their personal, hands-on involvement in diversity sends an unequivocal message about the importance of diversity and inclusion at these companies and organizations. Their work sets a powerful example in the workplace and in the communities in which they live and do business. We especially hope that all the employees at these firms take pride in the diversity leadership shown by the CEO.

At New York Life we believe that people’s differences can be their greatest attributes. We recognize that employees’ unique qualities often lead to innovation, positive change, and a more productive and dynamic workplace.

Let this award honor and proclaim to the world their Leadership in Action! Congratulations to all!

For more information about a career with New York Life visit us at www.newyorklife.com/diversity NEW YORK LIFE. THE COMPANY YOU KEEP.® © 2010 New York Life Insuranace Company, 51 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10010 EOE/M/F/D/V w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

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award™


 MARCH/APRIL 2011

Special CEO Edition

Dan Amos, Aflac Incorporated • Henrik Slipsager, ABM Industries Incorporated MG Bruce A. Casella, Army and Air Force Exchange Service • Douglas H. Brooks, Brinker International, Inc. • Bob Kelly, BNY Mellon

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CEO │ Leadership in Action

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Henrik

Slipsager

“ Diversity in all of its dimensions is a competitive advantage for ABM.”

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2011 award winner

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ounded in 1909, ABM is a leading provider of facility services, offering engineering, energy efficiency, commercial cleaning and maintenance, parking and security. We employ nearly 100,000 people. I recently reached my 10th year as CEO of this historic company. I marked the anniversary in unique fashion, appearing on CBS’s Undercover Boss. As you may know, the popular reality television program features company executives going incognito and working alongside their frontline employees. While my “success” on the frontlines underscored why I am best suited for my day job, I was enormously proud to witness firsthand these employees’ outstanding skills, clear dedication and client focus. My experience uncovered for millions why they are the backbone of ABM and the true stars of this Company. There was another We recognize that and Indonesian – and telling aspect. While rich diversity is an collectively reflects all we had no role in integral part of the of the world’s spiritual selecting the featured company’s past, present beliefs. We live and employees, look at and future success. The work in all 50 states, their profiles: Peter, twin goals of diversity Puerto Rico, Canada a Chicago window and inclusion require and elsewhere. Of cleaner, is Polish. commitment and nearly 100,000 Maria is an Albanian continued focus. employees, 75 percent foreperson in New Moving forward, our are people of color. York. Kenny, Tampa path will concentrate The context is even shuttle driver, is a on leveraging and more compelling: native of Puerto Rico. maximizing our 100+ years in business. Larry, an African $3.5 billion in sales. employees’ rich skills American freight Thousands of clients. and talents and operator, is a New Fortune 500 Company. furthering the cultural Yorker. I, by the Diversity is working. breadth of our way, am a native of Our enduring success organization to Denmark. is directly related to the promote more diversity Undercover Boss rediversity of our eminto every level of the vealed ABM’s rich diployees, and the richmanagerial ranks. We versity. Our workforce ness and depth of their have the foundation. speaks languages rangtalent. Diversity in all We will build on it – ing from Cantonese of its dimensions is a driven by ABM’s core and Somalian to competitive advantage values of respect, fairRussian to Spanish for ABM. ness and dignity. PDJ

Company: ABM Industries Incorporated (NYSE: ABM) headquarters: New York City web site: www.abm.com Primary business: Facility Services ANNUAL REVENUES: $3.5 billion Employees: Nearly 100,000

TITLE: President & Chief Executive Officer EDUCATION: MBA (equivalent), University of Copenhagen FIRST JOB: Summer Landscaping (age 14) WHAT I’M READING: The Man from Bejing, by Henning Mankell MY PHILOSOPHY: Follow your vision. BEST ADVICE: Take pride in whatever you do. FAMILY: Married with three children INTERESTS: Family, golf, soccer, bridge, fishing

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  

CEO │ Leadership in Action

A

s I write this essay, a colleague sent me an interesting article detailing a study from the California State Education Department. It notes that Latinos now make up a majority of California’s public school students, cracking the 50 percent barrier for the first time. Furthermore, 27 percent of students self-identify as white, and 23 percent identify as black, Asian or other. As the future of our country becomes increasingly diverse, it underscores a dynamic that I, as CEO of a FORTUNE 500 company, must ingrain into the culture of our business. There is no such thing as a “one-size-fits-all” approach, and the importance of sustaining a strong diversity program is no more a luxury than the air we breathe. You either do it, or you perish. Leadership I’ve learned that true diversity, the kind that develops into an expansion of thought and experiences, won’t happen without a commitment from the top, which is why I insist on a strong diversity program. If we hired only people who looked and sounded like me, it would limit our success, so I celebrate our eclectic workforce. We have women – in particular, minority women – at the highest levels. More than 40 percent of our employees are minorities, while women account for more than half of our management team, including 30 percent of senior executives. While having a naturally diverse employee pool is a privilege, embracing this good fortune provides the credibility we need to break into untapped or underrepresented consumer markets by showing decision makers, our potential customers, that

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we are serious about diversity, which makes us stronger as a company. Turning Words into Actions Since 2003, we’ve spent more than $100 million working with diverse suppliers, leading one magazine to name Aflac a Top 50 Corporation for supplier diversity and another to award us a spot on their top 40 list for diversity several times. Aside from it just being the right thing to do, there is a strong business case for diversity. In 2010, we unveiled an improved, culturally sensitive Hispanic Web site in hopes of reaching this under-served market. We’re hiring more Hispanic agents to reflect the fastest growing population in America. Our country is diverse, our market is diverse. We welcome these demographic changes with open arms and an eye toward the future. PDJ

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Company: Aflac Incorporated (NYSE: AFL) headquarters: Columbus, Georgia web site: www.aflac.com Primary business: Supplemental Insurance ANNUAL REVENUES: $18 billion Employees: 8,000 Including U.S. and Japan TITLE: Chairman and CEO EDUCATION: Bachelor’s in Risk Management, University of Georgia FIRST JOB: 1973-1983 - State Sales Coordinator for Aflac WHAT I’M READING: Stall Points, by Matthew Olson and Derek van Bever MY PHILOSOPHY: In college I learned the fundamental principles of risk management and have always employed them in my personal and business decisions. BEST ADVICE: If you treat your employees well they will take care of your customers and your business. FAMILY: Wife Kathelen, children Paul II and Lauren INTERESTS: Family, art, fishing, and UGA Football FAVORITE CHARITIES: Children’s cancer research and treatment at the Aflac Cancer Center in Atlanta


2011 award winner

Dan

Amos

“ While having a naturally diverse employee pool is a privilege, embracing this good fortune provides the credibility we need to break into untapped or underrepresented consumer markets…”

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CEO │ Leadership in Action

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MG Bruce A.

Casella

“ The Diversity Leadership Council works to strengthen diversity at all management levels to more closely reflect the overall workforce.” 30

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11 award winner

Company: Army and Air Force Exchange Service headquarters: Dallas, Texas web site: www.shopemyexchange.com Primary business: Multi-channel Retailer ANNUAL REVENUES: $9-10 billion Employees: 44,000 TITLE: Commanding General and CEO EDUCATION: BS, US Military Academy; MS, Systems Management; MS, Electrical Engineering FIRST JOB: Military – Army 2nd Lieutenant, Signal Corps, Republic of South Korea WHAT I’M READING: Wooden on Leadership, by John Wooden MY PHILOSOPHY: Work hard, live by a high set of values. BEST ADVICE: Look at organization from several levels. Use metrics to make senior leadership aware of diversity challenges. FAMILY: Daughter (Heather)

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iversity and inclusion are so essential to the Army and Air Force Exchange Service’s success that both are incorporated into the military command’s overall strategy. The Exchange’s five year strategic plan has a key goal to build a culture of loyalty, ownership, sustainability and continuous improvement, including the key strategy of growth in diversity representation. To further strengthen this culture of loyalty and inclusion, the Exchange is reaching out to all associates by supporting nine associate resource groups that provide opportunities, partner with and give back to communities, network with senior management and attain career-building skills. The Diversity cludes being a premier the effort is gaining Leadership Council momentum as minority collaborative partner works to strengthen spend increased 81% that both “identifies diversity at all manand develops new busi- in the third quarter as agement levels to compared to last year, nesses to close the more closely reflect innovation gap.” A key providing increased the overall workforce. business opportunities performance measure The Exchange is fowhile serving a diverse of this goal is to cusing efforts to grow increase spending with customer base of 12.3 management diversity million people worldminority- veterannumbers, through stra- disabled veteran- and wide. tegic recruiting, menThe Exchange is an women-owned busitoring associates, as organization that cares nesses. This isn’t new well as career developto get it right. The refor the Exchange supment, assignments and plier diversity program sult is a great organizapromotions. tion full of opportunity which has been at The organization’s work for more than 20 for people, products strategic plan also inyears; results indicate and partnerships. PDJ

INTERESTS: Racquetball, golf, history FAVORITE CHARITY: Combined Federal Campaign

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CEO │ Leadership in Action

  

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or any global company that cares about performance, the decision to foster a diverse and inclusive workforce is not rocket science; it’s just good business. As studies clearly show, a diverse workforce is just more effective. Sales tend to be higher. Return on equity tends to be higher. And it’s easier to attract and retain top talent. At BNY Mellon, we welcome what each employee has to offer because it’s good for clients, good for shareholders and better for all of us. Diversity of thought can be a powerful force: It means that in serving our clients we’re able to draw on a wealth of experiences, viewpoints, perspectives and fresh thinking world-wide. Since creativity so often springs only have as much power as we give from difference, our diversity transthem. When you’re winning new lates into innovative solutions for our business, when you’re the one the clients. client wants to speak to, or when Worldwide, our company continyou’re driving a project to a successues to work to ensure a level playing ful conclusion, your efforts will be field where each person is able to recognized. Your work speaks for contribute and advance. And we pro- itself, whoever you are and whatever vide support mechanisms, so no one you do. has to go it alone. As chair of our Global Diversity We have established a number of & Inclusion Council, I feel responaffinity networks. These are formalsible for ensuring that our organizaized networks around the world that tion supports its people, rewards support people with a shared charac- performance and values what each teristic, such as women; people from individual brings to our company. multi-cultural backgrounds; those My personal involvement also signals with disabilities; and lesbian, gay, to every BNY Mellon employee that bisexual and transgender employees. it’s not just an HR initiative; it’s core Our affinity networks support thou- to our business. The only way we’ll sands of employees and are open to deliver on our performance goals is all – not just those for whom the if our people have the room to fully name implies membership. utilize their talents. There is just an incredible power I’m proud of the progress we’ve in community, in networking with made in recent years to make that a others and in working together to reality. That can only be good for achieve our goals. our employees, our clients and our I’ve also found that stereotypes shareholders. PDJ

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Company: BNY Mellon (NYSE: BK) headquarters: New York City web site: www.bnymellon.com Primary business: Financial Services ANNUAL REVENUES: $13.6 billion Employees: 47,700 (six continents, 36 countries and 100 markets)

TITLE: Chairman and Chief Executive Officer EDUCATION: Chartered Accountant and FCA; MBA and honorary doctorate, Cass Business School, City University in London; bachelor’s degree and honorary doctorate, St. Mary’s University in Canada. FAMILY: Wife of 28 years, Rose; two children. Community Involvement: Chairman of the Financial Services Forum and president of the Federal Advisory Council of the Federal Reserve Board; member of the Boards of Directors of the Financial Services Roundtable and the Institute of International Finance (IIF); member of the Trilateral Commission and the Partnership for New York City


2011 award winner

Bob

Kelly

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Douglas H.

Brooks

“ A good company becomes a great company with dedication, respect, leadership and inclusiveness which is our commitment.” 34

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2011 award winner

Company: Brinker International, Inc. (NYSE: EAT) headquarters: Dallas, Texas website: www.brinker.com Primary business: Parent company of restaurant brands Chili’s® Grill & Bar and Maggiano’s Little Italy® ANNUAL REVENUES: $2.8 billion Employees: More than 100,000 TITLE: President, CEO and Chairman of the Board EDUCATION: BS, Hotel and Restaurant Management, University of Houston FIRST JOB: Dishwasher and busboy at Youngblood’s Fried Chicken in Dallas at age 13 WHAT I’M READING: Outliers, by Malcolm Gladwell MY PHILOSOPHY: Be honest with people, but make them feel special. BEST ADVICE: Don’t judge a book by its cover. Never say never and never say always. FAMILY: Holly, his wife of 33 years, and their two adult sons, Taylor and Kyle. INTERESTS: Non-profit work, travel, golf, reading FAVORITE CHARITIES: Limbs for Life Foundation, Kenny Can Foundation

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t Brinker International, our core values of growth, diversity, family, integrity, passion and balance guide us in the way we serve our guests, the way we work with each other and in the way we serve our communities. From the variety of dining experiences we offer at our restaurant brands to the more than 100,000 team members who each contribute something unique, celebrating diversity is something we do every day. A good company becomes a great company with dedication, respect, leadership and inclusiveness, which is our commitment. My approach as a leader of this company is strengthened through the involvement of my team members. They teach me to embrace and value the differences and perspectives in others because each person could be a potential guest or a future team member who has the ability to impact our business. It is because of our passionate commitment, we have tied diversity metrics to Brinker’s fiscal 2011 year-end results and bonus plans. These metrics significantly help keep diversity a top priority within the business. Furthermore, I believe it is crucial integrates diversity and diversity guides our to sustain a strong inclusion throughout company in the way diversity and incluthe following business we provide hospitality sion program, as it components: multiculand in every interaction not only impacts the tural marketing and with our guests, as well way we attract, retain advertising, supplier as our approach with and develop our team diversity, global opteam members and in members, but it enerations, recruitment, the communities we sures value is added to training, advancement, serve. the company and our mentorship, internship, Lastly, the reason we shareholders. From higher education, com- passionately support our workplace to our munity involvement diversity and inclurestaurants, to the and more. sion is because as we communities we serve, We do not view dicelebrate the differBrinker has and will versity as a business ences that make a good continue to integrate case; rather it is a core company great and diversity and incluvalue that is ingrained leverage the individual sion initiatives into all into the company’s strengths of our team areas of our business cultural beliefs. Our members, we create an and cultural beliefs. passion is making innovative and unified Specifically, Brinker people feel special, and team. PDJ

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 MARCH/APRIL 2011

Special CEO Edition

Michael Nannes, Dickstein Shapiro LLP • Patrick C. Dunican Jr., Gibbons P.C. • Christopher E. Pinnington, Fraser Milner Casgrain LLP Don R. Knauss, The Clorox Company • Alan MacGibbon, Deloitte & Touche LLP

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Company: The Clorox Company (NYSE: CLX) headquarters: Oakland, California web site: www.TheCloroxCompany.com and www.CloroxCSR.com Primary business: Consumer Packaged Goods ANNUAL REVENUES: $5.53 billion Employees: 8,300 TITLE: Chairman and CEO EDUCATION: Indiana University FIRST JOB: U.S. Marine Corps WHAT I’M READING: Theodore Roosevelt Trilogy, by Edmund Morris MY PHILOSOPHY: From the words of Jackie Robinson: “A life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives.” BEST ADVICE: Your people come first. FAMILY: Wife, Ellie; three sons, Jack, Mickey, Alec; and daughter, Kara INTERESTS: Golf, playing with my kids (football, soccer) FAVORITE CHARITIES: Don and Ellie Knauss Scholarship

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CEO │ Leadership in Action

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t the end of the day, it doesn’t matter if you’re black or white, gay or straight, tall or short. What does matter is the kind of human being you are – your character. Race, sexual orientation, expression or characteristics are not differences that should matter except for the richness and diversity of thought and experience they bring to the table. If you disenfranchise people for these reasons – or any other – you limit the genius of an organization. It’s about winning and keeping the best and brightest engaged. When people hold themselves back, you lose out on the best they have to offer and the unique perspectives they’ve gained from their journeys through life. Cultivating an environment that celebrates diversity, that makes it comfortable and safe for each person to bring his or her whole self to work every day, is key. Not only is it the right thing to do, but failing to do so negatively affects productivity, employee engagement, retention and more. Fundamentally, I believe great leaders – really, great people – share five key qualities: integrity, curiosity, optimism, compassion and humility. Theses traits are the differences I believe should really make a difference in the workplace. Integrity is at the core of trust. The single Francisco and gay rights is fundamental to buildkey to effectiveness in activist, said, “Hope will ing the connections my mind is trust built between people that go never be silent.” from integrity. If I bebeyond tolerating diCompassion is a lieve that you’re always versity to embracing it. key to trust as well. going to tell the truth, It’s about attracting and Compassionate leaders I’m going to trust you. put the concerns of oth- keeping top talent. And when you trust It’s my job to set an ers ahead of themselves. others, things get done. example and provide Humility. To me, Curiosity. Ideas drive humility is about being the leadership our comorganizations. They approachable and acpany needs to continue drive innovation. They cessible. That’s how you changing for the better. break new ground. You learn what’s really going I work to continually can only continue to on and it’s how you reinforce the standard get better at what you promote engagement that all employees are do if you are truly curi- through making genuine expected to be open to ous about your craft. connections with people. diversity of all types and Optimism nurtures Humility is behaving in to accept people who dreamers. Optimism a way that’s not arrogant are different from themcreates possibilities. and insensitive. selves. It’s also my job Optimists are problem I believe that modelto inspire people to live solvers. Optimists speak ing these five behaviors the leadership traits and up to create a betshapes our culture at realize a better future ter future. As Harvey Clorox and has the – a future of equality Milk, the first openly power to create a trustand openness for all our gay supervisor of San ing environment, which people at Clorox. PDJ

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2011 award winner

Don R.

Knauss

“ What does matter is the kind of human being you are – your character.”

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CEO │ Leadership in Action

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Alan

MacGibbon “ I’m passionately committed to the process of becoming a more inclusive organization.”

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11 award winner

A

s CEO of Deloitte, my job is one of stewardship: setting the stage for continued success. When we began to look at diversity, I made sure it was discussed at every executive meeting, board meeting, and town hall. People were waiting for me to get tired of talking about it, but I’ve grown more committed to building an inclusive workplace. I know I won’t see the full results of efforts; the true test of my leadership will be the longevity of Deloitte’s commitment to diversity. Operating as a fully goals, we must appeal We’ll reach that goal bilingual company to the best and brightby making diverse hirfor over 150 years est, and they come ing choices at all career has provided us with from every part of our stages – not just out of a launching pad to diverse society. university, where the inclusiveness. We’ve My approach is to pool of candidates natalways recognized create opportunities to urally reflects Canadian the rich thinking and put people in leadersociety – but also at solutions that result ship roles, not only as more senior levels. We’ll from more than one a reward for their abili- also use self-identifying language and culture, ties, but to give diverse data to monitor and so taking it to the groups role models address any anomalies next level makes good they can look up to. in turnover. sense. Last month, Occasionally, you have I’m passionately I visited a client in to stretch the fit a bit – committed to the Dubai and observed but if you don’t make process of becomfirsthand how meanthe effort, you’ll never ing a more inclusive ingful it was to have see change. In the next organization. With team members who two years, we want a every step, the learning speak Arabic and are greater proportion of has been incredible. familiar with Muslim our newly promoted Whether supportculture. In Canada, leaders to be diverse. ing our LGBT netwe are fortunate to Our goal is 50 percent, work, sponsoring the have people of every Paralympic Games, language, every culture and includes people with disabilities and or holding a crossand every lifestyle, as LGBTs (lesbian, gay, country dialogue on well as the new milbisexual and transgendiversity, we are not lennial generation endered people), not just just aiming at the tartering the workforce. visible minorities and get, we are embracing To achieve our firm’s women. the journey. PDJ ambitious growth

Company: Deloitte & Touche LLP headquarters: Toronto, Ontario web site: www.deloitte.ca Primary business: Professional Services ANNUAL REVENUES: $1.4 billion Employees: 7,638 TITLE: Managing Partner and Chief Executive Officer EDUCATION: Bachelor of Commerce, University of New Brunswick; Honorary Doctor of Letters, University of New Brunswick FIRST JOB: Credit Manager at a hardware store WHAT I’M READING: The Girl who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest, by Stieg Larsson MY PHILOSOPHY: Lead by example – show versus tell. BEST ADVICE: Worry about what you have to address, not what is outside your control. FAMILY: Wife Glynis and two daughters INTERESTS: Golf, travel, gardening FAVORITE CHARITIES: United Way and The Learning Partnership

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CEO │ Leadership in Action

headquarters: Washington, DC web site: www.DicksteinShapiro.com Primary business: Law Firm ANNUAL REVENUES: $297 million Employees: 780 TITLE: Chairman EDUCATION: BBA, with High Distinction, University of Michigan; JD, Georgetown University Law Center FIRST JOB: My first non-legal job was as a truck driver for a grain mill WHAT I’M READING: Citizens of London, by Lynne Olson MY PHILOSOPHY: Take a deep breath; realize how fortunate you are. BEST ADVICE: Did you really mean to email that....? FAMILY: The best part of my life (31 years of marriage and three kids in their 20s) INTERESTS: My kids; multiple sports (when talent doesn’t matter) FAVORITE CHARITIES: Legal Aid Society; Duke Ellington Fund

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Company: Dickstein Shapiro LLP

s the leader of a large national law firm, I have learned that it’s impossible to put too high a premium on diversity. That may sound like overstatement, but it’s not. The legal industry has evolved to a point where diversity issues are enmeshed with the core of our business—finding and retaining the best attorneys and representing top corporations. In other words, firms that don’t understand diversity will get left behind (which isn’t a bad thing). Most law firm leaders understand this. However, generating new ideas about diversity and finding creative ways to enhance it is a constant challenge. To other leaders, I only have this advice: find inspiration anywhere, and everywhere, you can. I have been lucky to find teachprovider networks. Diversity became ers in all corners of my work and a heavy factor in how DuPont picked life, from my wife to colleagues and its legal representation, and the move clients. My education began, in sent a message to firms around the many ways, with women’s issues, as I country: diversity needed to be a watched my wife Nancy successfully business priority. balance her own legal career with And, at Dickstein Shapiro it is. My motherhood, blazing a part-time firm continues to find new ways to path in 1987. support and promote our diverse atAround the same time, a new astorneys. Most recently, we launched sociate arrived at the firm who would a mentoring and retention program later demonstrate the importance of that pairs African American partners flexibility. In her first month on the with associates. We also maintain a job, Deborah Kelly learned she was thriving Women’s Leadership Initiative pregnant with triplets, and immedithat supports business development ately chose an alternative schedule, for our women attorneys. And, I’m which she maintained even as she proud that our efforts are have been made partner. A responsive manage- recognized by the MCCA, the DC ment team is paramount in making Women’s Bar Association, and the such arrangements work. She has re- ABA’s National Association of Women mained with our firm as her children Lawyers. My involvement in these have grown, providing clients consis- and other organizations, such as the tent representation and pride in the Advisory Council of the Project for firm’s flexibility. Attorney Retention and the Board of I have also found guidance in cliDirectors of the Duke Ellington Fund, ents, like Stacey Mobley, the longare crucial in advancing inclusion. time general counsel of DuPont, Family, friends, colleagues, and who joined our firm a few years clients—I’ve learned about diversity ago. Stacey developed the “DuPont from all parts of my life. Every leader Model,” one of the first legal-preferred should. PDJ

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2011 award winner

Michael

Nannes

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CEO │ Leadership in Action

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Christopher E.

Pinnington “ While we have made a great deal of progress, we are in a constant state of learning and have much work to do.” 44

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2011 award winner

A

s the son of a career member of the Canadian Armed Forces, I spent much of my childhood living abroad. This exposed me to a vast array of cultures and world views, and taught me the importance of understanding and appreciating different perspectives. My early experiences prepared me well for the future. I quickly learned that in the working world, depth and innovation come more readily from diverse groups who are better able to identify and seize opportunities and to confront challenges. Throughout my career, I have worked to apply the lessons of my childhood and have benefitted from surrounding myself with highly talented people holding divergent points of view. Given the opportunity to lead FMC, I made it my personal priority to instill and nurture a culture of mutual respect, compassion and collegiality, and to ensure that every individual is heard and feels equally respected, valued and honored. I believe that if we are able to achieve these simple things, it will benefit us all, align us with our clients’ needs and expectations, and drive our business success. clients, and we have created internSeveral years ago when I was the Managing Partner of FMC’s Toronto ships to assist internationally-trained office, I asked a group of individuals lawyers transition to legal practice in Canada. I am immensely proud of to work with me to tackle the chalwhat we have accomplished. lenge of building a continuous and Over the past several years, FMC has sustainable culture of diversity and been honored by the business and legal inclusion at FMC. Since then, we have worked together to make diver- communities for our commitment and achievements, and while the recognisity and inclusion part of our daily dialogue. Today, diversity and inclu- tion is gratifying, it does not define sion is an important part of our stra- my commitment. In 2011, we will embark on our second Engagement tegic plan. We have both a National and Inclusion survey which will proDiversity and Inclusion Committee vide us with a measure of how far we and local committees in each of our have come and signal where we need offices which address local interests to go from here. I am determined that and concerns. we continue moving forward in our We have mandated awareness journey, and that our commitment to training for all members of the orgaimprove our own diversity reflects our nization with hiring, promotion or compensation responsibilities, and we culture and our values. As CEO, it is essential for me to actively lead the are on the verge of providing awarecharge by inspiring and motivating ness training to every firm member members of the firm to make diversity through a new e-learning initiative. and inclusion a priority, both personWe sponsor scholarships and conferences, often in collaboration with our ally and professionally. PDJ

Company: Fraser Milner Casgrain LLP (FMC) headquarters: Montréal, Ottawa, Toronto, Edmonton, Calgary, Vancouver web site: www.fmc-law.com Primary business: Law Firm Employees: 1,500 TITLE: Chief Executive Officer EDUCATION: BA, Trinity College, University of Toronto; LLB, Osgoode Hall Law School FIRST JOB: I worked on an assembly line in a publishing plant WHAT I’M READING: Swedish author Henning Mankell’s addictive Kurt Wallander series of crime novels MY PHILOSOPHY: We achieve greater success through collaboration and teamwork. BEST ADVICE: Surround yourself with colleagues who complement your strengths but provide diverse skills and perspectives. FAMILY: Wife, Astrid; children – Hilary, Allison, Stephanie, Ian INTERESTS: Golf, tennis, cross-country skiing/snowshoeing, gardening, cooking, reading and travel FAVORITE CHARITy: United Way

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CEO │ Leadership in Action

S

ince our founding in 1926, Gibbons has been headquartered in Newark, a city with a dynamic, diverse population from which we have always drawn a significant portion of our employee base. As long as we have been in business, we have seen in action the distinct value diversity brings to a workplace. Gibbons is committed to attracting, developing, and advancing the best lawyers possible, recognizing that diversity adds valuable perspectives, experience, talents, and cultural competence that enhance the creativity and effectiveness of our legal practice and client service. Diversity also enables the firm to reflect the broader world we live in, allowing our employees to function, both professionally and socially, in a familiar, collegial setting that inspires their best work. Our clients spemal client service. increasing at six times cifically seek out and Our commitment to the rate of non-W/ value service providers diversity also enhances MBE companies in with diverse workforcthe service provided to the United States. It es that include women us in our own business simply makes business and people of color at operations. Gibbons sense for Gibbons to all levels, because they affiliate with such a themselves increasingly strives to obtain the best quality and price fast-growing market have diverse profesfor goods and services. segment. By formsionals in decisionOur supplier diversity ing relationships with making positions program supports this these companies, we are and because, as smart goal by providing acworking with potential businesspeople, they cess to a larger pool of future clients. By suprecognize that diverse qualified providers. The porting W/MBEs that viewpoints lead to the professionals with purvalue diversity and inbest possible work chasing power at our clusion, moreover, we product. In addition, firm consider diversity help them to succeed clients particularly apan important purchasand thus support our preciate our retention ing criteria, assessing own corporate values: efforts with regard to vendors based in part the more they succeed, women and people of on their commitment the more likely they are color. The loss of conto diversity and certifito hire and promote a tinuity and productivcation as a W/MBE. diverse workforce. This ity when an attorney A diverse pool of sup- process of “paying it leaves a firm, requiring pliers fosters competiforward” serves to exhis or her entire casetion and results in betpand diversity throughload to be transferred ter service, price, and out the entire business to other attorneys, is quality. W/MBEs are community. PDJ vast, interrupting opti-

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Company: Gibbons P.C. headquarters: Newark, New Jersey web site: www.gibbonslaw.com Primary business: Law ANNUAL REVENUES: $111 million Employees: 373 TITLE: Chairman and Managing Director EDUCATION: Seton Hall University Law School, JD, cum laude, 1991; Iona College, BA, 1988 FIRST JOB: Paper boy WHAT I’M READING: The Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Star-Ledger, and Record newspapers daily, NJBIZ magazine, and industry newspapers that cover law MY PHILOSOPHY: Individuals affiliated with an organization should sublimate their own egos for the good of the organization. When making decisions never ask what is best for you, but rather what is best for your company. FAMILY: Wife Christina and children Morgan and Michael INTERESTS: New York Yankee baseball, New York Giants football FAVORITE CHARITIES: New Jersey State Bar Foundation; Seton Hall University School of Law


2011 award winner

Patrick C.

Dunican Jr. “ Our commitment to diversity also enhances the service provided to us in our own business operations.”

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FRESH

PERSPECTIVES, CREATED

DAILY. © 2010 Lockheed Martin Corporation

THIS IS HOW Diversity is more than a goal. It’s a necessity. When facing down the most important projects in the world, every idea counts. Every viewpoint matters. That’s why, at Lockheed Martin, we not only believe in diversity. We embrace it. Because diversity is the “how” that delivers the most innovative solutions to some of the most complex problems imaginable.

lockheedmartin.com/how


 MARCH/APRIL 2011

Special CEO Edition

John B. Veihmeyer, KPMG LLP • Michael I. Roth, Interpublic Group • Robert J. Stevens, Lockheed Martin Corporation Beth Mooney, KeyCorp • Michael R. Anastasio, Los Alamos National Laboratory

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CEO │ Leadership in Action

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Michael I.

Roth

“ Embracing diversity makes us a better partner to our clients, a more attractive employer, and better at creating value for shareholders.” 50

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2011 award winner

Company: Interpublic Group (NASDAQ: IPG) headquarters: New York City web site: www.interpublic.com Primary business: Marketing Services ANNUAL REVENUES: $6 billion Employees: 41,000

TITLE: Chairman and Chief Executive Officer EDUCATION: LLM, New York University Law School; JD, Boston University Law School FIRST JOB: Tax Lawyer at Coopers & Lybrand WHAT I’M READING: Crime mysteries MY PHILOSOPHY: Do what is right. BEST ADVICE: Keep your head down and do your best. FAMILY: Married with three children and four grandchildren INTERESTS: Golf FAVORITE CHARITIES: Enterprise Community Partners, Columbian Presbyterian Hospital

D

uring the last five years, since I became CEO, establishing best-inclass diversity and inclusion practices at Interpublic has become a personal priority for me as well as a business imperative for Interpublic. Growing up in Brooklyn’s Flatbush neighborhood during the 1950s, I learned about diversity firsthand. Accepting and living with people from a variety of cultures and backgrounds who spoke many different languages – literally and figuratively – was a way of life for me and my family. It’s now a way of life in the business world as well. Embracing diversity makes us a better partner to our clients, a more attractive employer, and better at creating value for shareholders. It’s logical that a diverse workforce can communicate more effectively with an increasingly diverse global consumer. People of color now make up about 35 percent of the population in the United States. The spending power of four major multicultural groups – African Americans, Asian Americans, Gays and Lesbians, and Hispanics – is expected to collectively reach over $4 trillion by 2013. Diversity is increasing around the world too. About half the populaApart from the business case, we’re tion of London self-identifies as also committed to this because it’s a member of an ethnic group. In the right thing to do. Everyone has Sydney, a third of the population something to contribute and everywas born overseas. You’re also seeing one needs the chance to achieve their it in fast-growth markets like Seoul. aspirations, and that can only happen Even in countries like Germany or in an inclusive culture. I’m fortunate Belgium, there is greater diversity enough to be in a position to make a among the population than we have difference, and I see that as a moral ever seen. So diversity plays into our and executive obligation. I’d like to long-term plans for how to grow see us set the standard and make a business at IPG in all markets in difference for the industry as well. which we operate. Thanks to the programs we’ve Research shows that creativity, implemented over the last few years, productivity and efficiency improve we’ve made great strides, but we’re when diversity increases. And our tal- not done yet. I remain committed to ent is not only happier, but better if building on our progress, and makwe get this right – diverse companies ing sure IPG accurately reflects our have higher morale and become emclients, consumers and the commuployers of choice for the best talent. nities where we do business. PDJ

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CEO │ Leadership in Action

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O

n May 1, 2011, I am slated to become the first woman CEO of a Top 20 U.S. bank when I assume the roles of Chairman and CEO of KeyCorp. That milestone speaks volumes about Key and its approach to diversity and inclusion. One of the major reasons I came to Key was our CEO Henry Meyer’s intense commitment to diversity and the tone he set for the company as a result. Hiring and supporting me was clear evidence of the bank’s commitment and his diversity leadership. He has set a remarkable precedent. Inclusion does not This is personally ing inclusion. It’s more happen by philosophy, deeply important to obvious, and usually although commitme, and over time, easier to communicate, ment certainly begins I intend to lead the when the marker is there. Instead, it hapenterprise in creating for ethnicity, physipens by example, by plans and programs cal ability or gender, actions that embody that will take us to the for example. It’s more conviction and bring next level. We have a subtle, and sometimes that conviction to solid foundation, but more challenging to life. I am proud to – because diversity and embrace, when we say that Key’s steps inclusion are a journeed to build diversity to embed diversity ney, not a finish line of approach, thinking into its cultural DNA – there is always more style or experience. are being recognized work to do. But embrace it we locally and nationTwo areas of inclumust. Diverse workally. Honors include sion strike me as parforces and workplaces multiple awards for a ticularly important. reflect our changing supplier diversity ratio First is the importance society and comnearly three times the of measurement in fos- munities. They bring national average for a richer and deeper corporations; four con- tering a culture of inclusion. Key rigorously perspective to bear secutive annual citameasures diversity in its on business decisions tions from the Human workforce, policies and and customer service, Rights Campaign as practices, and holds and they help any ena Best Place to Work managers accountable terprise make better for LGBT Equality; for the results. decisions. Diversity is and four recognitions Second, it’s critical not just the right thing from DiversityInc as a that we stay mindful to do: it’s a measure of Top 50 Company for of how we are definour success. PDJ Diversity.

Company: KeyCorp (NYSE: KEY) headquarters: Cleveland, Ohio web site: www.Key.com Primary business: Financial Services ANNUAL REVENUES: $4.4 billion (2009) Employees: Approximately 15,500 TITLE: President and Chief Operating Officer, KeyCorp (will become Chairman and CEO on May 1, 2011, the first woman CEO of a top 20 U.S. bank) EDUCATION: BA, University of Texas; MBA, Southern Methodist University FIRST JOB: Republic Bank of Texas/First Republic WHAT I’M READING: To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee MY PHILOSOPHY: Be your best. Be of service. Be grateful. BEST ADVICE: Life is either too long or too short not to be happy at home and at work. FAMILY: I am blessed with my family and a wide circle of friends. INTERESTS: Events with half-times and intermissions FAVORITE Charity: United Way

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Beth

Mooney

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CEO │ Leadership in Action

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John B.

Veihmeyer “ In today’s global business environment, diversity must be a strategic business imperative.”

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11 award winner

Company: KPMG LLP headquarters: New York City web site: www.us.kpmg.com Primary business: Audit, Tax, and Advisory Services Employees: More than 21,000 in the U.S.

TITLE: Chairman and Chief Executive Officer EDUCATION: BBA in Accounting, University of Notre Dame FIRST JOB: Working in a warehouse, handling shipments and inventory WHAT I’M READING: It’s Your Ship, by Mike Abrashoff, a U.S. Navy Captain MY PHILOSOPHY: Be honest and respectful with everyone you interact with, and making them feel valued at that moment. BEST ADVICE: Don’t try to orchestrate every step in your career path. Just do every job as well as you possibly can. FAMILY: Married with three children INTERESTS: Community involvement, golf, vacationing at the beach, and Notre Dame sports FAVORITE CHARITIES: Family for Literacy, a KPMG initiative

D

iversity and inclusion are priorities for me, as they are for KPMG LLP, and they’re woven into everything we do. My own commitment to diversity and the approach I take to leading KPMG’s diversity initiatives has its roots in my personal as well as professional experiences, so it’s easy for me to be passionate about ensuring that KPMG remains an organization that values the contributions of all our people and creates opportunities for them to succeed. I’m very hands on when it comes to diversity: I serve as the executive chair of our Diversity Advisory Board and expanded our annual diversity conference, now the Chairman’s Forum on Diversity. I led the 3-hour firmwide webcast for 1,200 KPMG partners and employees, articulated my six diversity strategic imperatives and goals for the next five years, and challenged them to be bolder in their vision of what we can achieve together. The Chairman’s Forum reaffirmed for me that my passion is shared by KPMG’s people at all levels of the firm, as well as the members of the Diversity Advisory Board, Women’s Advisory Board, and our six employee-driven national diversity networks, which engage more than 43 percent of our people. In today’s global business environment, diversity must be a strategic port our goals and strengthen our business imperative. At KPMG, diculture through recruiting programs versity is aligned with and supports that help us identify and mentor all our strategic priorities; we believe high-potential college freshmen and our ability to leverage the diverse sophomores and through developexperiences, talents, ideas, and perment programs that target our ethspectives of all our people is linked nically diverse associates and help to our commercial success. Diversity ensure that they receive the client supports our people, enhances our exposure and experience they need organization, and enables us to deliv- to succeed early in their career. We er exceptional service to our clients. also foster gender-specific programs In my view, diversity and inclusion that help our senior associate women are key to helping any organization keep their careers on track, and other achieve its goals. Fostering and susdevelopment programs as well. taining a diverse and inclusive work We work hard every day to adenvironment enables us to provide vance our diversity strategy and the skills, perspectives, and innovative ensure that we continue to foster an ideas that our clients expect from us. inclusive work environment, and it It also enables us to create meaninggives me great pride that our emful mentoring and development opployee surveys tell us that the majorportunities for our people, support ity of our people consider KPMG a their career objectives, and help them great place to work and build a cabuild the careers to which they aspire. reer, regardless of their gender, race, We’ve leveraged diversity to supor sexual orientation. PDJ

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Company: Lockheed Martin Corporation (NYSE: LMT) headquarters: Bethesda, Maryland web site: www.lockheedmartin.com Primary business: Global Security ANNUAL REVENUES: $45.8 billion in 2010 Employees: 132,000 TITLE: Chairman & CEO EDUCATION: MBA, Columbia University; master’s in engineering and management, Polytechnic University of New York; bachelor’s (summa cum laude), Slippery Rock University FIRST JOB: Paperboy, age 7, McKeesport, Pennsylvania WHAT I’M READING: Edmund Morris’s three-part biography of Teddy Roosevelt MY PHILOSOPHY: Work hard and smart, be humble, do what’s right. BEST ADVICE: Always treat people with respect and take responsibility for your actions. FAMILY: Wife, Michelle; sons, John and Brian; dog, Benny (Pekingese) INTERESTS: Reading, working on the farm

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CEO │ Leadership in Action

O

ne of the most inspiring things about working at Lockheed Martin is that diversity has real meaning here. We know the nature of our workforce is fundamentally shifting. Talent today is much more multi-ethnic, multi-racial, multi-gender and multi-generational— and we are better and stronger for it. As a global security leader charged with integrating very large, complex systems, we benefit from the greatest diversity of views in looking at how to solve problems. Diversity is not about numbers. It’s a philosophy of inclusion that gets people to the table early and often, and creates an inviting climate where they are comfortable to offer their ideas. Ideally, those ideas are formed through a very different perspective than the person sitting to their left or right, because that’s the richest environment that we could hope to achieve. Our job as leaders is to create that ing innovative teams where everyone climate, which is why we spend so feels respected and empowered is abmuch time on leadership developsolutely critical. ment. If you want to attract the At Lockheed Martin, we have best and brightest talent, you have 132,000 men and women who to put the best leaders in front of bring their commitment to excelthem. We’ve worked to embed this lence and integrity to the workplace philosophy through our culture every day. They have a bold spirit in a program called Full Spectrum Leadership. We expect our leaders to of creativity, adventure and deterget results, because we make substan- mination to invent things no one thought possible – and we need tial commitments every day. every one of them at the table. And we believe they get the best When the safety of the men and results when they model behaviors that inspire the workforce and cre- women in our armed forces often depends on our products, and our ate an environment of inclusion customer demands a laser-sharp and trust. Maintaining a diverse and inclusive focus on providing innovative yet environment is more than an imper- affordable solutions, we simply need ative for success – it’s the right thing every individual and every group to do. In our increasingly demanding fully engaged. That’s our diversity and inclusion promise. PDJ global security environment, build-

FAVORITE CHARITIES: Marine Corps Scholarship Foundation and Medal of Honor Foundation

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2011 award winner

Robert J.

Stevens “ Our job as leaders is to create that climate, which is why we spend so much time on leadership development.”

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CEO │ Leadership in Action

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Michael R.

Anastasio “ I knew that progress in diversity required me to take visible, demonstrable actions and establish clear expectations for my senior managers.” 58

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11 award winner

I

n assessing the health of diversity at Los Alamos National Laboratory, we have several statistics that might tell a very positive story – namely the strong representation of Hispanics in our workforce. However, as the new director at the Lab several years ago, I found unsatisfactory answers to many diversity-related questions that I posed. Most notably, I was concerned with the paucity of women and minorities in management positions. As the Laboratory’s director, I understand the unique leadership position I hold to set diversity-related priorities and influence organizational behavior. I knew that progress in diversity required me to take visible, demonstrable actions and establish clear expectations for my senior managers. And I embraced this challenge with gusto. With the support of our Equal Opportunity Office, I established and agreed to chair the Lab’s executive diversity committee, which set clear goals and strategies and championed diversity initiatives to achieve measurable results. Laboratory’s position as one of the We shaped diversity initiatives largest employers in Northern New using proactive and consistent proMexico. I support the bolstering of cesses to not only increase underregional impacts through strong represented populations, but also to diverse supplier and economic drive better performance, products, development programs as well as and employee satisfaction. To set us on a path to greater diversity among community giving campaigns and educational outreach initiatives that management ranks, we introduced support underprivileged populaspecific initiatives including the tions, which in New Mexico too establishment of a new manager often include Hispanics and Native “on-ramp” to provide a fair and American Pueblo peoples. unbiased screening process to assess management potential; a protégé/ Overall, I believe that sustaining a mentor program to provide a diverse strong diversity and inclusion proand inclusive group of protégés with gram is helping our Laboratory reach high-level contacts and the skills and exceed its goals by bringing torequired for success; and a managegether the best and brightest of ideas ment hiring process review board to and perspectives to enhance creativensure hiring processes are not only ity, problem-solving, and innovafair and consistent but also utilized tion—all of which are imperative to to maximize applicant pools in terms resolving the nation’s most critical of both quality and diversity. security issues, and all of which are Outside of workforce initiahallmarks of Los Alamos National tives, I am also responsive to the Laboratory. PDJ

Company: Los Alamos National Laboratory headquarters: Los Alamos, New Mexico web site: www.lanl.gov Primary business: National Security Science Employees: 10,608

TITLE: Laboratory Director and LANS, LLC President EDUCATION: BA in Physics, with honors, from Johns Hopkins University; MA and PhD in Theoretical Nuclear Physics from State University of New York, Stony Brook FIRST JOB: Paper route in DC suburbs; clerk typist for Dept. of Health, Safety and Welfare WHAT I’M READING: The Devil in the White City, by Erik Larson MY PHILOSOPHY: Appreciate and value others’ perspectives. BEST ADVICE: Appreciate and value others’ perspectives. FAMILY: Married to wife, Ann; two daughters, Alison and Alexandra INTERESTS: Music and sports FAVORITE CHARITIES: Numerous

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WE’RE PROUD OF OUR DIFFERENCES. ALL 120,000 OF THEM. Commissioning a new aircraft carrier. Launching a space telescope. Building the IT infrastructure of tomorrow. Success stories like these are why Northrop Grumman is a leader in global security. We foster a wide range of perspectives to power our world-class aerospace, information technology, and defense projects. Perspectives like yours. At every level, we’ve made strong commitments to workforce diversity, because we know that greatness is often the product of bringing fresh perspectives to the table. So, if you’re interested in a career as vast as your ambitions, take a look at everything we have to offer.

Achievement never ends. For all current engineering and other opportunities, please visit our website:

careers.northropgrumman.com

©2011 Northrop Grumman Corporation. Northrop Grumman is an Equal Opportunity Employer committed to hiring and retaining a diverse workforce regardless of age. U.S. Citizenship is required for most positions.


 MARCH/APRIL 2011

Special CEO Edition

Leo Kiely, MillerCoors • Mark Ketchum, Newell Rubbermaid • Jeffrey A. Joerres, Manpower Inc. Linda A. Mills, Northrop Grumman Information Systems • Cynthia Morton, Ministry of Labour, Government of Ontario • James Murren, MGM Resorts International

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CEO │ Leadership in Action

headquarters: Milwaukee, Wisconsin web site: www.manpower.com Primary business: Full suite of innovative workforce solutions and services ANNUAL REVENUES: $19 billion in 2010 Employees: 30,000 worldwide

TITLE: Chairman and CEO EDUCATION: Bachelor’s degree, Marquette University College of Business Administration FIRST JOB: Typewriter installer for IBM WHAT I’M READING: The World is Blue, by Sylvia Earle MY PHILOSOPHY: CEOs are there to serve, not be served. BEST ADVICE: Get out of your office and meet people face to face. FAMILY: Wife, Sarah; children Emily, Tommy, Madeline and Michael INTERESTS: Motorcycles and wine FAVORITE Charity: United Way

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Company: Manpower Inc. (NYSE: MAN)

hy is diversity important within modern organizations? Is it because it’s the right thing to do? No doubt, unleashing the potential of people from all walks of life helps improve lives, but it goes much deeper and is more sustainable than that. Demonstrating a firm commitment to diversity is in companies’ best interests—and that of the clients they serve. If you place a premium on diversity, you create better discussions, make more sustainable profit, and engage all segments of the potential workforce.The need to do this has never been greater. As we enter this new post-downturn age, access to key talent is becoming the competitive differentiator, and companies need to focus on the human side of their business. Working-age populations are shrinking, the nature of work is shifting and emerging markets are becoming key players on the world stage, exacerbating a situation where employers seeking a highly specific set of skills are already struggling to find the people they need. With talent so hard to locate, savvy emWomen have long ly existed outside of the ployers everywhere been an under-tapped workforce due to strict need to give themselves talent pool, a situaadherence to its relia leg up. That means tion that must change gious values. Through tapping in to worknow that the talent our Manpower Bereshit ing populations that mismatch is a reality. subsidiary, we trained have traditionally been The benefits of women workers from this unrepresented in order participating in the group and educated to access the best talworkforce are strikemployers around their ent. The nature of ing, but the traditional cultural sensitivities. Manpower’s business— 40-hour work week is The benefits of emdelivering innovative impractical for women ploying members of an workforce solutions— with childcare responsi- untapped workforce gives us a privileged bilities, and companies were demonstrated to position to promote need to adopt flexible the client – and prodiversity. Within our work practices if they vided to them as the organization and for are to get women into solution. our clients, we passion- the workforce in greater Organizations can ately believe that ennumbers. continue to create and gaging all segments of In some countries, share knowledge and the potential workforce women face cultural innovation only by is essential to mainbarriers to employment, remaining open to the taining our dominant as do other groups. ideas of all, and by rerole as a world of work In Israel the Ultraflecting the diversity of expert and helping our Orthodox Jewish coma more interconnected clients win. munity has traditional- world. PDJ

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2011 award winner

Jeffrey A.

Joerres

“ With talent so hard to locate, savvy employers everywhere need to give themselves a leg up.” w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

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CEO │ Leadership in Action

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James

Murren

“ Our Diversity Initiative is integral to the continuous evolution and advancement of our company.” 64

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2011 award winner

M

GM Resorts International just enjoyed a milestone year for our Company’s Diversity Initiative, celebrating its 10th anniversary since launching it in 2000 as the gaming industry’s first formal diversity initiative. We have a lot to reflect upon. Our anniversary event in October 2010 celebrated many of the largest accomplishments of our Initiative to date with more than 600 of our minority business partners, community leaders, and diversity advocates from across the country, in addition to hundreds of our employees. For example, today more than 61 percent of our 62,000 employees nationwide are minorities, marking the highest proportion of minority employees in the history of MGM Resorts. Beyond our four walls, In today’s economy, Diversity Champions our Diversity Initiative every employee and training workshop prior has been impactful in every team in our multi- to the end of this year. our Company’s surcultural, pluralistic We’ve graduated more rounding communities. workplace must be opthan 11,000 Champions Over the past 10 years, erating on all cylinders to date. we have reached out to at all times. One of the We also recently dethe minority business most dynamic forces voted new Company community to spend in our Company is the resources and staff to more than $1 billion in diversity of viewpoints continuing to commuMWBDE purchasing and experiences of our nicate and embed dicontracts, and an addiemployees, whose ethnic versity principles in our tional $1.5 billion in mibackgrounds are rooted culture of inclusion, colnority construction and in practically every corlaboration and employee engineering services. ner of the Earth. engagement. When I became I work in one of the And, our experience Chairman and CEO of most competitive travel in diversity is playing a MGM Resorts in 2008, destinations in the entire larger role than ever in I committed myself to world. The company our Company’s internado more than merely that operates at the high- tional operations as we continuing the tremenest level, and achieves continue the expansion dous legacy of diversity the greatest results, is the of our famous brand that our Company has company whose teams names to new locations built. Our Diversity are the most motivated, across the globe. Initiative is integral to the most productive, the We are standing the continuous evolumost innovative and the taller today, united in tion and advancement most engaged with the our diversity. Yet as of our Company. customer and with each far as we have traveled Diversity is much other. with this Initiative, we more than crossWe recently set a goal recognize that we have cultural etiquette and to train an additional many miles to go in political correctness. 4,000 managers in our our journey. PDJ

Company: MGM Resorts International (NYSE: MGM) headquarters: Las Vegas, Nevada web site: www.mgmresorts.com Primary business: Hospitality & Gaming ANNUAL REVENUES: $6 billion Employees: 61,000 TITLE: Chairman and Chief Executive Officer EDUCATION: Trinity College FIRST JOB: Research assistant for institutional brokerage firm WHAT I’M READING: Animal, Vegetable, Miracle, by Barbara Kingsolver, with Steven L. Hopp and Camille Kingsolver MY PHILOSOPHY: As Theodore Roosevelt said, the best prize that life has to offer is the chance to work hard at work worth doing. Working hard, doing the very best you can and perseverance are the keys to success in any life endeavor. BEST ADVICE: Never give up and never give in when confronted with adversity. FAMILY: Wife of over 20 years; two sons, ages 12 and 15. INTERESTS: Sports, the arts, philanthropy FAVORITE Charity: Nevada Cancer Institute

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CEO │ Leadership in Action

Company: MillerCoors (NYSE: TAP) headquarters: Chicago, Illinois

I

’ve always believed that great people drive great business results. At MillerCoors, a diverse workforce keeps us ahead of our competitors and ultimately helps us to better understand our consumers. It’s a key part of how we’re creating America’s best beer company. That’s why we’ve made a commitment to both the workplace and the marketplace. We are working to ensure that diversity and inclusion are included in all aspects of our business. And because people are at the heart of all we do, we’re committed to building lasting relationships with diverse communities and suppliers. Since the joint venture in July works to develop capabilities and 2008, MillerCoors has invested talent. Additionally, our supplier more than half a billion dollars in diversity program helped grow our multicultural initiatives and comdiverse supplier spend by nearly 10 munity programs. Our MillerCoors percent last year alone. Urban Entrepreneur Series (MUES) I’ve often said that people are has empowered urban and multicul- our most important ingredient. At tural communities in the marketMillerCoors, by making a commitplace since 1999 by providing train- ment to diversity, we’re creating an ing and resources and has awarded environment where people conmore than $1.4 million in small tribute their best on a daily basis. business grants. We’ve also impleDiversity and inclusion are essential mented workplace development to how we will win in the marketinitiatives, such as a women’s group- place and critical to the relationships mentoring program that specifically that we build in the workplace. PDJ

web site: www.millercoors.com Primary business: Beer Industry ANNUAL REVENUES: $7.6 billion Employees: More than 8,000 TITLE: CEO EDUCATION: Bachelor’s degree, Harvard University; MBA, the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania FIRST JOB: Cutting lawns at a cemetery in Long Branch, New Jersey WHAT I’M READING: Dog On It, by Spencer Quinn MY PHILOSOPHY: People make it happen! BEST ADVICE: Let your results do your talking. FAMILY: My wife of 40 years, Susan, a Presbyterian minister; son, Bill (Leo IV), action firm director; daughter, Whitney, graphic artist; three grandchildren: Leo V, Tegan and Margot and a dog named Winston INTERESTS: Sailing FAVORITE Charity: United Way

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2011 award winner

Leo

Kiely

“ We are working to ensure that diversity and inclusion are included in all aspects of our business.” w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

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CEO │ Leadership in Action

201

Cynthia

Morton

“ I am excited and determined we will not lose sight of our goals or the steps we must take to get there.” 68

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11 award winner

Company: Ministry of Labour, Government of Ontario headquarters: Toronto, Ontario, CANADA web site: www.labour.gov.on.ca Primary business: Government Employees: 1,505

TITLE: Deputy Minister EDUCATION: Law Degree FIRST JOB: Waitress WHAT I’M READING: Unbroken, by Laura Hillenbrand MY PHILOSOPHY: Shape the future, don’t fear it . BEST ADVICE: Don’t take yourself too seriously. FAMILY: Four great kids and a partner who doesn’t take me too seriously INTERESTS: Travel, art, theatre, time with family FAVORITE CHARITY: Foster Parents Plan of Canada

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iversity is a journey we have all embarked upon in the public service of Ontario, and every deputy and their ministry has been challenged to find a way to make this journey an essential part of our commitment both to our staff and to the diverse public we serve. The culture within which I work has put to rest the debate of whether diversity is an essential component of a successful business strategy. In Ontario, the labour market of today and the future is one where employers must compete for the best and the brightest. If we are to be one of the employers who attract these candidates, we must welcome, value and celebrate the diversity of our workforce. safe and respectful. For these reasons, inclusive workplace. The challenge before us the ministry has emEarly in 2010, our sewas to take this combarked on a journey nior leaders participatmitment to heart, as of transformation. I ed in a 360 evaluation we worked to create am excited and decalled the Equitable a safe and respectful termined we will not Leader Assessment. workplace across the lose sight of our goals Using this tool, our Ministry of Labour. or the steps we must staff was asked to proIf we were to cretake to get there. We vide feedback to leaders ate and sustain a work have begun this jourabout their behaviour environment where ney through a process in core competency our staff felt respected, of assessing our roles areas related to diversity valued and free of any as leaders. I know the and inclusion. The reprejudices, the minvalue of my personal sults will provide clear istry’s senior manageinvestment in designand measurable objecment team needed to ing, championing tives on which to base lead that journey. and implementing our ongoing leadership We had to examine the changes we must development. our leadership styles make. My other job is As I grow older I have and gain an underto reward and recoglearned patience but standing of our indinize other leaders who also the need for results vidual and collective are also investing in and steadfast leaderstrengths and weakbetter understanding ship. Our journey will nesses in a safe and their behaviours and end when diversity is respectful way. their responsibilities. so entrenched in every We then asked our I am very fortunate deed and action that it staff what they felt to have a strong group no longer has a name about core competenof managers and staff – it is, simply put, the cies with respect to who spend their caMinistry of Labour’s behaviours that chamreers trying to make culture, without debate pioned a diverse and workplaces in Ontario or question. PDJ

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CEO │ Leadership in Action

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or the past five years, I’ve been working to build a new culture and business model at Newell Rubbermaid. Inclusion and diversity have been a key part of that transformation. Our vision is to be a company of “Brands that Matter” to consumers around the globe. My four decades in consumer products has taught me that to truly connect with your target consumer, you must do everything you can to understand them and empathize with them. You will do this most successfully if you have an employee base that mirrors the diversity of your consumer base. That’s why our board of directors and I have been pushing our organization to develop a more robust inclusion and diversity program. The more diversity our employees bring to the table—whether it is gender, lifestyle, ethnicity, societal norms or geographic origin—the greater the opportunity for us to understand and connect with like-minded consumers. That cultural competence has helped us innovate better products, build our brands and grow sales. That’s a strong business case. The other benefit of developing a riers to success and their creativity more inclusive, diverse workplace is will be embraced. This is especially how it has strengthened our company’s culture. We want every Newell important to the new generation of younger employees who are more Rubbermaid employee to be able to multicultural than ever before. bring their whole self to work, so True, inclusion and diversity’s imthey can contribute to their utmost pact on culture is hard to measure. potential. In an environment where differences are not just respected, but But I believe a company’s culture is ultimately more important than celebrated, this gives us a powerful its strategy over time. Without the boost to morale, productivity and right culture, the best strategies are career growth. doomed to failure. The appeal of a company’s culture Over my 40-year career, I have is not just internal. It also enables seen and supported integration in the a company to more easily recruit and retain new talent. This has been workplace, first with women, followed by racial integration and the broader vitally important as we work to build new capabilities in the areas of notion of inclusion and diversity. Today, we are leveraging inclusion marketing and innovation. When a and diversity to strengthen our culture prospective employee looks around and change the very way that work and sees diversity in our hallways, gets done. The business and human they know we are a company that is benefits are clear. In today’s global welcoming and open to new ideas. economy, they are essential. PDJ They realize there will be fewer bar-

Company: Newell Rubbermaid (NYSE: NWL) headquarters: Atlanta, Georgia web site: www.newellrubbermaid.com Primary business: Global marketer of consumer and commercial products ANNUAL REVENUES: $5.8 billion (2010) Employees: 22,000

TITLE: President and CEO EDUCATION: Cornell University, BS, Industrial Engineering FIRST JOB: Manufacturing shift supervisor for Procter & Gamble WHAT I’M READING: The Summer of 1787, by David Stewart MY PHILOSOPHY: Put your full self into everything you do. BEST ADVICE: Actions speak louder than words. FAMILY: Married, two grown children INTERESTS: Travel, cycling and golf FAVORITE Charity: United Way


2011 award winner

Mark

Ketchum “Our vision is to be a company of ‘Brands that Matter’ to consumers around the globe.” w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

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CEO │ Leadership in Action

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Linda A.

Mills

“Diversity and inclusion is one of the key metrics used to measure our overall business performance.” 72

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2011 award winner

Company: Northrop Grumman Information Systems (NYSE: NOC) headquarters: McLean, Virginia web site: www.northropgrumman.com Primary business: Global provider of advanced solutions for defense, intelligence, civil agency and commercial customers ANNUAL REVENUES: $8.4 billion Employees: 24,000 TITLE: President EDUCATION: BS, Mathematics; MS, Computer Science; Executive Education: Harvard University and University of Virginia FIRST JOB: Systems engineer, Bell Labs WHAT I’M READING: Thinking in Pictures, by Temple Grandin MY PHILOSOPHY: Be passionate about what you do and do your best. BEST ADVICE: Don’t be afraid of risk. Risk forces you to stretch and grow. FAMILY: Husband and two daughters INTERESTS: Traveling to new places and cultures; antiques; decorating and gardening

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t Northrop Grumman we understand that creating a workforce and workplace that values diversity and fosters inclusion and engagement is pivotal to creating and sustaining innovation, productivity and profitability. For me, it is very personal. Leadership starts at the top. I am committed to creating an inclusive workplace for our employees in all dimensions – ethnicity, gender, background, culture, thought and others. I chair our Diversity and Inclusion Council with representation from my executive leadership to set the sector’s strategic and tactical direction. This is not something new. Diversity and inclusion is a pervasive and continuing theme with metrics to measure our effectiveness and to drive change into the organization. Diversity and inclusion is one of the key metrics used to measure our overall business performance. We measure the diversity of our population in our two most senior bands, as measured against external benchmarks. We are making a difference in our senior representation. While metrics are important, it is about our people and our culture too. To expedite our groups with more than hiring, retaining and change, I asked my vice 3,000 participating em- developing the right presidents as leaders to ployees. These groups talent? Are we measurcommit to one diversiare a tremendous source ing up to industry best ty action annually. Our of ideas, energy and practices? This focus on Annual Diversity and diversity engagement. measurable outcomes Engagement Reports Together these activities will make a great prohighlighted their vishave vitalized diversity gram excellent. You can ible participation and and are changing our see the change. enthusiasm. Second, culture. Diversity is a critiwe implemented a diI am determined to cal business issue for verse slate of candidates drive diversity and inthe aerospace industry. for all manager openclusion deep into the Our country does not ings, giving qualified, Information Systems have enough scientists, diverse applicants and culture. To this end, mathematicians and our leaders more exmy Diversity and technologists. Every posure to each other. Inclusion Council individual makes a Last, we have seven focuses on measures difference to our naself-governing, vibrant of effectiveness and tion’s security and our employee resource engagement. Are we future! PDJ

FAVORITE Charity: University foundations with an aim toward increasing women in technical disciplines

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YOUR INDIVIDUALITY

>

YOU KNOW

UNLEASH YOUR IDEAS, AND MAKE YOUR MARK.

At UnitedHealth Group, diversity isn’t just a corporate buzzword. It’s the way we work, and it comes through in everything we do. From the high-performing people we hire, to the health care services we provide, we advocate the possibilities of unique thinking. We’ve become a Fortune 21 company by creating an inclusive environment fueled by innovative ideas. Our employees have diverse cultural backgrounds, beliefs, perspectives, and lifestyles. But they all have one thing in common - their ability to excel. Right now, we’re working to build the health care system of tomorrow. One that will work better for more people in more ways than ever. A goal with this kind of magnitude requires the brightest, most forward-thinking minds around. We have them here. And they’re making a difference. Make your mark of distinction at greaterthancareers.com.

Diversity creates a healthier atmosphere: equal opportunity employer M/F/D/V. UnitedHealth Group is a drug-free workplace. Candidates are required to pass a drug test before beginning employment. © 2011 UnitedHealth Group. All rights reserved.


 MARCH/APRIL 2011

Special CEO Edition

R. Peter MacKinnon, Q.C., University of Saskatchewan • Darren Entwistle, TELUS • George Chavel, Sodexo, Inc. Clayton M. Jones, Rockwell Collins • Murray D. Martin, Pitney Bowes Inc. • William Blair, Toronto Police Service

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Company: Pitney Bowes Inc. (NYSE: PBI) headquarters: Stamford, Connecticut web site: www.pb.com Primary business: Customer Communications Management (CCM) Hardware, Software and Services ANNUAL REVENUES: $5.4 billion Employees: 30,700 (Globally) TITLE: Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer EDUCATION: University of Waterloo FIRST JOB: A dog kennel and breeding business. WHAT I’M READING: The Mentor Leader, by Tony Dungy MY PHILOSOPHY: Don’t ask others to do what you aren’t prepared to do yourself. BEST ADVICE: You can do anything anyone else can; it just may take you longer the first time. FAMILY: Wife Ruth; sons Joel and Philip; daughter Tricia; daughters-in-law Jen and Jacqueline; grandsons Jude and Gabriel; granddaughter Naomi INTERESTS: Hardware and software technologies, heli-skiing, hockey, and others FAVORITE CHARITIES: Bridgeport Mission, World Relief – Rwanda

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CEO │ Leadership in Action

I

n reflecting on 90 years of Pitney Bowes heritage, I have seen firsthand the value that inclusion and diversity can bring to the workplace. It results in better business decisions and fosters awareness that leads to a stronger, more value-oriented culture whose leadership drives success. As a global company, Pitney Bowes views diversity as a business imperative. Our commitment to diversity dates back to our first chairman, Walter Wheeler, who in the 1940s became a role model for racial inclusion. Like our ability to stay on top of the curve of technology, we also saw the value that diversity brought to the innovations that continue to change the way in which we connect with our customers. Diversity and incluregularly to make sure Since Wheeler’s time, sion goals are part of they are fostering an our mosaic of cultures, executive performance environment where all generations, languages, reviews, and manageemployees feel involved races, genders, perspecment compensation is and engaged in their tives and work styles tied to successful diver- work. has continued to equip We continue to perus to better understand sity initiatives. We serve our global markets petuate a culture that our evolving markets, with a workforce and gives our employees the to connect us with our strategic partner base opportunity to realize global customer base, that includes minority their potential with sucand to attract and reand women businesses. cession planning stratetain the best talent and This diversity gives us gies that help us track, suppliers. a better understanding measure and monitor Under my leadership of what customers want diversity metrics. diversity remains a top and need and helps Our unit heads are priority. One third of us anticipate market also accountable for our board of directors trends. It also increases developing talent and are ethnic minorities our agility in respondinclusion plans that and 25 percent are ing to changing market detail the activities women. I am pleased conditions and enables and actions needed to to sit on the board of us to build strong support their business directors of Catalyst, relationships. plans. We review our whose mission aligns We help our emprogress several times a closely with ours. We ployees and leaders year, and the Director also support mutually understand the value of of Diversity formally beneficial partnerships diversity and inclusion presents those findings with diverse organizathrough both education to the board of directions like the National and action. We hold tors. This creates a level Urban League, Society our leaders accountof transparency and of Women Engineers able for nurturing and guides the development and The National developing their teams, of our diversity strateSociety of Hispanic and we follow up gies and plans. PDJ MBAs.

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2011 award winner

Murray D.

Martin

“ We believe that diversity is a core value embodied by our employees and expressed through our relationships with our customers, our business partners and our communities.” w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

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CEO │ Leadership in Action

201

Clayton M.

Jones

“ As we expand into new markets, we challenge ourselves to expand our understanding of diversity and inclusion.” 78

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11 award winner

A

s a child growing up in Nashville, Tennessee, in the 1950s and 60s, I witnessed a nation torn by racial animosity. I also observed the first steps in a process to replace hatred and fear with tolerance and acceptance. That experience influenced how I think about diversity, even as the definition has grown to include the many perspectives found in today’s workplace. Historically, Rockwell Collins’ diversity efforts were focused almost exclusively on compliance: following laws and regulations to avoid negative consequences. and tools. Employee markets, we challenge But in 2005, as we networks provide a ourselves to expand our discussed the compaforum for the exchange understanding of diverny’s future, it became of ideas and buildsity and inclusion. How clear that diversity ing of community. does a company based wasn’t just something Partnerships with eduin America’s heartland we had to do to avoid cational institutions and welcome and integrate negative consequences. organizations bring new a global workforce? It was something we voices and perspectives. How do those voices should do because it We’ve even reached infuse, inspire and lead was good business. out to our local commu- our company forward? And it was something nity. In 2005, Rockwell And how do we build we must do, to ensure Collins partnered with an environment that success in the economcompanies in our home makes that possible? ic and cultural world region of eastern Iowa We’ve expanded our of the 21st century. to launch Diversity diversity and inclusion Today, our diverFocus, an organization efforts globally to help sity and inclusion to promote diversity answer these questions, programs are dramatiawareness, act as an inand I look forward to cally different from formation clearinghouse this next leg of our those of yesteryear. and advance new ideas journey. Focused around three As a boy, I saw how a key initiatives—People, to foster a more diverse community. dedication to diversity Workplace, and Even as we celebrate could change a society. Marketplace—all stratour successes, we also Today, I am proud to egies foster a culture look to the future. lead an organization that values differences Rockwell Collins’ mar- that sees the value— as a competitive adketplace is changing from a moral perspecvantage. Enterpriserapidly, with intertive and a business wide education efforts national opportuniperspective—to do the provide leaders and ties growing daily. As same, globally, for genemployees worldwide we expand into new erations to come. PDJ with essential concepts

Company: Rockwell Collins (NYSE: COL) headquarters: Cedar Rapids, Iowa web site: www.rockwellcollins.com Primary business: Aerospace and Defense ANNUAL REVENUES: $4.7 billion Employees: 20,000

TITLE: Chairman, President and CEO EDUCATION: Bachelor’s degree from the University of Tennessee; MBA from George Washington University FIRST JOB: U.S. Air Force Officer WHAT I’M READING: Unbroken, by Laura Hillenbrand and The Age of the Unthinkable, by Joshua Ramo MY PHILOSOPHY: Strive to achieve your full potential, and help others achieve theirs as well. BEST ADVICE: Keep your professional and personal life in balance; you control that priority. FAMILY: Wife: Debbie; Daughters: Lindsey and Melissa INTERESTS: Golf, skeet/trap shooting, music FAVORITE CHARITy: Alzheimer’s Association

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CEO │ Leadership in Action

headquarters: North America, Gaithersburg, Maryland web site: www.sodexousa.com Primary business: Design, manage and deliver solutions contributing to clients’ organizations ANNUAL REVENUES: $8 billion Employees: 120,000 worldwide TITLE: President and CEO EDUCATION: BA, Economics and Management, Albion College FIRST JOB: Stock boy on the loading dock of my father’s candy and tobacco wholesale distributorship WHAT I’M READING: Employer Brand Leadership, by Brett Minchington MY PHILOSOPHY: Be yourself; treat everyone around you with respect and dignity; be open to new possibilities; listen to good advice. BEST ADVICE: Keeping employees happy is attainable by providing clear direction, setting expectations, and communicating intent. FAMILY: Married with two sons INTERESTS: Playing the piano, golf, Pittsburgh Steelers

O

FAVORITE CHARITY: Sodexo Foundation

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Company: Sodexo, Inc. (NYSE Euronext: SW)

ne of my key responsibilities as Sodexo’s CEO is to serve as the company’s chief culture officer. That means I set the tone. With help from some very capable leaders, I create and foster a healthy environment that encourages all our people to excel and reach their potential so they can deliver their very best to our clients, customers, and the communities in which we live and work. As the leading provider of quality of daily life solutions, Sodexo North America serves 10 million people daily at more than 6,000 locations in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. To succeed, our organizational environment has to be diverse and welcoming for clients, customers, and our workforce. So I take a personal and visible interest in promoting diversity and inclusion deep into our cultural fabric, which makes me the chief advocate for these initiatives. For example, I chair Sodexo’s September 2010 by introducing an Diversity Leadership Council, our formal diversity and inclusion gover- external Diversity and Inclusion nance platform. Diversity and inclu- Advisory Board, comprised of seven sion is a key element of our business accomplished outside business and community leaders with specific strategy and it’s an important comareas of expertise representing diponent of everyone’s performance verse communities. These leaders evaluation and bonus. But we don’t stop there. Genuine diversity requires will help Sodexo stay focused on, and remain accountable for, making inclusion because we believe a fully inclusive and open environment pro- progress on our diversity and incluvides opportunities for all employees sion objectives. We are very pleased this committo contribute to our business success. So to bring that culture of diversity ment has resulted in high employee engagement and retention, increased and inclusion to life, we launched talent development opportunities, our first two Employee Network public recognition, and bottom-line Groups just eight years ago. Today, success. Yet, Sodexo’s diversity and we have eight groups – with over inclusion journey continues to evolve 3,000 members – that contribute and we must continue to raise the to the professional development of bar. While I take great pride in what our employees and enable them to we have achieved together, I always participate in service projects in our challenge my leadership team to look communities. Our most recently beyond the accomplishments and launched network groups address identify new strategies and opportuintergenerational and military emnities to drive Sodexo’s commitment ployee issues. to diversity and inclusion deeper into Sodexo expanded its commitour organizational culture. PDJ ment to diversity and inclusion in

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2011 award winner

George

Chavel

“ To succeed, our organizational environment has to be diverse and welcoming for clients, customers, and our workforce.” w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

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CEO │ Leadership in Action

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Darren

Entwistle

“ Our success is realized through unleashing the power of communications technologies to enhance the lifestyles of our customers.” 82

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ELUS’ brand promise, the future is friendly, reflects our culture, our values and our desire to make communications technology enjoyable and useful for all Canadians. Our brand uses the diversity of nature to communicate who we are, what we stand for and what we want to do for our key stakeholders. Just imagine how boring life would be if you walked into a forest and every single tree, branch and leaf looked exactly the same. We as a team recognize that one voice does not speak for everyone. At TELUS, we understand that a diverse and inclusive environment – in terms of gender, sexual orientation, race, culture and diversity of thought – facilitates a broader exchange of perspectives and better reflects the true makeup of society. I wholeheartedly believe that diversity builds stronger societies, communities and corporations. our annual Pulsecheck survey comAt the end of the day, if you want pleted by team members across to be a great company that wins in the marketplace through innovation, TELUS and through employment creativity and a better understanding equity statistics that track the perof client needs, you have to have the centage of women, Aboriginal best people drawn from all constitu- peoples, visible minorities and people encies of society to fully benefit from with disabilities in our workforce. In 2011 and 2012, we will condiversity of thought. Expressed mathematically, diversity tinue to integrate a culture of respect creates a whole that is actually great- and inclusiveness through: • Increased education and awareer than the sum of the parts. Why? ness, using formal and informal learnBecause we are a truer and more ing approaches that clearly demongenuine, authentic reflection of the society, the markets and the custom- strate the value of diversity of thought; • Strategic partnerships with the ers that we serve. Canadian Board Diversity Council, For over six years, we have been Pride at Work Canada and other supporting diversity and inclusivediversity-focused organizations; and ness initiatives at all levels of our • Ongoing community investments company, starting with an executive and affinity marketing programs to values contract with specific acbetter align and connect with our dicountability for equitable leaderverse customers and communities. ship. We also have a Diversity and Our success is realized through Inclusiveness Council comprised of unleashing the power of communicateam members from all walks of life tions technologies to enhance the lifeas well as team member resource styles of our customers. Thus our sucgroups that focus on integrating cess can only be optimized through more inclusion at TELUS. We track our progress on being an a team who truly reflects and understands the clients that we serve. PDJ employer of choice for all through

Company: TELUS (TSE: T) headquarters: Vancouver, British Columbia web site: www.telus.com Primary business: Telecommunications company ANNUAL REVENUES: $9.7 billion Employees: 35,000 TITLE: President and Chief Executive Officer EDUCATION: BA, Economics, Concordia University; MBA, McGill University; diploma in Network Engineering, University of Toronto. FIRST JOB: Telephone installer and repairman WHAT I’M READING: Where Hope Takes Root, by the Aga Khan MY PHILOSOPHY: Have the courage to innovate, a passion for growth, a belief in spirited teamwork and embrace change while initiating opportunity. FAMILY: Married, two children INTERESTS: Family, history, innovation, human performance, transforming healthcare FAVORITE CHARITIES: Go Pink, a program that raised over $2 million that will assist in the early detection of breast cancer and inspired over 800,000 people to turn their Facebook picture pink

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have been a police officer in the city of Toronto since 1976 and Chief since 2005, and I am honored to serve the residents of Toronto by providing them with effective, bias-free policing. Toronto is one of the most culturally diverse cities in the world, and the Toronto Police Service is fully committed to working with all of its residents in a respectful and equitable manner. In 2006 the Toronto Police Service created a Diversity Management Unit. This was a first in Canada, and we are still the only police service with such a unit. Our mandate is to coordinate human rights issues and activities across the service and address barriers and gaps in order to create a more inclusive workplace for all our members. psychological proprovide support, create In March 2007, I grams. In 2008 the networking opportunicommitted to a threeties and enable knowlyear project whereby the Ontario Psychological Association recognized edge sharing and skill Toronto Police Service us as the inaugural development for many worked alongside the winner of the Ontario different cultural groups Ontario Human Rights Healthy Workplace within the Service and Commission with the Award. ensure that we have an goal of identifying and In 2009 we were inclusive and welcomeliminating discriminaing work environment tion in our employment recognized by the American Psychological for our members. practices and in our deAssociation as a best In closing, I want to livery of police services practices honoree for recognize my employto the public. The projthe creation of a formal ment unit for taking ect recently concluded, promotional mentorship significant steps to overresulting in many program – created in come barriers that tradipositive changes for the response to an awaretionally prevented some Service and a legacy of ness that minority group members of the city’s digreater awareness of, members of the Service verse community groups and commitment to, were underrepresented from choosing a career human rights issues. in the supervisory and in policing. Their efforts The Service has been senior officer ranks. have been very effecawarded the Canada’s In 2010 the tive and have resulted Best Diversity Employers American Psychological in the Service becoming award for three consecAssociation again recincreasingly reflective of utive years: 2008, 2009 ognized our achievethe city’s population. and 2010. This award ments with the Healthy I am proud of my recognizes employers Workplace Award in members’ accomplishthat have exceptional ments and of the opworkplace diversity and our category. In 2008 the Service portunity to continually inclusion programs. approved the formaimprove service to both The Toronto Police tion of internal support members and the citiService has also been networks. These groups zens of Toronto. PDJ recognized for its 84

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Company: Toronto Police Service headquarters: Toronto, Ontario web site: www.torontopolice.on.ca Primary business: Police Employees: 8,000 (5,600 sworn, 2,400 civilian)

TITLE: Chief of Police EDUCATION: BA, University of Toronto FIRST JOB: Pumping Gas WHAT I’M READING: Dark Ages Ahead, by Jane Jacobs FAMILY: Wife, Susanne; 3 children, Matt, Rachel, Jonathan FAVORITE CHARITy: United Way


2011 award winner

William

Blair

“ I am proud of my members’ accomplishments and of the opportunity to continually improve service to both members and the citizens of Toronto.” w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

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R. Peter

MacKinnon , Q.C. “ Recognizing the potential of all people is a strategy that can have lasting effects on the entire organization.”

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2011 award winner

Company: University of Saskatchewan headquarters: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada web site: www.usask.ca Primary business: Education ANNUAL REVENUES: $808 million Employees: 7,000

TITLE: President and Vice-Chancellor EDUCATION: BA, LLB, LLM FIRST JOB: Picking vegetables on a farm in PEI (1963) WHAT I’M READING: Churchill and Gandhi BEST ADVICE: Always bring your ‘A’ game. FAMILY: Spouse, two sons, one daughter-in-law INTERESTS: Reading, baseball, travel FAVORITE CHARITIES: University of Saskatchewan, Confederation Centre of the Arts, United Way

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he University of Saskatchewan is charting a course for its future. We are determined to make the changes that are required to place the University of Saskatchewan among the most distinguished universities in Canada and in the world. We have set high goals for ourselves, and we will continue to work together to attain them. In a province of about one million people, the aboriginal community makes up approximately 15 percent of the population. Demographers and economists estimate this number to reach as high as 35 percent by the year 2045. Aboriginal children are among the fastest growing segment of our society. We recognize the economic, social and intellectual potential of this emerging population that has been largely ignored by most of Canada. This realization has led us to graduation rates of aboriginal people, embrace the aboriginal opportuincreased community involvement nity through all of our integrated through meaningful partnerships planning processes. In 2001, we embarked on a change agenda to ad- with the aboriginal community, and a culture of acceptance and integradress the low levels of participation tion on our campus. No longer do of aboriginal people in post secondwe ask ourselves why the inclusion ary education. Five areas of focus of aboriginal people is vital to our were identified: student affairs, acasuccess, but rather, how can we condemic programs, research programs, tinue to foster a culture of inclusion cultural programs and community for all? outreach. Recognizing the potential of all Since that time, aboriginal stupeople is a strategy that can have dents have increased from 3 percent lasting effects on the entire organizain 2001 to 9 percent in 2010. Our tion. I should observe that in 2001, goal is to reach 15 percent by the 26 percent of our faculty members year 2020. An aboriginal advisor were female. Today, 34 percent of position was created to provide adour faculty members are female and vice on our aboriginal engagement 40 percent of those are under the age strategy. There has been an increase of 45. in the number of aboriginal faculty We will continue to be driven by and staff. Our campus proudly hosts principles of human dignity and fairan annual powwow that honors our ness in all we do, including strategies graduates. The recognition of indigfor equity and diversity, in educaenous knowledge has increased our tion, employment, and all our acresearch capacity and attracted leadtivities. For work and for study, the ing scholars to our institution. University of Saskatchewan will be a The success of this approach has destination of choice. PDJ led to increased participation and

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Thanks to You,

Women from every walk of life have improved their communities and our nation.

WellPoint proudly celebrates Women's History Month At WellPoint, we are addressing tomorrow’s health care issues today by taking a leadership role in women’s health. Focusing on the medical issues that most affect women, we’ve developed a four-pronged approach that addresses wellness and prevention, disease management, quality improvement, and community involvement. And, our commitment extends to providing our associates with connections to WOW – the Women of WellPoint associate resource group, on-site lactation rooms and dependent care spending accounts. Better health care, thanks to you. Visit us online at wellpoint.com/careers ® Registered Trademark, WellPoint, Inc. ® Registered Trademark, Working Mother ® Registered Trademark, Latina Style Magazine © 2011 WellPoint, Inc. All Rights Reserved. EOE


 MARCH/APRIL 2011

Special CEO Edition

David P. Steiner, Waste Management, Inc. • John D. Forsyth, Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield • Doug Parker, US Airways Diane P. Holder, UPMC Health Plan • Mandy Shapansky, Xerox Canada • Angela F. Braly, WellPoint, Inc. (not pictured)

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t UPMC Health Plan, we have had success incorporating inclusion and diversity into our company’s operation because we live by those ideals every day. Inclusion drives innovation, and it is what helps our company keep pace with a changing industry. Dignity and respect is a way of doing business at UPMC Health Plan and part of the company’s DNA. It all starts with our belief that inclusion is based on one core truth: that everyone deserves dignity and respect. At UPMC Health Plan – as well as throughout the entire UPMC Insurance Services Division and our parent company, UPMC – that way of thinking is not just limited to employees. It extends to our members and to the communities we serve. For example, UPMC tive called “A Journey lence. I keep an open Health Plan works to Inclusion.” This mind when looking to closely with commuyearlong effort focused fill positions at UPMC nity programs such as Health Plan. I look for Healthy Armstrong and on enjoyable activities that promoted digdiverse talent that will We Can!, which are nity and respect and help the organization designed to improve encouraged inclusion to effectively serve the the health of children among employees. community by fostering and families in rural For our efforts, a work environment of and urban areas. The we were given the creative thoughts, ideas, Health Plan also supLeadership in Action and innovation. ports Pennsylvania In my role as Women Work, an orga- award from the Center for Inclusion Executive Vice President nization that promotes at UPMC, which is of UPMC, President of the economic self-suffiawarded to the busithe UPMC Insurance ciency of single parents ness unit that has gone Services Division, and and displaced homeabove and beyond to President and CEO of makers. As a company, champion a culture UPMC Health Plan, I we have been recogof inclusion. In 2011, know that the commitnized over the years for we will enhance our ment to inclusion that our consistent backing employee recognition is shared by our entire of organizations that program by honoring team has had a dramatic work with persons with employees who practice impact on the values of disabilities, such as the inclusion in their acour organization and Blind & Rehabilitation tions and behaviors. on the communities we Services of Pittsburgh At UPMC Health serve. All of us strive to and the Epilepsy Plan, a company with implement the concepts Foundation of Western a workforce that is of dignity and incluPennsylvania. about three-quarters sion because we live it, In 2010, our staff female, inclusion drives because that is who we and management parinnovation and excelare. PDJ ticipated in an initia-

Company: UPMC Health Plan headquarters: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania website: www.upmchealthplan.com Primary business: Health Insurance ANNUAL REVENUES: $3 billion Employees: 2,145

TITLE: President and CEO EDUCATION: University of Michigan, BA; Columbia University, MS FIRST JOB: Writer, local newspaper WHAT I’M READING: Unbroken, by Laura Hillenbrand MY PHILOSOPHY: Everyone should try to leave the world a much better place than they found it. BEST ADVICE: Find your passion and follow it. FAMILY: Husband, two daughters, and a son INTERESTS: Family, work, tennis and reading FAVORITE CHARITY: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh


2011 award winner

Diane P.

Holder

“ Dignity and respect is a way of doing business at UPMC Health Plan and part of the company’s DNA.” w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

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Doug

Parker

“ Our efforts to create an environment where all of our employees are treated with respect and equal opportunity have been noticed.” 92

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11 award winner

Company: US Airways (NYSE: LCC) headquarters: Tempe, Arizona web site: www.usairways.com Primary business: Aviation/transportation ANNUAL REVENUES: $10.5 billion Employees: 32,000 TITLE: Chairman and Chief Executive Officer EDUCATION: BA in Economics, Albion College; MBA, Vanderbilt University FIRST JOB: Bagger at a grocery store WHAT I’M READING: The Black Swan, by Nassim Nicholas Taleb MY PHILOSOPHY: Get the very best team of people you can find and give them the latitude to do their jobs as they see fit. BEST ADVICE: Don’t take yourself too seriously. FAMILY: Wife Gwen; children Jackson, 16; Luke, 13; Eliza, 11 INTERESTS: Family, traveling, attending school events and coaching; golfing, running FAVORITE CHARITIES: United Way, United Methodist Outreach Ministries’ (UMOM) New Day Center, Habitat for Humanity

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early 80 million customers each year count on US Airways to get them to more than 200 destinations in 32 countries and territories safely, reliably and conveniently. It’s our commitment to an inclusive environment that helps us better serve the needs of our diverse customer base, attract top talent and provide growth opportunities for our 32,000 employees. I’m proud to say we’ve built a truly welcoming culture for every member of our employee family. And I hope that culture is apparent to the people who choose our airline for their travel needs. I think the cornerstone of an inclusive environment is open, women make up about 40 percent of honest, frequent communication. the US Airways team. We’ve worked hard to make sure that Our efforts to create an environemployees know that their voice is ment where all of our employees heard and that I and other members are treated with respect and equal of our leadership team are listening opportunity have been noticed. US to and acting on their suggestions Airways was the only airline recogand concerns. One of the ways nized as one of the 50 best compawe do this is by hosting quarterly nies for Latinas to work for in the company-wide meetings and United States in the LATINA Style monthly meetings that are geared 50 Report for 2010. And last fall, for to specific employee groups. the sixth year in a row, we received a A more unique approach we’ve had 100 percent ranking on the Human to creating an inclusive workplace Rights Campaign’s Corporate is establishing company-sponsored Equality Index. employee resource groups that I feel very good about the culture encourage networking and career of diversity and inclusion we have development. These professional ascreated. We will continue working sociations are made up of people to make sure that each one of our from similar backgrounds as well as employees feels valued and knows those who support them or who are he or she not only has room to grow interested in learning more about in our company, but will be supthem. We currently have eight emported in doing so. Our focus on ployee resource groups, all of which mentoring future leaders, along with are guided by members of our exstrengthening our diversity recruitecutive team. Membership in these ment and training efforts, will engroups has increased 26 percent over sure US Airways is a company our the past year, with the fastest growth employees enjoy working for and an in our professional women’s network. airline our customers enjoy doing That’s not surprising, given that business with. PDJ

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Company: Waste Management, Inc. (NYSE: WM) headquarters: Houston, Texas web site: www.wm.com Primary business: Environmental Services ANNUAL REVENUES: $12 billion Employees: 43,000 TITLE: President and Chief Executive Officer EDUCATION: BS, Accounting, Louisiana State University; JD, Law, UCLA FIRST JOB: Delivering newspapers WHAT I’M READING: I like to read books about quantum physics. It’s fascinating to ponder how the universe was created. MY PHILOSOPHY: To surround myself with great people and give them the room and support to succeed. BEST ADVICE: If you want someone to do something, don’t order them to do it. FAMILY: Wife Judy; children Paul, 15; Matthew, 14; and Michael, 12

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CEO │ Leadership in Action

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t Waste Management, I know that talent is our one true competitive advantage. After all, in today’s business environment, every major corporation has access to the same tools and technology. Even the smallest organization can research a world of information on the Internet—a resource previously only available to major academic institutions and prestigious consulting firms. As the leading provider of comprehensive waste and environmental services in North America, our company has rock-solid processes, robust systems, and one of the nation’s largest fleets of trucks. But without our diverse talent, we have nothing. We employ more than 43,000 ness and diversity strategies to build people and serve 20 million custom- a stronger foundation that reaches all ers each year. Our success depends customers, markets, and talent. on continuing to build an environSpecifically, our diversity mission is ment with a broad diversity strategy to champion an inclusive culture that and a culture of inclusiveness to help embraces individual differences and us understand our millions of diverse unique needs while driving innovacustomers. tion; to leverage the diverse talent of That’s why I am committed to our workforce to enhance business creating a culture that appreciates growth; to ensure our workforce is differences. My team and I seek reflective of the global marketplace intelligent individuals who bring and divergent population we serve; unique opinions, ideas, and perspec- and to cultivate relationships with tives to our company. Diversity and strategic business partners that will inclusion are an integral part of my ensure our ability to access, attract long-term strategy because a success- and retain a diverse workforce. ful organization’s employees know Diversity is about more than their opportunities are gated only by gender, race, or ethnicity. It’s about their performance. We are making who we are as individuals and the good progress toward our goals, and unique differences we bring to Waste we will continue to evolve our busiManagement every day. PDJ

INTERESTS: Spending time with family FAVORITE CHARITIES: Those that support people in need.

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2011 award winner

David P.

Steiner

“Our success depends on continuing to build an environment with a broad diversity strategy and a culture of inclusiveness to help us understand our millions of diverse customers.” w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

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John D.

Forsyth

“ Together we will continue to enhance our diversity and inclusiveness and, as a result, be a better company.” 96

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11 award winner

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iversity is more than just the right thing to do at Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield. It’s one of our core values and a critical ingredient in our vision to improve the health of Iowans and South Dakotans. Recognizing, respecting and celebrating our differences, both seen and unseen, also provides an advantage in the marketplace, makes us an employer of choice in Iowa and South Dakota, and enhances our value in the community. As CEO, I am personally responsible and accountable to ensure diversity is central to everything we do as a company. That said, our culture is the result of a team effort. Some of the work we’re doing includes the following: Workforce: Wellmark’s investment in an inclusive workforce begins levels. Employees were used as conboth at the top of the organization, sultants throughout the design and with our diverse leadership team, and building process. among individual employees who are Marketplace: Diversity is part of empowered to regularly recommend Wellmark’s day-to-day work, includdiversity-related ideas directly to me. ing customer service, product develThese efforts meet in the middle with opment and provider networking. Wellmark’s Inclusion Council. The We���re also active in the marketplace, council, which I chair, is comprised of seeking opportunities to reach poemployees throughout the company tential customers and attract diverse who serve as our eyes and ears interemployees. At the recent CelebrAsian nally, and as community ambassadors. festival, for example, Wellmark ofDiversity is also important for our fered free health screenings and fitrecruiting and education efforts. ness exhibitions. Wellmark participates in job fairs Wellmark’s inclusion efforts were and leverages community affiliations honored in 2010 by the NAACP to ensure we attract a diverse pool of and Greater Des Moines Partnership. candidates. Inclusion is reflected in Our employees are also engaged. In each leader’s performance goals, and a recent survey, 99.3 percent could we encourage leaders to get involved name our diversity goal of accepwith diverse organizations in the tance and appreciation; 99.4 percent community. could define stereotypes; and 93.3 Workplace: Wellmark recently percent could identify the approprimoved into a new headquarters built ate response when hearing offensive with diversity and inclusion in mind. remarks. The facility features hearing-aid We understand the value of a dicompatible phones, adjustable-height verse workforce, workplace and marworkstations, scooter accommodaketplace. It’s a journey that has made tions and touch-free equipment in a difference and never ends. Together the restrooms and café. Our Well for we will continue to enhance our Life Fitness Center offers options for diversity and inclusiveness and, as a all physical capabilities and fitness result, be a better company. PDJ

Company: Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield headquarters: Des Moines, Iowa web site: www.wellmark.com Primary business: Health Insurance ANNUAL REVENUES: $3.3 billion Employees: 1,900 TITLE: Chairman & CEO EDUCATION: BS, Business Administration and MA, Economics, Michigan State University FIRST JOB: Age 10-18, morning paper route for 95 residents WHAT I’M READING: The Blue Zones, Dan Buettner and All The Devils Are Here – The Hidden History of the Financial Crisis, by Bethany McLean and Joe Nocera MY PHILOSOPHY: If you don’t have integrity, you don’t have anything. Lead with passion and compassion. BEST ADVICE: Make sure you have balance in your life and always give back to your community. FAMILY: Wife, Rita INTERESTS: Sports, cars, economics, work, volunteering, reading FAVORITE CHARITy: Variety – The Children’s Charity

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headquarters: Indianapolis, Indiana web site: www.WellPoint.com Primary business: Health Benefits ANNUAL REVENUES: Approximately $58 billion Employees: More than 37,000 TITLE: Chair, President and CEO EDUCATION: JD, Southern Methodist University School of Law, Undergraduate degree in finance from Texas Tech University FIRST JOB: Waitress WHAT I’M READING: The Essential Wooden, by John Wooden MY PHILOSOPHY: Do the right thing. Do it for the customer. Do it right the first time. BEST ADVICE: Work hard, always be yourself, commit to something you feel passionate about, serve your customer, and always do the right thing. FAMILY: I have a wonderful husband and three terrific children INTERESTS: Spending time with my family

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FAVORITE CHARITy: United Way

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Company: WellPoint, Inc. (NYSE: WLP)

iversity is good business. I believe that’s especially true in health care. At WellPoint, one of our objectives is to create the best health care value in our industry. The health care system can be a challenge to navigate, and we work to connect our customers to the quality care they want and need. We also work hard to manage costs, so quality care is affordable and accessible for our customers. However, how people understand these connections in health care, and how their communities inform them of these connections, is very different across racial, cultural, gender, and economic lines. Let me offer an example. We recently conducted research among our African – American and Hispanic members with the ultimate goal of enhancing our disease management programs for diabetes to make them more culturally relevant. One of the important findings was that participants in our programs really loved their cultural foods and were having a tough time making healthier changes to their diets. We now offer inforbusiness and how it when our associates mation that specifically helps us fulfill our mis- and our suppliers come shows how traditional sion to improve the from the same commufoods can be made in lives of the people we nities and understand healthier ways, what serve and the health of the various perceptions traditional ingredients that exist about accesscan be kept, and which our communities. If you’re building a ing health care. We’re should be substituted. world-class workforce, very proud of the work Building on this work, it has to be diverse. We we’ve done at WellPoint we were privileged to cover approximately to promote diversity be awarded a grant one in nine Americans, in our workforce, our by the Robert Wood from all walks of life, workplace, and in the Johnson Foundation under our affiliated marketplaces we serve. to implement a health plans. To imAs we make health health disparities prove the care and care reform work for pilot aimed at helpservice we provide our our customers, we will ing African-American customers and memonly build upon our and Hispanic members bers, we rely on the commitment – through better manage their expertise of our diverse diversity – to simplify diabetes. associate base. the connection between This is one example We believe we serve health, care and value of how diversity is our customers best for all Americans. PDJ an imperative for our

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2011 award winner

Angela F.

Braly

“ If you’re building a world-class workforce, it has to be diverse.”

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Mandy

Shapansky “ At the core of our values is diversity; and at Xerox, it’s more than a commitment; it’s who we are.”

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s a 25 year Xerox employee, I know this organization to be one that has great values that have stood the test of time. At the core of our values is diversity; and at Xerox, it’s more than a commitment; it’s who we are. We operate in 160 countries and employ professionals from every corner of the globe. Every day, we bring together people from different disciplines and backgrounds to make our products and services even better. Our commitment to diversity is evident across the company. In fact, we’re proud to say that women and minorities make up 52 percent of our North American workforce. Let me share just some entry-level positions to Canada leadership team of the external recognithe top seats. When you was made up of 11 white tion we have received. have been at it as long as men; by contrast, my Xerox was named one of we have, the bench gets leadership team is comthe Top 50 Companies pretty strong for the next prised of five women and for Diversity by generation of leaders who five men, three of whom DiversityInc. and one of represent the real world. are visible minorities. Canada’s Top Diversity What they all have in With our consistent focus Employers. The Globe common are strong skills, we will continue to build and Mail recently ranked a solid work ethic, comand enhance our diverse Xerox Canada as one mitment and a will to workforce while living of the Greater Toronto win. our values to ensure all area’s top employers I am honored to be a employees feel included for 2011, and last year woman in the leadership and valued for their Xerox Canada was recrole for Xerox Canada, unique contributions. ognized for its commitbut more importantly, It is my view that this ment to building the Xerox is an organization diversity of background, success of women with that has consistently broexperience and thought is The Canadian Women ken barriers for women a key driver of continued in Communications in leadership positions. In success. Employees with Employer of the Year fact, when Ursula Burns different ways of thinkAward. was appointed worldwide ing – and different ways Diversity goes beyond CEO of Xerox in 2009, of perceiving our world race and gender. It celshe took the reigns from – are employees who ebrates and values difAnne Mulcahy in the create innovative soluferences in age, outlook, same role. It was the first tions. In a business like cultural background, time that any Fortune Xerox, whose lifeblood lifestyle, physical ability 100 company had passed is fresh ideas, this variety and sexual orientation. leadership from one of perspectives is a priceThe power of our people woman to another. less resource and a key to development model is When I joined the achieving critical business that it recognizes the company, the Xerox value of diversity from results. PDJ

Company: Xerox Canada (NYSE: XRX) headquarters: Toronto, Ontario web site: www.xerox.ca www.xerox.ca/index/frca Primary business: Business process and document management. ANNUAL REVENUES: $1.1 billion Employees: 4,000

TITLE: President and Chief Executive Officer EDUCATION: Honors BA in Economics, University of Waterloo; Chartered Accountant FIRST JOB: Working at a German Deli in the meat counter WHAT I’M READING: The Sentimentalists, by Johanna Skibsrud MY PHILOSOPHY: Life is about the journey, not the destination. BEST ADVICE: Give credit to others and it will come back tenfold. FAMILY: Husband Kerry and four kids: Sarah, Melissa, Taylor and Sydney INTERESTS: Travel FAVORITE CHARITy: Feed the Children

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thought thoughtleaders leaders thoughtleaders

A continuing series designed to bring you perspectives and ideas from leading diversity professionals. Do you have a question for our thoughtleaders? Send your suggestions to damianjohnson@diversityjournal.com.

Supplier Diversity in a Down Economy By April Watkins, SPHR

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Vice President, Inclusion and Human Resources, Americas, Burger King Corporation

ne of the first measures companies take when identifying efficiencies, streamlining operations and reducing costs, is to consolidate supply chain/procurement vendors. For better or for worse, this practice tends to favor large-scale suppliers who can usually offer more goods and services for less. Unfortunately, many minority businesses that often fall into the small-scale supplier category lose out. To maintain our diverse supplier partners, Burger King Corporation regularly implements diversity strategies within our supply chain, which help support our business objectives by entrenching essential diversity practices in our day-to-day activities. Try some of these tips to help keep supplier diversity a priority in your business, in every operating environment: Ask large-scale vendors to sub-contract work to minority businesses. If they are serious about being a partner, they should be willing to adopt strong values about supplier diversity. Meet with small-scale suppliers. See if they can partner together or form joint ventures to offer inclusive packages/services at lower costs. Focus on outreach to minority vendors. If you reach out during the idea phase, minority vendors are more likely to be able to adapt to project expansions. Ask for referrals from your minority supply base. Often times diverse suppliers are well networked with other minority businesses. Increase engagement and activity with diversity-advocacy groups. Refresh your knowledge and ask for updates to understand how best to leverage Pro f iles in D iv ersi t y J ourna l

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and get ROI out of these partnerships. Make supplier diversity routine. Stay in touch with suppliers and send updates about recertification. Also, publish procedures and checklists online and send notifications when there is new business up for bid. Shelf fears. Bringing on small-scale suppliers for critical initiatives can be stressful. Sometimes we cast judgment; allow minority suppliers to dispel your fears and bring facts, assurances or guarantees to support their abilities. Set goals, track your progress and publish your success. Share success stories with C-level leadership and other employees. Awareness aids in the process of embedding supplier diversity into corporate culture. For supplier diversity efforts to flourish, we must begin to think differently. Burger King Corporation understands how a diverse supply chain enhances every aspect of the community by creating jobs, expanding consumer spending and effectively supporting our business. Corporations should remember that a diverse supply chain is critical for long-term competitive advantage and there should always be a focus on maintaining diversity in this space, especially during challenging times. It may be the very force that helps sustain a corporation in a turbulent economy. PDJ April Watkins leads the human capital vision, including the direction and execution of HR practices in support of business growth and profitability, for Burger King Corporation (BKC). She is also responsible for defining and driving a diversity inclusion strategy that is integrated throughout all franchise, supplier, workforce and community channels in the Americas.


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The Value of a Progression Model for Inclusion and Diversity Initiatives By Marilyn Nagel Chief Diversity Officer, Cisco

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ttracting, retaining, and developing a diverse workforce is a top priority for Cisco, an organization that employs 72,600 people in more than 90 countries. At Cisco, we are focused on creating an inclusive culture that maximizes the contributions of our vast workforce, and helps ensure we have the creative, collaborative environment we need to support our globalization strategy. Employee Resource Groups (ERGs) are one way that we engage our employees to help them achieve both individual and business goals. These groups bring employees from different backgrounds, cultures, and experiences together, often using Cisco communication and collaboration technologies, to develop their business understanding, skills, and networks. We encourage our ERGs to use their resources to find new ways to foster innovation, uncover market needs, and explore areas of potential growth. ERGs have had a big impact across our organization. Many employees have told us their ERGs helped them develop leadership skills and gave them a way to make a difference outside their regular day-to-day jobs. From a business standpoint, we have seen these groups create meaningful dialogues that have led to business opportunities, where our unique understanding gives us a competitive advantage and increases profits. We wanted to identify a way to help ensure that these benefits were repeatable. With different ERGs doing different things for different results, we needed to gain insight into their true effectiveness. We needed our ERGs to achieve accountability and consistency, but without sacrificing their unique value. With these factors in mind, we developed an ERG progression model that each group could use

“We encourage our ERGs to use their resources to find new ways to foster innovation, uncover market needs, and explore areas of potential growth.”

to assess itself, its work, and its organizational evolution. This model creates a framework that applies structure, governance, and leadership to our ERGs, yet preserves their autonomy through benchmarks, best practices, and processes that increase competencies within each group. Since introducing this progression model, we have seen our ERGs measure return on their investments, increase their positive impact on the business, and be recognized for their contributions. For example, they now have the structure and technology needed to communicate their strategic goals and achievements to multiple audiences. This small change immediately increased their influence and widened their scope, allowing them to support, in a more formal way, the organization’s access to localized information and understanding of related markets. ERGs are fast becoming a market-savvy organizational resource that will help us remain competitive in the global economy. Our progression model gives our ERGs a predictable way forward; one that unites them, so they can inspire us to value our differences and succeed. PDJ Marilyn Nagel, Cisco’s Chief Diversity Officer, is responsible for facilitating the global Inclusion & Diversity (I&D) board, which sets the I&D strategy for Cisco® (www.cisco.com). She also develops the I&D strategic plan and is continually looking for ways to help Cisco stay innovative, by driving policy changes to create a more inclusive environment. Ms. Nagel has worked in academia, leadership and organizational development for nearly 30 years, holds several master’s degrees and serves on non-profit boards. w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

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Sponsorship Matters

By Ana Duarte McCarthy Chief Diversity Officer, Citi

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ake a moment to ponder she adheres to them. Sound like work? It these questions. Is there some- is. However, if you consider that research one who always speaks favorably indicates that employees with sponsors for you when you are not in the are more likely to ask their managers for room? Who is genuinely interested in your a stretch assignment, the impact can be career and is willing to personally invest significant. in your success? Who readily introduces Another opportunity exists for corporayou to people of influence for your benefit tions to develop a culture that embraces and opportunity? Was there someone who and fosters sponsorship of talented emcame to mind besides your parents? Was it ployees. At Citi, we have embarked on one person, several people? If your answer this through Women Leading Citi, a pilot was not an enthusiastic “yes” initiative that pairs 59 manto all of the above, research aging director-level women “When seeking would suggest that you need with male and female senior sponsorship, it is sponsorship. advocates for 18 months. important to be When seeking sponsorThe advocates are asked, strategic and to ship, it is important to be among other goals, to prorecognize that strategic and to recognize vide career development that developing positive redeveloping positive feedback and to support the lationships is a two way growth of the participant’s relationships is a street. To some extent, you network and visibility withtwo way street.” can focus on creating netin Citi. Since the inception works of individuals and of Women Leading Citi, 56 embedding that as part of your goals/ac- of the 59 have been retained, and more complishments for the year, much the way than half the group has had an expansion that you would focus on priorities among of responsibility or been promoted. While your responsibilities. we continue to assess the impact of Women For example, a colleague I know has Leading Citi, we are pleased at the promise three individuals that she has identified as it offers supporting the advancement of her prospects for 2011. She has carefully women into senior management. PDJ researched them and has made a point of introducing herself to them at meetings, town halls, and through others who are Ana Duarte McCarthy, Citi’s chief diversity officer, is responsible acquaintances. She has set a goal of getting for the development and integration of Citi’s workforce diversity strategy for attracting diverse talent, workforce development, on their calendars once a quarter and has fostering an inclusive work environment, and ensuring management blocked those meeting times in advance so accountability.

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Bring It!

Your Talents. Your Ideas. Your Passion. Thu, Verizon, Marketing

At Verizon, we want you to bring your diverse talents, experiences, backgrounds, and viewpoints to work. It’s your smarter leadership, bolder innovations, and faster results that will move our business forward at the speed of FiOS! So, bring it in and bring it on – bring your diversity to work at Verizon!

Verizon Diversity Leadership. Innovation. Results.


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A Proposal for Resolving Diversity Problems By Luis J. Diaz, Esq. Chief Diversity Officer, Gibbons P.C.

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ue to market pressures, the business of law is migrating from an informal partnership structure to a more centralized, corporate management structure. Effective administration of processes like marketing, finance, and diversity management can be a qualitative differentiator in the marketplace. The challenge for law firms is to manage these initiatives to bring more value to clients, who are asking firms to build client services into their work product without adding cost. For example, many corporations demand an integrated approach to marketplace, workplace, and supplier diversity, to compete more effectively and to ensure that diverse professionals at majority firms thrive and to create opportunities for M/WBE vendors. Historically, these initiatives have operated separately and with different stakeholders; a new model was required. Our solution was to launch a supplier diversity program, GDI-123, that addresses the different objectives of constituencies in the vendor/client relationship. It is replicable in other professional service industries. GDI-123 helps Gibbons and clients realize a triple bottom

“Effective administration of processes like marketing, finance, and diversity management can be a qualitative differentiator in the marketplace.”

line: (i) meeting diverse spend goals with qualified M/WBE vendors; (ii) utilizing diverse Gibbons attorneys with total quality management of services; and (iii) obtaining competitive blended rates for legal services and optimum prices for other products and services. The GDI123 administrator directs the entire business process, so no administrative burden is placed on clients’ in-house personnel. Diverse spend and resource utilization goals are based on each client’s goals. We maximize diverse attorney utilization and assign projects using proprietary nationwide databases of certified M/WBEs, including clientrequested vendors. The GDI-123 administrator negotiates pricing with vendors to ensure competitive blended rates. Upon completion, GDI-123 projects are subjected to a proprietary quality review process. During service delivery, Gibbons also mentors the M/ WBE providers as required, conducting education sessions to assist with certification, teach best

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practices, and promote visibility for M/WBEs, helping to increase the ranks of such businesses. Identifying a large pool of certified M/WBE vendors fosters competition and results in better service, price, and quality. Moreover, M/WBEs are increasing at six times the rate of non-M/ WBE companies in the United States. It simply makes sense for Gibbons to affiliate with such a fast-growing market segment. By supporting M/WBEs that value inclusion, we help them to succeed and thus support our own corporate values: the more they succeed, the more likely they are to hire and promote a diverse workforce. GDI-123 has so impressed the clients to whom we have presented it that some, in turn, have launched the program within their own companies as an diversity solution with a triple return. PDJ Luis J. Diaz, Esq. is the Chief Diversity Officer of Gibbons P.C. He works with the firm’s Diversity Committee to implement all aspects of its diversity initiatives and manages the firm’s supplier diversity program. Mr. Diaz is also a Director in the firm’s Intellectual Property Department.


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The Failing State of Diversity in the Legal Profession By Donald S. Prophete Vice President, Ogletree Deakins

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n many respects, I’m not the typical actual game. In other words, his criticism was that diverse attorney working in a large law firm. I had no real desire to get the uniform dirty, I just I’ve had a very successful career thus far. liked being draped in the pretty colors. With all of my success, what beef could I Too many law firms and corporations have possibly have with the state of diversity in the legal developed a love for wearing the uniform withprofession? out the desire to get the uniform dirty. These An objective review of diversity in the legal pro- companies and law firms draft diversity policies, fession leads to only one conclusion: that diversity buy tickets to diversity events and sign the call-to efforts in the profession have been largely superfi- action-letter as a substitute for a real and thoughtcial and far too slow compared to those in other ful commitment to diversity. Few companies have white collar professions. established real practices meant to identify, deSeven years ago, Roderick Palmore penned the velop and maintain meaningful relationships with “Call to action” letter, a pledge signed by the diverse counsel. general counsel of some of the country’s largest Ask your Fortune 500 contacts to identify their corporations, vowing to make diversity a major list of national go-to counsel in various substanconsideration in their selection of tive areas. Then compare that list outside counsel. Since his letter in “Creating strong role with their go-to lists from 2004. 2004, nearly every major law firm models is the answer I’m willing to wager that the list has developed diversity programs. has remained unchanged. How to increasing diverse Still, real progress in diversifying much more difficult is it to estabinterest in the the profession has been painfully lish meaningful relationships with profession.” slow. According to the National diverse experts in law firms rather Association for Law Placement than with the traditional white (NALP), the percentage of minormale expert? ity attorneys at U.S. law firms has increased by a Creating strong role models is the answer to mere 2.5 since Mr. Palmore’s letter. increasing diverse interest in the profession. Until Although it’s true that Mr. Palmore’s letter has corporations and law firms allow for the developimproved the attitude towards diversity, the profes- ment of credible, diverse role models, the profession has not taken sufficient steps to make real and sion will have very limited success in addressing the sustainable changes. To the contrary, the misuse of diversity crisis that exists today. PDJ Mr. Palmore’s letter has provided corporations and law firms a cover to mask their lack of commitment to diversity. When I was younger, my football coach once Donald S. Prophete serves on Ogletree Deakins’ five-member board of directors snarled at me that the only limitation I had to and as the firm’s vice president. He has been selected for inclusion in Best Lawyers in America, Chambers USA: America’s Leading Business Lawyers; Legal 500, as being the best cornerback in our conference was one of the leading employment litigation attorneys in the United States, and by that I loved wearing the uniform more than the Super Lawyers. w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

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Building the Dream:

UC Berkeley’s Plans for Equity, Inclusion, and Diversity By Gibor Basri Vice Chancellor for Equity & Inclusion, UC Berkeley

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y 30 years as a professor in the Department of Astronomy at the University of California, Berkeley, has given me a comprehensive perspective about the needs and desires of the students, faculty, and staff on this campus. With shifts in state policies and economic challenges over the past few decades, I have shared mounting concerns about the ability of this university to continue to reflect the rich diversity of California and the nation. In 2007, Chancellor Robert J. Birgeneau, with the support of campus leadership, launched an entirely new division—the Division of Equity & Inclusion—to address these concerns as never before. When I took on the role of vice chancellor for the Division of Equity & Inclusion the following year, I sought to establish a 10-year strategic plan for equity, inclusion, and diversity that would propel the campus into a future where three guiding principles would dictate every action we take: excellence in all that we do; equity and fair treatment for everyone on campus with respect to access to resources, opportunities, and advancement; and inclusion in an engaging and healthy campus climate in which any individual or group could feel welcomed, respected, supported, and valued. Based on extensive consultation with campus stakeholders and colleagues nationwide, and an investigation of best practices, our strategic plan was crafted to transform this campus into a more equitable and inclusive institution. It is a strategy that emphasizes accountability by creating a new planning and assessment system for tracking our progress, and one that creates reward structures to recognize and incentivize progress. The campus received essential support from

“As Berkeley takes on the challenges ahead, I am pleased with the response of the campus and hopeful about the impact at our university and beyond.”

the Evelyn and Walter Haas, Jr. Fund to develop this strategic plan and to launch a five-year UC Berkeley Initiative for Equity, Inclusion, and Diversity. It’s an initiative designed to speak to every student and potential student, every professor or aspiring scholar, and every member of our staff. This comprehensive initiative will bring new faculty to the Haas Diversity Research Center to pursue work on areas from LBGTQ equity to economic disparities; expand the groundbreaking American Cultures program to include community-based scholarship courses; provide new resources for faculty mentoring and multicultural education programs; and offer grants to engage faculty, students, and staff in improving the campus climate. Undergirding this effort is a new commitment to applied research and development to help ensure targeted outcomes and goals. As Berkeley takes on the challenges ahead, I am pleased with the response of the campus and hopeful about the impact at our university and beyond. I encourage you to check out our progress by visiting diversity.berkeley.edu. PDJ Dr. Gibor Basri is the vice chancellor for equity and inclusion at the University of California, Berkeley, overseeing a staff of approximately 150 and a $17-million budget. His responsibilities include working with faculty, staff, and students on strategic planning and fundraising for UC Berkeley’s Initiative for Equity, Inclusion, and Diversity and to carry out other key programs. An expert in “brown dwarves,” stars that cool down to planetary temperatures, Basri is an astrophysicist, who has taught at Berkeley for 25 years.


Work that makes a difference.

Opportunities that expand your horizons.

A culture that embraces diversity.

Are you ready for what’s next in your career? At Booz Allen Hamilton, our ability to help clients solve their most challenging problems and achieve success in their most critical missions hinges on our people. We also believe diversity of backgrounds contributes to more innovative ideas, which in turn drive better results for clients. Booz Allen’s commitment to an inclusive environment incorporates facilitating understanding and awareness, and creating initiatives to improve the quality of work life for our staff. From our long-standing relationships with organizations such as Girls Inc., Society of Women Engineers, and League of Black Women, to supporting events such as Women in Clearable Careers, we understand diversity is central to who we are and what we do. If you’re looking to do work that makes a difference at a firm that’s committed to helping you achieve your professional and personal goals, Booz Allen could be what’s next in your career. For more information, e-mail diversityrecruiting@bah.com.

Ready for what’s next. www.boozallen.com/careers We are proud of our diverse environment, EOE/M/F/D/V.


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Leading Diversity & Inclusion Transformation By Tisa Jackson Vice President of Diversity and Inclusion, Union Bank, N.A.

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zation’s needs and act accordingly rather than following the crowd. For example, focus on providing sponsors instead of just mentors to high potential employees. A sponsor can assist in assigning visible projects. A mentor is also important in terms of providing advice and serving as a sounding board, but opening doors to sponsorship can be a viable strategy in engaging executives of all backgrounds in developing diverse talent. When looking externally, toward customers, suppliers, vendors and candidates, choose partnership over sponsorship. If you merely sponsor an event, the community doesn’t really get to know you. A partner creates a rela-

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r. Martin Luther King, Jr., said: “Life’s most persistent and urgent question is: What are you doing for others? Do not say you will do it ‘someday,’ now is the time. Do not say ‘someone’ will do it, you are the one...” These words echo a than a program; it is a familiar theme for di- cultural change process versity professionals, be- comprised of programs, cause we enter this work processes, policies and with a commitment to initiatives tied to busidoing everything we ness. Focus on key procan to achieve equity cesses instead of primarfor all people. ily focusing on managAchieving progress ing hiring or training is more challenging in programs. this global economic cliDe-specialize your mate. Recent financial thinking. Diversity and strains have resulted in inclusion has continued some companies cut- to expand beyond staffting or reducing their ing and human resourcdiversity and inclusion es. Depending on the teams. But the economic industry and project, downturn offers some you may need to think surprising opportunities, like a marketer, buyer, and forward-thinking public relations profesexecutives recognize new sional or business develbusiness potential in that opment representative their clients and custom- in the course of a week. ers are more diverse. The Savor the opportunity following recommenda- to make positive change tions can help you lead and embrace the oppordiversity and inclusion tunity to de-specialize transformation. your thinking. Change your mindChallenge conset. Diversity and in- ventional wisdom. clusion is much more Evaluate your organi-

“Regardless of the economic environment, diversity and inclusion is an opportunity, not a problem.”

tionship and is actively engaged in organizations as a board member or speaker. You need to be aware of their mission so they can help you with your mission. Regardless of the economic environment, diversity and inclusion is an opportunity, not a problem. We are responsible for keeping the vision. We must continuously challenge ourselves to lead the expanding scope and needs of diversity and inclusion within the business community. PDJ

Tisa Jackson, vice president of Diversity and Inclusion for Union Bank, N.A., is founder of the Professional & Technical Diversity Network (PTDN) of greater Los Angeles, a diversity consortium comprised of companies committed to diversity and inclusion. Headquartered in San Francisco, UnionBanCal Corporation is a financial holding company with assets of $79.1 billion at December 31, 2010. Its primary subsidiary, Union Bank, N.A., is a full service commercial bank providing services to individuals, small businesses, middle-market companies, and major corporations. The bank operates 401 banking offices in California, Washington, Oregon and Texas, as well as two international offices.


At Bank of the West, we value the individual.

Different perspectives generate fresh ideas. That’s why at Bank of the West, we value diversity and equal opportunity for all our employees. We’ve grown stronger thanks to our unique blend of people. After all, in today’s competitive banking environment, it is our employees that keep us a step ahead of the rest. For career opportunities, visit us online at bankofthewest.com.

© 2011 Bank of the West. Bank of the West and its subsidiaries are equal opportunity/affirmative action employers. M/F/D/V


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Bringing the Music to All of the People By Master Sgt. Steven M. Przyzycki The USAF Academy Band, The United States Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs

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ll of us in the Air Force Academy Band take pride in our mission as ambassadors for the Air Force. We deliver the Air Force message through the emotional impact of music. Attracting an audience of greater diversity has proven to be a challenge. There is great respon- audience and increase sibility in our positions our nationwide appeal. as bandsmen. For many Essentially, everyone citizens, our appear- wins. ances are the only conAs recently as October nection they have with 2010, we performed in the Air Force. History Nogales, Arizona, only has proven that art, par- one mile from the naticularly music, is the tional border. The conbest vehicle to invoke cert featured a selection patriotism and win the in which students from trust of the people. the local high school The most effec- sat in and performed tive tool that we can with the band. All of implement to increase these students were diversity is location, Mexican nationals. location, location! We This was their first and must bring the music only opportunity to be to the people and per- in contact with airmen. form in communities Coincidentally, a rerich in diversity. In tired Tuskegee Airman most cases, these are was in attendance at also Congressional dis- this concert. tricts from which we Our rock band, Blue strive to attract cadets. Steel, travels the counAt first, this may re- try performing with sult in smaller audi- youth orchestras, and ences. However, time they have appeared will prove to attract twice at the Harlem’s a larger, more diverse Children Zone. We will

“The most effective tool that we can implement to increase diversity is location, location, location!”

continue to play in the academy’s high interest areas that are rich in cultural multiplicity. Already, cadet nominations have been submitted from some of these communities. How wonderful it is to perform in these new frontiers. We view our goal to increase diversity as a very welcome opportunity: a chance to perform and tell the Air Force story to new, eager listeners. How privileged we are to embark on this endeavor to change the face of our Air Force! The United States Air Force Academy Band represents the Air Force Academy, the leading educational institution developing and inspiring air and space leaders of character with a vision for tomorrow.

The band, comprised of 56 active-duty Air Force bandsmen, is dedicated to serving our great nation and representing our future leaders being trained at the Academy. For over 50 years, the United States Air Force Academy Band has used the power of music to inspire Air Force personnel and the nation they serve, produce innovative musical programs and products, and communicate Air Force excellence to millions around the world. PDJ Master Sergeant Steven M. Przyzycki, percussion, hails from Chicago, Illinois. Steve holds Bachelor and Master of Music degrees in Percussion Performance from Chicago Musical College of Roosevelt University. He joined the band in June 1997 and, in addition to performing with the band, he is also the noncommissioned officer in charge of the band’s public affairs shop.


Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina Honors

March

Women’s History Month

Perspective “Each of us brings to our job, whatever it is, our lifetime of experience and our values.” Sandra Day O’Connor Sept. 25, 1981: Sandra Day O’Connor is appointed the first woman justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. No endorsement or sponsorship is implied by the use of the above quote. BrainyQuote.com: Sandra Day O’Connor. www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/s/sandra_day_oconnor.html (Accessed Dec. 15, 2010). Supreme Court of the United States. www.supremecourt.gov (Accessed Feb. 7, 2011). An independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. U4884b, 2/11


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From Diversity to Inclusion in 10 Months By Col. Bart Weiss Academy Preparatory School Commander, The United States Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs

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n the November/ December 2009 issue of Profiles in Diversity Journal, Shinder Dhillon writes, “(Diversity) is about getting the right mix of people, with the right mix of skills and competencies.” That has been my vision as a commander at every opportunity I’ve had to command in the Air Force, and it is my vision for the Air Force Academy Preparatory School. Our diversity grows from our population of cadet candidates with prior service in the Air Force, as well as cadet candidates who come here directly after graduating from high school. Some of the cadet candidates have deployed. Some may know brothers or sisters in arms who never came home. Our priorservice cadet candidates are usually among the first to step into leadership positions, and we capitalize on their experience to develop high school graduates into leaders. Cadet candidates who come directly from high school may not have the experiences of those with prior service, but they, too, have leadership potential. Anyone who positively stands out will receive recognition and opportunities to achieve great-

“Basic training brings them together as a class by forcing them to depend on one another.”

er goals in the service of the Academy and Country. All of our cadet candidates need a little work academically to get them ready for four years at the Academy. The Prep School lifts all participants academically and makes sure those who come from weaker schools or who have been away from academics while deployed are prepared for the rigors of an Academy education. Part of the reason we conduct basic military training at the Prep School is to build relationships and esprit de corps among the 240 cadet candidates. Basic training brings them together as a class by forcing them to depend on one another. At the start of the academic year, when cadet candidates no longer have to sit with their flights, they tend to gravitate towards the groups of candidates with whom they most identify: African Americans, Hispanic Americans, football players, basketball players. But because we focus on the concept of brothers and sisters in arms, the dynamic

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changes within a few months from sitting together based on similarities to sitting together based on shared interests. These shared interests rapidly evolve into forged bonds that transcend ethnic and cultural barriers and make the Prep School an inclusive environment. At the end of their 10-month stay, our class no longer consists of high school graduates, recruited athletes or prior-enlisted airmen. Instead, they are one team, one class of cadet candidates—Preppies. The inclusion bridge is gapped, measured and seamed within the 10-month timeframe, to begin anew during Basic Cadet Training at the Academy. PDJ

Col. Bartholomew “Bart” Weiss is the commander of the Air Force Academy Preparatory School in Colorado Springs, Colo. He directs a one-year academic, military and athletic program – whose main focus is to prepare young men and women to succeed at the United States Air Force Academy. He is a 1986 graduate of the Air Force Academy and a native of Muskegon, Mich. He holds a Master of Science degree in strategic studies from the Army War College and a Bachelor of Science degree in financial management from the Academy.


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Sponsored Networking:

Building Vital Professional Relationships By Scott Conking Principal and Head of Culture & Diversity, Vanguard

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workforce. Instead, organizations must make special efforts to help emerging diverse talent build relationships. One effective way to do that is by using sponsors to help emerging leaders bridge interpersonal gaps and develop relationships. Sponsorship differs from mentorship; it means being omnipresent in the professional life of an emerging leader, whereas mentorship tends to be on an asneeded basis. A sponsor provides proactive, unsolicited, and candid feedback, context and advice. A sponsor also advocates for the emerging leader, attesting to his or her talents and promoting his or her consideration for roles and programs. Through sponsored networking, the sponsor involves the emerging leaders in events and experiences that can lead to professional relationships with senior leaders that might not develop

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n the hit TV show Mad Men, the office is largely white and largely male, and those who don’t fit that profile are largely left out. Though today’s workplace is infinitely more diverse than what we see on Mad Men, it’s still true that homogeneity can limit inclusivity. But an approach called sponsored networking can help emerging diverse talent to build the professional relationships that are so vital to their success. We all know that ca- dominated by white, reers and leadership Christian, predomiteams are built based on nantly suburban males the abilities, engagement with traditional families, levels, and aspirations of most of the young aspirtalent rising through an ing leaders could easily organization. However, build rapport with the movement through the leaders in the organizaranks of an organization tion. In today’s more dican also accelerate on verse, mobile, and tranthe strength of personal sient workplace, aspiring connections forged over leaders do not necessarily many years. These rela- have the same interests tionships may be based and experiences as the on shared interests such organization’s leaders. as sports, educational How should compainstitutions, similar fam- nies address this chalily experiences, religious lenge? I believe comand ethnic communi- panies can no longer ties, common hobbies, rely on traditional comand neighborhoods. monalities to build a And what could be more leadership team. If they natural than to develop a try to, they’ll be relying bond based on a shared on a shrinking, oneconnection? dimensional talent pool, In a world where the and one that might not educated workforce was connect with a diverse

“A sponsor provides proactive, unsolicited, and candid feedback, context and advice.”

otherwise. Sponsored networking means constant connecting, brokered interactions, social activities, outreach, and active involvement in Employee Resource Groups by both senior and emerging leaders. Sponsorships can help emerging talent to build the relationships they’ll need in order to engage and thrive in an organization. It’s a focused approach, but I think that it’s very necessary in today’s diverse workplace. It’s great that we’ve come a long way from the Mad Men era, but we must do more. Building diverse leadership teams will require focused efforts that engage established leaders in close sponsor relationships with emerging talent. PDJ


CHEVRON, the CHEVRON HALLMARK and HUMAN ENERGY are registered trademarks of Chevron Intellectual Property LLC. Š 2009 Chevron Corporation. All rights reserved.

Our people are as diverse as their ideas.

tplace, rldwide marke To work in a wo represents workforce that Chevron has a siness, we rever we do bu the world. Whe r our y is essential fo believe diversit . Because d partners alike employees an human ts of view, our with more poin er. es even strong energy becom om. visit chevron.c To learn more,


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Diversity and New York: One and the Same By Mark Wagar President and CEO, Empire BlueCross BlueShield

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Ihave had the good fortune to live and work in several states. At every stop, I learned more about diversity and the richness it adds to one’s life. But, it wasn’t until I moved to New York, where millions of people live, work, eat, shop and commute shoulder-toshoulder, that I have come to understand why it is known as the “melting pot” of America and how transcendent a concept that is. Empire BlueCross BlueShield is the largest insurer in New York, covering nearly six million people. Our membership includes hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers of African American, Hispanic, Russian, Arab, Italian, Asian, Irish and Native American descent, and many others—a cultural mélange that is fascinating and profound. If Empire didn’t strive to understand our broad marketplace, we wouldn’t be a company that people choose to do business with. Nor would we be a company that attracts top talent. Here are some of the ways we’re incorporating diversity into our business. Workplace Welcoming to All We work hard to recruit a diverse staff that reflects our membership demographic. We established a Strategic

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Diversity Committee that works to champion diversity, and Workplace Diversity and Culture Ambassadors to involve associates in worksite events. Our Community Ambassadors actively relationship-build with leaders and activists in several ethnic communities. We communicate about diversity. When New Yorkers were worried about a mosque being built near Ground Zero, we talked about the Ramadan celebration and the commonalities of religious faiths. I sent my holiday card out at the beginning of December, acknowledging and honoring not just Christmas, but Chanukah and Kwanzaa, too. Focus on Our Members’ Needs We tailor service to cultural dictates. When one of our Haitian members needed hospital care, but couldn’t understand his doctor, we got one of our Creole-speaking associates on the phone to translate. We work to break down communication roadblocks between physicians and our members to improve health outcomes. For example, we have worked with providers on how to improve their communication with our female Asian members, who may be uncomfortable making direct eye contact with a male physician.

M A R C H / A P R I L 2 0 11

We are addressing health disparities. Our Healthy Weigh To Change weight loss program is offered in both English and Spanish, and we’ve seen exceptional results for our Spanish-speaking participants. Supporting Diversity Efforts in the Community I sit on the boards of, and we support, dozens of community initiatives that impact New Yorkers’ health status, increase access to key services and help build strong communities, including organizations like: The Arthur Ashe Institute for Urban Health, which aims to reduce morbidity and mortality by increasing healthcare provider diversity. Union Settlement, which improves the lives and health of lowincome and immigrant residents living in East Harlem. The Committee for Hispanic Children and Families’ “Healthy Living” program, a nutrition and fitness program for families in the Central Bronx. New York has the richest ethnic diversity in the world. I feel blessed to be part of this beautiful population mosaic, and to have come to more fully understand the value of being responsive to the entirety of our broad marketplace. PDJ


Your future is

bright. At Freddie Mac, you’ll have a rewarding career as you play a role in helping the nation recover from the housing and economic crisis, and implementing the President’s Making Home Affordable program. A vital component in the secondary mortgage market, Freddie Mac has made homeownership and rental housing more accessible and more affordable for one in six homebuyers and more than five million renters.

Audit | Compliance Single-Family Portfolio Management | IT When you join the Freddie Mac team, you’ll discover an inclusive, empowering culture with an equal opportunity employer who recognizes the value of diversity. You’ll also find a total rewards package that supports your success both at work and in your personal life. We encourage you to visit us at upcoming diversity conferences, which are listed on our career site. Visit us online at:

FreddieMacDiversity.jobs careers with impact


catalyst

www.catalyst.org

Catalyst Census Reveals Lack of Progress but New Study Offers a Solution By Catalyst

W

omen’s representation has not grown significantly in corporate boardrooms, executive office suites, or the ranks of companies’ top earners in the last year, according to the 2010 Catalyst Census: Fortune 500 Women Board Directors and the 2010 Catalyst Census: Fortune 500 Women Executive Officers and Top Earners. “Corporate America needs to get ‘unstuck’ when it comes to advancing women to leadership,” said Ilene H. Lang, Catalyst president and CEO. “This is our fifth report where the annual change in female leadership remained flat. If this trend line represented a patient’s pulse—she’d be dead.” The 2010 Catalyst Census: Fortune 500 Women Board Directors examines women’s representation in corporate governance at the largest U.S. companies, while the 2010 Catalyst Census: Fortune 500 Women Executive Officers and Top Earners details women’s representation in senior leadership positions. These annual reports provide statistics to gauge women’s advancement into leadership and highlight the gender diversity gap. The results are as follows: • Women held 15.7 percent of board seats in 2010— only a 0.5 percentage point gain over the 15.2 percent they held in 2009. • In both 2009 and 2010, more than 50 percent of companies had at least two women board directors, yet more than 10 percent had no women serving on their boards. The percentage of companies with three or more women board directors also remained flat. • In 2010, women held only 14.4 percent of executive officer positions, up from 13.5 percent in 2009. • In 2010, women executive officers held only 7.6 percent of the top earner positions, as compared with 6.3 percent in 2009. • In 2009, more than two-thirds of companies had at least one woman executive officer; this number did not change in 2010. The same held true for companies with no women executive officers. While this news does little to reinforce any talk of progress, Catalyst research shows that advancing talented women could provide businesses with an enormous competitive ad120

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vantage. In fact, our latest global study, Mentoring: Necessary But Insufficient for Advancement, demonstrates that men with mentors are promoted more and compensated at a higher rate, while women with mentors are far less likely to be promoted or paid more as a result of being mentored. But sponsors—mentors who advocate for promotions and highprofile development opportunities—could help narrow the gender leadership gap. The study finds that men’s mentors tend to hold more senior positions, which means they have the clout necessary to provide sponsorship. Other findings include: • Men with mentors had starting salaries in their first post-MBA jobs that were, on average, $9,260 higher than the starting salaries of women with mentors. • Men received more promotions than women, and their promotions came with greater salary increases— men received 21 percent more in compensation per promotion while women’s compensation increased by only 2 percent per promotion. • High-potential women and men with senior-level mentors—those in a position to provide sponsorship—advanced further and earned more than those with less senior mentors, pointing to the need for career support from people with clout. Sponsorship is not a silver bullet, however. Men with senior-level mentors still had greater salary increases than women with senior-level mentors. “Jumpstarting women’s advancement takes commitment fueled by urgency,” said Ms. Lang. “Our research points to a solution that can narrow the gender leadership gap and supercharge the leadership pool—making corporate America more competitive in the process.” PDJ

Founded in 1962, Catalyst is the leading nonprofit membership organization working globally with businesses and the professions to build inclusive workplaces and expand opportunities for women and business. With offices in the United States, Canada, and Europe, and more than 400 preeminent corporations as members, Catalyst is the trusted resource for research, information, and advice about women at work. Catalyst annually honors exemplary organizational initiatives that promote women’s advancement with the Catalyst Award.


CAREERS AT SHELL The most successful problem solvers look at things differently and see solutions no one else can. Who would have thought to use fish protein to stop gas freezing in subsea pipes? One of our people did. And right now we’re looking for more people who can bring a fresh perspective to the energy challenge. We’ll provide training, support and career choices to develop your potential. We’ll get you working with some of our most accomplished problem solvers. And together we can help build a responsible energy future. Think further. For more information and to apply online, please visit www.shell.com/careers. Shell is an equal opportunity employer.

“Shell provided me with the opportunity to handle challenges and manage issues in a dynamic refinery environment. I count it a privilege to be part of this globalized entity and I was convinced that my journey in Shell will be filled with continual learnings, growth and never-ending opportunities to contribute.”

“With the open career progression opportunity, every employee of Shell can choose his/her own field as per their interests.”

“The best thing about working in Shell is the balance between life and work; between exposure and depth of experience offered to employees, and between making profits and caring for its employees and the community.”

Gloria Wang Environment Officer – HSSEQ Department

Jasmine Tiwari Senior Associate Researcher

Kishoore Jehan Marketing Executive


momentum

continued from page 9

Chrysler Group Engineers Honored Eleven Chrysler Group LLC engineers were honored with Modern Day Tech Leader Awards at a luncheon during the 25th Black Engineer of the Year Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Global Competitiveness Conference on Feb. 18 in Washington, D.C. The awards recognize bright, high performance, up-and-coming women and men who are shaping the future of engineering, science and technology. The Chrysler Group award winners and their affiliations are: Scott Ashley, Powertrain; Chrysler Group employees honored with Modern Day Tech Leader Awards at Jaison Busby, ITM; Marietta Cleveland, the recent Black Engineer of the Year conference are (from left to right): Jaison Busby, Scott Ashley, Deirdre Simpson, Al Kneeland, Keera Riddick, Blair Parker, Engineering; Amr Kady, Manufacturing; Amr Kady, Pam Hutchins-Pugh, Annamalai Kailainathan, Marietta Cleveland, Annamalai Kailainathan, ITM; Alphonse Damon Royster. Kneeland, Manufacturing; Pam Hutchins-Pugh, Powertrain; Blair Parker, Quality; Keera Riddick, Engineering; Damon Royster, Manufacturing; and Deirdre Simpson, Manufacturing. The Chrysler Group has been the exclusive sponsor of the Black Engineer Awards Gala for nearly two decades.

The International Diversity & Inclusion Lexicon™ E D U C A T O R’ S

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For more information and to download an order form, visit www.diversityjournal.com/the-international-diversity-inclusion-lexicon


energized by

Diversity

With more than 7 million customers and 27,000 employees, National Grid is one of the largest investor-owned utilities in the world. And, our greatest strength comes from the power of inclusion and diversity in our workforce. The value of an individual’s skills, special talents, multicultural experiences, and alternative life styles is an integral part of our corporate culture. So is our commitment to preserving the environment as we address the energy needs of our customers. Whether you are interested in future employment, or are a small business entrepreneur, we welcome your perspective. Learn more about career and business opportunities at www.nationalgridus.com.


My turn

Disability & LGBT –

Similarities and Difference and How to Support Them in the Workplace By Nadine Vogel President Springboard Consulting LLC

T

That’s so gay. That’s retarded. Are the children yours? Can you have children? But she doesn’t look like a lesbian. I have that handicapped woman on my team. Alarming? Yes, but these are just some of the remarks heard around the water cooler. These words are hurtful and can be seen as a form of bullying and harassment. About 15 percent of the workforce is either someone with a disability or someone who has a child or other dependent with special needs. Another 10 percent is someone who is LGBT. Many companies have policies in support of these individuals, due to legal requirements, while others have policies surrounding a company’s commitment to fairness and/or the ability to recruit and retain qualified employees. And while the policies are important, it takes a lot more than policies to make a workplace LGBT or disability friendly. It takes the practices of social justice, of supportive co-workers who show genuine respect and possess sensitivity to the concerns of these communities. For someone who is LGBT, the process of coming out can be misinterpreted, which often leads to invisibility and social isolation. For someone who has not come out, what seems like a simple question, such as “are you married?” can become complicated. On the other hand, for people with disabilities, our society’s most socially isolated group, coming out

is often unavoidable either because the disability is visible or the person needs to come out in order to receive the supports they require to be successful in the workplace. So often these inappropriate comments arise as the result of misunderstanding or a lack of information. So what’s an employer to do? Train; specifically on etiquette and awareness, using reallife examples that will help guide understanding, inclusion and acceptance of everyone. Also ensure that internal communications, company-wide celebratory events, resource groups and mentor programs are inclusive of the LGBT and disability communities. In conclusion, keep in mind that people who are LGBT and/ or disabled, are individuals with families, jobs, hobbies, likes and dislikes, problems and joys. While their sexual orientation and/or disability may be an integral part of who they are, it alone does not define them. Making it comfortable for everyone to be who they are and bring their full selves and creativity to the workplace is critical to everyone’s success. You can learn more about this most important topic and how best to support it in the workforce and workplace by contacting Springboard Consulting. PDJ

“Making it comfortable for everyone to be who they are and bring their full selves and creativity to the workplace is critical to everyone’s success.”

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Nadine Vogel is President of Springboard Consulting LLC. Springboard (www.consultspringboard.com) is considered a global expert; working with corporations, governments and organizations on issues pertaining to supporting the disability community in the workforce, workplace and marketplace. She is also the author of DIVE IN: Springboard into the Profitability, Productivity and Potential of the Special Needs Workforce.


It takes all of us to shape innovation As a global leader in packaging solutions, MWV understands that diversity fuels innovation. That’s why we’ve built a culture of inclusion in which people of all backgrounds are valued and multiple viewpoints are encouraged. Together, our talented workforce generates creativity that keeps us competitive in the marketplace. That’s the power of diversity.

mwv.com


advantage

corporate index BOLD denotes Advertiser

ABM Industries Incorporated . . . . . . . . . . . www.abm.com . . . . . . . . . . . 25, 26 – 27

MGM Resorts International. . . . . . . . . . . . www.memresorts.com . . . . . 61, 64 – 65

Aflac, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.aflac.com. . . . . . . . . . . 25, 28 – 29

MillerCoors . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.millercoors.com . . . . . . 61, 66 – 67

American Institute for Managing Diversity. . . . . . www.aimd.org. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Ministry of Labour, Government of Ontario. . . www.mol.on.ca. . . . . . . . . . . 61, 68 – 69

Army and Air Force Exchange Service. . . . . . . www.aafes.com. . . . . . . . . . . 25, 30 – 31

National Grid. . . . . . . . . . . www.nationalgrid.com. . . . . . . . 8, 123

Bank of the West. . . . . . . . www.bankofthewest.com. . . . . . . . 111 Blue Cross Blue Shield North Carolina. . . . . . . . . www.bcbsnc.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 BNY Mellon. . . . . . . . . . . . . www.bnymellon.com. . . . . . . 25, 32 – 33 Booz Allen Hamilton. . . . . www.boozallen.com. . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Brinker International, Inc. . . www.brinker.com. . . . . . . . . . 25, 34 – 35 Burger King Corporation. . . www.bk.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Catalyst. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.catalyst.org. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8, 120 Chevron. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.chevron.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 Chrysler Group LLC. . . . . www.chryslergroupllc.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inside Cover, 1, 9, 122 Cisco Systems, Inc.. . . . . . . www.cisco.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Citigroup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.citigroup.com. . 104, Back Cover Clorox Company, The. . . . . www.TheCloroxCompany.com and www.CloroxCSR.com. . . . . . 37, 38 – 39 Communicating Across Cultures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.craigstorti.com. . . . . . . . . . 10 – 11

New York Life Insurance Company. . . . www.newyorklife.com . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Newell Rubbermaid. . . . . . . www.newellrubbermaid.com. . 61, 70 – 71 Northrop Grumman Information Systems. . . . www.northropgrumman.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60, 61, 72 – 73 Ogletree Deakins. . . . . . . . . www.ogletreedeakins.com . . . . . . . . 107 Pitney Bowes Inc.. . . . . . . . www.pb.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . 75, 76 –77 Rockwell Collins . . . . . . . . . www.rockwellcollins.com . . . 75, 78 – 79 Royal Dutch Shell. . . . . . . www.shell.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Sodexo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.sodexousa.com. . . 3, 75, 80 – 81 Springboard Consulting LLC. . . . . . . . . www.consultspringboard.com. . . . . . 124 TELUS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.telus.com. . . . . . . . . . . 75, 82 – 83 The Lifetime Healthcare Companies . . . . . . . . . . . . www.lifethc.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 Toronto Police Service. . . . . www.torontopolice.on.ca. . . . 75, 84 – 85 TWI, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.twiinc.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Deloitte & Touche LLP . . . www.deloitte.ca. . . . . . . 36, 37, 40– 41

UC Berkeley . . . . . . . . . . . . www.berkeley.edu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108

Dickstein Shapiro LLP. . . . . www.dicksteinshapiro.com. . 37, 42 – 43

United States Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, The www.usafa.af.mil. . . . . . . . . . . . 112, 114

Empire Blue Cross Blue Shield . . . . . . . . . . . . www.empireblue.com. . . . . . . . . . . . 118 Fraser Milner Casgrain LLP. . . . . . . . . . www.fmc-law.com . . . . . 5, 37, 44 – 45 Freddie Mac. . . . . . . . . . . . www.freddiemac.com. . . . . . . . . . . 119 Gibbons P.C.. . . . . . . . . . . . www.gibbonslaw.com. . 37, 46 – 47, 106 Interpublic Group . . . . . . . www.interpublic.com. . . 7, 49, 50 – 51 ITT Corporation. . . . . . . . . www.itt.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 Johnson Controls . . . . . . . . www.johnsoncontrols.com . . . . . . . . . . 9 KeyCorp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.key.com . . . . . . . . . . . . 49, 52 – 53 KPMG LLP. . . . . . . . . . . . . www.kpmg.com. . . . . . . 15, 49, 54 – 55 Lockheed Martin Corporation. . . . . . . . . . . www.lockheedmartin.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48, 49, 56 – 57 Los Alamos National Laboratory. . . . . . . . . . . . . www.lanl.gov. . . . . . . . . . . . . 49, 58 – 59 Manpower Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . www.manpower.com. . . . . . . 61, 62 – 63 MeadWestvaco Corporation. . . . . . . . . . . www.mwv.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 126

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Union Bank N.A.. . . . . . . . . www.unionbank.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 UnitedHealth Group . . . . . www.unitedhealthgroup.com. . . . . . 74 University of Saskatchewan. . . . . . . . . . . www.usask.ca. . . . . . . . . . . . 75, 86 – 87 UPMC Health Plan . . . . . . . www.upmchealthplan.com . . 89, 90 – 91 US Airways . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.usairways.com. . . . . . . 89, 92 – 93 Vanguard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.vanguard.com. . . . . . . . . 24, 116 Verizon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.verizon.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Walmart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.walmart.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Waste Management, Inc.. . www.wm.com and www.thinkgreen.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89, 94 – 95, Inside Back Cover Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield. . . . . . . . . www.wellmark.com. . . . . . . . 89, 96 – 97 WellPoint, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . www.wellpoint.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12, 88, 89, 98 – 99 Xerox Canada. . . . . . . . . . . www.xerox.ca/index/frca.html and www.xerox.ca . . . . . . . . . 89, 100 – 101


Diversity is Our Competitive Advantage. We, at ITT, are committed to building a workforce that mirrors the world in which we do business. With operations in over 60 countries and customers on seven continents, ITT is well positioned and making a difference on a global scale. As we continue to grow, we look first to create an environment where our talented employees can succeed and make the world a better place through their unique contributions. We embrace diversity, which includes but is not limited to race, religion, gender, disability, nationality, age, sexual orientation, and ethnic background. Our culture, work practices and programs enable an inclusive and innovative workforce and workplace resulting in premier performance in the global marketplace.

www.itt.com/careers We are an equal opportunity employer m/f/d/v.

The “ITT Engineered Blocks” symbol and “Engineered for life” are registered trademarks of the ITT Corporation. © 2006


last word

Calling All Allies: A New Secret from Inclusion By Marie Y. Philippe, PhD Corporate Vice President, Culture and Organizational Effectiveness The Lifetime Healthcare Companies

A

At times, in the workplace, there is the belief that champions of diversity and inclusion (D&I) are somewhat limited to particular marginalized groups or confined within the walls of the operation. Nothing is further from the truth. One of the most powerful yet often underutilized weapons in the fight against inequality is our allies—not minority group or LGBT community members, including sometimes even those outside of our organization. Who are these allies and how do I get them engaged? There is some homework required. However, with due diligence, creativity and willingness to explore new territories, you will find them. For those who have taken this road, positive outcomes have exceeded their expectations. In your workplace, many from the dominant Euroethnic groups understand the value of differences. Many more have experienced the benefits of having perspectives different from their own. Many are willing and able to speak up to educate those from their own group about the unspoken privilege they enjoy. There is almost instant credibility rather than a process involved in getting the point across from someone “different.” Whether the heterosexual Caucasian ally is a senior leader or not, there is power in having someone from our own cultural background telling us how they see and value differences. It takes time to uncover such allies because they are often not so visible. Allies can be quiet influencers or may have impressive functional titles which carry built-in followers. Do not underestimate, however, the natural leaders and influencers who can grow to become great champions, if cultivated. What about the board members? How are you inte-

grating diversity in your board room? If you say “let’s not go there,” then it is time to find an ally to shake it a bit in that board room. Although it is a challenging task, finding an energized, dedicated and consistent champion on the board of directors may have the greatest payoff. One of the first steps in that direction is the analysis of the board composition. From there, bring forth the data to engage your CEO in a realistic, 21st-century, business-relevant conversation about board diversity. At this juncture, you build your own strategic path. Should you offer to share with the board how the D&I initiative is progressing? Or should you prepare a report for the finance committee about lost opportunities due to a lack of diversity in your markets, suppliers, leadership, etc.? Or should you use the annual report as a conversation starter with someone on the board if you have that level of interaction? You need to think about how you should proceed. Having a board member champion diversity yields high dividends, even if he or she is not from a minority group. Champions can also be groomed from the external world and can offer significant and effective support. The CEOs of community based organizations, local clergy, local university educators and students who have had a great internship experience can create networks of champions for your D&I initiative. The relationships you build for community engagement are no different in their process than those you build internally. To identify and groom allies, it is critical to connect as human beings, as different human beings with mutual respect. Champions of diversity must be from a diversity of champions. That is one of the best secrets for success. Go find some allies. PDJ

“Champions of diversity must be from a diversity of champions.”

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Marie Y. Philippe, PhD, is well known for her leadership contribution in corporate culture transformation through strategic diversity initiatives and organizational change management. She can be reached at marie.philippe@lifethc.com.


DIverSIty IS the WAy To change the world for the better, we need a diverse perspective.

We Do BuSIneSS.

Building a great career is like building great vehicles. It starts with technological innovation is matched only by our belief in the

We are 45,000 strong— a diverse collection of research, development, and experience. At Chrysler, our history of experiences, ideas, and progressive people that drive us forward. See how you can principles working together to passpart our planet on to the become of a movement of the future. It’s as bright as you make it. next generation in better shape than we inherited it. It is diversity of thought that keeps Waste Management at the forefront of innovation and sustainability. We need great people to join us. Find out more at wm.com/careers/index.jsp.

Building Great Careers www.chryslercareers.com


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