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Also Featuring … Catalyst • Multicultural Marketing • Generations on Generations • Perspectives • Thoughtleaders

Volume 12, Number 2 March / April 2010

12.95 U.S.

$

PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL March / April 2010 • VOLUME 12 NUMBER 2

If you’re a college graduate and want to get a head start on success, look no further than the Navy. As an Officer, you’ll get a wide variety of career paths to choose from, in engineering, management, intelligence, science or aviation, just to name a few. And get responsibility you might otherwise have to wait years for, giving you a competitive jump on your peers that nowhere else can give you so quickly. Unlimited potential is yours. Just visit navy.com or call 1-800-USA-NAVY for more information. © 2010. Paid for by the U.S. Navy. All rights reserved.

www.diversityjournal.com

MY JOB DOESN’T JUST PROPEL A S H I P. I T P R O P E L S M Y F U T U R E .

Special Exclusive Feature:

U.S. Navy Brings Comfort to Haiti USNS Comfort (T-AH 20) assists with the global humanitarian and disaster relief efforts of Operation Unified Response, following the devastating 7.0 magnitude earthquake in Haiti.


What they did inspires us to get it done. Madame CJ Walker, Entrepreneur

“All these innovators worked to provide greater solutions for others in ways “These amazing people

Walker developed and

never attempted before. In spite of

marketed a hugely

barriers, they lived without boundaries.

helped me get where I am

Their efforts influence my endeavors.”

today—dedicating my group

successful line of beauty

Yolanda Daniel, VP Internal Audit

products for women of

to attracting, retaining and

Dr. Mae Jemison, Astronaut

color. By 1917, she had

developing our incredibly

the largest

After volunteering as a physician in

talented resource of diverse employees.”

business in

the Peace Corps, Jemison joined NASA

Sandra A. Taylor, VP National Accounts

the United

and flew a mission on the space shuttle

Elijah McCoy, Transportation

States owned

Endeavour. Jemison’s advice: “The best way

McCoy invented an automatic

by an African

to make dreams come true is to wake up!”

lubricator for oiling the steam

American.

engines of locomotives that

A company that is making a

revolutionized the railroad industry.

difference in your

Some say engineers would avoid using inferior copies of his invention by demanding “the Real McCoy.”

1872

1906 1881

1992 1988

world and the

2007

2005 world around you.

2009 2008

Lewis Latimer, Lighting “I’m humbled to be on the same page

A gifted draftsman who once

with people who always pushed

worked for Alexander Graham

forward to benefit others. In my job,

Bell, Latimer invented a

African Americans have always been pioneers in industry. Using innovation, strengths and guide them to win.” “Whatever niche in life you find Littie D. Brown, yourself, dare to make a difference creativity and hard work to do things VP Regional Sales in someone’s life. These pioneers that have never been done before. That did, and I’m determined to do the entrepreneurial spirit paved the way for Waste Management is a Fortune 200 company thatsame is changing the better. We are strongly committed every day.” the world for Grainger’s African American leaders to Ernest L. Duplessis, always find innovative ways to help our VP Investor Relations to promoting diversity and inclusion and empowering our employees. We are workingget with we serve customers thethe jobcommunities done. I work to help people see their

method for the production of carbon filaments for the light bulb in 1881. His innovation helped illuminate the world.

Dr. Patricia Bath, Surgeon Bath, the first African American woman doctor to receive a medical patent, designed a device to help remove cataracts with a fiberoptic laser. She also co-founded the American Institute for the Prevention of Blindness. Her vision has helped countless others see.

to fuel innovative change—and we need your help. www.wmcareers.com To learn more about the power of diversity at Grainger, visit

From everyday collection to environmental protection. Think Green. Think Waste Management. www.thinkgreen.com


“All these innovators worked to provide greater solutions for others in ways “These amazing people

never attempted before. In spite of barriers, they lived without boundaries.

helped me get where I am

Their efforts influence my endeavors.”

today—dedicating my group

Yolanda Daniel, VP Internal Audit

to attracting, retaining and developing our incredibly talented resource of diverse employees.”

Sandra A. Taylor, VP National Accounts

2007 2005

2009 2008

“I’m humbled to be on the same page with people who always pushed forward to benefit others. In my job, I work to help people see their strengths and guide them to win.”

“Whatever niche in life you find

Littie D. Brown, VP Regional Sales

yourself, dare to make a difference in someone’s life. These pioneers did, and I’m determined to do the same every day.”

Ernest L. Duplessis, VP Investor Relations

African Americans have always been pioneers in industry. Using innovation, creativity and hard work to do things that have never been done before. That entrepreneurial spirit paved the way for Grainger’s African American leaders to always find innovative ways to help our customers get the job done. To learn more about the power of diversity at Grainger, visit


notebook from the editor O editors notebook

Good Isn’t Always Good Enough

One of the unique characteristics of our magazine is that most of the articles are personally written by experts in the field of diversity and inclusion. Our contributing writers have the latitude to write about whatever they feel is important to them at any given time.

That freedom is why I found it interesting that many of the articles in this issue follow a theme of career growth, and how inclusion (or lack of ) into the elusive corporate culture allows some to flourish while others seem to stand still. Our experts are responding to some blip on their radar indicating a stagnation in diverse upward mobility. Is this due to the economy, where no one and nothing is advancing? Is it due to a shortage of available positions—too many people vying for too few jobs? Whatever the reason, the solution seems to be found in somehow understanding the unwritten rules of an organization and learning how to use these rules for career advancement. Generational differences play a big part in how people perceive the ideal way to be noticed and promoted. What works for one generation may seem passive or rude to another. Mentoring becomes critical when the only way to understand the inner workings of an organization is to learn it from one who has already experienced it. Being able to parlay practical life experience into leadership positions may be a new skill many of us need to develop. Learning how to stand out from the crowd will result in growth and success. Be sure to read these articles with an eye toward how your own organization can better develop and grow their entire diverse workforce. A special thanks goes to the U.S. Navy and our own Damian Johnson for a personal glimpse into the lives of the officers and sailors who responded immediately to the tragic devastation caused by the January earthquake in Haiti. Enjoy this issue; as always, the information we bring you reveals what the experts are thinking; their best practices can lead directly to your success, and the success of your organization.

Cheri Morabito Editor

James R. Rector PUBLISHER

Cheri Morabito

EDITOR / CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Damian Johnson

MARKETING DIRECTOR

Laurel L. Fumic

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Kenneth J. Kovach

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Alina Dunaeva

O verseas C orrespondent

Jason Bice

WEB MASTER C ontributing W riters

Pamela Arnold Michal Fineman Melanie Harrington Linda Jimenez

Mary L. Martinéz Marie Philippe, Ph.D. Craig Storti Trevor Wilson

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Commentaries or questions should be

addressed to: Profiles in Diversity Journal, P.O. Box 45605, Cleveland, OH 44145-0605. All correspondence should include author’s full name, address, e-mail and phone number. DISPLAY ADVERTISING

Profiles in Diversity Journal Gemini Towers #1 1991 Crocker Road, Suite 320 Westlake, OH 44145 Tel: 440.892.0444 Fax: 440.892.0737 profiles@diversityjournal.com

Profiles in Diversity Journal would like to note the passing of Elsie Cross

Elsie Cross— An Influential Leader in Organizational Development and Diversity Training Elsie Y. Cross, 81, an influential pioneer in organizational development, a trail blazer in the field of diversity for Fortune 1000 companies, and founder of Elsie Y. Cross Associates, Inc., died of a heart attack on December 7 in Chestnut Hill Hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. For more than 35 years, Cross guided critical change initiatives in major corporations, government agencies, universities, and financial institutions in the U.S., Europe and the Caribbean. She also contributed to President Clinton’s Initiative on Race, and Harvard Business School’s case study collection. Through her tireless work, Cross gained a reputation as one of the nation’s top organization development and diversity consultants. She was 2

Profiles in Diversit y Journal

former chair of the National Training Laboratories Institute for Applied Behavioral Science (NTL) board of directors and a founding member of the Women’s subgroup in the Organization Development Network. Cross also led diversity-management seminars at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton Executive Education Center and was a speaker for many professional organizations. Cross authored Managing Diversity—The Courage to Lead; was the publisher of The Language Guide; and founded The Diversity Factor, a quarterly e-journal, which is recognized as a leading source of information for people facing the deeper issues of diversity. She was also frequently interviewed by leading publications and on radio/ television programs, such as The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal.

March/April 2010

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contents

table of contents

Volume 12 • Number 2 March / April 2010

On the Cover

20 U.S. Navy Brings Comfort to Haiti:

In an interview with U.S. Navy Surgeon General and five of his officers and sailors, learn how the diverse make-up of the Navy’s personnel enables it to best respond to the most difficult tasks around the globe.

Special Features

30 Generations upon Generations

34

42

Multicultural Marketing Best Practices

20

thoughtleaders

s ATION R E N E NS G upon ENERATIO

perspectives 10 Culture Matters

30

by Craig Storti

Best Practices in Multicultural Marketing

12 From My Perspective by Linda Jimenez, WellPoint, Inc. 14 Global Diversity by Mary L. Martinéz, Michal Fineman, ORC Worldwide

16 Viewpoint by Melanie Harrington, Pamela Arnold, AIMD 18 Human Equity™ by Trevor Wilson, TWI Inc.

G

34 42 thoughtleaders2010

64 Last Word by Marie Philippe, Ph.D.

DEPARTMENTS 6 Momentum Diversity Who, What, Where and When Storti

Jimenez

Harrington

Arnold

8 Catalyst 

Martinéz

Fineman

Wilson

philippe

On the cover: Navy chaplain Lt. Marlin Williams prays for a Haitian boy as he receives treatment at the Killick Haitian Coast Guard Clinic. The boy was trapped under the bodies of dead family members in a collapsed building for seven days before he was rescued from the rubble. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Candice Villarreal/Released). 4

Profiles in Diversit y Journal

March/April 2010

U  nwritten Rules: Why Doing a Good Job Might Not Be Enough


momentum momentum who…what…where…when

CH2M HILL Director of Diversity and Inclusion Honored at Trumpet Awards DENVER—Faye Wilson Tate, Vice President and Director of Global Diversity and Inclusion for CH2M HILL, was recognized as an honoree at the “High Tea with High Heels” event at the Trumpet Awards ceremony held in Atlanta on January 30. Tate In her role at CH2M HILL, Tate is responsible for global employee and supplier diversity, policy development, community relations, and diversity and inclusion training. A graduate of the Denver Metro Chamber’s Leadership Denver Program, Tate was recognized as a “Woman of Distinction” by The Mile High Council of Girl Scouts of America, received the Community Trailblazer Award from the National Council of Negro Women and the Citizen of the Year Award from the Chi Phi Chapter of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc.

She is a distinguished community and civic leader, lending her expertise to several Denver-area organizations, including March of Dimes; The Urban League of Metropolitan Denver District Court Child Care Center; Metro Denver Chamber of Commerce Leadership Foundation; Rocky Mountain Minority Supplier Development Council; Colorado Bright Beginnings; Colorado Association of Black Professional Engineers and Scientists; Jack & Jill of America; The Links, Inc.; Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. and The Junior League of Denver.

Deloitte Appoints Zamora Chief Diversity Officer NEW YORK CITY—Deloitte has announced the appointment of John Zamora to the position of Chief Diversity Officer. Zamora will be responsible for Deloitte’s diversity strategy and will lead its continuing efforts to attract, retain and ZAMORA develop the best talent in the marketplace. Zamora currently works with clients in the Real Estate & Tourism, Hospitality & Leisure 6

Profiles in Diversit y Journal

industries and is the operations leader for the Southeast region. He will continue in this role in addition to serving as chief diversity officer.

CVS Caremark Names Casey as New Diversity Officer WOONSOCKET, Rhode Island—CVS Caremark has announced the appointment of David Casey as Vice President and Diversity Officer, CVS Caremark. In this new role, Casey will lead the company’s efforts related to strategic dicasey versity management. Casey has extensive experience in the diversity field, having served most recently as chief diversity officer at WellPoint and as Regional Director of Business Development for Bernard Hodes Group. Casey serves on advisory boards for the American Institute for Managing Diversity and Profiles in Diversity Journal, where he is also a contributing columnist. He was inducted into the National Eagle Leadership Institute in 2006 and is a member of the Society of Human Resources Management. He is active in the community and with several nonprofit organizations, including the Urban League and United Way. A veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps, Casey served in Operation Desert Storm.

Comcast Promotes Fore to Regional Vice President for Oregon/SW Washington Beaverton, Oregon—Comcast Corporation, one of the nation’s leading providers of entertainment, information and communications services, has promoted Hank Fore to Regional Vice President of the Oregon/SW Washington fore region. Fore will report directly to Comcast West Division President Steve White and will oversee all aspects of Comcast’s video, high-speed Internet and telephone operations from Longview, Washington to Eugene, Oregon, serving more

March/April 2010

than 600,000 customers and managing about 2,100 employees. Fore joins Oregon from Comcast’s East Bay Area market in California, where he most recently served as Area Vice President. In this position, he held management responsibilities for about 500,000 customers and 1,100 employees. Under Fore’s leadership, he immediately focused on improving the customer experience, dramatically improving the local technical operations metrics, including ontime arrival of technicians and repeat trouble calls. He successfully launched a number of advanced services to his customers, adding Comcast Digital Voice, expanding HD and VOD options, and increasing high-speed internet speeds. In addition, Fore’s employees helped vote Comcast as a “Best Place to Work” for three consecutive years in The San Francisco Business Times, East Bay Business Times and the Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal.

Shell Names Stewart Manager of Supplier Diversity HOUSTON—Debra Clark Stewart has assumed the role of Manager of Supplier Diversity, Diversity Outreach and Workforce Development for Shell Oil Company. She will be responsible for developing and Stewart implementing strategies and programs that support U.S. Supplier Diversity (local content) and Diversity Outreach Programs (diverse NGO partnerships), ensuring compliance as a government contractor and maximizing corporate brand and reputation. In addition, she will lead Shell’s efforts in identifying and creating external programs and approaches to attract young talent to Engineering, Geosciences, Operations and Maintenance Crafts through workforce development initiatives. Over the past 20 years, Stewart has worked across a spectrum of Shell businesses, and has a wealth of knowledge and experience that will support identifying and developing opportunities for minority- and womenowned enterprises to do business with Shell/ Motiva operations and building stronger relationships within diverse communities.


Lockheed Martin Executive Joanne Maguire Named Rocky Mountain USO Advisory Council Chair COLORADO SPRINGS, Colorado—Rocky Mountain USO welcomes its newest member, Executive Vice President, Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, Joanne M. Maguire, as the Advisory Council Chair. As Council Chair, Maguire Maguire will serve as USO’s goodwill ambassador, promoting friendship and understanding between the military members, their families and the communities where they are serving. The Advisory Council provides an essential role in the identification and development of financial and community resources necessary for the implementation of USO programs and services. Council members also recommend and share specialized knowledge with the USO center director to ensure the success and viability of USO programs and services. Maguire has served in her current position with Lockheed Martin since 2006, overseeing a division of more than 17,400 employees and $8.6 billion in sales. Maguire was named an Honorary Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics in 2009, has been listed on Fortune magazine’s 50 Most Powerful Women in Business from 2006-2009, and named one of the Top 50 Women in Technology by Corporate Board Member magazine in 2008.

Harley-Davidson, Inc. Names Calaway Vice President of Human Resources MILWAUKEE—Harley-Davidson, Inc. has named Tonit Calaway to the position of Vice President, Human Resources. Calaway currently serves as the Company’s Assistant General Counsel and Chief Compliance Officer. Calaway Calaway joined Harley-Davidson in 1998 as Corporate Counsel, and has held positions of increasing responsibility in the Company’s

legal group. She is President of the Board of Directors of Meta House, Inc., a Milwaukee non-profit dedicated to substance abuse recovery for women. She also serves on the Board of Directors of the University of WisconsinMilwaukee Foundation.

Freddie Mac Names Williams Vice President and Chief Diversity Officer McLEAN, Virginia—Freddie Mac has named Diversity Director Tujuanna Williams as the company’s Vice President and Chief Diversity Officer. In this critical role, she will continue to lead the company’s diversity Williams and inclusion efforts, with a heightened focus on fostering an even more inclusive culture and helping to build the company’s pipeline of high quality, diverse talent to help support the nation’s housing recovery and President Obama’s Making Home Affordable program. Williams joined Freddie Mac in October 2006 as the director of the Office of Diversity and Inclusion. She has spearheaded the company’s diversity and inclusion strategy, with a particular focus on embedding inclusion throughout Freddie Mac’s talent management practices, external partnerships, and education.

New York Life Appoints Schub as Head of Human Resources NEW YORK CITY—New York Life Insurance Company has announced the appointment of Barry Schub as senior vice president in charge of Human Resources. Schub is currently a senior executive with New York Life InvestSchub ments, a wholly owned subsidiary, where he is responsible for overseeing Retirement Plan Services, Strategy and Mergers & Acquisitions.

CEO in setting policy for the company. Schub’s career experience includes banking as well as investment management. He began his career with Bankers Trust Company, where he was in a series of senior management positions for 18 years in sales, marketing and client service. Immediately prior to joining New York Life Investments in 2001, he was a vice president at E*TRADE Group Inc., with responsibility for institutional and retail retirement products as well as college savings programs.

Arnold named as President of the American Institute for Managing Diversity (AIMD) ATLANTA, Georgia—The American Institute for Managing Diversity (AIMD), one of the nation’s first and leading nonprofit diversity think tanks dedicated to the advancement of diversity management, ARNOLD welcomes a new president, Pamela W. Arnold. As President, Arnold will provide leadership as the institute continues to advance diversity thought leadership through research, education and public outreach.

“She knows the organization, she provided leadership to the organization, she’s passionate about the mission of the organization and this will serve her well in this new role,” says Ralph Cleveland, Board Member and Executive Vice President at AGL Resources. Ms. Arnold has served as an active member of the American Institute for Managing Diversity, Inc. (AIMD) Board of Trustees since 2005 where she served as the chair person of the Board Development Committee. PDJ

As part of his new role, Schub is joining New York Life’s Executive Management Committee, which is comprised of New York Life’s senior executive leadership and assists the

P ro f i l e s i n D i v e r s i t y J o u r n a l

March/April 2010

7


www.catalyst.org

I

Unwritten Rules: Why Doing a Good Job Might Not Be Enough By Catalyst

In today’s tough business climate, getting ahead is tough for any professional—whether seasoned executive or entry-level. And while every organization has their rules and regulations, as mandated by handbooks, performance review procedures, or by senior leadership, others are left implicit—unwritten—for employees to decipher on their own. Those who do not have the tools to access this maze of “unwritten rules” and the important knowledge the rules provide remain left out, no matter how competent they are. Catalyst knows from prior research that some individuals, especially women and people of color, are often excluded from important informal networks in companies.1 Without access to influential “inner circles,” these individuals miss out on opportunities for development and the chance to piece together information about what it really takes to get ahead. The upshot: both individuals and corporations lose out. Women and people of color don’t advance as far, as fast. Corporations don’t effectively use all the talent that is available to them.2 For the first report in Catalyst’s series on this topic, Unwritten Rules: What You Don’t Know Can Hurt Your Career, we interviewed 65 women and men from a variety of industries, locations, and roles about the unwritten rules and how they had used these rules to develop and advance their careers. We learned that when it comes to career advancement, “just” doing a good job wasn’t enough. We uncovered a set of strategies—unwritten rules—that individuals deemed critical to their advancement. But the question remained whether those strategies work effectively for all women and men. In the second report of the series, Unwritten Rules: Why Doing a Good Job Might Not Be Enough, we provide findings from an online survey taken by nearly 7003 respondents working in a variety of industries and workplaces, mostly across Canada, Europe, and the United States. The majority held managerial positions and had more than five years of work experience. We asked them: • What unwritten rules for getting ahead were important at their current organization? • Which of the rules had they personally followed? Which rules did they wish they had known about from the very beginning of their career? • How did they learn about these unwritten rules? The large and varied sample allowed us to delve into how individuals used unwritten rules and how they perceived them as important to advancing their career. We also were able to compare differences 1Catalyst,

in the perception and use of unwritten rules among women and men of different racial/ethnic backgrounds. Based on the responses of the survey participants, the study revealed that: • I n general, regardless of gender or race/ethnicity, respondents agreed that unwritten rules play a major role in career advancement. Respondents rated activities involving communication and feedback, performance and results, career planning, increasing visibility, and relationship building as particularly important. • I n terms of the strategies they had used in the past, participants were more likely to have focused on time-related strategies (e.g., working long hours) and on performance-related strategies (e.g., exceeding expectations) than on visibility and relationship building. The inconsistencies between what participants rated as important for advancement and what they had used in the past provide a learning opportunity for both individuals and organizations. • Women were more likely than men and, among women, women of color were more likely than white women, to rate “seeking visibility” as important. Compared to white women, women of color were also more likely to report having used other strategies that emphasize visibility and showcase job commitment, including explicitly “communicating their willingness to work long hours” and “face time.” • When it comes to learning about advancement strategies in the workplace, participants rated observation, seeking out mentors, and soliciting feedback as the ones they used most often. These approaches also emerged as the most effective ways to learn about unwritten rules for advancement. •A  lthough a majority of respondents had learned unwritten rules through “trial and error,” this approach was not rated as particularly useful. These and other findings can help individuals better understand advancement strategies in their own organization. In addition, diversity and inclusion professionals can gain insight into their own organizations’ cultures of unwritten rules and learn ways to increase transparency in communicating requirements for career advancement. PDJ Founded in 1962, Catalyst is the leading nonprofit membership organization working globally with businesses and the professions to build inclusive workplaces and expand opportunities for women and business. Visit www.catalyst.org/page/82/catalyst-enewsletters to begin receiving Catalyst C-News, our e-newsletter.

Women and Men in U.S. Corporate Leadership: Same Workplace, Different Realities? (2004); Catalyst, Connections that Count: The Informal Networks of Women of Color in the United States (2006). Gilsdorf, “Organizational Rules on Communicating: How Employees Are—and Are Not—Learning the Ropes,” Journal of Business Communication, vol. 35, no. 2 (April 1998): p. 173-201; Lorelle B. Jabs, “Communicative Rules and Organizational Decision Making,” Journal of Business Communication, vol. 42, no. 3 (July 2005): p. 265-288; Monica Kirkpatrick Johnson, Jeylan T. Mortimer, Jennifer C. Lee, and Michael J. Stern, “Judgments About Work: Dimensionality Revisited,” Work and Occupations, vol. 34, no. 3 (August 2007): p. 290-317; Laura Sabattini, Unwritten Rules: What you Don’t Know Can Hurt your Career (Catalyst, 2008). 3Out of 686 respondents, there were 339 women and 248 men. Respondents who did not report their gender but completed the questionnaire were still included in many of the analyses. 2Jeanette W.

8

Profiles in Diversit y Journal

March/April 2010


from the publisher

Leaders Are Nurtured and Grown, Not Born

A

A friend recently complained about a patch of dirt in his front lawn where the grass used to grow. I asked him what kind of seed he’d used and whether he was watering it enough. His reply startled me. “Oh, I haven’t really done anything to make it grow. I’d hoped it just would fill in by itself from the grass around it.”

Later, I thought about his response, and I realized that many companies take the same approach to developing Accepting Nominations Now! women leaders. Every company I know claims to support women and their rise into the th top ranks of management, yet not Annual enough are preparing the corporate soil, planting the seeds of opportu® nity, and nurturing the development of their finest people. Rather, they seem to be relying on hope that a Celebrating the Achievements and Personalities fully-qualified female executive will appreciates recognition and the opportuo f L e a d i n gtruly Wo m e n E x e c uthe t i v enational s magically appear. nity to contribute a mentoring essay for publication. Nominated by their colleagues, peers, and mentors for their initiative and achievements, these are women of purpose and to herald the comThis is precisely why we are so eager Such publicity will help you recruit and retain the best drive who represent diversity within their spheres of influence. panies who are championing the development of women talent available. But that’s just part of the story. Your parThese profiles will focus on each executive’s unique and personal contributions, executives. These companies are doing fine work that for ticipation and willthe serve as an opportunity the international community quality to get to know inbusiness this premium feature shows that you women as individuals. The profiles and essays are portrayals, not just resumes, of real all organizations should be doing,these yet they are rarely recyour solidly committed to gender diverwomen executives with real stories to and tell, and they company represent the are kind of information shared by resolve. a mentor with an aspiring novice, particularly someone breaking new ground within an ognized for their vision, energy, and compaThese sity, refusing to be side-tracked by the pressing issues of the organization or industry. nies, and more specifically, the visionary CEOs at the helm, day. What a powerful message to bring to market! V i s i t w w w. d i v e r s i t y j o u r n a l . c o m f o r D o w n load a have decided that hope is not a strategy. O f f i c i a l N o mTalented i n a t i o n F o r mwomen a n d I n f o rwant m a t i o n ,to o r know which companies N o m i nation a l l o r E - M a i l D a m i a n J o h n s o n R I g h t AwAy Where does your company fit? Are you a leader? OrCt oare are best suited for their career development. They put a D i s c u s s yo u r N o m i n e e . F o r m T oDAy! 1 . 8 0 0 . 5 7 3premium . 2 8 6 7 d a mon i a n j obeing hnson@ d i v e r s i t y jin o u r their nal.com you just hoping? engaged work, challenged to We will soon publish our 9th Annual Women Worth surpass expectations, and valued for their expertise. They Watching® issue. This September-October edition will are loyal to their mentors and determined to pursue feature mentoring essays by nearly 100 of the brightest, leadership positions with first-rate organizations that set most talented women working in business, education, the standard for career opportunity. government, and the nonprofit sector. Over the past eight One might say, they aren’t going to let any grass grow years, we have honored hundreds of Multiple their peers, and in under their feet. Neither should you. full page froNt CoVerS profile nearly every case, the woman being recognized credits her Learn more about our special issue by visiting us company for fostering the development of her career. online at: www.diversityjournal.com/womenworthwatching.

Women Worth Watching 9

special issue

women worth watching in 2010

Tina Waters

T

Comcast Corporatio n

TITLE: Senior Vice President of Customer Care, Comcast Cable

EDUCATION: BS in Business Administration, Villanova; MS, Organizational Dynamics, University of Pennsylvania

Throughout my life, my mom has been my number one mentor She taught me by example and role model. that “to whom much is given, much is expected,” and to take the blessings of my life and give them to others. I have lessons with me throughout carried those my personal life and professional endeavors. In addition to my mother, I’ve had many people me and influenced in my life that have me to be the mentored ager working at a neighborhood person that I am today. From my days as a teenrestaurant, to my current there have been many position at Comcast, people along the way who have served as and have shown me mentors to me that being a leader is about more than giving instruction. Mentoring is about taking people’s potential and guiding them toward their goals, which ultimately reaching leads to us reaching about being an advocate our collective goals. It is also for others. Additionally, it is about being a leader manager. I’ve learned great lessons from versus a family, friends, colleagues, and even those whom supervisors, I have supervised.

FIRST JOB: Call Center Assistant Manager at Bell Atlantic

WHAT I’M READING: Lipstick Jihad, by Azadeh Moaveni; my monthly Vanity Fair magazine

MY PHILOSOPHY: To whom much is given, much is expected.

FAMILY: I live with my husband Thomas, my stepdaughter Jazmine, and my mother, Patty; my sister and brother, nieces and nephews, and grandmother all live close by; my father, Voyer, resides in LA. Family is very important!

INTERESTS: Tennis, indoor rock climbing, reading, shopping, family time, doubledutch, international travel.

FAVORITE CHARITIES: Montgomery County Head Start; Urban League of Philadelphia

COMPANY: Comcast

Corporation

HEADQUARTERS: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

WEB SITE: www.comcast.com

BUSINESS: Cable, internet, and phone communications.

ANNUAL REVENUES:

$34.3 billion

EMPLOYEES: Approximately

134

I urge the CEO of any company or organization with a rising female executive to nominate her for this year’s recognition. Do not shy away from this honor. Many companies have participated in this publishing event for several years in a row. Take a page from their playbook. Put yourself among the CEOs whose quest for talent knows no bounds. Are you afraid that your protégée will be embarrassed by the recognition? Don’t be. Dozens order plaques of their full-page article for display in their offices. Each woman

100,000

PROFILES IN DIVERSIT Y JOURNAL

“…be persistent while leaning wise council of mentorson the .”

My career path began at Bell Atlantic right out of college. I entered management training program and learned their to manage people at From there, I honed call centers. my skills at PECO Energy, a consulting Group, and for a brief firm called Gartner time, a start-up called Software Consulting joined Comcast, where Group. I then I have been for 10 years, doing what I about—helping others am really passionate by connecting how a business can positively a person’s experience. impact I have gained much knowledge from these including learning experiences, the value of negotiation skills, how to find common the ability to think systematically and ground, how to coach and develop others. I also overcame some hurdles. I realized that leadership is hard work never easy when you work in a people-centric and is environment. I also challenges in some experienced instances of not being taken seriously by a woman and a person others because I am of color. But my perspective for the lesson in each was always positive, situation. looking I have so much that I want to do in my life. And my advice women is to be persistent to young while leaning on the wise council of mentors. can act as a strong support system and They can help move you fullest potential. toward reaching your

SEPTEMBER/O

CTOBER 2009

If you have questions, I will be happy to take your call or respond to your e-mail. I hope to see your company among those gaining national acclaim for your nurturing of women in leadership. My hat is off to you for the work you do.

James R. Rector Publisher

P ro f i l e s i n D i v e r s i t y J o u r n a l

March/April 2010

9


culture matters

Serving This Public? By Craig Storti

A

A fast-growing county in the far suburbs of Washington, D.C., a place once so rural it never dreamed it could be a suburb of another place, has recently begun to experience an increase in immigration from Central America. I was interviewing a county social worker there a while back, a woman who now has a new kind of client: working-class immigrants from El Salvador and Honduras.

problems with the behavior of the wife or of the children, that reflects poorly on the husband/father. That there are such problems is bad enough, of course, but if the father further admits that he can’t solve the problem, which is what it means if he allows his wife to visit a social worker, that’s even worse. And if he actually accompanies his wife to meet with the social worker—to discuss a family problem with a complete stranger, to admit his inadequacy to such a person, and to a woman besides—such a man can be accused of a lot of things, perhaps, but being disengaged is definitely not one of them.

“The families come in,” she said, “and we try to deal with their problems. A lot of the issues involve the children: malnutrition, psychological problems, sometimes drug abuse. The mothers are very concerned, but the fathers don’t say anything. How do you engage Hispanic males?” The woman was genuinely concerned. Because the problem involved children, any solution would most probably have to involve both parents, but the fathers, as she put it, “aren’t engaged.” And she couldn’t understand why.

So what is the moral of this tale? Whenever we interpret behavior, whenever we decide what someone else’s actions mean, we are obliged to do so from the perspective of our own experience. But if that person, an Hispanic man in this case, comes from another culture, then your experience—gained in your culture—may not be a very reliable guide to his behavior. There’s a good chance, in short, that you may be misinterpreting some of his behavior (as he may be yours).

I didn’t really know why, of course, not being familiar with the specifics. I didn’t even know if it was a cultural problem, a personal problem (maybe this woman’s manner was somehow threatening to men), or perhaps just a language problem (maybe all the wives she met with spoke better English than their husbands). But it did occur to me that perhaps the social worker was reading the situation wrong, interpreting it, that is, from an Anglo, U.S. perspective. In her world, if the father in a parent conference just sits there and says nothing, then he’s disengaged. But in the culture many of this woman’s clients come from, the very fact that the father came to the social worker’s office with his wife may suggest that he is in fact deeply concerned. He may not say much—he may not say anything—but if he’s in the room with the social worker, he’s very “engaged.” How so? This is simplistic, but the explanation goes something like this. In many Hispanic cultures, the father is traditionally the keeper of the family honor. The reputation and good name of the family are ultimately the responsibility of the head of the household; if there are family problems,

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Fine (you’re thinking); I may be wrong about this guy. So now what do I do? The short answer, of course, is that you need to interpret this man’s behavior from his cultural point of view, not yours, to understand better where he is coming from, and then the path to helping him and his son will no doubt be much clearer to you. And you can get on with your job. But let’s be honest: how are you supposed to understand where a working class, quite possibly illiterate El Salvadorian campesino is coming from? And even if you could miraculously figure that out, what about the 35 other nationalities you have in your county? Do you likewise have to figure out where Sudanese refugees, Somalian exiles, Ukrainian immigrants, Chechnyian asylum seekers, and unwed Guatemalan mothers are coming from? In a perfect world, sure; in the world we live in, good luck. And so we’re back where we started. This is a serious and growing challenge as the U.S. becomes more culturally diverse, especially for people who work in public services, whether at the municipal, county, state, or even national level. If you serve the public, and the public is


Whenever we interpret

behavior, whenever we decide

what someone else’s actions

mean, we are obliged to do so

from the perspective of

our own experience.

becoming increasingly multi-cultural—1 in 5 citizens in the county my social worker is from were born outside the U.S.— how do you serve people you know very little about and may not understand very well? First of all, keep everything in perspective: while it’s true you won’t understand some things about people from a different culture, you will actually understand some others. We may all be cultural beings in some ways, products of our unique national culture, but we are also human beings in many others. Some things about that Salvadorian father may be forever unfathomable to you, but some other things will be as true for him as for the American father who is your next appointment. You’re not doomed to misinterpret everything that father says and does; just some things. Second: with clients from a different culture, don’t assume you understand what’s going on in front of you. Assume, in fact, that you don’t, and then proceed to check your understanding with the client. I told my social worker that the next time she met with Mr. and Mrs. Miranda ,she should bring up the subject of involving the father in cases like this, state her perceptions (that Mr. Miranda seemed disengaged), ask if her perception was valid, and have a discussion about what the clients felt Mr. Miranda’s role should be in solving the problem. Which brings us to the third thing public servants can do in such cases: let the members of the public educate you about their culture. Since it’s not realistic for you to become expert

in 35 cultures, let the experts in those cultures help you. Ask the Mirandas what would happen/if it might work to try solution X or approach Y in their son’s case. By all means bring your professional expertise to bear on the situation, even if that expertise may be somewhat ethnocentric, and let the Mirandas pick the parts that will work in their culture and reject the others. Just as you should not assume all your expertise is relevant, don’t assume all of it is irrelevant. Fourth: Use the cultural resources around you. Mr. and Mrs. Miranda can certainly educate you about their culture, but so can the coworkers and colleagues from their part of the world who happen to be in your workforce, if not in your office or even in your division. One out of 8 Americans is foreign-born, and 1 out of 6 people in the U.S. workforce. There may not be another Salvadorian or Chechnyian in your immediate workplace, but there may be people from the same region of the world or from a similar culture. And if not, then somebody you know—from church, from your child’s school, from day care—has to know somebody else who knows somebody from El Salvador. You don’t have to figure all this out on your own. Fifth: Give the Mirandas some credit. They know they’re foreigners, that it is they who have moved to your country, and that the burden is therefore on them to learn about and try to adjust to your culture (just as you would feel the burden if you immigrated to their country). And they’re probably trying very hard. At some level, the Mirandas know it’s not realistic to expect a middle-class, middle-aged Caucasian American social worker to figure out where two rural Salvadorians are coming from. They may realize, in short, that you probably are misinterpreting some of their behavior and that you may on occasion be giving them some pretty ethnocentric counseling, and they will make the necessary adjustments. PDJ

Craig Storti, a consultant and trainer in the field of intercultural communications, is the author of seven books. His latest, Speaking of India, describes the common cultural flashpoints when Indians work together with North Americans and western Europeans. He can be contacted at: craig@craigstorti.com. P ro f i l e s i n D i v e r s i t y J o u r n a l

March/April 2010

11


from my perspective…

Establishing an Executive Presence and Building Positive Relationships By Linda Jimenez

D

Chief Diversity Officer and Staff Vice President—Diversity & Inclusion WellPoint, Inc.

Diversity involves working within the world of human interactions and relationships. At WellPoint, much of our culture is built upon the concept of “Be Here Now,” emphasizing that the key to establishing “executive presence” is through the management of how one acts and interacts with others at work, both professionally and personally. WellPoint recently hosted an informal after-school reception for the students and parents of our new mentoring program for ninth graders. One young man, 14, arrived after track practice, still dressed in his uniform. He seemed shy as he spent some time mingling and snacking with his fellow classmates. As we engaged him in conversation, he carried himself with an air of energy and confidence, and spoke as if he had anticipated every question. His answers were clear, concise, and delivered with conviction and without hesitation. His responses to challenging questions were strong: “I can” or “I will” or “I am sure.” Executive presence? He definitely had it—I wanted to hire him on the spot! On the flip side, I have recently worked with adult professionals engaged in very important initiatives where there were opportunities to engage and motivate others. Some of these individuals were slouching in their seats, yawning and talking with their hands covering their mouths. Their communication style was often handled through simple emails, so they did not engage in conversation or dialogue freely, passionately, or enthusiastically. Of course, we have all been there; at the end of a long day filled with issues and problems, overloaded by emails and voicemails, and overwhelmed with projects. Sometimes, this may cause us to simply forget or lose sight that our behavior and attitudes leave lasting impressions on others. The perceptions that others have of us can hinder or hurt our careers. Executive presence is not a quality with which most individuals are born. The majority of individuals who have executive presence have developed a clearer understanding that everything they do or say communicates volumes about who they are, and these individuals have taken control of the signals they send. All of us have the opportunity to work on developing a strong executive presence. 12

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Think of someone you know and admire, or focus on a relationship that matters to you at home or at work. Write down the qualities that give this person “executive presence.” Is it the way they walk into a room, deliver a presentation, or speak to people personally or by phone? Some of the qualities that you will consistently find among individuals who have a strong executive presence are: Carry Yourself with Confidence. How an individual presents physically, or comports themselves, conveys great meaning. One should sit, stand, move, and gesture with purpose. Body language, posture, gestures, facial expressions, and movement convey energy, vitality, and confidence. Act with Authenticity. When an individual shows up genuinely and honestly, it lays the foundation for bringing one’s whole self to the table. Acting with authenticity means being courageous while remaining vulnerable, speaking truthfully while remaining tactful, and providing constructive feedback while accepting the opinions of others. Listen Well. In today’s world of constant distractions from email, phone, BlackBerry devices, texts, and instant messaging, individuals who truly listen do stand out. They make others feel valued, important, and heard. Dress As If Image Matters. It may seem unfair, but an individual’s physical appearance speaks volumes about their “executive presence.” You may think things like clothing, grooming, hairstyles, jewelry, or makeup shouldn’t matter, but—welcome to the real world—they do matter! Communicate Well. It is crucial to communicate the substance of what you know effectively. Individuals with a strong executive presence almost always speak clearly, succinctly, powerfully and with conviction. Individuals with “executive presence” use all aspects of their voice to sell their ideas and generate enthusiasm. Others are inspired to follow the leadership of those with executive presence. PDJ

Linda Jimenez is a native of San Antonio, Texas, and attended the University of Texas at Austin where she received her B.A. with honors. She is also a graduate of the University of Texas School of Law and has spent 20 years specializing in labor and employment law.


CAREERS AT SHELL The most successful problem solvers look at things differently and see solutions no one else can. Who would have thought to use fish protein to stop gas freezing in subsea pipes? One of our people did. And right now we’re looking for more people who can bring a fresh perspective to the energy challenge. We’ll provide training, support and career choices to develop your potential. We’ll get you working with some of our most accomplished problem solvers. And together we can help build a responsible energy future. Think further. For more information and to apply online, please visit www.shell.com/careers. Shell is an equal opportunity employer.

“Shell provided me with the opportunity to handle challenges and manage issues in a dynamic refinery environment. I count it a privilege to be part of this globalized entity and I was convinced that my journey in Shell will be filled with continual learnings, growth and never-ending opportunities to contribute.”

“With the open career progression opportunity, every employee of Shell can choose his/her own field as per their interests.”

“The best thing about working in Shell is the balance between life and work; between exposure and depth of experience offered to employees, and between making profits and caring for its employees and the community.”

Gloria Wang Environment Officer – HSSEQ Department

Jasmine Tiwari Senior Associate Researcher

Kishoore Jehan Marketing Executive


global diversity Are Your Business Leaders Ready to Champion Diversity and Inclusion? By M  ary L. Martinéz, Director, Workforce Management & Diversity Consulting; and Michal Fineman, Senior Talent Management & Global Diversity Consultant

W ORC Worldwide

Martinéz

We talk a lot about the necessity for business managers to “take ownership” of diversity and inclusion efforts. But we often fail to give them the support we routinely provide to managers filling other crucial roles in the business.

Perhaps the most frequently neglected support for business champions is learning opportunities that will expand their vision of diversity and their ability to make that vision a reality. Champions are asked to lead Fineman D&I change in the organization, but few have had any formal exposure to how to do that. Business managers sometimes tell us that they feel at sea in their roles as D&I champions. They support diversity and inclusion, but they don’t really know how to activate it. They need to be able to talk knowledgeably about the basic theory behind D&I work and have the skills to take effective action. In particular, they should know how to: • Define diversity and inclusion, • Make a compelling case for D&I in the context of their organizational goals and strategy, • Set meaningful objectives for themselves, • Gain support from other business leaders, • Integrate D&I into the organization’s management processes, • Recognize the subtle, often unconscious ways bias may express itself and influence employment decisions, and • Communicate effectively about D&I to a range of audiences—often in different parts of the world.

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What is the best way to deliver learning experiences to business champions who have a lot on their plates already, are reluctant to commit time away from the office, and may even feel they “already know it”? There are a number of ways to make the learning compelling and to accommodate busy schedules, such as bringing experts into the organization rather than sending people outside; creating a series of relatively short events, interspersed with structured sharing of participants’ experiences with applying the learnings; and blending learning with visioning, strategy formulation, and action planning. For creating real engagement and bringing champions up to speed on diversity fundamentals, we believe the most effective approach is a half- or full-day session—long enough to create a pocket of time and space in which participants can focus entirely on diversity and inclusion. A dedicated day allows time for more than just imparting information: Participants can discuss, reflect, and actually apply what they’ve learned to their own personal experiences and business challenges. An executive at a major pharmaceutical who recently participated in a session of this kind noted that it provided the “opportunity to have an open, fresh dialogue, beyond anything we had had in the past about diversity.” Aside from guidance on how to fill their roles, business managers gain something else very important from these discussions, particularly when they are in the room with their peers from other companies or even other parts of their own organization: the chance to learn from other champions and trade war stories about the challenges they’re facing, the things they’ve tried that have worked—and those that haven’t. In the process, they widen their own personal networks. The diversity function may want to help maintain and nourish these networks by providing ongoing opportunities for alumni to share their subsequent “real-life” learnings—in person, or via some virtual communication tool such as a D&I wiki or discussion board, or even Twitter exchanges! PDJ ORC Worldwide (ORC) is an international management consulting firm offering professional assistance in the areas of global equality, diversity and inclusion; talent management; global and domestic compensation; labor and employee relations; and occupational safety and health. Visit www.orcworldwide.com for more information.


At Vanguard, diversity is about more than color.

At Vanguard, we know diversity is more than just labels or gender or the color of someone’s skin. We believe in an unwavering commitment to inclusiveness that resonates through every level of our team. Diversity at Vanguard means: • Respecting the variety and differences among people across all communities and creeds. • Putting programs in place to foster connection in the workplace—including monthly awareness activities, diversity councils, and training activities for everyone from senior management to new hires. • Partnering with national professional organizations representing minorities and women. • Actively recruiting and promoting a diverse workforce. Most importantly, we value our employees for being themselves and for what they contribute. Because in an environment that champions the unique value of each individual, diversity represents unlimited potential.

To learn more

Connect with Vanguard > www.vanguard.com/careers ®

Vanguard is an Equal Opportunity Employer. © 2010 The Vanguard Group, Inc. All rights reserved.


viewpoint

Mentoring: A Tool To Improve CrossGenerational Employee Engagement By M  elanie Harrington, President; and Pamela Arnold, President-Elect

I

American Institute for Managing Diversity, Inc.

Harrington

Arnold

In the last decade, there has been considerable information shared about the four generations in the workplace, with a growing body of literature amassing on the youngest of the working generations, due in part to the management challenges they are causing Baby Boomers. The diversity challenge for employers with multigenerational workforces is how to increase productivity and engagement across the generations. Often, cross-generational language, behaviors, and even values can be different, adding complexity, and sometimes tension, to the work environment. To overcome these issues, employees and employers need tools that foster greater generational diversity awareness and intergenerational relationships. One of the more effective tools organizations are using to foster engagement across generations is mentoring programs. An AIMD focus group participant recently noted, “without mentoring, your successes are dependent on chance and serendipity.” Mentoring remains a critical path to success for the overwhelming majority of today’s organizational leaders. In a 2009 AIMD study of cross-generational mentoring programs, researchers discovered critical factors that can hinder or facilitate the effectiveness of the program. Whether an organization is launching a new program or modifying a mature one, the following program traits are important considerations for an organization seeking to improve employee engagement.

Mentor Programs Tend to Fail When: Mentors and/or senior employees don’t see mentoring as a responsibility • No one wants to be accountable for advancing the next generation of employees There is poor mentor/mentee matching • Mismatch in mentor/mentee work goals, interests, and needs creates challenges • Personality differences create tension • Mentor or mentee stereotyping and biases generate disrespect and contribute to the erosion of the relationship • Mentor’s and/or mentee’s availability is too limited There is a weak program structure and design • Follow-up and feedback meetings are not incorporated in the structure of the mentoring program • The employer has not sufficiently integrated the mentoring program into the organizational strategy • The mentoring program’s goals are perceived as fuzzy and unorganized There is poor mentoring • Mentor lacks motivation • Mentor doesn’t provide guidance or transfer knowledge to the mentee • Mentee doesn’t view mentor as authentic and trust fails to develop

Mentor Programs Tend to Succeed When: The program has a strong visible purpose • The employer establishes a clear and strong purpose for the mentoring program at the beginning and continues to communicate the purpose regularly • The goals and purpose of the program are displayed on the organization’s website, social board, at the mentoring opening session, in their mentoring package, etc. •M  entoring program goals are clear, helping sustain motivation among employees There is effective match-making • The program driver matches the mentor’s skills, knowledge, and abilities to the mentee’s professional and personal developmental needs and goals • S elf-assessment tools are used to set mentor/mentee relationship goals and improve mentor/mentee match-making There is a supportive organizational cultural • The employer fosters a mentoring culture within the organization that rewards the constructive investment of time and effort that mentors give to the mentor/mentee relationship • The organization tracks progress against the program’s stated goals and instills a sense of accountability among all participants • The program incorporates feedback meetings with established guidelines to give mentors and mentees the opportunity to provide concerns or suggestions periodically • The program includes an evaluation of the mentor and mentee, fostering accountability among all the parties

Finally, two of the most critical factors of a successful cross-generational mentoring program are the creation of an organizational culture that supports and encourages mentoring, and a culture that visibly values the potential contributions of all generations. Time and time again, our most accomplished leaders attribute their successes to mentors. As organizations employ workers from age 16 to 70 and older, mentors and mentees can decode the generational mysteries together. PDJ 16

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Thanks to you, women from every walk of life have improved their communities and our nation.

WellPoint proudly celebrates Women's History Month. At WellPoint, we are addressing tomorrow’s health care issues today by taking a leadership role in women’s health. Focusing on the medical issues that most affect women, we’ve developed a four-pronged approach that addresses wellness and prevention, disease management, quality improvement, and community involvement. And, our commitment extends to providing our associates with connections to WOW - the Women of WellPoint associate resource group, on-site lactation rooms and dependent care spending accounts.

Better health care, thanks to you. Visit us online at wellpoint.com/diversity EOE®

Registered Trademark, WellPoint, Inc. ©2010 WellPoint, Inc. All Rights Reserved ®Registered Trademark, Diversity Inc Media LLC ®Registered Trademark, Profiles in Diversity Journal


human equity™

Beyond Group to Individual Diversity By Trevor Wilson Author and Global Human Equity Strategist TWI Inc.

“Differences of trait and talent are like blood types. They cut across the superficial variations of race, sex and age and capture each person’s uniqueness.”

Q

Quite a few years ago one of TWI’s clients decided to “evolve” their diversity program beyond a focus on women and ethnic minorities. They were responding to internal pressure from the increasingly vocal LGBT employees. They too wanted “to be respected for the skills and talents they contribute,” and funded as an official diversity group. It was a foregone conclusion that their request would be granted. There was one concern. There were other groups who also wanted to be included in the diversity program. One very practical-minded executive had the bright idea of identifying the next three groups that may ask for formal recognition under the diversity strategy. They therefore brainstormed all the groups that could “claim” they have faced unfair treatment in the organization over the past fifty years. They quickly identified over 100 groups, including SWAMS (straight, white able-bodied males). I asked them if their idea was to add one group every year to their diversity program, until they have achieved a totally fair and inclusive work environment! If so their strategy was going to take a fairly long time. At that moment I realized that the future focus of diversity required a shift. Up until this point, our discussions about gender, race, sexual orientation, faith, class, and other dimensions of diversity have been group focused. To evolve to the next step it is time to concentrate on unearthing the diversity and uniqueness of talent within each individual. With Human Equity™, TWI is doing just that. Not too long ago, we provided a human equity intervention for one of our clients. It was focused on succession

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Marcus Buckingham, What Great Managers Do

planning. Annually the leader of each global business unit was required to identify the top five candidates from their area that they believed were ready for executive promotion. One business unit leader complained that, for the last three years, he had presented his acting Director of Marketing to the executive selection panel, but she had been summarily rejected because she did not have the required Ivy League MBA, and lacked a couple of years experience in marketing. He noted that she was also a minority woman, which added a bit to the risk assessment. We suggested that he present his candidate again featuring her intangible assets such as her innate strengths, her unique abilities, her distinctive personality, her committed attitude and her unique life experience as the first successful minority women in several positions, i.e., a real pioneer. The next time the candidate was presented to the committee, the discussion focused on her unique talents. They agreed that she was definitely one of the top five candidates and ready for executive promotion. This is Human Equity in action. It seeks to move the diversity conversation back to the uniqueness of each individual. The vehicle for this move will be discussed in our next article, where we explore diversity and the SHAPE of talent. PDJ

In 1996 Trevor started TWI Inc. to specialize in the area of equity and diversity as a business issue. In the same year, Trevor published a highly acclaimed book entitled Diversity at Work: The Business Case for Equity. The firm’s clients include some of the most progressive global employers. TWI’s Human Equity™ approach was instrumental in catapulting Coca-Cola’s South African division to the top performing division worldwide. Visit www.twiinc.com for more information.


Your talents will

shine.

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Audit | Compliance | Default Asset Management | IT When you join the Freddie Mac team, you’ll discover an inclusive, empowering culture with an equal opportunity employer who recognizes the value of diversity. You’ll also find a total rewards package that supports your success both at work and in your personal life. We encourage you to visit us at upcoming diversity conferences, which are listed on our career site. Visit us online at:

FreddieMacDiversity.jobs careers with impact


U.S. Navy Brings Comfort to Haiti On January 12, 2010 at 4:53 p.m. the tiny nation of Haiti was devastated by a 7.0 magnitude earthquake. The quake’s epicenter struck just 10 miles outside the capital Port-au-Prince. When news of the earthquake began, the death toll was estimated at around 50,000 people. In the days that followed, this number grew to approximately 250,000, making it one of the biggest natural disasters in recorded history. On January 13, one day after the quake, the USNS Comfort (T-AH 20), one the U.S. Navy’s two Mercy-class

The Roman Catholic cathedral, in the foreground, and the capital of Port-au-Prince, in ruins after the earthquake.

hospital ships, received orders to travel to Haiti and begin a

(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kristopher Wilson/Released)

much-needed humanitarian relief effort. The Comfort arrived in Haiti on January 20 and began treating the injured. U.S. Southern Command released Comfort from its mission on March 9, 2010. At the close of the mission, the USNS

Interviews conducted By Damian P. Johnson

Comfort had admitted 871 patients, performed 843 surgeries, and evacuated 77 patients to the U.S. for further treatment. In the following interviews with U.S. Navy Surgeon General Vice Admiral Adam M. Robinson, Jr., and five of his officers and sailors, Profiles in Diversity Journal learns how the diverse make-up of the U.S. Navy’s personnel enables it to best respond to the most difficult tasks around the globe.

About the USNS Comfort (T-AH 20) • T he USNS Comfort (T-AH 20) received orders to go to Haiti on January 13, 2010, and departed Baltimore, Maryland on January 16. • Comfort began taking patients on January 19 and arrived in Haiti on January 20. • 871 total patients admitted • 77 patients evacuated to the U.S. for further treatment • 85 patients remaining onboard • 843 total surgeries

The Military Sealift Command hospital ship USNS Comfort (T-AH 20) arrives at Naval Station Norfolk following a sevenweek deployment to the U.S. Southern Command area of responsibility to provide medical care in Haiti as part of Operation Unified Response. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Ryan Steinhour/Released)

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•A  pproximately 130 nurses, 80 doctors, and 500 corpsmen serve aboard the USNS Comfort, in addition to support personnel. The total crew aboard the ship is over 1000. •A  ccording to Cmdr. Tim Donahue, the ship’s director of surgery, Comfort received patients every six to nine minutes during its first four days in Haiti and had more than 540 critically-injured patients on board within the first 10 days. During this initial phase of its mission, the Navy hospital ship ran 10 operating rooms at full capacity to care for injured Haitian, American, and other foreign national earthquake victims requiring surgical care.


Navy Surgeon General VADM Adam M. Robinson, Jr. “I am incredibly proud of the professionals who came together on short notice to make the deployment happen. Medicine is a common language that all people understand, and it is a way to bridge differences.”

Vice Adm. Adam Robinson, Jr.

Reports estimate 250,000 Haitians lost their lives in the earthquake. What kind of impact does this have on you personally, and what impact does it have on the U.S. Navy?

The impact personally is that any time there’s a disaster and a tragedy of this magnitude anywhere in the world, there is certainly a sense of loss and a sense of bereavement that I think any human being will feel. Haiti is one of the poorest nations in the western hemisphere. In 1999, I took a fleet hospital to Port-au-Prince and spent six months there and in the surrounding communities. We saw approximately 26,000 Haitian nationals while doing medical work, so I have a bit of history and knowledge about the people, the culture, the geography, and many of the places that were involved in the devastating earthquake. So for me it was very personal because I wondered if some of the translators and some of the men and women and young kids had been killed or injured. The second thing is, when I was there, the U.N. had been there doing security and a lot of food distribution. When I learned that there were approximately 100 U.N. folks killed and injured in the initial earthquake, I had an immediate feeling of loss because I remember how integral the U.N. and foreign nationals were to our humanitarian assistance mission when we were there. It was a very direct blow that I felt from the earthquake. You travel quite frequently in your position—to Iraq, to Guantanamo, you’ve spoken with Bishop Desmond Tutu on various health issues in Africa. Do you know when you will be visiting Haiti?

I have not yet been to Haiti since this event. When the earthquake occurred, the last thing they needed was another three-star medical officer arriving to take a look around. They needed to have people on the ground who

were able to start bringing care, and that’s the purpose for sending the USNS Comfort (T-AH 20). We had the Comfort ready to go in 76½ hours, and within a four-day period of time they arrived in Haiti and began receiving casualties—100% up-and-ready— they received hundreds of casualties during that time. Navy medicine has had a presence in Haiti since a few days after the catastrophe. At the appropriate time I will visit, but I think that my visiting is not nearly as important as the Navy’s response of getting help, getting resources, getting medical aide, getting food, getting shelter, and getting the care there. That was the emphasis of this mission, and I think we accomplished that. What was your advice to those who were about to make the journey to Haiti?

From experience I learned that, on a good day, the infrastructure in Haiti is very fragile, the country is very poor, and the people are very much in need of the basic necessities of life: food, clean water, and shelter. When that was all destroyed, I told the men and women on the ship that they were going to see devastation that was probably unparalleled to anything they had seen before. They would probably not be able to imagine it within their frame of reference. But most of the men and women on the Comfort didn’t get to the shore, so that wasn’t an issue. What they did end up seeing were the people who were injured in the destruction. They saw absolutely horrific and massive injuries from the falling debris.

How many other ships does the Navy have on station, and how long did it take for them to arrive?

We also had two other ships that are stationed there, the USS Bataan (LHD 5), and the USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70), and with Vinson, Bataan and Comfort, we had approximately 1,500 Navy medical personnel on station within 5 to 7 days after the earthquake occurred. You may think that’s slow, but if you consider that the infrastructure on the shore was completely destroyed—no water, no electricity, no buildings, no hospitals, no communication of any substance, and there wasn’t a secure situation either from a transportation or a logistics point of view— having those Navy ships offshore and delivering medical and other care was a life-saving, essential element in the whole relief effort. How does the Navy’s diverse workforce enhance this mission?

First, the Navy has a number of Creolespeaking personnel who were members of the medical staff and crew of the Comfort who went to Haiti. I think there were between 5 and 10 Creole-speakers who were able to serve as translators, and also able to help with the cultural awareness that they provided the medical personnel. Second, we had a number of medical personnel from non-governmental organizations

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U.S. Navy Brings Comfort to Haiti (NGOs) who were French and Creole speakers, enabling us to supplement the people we had onboard the Comfort. Third, I think that we have the ability to have medicine serve as a common denominator and, in some respects, the common translator. What I mean by that is no matter who you are, no matter what color, gender, or what your cultural or economic status may be—when you see people who are in need of specific types of treatment, particularly medical care—we need to be able to provide that care to them no matter where that is, any place, anywhere. I think that those are the things I look at in terms of diversity in the workforce, and the diversity of the cultural dynamics that are at play, and also the necessity of making sure that we respond to people in need, no matter who they are. This sort of disaster relief has to be new to a lot of people on this mission. Are your men and women exhibiting new levels of leadership?

Most of them are seeing, and being involved with, things that are requiring another level of energy and another level of personal commitment. They do that every day. In terms of leadership, one of the things that is important in the military, in the Navy, and in Navy medicine, is the ability to be flexible and innovative in times of disaster and adversity—and to actually give an innovative and flexible response to things that do not fit the norm. And in the leadership arena, one of the things that is most important is, that no matter what the cost, no matter what the mechanical units being used are, no matter what the apparatus or the supplies may be, no matter how much the ship or the planes may cost, it’s all about people. The most important asset we have is always our people. In medicine, the first thing commanders need to be aware of is their people and affirming them in every way possible—professionally, psychologically, emotionally, and spiritually. That empowerment leads people to recognize that, as long as we’re working to make life better for the people we’re dealing with, then we’re doing our best and there will be nothing but positive outcomes. We take care of one another, we take care of our patients, and we take care of the people who are helping our patients. That’s the way 22

Profiles in Diversit y Journal

Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Philip Davila, from Petronila, Texas, examines a Haitian woman’s leg as Chief Warrant Officer Wilfrid Bossous translates. (U.S. Navy photo by Lt. j.g. Michael Quisao/Released)

we’re going to have positive outcomes and be the most effective. I think that’s the way to make sure that Navy and military health systems in general can make an impact on the lives of the people we’re treating. And in terms of leadership, I think the men and women on Comfort and their leaders have performed brilliantly in that respect. When your people first got in Haiti, what was their initial response to you at seeing the devastation first hand? Was there anything that came back to you that you were not expecting?

No. I can truly say that there was not. I tried to prepare my people for the impact of seeing things that were almost unimaginable, and I think I wasn’t incorrect with that. The response from my people was several-fold: First, they were absolutely stellar in beginning to provide care. They were also stunned at the horrific injuries that they were seeing. They were stunned at the level of poverty that they were seeing. There were many injured people who were being seen by a physician for the first time in their lives, and were flown to the USNS Comfort. Of course, they had never been injured this badly before. But we found people who had all sorts of different chronic diseases that had never been attended to who were now aboard the ship. So it was not only their injuries that needed to be taken care of, but there also needed to be decisions regarding the medical and chronic physical anomalies that were being seen and how they should be cared for, and how and when, and if, we should intervene. It became a very important learning sphere for my medical professionals in terms of taking care of the victims they had from the Haitian earthquake.

March/April 2010

In the situational reports you’ve received, have you found your sailors and officers using more creativity, ingenuity, and out-of-the-box thinking?

Yes. But to put it in perspective, the Comfort is a tertiary-care and even a quaternary-care facility. You can consider the Comfort a very large, and very capable, community hospital, so there were very few injuries that we couldn’t care for. The difference here is the extent and type of injuries. For example, we would see people who were paralyzed and were going to be permanently paralyzed and disabled because of neurological injuries—spinal or head injuries—it wasn’t that we were not going to care for and do everything we could for them, but there was the thought that these men, women, and children are going to need life-long care. How are we going to do that? These are the issues that the men and women on Comfort are faced with. The way these questions have been answered is, as the Haitian government and people increase their infrastructure and increase the robustness of their medical care, and as the NGO workers increase their capabilities within the country, and as the interagency (Departments of State, and Health and Human Services) and international partnerships occur with the U.N. and other nations that have come onboard—we’re going to be able to answer all these questions. But these are the kind of issues we have from a medical perspective, because it’s not just about delivering care in an quick manner: it’s also making sure that we can sustain that care for those individuals who need it. PDJ


U.S. Navy Brings Comfort to Haiti

Lieutenant Commander Karen Stokes Dallas native Lt. Cmdr. Karen Stokes, the dental medical director aboard USNS Comfort (T-AH 20), speaks to a U.S. soldier about the X-ray capabilities aboard the hospital ship. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matthew Jackson/Released)

How long have you held the position of Command Diversity Officer in Bethesda?

I’ve been the Diversity Officer in Bethesda since August of last year. It’s a brand new program that they’ve given me the opportunity to build. And as far as diversity here in Haiti, it’s exciting to see how the Navy has all the skills to address this disaster relief mission, from the translators to the way the patients are treated. The regard for cultural sensitivity is evident everywhere. What is your job onboard the USNS Comfort?

I’m the dentist onboard—the only dentist here—we always use translators when treating Haitian patients here. Are you treating Haitians or crew members?

Our primary mission is to support the crew and providers. There are dental emergencies that arise, but there is an annual exam in their birth month. I do provide restorations and routine exams, but with patients at the ports, I mainly address extractions, removing teeth that have been giving them problems, and provide prosthetics to replace the teeth. Why did you join the Navy as opposed to the other branches available?

In dental school, all the branches came to my school in Dallas, Texas and offered scholarships and various packages. The Navy pursued us the strongest and the scholarship package was the most appealing. My husband and I joined at the same time and have been in ever since. How long was your trip from home port to Haiti?

I was given 22 hours notice to get my sea bag ready before we left. I believe it was 4½ days from Baltimore to the shores of Haiti.

Knowing of the major devastation and loss of life, what were your thoughts on the way down there?

I was confident that our crew was going to address as many injuries as possible in a short amount of time. Everyone wanted to help as much as possible. I think there is a strong sense of confidence here.

Have you been doing anything that you wouldn’t be doing stateside due to facilities or equipment?

Yes, I immediately volunteered.

No, thankfully not. We maintain the same standard of care at Bethesda, using the same equipment. Supplies have not been an issue and my clinic was very well stocked. I feel that I’m consistent with the level of care I’m providing.

Were you involved with any training to prepare yourself for this mission?

Do you do any diversity training while onboard the Comfort right now?

No, none other than what the Navy has given me in my tenure. Overall, it’s been phenomenal training.

I have not. In the evening meetings, cultural sensitivity has been brought up.

Did you see anything you weren’t expecting to see?

In terms of communicating with the patients. Just as we would in Bethesda, you have to regard their culture, what things might be held privately. One thing I realize is that we have a very strong preventative dental view in the states; in Haiti it’s not as strong. I’ve seen a lot of dental decay, but you have to be very careful in describing the patient’s teeth to them—they do take great pride in their teeth. In asking if they are flossing, I have had translators say “you need to rephrase that.” You have to be very delicate with the words you choose.

Did you choose this assignment?

I was prepared. I’ve been trained to be a triage officer. With the earthquake in Haiti, the scene is grim, but I think everyone here met the mission. Could you take us through a typical day her in Haiti?

We have sick call from 8-10 and 1300-1400, and I do try to keep an appointed schedule, but we’ve been very busy in the dental clinic, seeing 8 to 15 crew members a day. Do you see Haitian patients too?

Early on, when time allowed, I was able to go to the wards and screen. Now that things are slowing, I have visited most of the patients there and I haven’t been going for repeat visits. But if there is a dental emergency, my door is open. What kind of impact has this mission had on you?

It has made me very proud to be a part of the Navy. Just to see that we can reach out to different groups of people on a minute’s notice gives a real sense of pride.

In what respect?

How long have you been onboard the Comfort?

3 weeks. Since the 16th, when I boarded the Comfort. I’ve been in Haiti since the 20th. We don’t know how long we will be staying. How has this mission changed your life?

It taught me how fortunate I am. I’m very grateful to live in America and have all the medical care and health care that we have in the Navy. I’m very grateful for that. PDJ

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U.S. Navy Brings Comfort to Haiti

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the devastation

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PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (Jan. 28, 2010) The Petionville Country Club in Port-au-Prince, Haiti is being used as a field hospital, food distribution location, and as a tent city to house 50,000 earthquake survivors. (U.S. Navy photo by Interior Communications Electrician 1st Class Jason Richard Stephens/Released)

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PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (Jan. 19, 2010) A Haitian man walks past a sign requesting help and supplies in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Units from all branches of the U.S. military are conducting humanitarian and disaster relief operations as part of Operation Unified Response. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication

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PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (Jan. 28, 2010) Thousands of displaced Haitians live in one of the many tent cities located throughout the capital of Port-au-Prince. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kristopher Wilson/Released)

Specialist 2nd Class Michael C. Barton/Released)

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PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (Jan. 28, 2010) A neighborhood is in ruins in the Haitian capital of Port-au-Prince following the devastating 7.0 magnitude earthquake that struck the region on January 12, 2010. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (Jan. 28, 2010) The Presidential Palace sits in ruins while hundreds of displaced Haitians take shelter in one of the many tent cities just outside the palace’s main gate. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist

BAIE DE GRAND GROVE, Haiti (Jan. 28, 2010) A Haitian man watches as a Seabee assigned to Amphibious Construction Battalion (ACB) 2 removes rubble from a collapsed church in Baie De Grand Grove, Haiti. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication

Specialist 2nd Class Kristopher Wilson/Released)

2nd Class Kristopher Wilson/Released)

Specialist 1st Class Monique Hilley/Released)

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U.S. Navy Brings Comfort to Haiti

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the response 9

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PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (Jan. 19, 2010) Search-andRescue teams from France, Haiti, Turkey, and members of the U.S. Air Force 23rd Special Tactics Squadron place Hottline Lozoma, a 25-year-old Haitian woman, on a stretcher after extracting her from the rubble of a collapsed market. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass

CARREFOUR, Haiti (Feb. 7, 2010) Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Fuel) 3rd Class Jonas Mileon, a Creole-to-English translator, and Boatswain’s Mate 3rd Class Maritsa Vazquez, both from Maritime Civil Affairs Team 2, assist a Haitian citizen seeking aid from the Civil Military Operation Center. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass

Communication Specialist 2nd Class Michael C. Barton/Released)

Communication Specialist Seaman Jonathan Pankau/Released)

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KILLICK, Haiti (Jan. 19, 2010) A Haitian woman screams in pain as U.S. military medical personnel try to set her broken leg at a clinic at the Killick Haitian Coast Guard Base. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Martine Curaron/Released)

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LEOGANE, Haiti (Feb. 6, 2010) Lt. Dalia Figueroa, from Puerto Rico, a medical officer aboard the amphibious dock landing ship USS Carter Hall (LSD 50), examines a child at a field treatment camp at the Hospital Cardinal Leger. (U.S. Navy photo by

Thank you to the Bureau of Medicine’s Vice Admiral Adam Robinson and LT David Shark for their support in the development of this story. We also appreciate the Navy Diversity Directorate’s Director Capt. Ken Barrett and Lt. Cmdr. Karen Eifert, who worked diligently to coordinate interviews on the ground in Haiti. The Navy Diversity Directorate continues to be a leader in innovative diversity initiatives amongst all of the service branches.

Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Hendrick Dickson/Released) P ro f i l e s i n D i v e r s i t y J o u r n a l

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U.S. Navy Brings Comfort to Haiti

Lieutenant Commander Mill Etienne Neurosurgeon Lt. Cmdr. Mill Etienne, from Spring Valley, New York, discusses treatment with 43-year-old Rollande Louis-Laurent aboard the hospital ship USNS Comfort (T-AH 20). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Edwardo Proano/Released)

Why did you and your parents leave Haiti?

My parents left Haiti during the reign of Jean-Claude “Baby Doc” Duvalier. That was a time when many people were being killed in Haiti, particularly people who didn’t agree with his doctrine. My parents left to seek refuge in the U.S. and to also seek better opportunities. You’re a neurologist, but have you also been doing some translating for the Navy?

I don’t work as a full-time translator, but if I’m at the hospital and see a physician who needs help with translating, I am most happy to provide that assistance. After hearing of all the devastation after the earthquake, what were your thoughts while in transit?

Personally, we had some family members who were victims for a couple of days. We were fortunate enough to learn the night before I left that they were all doing okay—it was nice to leave knowing that. But as I was traveling down on the ship, we were in the dark about what was happening there. At home you have television and radio, but on the ship you end up missing some of the news. I would have liked to have been in Haiti helping during day 1 or 2, but it was best to have a few days on the ship to plan how we were going to help the most people. Did you do any specific training to prepare yourselves?

Being that I was the only officer who had a Haitian background, I felt some responsibility to educate the crew about the Haitian culture, history, and language. I assembled a group of people with Haitian backgrounds, 26

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and we compiled a book of words and phrases that would most likely be used with the patients. We also started planning an interpreter service—we got all of our members who speak Creole, as well as Red Cross volunteers and other military personnel, to come onboard the ship as an effective interpreter service. Given that you are a native of Haiti, what impact did hearing of this tragedy have on you?

It was certainly a very difficult situation to see the country I was born in, destroyed. Recently, on a trip into the city, I actually went to the street I grew up on. It’s certainly a heartwrenching experience to see the very roads I used to walk on completely destroyed, with the buildings torn down, bricks everywhere, garbage on the ground, and people basically starving in the streets.

I’m treating people who have had injuries to their skulls, spines, and nerves. What is the difference taking on casualties in Haiti versus casualties of war?

Up until this past June, I was practicing civilian medicine. When I went active duty and worked full-time at Bethesda Naval Medical Center, I felt a great sense of pride and privilege to take care of our troops who put their lives on the line for our country. In Haiti, we’ve seen people who are victims of a natural disaster. So now we’re taking care of underprivileged, underserved people who need our help, and I get a great sense of pride doing that. The differences are really small, but the commonalities are big. Just like our troops, the Haitians are good people. They are victims in this disaster and they desperately need our help. Do you have a vision of what Haiti might look like when the Navy is done there?

It depends on whether I’m on the ship or at the hospital in the community. The days are long. We wake up at 0600 and the days could last until midnight or 0100. Today, for example, I went to the Port-au-Prince hospital to treat injured kids, many of whom have become orphans because their parents have died or are still missing. It was a great feeling, caring for these kids who wouldn’t have access to this kind of treatment otherwise.

Since there’s been such a huge outpouring of support from the U.S. government and around the world, Haiti is now in a unique situation. If this charity is coordinated appropriately, the country could be rebuilt better than it was before. 250,000 people is a major loss, but I believe those remaining are ready to work really hard to build this country back for those that live here and those who want to visit. It’s going to take time and proper leadership to get it there, but I do believe that’s where it is going.

How many people do you treat per day?

How has this mission changed your life?

The number varies day to day. Some days I see 12 patients, and other days I see only 4 or 5. But the types of patients I’m seeing are people who have had crush injuries, which happen when a person was in a structure that collapsed on top of them. As a neurologist

Being deployed on this humanitarian mission is really personal, as Haiti is my native country, and it reaffirms that I have indeed made the correct choice in my career. I look forward to continuing my service to the U.S. and particularly the U.S. Navy. PDJ

Tell us about a typical day for you in Haiti.

March/April 2010


U.S. Navy Brings Comfort to Haiti

Lieutenant Lyla Law Lt. Lyla Law, from Wolf Point, Montana, is currently supporting relief efforts in Haiti with Operation Unified Response as an assistant patient discharge administrator and as a nurse providing direct patient care. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matthew Jackson/Released)

How long have you been in the Navy?

What was the first thing you saw when you got to Haiti?

I’ve been in the Navy as a commissioned officer for 2 years, but I served in the public health service and as an enlisted for 8 years, active and reserve. I was a deck mechanic. And then I did my bachelor’s and master’s in health services in 2002-2008.

When we finally stopped moving, I’d thought it was the most beautiful thing I’ve ever seen. Unfortunately, when I started seeing patients my heart turned, because I was saddened by the amount of people we were dealing with. You could see the devastation in their eyes and you could tell that everyone was hurt, physically. But there was more to it than that—it was the loss that they felt. I had the opportunity to work in Causality Regulation in the receiving area and I think we brought in over 80 people the first day. Just the human touch meant more to them than anything—just to know that we were there. It was overwhelming, the amount of people that we saw.

Could you take us through a typical day in Haiti?

A day here is 12 or 13 hours. I get up pretty early. I go for a run about 0430, then go to work down on the new patient ward, getting the reports on patients. We have to work through translators to get the answers to some questions, so some days we are working twice as hard, visiting with the patients, giving medication, and of course, translating. We finally end our day around 1900-1930. But it’s been very rewarding, even with the extra effort it takes to communicate. Did you have specific training to prepare for Haiti?

No. But one of the reasons I think I was selected to do this was that I used to work in the public health service, and also worked through the hurricanes and had been on some teams with FEMA out there. I enjoy the organized chaos, the fast pace, and adrenaline of it, but I think that starting with something from the beginning like this—I was excited to come. I knew it would be hard work, but I knew it would be very rewarding too. We were told on Thursday and we were on the ship Friday and pulled out Saturday morning. But I think that the training that we’ve had taught us the ability to work with less, and get more done. You’re always like that when you work on reservations, it’s easier to adapt when you have a little bit, but to come down here was something that—I know they needed help—I thought I was more ready because of what I’ve seen in the past. Because of where I’ve been and I thought that I brought that to the table for them.

Did you find yourself doing anything differently in Haiti than you would do stateside?

We’ve gotten really creative. As a nurse, we don’t have some of the supplies that we’re accustomed to stateside. On one patient, we didn’t have the wound vacuum that we needed, so we rigged up a suction machine out of a Serac machine and we’ve seen tremendous results with that. Every day we improvise— all the way from paperwork to translating to the equipment that we have to use. Have you seen your shipmates take on their own sense of leadership due to the crisis?

Oh yes, absolutely. As many patients as we were taking on, we had to spread ourselves pretty thin, but the junior officers, JGs, and ensigns have taken on their role to work with the corpsman, and the corpsmen have also stepped up with their roles. Most of them came out of admin, but were now taking vitals and assessments. We had to do a lot of quick teaching. They’ve all stepped up and done wonderfully.

When you were bringing patients onto the ship, did the corpsmen help in triage?

There were quite a few corpsmen stationed in the different areas of triage. They did step up and were very well-versed in their assessments and getting the patients where they needed to be. A lot of experience on the ship was from the corpsmen. They are very organized in their thoughts and actions out here. Without them, I probably couldn’t have done my job as well as I am doing right now. How has this mission changed your life?

I think it has reminded me of where I came from. It brought me back to the core of who I am. This population is very similar to the population that I was born and raised in, and I think that it renews the spirit of helping and made me appreciate my life more. Anything that you want our readers to know?

Being in the Navy has given me the opportunity to do this. It’s true that whatever you bring to the table is what you make out of yourself. Everyone must always believe in themselves. During the first week here, the days and nights went by so fast, that if you didn’t believe that you were going to make it, you may not have. I look back now and thank God we made it through. You just have to believe in yourself. PDJ

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U.S. Navy Brings Comfort to Haiti

Petty Officer 1st Class (SW/PJ) Dietrich Rey Electronics Technician 1st Class (SW/PJ) Dietrich Rey from Queens, New York, provides water to a thirsty Haitian child being treated for a broken leg aboard USNS Comfort (T-AH 20). Rey is assisting as a Creole translator aboard the hospital ship, communicating necessary information to doctors and ensuring patient’s needs are met. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Timothy Wilson/Released)

What is a typical day for you now in Haiti?

I’m available for the translator division, and work about 18 to 20 hour days. There are about 72 military translators, and roughly 70 Red Cross volunteers, so there is a lot of work to make sure all the wards and ground units are covered with translators. Are you doing anything as an electronics technician right now?

You lived in Haiti from ages 6-17. What was it like back then, growing up there?

I was able to enjoy the natural beauty of the island; the political turmoil didn’t start until I was in my teens. I was able to enjoy the simple island life. Go to the beach at Christmas, sleep with your door open, these types of things. I had a very colorful childhood. Riding horses, playing soccer, martial arts—things that I might not have had the opportunity to do had I not lived there. Haiti when I was a young child was pretty safe. With some supervision, I was able to run errands and such. But as I got older, the political uproar started and it made it a little more difficult and a little less safe. What were your thoughts on the way down there, knowing the devastation, the loss of life?

I was recently in Haiti for my mother’s funeral, and said that I wouldn’t come back— I wanted to remember the island and good times I’d had with my mother. Once I saw the news, I knew I had to come back. I was looking for the CO of the ship and found out he was looking for me! I wanted to come and help and be a part of the reconstruction. I was excited for that reason, but was hesitant to see the destruction and the injured people. It always hurts to see people that are unable to help themselves. But to know that I could help made me feel proud and happy. 28

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especially difficult when dealing with children. But it’s been wonderful to see the resilience of the people. They are happy to be alive, when all is said and done. It’s great to see kids that I thought weren’t going to make it, and now they are smiling and laughing, joking around and learning English. It’s really amazing. What impact has this mission had on you?

I work on communications equipment onboard the ship. But basically I translate documents. We put together a book with phrases and questions that were written phonetically for English speakers that would sound like they are speaking Creole. There were 5 or 6 of us who worked on that.

Volunteering and helping others has been something that I’ve always been doing. My mother would take me to help volunteer with her when I was in Haiti. I’ve always thought that the right thing to do is the right thing to do. This relief effort has emphasized the feeling that, when a team of people do the right thing, it can impact thousands of lives.

Have you seen anything you didn’t expect?

Do you have any family still in Haiti?

I was mentally prepared to see what I saw. Growing up there, seeing landmarks from my childhood gone was disheartening; to know that things that have been around for hundreds of years are now destroyed. There was nothing that I didn’t expect to see, but it was still hard to see.

Yes. My brother and sister were both in the United States when the earthquake happened. They are actually stuck in the U.S. right now, not able to get back to Haiti, but that’s a good thing, they’re fine. My aunt and uncle’s house was damaged, but they weren’t hurt. I do have some cousins that I’ve been unable to find, so I’m not sure what their status is. I can just hope for the best.

Which landmarks did you see that were destroyed?

The Presidential Palace and my mother’s church, Sacred Heart, where her burial services were held in December. The police headquarters, the schools that were here since my parents were children. To think about the history of it all now gone is hard to imagine. You are translating between English and Creole. What types of conversations have you heard?

The common theme when patients come in is to get their date of birth and the type of injury they have, so we can treat them. The thing that is hard to translate is when someone has to lose a limb, or something along those lines. It’s always very difficult to tell someone that if you don’t lose this limb, you’re not going to make it. It’s

March/April 2010

What are the dangers in Haiti right now?

Disease is rampant because people are gathered in ways that they normally wouldn’t be. Clean water is an issue as well. Also, buildings that aren’t secure or are partially destroyed can collapse. There were some kids killed the other day who went into a school that then collapsed. How has this mission changed your life? Will you do anything differently?

I appreciate things a little bit more. Small things, like just being able to walk, or having water—these are things that go unnoticed, but that I now appreciate more. PDJ


U.S. Navy Brings Comfort to Haiti

Staff Sergeant Loobens Alphonse Marine Corps Staff Sgt. Loobens Alphonse is serving as a translator in support of Operation Unified Response aboard the Military Sealift Command hospital ship USNS Comfort (T-AH 20). Alphonse speaks and understands both French and Creole, language skills that make him a valuable member of the Comfort team. By translating between doctors and the Haitian earthquake victims they are treating, Alphonse helps to identify medical conditions more quickly and provide ease to patients. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matthew Jackson/Released)

I understand that you were born in Port-au-Prince. Could you give us a little glimpse of what it was like growing up in Haiti?

I came to the states 28 years ago, when I was 8. My father sheltered us from street life, so really, I didn’t experience a lot of things that went on outside of the confines of our home and school. I only remember going to school, going to the movies, reciting the pledge of allegiance every morning, going to church, eating and playing in our front yard. Why did you choose to join the Marines rather than another branch of the military?

Upon graduating high school, I got a scholarship to go to the Community College, and I always wanted to further my education. However, because I was not an American resident, not to mention a citizen, I couldn’t. To continue with school, I would have to pay international fees, which at that time were three times that of regular tuition. So the next step for me was to join the military. I joined the United States Marines because I’ve always been a very disciplined person and I thought that the Marine Corps would be a very good thing for me. We all heard of the devastation, the loss of life from the earthquake. What were your thoughts on the way down there?

I’ve been deployed to Iraq before, but when I boarded the aircraft at Norfolk to leave for Haiti, I experienced some anxiety, and I think everyone else did too. Going to Iraq, I knew I would be in imminent danger, but in Haiti, I knew that I would see someone hurt, and that could have very well been me. My mother put us on a plane to the U.S. in 1982, and now I was going to see people in Haiti who could have been me, had she not done that. Can you take us through a typical day for you?

We muster at 0700 and then report to our respective posts, which can either be the

recovery ward, the operation room, or the intensive care unit. After muster you’re looking at a 14-15 hour shift. In the wards, we are there to help translate for the health care providers, doctors, nurses, corpsmen, and patients. Most of us do more than just translating. Many times we take it upon ourselves to help with the hygiene, help moving patients from bed to bed, folding sheets, making beds, helping the patients drink and eat, and often times holding their hands for comfort.

How has your degree in Social Psychology helped you in this mission?

More compassion. Not much creativity in what we do. We learn from the corpsmen and ask for instruction as it relates to what we can do to help out. If we’re not translating, we want to know if there is something that we can help with. We’ve been challenged to take it several notches beyond just translating.

My degree in Social Psych has helped me put myself in their shoes and understand that everybody is frustrated. Not just the patients, but the doctors, the nurses, the corpsmen, my fellow translators. I try to help them deal with their frustrations and regain composure. What I try to do with every patient is touch them. Whether it’s their hand, shoulder, or head, I feel that it’s important to have that physical connection to help build comfort. A simple human touch.

When sort of things are you translating?

How has the mission changed your life?

The two things that I’ve heard over and over again is, “I’m in pain,” and “When am I going home?” These patients are hurting physically and emotionally.

I don’t think it will change me much in how I interact with my unit, but it has changed forever how I interact with people in general, especially my family members. I’ve been placed in a situation where I’m giving emotional attention and consoling people that I don’t even know. If I can care for these total strangers, then I can do the same for those people close to me. I’m also interested in pursuing something in the health care or medical fields, and might be going to nursing school this fall. This perspective has given me a better understanding of human suffering in general. I will be a better, more compassionate person having had this experience. PDJ

Have you found yourself doing things differently in Haiti than you would stateside?

What’s the most unique translation that you’ve had to do while there in Haiti?

When I first got here, there was a young lady who was an amputee and surgery candidate. The reason for needing amputation was that her leg was rotting away. They had been trying to get her to agree to have her leg amputated but she refused. And they were telling her that she was going to die if she didn’t have the surgery. I asked if I could talk to her; I told her the situation and about 15 minutes later, she agreed to the surgery and was discharged about a week or so afterwards. That was the most unique situation that I’ve had since I’ve been here.

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Changing Perceptions Multi-Generational Workforce Offers More Opportunity than Challenge By Jennifer L. Blevins Executive Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer AXA Equitable

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Four different generations in the workforce. This is the reality of the employee landscape of today. While much has been debated and written about the challenges of generational “difference,” are we making too much of the idea that companies will not be able to tap unique attitudes and behaviors?

parts. This issue has become even more pressing due to the economic crisis, which has caused many to postpone retirement.

On the surface, it may not seem so. It is quite natural to focus on the challenges posed by melding these different generations. But the reality is that the opportunities are unlike any we have seen before. The key is enabling all employees to understand and respect each other for the value they bring and to recognize the similarities among them.

Mentoring is an effective way to dispel this perception and get back to reality. Most people think only of traditional mentoring, when someone who is considered more senior in their career guides someone new. But the multi-generational workforce of today allows for mentoring in “reverse.” This occurs when employees from younger generations share with others the fabric of their style, including new technologies and communication methods designed to enhance productivity and job satisfaction.

For instance, there has been a lot of emphasis on Generation Y’s vocal desire for work-life balance. The truth is this flexibility is a major desire for all. Finding ways to provide it will ultimately help employers recruit, engage and retain talent across all four generations. Notably, with added flexibility, baby boom and traditionalist employees— whose institutional knowledge is viewed as bedrock—may choose to remain in the workforce longer and pass along their experience and knowledge to their younger counter30

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Perception is a challenge, however. Employees well into their careers may still perceive work-life balance as an earned privilege. Generation Y, in many ways, have it as an expectation. Finding ways to bridge both sets of views is important.

The opportunities are before us. As talent managers, it’s imperative that we create a culture where different generations are not only valued but are also desired. Only when we embrace this difference can we truly harness the talent within each and every employee, regardless of their generational uniqueness. PDJ

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For the first time in history, four generations are actively together in the workforce. As shown in the chart below, when you were born determines which generation you belong to, and each generation carries different traits and attitudes about how one fits in the workplace. Having these four generations working together can become a major challenge for leaders: how to harness the talents of each generation and create unified teams in order to optimize bottom-line effectiveness.

Profiles in Diversity Journal asked about the challenges in recruiting, developing, motivating, and melding the four generations. The responses are as different as the generations themselves.

1965 – 1980 Generation X

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1981 – 2000 Generation Y, Millennials

i-Gen Building Knowledge, Understanding, and Skill-Sets

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By Jane Buttermore i-Gen Chair; Vice President of Operations, Metropolitan Schools Market Sodexo

Two important events in our history are affecting our workforce today: the country’s uncertain economy combined with medical advancements are creating a workforce that is living longer and/or having to work into their retirement years. This combination has led to four generations working side-by-side for the first time in history. The varied backgrounds and experiences of these generations challenge us to recognize, respect, and harness these differences to create effective and sustainable workforces. At Sodexo, our Intergenerational Employee Network Group (i-Gen) creates the opportunity to educate, value, and engage these differences, and focus on the similarities. We have learned that each generation wants to be respected and feel that they bring value to the organization. The group has experienced unprecedented interest, with over 550 employees joining in just the first six months. Our i-Gen meetings offer program training that educates and builds awareness around each generation’s unique attributes and the historical events that have shaped their lives. These differences include what motivates them, their work ethic, and how they want to be rewarded. Once each generation understands these drivers, they become a more effective and efficient workforce. i-Gen also recognizes the personal issues that may be facing each generation. Our group works with “Lifeworks”

to provide personal consultation and programs to help them outside of work, so they can be more focused and productive at work. Perhaps our Gen Xers are looking for parenting skills, or our Baby Boomers need elder-care assistance. Our network group provides them with resource links to assist them in their personal needs. The “value-add” of our intergenerational network team is the cross sharing of skills. Our GenYs are interested in learning how to navigate through large organizations quickly, while our Traditionalists wants to learn how to tweet. i-Gen communicates to our members through traditional email, but also through Facebook, Twitter, and Flicker. i-Gen will be introducing a Social Networking 101 webinar to its members in the near future. The group will be introducing “speed mentoring” at our meetings to assist in the transferring of these generational skills and experiences. Panel discussions will help each group talk about situations and solutions in their work environment. i-Gen will continue to work with our members to develop ways to share and educate. As an organization that will be vying for top talent, we must be prepared to create an environment where people want to work. PDJ

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Generations in a Family Business By Meghann McKenna, CLU Agent New York Life Insurance Company

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In my life, work and family are one. I am part of a family business, and one of the major challenges for many small businesses, including family businesses, is business succession: how will the business continue when the initial owner wants to retire? There are many important pieces to preparing for successful business succession. In my case, we serve the financial needs of families and businesses; the challenge of understanding the needs of clients is of the utmost importance. My grandfather started the business over 60 years ago. He was a pro at understanding his clients’ needs and educating them on how to properly prepare their finances. How could my dad and I step in and serve the needs of clients who had established a close professional relationship with my granddad and continue the business? On the surface this appears to be a challenge, but in my circumstance, it is what makes our business strong and prosperous. What is inherent in our business is that we serve families. So while my grandfather was able to work with families when he started in the business in 1949, those moms and dads had children, who naturally became my father’s clients. And those children had children and they became my clients. So, when I joined the business five years ago, three generations of McKennas were serving three generations of other families in our area.

What I find is that I have a connection to families of my generation and can relate to their needs. They have demanding jobs, support a family, and/or have a mortgage, and find time to enjoy themselves in the fastpaced world of the 21st century. Not only can I serve people of my own generation, but because of our multi-generational practice, we teach each other. I learned from my grandfather how to work with an older male who may not be used to women in the workforce. I was able to help my grandfather see that young single women today face many of the same planning issues that single men face. My father has been able to adapt with changing technology and communication styles between generations. Having a single daughter as a business partner has made my father more knowledgeable of the younger generation and how to market to, and work with, them. So while I may rush home to fix dinner for my friends or struggle to find time to date, I have learned how to work with many different types of individuals. PDJ

Meghann McKenna, CLU, is a New York Life agent based in Bozeman, Montana. She has qualified for the MDRT—an international, independent association of the world’s leading life insurance and financial services professionals—since the start of her career in 2004. She also serves as the chairwoman of the board for Special Olympics Montana. 32

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From the Address Book Generation to the Facebook Generation By Candi Castleberry-Singleton

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Although many people in the workforce remember the address book, fewer and fewer have used one for the purpose of storing contact information. You might remember writing—often in pencil—the contact information of a friend or colleague in your address book, later crossing it out and updating it when the information changed. You might also remember the phone technology used to connect to the telephone numbers in your address book. Depending on how far back you can recall, you have memories of the operator-facilitated call, a time before area codes when phone numbers started with letters, a party line, or an emergency interruption while you were on a call because there was no two-way calling. While those of you smile while reading, with flashbacks of your personal memories, others are reading wondering how old you must be to remember any of it. Well, Facebook is to some what an address book was (or is) to others, a means for storing contact information which is updated online by a friend, rather the Facebook owner. This generation updates their status on where they are, where they are headed, and what they are thinking at that moment. It offers some confusion for the address book generation, who wonder why anyone would post their current status online or if anyone really cares. Try convincing the 400 million active Facebook users that no one cares. This generation may only remember a time when their primary communication technology was the cell phone with mobile applications and internet technology, such as Skype, that offers free video conferencing and file sharing. While they may not remember a time before the cell phone, internet, or the first (very expensive) video phone was invented, they

Chief, Inclusion and Diversity UPMC Center for Inclusion in Health Care

know that those who do remember that time aren’t in their generation. Although there are “address-bookers” who use Facebook and vice versa, this lighthearted conversation offers some general distinctions between each generation’s management of contact information and communication technology. It also highlights one of the diversity challenges that all organizations face: having multiple generations in the workplace, who communicate and think differently about nearly everything. Whether our preference is online social networking or in-person networking; or communication via text, email or in-person; rather than trying to determine which generation is right or wrong, we should accept that we are just simply different. Organizations that have begun to focus on regulating Facebook activity during work hours should remember that what was once known as the “water cooler conversation” can now be analogous to a Facebook update. Perhaps the address book generation, rather than trying to regulate the Facebook generation’s social interactions, should focus policies on appropriate behavior during work hours, and appropriate use of the organization’s brand at all times. We should all try to “Find common ground,” one of 30-Tips of Dignity and Respect,1 created by UPMC employees to promote an environment of inclusion. A commitment to inclusion requires a core belief that everyone deserves dignity and respect, regardless of generation. PDJ

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Best Practices in Multicultural Marketing As the demographics of America become more diverse and target-markets stretch globally, the job of marketing has become more demanding and more important than ever before. Today, marketing experts are asked not only to develop goods and services targeted toward different groups, but to also develop different ways to appeal to these many diverse groups. There are many folks who specialize in multicultural marketing, and also a good number who are just beginning the global-marketing journey.

Profiles in Diversity Journal asked multicultural marketing executives to share their Best Practices in Multicultural Marketing. Learn what works, what doesn’t, and what the realistic expectations are in this challenging world.

Crystal Worthem

Multicultural Marketing Manager

Ford Motor Company Multicultural marketing is a key component of our plan to drive sales and market share. How does your organization use ethnic insights to drive growth?

The insights we gather are included in our strategic and tactical planning. It is a part of the business planning process. Multicultural marketing isn’t considered just a community initiative; it is a collective effort that is tied back to the business plan. How is your organization’s senior management engaged or involved in the multicultural marketing process? Headquarters: Dearborn, Michigan Web site: www.ford.com Primary Business: Automotive

All levels of senior management have touched our multicultural marketing planning in some way. The General Manager of Marketing and the Director of Communications are involved day-to-day, from strategy to tactical execution. The management team is very supportive in removing barriers to success.

The management team is very supportive in removing barriers to success.

Do you engage ethnic business partners in your multicultural marketing process? If so, how?

Yes, they are the keepers of the best cultural insights. We utilize our strategic partners for a better understanding of the marketplace, best practices, and execution of culturally relevant programs. List the various ways your organization begins to understand the culture of the groups it wants to reach.

We engage our multicultural ad agencies in the product research process to ensure that we get culturally relevant insights to connect with the target markets. PDJ

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Best Pr ac tices in Multicultur al Marke ting

Juliette Mayers

Executive Director, Multicultural Marketing

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts (BCBSMA) Multicultural Marketing develops business and consumer strategies to ensure the needs of its diverse members and potential members. In terms of integration, all key areas of our business are involved in the work and in the ongoing development of infrastructure to support our rapidly changing marketplace. For example, the Multicultural Marketing Steering Group, the cross-functional team of leaders who help to implement our strategy, include senior leaders from Corporate Relations, Marketing, Sales, Service, Medical Innovation & Leadership, Human Resources, Health Care Services, Finance, and the Office of the CEO. Do you engage ethnic business partners in your multicultural marketing process? If so, how?

BCBSMA in 2009 initiated and engaged two very important ethnic health care and business partners. One was with the Hispanic-American Chamber of Commerce (HACC). Key components of the partnership include creating both a B2B and B2C multicultural capabilities brochure in Spanish, assigning a bilingual sales rep, and collaborating with HACC on a healthcare event for Latino-owned businesses. The second was with Whittier Street Health Center, one of the largest community health centers in the Boston area. The result of this partnership in year-one of the program, was a 22% increase in multicultural members who are patients of Whittier Street Health Center. Key components of the partnership included creating multicultural health care educational materials in English and Spanish, collaborating on programming and support of Whittier’s programs, training for Whittier staff about BCBSMA products and services, appointment of a sales representative for Whittier and sponsorship of Whittier’s events including the Men’s Health Summit, Links to Women’s Health and the International Gospel Concert.

How does your organization show how your products or services will benefit and/or meet the needs of different groups targeted?

Headquarters: Boston, Massachusetts Web site: www.bluecrossma.com

In January 2010, BCBSMA Primary Business: Health Insurance launched a new web site for multicultural consumers in English and Spanish. It helps the visitor access information on how to choose a health care plan that is best for their family, lots of nutrition and health information, and how to find a doctor. It’s very user-friendly and includes a “rollover glossary” that lets the user mouse over a term for instant definitions of commonly used health care and insurance terms. BCBSMA Multicultural Marketing asked its PR firm, Colette Phillips Communications, Inc, New England’s premier multicultural marketing firm and a 10-year vendor for the company, to create a dynamic brochure that would have applicability to multicultural consumers as well as wide appeal to crossover audiences. List the various ways your organization begins The result is a brochure that is vibrant and Multicultur al Ambassadors to understand the culture of the groups it wants informative, communicating information to reach. about BCBSMA with compassion and ex tend BCBSMA’s reach into In 2008, BCBSMA conducted a comwarmth. And while it was culturally sensitive, the communit y. prehensive planning and marketing research the piece’s theme, which highlighted the study that resulted in identification and importance of family, appealed to consumers validation of the Hispanic and Africanfrom all walks of life. American market segments as areas of growth and opportunity. BCBSMA has done qualitative and quantitative studies to assess Please include any other relevant topics, innovations or ideas you would the multicultural marketplace and based on those studies, we like us to know about your multicultural marketing program. have approximations of the racial and ethnic composition of BCBSMA in 2009 developed and launched the Multicultural our membership. Many studies have concluded that there are Marketing Ambassadors initiative, a means of extending differences in outcomes and access for minorities, and collection BCBSMA’s reach into diverse communities and actively engaging is now a high priority for the state of Massachusetts and for the community. The inaugural team of 20 Ambassadors support healthcare providers. Multicultural Marketing events and activities and work in Multicultural Ambassadors extend BCBSMA’s reach into partnership on company-wide outreach efforts to build brand the community. BCBSMA also has a team of Spanish-speaking awareness and to provide consumer healthcare education, resulting Member Service Representatives and Spanish-speaking in membership growth and enhanced value for BCBSMA. representatives who regularly attend multicultural health fairs and The Ambassadors undergo comprehensive training in cultural staff the BCBSMA booth. competency and the company’s products and services. PDJ What is your most rewarding career accomplishment?

As it relates to Multicultural Marketing, it is the ability to combine my expertise in Marketing and Diversity to achieve bottom-line results for BCBSMA while supporting our company’s commitment to being an outstanding corporate citizen.

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Best Pr ac tices in Multicultur al Marke ting

Rich Baron

Executive Director, Customer Development Marketing

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Boehringer Ingelheim has been committed to improving the lives of patients and their families for nearly 125 years. This commitment extends to every area of our business—including our multicultural marketing strategy. Our customers and patients represent a diverse group of generations, genders, backgrounds and ethnicities—all with their unique beliefs and perspectives. We take all of these factors into consideration, and based on the patient we’re trying to reach, we target our marketing initiatives to address these demographic and cultural differences.

Headquarters: Ridgefield, Connecticut Web site: us.boehringer-ingelheim.com Primary Business: Pharmaceutical Manufacturer

How does your organization use ethnic insights to drive growth?

We conduct extensive studies of different customer segments to try to understand not only how they may differ from each other, but, more importantly, what are the key attributes that define that customer? What is important to them and their families? What are their impressions of healthcare (their own, their family and the system)? With these insights we are able to design the most appropriate messages, the most relevant creative concepts, and the most impactful materials and programs. Do you engage ethnic business partners in your multicultural marketing process? If so, how?

Once we have identified that a certain condition may be more prevalent within a particular culture, we look to partner with companies that have expertise with these segments, whether that be, for example, Hispanic advertising agencies that specialize in marketing to Hispanics or Hispanic media agencies that can help us identify the best media channels to reach a particular population. List the various ways your organization begins to understand the culture of the groups it wants to reach.

Understanding the condition and the patients affec ted is the critic al starting point as we de velop multicultur al c ampaigns.

We involve both internal and external sources. Externally, we conduct quantitative research with customers from the target group in order to better understand their opinions regarding healthcare, their cultural preferences and norms and their perspectives related to the condition being treated. We take these factors into account when we create marketing materials and then we test these materials specifically with these groups.

In many cases, these materials are notably different than our general market materials, because they are culturally specific for the population being targeted. Internally, Boehringer Ingelheim has a very diverse culture so we also test concepts and materials with employee groups representing the culture we are trying to reach in order to get an internal perspective.

How does your organization show how your products or services will benefit and/or meet the needs of different groups targeted?

It’s important to understand how different diseases or conditions differ from culture to culture. For example, is the incidence of hypertension higher amongst African Americans or is the incidence of diabetes higher with Hispanics? Understanding the condition and the patients affected is the critical starting point as we develop multicultural campaigns. The cultural norms around family also influence our approach. For example, we know that a strong extended family is important in the Hispanic culture so we may provide additional educational materials for family members in a Hispanic campaign. Once a campaign is up and running we do specific tracking research against the relevant customer group (e.g., Hispanic) to see how the campaign and materials resonate and then make adjustments as needed. PDJ

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Best Pr ac tices in Multicultur al Marke ting

Mónica Contreras

Assistant Vice President / Marketing & Communications

New York Life Insurance Company The objective of our grassroots-based multicultural marketing approach is to position New York Life as the Company of the Community. The efforts we dedicate to serve six cultural markets— African-American, Asian-Indian, Chinese, Hispanic, Korean, and Vietnamese—are driven by an understanding of the enormous importance of being “in” the community if we want to be “of” the community. In other words, to be part of one community, we must be relevant in it. We understand that the only way to achieve this relevance is by being there, at the heart of the community, with solutions and services that meet the community’s needs for financial protection, and with a network of highly qualified local agents ready to deliver them. How does your organization use ethnic insights to drive growth?

New York Life’s Hispanic market initiative is an example of how New York Life uses ethnic insights to drive growth. At 45.9 million* strong, Hispanics have become the fastest-growing demographic group in the U.S., and their rapidly increasing buying power will reach $1.4 trillion by 2013.** However, they’re also one of the most underserved markets when it comes to understanding their own needs for financial protection and accessing professionals who can provide this information. This knowledge led us to expand and advance our efforts to recruit highly trained, culturally proficient agents who can provide financial recommendations to Hispanic families and businesses.

This commitment to diversity and integration helps us ensure that a robust infrastructure of multicultural and product-specific marketers is in place to provide our agents with culturally sensitive sales ideas, technical assistance and product support.

Headquarters: New York City Web site: www.newyorklife.com Primary Business: Life Insurance

How does your organization show how your products or services will

We knew that ensuring a robust human infrastructure would not benefit and/or meet the needs of different groups targeted? suffice if it wasn’t accompanied by a serious commitment to facilitate As members of the community, our agents understand the issues relevant market data, in-language resources, and culturally sensitive that are most important to their neighbors, and this grassrootssales training to our agents, who would in based knowledge helps them deliver tailored turn pass it on to clients and prospects in the financial solutions to meet their needs. From community. We decided last year to make a service delivery standpoint, our financial By the end of 2009, we added significant investments to expand our core team professionals are not only the primary of technical experts in marketing, training, distribution point for products and services: close to 500 agents dedic ated to and development, dedicated to supporting the They’re also the first, and often the only, serving the Hispanic communit y. work of existing and new agents at any stage of company representative with whom clients their career. will interact over the years. Their success Our efforts are paying off. By the end of 2009, our strongest recruiting year in the Hispanic Market, we added close to 500 agents dedicated to serving the Hispanic community. A growing team of seasoned professionals was also in place to provide branding, advertising, and media relations opportunities, as well as marketspecific promotional activities, culturally sensitive sales know-how and a growing list of in-language materials. Even further, in a year of great economic challenges, our overall sales results were significantly stronger than 2008 figures. Hispanic market agents sold 22 percent more life insurance policies than the year before. List the various ways your organization begins to understand the culture of the groups it wants to reach.

A diverse corporate culture is necessary to anticipate and serve the needs of the cultural markets we serve. In this way, our recruiting, employee training, and professional education efforts are focused on ensuring that the entire organization reflects the cultural sensitivity that’s needed to serve all of our clients.

is built on the quality of the relationships they establish with the people they serve. By putting our agents in the driver’s seat of our multicultural marketing approach, we ensure that cultural competence becomes intrinsic to every aspect of our operation. Is it important for the marketing team and front-line sales force to reflect the target markets? If so, why?

Focused recruiting is essential to ensure the success of our multicultural marketing efforts. Our agents, and the people who support their work through dedicated marketing and training, must mirror the demographics of the communities in which they live and work. More than half of last year’s recruits were women or members of an ethnic group. Also, our growing network of agents who are recruited from within their communities are the conduit through which we can gauge the market’s needs for our products, service delivery preferences, and required support through community involvement. Our growing team of marketing professionals, who work to support the efforts of all of our cultural market agents, share the ethnic, language, and/or cultural heritage that are so essential in forming enduring, trust-based agent-client connections. PDJ

* U.S. Census Bureau. ** Selig Center for Economic Growth, Terry College of Business, The University of Georgia. P ro f i l e s i n D i v e r s i t y J o u r n a l

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Best Pr ac tices in Multicultur al Marke ting

Pranab Shah

Vice President and Managing Director, Global Business

United States Postal Service (USPS)

Headquarters: Washington, D.C. Web site: www.usps.com Primary Business: Federal Government

The U.S. Postal Service embraces multicultural marketing as a natural part of fulfilling its universal service mandate. Beyond that, the USPS has continued to expand its reach to better serve the unique needs of the diverse U.S. population, and has had numerous multicultural marketing and outreach strategies through the decades. Examples include the Black Heritage stamp series, now in its 33rd year, and the annual Lunar New Year stamp series. For each commemorative stamp issued, a national dedication ceremony is held that heightens social awareness, while bringing together community and business leaders. We also have product fact sheets available in 10 languages, and provide in-language customer brochures. We partner with national and local multicultural organizations, and have Spanish-speaking customer care agents available 24-7 through our toll-free information line. We’re facilitating global commerce and helping businesses grow globally, by using USPS products and services to ship internationally.

How does your organization use ethnic insights to drive growth?

The USPS is in the process of deploying GrowGlobal!™ (GG!), a multicultural, smallmedium business strategy across 30 USPS districts selected through market research for their demographic profiles and business growth potential. In FY 2009, the pilot GG! initiative launched in 10 USPS districts, resulting in nearly 10% growth in multicultural business revenue. GG! is a broad collaborative business initiative involving both national and local organizational teamwork. Support from USPS Headquarters is provided through market intelligence, while a locally-based cross-functional collaboration model for relationshipbuilding with the Asian and Hispanic SME market is developed at the community level to focus on participating with key multicultural business organizations. How is your organization’s senior management engaged or involved in the multicultural marketing process?

the relationships we develop with our business partners. The model focuses on building relationships within the multicultural business community through market research, country visits, communication with strategic partners overseas, trade show visits, membership in civic organizations, and multicultural recruiting practices. We also participate in joint marketing efforts with foreign posts both in the U.S. and abroad. List the various ways your organization begins to understand the culture of the groups it wants to reach.

Understanding the diverse cultures of our business customers starts when the Headquarters marketing team provides cultural insight training and research resources to help employees understand the differences and unique values of various ethnicities. This guidance spurs greater cultural awareness and improvements to listening skills, which are key ingredients for building successful business relationships in a global business environment. How does your organization show how your products or services will benefit and/or meet the needs of different groups targeted?

The USPS customizes products to the needs of diverse audiences, including bilingual sales collateral at one-on-one meetings or Senior leadership is actively engaged a national dedic ation ceremony is specific in-culture events. The Postal Service in multicultural activities throughout also identifies opportunities to better serve the organization. Our vice president of held that heightens social awareness, the diverse needs of communities, such as Employee Development and Diversity while bringing together communit y offering the Dinero Seguro money transfer is instrumental in ensuring cultural service in retail office locations with high awareness programs are integrated into and b usiness leaders. Hispanic foreign-born population densities; the approaches used by the Global ensuring appropriate promotional efforts Business team as it identifies areas where convey product options to the right audience; and promoting USPS business opportunities may exist. online shipping solutions through online media and search engines to The GrowGlobal! (GG!) initiative is an example of how Hispanic and Asian business customers. Benefits to targeted groups multicultural marketing initiatives are planned, approved and include access to a variety of shipping options at competitive prices. implemented by senior management across numerous functional areas within the organization. The Postmaster General and CEO authorized Is it important for the marketing team and front-line sales force to reflect the the Headquarters team to deploy GG! nationwide. The initiative target market? If so, why? is being championed by senior leadership, including the USPS We have found it is beneficial for the marketing team to have some Chief Operating Officer and officers representing Sales, Corporate representation of the culture being addressed. Ensuring all team Communications, Mailing and Shipping Services, Operations, and members honor cultural differences when working with different Customer Relations. ethnicities is critical to establishing successful relationships. Collateral

For each commemor ative stamp issued,

Do you engage ethnic business partners in your multicultural marketing process? If you do, how?

The key to the success of our multicultural marketing programs is

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materials reflect cultural sensitivity as well. Utilitizing the diversity within our organization allows us to make strong business connections with communities across the nation and around the world. PDJ


energized by

Diversity

With more than 7 million customers and 27,000 employees, National Grid is one of the largest investor-owned utilities in the world. And, our greatest strength comes from the power of inclusion and diversity in our workforce. The value of an individual’s skills, special talents, multicultural experiences, and alternative life styles is an integral part of our corporate culture. So is our commitment to preserving the environment as we address the energy needs of our customers. Whether you are interested in future employment, or are a small business entrepreneur, we welcome your perspective. Learn more about career and business opportunities at www.nationalgridus.com.


Best Pr ac tices in Multicultur al Marke ting

Oscar Madrid

Director, Multicultural Marketing

Verizon Communications Verizon’s desire is to effectively promote our great products and services in a way that appeals to our multicultural consumers, providing them access to the best in entertainment, internet and voice service. This includes providing bundled packages, relevant programming, remarkably fast internet, all wrapped in reliability and customer service that exceeds customers’ expectations. We want to ensure that we listen to and respond to what customers are asking for, and that we do it in a culturally relevant and inclusive way. Above all, we strive for a perfect end-to-end customer experience: before, during, and after the sales transaction.

Headquarters: New York City Web site: www.verizon.com

How does your organization use ethnic insights to drive growth?

Do you engage ethnic business partners in your multicultural marketing process? If so, how?

Consumer insight is an Just like we do with our employee base, Verizon supports and absolute must, if Verizon encourages diversity within its business partners, as well. We is to succeed with driving work with agency partners that employ diverse talent, and thus growth within the multi- ensure that we capture the best and most innovative solutions, cultural segments. We use whether they are assisting with marketing, advertising, a number of research tac- promotions or events. From a supplier diversity perspective, tics to understand customers’ needs and wants, such as primary we encourage our business partners to engage minority- and and secondary research, focus groups, syndicated research, etc. women-owned firms to support our work whenever possible. Most importantly, however, is our desire to be close to the cus- This provides opportunity for all of us to be more inclusive tomer. To demonstrate that commitment, we have made and and positions us to capture the breadth of thoughts, ideas, and sustained a sizeable investment in sales and customer service services that support Verizon’s efforts. centers dedicated to our customers with Is it important for the marketing team and frontdisabilities and our multilingual cusline sales force to reflect the target markets? tomers. Listening to the feedback from We work with agenc y partners If so, why? our employees and customers in these that employ diverse talent, and Without question. Verizon understands centers and our retail outlets ensures we and is responsive to all of our customers’ are capturing the information we need to thus ensure that we c apture needs by reflecting the communities we effectively respond to our customers’ rethe best and most innovative serve, within our front-line on up to our quirements. In addition, we tap into the leadership teams. insights of our employee resource groups solutions, whether the y are to aid us in these efforts. I’ll share an example. We have a

Primary Business: Telecommunications

assisting with marketing,

How is your organization’s senior management engaged or involved in the multicultural marketing process?

Our senior leadership has always supported, and continues to support, multicultural marketing initiatives—most obviously with the continued investment of resources. This commitment is further demonstrated by their “out-front” support of our multicultural initiatives; ensuring that diverse customer segments are considered at every phase of our marketing efforts—from product development, to securing content, to developing promotions, to building and strengthening our service infrastructure.

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center for customers with disabilities that is staffed, in part, by employees with disabilities. Their feedback and input led us to enhance our portal— Verizon.com—to ensure that it is fully accessible for our customers with disabilities. In addition, we introduced videophone-enabled customer service for our customers who prefer to communicate using American Sign Language. Verizon supports diversity in all aspects and at all levels of its business, from recruiting to procurement, to marketing. PDJ

advertising, promotions or e vents.

March/April 2010


[ Bank of the West ]

WANT TO WORK FOR A TRULY GREAT BANK?

AT BANK OF THE WEST, WE BELIEVE OUR CUSTOMERS ARE WELL SERVED BY EMPLOYEES WHO ARE WELL SERVED. Different perspectives generate fresh ideas. That’s why at Bank of the West, we value diversity and equal opportunity for all our employees. Year after year, we continue to grow stronger thanks to our unique blend of people. After all, in today’s competitive banking environment, it is our employees with innovative ideas that keep us a step ahead of the rest.

www.bankofthewest.com

Bank of the West and its subsidiaries are equal opportunity/affirmative action employers. M/F/D/V

© 2007 Bank of the West. Member FDIC.


thought thoughtleaders2010 leaders Our ongoing series, designed to bring leading diversity professionals’ thoughts and ideas directly to you.

What would you like to learn from our thoughtleaders? Send your suggestions to damianjohnson@diversityjournal.com

thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders

Beyond Workforce to Marketplace Diversity By Sherry Snipes

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Director, Diversity & Inclusion The American Institute of Architects

In today’s ever changing world, diversity and inclusion have become important elements of many recruitment and workplace inclusion strategic plans. While workplace diversity and recruiting remain important, think about the diversity of your organization’s clients, customers, and vendors. Put a diversity lens on all the ways they are different, as business entities, but also as individuals. Race and gender are typically the first characteristics that come to mind; however, there are many other elements that make them different. For example, disability, socio-economics, national origin, geography, education, height, weight, culture, sexual orientation, age—the list can be endless. If all of your clients look the same, you probably have an opportunity to diversify your customer base. Organizations, regardless of size, should focus on diversity from a marketplace perspective. Clients and customers are demanding, requiring, or requesting that potential business partners have diverse teams. They may not be vocal about it, but when you attend a business meeting with— hmmm…three middle-aged white men—that client just might not call you back and you will never know why. If the client does business with the government or government contractors, they often have diversity requirements embedded in the selection process and are required to ensure that you have equal employment practices. Additionally, they want you to understand their business needs and cultural nuances. For example, if you are doing business in the Hispanic community, it may behoove you to understand, at minimum, rudimentary Spanish. A sole practitioner from Iowa recently told me that there is no diversity in Iowa. I asked her if she had honestly 42

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looked at her marketplace recently? Consider this: there is age diversity in Iowa. There is gender diversity in Iowa. There is disability diversity in Iowa. By taking a closer look at the market and potential clients, she found that there were overlooked business opportunities. You may think your market is not diverse, but after taking a deeper look, you will be surprised by what you find. Here are a few facts: • Demographic shifts are happening domestically and globally; • According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the number of business start-ups (brick & mortar and other) by minorities and women outpaces start-ups by the majority population; • According to a recent study by Socio-Economic Trends, in heterosexual households, females make 43% of financial decisions vs. 31% of joint decisions; • The LGBT community has significant buying power ($712 billion in 2007); • According the U.S. Census Bureau, 1 in 5 Americans is considered disabled, and the number of disabled Americans will increase with the aging population. What do these statistics tell you? Essentially, that there are opportunities to gain new business when organizations understand and leverage the diversity of their marketplace by looking beyond the usual suspects (a.k.a. your usual clients). Let’s assume you are convinced that marketplace diversity should be embedded in your overall business strategy. Start this process by learning and understanding the diversity of your marketplace. Identify gaps, and develop a plan to overcome deficiencies. Don’t forget to embed cultural competency and community alignment into your strategy. Good luck! PDJ


thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleader Dealing with Diverse Customers and Clients By Michael Collins Managing Director, Diversity Strategies American Airlines

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American Airlines constantly competes to earn the business and loyalty of its passengers and clients. In order to succeed in today’s marketplace, it is imperative that we at American Airlines not only embrace the diversity of our customers and clients, but of our own team and the world around us. As a company that bears the name “American,” much is expected of us, and we hold ourselves to an extremely high standard. Being a part of American Airlines means understanding that we help bridge the world together—and by doing so, we connect different cultures, environments and people.

In January 2008, American developed a robust diversity and inclusion page on www.AA.com, the first of its kind in the airline industry. The link promotes American’s efforts in supplier diversity, employees, diversity leadership, awards and recognition, corporate citizenship, and ongoing marketing initiatives. American also has products tailored for small businesses, and AA.com Web pages specifically tailored for women (aa.com/women) as well as the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) community (aa.com/rainbow).

We have dedicated sales teams that focus solely on diOur commitment to promoting diversity and equality verse customer groups, such as the African-American, is highlighted in being the first major airline to endorse LGBT and women communities. These sales Hispanic, the Employment Non-Discrimination Act (2008). We are also proud of our 16 Employee Resource Groups (ERGs), teams support and partner with many community organizawhich reflect a wide range of communities within Ameri- tions such as the NAACP, League of United Latin American’s employee populations. These ERGs promote a can Citizens (LULAC), the Human Rights Campaign and ® positive, productive work environment while creating av- Susan G. Komen for the Cure . enues for employees to conAs a global carrier, we tribute their ideas to the feel a responsibility to probusiness, and help American vide opportunities for womThe increasing globalization in develop products and services en- and minority-owned and our world requires more for its global customer base. small businesses to grow and prosper as part of our supThe increasing globalizainteraction between diverse ply chain. As a result, since tion in our world requires more the inception of our Supplier interaction between diverse culcultures, beliefs, and backgrounds. Diversity Program in 1989, tures, beliefs, and backgrounds. American has spent more Each customer, client, and than $3.6 billion with certiemployee brings a unique fied womenand minority-owned businesses. perspective that allows us to solve problems, overcome

challenges and implement new ideas. At American Airlines, we promote inclusion for all and strive to create an environment where all differences are valued. American uses a combination of third-party partners, newly-formed external advisory councils, our employees, and relationships with key advocacy organizations to gain greater insights into how to deliver the best travel experience possible.

American Airlines recognizes that being a global airline means we are in the business of connecting people and cultures from around the world. We are proud of our commitment to diversity and inclusion, and proud to “Welcome Aboard” the wonderful array of people our world reflects. PDJ

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thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders Evolving Diversity and Inclusion Beyond a Corporate Initiative By Tracey Gray-Walker

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Senior Vice President and Chief Diversity Officer AXA Equitable

Over the last several years, companies have continued to develop programs to help integrate diversity and inclusion into their cultures. While there has been much progress, corporate programs must continue to evolve if diversity and inclusion are to become part of the fabric of an organization.

demonstrate by their own involvement and personal accountability. At AXA Equitable, for example, our 15-member diversity and inclusion advisory council was created to help drive the company’s diversity strategy. The Council reports, on a quarterly basis, to our CEO and members of the executive management team on the company’s progress toward achieving its diversity and inclusion goals.

Additionally, our entire senior management team and One notable challenge is the perception that diversity and inclusion programs begin and end with Human more than 90 percent of the company’s managers and Resources. Creating a diverse and inclusive workplace executives have completed diversity training. The trainwhere differences are embraced and valued is essential ing promotes an understanding of why diversity and inclusion are compelling to create a culture that business drivers. It proengages people from A company first needs to demonstrate vides an opportunity to all backgrounds. For deepen individual undermaximum impact on to employees and customers that its standing of diversity and a company’s success, inclusion and their link diversity and inclusion commitment to diversity to leadership effectiveness. must be embedded into and inclusion emanates from the The training also explores all areas of the business, steps leaders can take to which will transform top and makes it way leverage diversity and inthese ideals into core clusion as a competitive business principles for a throughout the organization. advantage. Senior execucorporation. To achieve tives also submit annual this, a company first needs to demonstrate to employees and customers that diversity and inclusion business plans for their areas of its commitment to diversity and inclusion emanates from responsibility and each has appointed a champion to drive employee engagement toward achieving the group’s the top and makes its way throughout the organization. objectives. Furthermore, a portion of the compensation CEO and executive management support is critical. for the company’s senior executives is tied to meeting Diversity and inclusion will be most successful when diversity and inclusion goals. senior management is engaged and vocal about the With the support of a company’s senior management, role diversity and inclusion play in helping achieve diversity and inclusion will evolve beyond awarenessbusiness objectives. raising initiatives to become part of the very makeup of But commitment is not just something that senior an organization. PDJ executives can talk about. It must be something they

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samsclub.com

Supporting diversity, from our stockrooms to our boardrooms. At Sam’s Club®, we know important contributions can come from many different sources. That’s why we’re committed to recruiting exceptional candidates, regardless of their gender or race. We’re also committed to giving candidates the opportunity to advance—because those who work in the aisles of the Club may someday reach the halls of upper management. And after all, not only is promoting the success of a diverse workforce the right thing to do, but it strengthens Sam’s Club at every level.

SM


thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders Serving as a Strategic Business Partner By Faye Tate Director, Global Diversity and Inclusion (GD&I) CH2M HILL

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At CH2M HILL, our mission is to provide a business environment that promotes a culture that encourages every individual to contribute to the growth and business success of the firm. In addition, we strive to create an environment that values the differences and similarities in employees’ backgrounds and skills, and that maximizes each individual’s potential and the benefits derived from a diverse workforce to create a culture of inclusion.

our organization set us up for success as we began rolling out the strategy to all of our business unit leaders and their teams.

CH2M HILL has long been known as a firm deeply committed to the communities in which we serve. This commitment is making a difference educationally, socially, and environmentally across the globe. While we are impacting the lives of our clients every day, this commitment begins at home.

The strategy launch included a GD&I Client Toolkit, which provides an overview of GD&I services, a strategic partner video with CH2M HILL’s CEO, proposal language, CH2M HILL’s GD&I policy, and other related resources our business leaders and their teams can share with clients and prospective clients. This resource has proven to be a valuable tool for our business unit partners and is a clear differentiator for us in the marketplace.

CH2M HILL is an organization that strongly believes in creating a culture of inclusion for all of its employees. We believe in creating an environment that fosters success for our employees. Our employees’ success leads to client success and thus, market leadership. Just as we value our clients’ perspectives, we also value the varied perspectives, traits and identities of our own colleagues. Regardless of race, gender, age, disability, religion, culture, or sexual orientation, each talented employee is a unique and highly regarded and respected member of the CH2M HILL team. Recently, CH2M HILL launched a Global Diversity and Inclusion (GD&I) strategy. During this launch, CEO Lee McIntire told the firm’s senior leaders, “Our focus on global diversity and inclusion is a strategic business imperative.” This support from the top of

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As part of this strategy, the Global Diversity and Inclusion (GD&I) office serves as a strategic business development partner with CH2M HILL’s business units to help bring in new business. The GD&I team also partners with the firm’s clients and project managers to integrate our diversity/equality & inclusion values into on-site project teams. We also provide guidance to CH2M HILL leaders on their annual diversity goals.

We are proud to exhibit our firm’s commitment to diversity and inclusion in communities where we live and work. Further, our commitment to employee and supplier diversity further strengthens our ability to win work. At CH2M HILL, Diversity, Equality, and Inclusion are clearly strategic business imperatives. PDJ

Headquartered in Denver, employee-owned CH2M HILL is a global leader in engineering, procurement, construction, management and operations for government, civil, industrial and energy clients. With $6.3 billion in revenue and 25,000 employees, CH2M HILL is an industry-leading program management, construction management and design firm, as ranked by Engineering News-Record (2009). The firm’s work is concentrated in the areas of energy, water, transportation, environmental, nuclear, and industrial facilities. The firm has long been recognized as a most-admired company and leading employer. Visit www.ch2mhill.com.


A look back as we go forward On April 3, 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King. Jr. said, “Something is happening in our world.” In 2010, these words have fresh meaning — reflecting mountaintops reached and new hopes born. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina celebrates Black History Month. In honoring the past, we appreciate the present and find inspiration to create our future.

An independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. U6809, 1/10


thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders Making Diversity Part of a Company’s DNA By Kymberlee Dwinell,

Director, Center of Excellence, Ethics and Environmental Health and Safety, Diversity and Inclusion, Compliance; and

Pamela Roberts,

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Director, Diversity and Inclusion

Northrop Grumman Information Systems

Dwinell

Commitment to workforce diversity is a goal of nearly every company, large and small. An organization only grows stronger from combining cultures, generations and experiences. It’s an easy enough message to get across to management, but how do you get executives and managers invested in the long-term goal: making a commitment to diversity a part of your company’s DNA?

Roberts

One solution is to focus on the business case for diversity and inclusion. Growing a diverse workforce is important for many reasons, but it’s not just about meeting numbers or positive external and internal impressions. Achieving a diverse demographic representation of employees across the organization, along with an engaged workforce, can positively impact an organization’s bottom line. Focusing on the business case of diversity and inclusion is an essential strategic initiative that management will grasp and champion. The facts are that diversity increases employee satisfaction, commitment, creativity, and productivity. And fostering a diverse work culture can have a positive reflection on our customers as well. But this only resonates if employees and customers see the commitment in action from senior leadership. It is important for managers to understand how each diverse group feels within the organization, to genuinely care about the office culture, and accept and value the varied opinions of all groups of employees. When this happens, employee morale remains high, quality of work improves, and employee retention rates rise. 48

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At Northrop Grumman’s Information Systems sector, we have created many opportunities and forums to engage senior management in diversity and inclusion activities. Our internal Employee Resource Groups (ERGs) are formed around common communities of interests in support of business objectives. ERGs facilitate networking, professional and personal development, information sharing, and recruiting and community outreach. All employees are welcome to join the Employee Resource Groups regardless of their background. First and foremost, these internal organizations are learning opportunities and employees benefit from networking with others of different backgrounds. Another challenge workplaces face is generational differences. There are four generations in today’s workforce and each communicates differently and has different work ethics. Through internal workshops, we have coached It is important management on how each demographic group can for managers to work together effectively. understand how With flexibility, respect, and communication you each diverse can build a cohesive and group feels within harmonious work environment that will have a posithe organization tive impact on employees and customers.

It takes a deep commitment from all levels of the organization to build a truly diverse and open workforce culture. Through frequent communication and encouraging reinforcement of the value of diversity and inclusion, a company will realize benefits inside and out of the organization’s walls. Challenge your employees to make a commitment to diversity and inclusion part of their DNA. PDJ


WE STAND STRONG JOIN OUR TEAM

While many insurance and financial services firms are faltering, New York Life Insurance Company is still standing strong—in fact, we’re growing. One reason we continue to stand strong is we have the highest possible ratings for financial strength.* For the past 164 years we’ve protected families and met all of our obligations. And now more than ever our policyholders are looking for the peace of mind that products from New York Life Agents can help bring them. If you are looking for a new company or career, choose one that is strong today, and will be well into the future. For more information about a career as a New York Life Agent, please call 866-368-2914 or visit www.newyorklife.com/agent NEW YORK LIFE. THE COMPANY YOU KEEP.® *Standard & Poor’s (AAA), A.M. Best (A++), Moody’s (Aaa) and Fitch (AAA) for financial strength. Source: Individual Third-Party Ratings Reports (as of 6/16/09). © 2009 New York Life Insurance Company, 51 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10010

EOE M/F/D/V


thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders Diversity in Clinical Trials Benefits Everyone By Patty Martin Vice President, Global Diversity Eli Lilly and Company

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As scientific technology improves, it is becoming increasingly clear that there are differences in patient outcomes based on a variety of factors, such as genetics, environment, race or ethnicity, and cultural differences. These differences contribute to the fact that medicines do not always work for the patients to whom they are prescribed. Compounding the problem, diverse patients are historically underrepresented in clinical research. Trials that over-represent Caucasians lack sufficient data on potentially relevant patient differences. This is extremely important, because in some cases, medicines don’t work as well or they may work better. Side effect profiles or risks also may be different. At Eli Lilly and Company, we have changed our core business processes to understand patient differences and to include more diverse participants in our clinical trials. More inclusive data may allow doctors to prescribe the right medicines with more confidence, based on having representative data. It also helps to ensure consumers are prescribed medicines that will be more likely to work for them— personalized medicine.

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the Educational Network to Advance Cancer Clinical Trials, to discuss ways to attract more diverse investigators and patients. We are establishing advisory committees, such as our Latino Advisory Board, who we work closely with to identify various ways to increase representation of Hispanic patients in our clinical trials.

We have changed our core business processes to understand patient differences and to include more diverse participants in our

clinical trials.

In addition, clinical research organizations contracted by Lilly are being monitored and held accountable for achieving the same goal. Lilly also is reaching out to underrepresented patients in community hospitals by providing easy-tounderstand information about clinical research.

Our efforts focus on matching disease prevalence to our participant pools in clinical trials. This is important, because minorities suffer a higher incidence of certain diseases, such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease, compared to Caucasians. We are close to accomplishing our enrollment goals in diabetes and depression research, and we are quickly implementing interventions in oncology and cardiovascular disease.

We ask others in the health care system to join us in this journey to achieve appropriate diversity in clinical trials. At Lilly, we want to develop medicines that improve health outcomes for all patients. We believe improving individual patient outcomes begins with studying the differences that matter, and then delivering information in a way that is meaningful to them. PDJ

At Lilly, we understand we cannot accomplish our goals alone. We have convened representatives from the National Medical Association, the National Hispanic Medical Association, the National Council of La Raza, and

Eli Lilly and Company, a leading innovation-driven corporation, is developing a growing portfolio of pharmaceutical products by applying the latest research from its own worldwide laboratories and from collaborations with eminent scientific organizations. Headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana, Lilly provides answers through medicines and information for some of the world’s most urgent medical needs. Additional information about Lilly is available at www.lilly.com.

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thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders It Does Matter How You Play the Game

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By Ana Duarte-McCarthy

When I was younger and first entering the workforce in the early ’80s, the book Games Mother Never Taught You, by Betty Lehan Harragan, grabbed my attention in its discussion of how young girls, not familiar with playing games to win, carried that lack of experience into the workplace as a limitation in understanding competition.

Nearly 30 years later, women are clearly engaged in competition through involvement in a broad array of sports along with other activities—even bands and choirs compete! But have the lessons learned in the throes of competition translated to the workplace? Research would suggest that challenges remain. Riley Bowles, a Harvard Business School professor interviewed for the article “Negotiating Challenges for Women Leaders,” noted that, “within society, we do have a greater expectation of ‘niceness’ from women than from men. There’s a body of research showing that when women step into the realm of stereotypically masculine behavior and need to use an authoritative or directive leadership style, or need to aggressively claim, saying, ‘You should give me more money and resources,’ that this doesn’t feel right coming from a woman.”1 Whether women are expected to compete for resources in the same manner as male colleagues or not, there are some who perceive that the social constructs influencing women and competition still persist. However, it’s my perspective, from 15 years in Diversity and six years coaching girls’ basketball, that there are ways for women to learn to compete in a positive way (i.e., no sharp elbows) and get results. For example—in competitive sports you are often contemplating how to advance toward a goal (‘should I use the six iron or the five iron, and then hopefully get to about 20 yards out and then chip on?’). At work, people who are in the game also consider their next moves—what do I need to get ahead?—and a key move is strategic networking. Many people do not consider strategic networking as something to add to their already busy schedules. However, it’s essential. It’s been my experience that to advance, along with talent, you need advocates and sponsors that will speak on your behalf, give you access and visibility, and help you navigate the culture. Savvy people make those connections strategically.

Chief Diversity Officer CITIGROUP

Another question to consider—do you put your hand up for the ball? Some of the girls on my basketball team would complain that they were not getting the ball. We told them they needed to get open (lose their defenders) and call for the ball. In the workplace, people may not realize you are open. When a choice opportunity comes open, don’t scratch your head and have countless conversations (generally with yourself ) about whether or not you should put yourself forward. DO it! If you think you have some of the requirements for a position, don’t hold yourself back. At the minimum, you’ll get feedback about yourself and knowledge about areas for development. My last piece of advice—work as a team. Playing as a team means understanding that everyone in the game matters, whether they’re the MVP (most valuable player) or the benchwarmer that only gets play time during practice—everyone has a role. I think that fostering a great team requires having leaders who are passionate and encourage teammates to work collaboratively toward common goals. What can companies do to help people compete? At Citi, we are partnering with the UCLA Anderson School of Business to offer a program for highly valued women poised for senior management roles. The women participate in 2.5 days of leadership training, learning from professors who are experts in women’s studies and leadership, and focusing on core skills like strategic networking, communicating for high impact, and strategic leadership. The aspiration is that participants emerge ready to demonstrate executive readiness, feeling buoyed by their new network of peers, and that they share the lessons from the training with their managers and colleagues. The women who have participated in the program give it two thumbs up. Said one participant, “The biggest lesson is how to think about what my core skills are, not necessarily what my current position is, and how I can transfer these core skills to a another position and take on stretch assignments.” She’s plotting her next move—and is clearly in the game. Are you? PDJ

1“Negotiating

Challenges for Women Leaders”, HBS Working Knowledge, October 13, 2003. P ro f i l e s i n D i v e r s i t y J o u r n a l

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thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders Investing in the Future Workforce By Kathy Hopinkah Hannan

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National Managing Partner, Diversity and Corporate Social Responsibility KPMG LLP

Businesses throughout the United States are facing a crisis: Many of today’s youth are unprepared to enter the workforce and our current educational system is overburdened and unable to bridge the gap between education and workforce readiness. The Challenge

According to research, an American child drops out of high school every 26 seconds.1 The U.S. Department of Labor estimates that up to 95 million baby boomers will leave the workforce between 2010 and 2025. Only 40 million of the Gen X and Y population will be available to replace that seasoned, experienced, but nonetheless retiring, workforce. And, according to a recent study, businesses in the U.S. estimate that they spend a median value of $500 per employee on remedial training. If left unresolved, this crisis will continue to expand, and affect communities and businesses across the U.S., threatening our ability to compete in a rapidly changing and global economy. As businesses, employers, and leaders, it’s in our best interest to invest in and prepare our youth to help ensure our future success. The Opportunity

Crisis yields opportunity, and the opportunity currently before us is one that all businesses can be actively involved and invested in—educating and developing tomorrow’s workforce. There are several ways we can do this. As an example, our firm has made youth and education a primary focus of our philanthropic, community, and corporate citizenship efforts, targeting initiatives that support our business and future talent requirements. After researching and establishing key public/private partnerships that are making significant strides in the education space, we decided to focus our efforts on children in grades K-12, with the goal of making a difference during the earlier stages of child development. Given the evidence of the impact these formative years have on overall reading and math proficiency levels, we believe our investment in programs that 52

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help children acquire these basic but critical skills is a wise— and strategic—one that will help us mitigate a shortage of qualified workers in the future. Our public/private alliances in support of youth and education are highlighted by a commitment to several programs focused on, and committed to, improving educational opportunities for disadvantaged youth. It’s clear that our involvement in programs like Junior Achievement and Major League Baseball®’s Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities™ (RBI™), and development of programs like KPMG’s Family for Literacy, enable us to serve the children in our communities. Through Junior Achievement, volunteers from businesses like ours go directly to the classroom to educate students about workforce readiness, entrepreneurship, and financial literacy. Beyond the classroom, more than 1,000 KPMG volunteers in 20 cities across the U.S. participate in RBI, using the game of baseball to build self-esteem, teach the value of teamwork, and encourage academic achievement among kids in underserved communities. And we’re especially proud of that. KPMG’s Family for Literacy program has distributed more than 1 million new books to children in more than 70 local communities, enabling us to have an impact on childhood illiteracy. While these programs have their roots in community service, they also work today to help us close tomorrow’s workforce readiness gap. Equally important, they have the added benefit of increasing the engagement and morale of our current workforce—our employees—who partner with us in these endeavors, giving their passion and their time to make these programs successful. We believe investing in these types of programs is smart business because they provide children with access to resources and role models who can help them grow beyond the basics, eventually enabling them to excel in a variety of careers. Organizations should be invested in filling elementary and high-school classrooms, then filling the colleges, and then filling the workforce with viable candidates, because the 5-year-old who receives a new book from us today may be interviewing for a job with our companies tomorrow. PDJ 1 The

Forum for Youth Investment with the Ready by 21™ Partners. “Getting the Most Out of Your Dropout Prevention Summit: Planning Guide”. May 2008. Forum for Youth Investment and America’s Promise Alliance.


thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders Diversity and Inclusion Training Does Change Attitudes

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By Torrie Dunlap, CPLP Director, National Training Center on Inclusion Kids Included Together (KIT)

to make accommodations so that children with disabilities can successfully participate in the activity of their choosing. They learn to better support the behavior of children in their program, leading to a reduction in disenrollment. They also learn to become more effective collaborators with a child’s family. Parents of children with disabilities report difficulty in staying employed when their child is struggling in a child care center. A good relationship between the parent and staff work with can create a pro-active strategy to provide accommodations and diminish the reactive children are provided the phone calls to the parent to “please come pick their child up early.” necessary professional

Children with disabilities face many challenges in our world. Having access to the typical activities of childhood should not be one of them. Today, 20 years after President George H.W. Bush signed the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) into law, the most sweeping disability rights legislation to date, children with disabilities are still largely segregated in many communities. Inclusive opportunities in child care and recreation are still mostly unique exceptions and not the guarantee that the ADA was intended to provide. Parents who call a child or youth program still feel the need to ask if a child with a disability would be welcomed When people who and supported.

Part of the problem is that the ADA is a law with no proactive enforcement These skills transfer to their work with mechanism. People who open development, they learn to all children, regardless of ability, making childcare centers or recreation the child care center, summer camp, programs are not given an make accommodations so that recreation center, or arts program a place ADA handbook and explanachildren with disabilities can where diversity and respect for differences tion of their responsibility to is valued. Children with and without serve all children with their successfully participate in the disabilities benefit greatly from inclusive business license. Moreover, activity of their choosing. experiences, leading to a future where societal attitudes toward displaces like the National Training Center on ability still have a long way Inclusion won’t need to exist, and diversity to go. People with disabilities and inclusion is a natural part of life. face a lot of discrimination and lack of understanding, and people who provide child I believe that my work in promoting the inclusion of care and recreation report fear, lack of education/training, children with disabilities is important not only today, but and lack of resources as reasons why they don’t believe they also in creating a future where the percentage of people can serve children with disabilities in their setting. with disabilities in the labor force is not 21.9%, compared

In my work with recreation, child development, and youth enrichment programs through the National Training Center on Inclusion at Kids Included Together, I have seen the difference that training makes in changing attitudes towards disability. When people who work with children are provided the necessary professional development, they learn

1U.S.

with 70.1% for persons without disabilities.1 I am working for children today so that they can experience the typical activities of childhood, and grow into a workforce that is truly representative of the people in our communities. PDJ For more information about Kids Included Together, visit www.kitonline.org.

Department of Labor, ODEP: Office of Disability Employment, February, 2010. P ro f i l e s i n D i v e r s i t y J o u r n a l

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thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders Moving From Diversity to Inclusion By T. Hudson Jordan Director, Global Diversity & Talent Strategies Pitney Bowes Inc.

D

Do you know what you need to create an action plan for shifting from diversity management to inclusion?

the culture. Where gaps and barriers are identified, it is important to understand how inclusion can address deficiencies and support effective decision-making and better business results in these areas. Findings from the inventory are the basis of an action plan.

As a start, a common definition of “diversity” and “inclusion” is needed. Diversity means all the ways we differ. Some of these differences we are born with and cannot change. Anything that makes us unique is part of this definition of diversity. Inclusion involves bringing together and harnessing these diverse forces and resources, in a way that is beneficial. Inclusion puts the concept and practice of diversity into action by creating an environment of involvement, respect, and connection—where the richness of ideas, backgrounds, and perspectives are harnessed to create business value. Organizations need both diversity and inclusion to be successful.

•W  ork from a well-documented plan of action complete with goals, objectives and lots of small manageable tasks to help realize change. Achieving an inclusive work environment is a culture change initiative, but it does not require lots of large undertakings.

Many companies struggle and do not realize the full potential of a diverse and inclusive workforce. These organizations might still be focused on numbers and lack a complete understanding of the business imperative. While diversity in organizations is increasingly respected as a fundamental characteristic, neither acceptance nor appreciation have equated to inclusive workplaces where unique vantage points of diverse people are valued. Inclusion enhances an organization’s ability to achieve better business results by engaging people from diverse backgrounds and perspectives through participatory decision-making. An organization’s journey to become inclusive begins with a critical but simple inquiry: what actions is my organization taking to foster an inclusive work culture where uniqueness of beliefs, backgrounds, talents, capabilities, and ways of living are welcomed and leveraged for learning and informing better business decisions? This inventory of actions must begin with a macro view of diversity considering workforce, supplier diversity, philanthropy, communications, etc. Organizational systems must be assessed to determine the degree to which equitable access is provided to all. Several key strategies will also need to be revisited and even reinvented to facilitate total alignment of organizational systems, processes, and structures to transform 54

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• I ncorporate diversity principles across business functions and units. Diversity supports inclusion and should be practiced throughout all aspects of the organization, even in developing the plan for working toward a more inclusive culture. Inclusive practices must be integrated into product development, communications, training and education, career and professional development, recruitment and retention and overall leadership and management practices.  reate opportunities for cross-generational work •C teams and interactions. Cross-functional teams comprised of men and women who are intergenerational and racially diverse stimulate new thinking, which leads to greater possibilities. • I nvest in team building and leadership skills, as they are of increasing importance to benefit from diversity and to achieve inclusion. Instilling the organization with competencies that foster successful teams and skills for leading diverse teams is a critical success factor. • “ Mind the Middle.” Innovative organizations find ways to “mind the middle” without sacrificing executive and entry levels. While some organizations show slow progress on the diversity journey due to the lack of support from its senior leadership, many organizations find middle management derails progress. These action items will help your organization reap the benefits of a workplace inclusion strategy. Inclusion represents opportunity for growth, new knowledge, and global community. So, what is your organization doing to inspire next level thinking about shifting from diversity management to inclusion? PDJ


OUR COMPANY

>

THE SUM OF ITS PARTS

BE WHO YOU ARE. CREATE WHO WE’LL BE. UnitedHealth Group is working to create the health care system of tomorrow. One that will work better for more people in more ways than ever. A goal of this magnitude requires transformative ideas from a collective of diverse talent. At UnitedHealth Group, our commitment to diversity is clearly visible in the high-performing people we hire, in the health care services we provide, and in our dedication to social responsibility. We support and applaud the efforts of those who work to promote fairness, equality and opportunity. Uniting our individual efforts and abilities toward our common goal, we’re making a difference. Learn more about us at unitedhealthgroup.com

Diversity creates a healthier atmosphere: equal opportunity employer M/F/D/V. UnitedHealth Group is a drug-free workplace. Candidates are required to pass a drug test before beginning employment. © 2009 UnitedHealth Group. All rights reserved.


thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders In Tough Economic Times, It’s Best to Stay the Course By Tom Ostrander

A

Vice President, Human Resources Sparrow Hospital & Health System

An important aspect of organizational management is learning to stay the course in tough economic times. In the healthcare industry, we are privileged to manage and engage a diverse workforce, provide exceptional health care service to diverse patient populations, extend a safety net to many without insurance, and ensure appropriate standards of productivity that support excellence in quality. The challenge for hospital executives is to sustain these efforts and maintain a bottom line that allows recapitalization of the organization. Although there are no quick fixes or best practices that would “fit” every organization, to ensure diversity/inclusion stays the course, I offer the following points to consider: 1. Create a plan to integrate diversity and inclusion goals into the organization’s operational goals.

The ability to align and integrate diversity and inclusion into organizational life creates accountability for functional leaders. It positions diversity/inclusion as part of the decision-making process versus being an after-thought. 2. Accountability may start at the top but it must permeate throughout the organization.

It is important to have buy-in, accountability, and engagement throughout the organization. Just as a leader depends on managers, line-staff, and others to implement specific tactics to achieve goals and objectives, this same level of discipline and accountability needs to be extended to diversity and inclusion initiatives.

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3. Make sure your diversity/inclusion goals are measurable.

The saying, “measure what you treasure,” holds true for diversity. State your objective in measurable terms. Evaluate results and modify your process to attain desired goals. 4. Keep diversity/inclusion visible through both internal and external resources.

Use your marketing, communication, diversity councils and others to talk about and restate the organization’s commitment to diversity and inclusion; in tough economic times it sends a strong message. 5. Ensure your diversity/inclusion goals and objectives are aligned and support the strategic plan of the organization. 6. Make sure your champions, change agents, and advocates are at all levels in the organization and are being utilized to strategically move the diversity/inclusion agenda forward. 7. Continue to broaden the diversity definition and be as inclusive as possible. 8. The best practice that yielded initial results may not be the best practice for sustained and consistent improvement. Be open to making course corrections as necessary. 9. Create internal and external partnerships/ alliances in the achievement of goals. 10. Y  our destiny is the journey that you are on…

Stay the course, be encouraged and enjoy the journey. Sometimes it may take more than one attempt to create the right initiative and/or process that aligns and embeds diversity and inclusion into everyday functions. PDJ


Bring It!

Your Talents. Your Ideas. Your Passion. Thu, Verizon, Marketing

At Verizon, we want you to bring your diverse talents, experiences, backgrounds, and viewpoints to work. It’s your smarter leadership, bolder innovations, and faster results that will move our business forward at the speed of FiOS! So, bring it in and bring it on – bring your diversity to work at Verizon!

Verizon Diversity Leadership. Innovation. Results.


thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders Diversity, Innovation and Business Growth By Jeanne De Amicis Stitt Vice President, Marketing UnitedHealthcare

I

In order to secure resources to better focus on the multicultural marketplace, a company must show a quantifiable return on investment. It is more than fostering a diverse work force and adapting to diverse and changing market demographics. During annual and quarterly resource allocation and priority processes, the question of a quantifiable return on investment is inevitable. At UnitedHealthcare, we have teams of multicultural professionals dedicated to achieving growth by expanding our business among diverse communities and companies with multicultural employees. Our multicultural initiatives—Generations of Wellness (African American), Latino Health Solutions and Asian American Markets—lead the organization to create a regional and national portfolio of culturally and linguistically appropriate health care benefit plans and health management/wellness tools. In addition, these teams develop and test pilot programs to gauge a product’s appeal to multicultural populations and its potential return on investment. Once a pilot achieves quantifiable success, we launch the program nationally or in strategic demographic locations. One example of a multicultural product with a positive ROI is Latino Health Solutions’ PlanBienSM, a health benefit plan designed to address the cultural, language, and health care needs of the growing Hispanic population. Given that our Hispanic membership is significant and growing, it is a business imperative for us to build upon our loyal and expanding client base by serving our customers in-culture and with bilingual excellence. This is also key to our approach in addressing and helping to reduce health disparities among Hispanics. Studies indicate that communication and cultural barriers are key contributors to health disparities. Though some Hispanics may speak English on the job, many live in Spanish-speaking households and prefer to communicate in Spanish outside of work. The tendency to revert to Spanish

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is even stronger when discussing complex issues such as one’s health and health insurance coverage. This natural inclination to want to talk, listen, and read in one’s native tongue can create a significant obstacle for employers, health care providers, and health insurance carriers when attempting to communicate with Hispanics about available plans and policies. PlanBien provides a bilingual “connection” at almost every interface between the customer and UnitedHealthcare. Extensive cultural competency training across the organization has accompanied this effort. PlanBien was introduced in the South Florida market in a pilot program to demonstrate proof-of-concept and to measure the financial return. Measurable financial success in this market enabled us to secure the support, prioritization, and resources to expand into additional markets, including California, Texas, Arizona and Colorado—states with significant Hispanic populations. The success of PlanBien and other multicultural programs have enabled us to obtain additional resources to enhance existing programs, create new ones, and further expand our reach into the multicultural marketplace. Cultural and ethnic diversity within the U.S. population is increasing every day. As such it is imperative to build upon our commitment to reach out to multicultural populations through culturally relevant and linguistically appropriate programs that enhance the health and well-being of multicultural communities—programs that are market-driven and financially sustainable in order to achieve a successful return on investment. Therefore, expanding health care coverage among diverse populations requires insurance companies to design products and services that meet and address cultural preferences to ensure customers realize the full benefits of their health insurance coverage and to provide them with tools and resources that help them to enhance their overall well-being and live healthier lives. In doing so, a quantifiable return on investment is inevitable, in more ways than one can imagine. PDJ


thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders Bridging Generation Gaps in Today’s Workplace

M

By Tisa Jackson Vice President of Diversity and Inclusion Union Bank, N.A.

Most organizations know that, for the first time in history, we have four generations in the U.S. workforce, which means you might see everyone from 20-something Millennials to Generation Xers, Baby Boomers and seasoned Veterans working side-by-side. This can be a great advantage that puts companies in a stronger position to succeed in today’s multi-generational marketplace. But generation gaps may also be a hindrance, interfering with cooperation in the workplace and creating disconnects between workers and customers. It’s our job as diversity professionals to help companies create an environment in which all generations can work as a team, despite differences. At the same time, we must prepare employees to be attuned to generational differences they are likely to encounter in serving customers. It’s important to look at generational diversity from a broad perspective. For example, your company should have: • Recruitment strategies that reach out to different age groups so you can increase generational diversity in your workplace, supporting increased productivity due to the expanded knowledge and skill set of your workforce. • Training programs that promote better understanding and teamwork among employees of different generations—and prepare employees to meet the expectations of customers of all ages. • Marketing strategies that respond to the needs of customers at different stages of life. A Clash of Cultures

When generational differences are not addressed, the result may lead to problems that impact productivity and profitability. I saw this occur when I was working at a financial services firm a few years back, and Human Resources leadership asked me to help resolve a crisis. The company had been receiving complaints about poor customer service and had terminated a number of customer service representatives. Something had to be done quickly to prevent further attrition among employees—and customers. The company, which did most of its sales by phone, had assembled a young customer service team. Although these Millennials had strong sales skills, they hadn’t received any training to help them understand the nuances of serving the large number of Baby Boomers and Veterans in their clientele.

Feeling the pressure to meet their sales targets, some employees had become so frustrated by the number of questions they were receiving from customers that they had reacted in the worst possible way: by hanging up on them. Often, they would refer customers to the company’s Web site for more information, following protocol, rather than invest the time needed to provide answers that would give customers peace of mind. The customer service representatives didn’t understand that these customers were accustomed to having personal relationships with their bankers, and wary of doing business with someone they didn’t know. Nor did they realize that many of them were not comfortable with the Internet or online banking. Finding Solutions

We addressed this crisis in several ways. Our immediate priority was to provide training to help employees understand and appreciate differences between generations so they would be better equipped to meet the expectations of the mature market. The company also implemented changes in recruiting practices to increase the age diversity of the customer service staff, and the service delivery model was reexamined to ensure that mature customers would receive more personal attention. As is often the case, this company didn’t take action until a problem arose. Diversity professionals should take the lead in helping companies become more proactive so generational clashes can be prevented. But we should go beyond trying to prevent conflict and develop initiatives that enable companies to capture the benefits of having the diverse skill sets, experience and perspectives different generations bring to the workplace. PDJ

Tisa Jackson, Vice President of Diversity and Inclusion for Union Bank, N.A., has more than 13 years of experience in this field, as well as strategic human resources management, community development and organizational development. She is founder of the Professional & Technical Diversity Network (PTDN) of Greater Los Angeles, a diversity consortium comprised of companies committed to diversity and inclusion. Union Bank, N.A., is a full-service commercial bank providing an array of financial services to individuals, small businesses, middle-market companies, and major corporations. The bank has 337 banking offices in California, Oregon, Washington and Texas and two international offices. Union Bank is a proud member of the Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group (MUFG, NYSE:MTU), one of the world’s largest financial organizations. Visit www.unionbank.com for more information. P ro f i l e s i n D i v e r s i t y J o u r n a l

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thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders Building Trust Across Diversity By Dr. Charlita Shelton President University of the Rockies

M

More and more companies and corporations are taking diversity seriously and are creating diversity departments within their organizations. Diversity officers are in turn establishing diversity initiatives with the goal of creating an inclusive work environment. For individuals in an organization to embrace the concept of diversity, a level of trust needs to be established. Trust is formed when an organization shows commitment to diversity by alleviating employees’ fear of being judged or ridiculed because of cultural or personal differences. Diversity training raises the consciousness of employees and is one way to break down barriers. Everyone comes to the Individuals need to have table with their experiences an understanding of each based on many different other’s norms, values, and belief systems. Everyone factors that help to shape comes to the table with them as human beings. their experiences based on many different factors that help to shape them as human beings. We are all different, and those differences make us all diverse.

In the past when I have conducted diversity training, I had participants who were reluctant to voice their perspectives, because they perceived diversity training as something that only addressed people of different races and ethnicities. For example, a white male may not understand how to contribute to the dialogue of diversity if he has a preconceived notion that somehow he is not a diversity partner. In actuality, diversity is all inclusive.

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Diversity experts Marilyn Loden and Judy Rosener adapted a model called the “Four Dimensions of Diversity.” These dimensions are described as: Personality. These are the elements that shape and form a person’s persona. Internal Dimension. These include age, ethnicity, race, and gender. These are elements considered to be obvious. External Dimensions. This could be geographic location, marital status, work experience, educational background, or religious preference. Organizational Dimensions. These include areas such as management status, division/department, political association, seniority, or work location. Immediately after covering these dimensions in training, individuals who felt that they may not otherwise be included in the dialogue with regard to diversity lowered their guard and their level of trust increased. Why? Because diversity is inclusive of everyone! To build trust across diversity lines, an understanding of what diversity truly is becomes imperative. All stakeholders must believe that they are diverse in their own way and contribute to an organization’s “tapestry” of people who bring a level of richness to the workplace. Before trust can be established, one must feel safe within their environment to be who they are. And, they must feel included and valued. PDJ Dr. Charlita Shelton is the president of University of the Rockies, a graduate school specializing in psychology programs at the master’s and doctoral levels online and at its campus in Colorado Springs, Colo. Accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, the university offers a new master’s and doctorate degree specialization in Organizational Diversity.


CHEVRON, the CHEVRON HALLMARK and HUMAN ENERGY are registered trademarks of Chevron Intellectual Property LLC. Š 2009 Chevron Corporation. All rights reserved.

Our people are as diverse as their ideas.

tplace, rldwide marke To work in a wo represents workforce that Chevron has a siness, we rever we do bu the world. Whe r our y is essential fo believe diversit . Because d partners alike employees an human ts of view, our with more poin er. es even strong energy becom om. visit chevron.c To learn more,


advantage

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Verizon. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..57

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W.W. Grainger. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . Inside Front,

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www.grainger.com . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. pg 1

Chevron . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..61

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Work Where You Can Make A Difference! Surrounded by acclaimed universities, nationally ranked hospitals, and Fortune 500 companies, is the Wake County Public School System. This progressive, nationally recognized system is located in the Raleigh metro area, and encompasses the state capital of Raleigh, plus 11 other thriving towns. Home to high performing urban, suburban, and rural schools, the district serves more than 140,000 students in 163 schools. Consider the Wake County Public School System where we are committed to hiring the brightest and the best education professionals!

Walking the Talk in School Construction • Minority and women-owned

business enterprise (MWBE) participation on school construction projects is averaging 20%. • With the recent renovation and completion of Poe Elementary School, MWBE participation for that project was over 50% — a record for WCPSS school construction projects. • Recent completion of the new River Bend Elementary School, MWBE participation was 39 percent — another outstanding performance for WCPSS school construction projects.

To learn more about the Wake County Public School System and to explore exciting employment opportunities, please visit our website, www.wcpss.net. To learn more about Wake County Public School System Supplier Diversity Program, please visit our website, www.wcpss.net/facilities/mbe.html.

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© 2010 Lockheed Martin Corporation

B E T W E E N T H E C H A L L E N G E A N D T H E S O L U T I O N, T H E R E I S O N E IM P O R TA N T W O R D : H O W.

Diversity. It’s not a goal. It’s a necessity. When facing down the most important projects in the world, you need fresh ideas. And unique perspectives. Delivering the most complete answers to solve complex problems is all a question of how. And it is the how that makes all the difference.


last word

Non-Traditional Experiences: Your Key to Career Growth By Marie Y. Philippe, Ph.D.

S

Corporate Vice President, Culture and Organizational Effectiveness The Lifetime Healthcare Companies

“Sorry, this could have been a real promotional opportunity for you if only you had supervised others before.” Sound familiar? You can replace “promotion” by “new job” and “supervised others” by “developed a strategy” or “presented to large audiences,” or just about any other scenario that comes to mind. The point is that it is easy for anyone to get caught in the proverbial Catch-22 at work. The job cannot be yours because you do not have the experience, and you cannot get the experience because you do not have the job. How do you get off that treadmill?

To build that experience outside of the office, consider joining an organization like Toastmasters, and using every opportunity to compete: practice at local high schools that usually welcome professionals to inspire students, practice in front of your congregation, volunteer to emcee at family events, etc. It will be hard to discount your practical experiences as you enumerate them during your interview process.

Although not unique to ethnic minority employees, the challenge of growing one’s career in the corporate world seems particularly daunting for many talented women and various minorities. A determination to move ahead, supplemented by innovative thinking and good negotiation skills, can make a difference. Here are some ideas for consideration.

We budget our savings over given periods of time in order to buy a house or a car; we develop a plan to juggle work, family, social interaction, school, study time, vacation, etc.; we evaluate risks almost daily—the risk of pre-spending a year of discretionary income when tempted to purchase a coveted designer handbag, or investing all of your 401(k) in the company stock vs. diversifying with other instruments. Your real life strategic decisions—those with impacts lasting over a year—can translate into business equivalents.

Leadership skills. For many corporate positions requiring supervisory experience, there are alternatives a number of corporations are willing to accept. Do not underestimate any lead role that you had held while in the military, during community board service, or in church groups. A significant trait of leaders is to inspire and teach others; therefore if you can help your employer or future employer make the connection between your “Scout leader” abilities and your ability to inspire those whom you are in a position to lead, you will have a distinct advantage over your competition. Public speaking. Many professions require a superior command of verbal communication to large groups. The idea of public speaking can be frightening even for professional public speakers who often admit that, despite their apparent ease, they can experience butterflies or stage fright.

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Strategic Thinking. When coaching very talented, yet career-young individuals, the area where they overwhelmingly express a lack of confidence is the knowledge of strategy. Yet, strategy is part of what we all do to survive as intelligent beings.

No matter what obstacle is thrown into your career path, you can creatively circumvent it. It may not be easy for you to make the connection, because we are so conditioned to think that the only relevant experience is the one gained in the workplace. We must retrain ourselves to perceive the value we have created for ourselves in gaining solid experiences outside of the office. Helping those making decisions about your career understand that you deserve an opportunity because you have indeed developed the needed skills in a non-traditional setting can be the genesis of your new corporate success. PDJ Marie Y. Philippe, Ph.D. is well known for her leadership contribution in corporate culture transformation through strategic diversity initiatives and organizational change management. She can be reached at marie.philippe@lifethc.com.


What they did inspires us to get it done. Madame CJ Walker, Entrepreneur

“All these innovators worked to provide greater solutions for others in ways “These amazing people

Walker developed and

never attempted before. In spite of

marketed a hugely

barriers, they lived without boundaries.

helped me get where I am

Their efforts influence my endeavors.”

today—dedicating my group

successful line of beauty

Yolanda Daniel, VP Internal Audit

products for women of

to attracting, retaining and

Dr. Mae Jemison, Astronaut

color. By 1917, she had

developing our incredibly

the largest

After volunteering as a physician in

talented resource of diverse employees.”

business in

the Peace Corps, Jemison joined NASA

Sandra A. Taylor, VP National Accounts

the United

and flew a mission on the space shuttle

Elijah McCoy, Transportation

States owned

Endeavour. Jemison’s advice: “The best way

McCoy invented an automatic

by an African

to make dreams come true is to wake up!”

lubricator for oiling the steam

American.

engines of locomotives that

A company that is making a

revolutionized the railroad industry.

difference in your

Some say engineers would avoid using inferior copies of his invention by demanding “the Real McCoy.”

1872

1906 1881

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world and the

2007

2005 world around you.

2009 2008

Lewis Latimer, Lighting “I’m humbled to be on the same page

A gifted draftsman who once

with people who always pushed

worked for Alexander Graham

forward to benefit others. In my job,

Bell, Latimer invented a

African Americans have always been pioneers in industry. Using innovation, strengths and guide them to win.” “Whatever niche in life you find Littie D. Brown, yourself, dare to make a difference creativity and hard work to do things VP Regional Sales in someone’s life. These pioneers that have never been done before. That did, and I’m determined to do the entrepreneurial spirit paved the way for Waste Management is a Fortune 200 company thatsame is changing the better. We are strongly committed every day.” the world for Grainger’s African American leaders to Ernest L. Duplessis, always find innovative ways to help our VP Investor Relations to promoting diversity and inclusion and empowering our employees. We are workingget with we serve customers thethe jobcommunities done. I work to help people see their

method for the production of carbon filaments for the light bulb in 1881. His innovation helped illuminate the world.

Dr. Patricia Bath, Surgeon Bath, the first African American woman doctor to receive a medical patent, designed a device to help remove cataracts with a fiberoptic laser. She also co-founded the American Institute for the Prevention of Blindness. Her vision has helped countless others see.

to fuel innovative change—and we need your help. www.wmcareers.com To learn more about the power of diversity at Grainger, visit

From everyday collection to environmental protection. Think Green. Think Waste Management. www.thinkgreen.com


Also Featuring … Catalyst • Multicultural Marketing • Generations on Generations • Perspectives • Thoughtleaders

Volume 12, Number 2 March / April 2010

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PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL March / April 2010 • VOLUME 12 NUMBER 2

If you’re a college graduate and want to get a head start on success, look no further than the Navy. As an Officer, you’ll get a wide variety of career paths to choose from, in engineering, management, intelligence, science or aviation, just to name a few. And get responsibility you might otherwise have to wait years for, giving you a competitive jump on your peers that nowhere else can give you so quickly. Unlimited potential is yours. Just visit navy.com or call 1-800-USA-NAVY for more information. © 2010. Paid for by the U.S. Navy. All rights reserved.

www.diversityjournal.com

MY JOB DOESN’T JUST PROPEL A S H I P. I T P R O P E L S M Y F U T U R E .

Special Exclusive Feature:

U.S. Navy Brings Comfort to Haiti USNS Comfort (T-AH 20) assists with the global humanitarian and disaster relief efforts of Operation Unified Response, following the devastating 7.0 magnitude earthquake in Haiti.

Diversity Journal - Mar/Apr 2010  

U.S. Navy Brings Comfort to Haiti