Page 1

Also Featuring an Introduction by Ilene H. Lang, President & CEO of Catalyst • A Celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month

CAREERS AT SHELL The most successful problem solvers look at things differently and see solutions no one else can. Who would have thought to use fish protein to stop gas freezing in subsea pipes? One of our people did. And right now we’re looking for more people who can bring a fresh perspective to the energy challenge. We’ll provide training, support and career choices to develop your potential. We’ll get you working with some of our most accomplished problem solvers. And together we can help build a responsible energy future. Think further. For more information and to apply online, please visit www.shell.com/careers. Shell is an equal opportunity employer.

Gloria Wang Environment Officer – HSSEQ Department

Jasmine Tiwari Senior Associate Researcher

Kishoore Jehan Marketing Executive

September / October 2009 • VOLUME 11 NUMBER 5

“With the open career progression opportunity, every employee of Shell can choose his/her own field as per their interests.”

“The best thing about working in Shell is the balance between life and work; between exposure and depth of experience offered to employees, and between making profits and caring for its employees and the community.”

25.00 U.S.

$

PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

“Shell provided me with the opportunity to handle challenges and manage issues in a dynamic refinery environment. I count it a privilege to be part of this globalized entity and I was convinced that my journey in Shell will be filled with continual learnings, growth and never-ending opportunities to contribute.”

Volume 11, Number 5 September / October 2009

www.diversityjournal.com


Rise to new

heights.

Every day brings different challenges. Luckily, we have a diverse set of solutions.

Every day, thousands of people from all over the world come to us for the solutions they need to get their jobs done right. Their issues are diverse. And so are we. That’s why we’ve brought together a team that includes a variety of backgrounds, strengths and perspectives. For over 80 years, that’s been the best solution for the ones who get it done.

Join us as we play a key role in Making Home Affordable. We’re a vital part of President Obama’s initiative to stabilize the housing market. For you, that means exciting challenges and an opportunity to have a real impact on our nation’s economy – and your neighbors’ lives. We’ll provide a solid platform for your career and the tools to assist your professional growth. Explore the many opportunities we offer in:

Audit | Compliance | Default Asset Management | IT When you join the Freddie Mac team, you’ll discover an inclusive, empowering culture with an equal opportunity employer who recognizes the value of diversity. You’ll also find a total rewards package that supports your success both at work and in your personal life. We encourage you to visit us at upcoming diversity conferences, which are listed on our career site. Visit us online at:

Congratulations to Deb Oler for being named a Woman Worth Watching. That’s getting the job done.

FreddieMacDiversity.jobs careers with impact


Also Featuring an Introduction by Ilene H. Lang, President & CEO of Catalyst • A Celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month

Volume 11, Number 5 September / October 2009 Brenda Blisk The Blisk Financial Group

Kathleen C. Bock Vanguard

Andrea R Bortner Harris Corporation

25.00 U.S.

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Lori Beer

Kathleen Asser Weslock

WellPoint

SunGard

Lyn Beaty Halliburton

Amparo Bared Ryder System, Inc.

Stacy Brown-Philpot Google

Anne Marie Agnelli CA, Inc.

Tammy L. Butts AXA Advisors, LLC

DeAnna Allen Dickstein Shapiro LLP


[ BANK OF THE WEST ]

WANT TO WORK FOR A TRULY GREAT BANK?

AT BANK OF THE WEST, WE BELIEVE OUR CUSTOMERS ARE WELL SERVED BY EMPLOYEES WHO ARE WELL SERVED. Different perspectives generate fresh ideas. That’s why at Bank of the West, we value diversity and equal opportunity for all our employees. Year after year, we continue to grow stronger thanks to our unique blend of people. After all, in today’s competitive banking environment, it is our employees with innovative ideas that keep us a step ahead of the rest.

www.bankofthewest.com

Bank of the West and its subsidiaries are equal opportunity/affirmative action employers. M/F/D/V

© 2007 Bank of the West. Member FDIC.


Also Featuring an Introduction by Ilene H. Lang, President & CEO of Catalyst • A Celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month

Volume 11, Number 5 September / October 2009 Terri Dial Citigroup

Shirley Cunningham Monsanto Company

Ann D. Davidson ITT

25.00 U.S.

$

Teresa Carroll Kelly Services

Laree Daniel Aflac

Nancy Calderon KPMG LLP

Patricia S. Cain

Cynthia (Cindy) Davis

Neal, Gerber & Eisenberg LLP

Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.

Kimberley Crews Goode Northwestern Mutual

Lorna Donatone Sodexo, Inc.


www.bdo.com

“ We’re bringing in the partner. She’s already on it.” People who know, know BDO.

The diverse and dedicated professionals at BDO honor the contributions of women like Sandi Guy, Human Capital Partner, who have helped place us among the world’s leading accounting and consulting firms. Accountants and Consultants

© 2009 BDO Seidman, LLP. All rights reserved.


Also Featuring an Introduction by Ilene H. Lang, President & CEO of Catalyst • A Celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month

Volume 11, Number 5 September / October 2009

25.00 U.S.

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Lorrinda Gray-Davis Perini Building Co.

Swee-Chen Goh

Dawn Fitzpatrick Pitney Bowes

Carol A. Dudley The Dow Chemical Co.

Royal Dutch Shell

Sandra Guy BDO Seidman

Jo Ann Feindt U.S. Postal Service

Lynn A. Dugle Raytheon Company

Kim L. Feil Walgreens Co.

Lisa Ferrero Corning Incorporated

Susan B. Garcia American Airlines


Diversity &Inclusion drives innovation and success Kodak’s commitment to diversity and inclusion touches customers, consumers, employees, suppliers, shareholders, and more. While our vision is global, we focus upon the distinctive cultures and communities in which we live and work. We champion diversity as a business imperative to help drive innovation. Working together, we create technologies and services that unleash the power of pictures and printing. Become part of our picture—and join us on our journey to enrich people’s lives.

www.kodak.com/go/diversity © Eastman Kodak Company, 2008


Also Featuring an Introduction by Ilene H. Lang, President & CEO of Catalyst • A Celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month

Volume 11, Number 5 September / October 2009 Cisco

25.00 U.S.

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Laura K. Ipsen

Kathleen Hyle Deborah James

Constellation Energy

SAIC

Melanie Healey Procter & Gamble

Wendy Lee Herrick Unilever

Kathleen T. Hogan Microsoft

Sharon L. Hays CSC

Catherine Langlais

Marcy S. Klevorn Joyce P. Haag Eastman Kodak Company

NYSE Euronext

Ford Motor Company

Chizuru Kiyomura Pfizer Inc


Also Featuring an Introduction by Ilene H. Lang, President & CEO of Catalyst • A Celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month

Volume 11, Number 5 September / October 2009

25.00 U.S.

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Theresa K. Lee Candace Matthews Amway

Eastman Chemical Company

Michelle Y. Lee

Bonita Lewis Bell

Wells Fargo

Terex

Kathleen M. Mazzarella

Antoinette (Tonie) Leatherberry Deloitte Consulting LLP

Graybar

Julie L. Moore

Nan Mattai

Ecolab

Rockwell Collins

Tricia J. McClung Freddie Mac

Denise E. McEachern Bausch & Lomb

Susan Morisato Ovations Insurance Solutions


Also Featuring an Introduction by Ilene H. Lang, President & CEO of Catalyst • A Celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month

Volume 11, Number 5 September / October 2009

25.00 U.S.

$

Lori Raya Safeway Inc.

Anne R. Pramaggiore ComEd

Claire Beth Nogay Verizon

Nina J. Mullins Salt River Project

Joan O’Shaughnessy ARAMARK

Nancy Reagan Campbell Soup Company

Teri Plummer McClure UPS

Deb Oler W. W. Grainger, Inc.

Elizabeth W. Powers

Nereida (Neddy) Perez

Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP

National Grid

Cathy Plummer Hill Georgia Power


Also Featuring an Introduction by Ilene H. Lang, President & CEO of Catalyst • A Celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month

Volume 11, Number 5 September / October 2009 Donna Sams CVS Caremark

25.00 U.S.

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Sue Ann Schweitzer Textron Defense Systems

Lauventria Robinson The Coca-Cola Company

Cathy Suever Parker Hannifin

Ann P. Reeves Waste Management

Sandy Swider Janet L. Robinson The New York Times Company

Patricia B. (Pat) Shrader

Deborah L. Rice Highmark Inc.

Deborah M. Soon

Starwood Hotels

Catalyst

BD

Mary Stoddart Best Buy


Also Featuring an Introduction by Ilene H. Lang, President & CEO of Catalyst • A Celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month

Volume 11, Number 5 September / October 2009

25.00 U.S.

$

Amy E. Wagner Burger King Corp.

Suzzanne Uhland O’Melveny & Myers LLP

Frederica M. Williams Jamie K. Thorsen BMO

Ann Ziegler

Whittier Street Health Center

CDW Corporation

Sharon C. Taylor Prudential Financial

Barbara S. Wood KBR

Susan A. Thrope New York Life

Ellie Yieh Applied Materials

Stephanie Gaillard White MWV

Tina Waters Comcast Corporation

Mary D. Van de Kamp Kindred Healthcare


from the publisher notebook T editors notebook

Congratulations are in order…

James R. Rector PUBLISHER

To each executive in this special issue, we would like to extend a personal “Congratulations!” Wow! Just take a look at all the companies and their executive women in this 8th Annual WomenWorthWatching® issue!

With all the challenges facing the U.S. and world economies, these companies chose to honor one of their senior women executives, and make it a priority. Many of them have continually participated during the past 8 years, which again demonstrates their support for women in leadership. And that’s what makes them and this annual Women’s Issue very special. Since 1999, beginning with our first Glass Ceiling issue, we have invited companies to select one of their senior women leaders to prepare a personal mentoring essay and share some of their personal details. (See pages 24 to 143.) These extraordinary women, with busy schedules, took time out to “give back” to other women in the ranks who also aspire to business and personal leadership. It’s not often you can find so much wisdom and advice from senior managers in one place. (Our Mentorings™ book, just released this summer, includes one or more quotes from all the women profiled since 1999—over 1,500 quotes in total.) We are grateful to one of our partners, Catalyst, who prepared this year’s introduction to the WomenWorthWatching® feature. Catalyst President and CEO Ilene Lang and her organization are keenly aware of the opportunities for women in leadership. Through its annual research studies, Catalyst monitors the current status of how women are faring in their quest for leadership positions in the marketplace. Also, congratulations to all the leaders profiled in the Hispanic Heritage feature. We wish to thank all who participated in this issue, and also our staff, who continue to produce one of the most companyand people-focused magazines in the industry.

James R. Rector Publisher

Cheri Morabito

EDITOR / CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Damian Johnson

MARKETING DIRECTOR

Laurel L. Fumic

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Kenneth J. Kovach

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Alina Dunaeva

O verseas C orrespondent

Jason Bice

WEB MASTER C ontributing W riters

David Casey Melanie Harrington Eric C. Peterson Marie Philippe, Ph.D. Craig Storti LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Commentaries or questions should be

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art@diversityjournal.com 12

Pro f i les i n D i ve rsit y Journal

September/October 2009


contents

table of contents

Volume 11 • Number 5 September / October 2009

ÃœÊi>ÌÕÀˆ˜}Ê>˜Ê˜ÌÀœ`ÕV̈œ˜ÊLÞʏi˜iÊ°Ê>˜}]Ê*ÀiÈ`i˜ÌÊEÊ "ʜvÊ >Ì>ÞÃÌÊÊUÊÊÊ iiLÀ>̈œ˜Êœvʈë>˜ˆVÊiÀˆÌ>}iÊœ˜Ì…

features

Volume 11, Number 5 SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2009

25.00 U.S.

$

25

On the Cover / WomenWorthWatching® in 2010 Take a look at this year’s class of influential women. A corporate profile and personal profile accompany each woman’s mentoring essay.

25

144 Special Feature /

Hispanic Heritage Month The rich culture, shared values, and strong work ethic of Hispanic people should be celebrated with great appreciation throughout the country. The individuals profiled in this section provide an interesting perspective.

Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month

144

departments

20 Momentum Diversity Who, What, Where and When 22 Catalyst Women of Color in U.S. Law Firms 24 Viewpoint “ Women in Leadership: Why Not?” by Ilene H. Lang, President & CEO of Catalyst

156 MicroTriggers More Triggers from Janet Crenshaw Smith 160 Featured Organizations Organizations and Advertisers c or r ec t i on s

2008 Bureau of Labor Statistics Workforce Demographics1 50

In our prior issue, July/August 2009, Royal Dutch Shell was incorrectly identified as the

40

Shell Oil Company in the 2009 International Innovation in Diversity Awards feature. Also,

30

the chart accompanying David Casey’s article, Should I Get Paid

20

for Hiring a Person of Color? was incorrect (the legend was

10

reversed). The correct chart is at left.

0

Black or African American

Asian

Hispanic or Latino

Percent of total workforce

14

Pro f i les i n D i ve rsit y Journal

Women

Percent of C level jobs

September/October 2009

We regret the errors.

24


contents

table of contents

Volume 11 • Number 5 September / October 2009

Women Worth Watching 8th Annual

in

®

2010

25 Anne Marie Agnelli

47 Laree Daniel

67 Sharon L. Hays

CA, Inc.

Aflac

CSC

26 DeAnna Allen

48 Ann D. Davidson

68 Melanie Healey

Dickstein Shapiro LLP

ITT Corporation

Procter & Gamble

28 Kathleen Asser Weslock

50 Cynthia (Cindy) Davis

69 Wendy Lee Herrick

SunGard

Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.

Unilever

29 Amparo Bared

52 Terri Dial

70 Kathleen T. Hogan

Ryder System, Inc.

Citigroup Inc.

Microsoft Corporation

30 Lyn Beaty

53 Lorna Donatone

72 Kathleen Hyle

Halliburton

Sodexo, Inc.

Constellation Energy

32 Lori Beer

54 Carol A. Dudley

73 Laura K. Ipsen

WellPoint, Inc.

The Dow Chemical Co.

Cisco Systems, Inc.

34 Brenda Blisk

56 Lynn Dugle

74 Deborah James

The Blisk Financial Group

Raytheon Company

SAIC

36 Kathleen C. Bock

57 Kim L. Feil

75 Chizuru Kiyomura

Vanguard

Walgreens Co.

Pfizer Inc

38 Andrea R. Bortner

58 Jo Ann Feindt

76 Marcy S. Klevorn

Harris Corporation

U.S. Postal Service

Ford Motor Company

39 Stacy Brown-Philpot

59 Lisa Ferrero

78 Catherine Langlais

Google

Corning Incorporated

NYSE Euronext

40 Tammy L. Butts

60 Dawn Fitzpatrick

80 Antoinette (Tonie) Leatherberry

AXA Advisors, LLC

Pitney Bowes Inc.

Deloitte Consulting LLP

41 Patricia S. Cain

61 Susan B. Garcia

82 Michelle Y. Lee

Neal, Gerber & Eisenberg LLP

American Airlines

Wells Fargo & Company

42 Nancy Calderon

62 Swee Chen Goh

84 Theresa K. Lee

KPMG LLP

Royal Dutch Shell

Eastman Chemical Company

43 Teresa Carroll

63 Lorrinda Gray-Davis

86 Bonita Lewis Bell

Kelly Services

Perini Building Company

Terex Corporation

44 Kimberley Crews Goode

64 Sandra Guy

88 Nan Mattai

Northwestern Mutual

BDO Seidman, LLP

Rockwell Collins

46 Shirley Cunningham

66 Joyce P. Haag

90 Candace Matthews

16

Monsanto Company

Pro f i les i n D i ve rsit y Journal

Eastman Kodak Company

September/October 2009

Amway


One of our highest priorities is giving employees the opportunity to take their careers to the

C:MI

A:K:A Turn your potential into performance by submitting your resume to bmocm.com/recruiting.

Access our web page on your mobile phone by scanning this EZcode with ScanLife app* getscanlife.com

Your ambition achieved.™

BMO Capital Markets is a trade name used by BMO Financial Group for the wholesale banking businesses of Bank of Montreal, Harris N.A. and BMO Ireland Plc, and the institutional broker dealer businesses of BMO Capital Markets Corp., BMO Nesbitt Burns Trading Corp. and BMO Nesbitt Burns Securities Limited in the U.S., BMO Nesbitt Burns Inc. (Member CIPF) in Canada, Europe and Asia, BMO Nesbitt Burns Ltée/Ltd. (Member CIPF) in Canada, and BMO Capital Markets Limited in Europe and Australia. ® Registered trademark of Bank of Montreal in the United States, Canada and elsewhere. TM Trademark Bank of Montreal. *Standard data rates may apply.


contents

table of contents

Volume 11 • Number 5 September / October 2009

Women Worth Watching 8th Annual

in

®

2010

92 Kathleen M. Mazzarella

111 Nancy Reagan

129 Susan Thrope

New York Life Insurance Company

Graybar Electric Co., Inc.

Campbell Soup Co.

93 Tricia J. McClung

112 Ann P. Reeves

Freddie Mac

Waste Management, Inc.

130 Suzzanne Uhland

94 Denise McEachern

113 Deborah L. Rice

Bausch & Lomb, Incorporated

Highmark Inc.

132 Mary D. Van de Kamp

95 Julie Moore

114 Janet L. Robinson

Ecolab Inc.

The New York Times Company

116 Lauventria Robinson

Ovations Insurance Solutions

The Coca-Cola Company

118 Donna Sams

Salt River Project

CVS Caremark

120 Sue Ann Schweitzer

Verizon

Textron Defense Systems

121 Patricia B. (Pat) Shrader

W. W. Grainger, Inc.

BD

122 Deborah M. Soon

ARAMARK Ireland

Catalyst

123 Mary Stoddart

National Grid

Best Buy Co., Inc.

124 Cathy Suever

Georgia Power

Parker Hannifin

106 Teri Plummer McClure

125 Sandy Swider

Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc.

UPS

108 Elizabeth W. Powers

Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP

126 Sharon C. Taylor

109 Anne R. Pramaggiore

ComEd

Prudential Financial, Inc.

128 Jamie K. Thorsen

BMO Capital Markets

110 Lori Raya

18

Safeway Inc.

Pro f i les i n D i ve rsit y Journal

September/October 2009

Applied Materials, Inc.

143 Ann Ziegler

105 Cathy Plummer Hill

KBR

142 Ellie Yi-Li Yieh

104 Nereida (Neddy) Perez

Whittier Street Health Center

141 Barbara S. Wood

103 Joan O’Shaughnessy

MWV

138 Frederica M. Williams

102 Deb Oler

Comcast Corporation

136 Stephanie Gaillard White

100 Claire Beth Nogay

Burger King Corp.

134 Tina Waters

98 Nina J. Mullins

Kindred Healthcare

133 Amy E. Wagner

96 Susan Morisato

O’Melveny & Myers LLP

CDW Corporation


© 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. limited liability partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative.21034NSS

The power of you.

Empowered by us. KPMG LLP values the powerful contributions of women. There are no limits to where insight, innovation, and leadership can take you. We congratulate Nancy Calderon, KPMG’s national partner in charge of operations, and all of the women featured among Profiles in Diversity Journal’s 8th Annual WomenWorthWatching ®.

kpmgcareers.com

KPMG. A great place to build a career.


momentum momentum who…what…where…when

Kelli Valade Named Chief Operating Officer for Chili’s and On The Border DALLAS—Brinker International, Inc. has named Kelli Valade Chief Operating Officer for Chili’s Grill & Bar® and On The Valade Border Mexican ® Grill & Cantina . In this role, Valade will oversee operations for more than 1,400 Chili’s and On The Border restaurants nationwide. Valade has been with Brinker International for 13 years, holding various positions, including Director of HR for On The Border, VP for Emerging Brands & Corporate HR, and her most recent role as SVP of Chili’s and On The Border PeopleWorks and Brinker Shared Services. Active in several industry organizations, Valade holds a seat on the founders board of the Multi-Cultural Food Service Hospitality Alliance. She is also a member of the Society for Human Resource Management and Women’s Foodservice Forum.

Carin Stutz Named SVP of Brinker and COO of Global Business Development DALLAS—Brinker International, Inc. has named Carin Stutz as Senior Vice President of Brinker and Chief Operating Officer of its Global Business Stutz Development team. 20

Pro f i les i n D i ve rsit y Journal

Stutz is a restaurant industry veteran with a wide range of experience the Brinker Global team is eager to utilize. Stutz served, most recently, as the Executive Vice President of Operations of the mostly franchiseowned Applebee’s International, Inc. In her new role, she will oversee operations for the global team, working closely with franchisees as well as the Brinker global leadership team. Stutz will also help with business review for strategy planning, as well as developing the operations team for Brinker and its franchisees.

Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield in New Hampshire Names Sherwin Robinson as Regional Vice President of Underwriting MANCHESTER, N.H.—Citing his broad experience in the health insurance environment, Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield in Robinson New Hampshire is pleased to announce the appointment of Sherwin Robinson as Regional Vice President of Underwriting. “We are excited to have someone of Sherwin’s experience and skills joining our leadership team,” said Douglas J. Wenners, president and general manager, Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield in New Hampshire. “He has a proven track record of success in this field and we are thrilled to welcome him aboard.”

September/October 2009

Robinson joins Anthem from Health Net in Shelton, Connecticut, where he worked for ten years in a number of leadership roles, most recently as Regional Director of Underwriting. At Health Net, he oversaw all aspects of underwriting for three states and served as a critical member of the company’s strategy team.

Cook Associates Recruits Vice President of Human Resources for AmerisourceBergen Chicago— Cook Associates Executive Search recently completed the placement for Vice President of Human Resources WESLEY at AmerisourceBergen Packaging Group/Anderson Packaging, Inc., a division of AmerisourceBergen Corporation. Rosalyn Wesley was selected as the Vice President of Human Resources. In her previous position as Corporate Director of HR at Fortune Brands, Wesley led and directed innovative, business-focused strategies in performance management, talent acquisition and retention, leadership development, team building, workforce diversity and inclusion, wellness, benefits administration, reward and recognition. In her new position, Wesley will be responsible for ensuring HR alignment of all policies, practices, procedures and initiatives to create an environment of fairness, objectivity and high performance.


National Grid Names Carla Hunter Ramsey as Director of Supplier Diversity

for various New York institutions including New School University and the School of Visual Arts.

WALTHAM, Mass.­ —National Grid, Jennifer Williamson Promoted one of the nation’s to Vice President, Internal largest electricity Communications for Sodexo and gas delivery Gaithersburg, companies, has Md.—Jennifer appointed Carla Hunter Ramsey Williamson reHunter Ramsey cently accepted director of Supplier Diversity. the position of Hunter Ramsey will be responsible for overseeing National Grid’s supplier diversity program through which the company is expanding business opportunities and strengthening corporate partnerships with minority- and women-owned businesses. Based on Long Island, New York, she will work closely with National Grid’s business units to develop, implement and monitor supplier diversity policies and practices throughout the company in the U.S. “We are confident that Carla’s leadership and direction will greatly enhance our U.S. supplier diversity initiatives. Her appointment is part of our ongoing commitment to integrate inclusion and diversity into the very fabric of the company, including our purchase of goods and services,” said Jon Carlton, Global Procurement director for National Grid. Prior to joining National Grid, Hunter Ramsey served as the director of purchasing, contracts and property management for York College, a senior college of the City University of New York (CUNY). She has close to 20 years of experience in developing and implementing procurement programs

Vice President of Internal Williamson Communications for Sodexo. In her new role, Williamson will be responsible for the strategic direction, alignment, and implementation of Sodexo’s internal communications strategy. Under Williamson’s leadership, internal communications and human resources communications will be combined into one department to better leverage resources and expertise to inform, engage, and deliver value to our employees. Jennifer brings over 20 years of human resources, operations, and communications experience to her new role along with a strong background in training, change management, and strategic planning. Previously Jennifer served as Senior Director of Human Resources and Diversity Communications where she successfully lead several corporate-wide initiatives including the Employee Value Proposition, www. iamsodexo.com, and the Employee Network Groups.

Angela Kyle Joins New York Life Insurance Company as Senior Vice President for Investment Annuities NEW YORK CITY—New York Life Insurance Company has announced that Angela Kyle has joined the Kyle company as Senior Vice President and head of the company’s Individual Annuity Department. In this role, Kyle has responsibility for overseeing and leveraging the company’s Investment Annuities and Guaranteed Lifetime Income products. Ms. Kyle joins New York Life from TIAA-CREF, where she served as vice president and head of Pension Product Management and led the product initiatives for the pension portfolio of TIAA-CREF. She also led marketing efforts for institutional products and a newly created retail product division. Prior to TIAA-CREF, she was director of business management for Bank of America and held various positions at Wachovia, formerly First Union. PDJ

Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

September/October 2009

21


www.catalyst.org

Women of Color in U.S. Law Firms

T

By Catalyst

The retention, development, and advancement of women and minorities is a pressing issue for law firms today as the talent pool increasingly comprises women and people of color. In the past 20 years, the percentage of women entering U.S. law schools has never been lower than 40 percent. While women of color represented nearly one-quarter of all women associates in 2008, only 1.84 percent were partners. In the final installment of a four-part research series investigating the experiences of women of color in professional services firms, Catalyst benchmarked the experiences of women of color at law firms against those of their colleagues. The study was conducted through interviews with senior partners, as well as focus groups with Asian women, black women, and Latinas in a subsample of participating firms. To collect quantitative data, a web survey was distributed to lawyers working at the top 25 (by revenue) law firms in the United States. The survey was sent to 2,939 individuals, of which 1,242, or 42.3 percent, responded. Women of Color Face Unique Disadvantages Findings showed that women of color shared certain genderbased disadvantages with white women. These included perceived sexist comments, dissatisfaction with access to training opportunities for business development, and lack of support for balancing work and personal responsibilities. Findings also suggested that lawyers of color—both women and men—experienced racial/ethnic stereotyping, overall exclusion from the workplace, dissatisfaction with equity and opportunity, dissatisfaction with supervising attorney support, and a lack of influential mentors. In general, women of color said they were affected to a greater degree by barriers commonly encountered by other women, and that they experienced additional barriers unique to their own group. Such barriers pose severe challenges to women of color trying to fit into their organizations and forge positive relationships with influential others. As a result, their development and advancement in the relationship-based, client-service environment of law firms is often compromised. Of all groups surveyed, women of color were most likely to perceive negative stereotyping; they were also most likely to say they found it challenging to fit into their firm’s environment. They felt stymied by lack of access to business development opportunities and important client engagements. Women of color also felt that their supervising attorneys had low expectations of their performance. What emerged is a picture of women-of-color lawyers who feel disadvantaged in the workplace compared to white women (with whom they share gender), to men of color (with whom they share race/ethnicity), and to white men (from whom they are twice re22

Pro f i les i n D i ve rsit y Journal

September/October 2009

moved). However, women of color are by no means a monolithic group: for example, black women lawyers reported feeling a greater degree of exclusion than Asian women and Latinas. Best Practices Almost all first- and second-tier law firms in the United States have diversity and inclusion (D&I) programs that target women lawyers. Law firms have made some progress in addressing gender-based disadvantages in the workplace. However, managing partners and practice group leaders must realize that programs that help retain and develop white women lawyers may not be as effective for women of color. To reduce the disadvantages faced by women of color, firms should take the following steps: Develop authentic relationships—For women of color to feel more connected within the workplace, they need to feel more comfortable interacting with managers (e.g., with their supervising attorneys). Create a mentoring culture—While law firms may offer junior lawyers the chance to connect with formal mentors, many firms have not yet successfully achieved a culture of mentoring. To accelerate the careers of those from traditionally marginalized groups, law firms need to work aggressively on instilling mentoring as a core value. Monitor career development and advancement—Many women of color reported missing out on important assignments and developmental opportunities that could advance their careers. Firms need to be systematic in ensuring that women of color receive the opportunities necessary for advancement, including those that come about through networking with others at the firm. Increase work-life effectiveness—To avoid imperfect execution of diversity programs and practices, law firms must raise awareness about the unique work-life challenges faced by women of color and develop programs that meet their needs. Firms also need to redefine how work gets done and institute programs that emphasize flexibility as a business imperative. This will help create a culture where all lawyers feel more comfortable using firm resources intended to support work-life effectiveness. PDJ

Founded in 1962, Catalyst is the leading nonprofit membership organization working globally with businesses and the professions to build inclusive workplaces and expand opportunities for women and business. Visit www. catalyst.org to learn more about our work and download Catalyst reports. Visit www.catalyst.org/page/82/catalyst-e-newsletters to begin receiving Catalyst C-News, our monthly e-newsletter.


A company that can change your world and the world around you. Waste Management is a Fortune 200 company that is making a difference. We are strongly committed to upholding ethical standards and promoting diversity and inclusion. Waste Management and the communities we serve are working together to fuel innovative change and we need your help. www.wmcareers.com From everyday collection to environmental protection. Think Green. Think Waste Management. www.thinkgreen.com


Women Worth Watching 87th Annual

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2010 2009

Women in Leadership: Why Not?

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By Ilene H. Lang President & CEO of Catalyst

As Catalyst’s President and CEO, I’m often asked why we at Catalyst think it’s so important to advocate for women’s advancement. I answer that question with a question of my own: Why not? It’s the right thing and the smart thing to do. Catalyst studies demonstrate a direct correlation between women in senior leadership and better financial performance. But asking, “Why not?” isn’t just about financial outcomes. Women in leadership are proof of organizational meritocracy, where differences are valued and celebrated. These are organizations that are open to new ideas, foster innovation, and embrace more perspectives in decision-making. Perhaps most important, these are organizations where the decision-makers inside reflect the decision-makers outside in the marketplace. We know that women make or influence 80 percent of buying decisions. Reflecting them in senior management and on corporate boards shows a respect for customers, and that’s just good business.

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the educated workforce in the United States and around the world. As individuals, as leaders, and as companies, we have a great opportunity—to leverage the extraordinary value of diversity for our companies and for society as a whole. I’m delighted to introduce you to the women honored here in Profiles in Diversity Journal’s 8th Annual WomenWorthWatching® issue. These women represent the best of what is possible for organizations that embrace gender diversity–not as a “nice to have” but as a strategic business imperative. They also, unfortunately, represent a vastly untapped resource. According to the 2008 Catalyst Census of Women Board Directors of the Fortune 500 and the 2008 Catalyst Census of Corporate Officers and Top Earners of the Fortune 500, women held just 15.2 percent of board director positions and just 15.7 percent of corporate officer positions— stagnant compared to the previous year. Women’s advancement belongs in every smart company’s playbook. A 21st-century economy demands leadership that reflects a 21st-century workforce and 21st-century marketplace diversity.

These days, I find myself frequently asking why more companies aren’t stoking the pipeline of future leaders with the best and brightest women. Our recently released report on highpotential women and men during the economic downturn shows that women in senior leadership were—shockingly—three times more likely to have involuntarily lost their jobs because of company downsizing or closure than their male peers. How short-sighted!

These high-achieving WomenWorthWatching® are role models and mentors to future generations of women and men in the workplace.

We’re seeing an inevitable increase in the diversity of our population, our markets, and our workforce. Women, and women of color in particular, represent the fastest growing segment of

Ilene H. Lang is the President & CEO of Catalyst, the leading research and advisory organization working with businesses and the professions to build inclusive workplaces and expand opportunities for women and business. Visit the Catalyst website at www.catalyst.org.

Pro f i les i n D i ve rsit y Journal

September/October 2009

So as you read about and celebrate their remarkable achievements and inspirational stories, please ask yourself, “Why not women?” PDJ


women worth watching in 2010

Anne Marie Agnelli

R CA, Inc.

Reflecting back on my career path reminds me of all the peaks, valleys, and curves I have experienced over the years which have led to where I am today in the world of IT. Much of my career has been spent in heavily male-populated industries, which includes IT. I discovered early on, however not early enough, that building a community of colleagues who would provide guidance, support, and laughs was very important. Throughout my career, there have been many people who have helped me get to where I am today and still help me as my career continues. I selectively cultivate relationships with other professionals, both men and women, and together we serve as trusted advisors and confidants for each other. In addition to being my friends and treasured colleagues, they have been, and still are, my mentors.

“…mentoring does not need to be formal, with an experienced pro who is going to share the hidden secrets…” In my opinion, mentoring does not need to be formal, with an experienced pro who is going to share the hidden secrets to climbing the oh-so-slippery corporate ladder. To me, co-mentoring is the term that best describes how I view mentoring. I see it as an informal relationship that develops organically and is built on a foundation of mutual trust and respect. Additionally, I have benefited from mentoring experiences at many levels and believe that trusting somebody and building a positive relationship does not have to only be with someone at a higher level than myself, but could also be with my peers and those junior to me. It is because of these experiences that today I find myself serving as a mentor for both my direct reports and several colleagues at CA. Challenges and opportunities come in many forms. In our careers, as in life, there will be roadblocks, but I have learned that through strong support from the networks you create, you can achieve success. I feel fortunate to be working at a company like CA that has many females serving in top leadership positions. There is truly a strong sense of camaraderie among the women at CA and I know I can count on my colleagues when I need them most. Additionally, CA has an established partnership with the Anita Borg Institute for Women in Technology, a preeminent organization dedicated to positively impacting women in IT. This organization serves as an excellent source for best-practices and provides valuable resources. It is through all of this that I can lead by example and be a role model to others. Hopefully I can inspire and influence future leaders within CA and beyond.

TITLE: Vice President, Communications and Community Relations EDUCATION: BS, Communication Arts, St. John’s University, Jamaica, New York FIRST JOB: Salesperson at Bonwit Teller, New York City WHAT I’M READING: House of Cards, by William D. Cohan MY PHILOSOPHY: We make choices every day, whether we mean to or not, that direct and focus our lives. We must actively be the masters of our fate. FAMILY: Single, with an adorable Maltese named Frazier. INTERESTS: Running, reading, animals and shopping. FAVORITE CHARITies: Through my profession I am able to engage with many wonderful charitable organizations. Personally, my favorite charities involve saving and protecting animals.

COMPANY: CA, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Islandia, New York WEB SITE: www.ca.com BUSINESS: IT software management and solutions. ANNUAL REVENUES: $4.271 billion FY09 EMPLOYEES: 13,700

Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

September/October 2009

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women worth watching in 2010

DeAnna Allen

A

Dickstein Shapiro LLP

TITLE: Partner EDUCATION: BSEE from University of Maryland (College Park); JD from University of Miami (Coral Gables) FIRST JOB: Design Engineer for Florida Power & Light WHAT I’M READING: Eat, Pray, Love, by Elizabeth Gilbert; The Purpose Driven Life, by Rick Warren MY PHILOSOPHY: Embrace the truth and always value what you and others can bring to the table. Your circumstances will always change, but you are the one constant in all of your experiences, so regardless of your ups and your downs, never forget your value and always look for ways to improve yourself and your impact on those around you. FAMILY: Two sons: Robert Jr., 13; and Joseph, 8. INTERESTS: Culinary arts, photography, reading, traveling, shopping.

Within weeks of becoming a lawyer, I was struggling to balance everything while trying to ignore the voice in the back of my mind telling me there was no way I could pull it all off. I would like to say that the little voice was completely wrong and that I breezed through my first few years of motherhood and law firm life, but the truth is, the adjustment was difficult, and I was extremely self-conscious about my ability to keep up with my peers while being the mother I wanted to be. Despite the difficulties, I was committed to being a good mother and a good lawyer. It took a while, but eventually I learned I could not be all things to all people (at least not simultaneously). I began to focus on incrementally improving myself and those around me. I also surrounded myself with moresenior lawyers who had the patience and foresight to see that, even though I was a work in progress, I had both loads of potential and a pretty good dose of present value.

FAVORITE CHARITY: The American Cancer Society

“…eventually I learned I could not be all things to all people…”

COMPANY: Dickstein Shapiro LLP

Over the past 13 years, I have raised two boys while working full- and part-time, telecommuting, and driving as many as 100 miles round-trip to the office, as well as working (briefly) in-house and in law firms. In 2002, I joined Dickstein Shapiro as a lateral, and in 2006, I made partner. My time with the firm has provided me great opportunities to become a better lawyer and person. My colleagues also have supported me through major life transitions, including a divorce and a parent’s terminal illness. At times throughout my career, I have felt at the top of my game in lawyering, mothering, and just being me. At other times, I have felt out of balance. Regardless of the circumstances, I make a point of learning and growing. I think my greatest lesson from trying to balance the seemingly un-balanceable has been to always strive for improvement while remaining true to myself. For me, this means looking for and encouraging the best in myself and in others, because doing so inevitably leads to good results— even if the path is not exactly what I had envisioned.

HEADQUARTERS: Washington, D.C. WEB SITE: www.dicksteinshapiro.com BUSINESS: Law firm. ANNUAL REVENUES: $312 million EMPLOYEES: 855

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As a law school student, all of the female law firm partners I knew had wellplanned careers in which they first focused on becoming good lawyers (while routinely indulging in good shopping and occasionally in great vacations) before deciding whether to have children. I imagined myself following the same cosmopolitan and ordered path. True to plan, I joined one of Chicago’s largest law firms right out of law school, but my well-laid strategy had already begun to go astray: I found myself with an eight-month-old baby, a 6PM daycare pick-up that my husband and I juggled (with no extended family support), and a 2,000hour billable requirement.

Pro f i les i n Dive rsit y Journal

September/October 2009


women worth watching in 2010

Kathleen Asser Weslock

W SunGard

TITLE: Chief Human Resources Officer EDUCATION: BA Hood College; MILR Cornell University; JD Pace University FIRST JOB: Counselor, Girl Scout Camp WHAT I’M READING: Way too many novels to list and the Harvard Business Review MY PHILOSOPHY: Read the playbook, memorize it, then rip it up and make your own rules. FAMILY: Husband Sony from Greece; David (18) Derrick (16); two dogs and two horses—we do everything by twos (except the husband). INTERESTS: Work, people I work with, family, wellness, sports, reading, equestrian-wanna-be. FAVORITE CHARITies: Learning Leaders, NYC; ILR School, Cornell University; Wilson High School; American Friends of the Greek Jewish Museum

COMPANY: SunGard HEADQUARTERS: Wayne, Pennsylvania WEB SITE: www.sungard.com BUSINESS: Software & IT services. ANNUAL REVENUES: $5.6 billion EMPLOYEES: 20,000

When I graduated from college, I remember thinking that I would take my newly earned Spanish and Psychology degrees and be a translator or maybe a bilingual secretary. Little did I expect my early skills to help put me on the path I eventually took. Today, I am the chief human resources officer of SunGard—a global Fortune 500 software and IT services company with over 20,000 employees. Rising to an executive level was not a straight career path. I made several turns along the way that helped me build a strong foundation of knowledge and skills. Over the years, I’ve had stops in several different industries—government, financial services, consulting and law—and have even owned my own business. Each experience gave me the preparation and new skills for the next opportunity. Careers rarely have a single trajectory. What you do at each step of the way impacts the opportunities that may come your way. I stood out early in my career because of my linguistic and translation skills. These skills made me valuable and sought-after, and gave me access to opportunities and people I would otherwise not have had.

“Careers rarely have a single trajectory. What you do at each step of the way impacts the opportunities that may come your way.” My advice to the next generation of leaders is to think of your career as a marathon with many twists, not a straight-line sprint. You may have to take many different paths to reach your goals but a good indicator of whether you’re on the right path is whether you are truly happy and fulfilled with what you are doing. If you’re not, it’s time for a change. While women have made significant inroads into leadership and executive positions, there is still much to be accomplished. And, it’s up to every individual to take control of their own career and steer it in the desired direction. Persistence, resilience, tenacity and the ability to not take no for an answer are skills that are absolutely essential. I was lucky in that I learned these skills fairly early in life— long before I even started my work career. My current job gives me a lot of satisfaction, and there’s nothing I’d rather be doing. The lessons I learned earlier in life about career success are still applicable today. You need to demonstrate your value so others will seek you out; surround yourself with strong people; don’t let setbacks discourage you; and lastly there is no such thing as a “draft”—always make your work product the best it can be.

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September/October 2009


women worth watching in 2010

Amparo Bared

A

Ryder System, Inc.

A key part of being successful is loving what you do. I am passionate about my work, and I have a strong drive to do what is right and do it well. My work in talent management is about helping people reach their potential. I lead a proactive team that works on corporate initiatives to identify, develop, and deploy all levels of talent, including diverse employees, to help them perform to their highest capacity. I began working in human resources at a medical device manufacturer right out of college. I was fortunate to have a mentor who instilled in me the fundamental values of being a good human resources professional. She taught me the importance of integrity and being able to inspire trust from colleagues as well as having a strong understanding of the business and the internal and external customers. She also taught me the importance of standing up for what you believe in.

“…even with all the technology used to communicate today, there is no substitute for face-to-face communication.” I joined Ryder as a human resources manager in 1995. Over the years, I have grown professionally and have learned a lot about work-life balance and how to be a leader while maintaining a strong commitment to my family. I’ve had the privilege to lead exciting projects that have brought new technologies, processes, and initiatives to Ryder’s talent management program. My team has also developed a diversity and inclusion strategy that closely aligns our goals with the company’s business objectives. I believe if you pursue your goals with energy, passion, and drive, and always have faith in yourself, you can be successful. It’s important to have a strong work ethic and a clear understanding of what you want to achieve. I am fortunate to work for a company that values hard work and is led by very talented people. I have learned from my boss and from our business leaders, and I have worked to emulate the skills that have made them successful. I have also learned that, even with all the technology used to communicate today, there is no substitute for faceto-face communication. That’s what builds strong relationships. One of the biggest lessons I have learned as a woman and as a professional is the importance of being able to handle disagreements without taking them personally. At times, we have to take a tough stand and say things people may not want to hear. An effective professional should be able handle difficult communications without damaging relationships.

TITLE: Vice President of Human Resources and Talent Management EDUCATION: MBA, University of Miami; Bachelor’s in Human Resources Management, Florida International University FIRST JOB: Worked in human resources at a medical device manufacturer WHAT I’M READING: I tend to read several books at once. I’m currently reading Eat, Pray, Love, by Elizabeth Gilbert; Raising Cain: Protecting the Emotional Life of Boys, by Dan Kindlon and Michael Thompson; and The Four Seasons of Marriage, by Gary Chapman. MY PHILOSOPHY: Never give up. If you believe in something, pursue it with all the energy, drive and passion you have. Always believe in yourself. FAMILY: Husband, a 13-year-old son, a 13-year-old stepdaughter, and a 17-yearold stepson. INTERESTS: Spending time with my family, traveling, collecting art, and skiing. FAVORITE CHARITies: American Heart Association, and CARE

COMPANY: Ryder System, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Miami, Florida WEB SITE: www.ryder.com BUSINESS: Transportation and logistics solutions. ANNUAL REVENUES: $6.2 billion in 2008 EMPLOYEES: 28,000 employees worldwide

My best advice to women aspiring to become corporate leaders is to pursue what you love with energy, and make your own path. Learn from your mistakes and use them as an opportunity to grow. Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

September/October 2009

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women worth watching in 2010

Lyn Beaty

I

Halliburton

It is my firm belief that to experience success in your career does not require you to be special or develop a magic formula; it just requires a personal commitment to operational excellence and continuous development.

TITLE: Vice President, Internal Audit and Controls EDUCATION: University of Texas at Austin, BBA with a specialization in accounting FIRST JOB: Staff Accountant, Dresser Industries WHAT I’M READING: Chain of Blame, by Paul Muolo and Mathew Padilla; City of Thieves, by David Benioff; and Now, Discover Your Strengths, by Marcus Buckingham and Donald O. Clifton MY PHILOSOPHY: “I hope you dance.” FAMILY: Husband Reg; two children, Brandon and Ashley. INTERESTS: Lake activities, reading, traveling. FAVORITE CHARITies: American Lung Association, Houston Food Bank

COMPANY: Halliburton HEADQUARTERS: Houston, Texas and Dubai, United Arab Emirates WEB SITE: www.halliburton.com BUSINESS: Energy services. ANNUAL REVENUES: $18.3 billion in 2008

I have been very fortunate in my career at Halliburton. I have been offered many and varied opportunities in the organization, some positions existing, but many new. A personal commitment to operational excellence—delivering high quality outcomes in whatever you undertake—defines success not only in job satisfaction but also in new opportunities. My experience has taught me not all opportunities will be high profile or glamorous, but each will offer a unique development opportunity, adding or strengthening skill set competencies, which in turn yields a more desired skill set, which results in broader, more challenging opportunities.

“With a commitment to operational excellence and continuous development, career success is always an assured outcome.” I would encourage everyone to evaluate a job opportunity not solely on the basis of promotion or compensation, but on the opportunity to build competencies. While promotion, title, and compensation will be factors, they may not be the critical factors. What is to be learned from the experience may be what has a more sustainable payback than the immediate promotion factors. The current economy may have altered our near-term career plans. The opportunities and/or the timing may be significantly different than what we understood a year ago. But that change opens new doors for new opportunities. With a commitment to operational excellence and continuous development, career success is always an assured outcome.

EMPLOYEES: 50,000 plus

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Pro f i les i n Dive rsit y Journal

September/October 2009


An aggressive supplier diversity program. Not just the right thing to do—the smart thing to do.

At Halliburton, we’ve found that putting significant trust—and business—in the hands of minority and woman-owned businesses is a win-win proposition for us all. Vendors win by partnering with one of the world’s leading companies. Halliburton wins by receiving first-class service from these quality-driven firms, and our customers win by having the very best and most diverse suppliers devoted to making Halliburton the best oil and gas services supplier in the world. For more information, contact us at supplierdiversity@halliburton.com.

HALLIBURTON H e l p i n g © 2009 Halliburton. All rights reserved.

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women worth watching in 2010

Lori Beer

I

WellPoint, Inc.

TITLE: Executive Vice President and Chief Information Officer EDUCATION: BS, Computer Science, University of Dayton FIRST JOB: Software Engineer, Westinghouse Savannah River Site WHAT I’M READING: My Sister’s Keeper, by Jodi Picoult; Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done, by Larry Bossidy and Ram Charan MY PHILOSOPHY: Take accountability, deliver results, create value for the business and focus on continuous improvement. FAMILY: Husband, three children (two girls, one boy), dog. INTERESTS: My kids’ sporting events; gardening. FAVORITE CHARITies: United Way; Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation

COMPANY: WellPoint, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Indianapolis, Indiana WEB SITE: www.wellpoint.com BUSINESS: Health benefits. ANNUAL REVENUES: $61 billion EMPLOYEES: Approximately 42,000

I’m well aware that sometimes the IT field carries the perception of being “analytical” versus “strategic” or an “order taker” versus a “consultant to the business.” Fortunately, my experiences at WellPoint do not fit those stereotypes. In fact, in my decade at WellPoint, I’ve watched information technology associates become business leaders and have personally refocused our IT organization on collaborating with the business to create value for our customers. During my 10 years at WellPoint and more than 20 years in IT, I’ve learned two essential lessons: first, the technology itself is much less important than the expertise behind it; and second, take accountability to use technology as a strategic asset to create value for the business. At WellPoint, technology is a key enabler of making health care simpler, improving quality, and reducing cost for our members, and that means we must make information personalized and relevant to their needs. Growing up on a farm in New York instilled in me the importance of a strong work ethic, including taking accountability and working hard to achieve results. I learned if you do this, success will follow. This has carried into my professional career. From my first professional role to my current position as CIO, I have always focused on ensuring the entire business outcome was achieved, not just the specific tasks for which I was accountable. Technology is a key enabler to improving the productivity of the business and I have always looked for innovative ways to use technology to solve problems that improve results, which is what ultimately creates value for the business.

“…technology itself is much less important than the expertise behind it…” I was very fortunate that one of my prior employers allowed me to work part-time while my children were young; having that flexibility motivated me even more to deliver results for the company. Throughout my career I focused on engaging with the business and using technology to make business strategies real, because at the end of the day, success will be measured based on your results and the value you create for the business. Many times emerging leaders ask me: “why have you been successful and how can I take the next step in my career?” I tell them that it’s really pretty simple. Take accountability, deliver results, create value for the business, and focus on continuous improvement.

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September/October 2009


WE STAND STRONG JOIN OUR TEAM

While many insurance and financial services firms are faltering, New York Life Insurance Company is still standing strong—in fact, we’re growing. One reason we continue to stand strong is we have the highest possible ratings for financial strength.* For the past 164 years we’ve protected families and met all of our obligations. And now more than ever our policyholders are looking for the peace of mind that products from New York Life Agents can help bring them. If you are looking for a new company or career, choose one that is strong today, and will be well into the future. For more information about a career as a New York Life Agent, please call 866-368-2914 or visit www.newyorklife.com/agent NEW YORK LIFE. THE COMPANY YOU KEEP.® *Standard & Poor’s (AAA), A.M. Best (A++), Moody’s (Aaa) and Fitch (AAA) for financial strength. Source: Individual Third-Party Ratings Reports (as of 6/16/09). © 2009 New York Life Insurance Company, 51 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10010

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women worth watching in 2010

Brenda Blisk

A

Blisk Financial Group of Spire Investment Partners

As CEO of the Blisk Financial Group of Spire Investment Partners, I built my business by connecting within the business community through developing long-term client friendships rather than business relationships.

TITLE: CEO EDUCATION: Four years, between Tennessee Tech and George Peabody of Vanderbilt FIRST JOB: Working on the family farm WHAT I’M READING: The Middle-Class Millionaire, by Russ Alan Prince MY PHILOSOPHY: Client Satisfaction is our primary focus! FAMILY: Married, mother of 2. INTERESTS: Gardening, reading, touring historic sites in the U.S. FAVORITE CHARITies: Lombardi Cancer Research Center; Lutheran Laymen’s League

COMPANY: Blisk Financial Group of Spire Investment Partners

Growing up on a Tennessee dairy farm and milking cows before school helps to develop a strong work ethic. So how did a farm girl become a top financial advisor? Well, a farm really is a family business. You have to organize, schedule, make a profit, and learn how to help others. So business for me was a natural direction and my passion was always to serve people. I love to help. For 23 years, it’s been my mission to make a meaningful difference in my clients’ lives. As a breast cancer survivor, I am keenly aware of the importance of keeping one’s life in order, and as such, everything we do and the way we go about doing it, is guided by this calling. I’m often asked, “How did you overcome the structure of the male-dominated financial industry?” I believe it was less an obstacle and more a motivator. I used the odds to my advantage by focusing on potential clients ignored by my male counterparts—widows, women executives, and other women of influence.

“For 23 years, it’s been my mission to make a meaningful difference in my clients’ lives.”

HEADQUARTERS: McLean, Virginia WEB SITE: www.spireip.com BUSINESS: Wealth management. ANNUAL REVENUES: $2 million EMPLOYEES: 4

I have extended guidance up to and through four generations. Some of our best success stories involve our ability to communicate effective solutions to a variety of family relationships. Client trust flows from a blend of confident and thoughtful advice, step-by-step guidance, and the efficient implementation of their decisions. I rely on independent resources; create personalized plans, information, and education. Aside from the day-to-day mentoring of our Gen-Y support staff, I am mentoring through the Women in Technology Mentor-Protégée Program for professional women. This includes: career path advice, work/life balance tips, and the development of networking skills. It is essentially the balance of these that gives young women a real chance to succeed.

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Adding Vitality to Life

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Embracing differences, creating possibilities, growing together -- that’s what diversity is all about. Unilever understands the importance of diversity and that’s why it is a critical component of our business strategy and an integral part of everything we value and do.

www.unileverusa.com


women worth watching in 2010

Kathleen C. Bock

M Vanguard

My career path is best characterized by a well-known Beatles song, The Long and Winding Road—definitely a journey with many twists, turns, and lessons. Throughout my career I have learned valuable lessons including:

TITLE: Principal and Director of Internal Audit EDUCATION: BBA in Accounting, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania FIRST JOB: Secretary and salesperson WHAT I’M READING: The Majesty of the Law: Reflections of a Supreme Court Justice, by Sandra Day O’Connor MY PHILOSOPHY: Set your moral and ethical compass right, and everything else falls into place. FAMILY: Husband Chris, daughters Rose and Liz, and a huge extended family. INTERESTS: Yoga, history, music, and involvement with family. FAVORITE CHARITY: The United Way of Southeastern Pennsylvania because it touches so many.

COMPANY: Vanguard HEADQUARTERS: Valley Forge, Pennsylvania WEB SITE: www.vanguard.com BUSINESS: Vanguard is one of the world’s largest investment management companies, serving individual investors, institutions, employer-sponsored retirement plans, and financial professionals. As of July 31, 2009, Vanguard manages nearly $1.2 trillion in U.S. mutual fund assets. ANNUAL REVENUES: N/A EMPLOYEES: 12,500 in the United States

Be yourself and encourage others to do the same. My “career” began at age 14, working in an atypical job for girls my age—I was answering phones, filing, and selling refrigeration equipment. Not many other 14-year-old girls studied pressuretemperature charts and condensing units! Customers knew this and often asked to speak to “one of the guys.” With patience and the support of a great boss, I eventually convinced customers to ask for me if they wanted quality service. It’s not always easy being different, but I’ve learned that our differences bring valuable insights and perspectives that may not otherwise be considered. Take risks—calculated, of course. Early in my career, my husband accepted an overseas assignment. Having never been to Europe, we were excited about the adventure. I was fortunate to find a new position with new responsibilities, while moving our two girls to new schools to meet new friends. This was a big change for our family, yet the perspective I gained, both personally and professionally, was immeasurable and still serves me well today. Value adversity and learn from it. One of my most challenging experiences at Vanguard was responding to the impact the September 11th terrorist attacks had on our company—when our nation was under immense emotional stress. But challenging circumstances provide incredible opportunities to learn about business, people, and ourselves.

“…challenging circumstances provide incredible opportunities to learn about business, people, and ourselves.” Make thoughtful choices in balancing work and home life. People often ask how I do it all—have a career and family, and stay involved in outside interests. My response, “I don’t do it all and that’s okay!” I’ve made career choices that were in line with my priorities at the time. As a new mom, I left a promising accounting career for a part-time role to spend more time with my children. When my children were older, I chose to devote more time to my career. While the level of responsibility in my professional roles has varied to complement my personal life, my commitment to excelling in each role has been unwavering. Mentors are a must. Find them and be one! Working at Vanguard, I have the privilege of serving as adjunct faculty and mentor for leadership training programs. I’ve learned that leadership is as much about inspiring others as it is about learning from those around you. Inevitably, I get more from these programs than I give. And most importantly, never compromise on ethics and integrity.

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At Vanguard, diversity is about more than color.

At Vanguard, we know diversity is more than just labels or gender or the color of someone’s skin. We believe in an unwavering commitment to inclusiveness that resonates through every level of our team. Diversity at Vanguard means: • Respecting the variety and differences among people across all communities and creeds. • Putting programs in place to foster connection in the workplace—including monthly awareness activities, diversity councils, and training activities for everyone from senior management to new hires. • Partnering with national professional organizations representing minorities and women. • Actively recruiting and promoting a diverse workforce. Most importantly, we value our employees for being themselves and for what they contribute. Because in an environment that champions the unique value of each individual, diversity represents unlimited potential.

To learn more

Connect with Vanguard > www.vanguard.com/careers ®

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women worth watching in 2010

Andrea R. Bortner

H

Harris Corporation

TITLE: Vice President, Human Resources, Government Communications Division (Harris’ largest division—7,000 employees) EDUCATION: MBA, University of Southern California; BA, Canisius College FIRST JOB: Babysitter at age 11 WHAT I’M READING: The Catalyst, by Jeanne Liedtka, Robert Rosen, and Robert Wiltbank; Workforce Management magazine MY PHILOSOPHY: Live each day as if it were your last! FAMILY: Married to my wonderful husband Michael for 22 years; two very special children, Dolan (13) and Brenna (8); two loving parents; two creative older brothers and their beautiful wives, and 7 adventuresome nieces and nephews with one more on the way; two loyal brothers-in-law, and one more beautiful sister-in-law. INTERESTS: Family time, running, singing, painting, tennis, mentoring. FAVORITE CHARITies: United Way; The Haven

COMPANY: Harris Corporation HEADQUARTERS: Melbourne, Florida WEB SITE: www.harris.com BUSINESS: Communications and information technology company serving government and commercial markets worldwide. ANNUAL REVENUES: Approximately $5 billion EMPLOYEES: More than 15,000

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Have you ever been told you couldn’t do something because of your gender? That you couldn’t be involved in something because of your physical characteristics? That your career was limited because you decided to have children? Fortunately for me I have been presented with those “opportunities” throughout my life. And what I have discovered about a door shutting, or at times slamming in my face, is the strength you garner to find a new door, a new path, or a new opportunity. Each one of us is faced with challenging situations and it is how we choose to respond to these situations that ultimately steers our direction. If I had my life to do all over again I wouldn’t change a thing. It has been these experiences, whether difficult or easy, fun or heartbreaking, that truly shaped who I have become as an individual, wife, mother, daughter, sister, and executive.

“As you stretch yourself, do what you love...not what someone else wants you to love.” Throughout my professional and personal journey, I have been blessed to have many mentors. Some I have known personally and some I have simply admired for their character and their contributions. I began my career with determination and gratitude, but what I have learned from my mentors has and continues to broaden and refine me! One significant lesson I now embody both personally and professionally is to be a life-long learner. Be curious! Challenge! Ask questions! Stretch yourself in ways you could never imagine! Understand that in every endeavor there is the opportunity to enrich your own life and the lives of others. As you stretch yourself, do what you love…not what someone else wants you to love. I have been fortunate my entire career to truly love what I do. I may not have always had work situations I cared for, or assignments that were my favorite, but overall my experiences have been both challenging and rewarding. If you stay true to yourself and follow your dream through the many twists and turns you encounter, your journey will ultimately be fulfilling. Finally, by truly living each day as if it were your last, you will have a clear perspective of life through a wide angle lens—allowing you to keep all the various priorities and pressures facing you aligned. This has been my life-long practice for which I am grateful each day!

September/October 2009


women worth watching in 2010

Stacy Brown-Philpot

H Google

“Have perspective. Personal relationships matter. Keep a sense of humor.” My mentor shared these three short statements with me two years ago when I asked for advice on how to be successful in my first job leading a large team of more than 200 people. Today, it sums up my leadership style. For me, it all goes back to fifth grade. Anyone who knows me knows that my passion is mentoring middle school-aged girls. This is because that age was one of the most significant periods of change I experienced in my life. When I started fifth grade, I was sent off to a middle school that was not my neighborhood school. This meant that I had to make new friends and couldn’t carry my friendships from elementary school with me. This also meant that I was isolated from the friends in my neighborhood because they were going to the local school and having different experiences than my own. Being isolated and “the only one” that was bused to school was lonely at first and I was mad at my mom for forcing me into this situation. Over the years, I made new friends and received opportunities and experiences that others around me did not. Looking back, I am thankful for the hard choice that my mother made and grateful for her foresight in pushing me into new experiences so that I may have access to better opportunities.

“Surround yourself with people who will push the boundaries of what is possible and you will do the impossible.”

TITLE: Director, India Online Sales & Operations EDUCATION: BS in Economics from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania; MBA from the Stanford Graduate School of Business FIRST JOB: Pharmacy Assistant at my uncle’s pharmacy in Detroit, Michigan WHAT I’M READING: In Spite of the Gods: The Rise of Modern India, by Edward Luce MY PHILOSOPHY: Build talented, diverse, creative teams that strengthen your weaknesses. Groups of people will always accomplish much, much more than any one individual alone. As the African proverb says: If you want to go fast, go alone, but if you want to go far, go together. FAMILY: Husband, dog. INTERESTS: Golf, swimming, international travel. FAVORITE CHARITY: Friends for Youth

COMPANY: Google

And I haven’t looked back. My “dream job” is always one where I find myself faced with a big challenge and a high enough likelihood of failure that I have butterflies in my stomach almost all the time—but if I am successful, then the result is a huge impact on the business. The mentors in my life have pushed me into these situations when I was sometimes afraid to go on my own. They have also helped me learn from my mistakes, pick myself up, and keep moving ahead. My life and career have taken a variety of twists and turns, but at every intersection I’ve found a guiding hand to help make what turned out to be the right decisions. Surround yourself with people who will push the boundaries of what is possible, and you will do the impossible.

HEADQUARTERS: Mountain View, California WEB SITE: www.google.com BUSINESS: Google’s mission is to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful. ANNUAL REVENUES: $21,795.55 (millions of USD) in 2008 EMPLOYEES: 20,164 as of March 2009

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September/October 2009

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women worth watching in 2010

Tammy L. Butts

I

AXA Advisors, LLC

I have had a gratifying professional journey guided by my personal values. I started my career in 1994 at Wells Fargo Bank, where I spent a decade developing the business acumen and skills that became my professional foundation.

TITLE: Divisional Executive Vice President, Chicago Branch EDUCATION: BBA, Finance, Texas Christian University FIRST JOB: Credit Analyst, Interfirst Bank, Dallas, Texas WHAT I’M READING: The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, by Stephen R. Covey MY PHILOSOPHY: Change what I can, accept what I can’t, and have the wisdom to know the difference. FAMILY: Husband Doug, and 3 children, Jon, Michael, & Michelle. INTERESTS: Family time, cooking, gardening. FAVORITE CHARITy: Susan G. Komen for the Cure

COMPANY: AXA Advisors, LLC HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEB SITE: www.axaonline.com BUSINESS: Life insurance, annuity, and investment products and services. ANNUAL REVENUES: $18.58 billion U.S. dollars for 2008* EMPLOYEES: Approximately 11, 000 employees and sales personnel**

*This is the revenue number for affiliate AXA Equitable. **Includes employee figures from affiliate AXA Equitable Life Insurance Company.

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Like many professional women, my career path came to a crossroads when I started a family. Being a stay-at-home mom was a wonderful experience and, while it did put my career on hiatus, this decision would ultimately lead me down a road of greater career success—one that I could not have imagined possible at the time. In 1999, our family moved to Chicago for my husband’s new job. In 2001, I decided to go back to work after being home for six years. I interviewed for a position as a financial professional for AXA Advisors and was hired. It was different than anything I had done before, but it was a perfect fit for me—it was clientcentric with the potential for advancement and had a lot flexibility, providing the work/life balance that was important to me.

“There is no greater reward than giving back what was freely given to me —mentoring others to achieve their goals.” The road back to employment was not without its challenges. I had been out of the workforce and I was in a new city where I had very few business contacts. This forced me to build my financial services practice from scratch. After years of hard work and the good fortune to have multiple mentors at AXA Advisors—seasoned professionals who were generous with their knowledge and experience—I achieved a certain level of success and was promoted to district manager in 2005. In that role, I was responsible for recruiting, training, and developing other financial professionals, building a district of 19 professionals, 50 percent of them women. In January 2009, I was promoted to divisional executive vice president of the Chicago branch. I now find myself in the role of leader and mentor, working with an excellent team of professionals, some who were mentors to me and crucial to my own success in the industry. My journey has taken a couple of unexpected turns, but has led to a very rewarding career. I have worked with hundreds of people to help develop strategies to protect their financial futures, and I have helped others enter, grow, and succeed in this business. There is no greater reward than giving back what was freely given to me—mentoring others to achieve their goals. September/October 2009


women worth watching in 2010

Patricia S. Cain

I

Neal, Gerber & Eisenberg LLP

I have had many mentors throughout my life, starting with my father, who worked in the Pittsburgh steel mills. His chance to attend college was shortcircuited by the Great Depression, but he did understand the value of education. My love of reading started early when he paid me a dime for each day that I read the newspaper. Although my three older sisters did not go to college, my father supported my college aspirations and I became the first college, and law school, graduate in my family. After law school, adapting to the male-dominated environment of a Chicago law firm initially did not seem easy. Fortunately, a small group of women lawyers at the firm became a strong support group. We worked closely to establish the firm’s first maternity policy, and to end the firm’s patronage of social clubs that discriminated against women. Several male colleagues were also highly supportive, and arranged for me to become the firm’s first telecommuting attorney, which allowed me to relocate to Syracuse, New York to join my husband, while still remaining a partner. While my children were still at home, my volunteering focused on activities that allowed me to fulfill both my passion for volunteering with my desire to spend time with my children. One memorable example was a trip with my son to Mississippi to work on rebuilding homes in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

“There is no ‘right’ answer— it depends upon what you are seeking out of your life.” As I progressed in my career, I learned that the greatest rewards came from my impact on others. Taking the extra time to mentor a junior attorney, providing advice to a new mother about balancing family and work life, or listening to the perspectives of other attorneys on ways to improve the firm’s diversity efforts, I have learned that being a leader means more than just being a successful lawyer. In fact, my ability to care about people, by listening and seeing the world through their eyes, has proven valuable in my role as the first woman on my firm’s executive committee.

TITLE: Partner; Chair of Employee Benefits & Executive Compensation Practice Group EDUCATION: Georgetown University, AB; Northwestern University School of Law, JD FIRST JOB: Working at Gimbels Department Store selling men’s shirts WHAT I’M READING: Renegade: The Making of a President, by Richard Wolffe; Belong to Me, by Marisa de los Santos MY PHILOSOPHY: To whom much has been given, much is required. FAMILY: Husband, Grant Krafft; children, Catherine, 24, and Nicholas, 22. INTERESTS: Cooking, weight training, reading. FAVORITE CHARITY: Lutheran Social Services of Illinois

COMPANY: Neal, Gerber & Eisenberg LLP HEADQUARTERS: Chicago, Illinois WEB SITE: www.ngelaw.com BUSINESS: Law firm. EMPLOYEES: 400+

My advice for young professionals is to first determine and prioritize your professional and personal goals and aspirations, looking both at what you want and what is possible. There is no “right” answer—it depends upon what you are seeking out of your life. Take time to volunteer, spend time with your friends, and strengthen your family relationships. As my father taught me, it is your integrity and work ethic that will take you through life’s biggest challenges— even when your intellect and inspiration wear thin. Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

September/October 2009

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women worth watching in 2010

Nancy Calderon

W KPMG LLP

TITLE: National Partner in Charge, Operations EDUCATION: BS, Business Administration, University of California at Berkeley; MS, Taxation, Golden Gate University FIRST JOB: Cashier at fast food restaurant WHAT I’M READING: Infidel, by Ayaan Hirsi Ali MY PHILOSOPHY: Make the most of today as you never know what’s going to happen tomorrow. Remember and learn from your past, but don’t live in your past. FAMILY: Husband, Phillip; daughter Lindsey, 11. INTERESTS: Playing piano, cooking, golfing and watching my daughter perform in musical theater performances. FAVORITE CHARITies: Public educational institutions, especially New York City Public School 158, and University of California at Berkeley

COMPANY: KPMG LLP HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEB SITE: www.us.kpmg.com BUSINESS: Audit, tax and advisory services. ANNUAL REVENUES: $5.679 billion EMPLOYEES: 22,000

When I look back over my 23-year career, I know there has been one overriding theme to my success: Make each day count because you never know what the next day will bring. I learned this lesson early on, first when my first husband died at 21, and again when I lost one of my twins, and the other was born two months prematurely. In business, as in life, there are unexpected surprises. The trick is to do the best you can each day. Deal with problems as they come along but be open to new opportunities, and let your values, including a dedication to ethics, open and honest communication, and respect for others, guide your decisions.

“In the end, it all comes back to being true to yourself and your values, and open to new ideas.” My first mentor at KPMG showed me the real power of these principles when I was asked to lead KPMG’s western-region trust tax practice. It was a huge opportunity that would place me in front of important clients and the firm’s leadership. I wasn’t sure I had the right background and skills for the job, or that I’d be able to manage my family life as well, which then included a two-month-old baby. But after learning more about KPMG’s flexible work culture and having a long discussion with my mentor about my concerns—and her encouragement to be open to the challenge—I took the assignment. The job also prepared and positioned me for other challenges and new assignments, including my current role as KPMG’s National Partner in Charge, Operations. Developing and nurturing strong relationships are essential. I wouldn’t be where I am today without the support I received from my mentors, clients, and teams. I advise my own mentees to focus on caring for their teams as well as their clients, and I encourage them to network. KPMG established six national employee networks, including KPMG’s Network of Women (KNOW), to foster a diverse and inclusive work environment that helps employees build their careers. As a current KPMG Women’s Advisory Board member, the relationships I’ve made with both groups have been professionally and personally rewarding. Another thing I tell my mentees is to volunteer. I always raised my hand when there was some odd job to be done. Volunteering can take you out of your comfort zone, improve your skills, and help you stretch. It’s also a great way to give back to your community, one of my core values, as well as KPMG’s. In the end, it all comes back to being true to yourself and your values, and open to new ideas. While we can’t always know in advance the hand we’ll be dealt, we can decide to play that hand by a set of principles.

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September/October 2009


women worth watching in 2010

Teresa Carroll

L

Kelly Services

Leadership assessments from peers and bosses tell me that I’m good at building relationships. That’s what it’s all about—right? After all, a company is, at its core, an organization of people. And how do people productively work together? By building positive relationships. More importantly, for those of us in the service industry, relationships with customers and employees oftentimes equate to profit and growth. The term that is often used now is “engagement.” Are my customers engaged? Are my employees engaged? Am I engaged? As a leader, I approach my career with fervor. I believe anything you spend most of your life doing should be done with heart and passion. My own success is largely due to the great teams I’ve built over the years and the people I have spent time with, as a coach or mentor. I take my job as a leader seriously and commit to provide honest feedback to help others succeed. My proudest accomplishments involve the success of others who have listened to my advice, and either changed destructive behavior, and/or removed career obstacles within their control. Many of these individuals are now future leaders of our company.

“…a leader is faced with problems every day, and finding a way to solve them is paramount to success.”

TITLE: Senior Vice President, Global Service EDUCATION: MBA, University of Michigan; BS, Industrial Engineering, GMI Engineering & Management Institute FIRST JOB: Babysitter, cook, waitress (all at the same time) WHAT I’M READING: Midlife Orphan, by Jane Brooks MY PHILOSOPHY: Work hard, play hard. Also, three data points make a trend. FAMILY: Husband, Paul; two children, Alyssa and Jason. INTERESTS: Family, friends, reading, being a mom. FAVORITE CHARITIES: Meals on Wheels; Lighthouse

COMPANY: Kelly Services

Aside from building positive relationships and approaching things with heart and passion, my success can be attributed to a great work ethic and a continuous pursuit toward results. Blame it on my engineering degree, or blame it on my hard working roots, but I haven’t found a problem I don’t want to solve. In business, a leader is faced with problems every day, and finding a way to solve them is paramount to success. Ensuring execution and solving problems are two skills future leaders need to hone and perfect throughout their career.

HEADQUARTERS: Troy, Michigan WEB SITE: www.kellyservices.com BUSINESS: Human resources solutions. ANNUAL REVENUES: $5.5 billion EMPLOYEES: 8,600 worldwide

My advice to anyone reading this essay is to ask yourself, are you engaged in your career and your work? Are you building positive relationships and approaching your career with heart and passion? Are you working hard and relentlessly pursuing results? If the answer is yes, then pay it forward. Pass on that passion to somebody who can’t say yes and watch what happens.

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women worth watching in 2010

Kimberley Crews Goode

I

Northwestern Mutual

TITLE: Vice President, Communications & Corporate Affairs; President, Northwestern Mutual Foundation EDUCATION: BS, Journalism, Northwestern University FIRST JOB: Grocery store cashier in high school WHAT I’M READING: The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency, by Alexander McCall Smith MY PHILOSOPHY: To whom much is given, much is required. FAMILY: Married; three children (two girls, one boy). INTERESTS: Travel, movies, biking, gardening. FAVORITE CHARITY: Big Brothers Big Sisters of Metro Milwaukee

COMPANY: Northwestern Mutual HEADQUARTERS: Milwaukee, Wisconsin WEB SITE: www.northwesternmutual.com BUSINESS: Financial services. ANNUAL REVENUES: $22 billion in 2008 EMPLOYEES: 5,000

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Pro f i les i n Dive rsit y Journal

I didn’t wake up one day and decide, “I’m going to be a leader!” Rather, it was a series of experiences and mentors along the way that led me down this path. It wasn’t precisely mapped out; I just worked hard at being prepared and ready to take advantage of opportunities that came my way. My career officially began in the ninth grade when I enrolled in an Introduction to Journalism class to fill an empty spot on my schedule. This class sparked my passion for storytelling—using the power of words and pictures to express ideas and other perspectives. I was also fortunate to meet a very special teacher who emphasized the spoken word. Since then, I have found that effectively expressing ideas, voicing opinions, and asking questions are absolutely critical to success, regardless of your profession.

“…remember that all you can control is your contribution.” Armed with early exposure to the broad range of communication disciplines, I had a strong foundation for what would become a life-long love and ultimately rewarding career. Early on, I was fortunate to come into contact with the company’s first female African-American officer. I could see myself in her shoes, so I made it my business to learn what made her successful. She did not have much time to mentor me individually, but I learned a lot by observing and making myself useful. Ultimately, we developed a relationship because I worked hard at it and took every opportunity to open the line of communication between us in a constructive and meaningful way. I still admire her today and, because of her, I mentor others, particularly women and people of color. Looking back, my advice to those beginning their careers is to recognize that what you do matters. It is important to contribute each day to the best of your ability, because your track record is what will leave a lasting impression on others. Make everything you touch better; set high standards and work hard to deliver with excellence no matter where you are in your journey. And when you experience challenges, remember that all you can control is your contribution. Be flexible and adapt to changing requirements—all while holding on to the values that define who you are. Take time to learn from people around you—those you admire and those you don’t. And always, be prepared and ready—you never know when an opportunity will come your way.

September/October 2009


Raytheon People

Innovation. Driven by Diversity. As one of the world’s foremost technology leaders, Raytheon takes on some of the most difficult challenges imaginable. Meeting those challenges requires a diversity of talent, ideas, backgrounds, opinions and beliefs. Diversity helps our teams make better decisions, build stronger customer relationships and feel more inspired, supported and empowered. It is both a catalyst and an essential advantage to everything we do.

We’re proud to feature Raytheon employees in our ads. To join them in a rewarding career, visit

www.rayjobs.com © 2009 Raytheon Company. All rights reserved. “Customer Success Is Our Mission” is a registered trademark of Raytheon Company. Raytheon is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer and welcomes a wide diversity of applicants. U.S. citizenship and security clearance may be required.


women worth watching in 2010

Shirley Cunningham

T

Monsanto Company

Throughout my career, I’ve been lucky to have been surrounded by great people —people who possess the skills I’ve always aspired to have. Building this great network of leaders allowed me to tap into a deeper knowledge and resource base, and has helped me significantly in becoming the leader I am today.

TITLE: Chief Information Officer EDUCATION: MBA, Washington University FIRST JOB: Waitress WHAT I’M READING: The Emotional Intelligence Quick Book, by Travis Bradberry and Jean Greaves; Cannery Row, by John Steinbeck MY PHILOSOPHY: Be the best you can be with integrity. FAMILY: Husband, Mike; son, Michael. INTERESTS: Reading, cooking and hiking in Scotland. FAVORITE CHARITY: United Way

COMPANY: Monsanto Company HEADQUARTERS: St. Louis, Missouri WEB SITE: www.monsanto.com BUSINESS: Agriculture.

In 1998, I was asked to move from my home in Scotland, to Brussels, Belgium, to run information technology services for Monsanto’s Information Technology group, covering our three key business units. In this role, I went from managing 30-40 people to managing 300-400 people. My mentor and respected leaders offered me the best advice I could imagine—take roles that make you uncomfortable, because you don’t learn as much from roles you are comfortable with. I learned quickly that being uncomfortable in a role is a catalyst for change not only in your career, but also in you as a person. Even in my role, I’m always pursuing life-long learning. There is so much to learn from the people around you, as long as you keep an open mind to learning from different sources. It is important for every person within an organization to understand the business, and challenges facing the business. If you do this, you can provide different and better solutions to help further the entire organization.

“…take roles that make you uncomfortable, because you don’t learn as much from roles you are comfortable with.”

ANNUAL REVENUES: $11.4 billion in fiscal year 2008 EMPLOYEES: 26,400

I’ve been very fortunate to work for a company that empowers all of its employees to explore career options and do things outside of traditional work functions. The company’s leadership has recognized the skills and value I can bring to a position, and I’ve had job opportunities that have gone beyond my traditional role. I think when you are choosing where to begin, or continue, your career, it is imperative to work for a company that has the values and ethics that you admire. As a leader, I know that the business isn’t about me; it’s about the function and people I’m managing. The biggest accomplishment for me is to have my business function and people recognized for doing an outstanding job. I’m motivated by seeing people within my function succeeding, and at the end of the day, I want my team to provide outstanding value for our business. I’m always encouraging my people to take chances and learn outside of the box. My legacy would be to leave behind people that do an even better job than I did.

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September/October 2009


women worth watching in 2010

Laree Daniel

M Aflac

Mentoring is widely accepted in the business world; however, its roots have evolved. I believe people often serve as a mentor without ever knowing it. A mentor is essentially a teacher or coach. The most impactful mentors in my life are my parents. They guided me and have been a tremendous influence. The phrases—”The only failure is to fail to try,” “Nothing to it, but to do it,” and “Big girls don’t cry.”—are imprinted in my mind. I learned how to lead and how to be a team player as my dad worked countless hours managing his business and my mom filled in the gaps. While my career has taken many turns, from a cashier to the assembly line— deboning chicken and packing boxes of cereal—I accepted a service representative position at an insurance company to take advantage of its tuition reimbursement program. I truly believed that I would leave once I attained my master’s degree. Eighteen years later, having reached the executive suite, it’s clear that decision was pivotal for my career. I enjoy applying my mentoring philosophy to help others realize and achieve their goals. As a coach to fellow associates, I’m honored to guide future leaders to advance in their careers. Also, at church, I mentor youth in spiritual values, life style choices and skills.

“…people often serve as a mentor without ever knowing it.” Balancing career and a child with cancer proved to be one of my greatest challenges. When my son was diagnosed with a tumor at age two, I had to learn how to get my priorities straight in terms of what matters most in life: God, family, career. I managed to find common ground—a balance between my commitments at work and home.

TITLE: Senior Vice President of the Customer Assurance Organization EDUCATION: BS, Business and Psychology, Nebraska Wesleyan University; MS, Organizational Psychology, University of Nebraska. FIRST JOB: I was a cashier at our family grocery store WHAT I’M READING: Outliers, by Malcolm Gladwell MY PHILOSOPHY: If you can make a difference in the life of at least one person, then your life will not have been in vain. At the end of the day, it’s really not about you; it’s about the relationships that you build or don’t build. Live life as if “Failure is not an option.” This means that you never fail because you learn and grow from what others may call failure. Learn to adjust, adapt and overcome. The Apostle Paul said it best, “All things are possible through Christ who strengthens me” (Philippians 4:13). FAMILY: Husband; three sons. INTERESTS: Singing, acting, reading, adventurous activities. FAVORITE CHARITies: Aflac Cancer Center; American Cancer Society

Here are a few lessons that have kept me on track: • Volunteer. Give back to your community through church or nonprofit organizations. You can gain valuable, transferable skills through volunteer efforts.

COMPANY: Aflac

• Develop people. Build effective teams by bringing out the best in people and helping them to be their best.

WEB SITE: www.aflac.com

I believe that positive reinforcement is the most powerful management tool. I encourage managers to hire people that excel in ways that they don’t. A mentoring relationship allows you to assist someone in getting answers and direction by allowing them to reach their own conclusions. Most of the time people have the answer, but need confirmation, prompting, or someone to hold them accountable.

HEADQUARTERS: Columbus, Georgia

BUSINESS: Voluntary benefits sold at the worksite. ANNUAL REVENUES: $16.5 billion EMPLOYEES: 4,300

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women worth watching in 2010

Ann D. Davidson

A

ITT Corporation

TITLE: Vice President, Corporate Responsibility EDUCATION: BA, cum laude, Ohio University; JD, cum laude, University of Dayton School of Law FIRST JOB: Babysitting, Summer Camp Counselor, Lifeguard WHAT I’M READING: One Hundred Years of Solitude, by Gabriel Garcia Márquez MY PHILOSOPHY: Know yourself, be your best self, be purposeful with your life, and sometimes, just breathe and— with gratitude—appreciate all that is good around you. FAMILY: Wally, my husband of 34 years; daughters Sarah and Caitlin; son-in-law, (Sarah’s husband), Matt; my parents; my 7 brothers and sisters, and 6 in-laws; 14 nieces and nephews; and one great-niece. INTERESTS: My family, reading, road trips. FAVORITE CHARITies: Water for People; Mercy Corps; United Way

COMPANY: ITT Corporation HEADQUARTERS: White Plains, New York WEB SITE: www.itt.com BUSINESS: High technology engineering and manufacturing. ANNUAL REVENUES: $11.7 billion EMPLOYEES: 40,000

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A mentor is a trusted guide, and mentoring is one of the most effective ways to pass on learning from one person to another. Throughout my life, I have had many wonderful, informal mentors to whom I am grateful. Some do not know that I consider them my mentors. All took the time to teach, to coach, and to share their wisdom and experience with me. They also expected that the gratitude that I felt not be expressed to them directly, but rather expressed through me acting as a mentor to others. Any discussion of mentoring should start with our parents. Parenting is the most influential form of mentoring and my parents are my best mentors. They instilled in me, and each of my seven siblings, the importance of a goal-driven, purposeful life—balanced with having fun, and love, in our lives. We were given much responsibility at an early age, learned negotiation and compromise, decisionmaking and accountability, the need for effective teamwork, and leadership skills.

“People in successful organizations make mentoring a pervasive part of daily management.” Although I never had a formal mentor at work, or someone who specifically guided my career, I consider anyone who took an interest in my professional development, and anyone from whom I learned critical skills or knowledge, to be a mentor. My best mentors have been tough on me: not always easy to work with, or easy to listen to. They set high expectations. They taught me to be authentic to my own competencies and leadership style. They have been from different cultures, genders, ethnic backgrounds and generations. Above all, they took the time to teach or to advise me. It is up to those of us who want to continuously learn and improve to find people from whom we can learn, and to pass the gift of mentoring on to others. Successful organizations create and sustain value within an ethical framework that includes respect for their people, an environment based on integrity and candor, and a culture of professional excellence. People in successful organizations make mentoring a pervasive part of daily management. I am fortunate to work in such an environment at ITT where our values of respect, responsibility, and integrity sustain a culture of diversity and inclusion, and encourage different ideas and opinions, all in the pursuit of excellence. Through mentoring, we sustain organizational success by passing on to others our corporate values and our value-creation capabilities.

September/October 2009


Diversity is Our Competitive Advantage. We, at ITT, are committed to building a workforce that mirrors the world in which we do business. With operations in 55 countries and customers on seven continents, ITT is well positioned and making a difference on a global scale. As we continue to grow, we look first to create an environment where our talented employees can succeed and make the world a better place through their unique contributions. We embrace diversity, which includes but is not limited to race, religion, gender, disability, nationality, age, sexual orientation, and ethnic background. Our culture, work practices and programs enable an inclusive and innovative workforce and workplace resulting in premier performance in the global marketplace.

www.itt.com/careers We are an equal opportunity employer m/f/d/v.

The “ITT Engineered Blocks” symbol and “Engineered for life” are registered trademarks of the ITT Corporation. © 2006


women worth watching in 2010

Cynthia (Cindy) Davis

W

Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.

When trying to carve out a successful career path, I feel it is vital to surround yourself, not only with people who act as your champions, but also those who are willing to challenge you.

TITLE: Executive Vice President, Membership, Marketing & eCommerce for Sam’s Club EDUCATION: BA, College of William & Mary; Master’s, Thunderbird School of Global Management FIRST JOB: Assistant Account Executive, Ad Agency (BBDO/Tracy-Locke) on Frito-Lay account WHAT I’M READING: Women’s Devotional Bible; Made to Stick, by Chip Heath and Dan Heath; Throw Out Fifty Things, by Gail Blanke MY PHILOSOPHY: You can do anything, as long as you commit to doing it well. FAMILY: Husband (and best friend), Rob; 11-year-old son Jesse (who keeps me young); and two special stepchildren, Alexis and Matt. INTERESTS: The beach, my family, and any kind of game that challenges your mind (board games, cards, and even computer Scrabble). FAVORITE CHARITies: My son’s school; our church; and any child that comes knocking at our door selling something.

COMPANY: Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Bentonville, Arkansas WEB SITE: www.walmartstores.com BUSINESS: Retail. EMPLOYEES: 2 million worldwide

Champions are mentors who are your advocates. They provide encouragement, and help open doors to new opportunities and promotions. Challengers shoot straight with you, coach you when you need it most, push you out of your comfort zone, and help you develop your weaknesses. Most of us gravitate toward champions. But I have found the people who ask the tough questions and force you to see different perspectives have the greatest impact. If you have challengers on your personal board of directors, you will broaden your horizons and accelerate your development.

“…I have found in my career that the people who ask the tough questions and force you to see different perspectives have the greatest impact.” I was first challenged entering my senior year at William & Mary. I was headed for an accounting career until one of my professors encouraged me to take a marketing class. I wound up changing my major and getting my graduate degree in international marketing. Combining my solid financial background with the understanding of the customer one gets from marketing was exactly what I needed, and has served me well throughout my career. Given the important impact that mentors have had on my career development, I want to provide that same benefit to the associates I have the honor to mentor. I try to keep three things in mind: Listen more and talk less. I learned early that I gain as much benefit, if not more, from every mentoring conversation with a mentee. I value the connections I have with mentees across our company, especially with field associates who are closest to our members. Sam Walton was right—it’s where some of the best ideas come from. Make it productive for both of you. We are all busy, so making mentoring relationships productive for both of you matters. I often suggest that mentees bring a current project or problem to discuss, so we tackle a real challenge, while learning more about each other. Be both a champion and a challenger. I know how important both perspectives have been in my development, so I strive to bring both kinds of support to any mentoring relationship. We have many mentor relationships throughout our lives, but mentoring in the workplace is an opportunity for even greater success. A formal mentoring program, like Walmart has with Mentor Me and Mentoring Circles, propels one to carve out the time to really act on that intention.

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samsclub.com

Supporting diversity, from our stockrooms to our boardrooms. At Sam’s Club®, we know important contributions can come from many different sources. That’s why we’re committed to recruiting exceptional candidates, regardless of their gender or race. We’re also committed to giving candidates the opportunity to advance—because those who work in the aisles of the Club may someday reach the halls of upper management. And after all, not only is promoting the success of a diverse workforce the right thing to do, but it strengthens Sam’s Club at every level.

SM


women worth watching in 2010

Terri Dial

T

Citigroup Inc.

TITLE: Chief Executive Officer, Consumer Banking, North America; Global Head, Consumer Strategy EDUCATION: BA in Political Science, Northwestern University FIRST JOB: Bank teller WHAT I’M READING: The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society, by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows MY PHILOSOPHY: My greatest learning is that happiness or misery depends a lot more on attitude than circumstance—and you can change your attitude. FAMILY: Married. INTERESTS: Pleasure travel to over 100 countries, with special interest in places that are off the beaten path. FAVORITE CHARITIES: March of Dimes; Citymeals-on-Wheels

COMPANY: Citigroup Inc. HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEB SITE: www.citigroup.com BUSINESS: North America consumer banking. ANNUAL REVENUES: (Citigroup): $51.6 billion (2008) EMPLOYEES: (Citigroup): 279,000 (June 30, 2009)

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The happiest and most successful people I know see their careers not as a ladder or a mountain to be climbed, but as a river to be traveled. Rivers take unexpected turns, get caught in bends, and sometimes loop back upon themselves. They start small and the further they flow, the larger and more connected they become. The mouth of the river, just like the peak of a career, is usually the most connected place you could be—where cities and people, commerce and trade all come together. I hate the mountain as a metaphor for a career. The top of the mountain is cold, windy, and lonely! When I started my career as a teller at Wells Fargo Bank in 1973, I never expected nor aspired to lead a major business like Citi’s Consumer Bank—nor did I know I was beginning such a dynamic and rewarding journey. And now I truly do feel like I’m living at the mouth of the river, the most connected place of all. Early on I was fortunate to have challenging roles, which required creativity, judgment, and decision-making. I got to practice on small problems and opportunities. I had early, sharp, leadership experiences. I am grateful I had the opportunity to lead small groups early in my career—I made loads of mistakes, but my audience wasn’t too big! Throughout my career, I’ve been fortunate to have wonderful mentors who fostered my professional development. My most powerful mentoring relationships didn’t result from structured programs. Instead, my mentors were leaders who took a personal interest and found it natural to be an active part of my

“It’s the journey that matters.” career. They were not consciously mentoring me, and, in fact, I suspect they would be surprised to hear me refer to them as mentors. They gave me some very direct feedback, fortunately sometimes accompanied by a glass of wine. Of course, I learned even more from observing them as leaders, both what worked and what didn’t, and also what worked for them but wouldn’t for me. For most of us, self-awareness takes a conscious effort. The best advice I can give is to pursue accountability early on, get early, sharp, leadership experiences, be consciously aware of your leaders and learn from them, and build relationships with those with whom you share an affinity, as they may become your mentors. And remember the river, and all those points of connection. It’s the journey that matters.

September/October 2009


women worth watching in 2010

Lorna Donatone

T

Sodexo, Inc.

Throughout my career I have really pushed myself to stay open-minded about my career path and how I could leverage my experience. Women tend to underestimate their experience and it is very important to continually challenge yourself to go after the opportunities that appeal to you, regardless of whether you meet 100% of the requirements for the position. In order to do this you need to be completely self-aware of your strengths and weaknesses as you raise your hand for various opportunities. Having this self-awareness will help you to best position and leverage your strengths in a way that will help to mitigate any skill gaps or weaknesses.

“Make your aspirations known, and pursue the jobs, not just the titles, that will help you to achieve your goals.” It is also important to set the widest view possible of the options you will pursue as you progress through your career. You can really limit yourself if you are chasing a title. Make your aspirations known, and pursue the jobs, not just the titles, that will help you to achieve your goals. While I have advanced through my career by following a typical progression in finance, I did so by working in a variety of industries, including public and general accounting, high tech, airline, banking, and services. This broad exposure to multiple industries has helped me to expand my thinking and my skill-set, and prepared me to make the move from finance into operations. One of the best strategies that I have found for my career advancement was making sure that I was doing a very good job in my current role. While it is important to make your aspirations known and to actively pursue opportunities, it is equally critical that you are high-performing in your current position. The last key strategy that I will share with you is the importance of having a mentor throughout your career. No matter how far you advance, a mentor is critical for your continued success. Throughout my career I have had both formal and informal mentors who have helped me to challenge my ideas and have kept me from getting stale in my thinking. Most recently I have set up a reverse mentoring relationship with a former mentee of mine and I am looking forward to all that I will learn from my newest mentor.

TITLE: President, School Services EDUCATION: BS, Management, Tulane University; MBA, Accounting, Texas Christian University FIRST JOB: Auditor, Deloitte and Touche; Summers throughout college: Secretarial work WHAT I’M READING: The Associate, by John Grisham MY PHILOSOPHY: Try to make a personal connection with the people that you meet on a daily basis. More than just saying hello, engage the person in a conversation; you never know what you will learn! FAMILY: Married to Stephen; one daughter, Catherine. INTERESTS: Taking time to decompress and relax with family, either by playing golf or watching volleyball. FAVORITE CHARITy: Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure

COMPANY: Sodexo, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Gaithersburg, Maryland WEB SITE: www.Sodexousa.com BUSINESS: Sodexo is the leading provider of integrated food and facilities management services in North America. Sodexo serves more than 6,000 corporations, schools, hospitals, health care facilities, and college campuses. Additionally Sodexo is the official food service provider for the United States Marine Corps. ANNUAL REVENUES: $7.7 billion EMPLOYEES: 120,000

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women worth watching in 2010

Carol A. Dudley

Y

The Dow Chemical Company

TITLE: Senior Vice President, Basic Chemicals Division EDUCATION: BS, Chemical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University; Executive MBA, Indiana University FIRST JOB: Engineer WHAT I’M READING: Breaking Into the Boys’ Club, by Molly Shepard, Jane Stimmler, and Peter Dean MY PHILOSOPHY: To deliver results, communicate, and recognize your people. FAMILY: Two children: Erin 25, and Shannon, 21. INTERESTS: Reading, sewing and biking. FAVORITE CHARITY: United Way

COMPANY: The Dow Chemical Company HEADQUARTERS: Midland, Michigan WEB SITE: www.dow.com BUSINESS: Diversified chemical company that combines the power of science and technology with the “Human Element” to constantly improve what is essential to human progress. ANNUAL REVENUES: $58 billion EMPLOYEES: 46,000

You don’t get far in business these days without creating strong relationships with colleagues. Over the years, I have experienced a number of long-term mentoring relationships and I’ve gained much—both from having a mentor and from being one. When I asked some of my colleagues recently about what they valued most about our mentoring relationship, four words arose again and again—trust, openness, consistency, and honesty. Trust. This is the foundation that every strong relationship starts with—trust that confidences will be maintained, trust that advice will be compassionate but realistic, and trust that you will “be there” for each other. It is not something that is bestowed due to position or power—but rather it is earned over time. Trust can be risky at times, but is necessary to build strong relationships. Openness. Getting others to open up starts with being transparent about your own experiences. You must be willing to talk about your successes and your failures. It’s not always easy, but this kind of sharing often provides the most valuable lessons. Consistency. It is important to consistently work from a sound base of ethics and core beliefs—without wavering. Regardless of the external business environment or internal political situation, you need to stand up for what you believe in and take the time for what is most important.

“You don’t get far in business these days without creating strong relationships with colleagues.” Honesty. This isn’t just about telling the truth; it’s about being who you are. A young engineer from Brazil told me that one of the most important things she learned from me was not to be afraid to be feminine in a male-dominated industry. When my business team traveled to her site in the mid-1990s, she was shocked when I arrived in an outfit with ruffles and “pink lipstick.” She realized, then, that becoming an effective leader didn’t require adopting a masculine leader stereotype—but instead came from delivering results, assertiveness, listening to others, and being true to yourself. I’m proud that I have been able to be a role model for many women and men over the years. Throughout my career, I have learned from my mentors, and those I mentor, to stay focused on four key success factors—delivering results, building a diverse network of people, being a visionary leader, and enjoying what you do.

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BY CELEBRATING THE INDIVIDUAL, WE STRENGTHEN THE WHOLE.

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women worth watching in 2010

Lynn Dugle

I

Raytheon Company

TITLE: Vice President, Raytheon Company, and President, Raytheon Intelligence and Information Systems EDUCATION: BS, Technical Management, and BA, Spanish, Purdue University; MBA, Business Administration, University of Texas at Dallas FIRST JOB: Manufacturing engineer at Texas Instruments WHAT I’M READING: The Time Traveler’s Wife, by Audrey Niffenegger; Saving the World at Work, by Tim Sanders MY PHILOSOPHY: Live life to its fullest— go big, or go home. FAMILY: Husband, daughter, son. INTERESTS: Reading, sports, and church activities. FAVORITE CHARITies: ChildReach, Samaritan Inn

I am often asked to share my plan for climbing up the corporate ladder. I suppose you could say I’ve done that, but in reality my climb has been sideways as much as it has been up. Throughout my career, I’ve taken more lateral moves than promotions, and I’m a better and more well-rounded leader as a result. By making these moves, I’ve supported many different parts of companies, including Engineering, Finance, Quality and Business Development. Each move provided me with new skill sets, a fresh perspective, and a larger network. They’ve given me the breadth of experience to be able to run a large enterprise with confidence.

“It’s about having a plan for your life…” I don’t know if there is a secret to success. But I do know that it isn’t all about having a plan for your career. It’s about having a plan for your life— one that can be applied to anyone, anywhere. My life plan is what directs my actions, both personally and professionally: Know what’s important—to you. In other words, know your priorities and live by them every day. Have a clear line of sight. Be clear on how you are making a difference to those around you. You don’t have to share it, but it should be clear in your mind.

COMPANY: Raytheon Company HEADQUARTERS: Waltham, Massachusetts WEB SITE: www.raytheon.com BUSINESS: Defense, homeland security, information security. ANNUAL REVENUES: $23.2 billion EMPLOYEES: 73,000

Have fun more days than not. It’s important to remember to stop and ask yourself if you’re having fun. Not every day will be a good one, but on the whole the fun ones should be in the lead. Be a leader, not a boss. Unfortunately, there are a lot of bad bosses out there. Leaders help develop and grow their employees. Be one of the good ones. I like to remind people who I mentor that not every path is a straight line. Stay focused on your destination, but remember, it’s the experiences you have during the journey that make you who you are. Be true to your life plan, and the rest will take care of itself.

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women worth watching in 2010

Kim Feil

L

Walgreens Co.

Let’s start by getting to know me. One of my passions is renovating houses; I like taking great finds and making them stronger or giving them fresh direction. This love has emerged as a strong theme in my career. Being the first chief marketing officer at Walgreens excites me because I’m charged with re-inventing how consumers feel about our brand—one of the nation’s most iconic, trusted brands. After spending 26 years in consumer packaged goods working for Frito Lay and Sara Lee (to name two), I wanted to take on a new challenge—health and wellness. For me, it’s very rewarding to see legendary brands evolve through changing times. I didn’t get to where I am today without overcoming obstacles. Everyone in business will encounter challenges. That’s why I believe mentoring is key. While women and minorities still struggle with advancing in the corporate world, times are changing. We’re seeing more diverse executives than ever before. When it comes to mentors, my role model and cheerleader has to be my father. He worked his entire life at Procter & Gamble, and was a big supporter of diversity efforts. He recruited and helped develop women and people of color. I’ve had the pleasure of meeting women my father helped early in their careers. They tell me he was instrumental in coaching them through difficult times and helping them believe they could lead, and make a difference. It’s amazing to hear how much influence my father had on many talented leaders today. This validates the importance of mentoring and networking.

“…you cannot live up to your full potential operating in total isolation.”

TITLE: Chief Marketing Officer EDUCATION: MBA, BFA, Journalism; and BA, English; all from Southern Methodist University. FIRST JOB: Assistant Brand Manager on Doritos for Frito-Lay MY PHILOSOPHY: I believe that while many characteristics result in business success, the ones to be most proud of are hard work and integrity. INTERESTS: Cooking, gardening, and being outside with my two Golden Retrievers. FAVORITE CHARITies: Network of Executive Women; Salvation Army

COMPANY: Walgreens Co. HEADQUARTERS: Deerfield, Illinois WEB SITE: www.walgreens.com BUSINESS: Pharmacy. ANNUAL REVENUES: $59 billion (fiscal 2008) EMPLOYEES: 231,710

I always try to learn as much as I hope to teach. I’m the national secretary for the Network of Executive Women, an organization created to help women maximize their career opportunities. Networking is essential. No matter how smart you are or how hard you’re willing to work, you cannot live up to your full potential operating in total isolation. Through this organization, I’ve networked with people who demonstrate such passion for their career goals that you can’t walk away without being inspired. The best advice I can offer to aspiring business leaders is be yourself. Try to approach a task with your own style and use your strengths as stepping stones. Also, don’t think you have to solve all challenges at once. One personal motto that I live by is, “Lead, follow, or get out of the way!”

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women worth watching in 2010

Jo Ann Feindt

S

United States Postal Service

TITLE: Vice President, Great Lakes Area EDUCATION: Barry University FIRST JOB: Cashier WHAT I’M READING: Lance: The Making of the World’s Greatest Champion, by John Wilcockson MY PHILOSOPHY: Treat people well, and they will always take care of you. FAMILY: Single. INTERESTS: Golf, cycling, physical fitness, and the arts. FAVORITE CHARITY: Make-a-Wish Foundation

COMPANY: United States Postal Service HEADQUARTERS: Washington, D.C. WEB SITE: www.usps.com BUSINESS: Government agency. ANNUAL REVENUES: $74.9 billion EMPLOYEES: 765,088

Success is dependent upon building a competitive team with complementary skills, dreams, and enthusiasm. A leader’s foremost job is to match the right candidate with the right job, provide all the support possible, then stand back and let them flourish. I am honest with my team every step of the way, and give them the balance of freedom and enough direction to thrive. I follow the leadby-example philosophy. I am always prepared to reinvent myself, as the world around us is continually changing. I know I must stay open to new, fresh ideas in order to continue to grow and excel. In our day-to-day roles, situations arise where you may feel somewhat overwhelmed with the task at hand. Always remember to gain input from the people who have influence over the success of the task. Listen very intently and be decisive in order to overcome the challenge at hand. One of the most important things to remember is that respect is earned, never given; and respect is earned through listening to others. Professional success is never achieved alone. One of the most important elements for success that you must continue to develop is your ability to relate to people. Building professional relationships, mentoring others, and maintaining high ethical standards are the cornerstones to any good leader’s success.

“Professional success is never achieved alone.” Thirty-one years ago, when I was an entry level employee of the United States Postal Service, I would never have dreamt that one day I would be in a position to make a difference in the lives of nearly 93,000 employees who work within my area of responsibility. My personal motto is treat people well and they will always take care of you. Success, though, never comes easy or without sacrifices, whether it is maintaining my home and cross-country relationships in Florida, or working to grow my professional career in Chicago and throughout the Great Lakes area. Remember, it is important to continue to grow as a professional, step outside your comfort zone, strive to be the best, and balance your personal and professional life. Titles are not what define you; what you do with the title defines who you really are. Be the best!

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women worth watching in 2010

Lisa Ferrero

I

Corning Incorporated

It’s a timeless question, whether leaders are born or made. I certainly didn’t begin my career with the ambition of leading a business—I viewed myself as a member of a team, a “doer,” working hard to accomplish whatever needed to be done. But as I grew in my career and was coached by my supervisors, I learned how to tap into my innate desire to “control” and turn that into the ability to set direction, motivate, and lead teams to get things done. In my case, the rise to leadership was a gradual slope without a clear end goal. The defining step in my career was relocating to Japan, because it required such a leap of faith. At the time, there were no manufacturing or engineering roles in Tokyo, so my only option was marketing, an area in which I had no experience beyond my college coursework. Leaving my home country and a discipline I knew very well for entirely new territory forced me to embrace the unknown. The gamble paid off, and I’ve stayed on the commercial career path ever since. I’ve now spent a third of my career in Asia. Like many leaders, I am performance and rigor focused, and need to be able to add value while leading. However, when I try to characterize my leadership style, the main concepts that come to mind are fun and freedom.

“In the face of high pressure and long hours, it’s critical to make work fun.”

TITLE: Vice President and General Manager, Corning Display Technologies EDUCATION: Bachelor’s in Mathematics and Statistics, State University of New York, Oneonta; MBA, University of San Diego FIRST JOB: Cashier at a grocery store WHAT I’M READING: My favorite book is Stephen King’s The Stand MY PHILOSOPHY: Work hard, play hard. FAMILY: Husband and two sons, ages 16 and 19. INTERESTS: Boating, waterskiing, beach vacations. Currently training for a 10K race. FAVORITE CHARITies: My children! Also Food Bank, United Way, Girl Scouts, and Boy Scouts.

COMPANY: Corning Incorporated

I grew up in a family in which joking around the dinner table was an essential part of our daily routine, and that has influenced the way I lead. In the face of high pressure and long hours, it’s critical to make work fun. Along with that spirit of laughter, I value flexibility in all its many forms: freedom to debate, freedom to try and fail, freedom to approach work from different angles. When people are allowed to do their work in ways that reflect their personal styles, the product is all the stronger. This belief in diversity is endemic at Corning with our deep belief in valuing the individual.

HEADQUARTERS: Corning, New York WEB SITE: www.corning.com BUSINESS: Display technologies (glass substrates for LCD applications). ANNUAL REVENUES: $5.9 billion EMPLOYEES: Approximately 23,000 worldwide

My advice to the next generation of leaders is to concentrate on helping people reach their full potential. Be cognizant of your style and the effect it has on others, and be adaptable in your approach (lessons I’ve learned from working internationally). Along the way, take risks, keep a sense of humor, and appreciate and leverage the differences among your colleagues. If you do, you’ll be surprised at where your career can take you.

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women worth watching in 2010

Dawn Fitzpatrick

H

Pitney Bowes Inc.

How do you create the right recipe for career growth and development? Do you improvise, or follow a step-by-step process?

TITLE: Vice President, Marketing and Business Management, Pitney Bowes Document Messaging Technologies EDUCATION: BA, State University of New York, Cortland FIRST JOB: Elementary school teacher WHAT I’M READING: Blink, by Malcom Gladwell MY PHILOSOPHY: Leave behind a better place or situation than what you started with. FAMILY: Married 19 years to husband, Kevin; and two sons, Travis and Bobby. INTERESTS: Family, travel, golf, reading. FAVORITE CHARITy: Church

COMPANY: Pitney Bowes Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Stamford, Connecticut WEB SITE: www.pb.com BUSINESS: Mailstream technology. ANNUAL REVENUES: $6.3 billion EMPLOYEES: 35,000

Creating a delicious concoction is similar to an individual’s evolution along her career trajectory. Understanding key ingredients, without compromising the seemingly small ones, can enhance its flavor in many different ways. Reflecting on my own career, I have been fortunate to have had a variety of opportunities, experiences, and influential role models to shape the person I am today. I have found that taking risks, flexibility, and optimism are some of the most important ingredients for a successful career.

“Understand how you fit into your organization today, and how you would like to fit in tomorrow.” Seeing and creating possibilities is a big part of taking risk. Have you ever tasted something and asked what was in it? Sometimes you’re surprised at what was included in the recipe to create such a tasty dish. But the cook understood the possibilities and wasn’t afraid to fail. Similarly, make your career your own. Understand how you fit into your organization today, and how you would like to fit in tomorrow. Learn how to leverage your strengths and realistically identify the areas that need improvement. Recognize opportunities and keep your eyes and ears open for ways to do things better. Ask, why? Ask, why not? Taking risks can help you grow, professionally and personally. So can flexibility. Have you ever run out of an ingredient, didn’t have time to go to the store, and found an acceptable workaround? We’re all faced with career challenges and struggles, especially today when we’re increasingly asked to do more with less. Individuals who exhibit flexible thinking and action help sustain organizations, and are infinitely valuable. What about the seemingly small ingredients that I mentioned earlier? You can create a decadent dish, but without a pleasant presentation, no one will understand the appeal. Genuinely caring about what you do, how you do it, and how it affects others will gain the respect of your peers. Take an optimistic approach to resolving challenges and issues. Others will be drawn to your positive energy. Those are my key ingredients for job growth and development. Feel free to fold some of these into your own recipe—it makes a subtle mix.

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women worth watching in 2010

Susan B. Garcia

M American Airlines

My personal philosophy is that you should find something you have a passion for—but don’t let it get in the way of putting your family first. Balancing work and family has been my single greatest challenge—knowing my priorities, and checking my actions and decisions against those priorities, helps me keep my life on track, both professionally and personally. This philosophy is paralleled by my management belief, which is to invest in people. I am committed to developing others and building a deep bench of talent. My steadfast focus on these correlating philosophies has brought me a real sense of fulfillment. In terms of critical decisions in my professional growth, my decision to move to Mexico to study Spanish at the age of 18 was a defining moment in my career. That decision piqued my curiosity in people and other cultures and started me on the path to exploring the travel industry. Many doors have opened both professionally and personally for me as a result of being bilingual. Today, my family and I are involved in Medical Ministry International, where I have the opportunity to use these skills to impact the lives of others in need, primarily in South American countries where medical needs go largely unmet.

“Do the things you have a passion for, and you will always do well.” I am told that I am known for being straightforward, honest and genuine, with a holistic approach to business. These attributes are fundamental to building respect and trust, not only with my internal team, but with others in the business world. I have had a number of mentors, but one who stands out most is a former CFO, who taught me to think strategically and to consider the potential impact of my decisions on the entire company. He also taught me the value of outstanding written and verbal communication, which has proved its worth, time and time again. As a mentor, I have this advice to offer: Do the things you have a passion for, and you will always do well. If you find yourself in a role you do not enjoy, or that you feel is not a good fit for you, learn as much as you can in the process, and find ways to focus on the aspects of your work that have value and that do bring a sense of accomplishment. Remember any role is what you make of it. Most of all, keep your priorities in order so that you are spending your time on the things that matter most to you and your family.

TITLE: Vice President of Real-Time and Analytical Systems EDUCATION: BS, Computer Science and Spanish, Marquette University; MBA in Finance and Management, Southern Methodist University FIRST JOB: Worked in state parks cutting down trees, building dams, building fences, and painting at a logging camp operated by the State of Wisconsin WHAT I’M READING: The Shack, by William P. Young MY PHILOSOPHY: Always put your family first. FAMILY: Two daughters. INTERESTS: Traveling and spending time with my family. FAVORITE CHARITies: Medical Ministry International; Turtle Creek Mano

COMPANY: American Airlines HEADQUARTERS: Fort Worth, Texas WEB SITE: www.aa.com BUSINESS: Transportation. ANNUAL REVENUES: $23.7 billion EMPLOYEES: 89,000

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women worth watching in 2010

Swee Chen Goh

G

Royal Dutch Shell

TITLE: Vice President, Global Lubricants EDUCATION: BS, Victoria University of Wellington (New Zealand); MBA, University of Chicago FIRST JOB: Wrapping wafer biscuits for $1 a day WHAT I’M READING: Forgotten Kingdom, by Peter Goullart; The Audacity of Hope, by Barack Obama MY PHILOSOPHY: Live life with purpose and optimism. Happiness would be reflecting 20 years from now, and knowing that I have lived my life with no regrets. FAMILY: Husband of 20 years; and children aged 16,14, and 11. INTERESTS: Home renovations, cooking with family and friends. FAVORITE CHARITY: None. I contribute where the need is greatest. Right now, it is basic needs for underprivileged children.

COMPANY: Royal Dutch Shell HEADQUARTERS: The Hague, the Netherlands WEB SITE: www.shell.com BUSINESS: Global group of energy and petrochemical companies.

Growing up, the third girl in a poor Asian family of five other siblings, I learned to take each day as an opportunity to seek new frontiers. This could be challenging a status quo or finding new ways to get things done with what you have. Avoiding the path of least resistance is oftentimes an uphill struggle, but the rewards are well worth it. I have not always had a successful career. I recalled one of my early jobs in a Fortune Top 10 company. During the first year, I naively assumed that securing the job was the achievement, and I failed to contribute to my full capabilities. I had an atrocious year-end performance review. I concluded that I was the “victim” of an incompetent line manager. It took me a week to realize that I was responsible for the outcome—I own the first action to ensure that I have a successful career. Now, I go into each job aiming to leave the organization and business in a better place than when I first joined. I have been able to stretch my capabilities and knowledge through a variety of assignments in Shell. When I was offered the role of VP, Global IT Services, I thought I would surely be promoted to my level of incompetence and the likelihood of failure could be high. I accepted the challenge and the assignment became one of the highlights of my career. It was here I learned that a successful leader needs to have a keen nose to sniff out the business opportunities, a strong stomach to make the tough decisions, and the tenacity to see through what you started, despite obstacles.

“…go into each job aiming to leave the organization and business in a better place…” The word “I” is used numerous times here. This is done deliberately. I believe that a successful individual takes charge of his/her life and takes personal accountability for his/her actions. A successful individual also recognizes that “I” is one of many— inclusion of others and their perspectives will almost always lead to better outcomes.

ANNUAL REVENUES: $458.4 billion (2008) EMPLOYEES: 102,000

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women worth watching in 2010

Lorrinda Gray-Davis

A

Perini Building Company

As Perini Building Company’s director of diversity, I am often asked how I started working in this field. Good fortune, hard work, and my background have all been factors. Growing up, I knew there had to be a better way of life than the one I was living. I also knew that given the opportunity—not assistance—I could succeed. I can’t remember a time when I didn’t want to be in business, serving in a role that helped people improve their lives. From an early age, I wanted to make an impact. But perhaps most of all, I wanted to escape my childhood environment and make something of myself. I grew up in Oklahoma. My mother has always been disabled and never worked, my stepdad adopted me when I was four, and I have never met my biological father. Being part Choctaw Indian and Hispanic has not always been easy either. By the time I enrolled in junior high school, I had attended 11 schools. The only good thing about moving was I figured people wouldn’t recognize me as the kid who always paid with food stamps. What motivated me were the strong females in my family. My mother, aunt, and grandmother were like a small army. They were the force behind our meager existence. They kept our family moving forward. They didn’t have money or highpowered careers, but they saw the possibility of what the next generation could do. They made me and my brother realize our potential. They gave us confidence and motivated us to tackle life head-on.

“Everyone has the ability to succeed; often all people need is an opportunity.” Experiencing a difficult childhood, having people believe in me, and hard work have all fueled my ambition and desire to empower others to progress in their profession. Everyone has the ability to succeed; often all people need is an opportunity. It’s amazing what one person can do when given a chance. I am fortunate to work at a company that shares my vision and is willing to step out of what’s comfortable, and offer opportunities to minority- and women-owned businesses. What I am most proud of is being able to work with aspiring women- and minority-owned companies. It’s inspirational to hear how people have thrived in their endeavors in spite of insurmountable odds. It’s gratifying and invigorating to work with individuals who are willing to help others in their journey to build a more prosperous life.

TITLE: Director of Diversity EDUCATION: Tulsa Community College; Master Graduate, Rapport Leadership International FIRST JOB: Tulsa International Raceway, from when I was 10 years old until I was 18! WHAT I’M READING: The Answer, by John Assaraf and Murray Smith MY PHILOSOPHY: I am always reminded of a saying by Ralph Waldo Emerson: “Whatever course you decide upon, there is always someone to tell you that you are wrong. There are always difficulties arising which tempt you to believe your critics are right. To map out a course of action and follow it to an end requires courage.” FAMILY: One daughter. INTERESTS: Drag racing, self-improvement, reading, and spending time with my daughter. FAVORITE CHARITY: ShadeTree Women’s Shelter, Las Vegas, Nevada

COMPANY: Perini Building Company HEADQUARTERS: Las Vegas, Nevada WEB SITE: www.tutorperini.com BUSINESS: National general contractor. ANNUAL REVENUES: $5 billion EMPLOYEES: 724

It’s a rewarding time to work in diversity development. I have seen attitudes change and stereotypes dissipate. We all know it’s a slow process. But with persistence, we will achieve our collective effort of creating a more diverse, dynamic, and talented workforce.

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women worth watching in 2010

Sandra Guy

I

BDO Seidman, LLP

I truly believe that three little things can help anyone live a happy and meaningful life, both personally and professionally: passion, simplicity, and humor.

TITLE: Human Capital Partner EDUCATION: BS, Business and Commerce, University of Alabama FIRST JOB: Babysitter WHAT I’M READING: Liberty and Tyranny: A Conservative Manifesto, by Mark R. Levin MY PHILOSOPHY: Be passionate about what you do, always keep it simple and, above all else, never take yourself too seriously! FAMILY: Married with two dogs. INTERESTS: Golf, travel, and anything involving water (except in golf). FAVORITE CHARITies: The Avon Foundation; Paws For People

COMPANY: BDO Seidman, LLP

This philosophy has enabled me to experience and accomplish a great deal in my 19-year career, and to have a great time doing it! I can vividly remember the first day of my Human Resources Management class in college. It was like being hit by lightning. I knew it was exactly what I wanted to do, and my passion has never wavered. To this day, I cannot imagine doing anything else! I am certain that my enthusiasm for all areas of Human Capital has sustained the energy and credibility I needed over the years to pull together the projects and groups of individuals that have ultimately achieved great things. After college, as my career progressed, I noticed that the challenges I came across tended to appear more and more complicated. A disagreement couldn’t just be a disagreement; it became a “situation.” Then I realized that, in their need to understand and justify, many people overcomplicated what were really very basic issues. I also figured out that if I helped them cut through the complexities they had created, many people became open to simple solutions. Without my belief in, and practice of, keeping it simple, I could not have accomplished the things I have achieved in my past, nor would I be able to attain the goals I have set for myself in the future. If you don’t believe me, consider that there’s a reason why Real Simple is such a successful publication!

“…my passion has never wavered.”

HEADQUARTERS: Chicago, Illinois WEB SITE: www.bdo.com BUSINESS: Accounting and consulting. ANNUAL REVENUES: $620 million EMPLOYEES: 2,712

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Which leads me to the third thing that has helped me become successful. As a leader in the U.S. member firm of the world’s fifth largest accounting network, I am faced with some very serious demands. I won’t lie—it can be very stressful. I’ve found, however, that infusing a little humor into my everyday work is one of the best ways to manage that stress. Refusing to take myself too seriously has made me approachable by all levels of professionals, which ultimately enables me to keep a solid finger on the pulse of my organization. Plus, it’s fun to be silly sometimes! The result is that I have been asked to be take part in wonderful projects and opportunities that have positioned me for a great career in Human Capital.

September/October 2009


Constellation Energy is proud to support the achievements and success of leading women executives such as Kathleen Hyle, Senior Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Constellation Energy Resources. Working together, we’ve become a FORTUNE 500 company, the #1 national provider of energy and energy services to large industrial and commercial customers and the nation’s largest wholesale power seller. We recognize that through the diverse ideas and strong focus and commitment of our women executives, we are able to accomplish much and strengthen our position in the energy marketplace.

constellation.com


women worth watching in 2010

Joyce P. Haag

W

Eastman Kodak Company

When I think of the role of mentoring, I recall the time I pursued a high-level legal position in Eastman Kodak Company’s Europe, Africa, and Middle East Region (EAMER). Our general counsel at the time thanked me for taking the initiative, but told me I “wasn’t a good fit.”

TITLE: General Counsel and Senior Vice President EDUCATION: BA, Mathematics, Phi Beta Kappa, Mt. Holyoke College; JD, cum laude, Cornell Law School FIRST JOB: Associate at Boylan, Brown, Code, Vigdor & Wilson, a Rochester law firm WHAT I’M READING: Roadside Crosses, by Jeffery Deaver; Outliers, by Malcolm Gladwell MY PHILOSOPHY: Work hard. FAMILY: Husband, two adult daughters, one grandson. INTERESTS: Reading, golf. FAVORITE CHARITies: Mary Cariola Childrens’ Center; Susan B. Anthony House; Rochester General Hospital (All in Rochester)

COMPANY: Eastman Kodak Company HEADQUARTERS: Rochester, New York WEB SITE: www.kodak.com BUSINESS: Digital and traditional imaging and printing systems. ANNUAL REVENUES: $9.4 billion (YE 2008) EMPLOYEES: 24,400 worldwide (YE 2008)

Four years later, the position opened again. While my self-perception had not changed much, our current Assistant General Counsel, Dale Skivington, encouraged me to again apply for the job. This time, I was appointed General Counsel for Kodak in that region. The lesson I learned: circumstances change. Whether or not you are in a true mentor relationship, it’s important to listen to colleagues who see special attributes in you.

“Mentoring relationships need honesty as their cornerstone.” Formal mentorship roles can be difficult or even daunting for many professionals. If you manage a far-flung virtual team with no face-to-face interactions, it’s even harder. But we should listen to the suggestions of colleagues and coaches. In my career—first, in a private practice firm, and later, in Kodak’s legal department—I’ve benefited from informal mentors and colleagues whose insights and encouragement helped shape my career. They were eager sounding boards, genuinely interested in my career; they were honest; and, like Dale, they challenged or pushed me to take risks. Mentoring relationships need honesty as their cornerstone. We need to share both positive and negative feedback with a mentee. A good mentor will help a mentee identify ways to fine-tune and develop his or her professional strengths. And a good mentee will be willing to ask for guidance. When I entered the legal profession, I viewed my law degree as a strategic route to a business management career. However, by remaining open to new opportunities in the legal organization, I was able to establish my credibility and stay close to the strategic aspects of the business. There were obstacles, of course. Early in my career, when gender discrimination influenced law firms, I was told that “women were incapable of practicing in certain areas of the law.” Another interviewer shared that “we hired a woman attorney once. It didn’t work out.” Again, circumstances change. Times and attitudes change. Today, law firms and corporations increasingly value the different perspectives and expertise at their tables. Whether you identify the strengths you bring to that table, or a mentor identifies them for you, it’s important to take risks and seize the initiative.

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women worth watching in 2010

Sharon L. Hays

H CSC

How does a scientist end up in the corporate world? It’s a question I’m often asked and the answer involves a journey that passes through the halls of Congress and the offices of the White House. My interest in science started early. My mother, aided by a book entitled, “Science Experiments You Can Eat,” oversaw countless kitchen-based projects that further stoked my curiosity, and were—on occasion—actually edible. Because she worked in a laboratory, my mother often brought home leftover or borrowed projects for us to work on. So for me, helping my mom dissect a frog was a perfectly normal after-school activity. I also had a number of good teachers, and a few truly great ones, who helped prepare me for the rigors of my future scientific study. It was during graduate school when I realized that, while I loved the challenge of performing scientific research and the thrill of discovery, I did not want to spend my career as a research scientist. Instead, I became increasingly intrigued by the policy realm: how decisions that affect people’s lives get made and implemented. I realized that many of those decisions are, or should be, informed by science, and I wanted to be part of the action. Thanks to a fellowship program sponsored by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, I made a relatively seamless transition from the lab bench to Capitol Hill. I caught “Potomac fever,” as it’s known, and my transition from the laboratory to the Washington, D.C. policy world was sealed. From there, new and exciting job prospects seemed to materialize just when I was getting hungry for a fresh opportunity, leading me to a position in the White House and, most recently, to the business world.

“The gift of mentorship is one I’ve tried to pass on to others…”

TITLE: Vice President, Office of Science and Engineering EDUCATION: PhD, Biochemistry, Stanford University; BA, Molecular Biology, University of California, Berkeley FIRST JOB: Scooping ice cream at Baskin-Robbins WHAT I’M READING: Blue Ocean Strategy, by W. Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne MY PHILOSOPHY: Do the right thing—it almost always pays off in the long run. FAMILY: Married to Michael Baker. INTERESTS: Volunteering as a search and rescue dog handler; working out; gardening; scrapbooking. FAVORITE CHARITies: Charities that help both people and animals, such as Puppies Behind Bars, Paws with a Cause, among others.

COMPANY: CSC HEADQUARTERS: Falls Church, Virginia WEB SITE: www.csc.com BUSINESS: Business solutions, outsourcing, systems integration.

I’ve been lucky. I have had several mentors during different phases of my career—almost all of them scientists—who encouraged and challenged me, imparted insight, and, eventually, supported my somewhat unorthodox career choices. The gift of mentorship is one I’ve tried to pass on to others, in part by trying to help dispel the notion that the pursuit of scientific study is a oneway ticket to a life spent isolated in a laboratory. In reality, that couldn’t be further from the truth, and the demand for technically skilled individuals with well-honed critical thinking skills will only strengthen in the high-tech, global economy that exists today.

ANNUAL REVENUES: $16.74 billion EMPLOYEES: 92,000

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women worth watching in 2010

Melanie Healey

I

Procter & Gamble

TITLE: Group President, Global Feminine and Health Care GBU EDUCATION: BS, Business Administration, University of Richmond, Virginia FIRST JOB: Assistant Brand Manager, S.C. Johnson & Sons WHAT I’M READING: The Silver Lining, by Scott D. Anthony MY PHILOSOPHY: Seize opportunities with pride, passion, integrity, the right attitude, and with a touch of fun. FAMILY: Married to Bruce Healey; two children: son Nick, daughter Jackie. INTERESTS: Bridge, reading, traveling, and family.

I am a native of Brazil, born to a Chilean mother and an English father. I was the first in my family to attend college, and arrived in the United States for the first time just five days before beginning classes as a freshman at the University of Richmond. I started my career in Brazil working with S.C. Johnson, and then went on to work for Procter & Gamble in Caracas, Venezuela, and Mexico City, Mexico. Although raised in a Latin culture, my appearance and accent are very English. This mismatch in how I am perceived and who I really am has had a profound effect on how I view diversity. Repeatedly throughout my career, people have met me for the first time and made assumptions about me that are not always true. It has taught me never to assume who people are because of how they look or sound. It has encouraged me to take time to really get to know the people I work with, and understand their backgrounds and experiences.

“…strive to understand the different perspectives and experiences…”

FAVORITE CHARITy: United Way

COMPANY: Procter & Gamble HEADQUARTERS: Cincinnati, Ohio WEB SITE: www.pg.com

I actively look for connections that enable me to seek common ground and connect with people of a different background, race, religion, or lifestyle. I also strive to understand the different perspectives and experiences, as well as the unique strengths, of our people in order to make better business decisions and better organizational choices. In a global role, which includes employees from many different cultures, our team’s mission is to improve the lives of consumers in many different parts of the world.

BUSINESS: Consumer products. ANNUAL REVENUES: $79 billion (June 30, 2009) EMPLOYEES: 135,000 employees

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women worth watching in 2010

Wendy Lee Herrick

L Unilever

Leadership and success in business today are often narrowly defined by job status, remuneration, power, and awards. However, I believe true leadership and success is as much about personal development as it is personal achievement. It is about relationships, creativity, learning, growing, and making a difference every day. Real success must ring true with who you are—it is not a destination, but a journey. There are many good academic theories that suggest what leadership skills we should employ to succeed today, but the advice I would like to pass on to future business leaders comes from personal life experiences with family, friends, and colleagues, and from the opportunity to work in several different countries with Unilever. Approach everything you do with Passion and Purpose. My father always insisted, if you are going to take part—compete to win! Know what you want to do, and give it your all. Many understand purpose knowledge, but what is needed to connect and engage others in our purpose comes through passion— the heart. Balancing head and heart as a leader is critical to success. Understand the shadow you cast—Self Awareness. Being mindful of your impact on others is key to understanding how to approach, motivate, and inspire the company’s most valuable asset—its people. Likewise, invest the time to get to know your team, the struggles they face, and how you can encourage and support them to achieve their goals.

“Seize opportunities that help you achieve your life’s ambitions.” Embrace Diversity, and Value Inclusion. Competitive edge can be gained by harnessing the rich mosaic within the workforce and creating an environment where teams can share different ideas/perspectives and perform to their full potential. This is not simply about gender, age, ethnicity, disability, or sexual orientation: it’s about open-mindedness, embracing non-conformity, and creating balanced teams.

TITLE: Director, U.S. and Canada Business Integration EDUCATION: Chemical Engineering; Chartered Institute of Management Accounting, U.K. FIRST JOB: Flower and gift shop manager throughout high school WHAT I’M READING: Eat, Pray, Love, by Elizabeth Gilbert MY PHILOSOPHY: Attitude is a little thing that makes a BIG difference. FAMILY: Married to a wonderful man, supportive siblings, and extended family. INTERESTS: Travel, scuba diving, underwater photography, sports. FAVORITE CHARITY: Cancer research

COMPANY: Unilever HEADQUARTERS: Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey WEB SITE: www.unileverusa.com BUSINESS: Global consumer products company. ANNUAL REVENUES: Nearly $10 billion in U.S. sales in 2008 EMPLOYEES: About 12,000 in the U.S. and Puerto Rico

Seize Opportunities that help you achieve your life’s ambitions. Set your goals high and never let anyone convince you anything is impossible. My mother was my greatest inspiration. Her philosophy—“If you think you can, you’re right, and if you think you can’t, you’re right.” Hard work, love, and luck turned my opportunities into life changing experiences. Above all, always hold true to your Core Values. Remember to have fun, celebrate successes, and live life to its fullest. Ask yourself what you want to be remembered for in life, and set your priorities NOW to ensure you realize all your dreams. Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

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women worth watching in 2010

Kathleen T. Hogan

I

Microsoft Corporation

I always had a plan, but as John Lennon so eloquently said, “Life is what happens to you while you’re busy making other plans.”

TITLE: Corporate Vice President, Worldwide Microsoft Services EDUCATION: Bachelor’s degree, Applied Mathematics and Economics, magna cum laude, Harvard University; MBA, Stanford University Graduate School of Business FIRST JOB: Factory worker WHAT I’M READING: The Middle Place, by Kelly Corrigan MY PHILOSOPHY: Control what you can control; let the rest go. FAMILY: Husband and son. INTERESTS: Family time. FAVORITE CHARITies: Red Cross; Susan G. Komen Foundation

COMPANY: Microsoft Corporation HEADQUARTERS: Redmond, Washington WEB SITE: www.microsoft.com BUSINESS: Worldwide leader in software, services, and solutions that help people and businesses realize their full potential. ANNUAL REVENUES: $60.42 billion EMPLOYEES: 91,259 as of June 30, 2008

While I was at Harvard, I set my designs on becoming a Rhodes Scholar and then returning to teach mathematics or economics at a university. I was realizing my vision when I graduated from Harvard, but then my plans changed. When I wasn’t selected as a Rhodes Scholar I was offered a job at Oracle, and I thought that would be a good way to learn about the business world before I started off on my real career as a professor. Life as I know it today started happening. So much for my career as a professor; Oracle, Stanford University MBA program, & McKinsey came next and I was really enjoying what I was doing, so that plan to be a professor was set aside. Then Microsoft came along. At Microsoft, I had a great mentor who believed in me and my abilities, and pushed me to do things I never knew I was capable of.

“Seek out mentors that will help you see yourself in new ways…” I learned a lot along the way. First, having a great mentor that believes in you is invaluable. Seek out mentors that will help you see yourself in new ways and be open to the feedback and the encouragement. I am so grateful for my mentors and hope I am doing them justice by paying their investment in me forward. Second, be clear on your purpose and vision. Don’t just share it, but engage your team to help you achieve that vision. You can’t be successful on your own—nor should you want to be. The collective brainpower of a highly connected team is not only powerful, but also exhilarating. Most importantly, don’t forget to draw the line. Every part of your life— your family, your career, your health and well-being—want and need more attention from you every day. It’s up to you to strive for the balance that works for you. It requires making tough choices every day. Control what you can control, and let the rest go. While I still make plans for my future—for my family and my career—I know that life’s little surprises and the unexpected and wonderful twists and turns in life are what make the journey a real adventure.

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Thanks to you, women everywhere will be inspired to help make wellness possible for all people.

WellPoint congratulates all of the WomenWorthWatching®, including our own current and past recipients Lori Beer, Dijuana Lewis, and Lisa Moriyama. At WellPoint, we are addressing tomorrow’s health care issues today by taking a leadership role in women’s health. Focusing on the medical issues that most affect women, we’ve developed a four-pronged approach that addresses wellness and prevention, disease management, quality improvement, and community involvement.

Better health care, thanks to you. Visit us online at wellpoint.com/diversity Contact us at diversityrecruiting@wellpoint.com EOE

®Registered Trademark, WellPoint, Inc. ©2009 WellPoint, Inc. All Rights Reserved ®Registered Trademark, WomenWorthWatching ®2009 Profiles in Diversity Journal, All Rights Reserved


women worth watching in 2010

Kathleen Hyle

C

Constellation Energy

Colin Powell is quoted as saying, “There are no secrets to success. It is the result of preparation, hard work, and learning from failure.” I came across this quote a few weeks ago, and it really resonated with me. I think it reflects a core belief of mine and describes key drivers of my business success.

TITLE: Senior Vice President, Constellation Energy; Chief Operating Officer, Constellation Energy Resources EDUCATION: BA, Accounting, Loyola College FIRST JOB: 19th hole concession stand at municipal golf course WHAT I’M READING: I recently completed the Twilight series with my daughter. I found it to be quite enjoyable and a great way to prompt discussions of issues that may not be encountered in day-to-day life. Currently, I am reading War Child, by Emmanuel Jal, that my son gave me for Mother’s Day, to broaden my exposure to African literature. MY PHILOSOPHY: Hard work creates luck. FAMILY: Widowed; three children: Tim, 23; Mike, 21; Elyse, 18 INTERESTS: Family and friends, gardening, design and antiquing, and traveling FAVORITE CHARITies: YWCA; Girl Scouts; Organizations that support children and women

COMPANY: Constellation Energy HEADQUARTERS: Baltimore, Maryland WEB SITE: www.constellation.com BUSINESS: Energy. ANNUAL REVENUES: $19.8 billion (2008) EMPLOYEES: 9,910

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I was the first member of my family, including extended family, to attend college. I am the oldest child, with a single mom who was going to school at night to better her opportunities, as she worked hard to support her family. She received her college degree at age 50, well after I had graduated and started my career and family. Watching her showed me the significant value of education not only in making me a more well rounded individual, but in providing financial independence. My mom was always upbeat and positive, even in trying situations. She instilled in me a strong work ethic and the value of perseverance—both have served me well throughout life. As I think about my own children who have worked tirelessly to be accepted into the schools of their choice, I marvel at my own naiveté in applying to a single school, without any consideration for how I would pay for my education, or what would happen if I was not accepted. Once I decided, I was intensely focused on this goal by working hard and remaining committed to my success.

“I’ve never shied away from an opportunity to learn…” Throughout my career, my success has been as a result of completing the tough assignments, taking on additional work, asking lots of questions, critically evaluating and questioning past assumptions, understanding how my work adds value to the organization, and communicating complex concepts simplistically and in plain English. I’ve never shied away from an opportunity to learn; I’ve made lateral career moves to better my experiences and knowledge, which has assisted me in becoming an effective executive. This required me to step outside of my comfort zone, to take on risks and challenges for learning and development. Sometimes taking these risks didn’t always result in the outcome that I had expected, and on the surface, on one or two occasions, they may have looked like failures. But, ultimately, all of these experiences, both positive and negative, shaped me as a leader. Through these experiences and opportunities, I was able to successfully navigate change and adversity with clarity and a strong focus for results, which is invaluable in any career assignment.

September/October 2009


women worth watching in 2010

Laura K. Ipsen

I

Cisco Systems, Inc.

I first became alert to the political process in junior high school when I lost my campaign for Treasurer. I was stunned—I had canvassed the entire school with stylish neon posters, and I was a whiz at math. But I had missed a critical ingredient—building a strong base and leveraging all my potential supporters, from my fellow gymnasts to members of the orchestra (I played violin) to, yes, even the Latin Club. As the daughter of an artist, I had not yet learned the actual “art” of politics.

“I learned from my father that the best art is not perfect.”

Today, as a government affairs professional, I am often surprised when a co-worker scoffs at or refuses to “condescend” to what they describe as office politics. In the past, I would immediately begin a debate on the “virtues” of politics, in an attempt to convince them that opting out is like throwing away your winning lottery ticket. In fact, my definition of politics is less about vote counting, and more about network building. Just prior to the U.S. elections last year, I spoke to 150 Cisco women about “my art” and using this to shape their careers. I shared my list of “Dos and Don’ts” for office politics: Dos • Recognize that office politics is really targeted networking.

TITLE: Senior Vice President, Global Policy and Government Affairs EDUCATION: BA, International Relations, University of Virginia; Arabic Studies, Yarmouk University, Irbid, Jordan FIRST JOB: PricewaterhouseCoopers WHAT I’M READING: Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed, by Jared Diamond; My Sister’s Keeper, by Jodi Picoult MY PHILOSOPHY: Chart your own course, but embrace the stormy seas; Seek diversity in your experiences and continue learning; Take some risk along the way. INTERESTS: Art, running, politics, environment, Indian cooking, scuba diving, mentoring. FAVORITE CHARITies: American Diabetes Association; World Wildlife Fund

• Take an inventory of politics in your organization. • Build and manage your own “political campaign.” • Choose the level of engagement consistent with your values. • Define your own political network and actively pursue supporters.

COMPANY: Cisco Systems, Inc.

• Participate in an ethical and authentic way.

HEADQUARTERS: San Jose, California

Don’ts

WEB SITE: www.cisco.com

• Spend more time on politics than substance.

BUSINESS: Information communications technology.

• Invest all of your political “eggs” in one basket. • Get ahead by leaving others behind.

ANNUAL REVENUES: $39.5 billion

• Build relationships for short-term gain.

EMPLOYEES: 65,545

• Avoid your political adversaries. • Engage in destructive or unethical behavior (backstabbing, gossiping, bullying). I managed to pick up on a few of these guiding principles in time to win my race for vice president of my senior class. Now, I coach others in the corporate world to not be a victim of politics, but to use office politics to chart their own course—advancing not only themselves, but the goals of their organization and others. Hillary Rodham Clinton wrote, “The challenge now is to practice politics as the art of making what appears to be impossible, possible.” I learned from my father that the best art is not perfect. Politics exist in government, corporations, non-profits, and even on the playground. While politics in any form is not perfect, it is a universal reality that can make the seemingly impossible, possible—and that is art in action.

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women worth watching in 2010

Deborah James

I

Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC)

I have been so fortunate in my career, having served in senior government, non-profit, and business positions. The thread that ties my life’s work together is serving our men and women in uniform, and the engine that has always fueled my growth is mentorship and networking.

TITLE: Senior Vice President and Business Unit General Manager EDUCATION: Master’s in International Affairs, Columbia University; AB, Comparative Studies, Duke University FIRST JOB: Capitol Hill, as a professional staff member in the House Armed Services Committee, dealing with military and NATO issues for 10 years before moving to the Pentagon. WHAT I’M READING: East of Eden, by John Steinbeck MY PHILOSOPHY: Be aware of new opportunities, and be ready to seize them when they present. FAMILY: Sam and Regina. INTERESTS: Aspiring golfer, history. FAVORITE CHARITies: The Pentagon Federal Credit Union Foundation (a national charity working to meet the needs of our military and their families); USO

COMPANY: Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) HEADQUARTERS: San Diego, California WEB SITE: www.saic.com BUSINESS: Scientific, engineering, and technology applications. ANNUAL REVENUES: $10.1 billion (fiscal year ended January 31, 2009) EMPLOYEES: Approximately 45,000

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During my college years, my dream was to be a Foreign Service Officer, but the Foreign Service did not offer me a job—so I did a quick “reality check” and tried a new focus—national defense. Nearly three decades later, I have derived tremendous satisfaction from this career move—hence my motto: “Watch for new opportunities, and seize them when they present.” My first “official” job was serving as a professional staff member on the House Armed Services Committee. I was a young, 20-something female with no background in defense, serving with much older males, many of whom had retired from the military. Fortunately, my diverse background helped me find a niche—it turns out I was a better, more persuasive writer than my colleagues. In Congress and many other institutions, communication is everything, so when it came to speech and report writing, they needed me—just as I needed them to learn defense policy and budgets. My diverse skill set, coupled with a great boss who took the time to mentor me, enabled me to rise through the ranks, becoming a specialist in military personnel and NATO issues, and preparing me for future assignments.

“Watch for new opportunities and seize them when they present.” Nearly twenty years after meeting my first great boss and mentor on the House Armed Services Committee, this same individual introduced me to my current employer, SAIC. Although SAIC is a highly technical firm, my mentor explained that the company was expanding the diversity of its experience base, and was looking to grow new leaders. Today, I serve as a business unit general manager, responsible for 2,500 people, approximately $400 million in contract revenue annually, and crucial defense programs that are helping save the lives of military personnel on the battlefield. In addition, I serve as a member of SAIC’s Diversity Council, and an executive sponsor of SAIC’s Multicultural Network and my business unit’s Leadership Development Program. The centerpiece of our Leadership Development Program is—you guessed it—mentorship. Pass it on.

September/October 2009


women worth watching in 2010

Chizuru Kiyomura

I

Pfizer Inc

I believe that, in this complex, challenging, and exciting world, there are many opportunities where I can make a real difference. I look to actively tackle the challenges that come my way, and I have confidence in my ability to find a path forward, even when I am doing new things or entering unfamiliar territory. There have been times in my past when I was offered a promotion and hesitated, not knowing if I was the right person for the job. Now, I want new challenges, and I’ve found that by being more confident in my overall ability, and being stronger mentally, I can jump any hurdles in front of me.

“Good communication is difficult but essential; it sets leaders apart.” At Pfizer, each experience has helped me to grow, and has added to my circle of people I know and trust. I started at Pfizer as a pharmaceutical sales representative, and was one of the first female sales representatives in our industry in Japan. I had to overcome many obstacles as a pioneer in the field. However, I learned to work spontaneously: planning my work, executing it, and taking responsibility for the results. I also learned about the importance of interpersonal relationships and the dynamics of teamwork. With success in sales, I was put in charge of pharmaceutical products. I learned to enjoy immersing myself fully in my work. After honing my skills and being evaluated by those around me, I became confident in my ability. My third job was product marketing team leader. Here, being an outstanding individual contributor was not enough. Great teamwork was also necessary. I learned to communicate about overall strategy, and engage team members in ways to motivate them to execute on that strategy. I also learned that achievements gained as a team bring more satisfaction than those gained individually.

TITLE: Vice President, Marketing, Pfizer Japan Inc EDUCATION: Bachelor of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Science FIRST JOB: Pharmaceutical Sales Representative, Pfizer Japan WHAT I’M READING: Emotional Intelligence, by Daniel Goleman MY PHILOSOPHY: The opposite of success is not failure. It’s to do nothing. Be positive, rather than adequate or not adequate. FAMILY: Husband; two cats. INTERESTS: Camping, swimming. FAVORITE CHARITy: World Vision, and their child sponsorship program

COMPANY: Pfizer Inc HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEB SITE: www.pfizer.com BUSINESS: Healthcare. ANNUAL REVENUES: $48.3 billion EMPLOYEES: Approximately 82,000

Good communication is difficult but essential; it sets leaders apart. Some people have high-level skills, but do not emerge as leaders, because they fall short in communicating with others. A leader has to listen to, and encourage, ideas; be firm when necessary; be generous in conveying gratitude and acknowledging contributions; and be open to revealing one’s true thoughts without hiding behind the armor we often take to work. I have learned something from just about everyone I’ve worked with. I am thankful to those who have taken the time to teach me, and I demonstrate my gratitude by teaching others and giving them my support.

Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

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women worth watching in 2010

Marcy S. Klevorn

A

Ford Motor Company

TITLE: Director, Global IT Operations EDUCATION: BBA, Stephen Ross School of Business, University of Michigan FIRST JOB: Marketing representative for Ameritech on the Ford Motor Account WHAT I’M READING: Murder Inside the Beltway, by Margaret Truman; Grown Up Digital, by Don Tapscott MY PHILOSOPHY: Most people can do most anything; people always exceed your expectations. FAMILY: Husband, Scott; son, Joe, 20. INTERESTS: Running, bikram yoga, reading, travel, boating. FAVORITE CHARITies: Michigan Council for Women in Technology Foundation; The American Lung Association

COMPANY: Ford Motor Company HEADQUARTERS: Dearborn, Michigan

After spending the past 25 years working at Ford, I have moved from being an analyst to my current executive position, managing employees around the world. The journey has had several defining moments—challenges I could not have imagined—but most importantly, personal and professional growth that I do not take for granted. Through the years, communication and relationships have been essential to my success. Starting as an individual contributor working through, and with, others, to leading an organization of 3500+, I have learned the value of honest communication. Communicating is the hardest and most important thing we do. An honest answer is the best response, even if that answer is “I don’t know”. Tough times in the automotive industry have tested us, and open communication has been key in moving forward with deliberation and respect. Often there are hard choices, stretch deadlines, and difficult trade-offs—as leaders, we can act decisively and swiftly, utilizing open communications. Whether news is good, bad, or indifferent, people want to know what is happening—and that eliminates the fear of the unknown. Being part of a global team has highlighted the importance of communication. By traveling and listening, I have recognized cultural differences and seen things from perspectives I would have never imagined. I continue to learn more each day.

“…relationship building is the most productive and personally satisfying aspect of success.”

WEB SITE: www.ford.com BUSINESS: Automotive. ANNUAL REVENUES: $139.3 billion EMPLOYEES: 213,000

For me, relationship building is the most productive and personally satisfying aspect of success. I have found that entering relationships without preconceived ideas works best. Over time, people show you their capabilities, motivations, and who they really are. People never cease to amaze me with their dedication and abilities. Picturing yourself in the other person’s role is the start of building a strong relationship. There is nothing more satisfying than working to achieve common goals. Success has not been a one-woman feat; in fact, just the opposite. I often tell my team that “an assist is as good as a goal.” This is very true in my own life. I would not have gotten where I am today without the support of my professional team of employees, peers, bosses, and mentors, and my personal team of family and friends. The saying that “it takes a village” has certainly been true for me—a professional village at work; and a village of family, friends, and neighbors that help me make the complex fabric of “work-life integration” work.

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women worth watching in 2010

Catherine Langlais

F

NYSE Euronext

Financial markets are said to be merciless, overwhelmingly male-dominated places. When I was young, they didn’t figure anywhere in my career plans. Instead, I was drawn to my first love: English and American literature.

TITLE: General Counsel Europe EDUCATION: BA, English Literature and Civilization, University of English, Paris IV, Sorbonne; Bachelor’s degree, International Public Law; and Master’s degree, International and European Law, University of Law, Paris XI, Sceaux FIRST JOB: In-house Legal Counsel at French Bank, Credit National WHAT I’M READING: Everything— novels, adventures, essays MY PHILOSOPHY: On the other side of the clouds, there is always sky. FAMILY: Married; one son, 15. INTERESTS: Sports; tennis, skiing. FAVORITE CHARITY: UNICEF

COMPANY: NYSE Euronext HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEB SITE: www.nyx.com BUSINESS: Financial markets and trading technologies. ANNUAL REVENUES: $4.474 billion U.S. (2008) EMPLOYEES: 3,500 (as of June 30, 2009)

Yet, I don’t for a minute regret choosing to study European and international law. For me, law was the discipline that first opened the doors to the stock market, and then gave me the keys. And I have really enjoyed working in financial markets, an exciting and stimulating work environment. Law and regulatory systems have always helped me find solutions that can reconcile diverse—even opposing— interests, and thus meet the challenges of modern business. A young woman starting a career in finance needs lots of patience, a great deal of energy, plus a little selflessness and flexibility. Combining motherhood with an executive position in a financial company has always been a constant challenge, as anyone who’s faced the following dilemma will understand: it’s 8:00 a.m., your child is coming down with chicken pox, and you’ve got a make-or-break meeting at the Ministry of Finance. But all women are born with a talent for finding solutions to exceptionally complex problems! For me, that meant finding solutions when I helped the business teams coordinate the move from floor trading to electronic trading at Matif, France’s former international futures market. The transition was inevitable but it triggered a wave of disputes and tense negotiations.

“A young woman starting a career in finance needs lots of patience…” And I found solutions when I helped build the stock exchange of the 21st century, following the merger of Euronext (the Amsterdam, Brussels, Lisbon, and Paris stock exchanges; and the Liffe futures exchange in London), with the New York Stock Exchange in 2007 to create NYSE Euronext—by developing a regulatory framework and governance principles. NYSE Euronext was the first transatlantic exchange, and posed a unique set of challenges as we merged a U.S. regulated exchange with several European-regulated exchanges. Today I work on European regulatory issues, and it’s also an honor for me to head our group’s Global Diversity Initiative. This nourishes the unique social fabric of a stock exchange that is both local, through the traditions of our member exchanges in their home countries, and completely global, as today’s financial world is so interconnected. NYSE Euronext has always valued diversity, viewing our multicultural employees as an invaluable resource and encouraging individual initiatives— including those of women—as part of our overall strategy. That philosophy has contributed enormously to my success.

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NYSE EURONEXT CELEBRATES

THE MANY WOMEN WHO THROUGH INNOVATION, COLLABORATION & LEADERSHIP POWER THE EXCHANGING WORLD


women worth watching in 2010

Antoinette (Tonie) Leatherberry

A

Deloitte Consulting LLP

As a consulting professional services organization, Deloitte Consulting relies on its practitioners’ capabilities and talents. For Deloitte Consulting to be successful in professional services, its role models must strive for a standard of excellence.

TITLE: Principal EDUCATION: BSME, Boston University; MBA, Northeastern University FIRST JOB: Manufacturing software developer for Digital Equipment Corporation WHAT I’M READING: Einstein: His Life and Universe, by Walter Isaacson; The Irregulars: Roald Dahl and the British Spy Ring in Wartime Washington, by Jennet Conant MY PHILOSOPHY: Live your life fully and in the moment. You can’t change your destiny, but choices you make today have a bearing on the future. FAMILY: Two daughters, Kyra and Aisha, and a precocious Scottish Terrier, Isa. INTERESTS: My children. I also enjoy anything water-related, including sailing, fishing, swimming, and scuba diving. FAVORITE CHARITY: CARIE—Center for the Advocacy, Rights and Interest of the Elderly

Each and every day I ask myself, “Am I bringing my personal best?” For me this means focusing on developing our people—which includes helping them understand the business of consulting and the attributes of a successful consultant, as well as their clients’ business challenges, and empowering them to be their best. I am working to build Deloitte Consulting’s organizational strength through the cultivation of individual and diverse perspectives. For our practice to continue to thrive, it is more important than ever for us to place an increased emphasis on the human component. I am leading the efforts at Deloitte Consulting to raise the level of consciousness regarding the changing face of our world and workforce. Our people strategy at Deloitte Consulting will focus on the changing perspective of both our clients and our practitioners. I believe success is based on a combination of attributes and actions: a passion for learning, a focus on results, the ability to influence others, and a vision. What does success mean for our people? It means accomplishing what they set out to do—that’s what we all strive for. It also means walking away satisfied with the services they have provided to the client, and making sure the client is satisfied with the results.

“I want to empower our people to walk away from their projects as better consultants…”

COMPANY: Deloitte Consulting LLP HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEB SITE: www.deloitte.com BUSINESS: A leading global professional services organization that provides consulting services in the areas of technology, strategy & operations, and human capital to clients across all industries. EMPLOYEES: 37,382

However, success is not just about providing services; it’s also about growing personally and professionally. I want to empower our people to walk away from their projects as better consultants—with improved technical capabilities and advisory skills, increased understanding of the subject matter, and stronger client relationships. To what do I credit my own personal success? I have always had role models who saw something in me that was worth taking a risk and making an investment. I have also sought highly visible and complex client challenges, and I have always surrounded myself with good people whom I can both rely on and learn from. In addition, I invest heavily in my relationships. It’s just as important for me to help others achieve their success as it is for them to play an integral role in helping me achieve my goals; it’s mutually beneficial and is the foundation of a lasting relationship.

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Kathleen T. Hogan, Corporate Vice President Microsoft Worldwide Services

Staying in touch with 700 million customers, one at a time. Optimizing service and support; maximizing the return on investment; creating long-term relationships – when it comes to customer satisfaction, Kathleen Hogan has set the standard, time and time again. Under Kathleen’s leadership, her 17,000-person team has been instrumental in empowering individuals and businesses in more than 80 countries to meet their objectives through Microsoft products and services. Congratulations, Kathleen, for being one of Profiles in Diversity Journal’s “Women Worth Watching in 2010.”

www.youatmicrosoft.com Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

September/October 2009

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women worth watching in 2010

Michelle Y. Lee

A

Wells Fargo & Company

TITLE: Regional President, Wells Fargo Northeast Community Bank (NJ, NY, CT) EDUCATION: BM, Applied Voice, Boston Conservatory of Music FIRST JOB: Teller, First National State Bank, a predecessor company of Wachovia/Wells Fargo Bank WHAT I’M READING: A Mercy, by Toni Morrison MY PHILOSOPHY: I believe you should never let anyone set a goal for you that is higher than the ones you set for yourself. Great leaders don’t just set the bar high; they see the “bar”as an arbitrary measurement that sets arbitrary limits. Regardless of your interests, passions or line of work, the only limits are the ones you set for yourself! FAMILY: Happily single, four godchildren, two loving parents and awesome friendships. INTERESTS: Choir director, singer, songwriter, poet, playwright. FAVORITE CHARITY: Susan G. Komen for the Cure

COMPANY: Wells Fargo & Company HEADQUARTERS: San Francisco, California WEB SITE: www.wellsfargo.com BUSINESS: Wells Fargo & Company is a diversified financial services company with $1.3 trillion in assets, providing banking, insurance, investments, mortgage and consumer finance through more than 11,000 stores, over 12,000 ATMs and the internet across North America and internationally. ANNUAL REVENUES: $42.23 billion (2008)

Anyone looking at my resume and seeing that my undergraduate degree is in Music, Applied Voice from the Boston Conservatory of Music, can be forgiven for scratching their head and wondering how—or why—I made banking my career. In fact, my passion for music theory manifests itself in other forms of “theory,” such as math and accounting. So although I had no interest in a career, and only applied for a teller position so I wouldn’t have to wear a “fastfood uniform” again, I unintentionally found my passion, and from day one wanted to learn more and more about banking. I believe there are skills that I have learned from the disciplines of music theory, practice, and performance that I use every day as a banker and as a leader—the least of which is sometimes breaking into song on conference calls! Certainly, there are many important aspects to leadership, but one leadership accountability that is especially important to me is mentoring. A leader is only as successful as her team, and in addition to managing and motivating teammates, it is vitally important to help them learn, grow, and progress in their careers. Mentoring is a critical driver to increase diversity in the workplace. It plays a valuable role in the development of minorities and women for leadership positions, both of whom are seldom included in the “informal mentoring” that happens more naturally among white males. Mentoring can open doors, and provide access and visibility that otherwise might take years for a diverse leader to achieve without an advocate in their corner. In addition, mentoring plays an important role in keeping diverse talent engaged and connected to a company and usually leads to a faster, more sustainable progression for the protégé.

“Mentoring is actually a two-way street and is mutually rewarding for both parties.” Certainly, the number of women in the workplace has increased, but we continue to be under-represented in leadership positions. The proverbial glass ceiling is even harder to crack for people of color, so mentoring is an opportunity to address the dilemma of increasing the representation of women and people of color in senior leadership roles. Mentoring is actually a two-way street and is mutually rewarding for both parties. It is a gratifying experience for the leader both personally and professionally. Along with helping someone else, I have learned new perspectives and ways of thinking by mentoring others, in addition to gaining a sense of personal satisfaction by helping someone else with their career development. As I think back through my twenty-five-year career in banking, the accomplishments I am most proud of are the ones achieved by the people I have mentored. To think that I have, in some way, played a part in their success—there is no greater reward.

EMPLOYEES: 286,000

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Making a difference starts with making an effort A standing ovation WITH WACHOVIA Congratulations to our very own Michelle Lee. We honor your commitment to diversity and our community.

Michelle Lee Northeast Regional President, Community Banking

Š 2009 Wachovia Bank N.A. All rights reserved. 093171


women worth watching in 2010

Theresa K. Lee

W

Eastman Chemical Company

TITLE: Senior Vice President, Chief Legal Officer & Corporate Secretary EDUCATION: BS, Political Science and History, East Tennessee State University; JD, University of Tennessee, Knoxville; completed the Advanced Management Program at Harvard Business School FIRST JOB: Waiting tables at Pizza Hut WHAT I’M READING: American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House, by Jon Meacham; First Family, by David Baldacci; Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austen MY PHILOSOPHY: Work hard. See the big picture and don’t take yourself too seriously. FAMILY: Husband, Tony; two children: Patrick and Katherine. INTERESTS: Swimming, boating, reading, yoga. FAVORITE CHARITY: United Way

COMPANY: Eastman Chemical Company HEADQUARTERS: Kingsport, Tennessee WEB SITE: www.eastman.com BUSINESS: Manufacturer of chemicals, fibers, and plastics. ANNUAL REVENUES: $6.7 billion in 2008 EMPLOYEES: 10,000 worldwide

When I graduated from law school in 1977, I never dreamed my professional life would be so varied and so rewarding. I began my career as a legal aid attorney for Legal Services of Upper East Tennessee, working to provide legal services to those who need help but cannot afford it. My next job opportunity—working as a law clerk for Judge H. Emory Widener, Jr., United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit—opened the door for where I am today. Judge Widener was a mentor who taught and practiced standing firm in support of your values and beliefs, doing the right thing, and always looking at the big picture. He suggested I consider working in the legal department of Eastman Chemical Company because he liked the people who worked there. I applied and have been happily employed at Eastman for the last 22 years.

“It all comes down to enjoying what you do at work and helping others do the same.” When asked what I have learned throughout my career in both the public and private sector that I share when mentoring to others, I provide the following: • Do the right thing because it’s the right thing to do, not because someone is watching. • Like what you do at work and like the people you work with. At Eastman, I’ve been very fortunate to be part of a team of extraordinarily talented and caring people working together toward a common goal. Judge Widener had it right years ago when he said he liked the people who worked at Eastman. • Know yourself and be yourself. Be genuine. Decide who you are and what you need, desire, and dream of, rather than what others expect you to need or desire. Know what you do well and what you don’t do well; take advantage of the former and find help for the latter. • Be proactive—don’t wait for opportunity to knock. Seek it out—volunteer for assignments. Broaden your horizons. • Be patient and learn from opportunities that do not come your way. Figure out what you were lacking and focus on filling the gap. • Actively seek and value the feedback you get. Hear what someone is saying, and receive it as a gift that was very hard for the other person to give. • Remember it’s not about you—it’s about us! • Enjoy today—tomorrow will take care of itself. It all comes down to enjoying what you do at work, and helping others do the same.

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The sense of empowerment The drive for excellence The opportunity to emerge

Diversity is about making the most of our differences and similarities. At Eastman, we are creating a culture that enhances the capabilities of all employees. It’s our mix of differences and similarities that enrich our ability to generate innovative ideas and deliver practical solutions.

Š Eastman Chemical Company 2009 Eastman Chemical Company is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.

www.eastman.com


women worth watching in 2010

Bonita Lewis Bell

B

Terex Corporation

Being where I am today was not part of a well-thought-out plan. My career choice was the result of happenstance, but much of the success I have had results from great mentoring relationships that encouraged me to stretch professionally.

TITLE: Vice President, Deputy General Counsel EDUCATION: BS, Electrical Engineering, University of Maryland; JD, George Washington University FIRST JOB: Cashier at McDonald’s WHAT I’M READING: Color Me Butterfly, by L.Y. Marlow; Basic Black: The Essential Guide for Getting Ahead at Work (and in Life), by Cathie Black MY PHILOSOPHY: Get involved! You learn so much by taking on new tasks in your professional and personal life. FAMILY: Husband, Howard; son H.B., 6. INTERESTS: Reading, walking, traveling with my family. FAVORITE CHARITY: Alpha Kappa Alpha Educational Advancement Foundation

COMPANY: Terex Corporation HEADQUARTERS: Westport, Connecticut

I went to a high school that focused on steering minorities to careers in science and engineering. I was encouraged to become an engineer because of my aptitude for math. My high school counselor (one of my first mentors) could not have been more thrilled that I chose to major in electrical engineering. As a college junior, I had some reservations about an engineering career. At the encouragement of some graduating classmates (i.e., between class chatter in the student lounge), I decided to forego the traditional list of engineering recruiters and instead took a job as a Patent Examiner with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. The Patent Office was a great place for a freshly minted engineering graduate to work. I teamed with a senior examiner who was assigned to show me the ropes. Not only did he teach me the job, but he also helped me to understand the value of the mentoring relationship and its importance to job success. For a junior employee, I was good at my job. I realized that the Patent Office was the breeding ground for patent lawyers, and I decided, “I can do that.” I left the Patent Office after a little more than a year to attend law school full-time to pursue a career as an intellectual property lawyer.

“I would encourage everyone to find someone who has achieved what you want and ask that person for help.”

WEB SITE: www.terex.com BUSINESS: Manufacturer of equipment for use in various industries, including the construction, infrastructure, quarrying, surface mining, shipping, transportation, refining, and utility industries. ANNUAL REVENUES: $9.9 billion EMPLOYEES: 20,000

In a profession where minorities and women are woefully underrepresented, I have had the privilege of having many great mentors—most of whom did not look like me. While I may not have been their traditional pick for a protégée, my enthusiasm, willingness to listen, and generally upbeat attitude went a long way to bridging the gap and making the relationship work. I benefited (and continued to benefit) tremendously from the advice, direction, and opportunity that those relationships provided. I would encourage everyone to find someone who has achieved what you want, and ask that person for help. As I move through this phase of my career and look forward to the next, I continue to seek out those who can provide guidance and encouragement so that my success in my “coincidental” career will be not be left to chance.

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Sade Socially Minded Process Quality Engineer San Jose, California, USA

Sade was recently named Diversity and Inclusion lead for Global Supply Management Chain. In this role she’ll not only help foster a more inclusive work environment — she’ll help make Cisco a stronger company inside and out.

Who you are shapes who we are. We believe in the power of the human network. And we believe it starts with you. www.cisco.com/go/diversity


women worth watching in 2010

Nan Mattai

A

Rockwell Collins

TITLE: Senior Vice President, Engineering & Technology EDUCATION: BS, Physics and Mathematics, University of Guyana; MS, Physics, University of Windsor FIRST JOB: Teaching Assistant, Mathematics, University of Windsor WHAT I’M READING: The Innovator’s Dilemma, by Clayton M. Christensen; Pursuit of Happyness, by Chris Gardner MY PHILOSOPHY: Stay true to the core values that were instilled as a child. Remember there is always tomorrow to complete what you did not finish today. Look for the positives in life and in situations; do not dwell on the negatives. Learn from your mistakes. Do not ask someone to do something that you would not want to do yourself. FAMILY: Husband and two sons INTERESTS: Reading, cooking and travel abroad. FAVORITE CHARITy: American Diabetes Foundation

COMPANY: Rockwell Collins HEADQUARTERS: Cedar Rapids, Iowa WEB SITE: www.rockwellcollins.com BUSINESS: Aerospace and defense. ANNUAL REVENUES: $4.7 billion EMPLOYEES: Nearly 20,000

As the third child in a family of seven children, responsibility was placed on us older children to help care for our younger siblings. As a result, at an early age, I developed crucial organization, collaboration, negotiation, decision-making, and delegation skills, and sought out challenging and exciting tasks at home and school. My parents had no formal education beyond high school, but they fervently believed a college education was critical to their children’s future. They encouraged us to dream big and work hard. It is from these experiences that I formed my strong belief that one never stops learning. Today, I am fortunate to work in an environment where I interact with some of the best engineers and leaders in our industry. They help create an environment where continued learning is promoted and valued. During the early years of my career, we didn’t have a formal mentoring program; however, my supervisor encouraged me to take on new and exciting challenges. These challenges cultivated and strengthened my areas of technical expertise, my leadership abilities and my knowledge of the business environment.

“If you aspire to be a leader...take on challenging assignments that stretch you beyond your comfort zone…” One of my greatest career accomplishments was getting promoted to my current position—Senior Vice President of Engineering and Technology. In this role, I report to our Chairman, President, and CEO Clay Jones, and serve as the voice of our engineering workforce. After accepting the position, I soon realized that this job would require much more public speaking than I had done in the past. To overcome this new challenge, Clay served as my mentor to provide guidance and feedback. As I have taken these increasing levels of responsibilities at Rockwell Collins, my biggest concern has been maintaining the right level of work-family balance. One important lesson I learned is that there will be times when work requires more of my attention, and I need to give it that priority. But there also are times when my family requires more attention. With the right level of planning, prioritization, and family support, I am able to find that balance. If you aspire to be a leader, my advice is to establish your reputation as someone who can make things happen, take on challenging assignments that stretch you beyond your comfort zone, and deliver results that go beyond expectations. Seek out strong mentors who have walked that path before to accelerate your learning curve.

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women worth watching in 2010

Candace Matthews

U Amway

“Unto whom much is given, much is required” applies as much to my mentoring approach as it does to my overall life philosophy. How appropriate then that my first mentor and role model was my mother—although I didn’t realize it at the time.

TITLE: Chief Marketing Officer EDUCATION: BS, Carnegie Mellon University; MBA, Stanford Graduate School of Business FIRST JOB: Quality assurance engineer at the Packard Electric Division of General Motors WHAT I’M READING: Expect to Win, by Carla Harris MY PHILOSOPHY: Relayed by my mother and three-pronged: 1. Where there is a will, there is a way; 2. When the Lord closes a door, He opens a window; and, 3. “Unto whom much is given, much is required.” Luke 12:48 FAMILY: Husband, Bruce, married 10 years; twin daughters, Sydney and Simone; and son, Seth. INTERESTS: My family, musical theatre, piano, singing, sailing, horses, travel, the outdoors. FAVORITE CHARITies: Figure Skating in Harlem; West Michigan Center for Arts & Technology

COMPANY: Amway HEADQUARTERS: Ada, Michigan WEB SITE: www.amway.com BUSINESS: Amway develops, manufactures, markets, and sells (through independent business owners) high-quality health, beauty, and homecare products that help people live better lives. ANNUAL REVENUES: $8.2 billion EMPLOYEES: 15,000

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She was the CEO of our family of 18 children, 16 of whom went to college. She made us “high-performing” individuals through her nurturing, prayers, and quiet guidance, teaching us that we could accomplish anything to which we set our minds. Giving back—sharing our time, talent and treasure—was another key part of Mom’s mantra to us kids. My mother was a foster parent and taught us how to truly give of ourselves. My first “traditional” mentor had a strikingly similar approach. While recruiting me to join General Mills from Stanford Graduate School of Business, Ann Fudge told me she’d be my mentor and “teach me everything I needed to succeed” if I in turn would do the same for others.

“A good mentor will give you input you may not want to hear, but absolutely need to hear…” I was so blessed to have someone like Ann in my life at that time. I was 26 years old and fresh out of a business school; I didn’t know the first thing about the corporate world. With the exception of two brothers with lengthy careers with IBM, most of my family had pursued careers in social services or teaching. I didn’t even know what a mentor was or how valuable that opportunity was— but I was smart enough to accept the offer. From teaching me how to present myself to helping me navigate my career opportunities, Ann taught me what it takes to be successful in my career and in life. A good mentor will give you input you may not want to hear, but absolutely need to hear—and Ann did that. Her impact has been profound, and I am fortunate to still have Ann in my life. In return, I began to mentor others after I had 10 years of a professional career under my belt. Over the years, I’ve had the honor and privilege to mentor many individuals, and these experiences continue to enrich my life. When people ask me how I can be a good mentor with my busy schedule, I remind them that giving someone 15 quality minutes—time during which you truly listen to them—can be extremely valuable; I make an effort to give people my undivided attention when we’re together (a skill I learned from my mother!). I look forward to years of sharing with others what I’ve learned from the wonderful people in my life, knowing that every experience will teach me something new as well.

September/October 2009


WE’RE AN INDUSTRY LEADER THAT DEVELOPS AND INSPIRES LEADERS. Candace Matthews, Amway Chief Marketing Officer in Global Marketing, is one such leader. Candace focuses on building and strengthening relationships. And she provides the vision and direction for Amway’s Global Marketing team. As a result, together they create positive change. Her philosophy on mentoring and developing top talent is a belief shared by our entire company. A company that has 15,000 employees who support more than three million distributors who sell nutrition, beauty and homecare products. Products that, for 50 years and counting, have made people’s lives better. Like Candace, Amway employees have discovered the meaning of personal success. Which inspires countless others. Every day. For more information on Amway career opportunities, visit amway.com

Candace Matthews Chief Marketing Officer

YOUR BUSINESS BEAUT Y HOME

NUTRITION


women worth watching in 2010

Kathleen M. Mazzarella

I

Graybar Electric Co., Inc.

TITLE: Senior Vice President, Sales & Marketing, Comm/Data EDUCATION: AA, Telecommunications Engineering; Bachelor’s degree, Applied Behavioral Sciences; Master’s degree, Business Administration FIRST JOB: Customer Service Representative WHAT I’M READING: The Unthinkable: Who Survives When Disaster Strikes—and Why, by Amanda Ripley MY PHILOSOPHY: Earn trust through integrity, build a strong team, and expect only the best from yourself and those around you. FAMILY: Married, and mother of two grown daughters. INTERESTS: Taekwondo, cooking, reading. FAVORITE CHARITy: Variety St. Louis (serving on the Board, and supporting its work with disabled children in the St. Louis region)

COMPANY: Graybar Electric Co., Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Clayton, Missouri WEB SITE: www.graybar.com BUSINESS: Wholesale distribution. ANNUAL REVENUES: $5.4 billion (2008)

I have been incredibly fortunate to work for a great company where I have built a very successful career. At the age of 19, I started as a customer service representative at Graybar, and 29 years later, I am a senior vice president and a member of the company’s Board of Directors. That kind of career path really speaks to Graybar’s culture, and more importantly, to its core values of integrity, employee ownership, long-term view, and customer focus. My career path has also allowed me to learn Graybar’s business from the bottom up, and has given me the opportunity to benefit from the wisdom and experience of others. Most of this mentoring has been informal; however, it has been an essential part of my career growth.

“…the best way I can have a long-term impact is by taking a personal interest in the success of others.” At this point in my career and in my life, I recognize more than ever the importance of investing in the development of others. I’m proud of the things I’ve accomplished, but I want to be remembered as someone who made a positive impact on others, both personally and professionally. I want to help the next generation succeed, not only for their personal benefit, but also for the benefit of the organization, and the communities where we all live and work. As an example, I recently led the effort to start a women’s networking group at Graybar called WINGS, which stands for “Women Influencing Graybar’s Success.” In an industry that is predominately male, I am excited about the possibilities for this group. As it grows and develops, it will connect women with one another and provide mentoring opportunities to help women be successful in our company and our industry. I try to maintain a healthy perspective on my career, and to remember that the best way I can have a long-term impact is by taking a personal interest in the success of others.

EMPLOYEES: 8,000

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women worth watching in 2010

Tricia J. McClung

I

Freddie Mac

I believe the key to success in business (and in life) is to be personally courageous in whatever you do. Conquering small challenges can add up to big rewards. Throughout my life and career I have taken on personal challenges that have resulted in personal, as well as professional, satisfaction. One such example is public speaking. When I began work at Freddie Mac, I feared public speaking, but it was a personal goal to become a polished speaker—and I also felt it was essential to being a recognized leader. So I joined a Toastmasters group at work to help me conquer my fear, and I now love to speak in front of large audiences.

“…I love what I do, because I feel that I am making a real difference in the lives of others.”

TITLE: Vice President, Offerings Management, Single Family Sourcing EDUCATION: BS, Economics, George Mason University FIRST JOB: Computer programmer with EDS Consulting WHAT I’M READING: American Wife, by Curtis Sittenfeld MY PHILOSOPHY: Find ways to be personally courageous. FAMILY: Husband and daughter.

When I began my career, I didn’t necessarily set out to be an officer of a Fortune 500 company, but through setting personal goals, not being afraid to take on risks, and constantly challenging myself, my career soared. Today, I lead Freddie Mac’s Relief RefinanceSM Mortgage Initiative, a critical part of President Obama’s new Making Home Affordable plan that will help millions of families across the country keep their homes. I can honestly say I love what I do, because I feel that I am making a real difference in the lives of others. Having spent more than 20 years at Freddie Mac, and several more honing my business and project management skills, I offer others looking to achieve professional (and personal) success these five key strategies: 1. Celebrate the small things because they can all add up to big rewards. Instead of setting goals like “I want to be a vice president in 2 years,” set goals to achieve critical milestones that can help you get there, such as creating a network of mentors that will provide closer insight into your desired job.

INTERESTS: Reading, community outreach. FAVORITE CHARITY: HomeStretch; local women’s homeless shelters

COMPANY: Freddie Mac HEADQUARTERS: McLean, Virginia WEB SITE: www.freddiemac.com BUSINESS: Mortgage finance. ANNUAL REVENUES: Full year 2008 revenue was ($22 billion) EMPLOYEES: Approximately 5,000

2. Find yourself as part of the solution—not the problem. Oftentimes people complain about their job or a specific task. Be realistic about the situation and look for resolution. 3. You don’t have to go it alone. Developing meaningful relationships and important networks are key to building a successful career. 4. Ask for help and accept the advice of others around you. I have grown more successful in my career because of the advice I have sought from my colleagues and staff. They are some of my greatest mentors. 5. Be confident. While it’s important to rely on others, always believe in yourself and your abilities. Recognize that you can find personal courage and push through any challenge. Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

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women worth watching in 2010

Denise McEachern

G

Bausch & Lomb, Incorporated

TITLE: Vice President, Global Regulatory Affairs EDUCATION: BS, Biology/Chemistry, Washington College, Chestertown, Maryland; pursuing Executive JD, Concord Law School, Los Angeles, California FIRST JOB: Childcare center WHAT I’M READING: Law books MY PHILOSOPHY: Make a positive difference in people’s lives. FAMILY: Steve, husband for 24 years; daughter, Michelle; son, Chris. INTERESTS: Scuba diving, hiking, wine tasting. FAVORITE CHARITy: Susan G. Komen for the Cure

COMPANY: Bausch & Lomb, Incorporated HEADQUARTERS: Rochester, New York WEB SITE: www.bausch.com BUSINESS: Ophthalmic. EMPLOYEES: Approximately 10,000

Growing up in a large military family, I learned the importance of teamwork, strong relationships, independence, and hard work. As an adult, I moved thousands of miles away from my family, striking out into the unknown to pursue my education and career. Throughout my life’s journey thus far, I’ve met countless people and have learned many things that have helped shape me into who I am today. One of the most important things I’ve learned is to take responsibility for my own life. You can’t wait for someone to hand you something; if you do, you might not like what is being offered. Taking responsibility, understanding the options, and making the best of each situation has made me a stronger person today. Author Deanna Beisser captured it when she said, “Success is being who you are, and feeling proud of yourself for every task and challenge that you face and conquer along the way.”

“To grow and become successful, we must understand what works and what does not work.” In life’s classroom, we learn the most from our failures and near-failures. To grow and become successful, we must understand what works and what does not work. I’ve learned from my mistakes and realized that sometimes you just have to get off the bus and go in a different direction. Albert Einstein said it best: “Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again, and expecting different results.” I’ve learned that good relationships truly matter. The partners I work with are people—not a company, not a letter, not a voice over the phone. What makes me happy and proud is knowing that I have succeeded honestly, positively, and with integrity. I’ve learned to grow through my relationships, and give back by sharing skills and knowledge with the next generation of leaders. Indira Gandhi observed, “I suppose that leadership at one time meant muscles; but today it means getting along with people.” Career-wise, I dreamed of curing cancer, healing children, and traveling into space, which is not exactly where I have landed. However, with no regrets, I know that I’ve made a positive difference in people’s lives, as a scientist, as a mentor, and as a leader. The Bausch & Lomb vision, perfecting vision and enhancing life, resonates with me and my career in health care. Elbert Hubbard summed it up: “all success consists in this: you are doing something for somebody—benefitting humanity—and the feeling of success comes from the consciousness of this.”

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women worth watching in 2010

Julie Moore

H Ecolab Inc.

Having been raised on a farm in southern Minnesota, I was taught from an early age that, to be successful in life, I had to work hard, always do my best no matter the task, and be honest when dealing with others. So it stood to reason that if I followed those same principles at work, I believed, I would be successful no matter the career path I chose. While I still believe in the intrinsic value of those attributes, and try to follow them daily, I’ve since come to realize that there were a few more key ingredients in my personal recipe for career success.

“…you must actively seek opportunities to make an impact in an organization if you want to advance your career.” The first is opportunity. Experience has shown me that you must actively seek opportunities to make an impact in an organization if you want to advance your career. Those opportunities may not always be obvious, or even glamorous, and may involve some risk, but every opportunity should be weighed against your long-term career goals. For example, you must be willing to change roles within a company, or even change companies, if the business objectives no longer match your long-term goals. How you choose to handle each opportunity will ultimately define how successful you are along your own career path. The second ingredient is mentoring. Look for ways to be actively mentored through relationships with your peers, as well as passing on lessons learned by mentoring others. I have been part of a women’s peer networking group for over 12 years now, and have benefited in many ways. I’ve evaluated my different career choices. I’ve developed life-long friends with many women, and helped numerous others during my career. Mentoring others is the best way I know to follow a payit-forward mentality so that others can learn from my thoughts and experiences gained over the life of my career. The third and final ingredient for career success is passion. I truly believe you must find your passion in life and make that part of your career. My diverse background includes everything from positions as a computer programmer, to a marketing manager in packaged foods, to a global marketing leader, to a general manager for a vehicle-care business. At first glance, not a traditional career ladder. However, they all have one thing in common—these opportunities allowed me to play to my strengths and passion. In each role, I was able to evaluate complex business challenges, focus on developing long-term business strategies, and motivate a talented and diverse team to help make the business successful.

TITLE: VP, General Manager, Vehicle Care Division EDUCATION: BS, Quantitative Methods & Information Systems (minor in Computer Science), St. Cloud State University; MBA, University of Minnesota Carlson School FIRST JOB: Computer programmer, General Mills Inc. WHAT I’M READING: Audition, A Memoir, by Barbara Walters MY PHILOSOPHY: It’s all about having a talented, diverse group of people on your team for the best chance of success. FAMILY: Husband, Tom; two children: William, 15; Lauren 13. INTERESTS: Baseball, reading, cabin time in Northern Minnesota, networking & building relationships with others. FAVORITE CHARITY: American Heart Association

COMPANY: Ecolab Inc. HEADQUARTERS: St. Paul, Minnesota WEB SITE: www.ecolab.com BUSINESS: The leading provider of cleaning, food safety, and health protection products and services for the foodservice, hospitality, healthcare and industrial markets, helping customers achieve cleaner, safer and healthier environments while helping minimizing their environmental footprint. ANNUAL REVENUES: $6 billion EMPLOYEES: 26,000 employees in more than 160 countries

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women worth watching in 2010

Susan Morisato

A

Ovations Insurance Solutions

TITLE: President EDUCATION: BS, Mathematics and Education; MS, Mathematics, University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign) FIRST JOB: Actuarial student—Aetna Life and Casualty; aside from overall helper in a family diner during my teen years WHAT I’M READING: Outliers, by Malcolm Gladwell; and assorted mysteries MY PHILOSOPHY: I am ultimately accountable for my actions and believe I can create my own path for success and fulfillment. In dealing with people day-to-day or in business, I believe in building relationships and teams, because it is through embracing the diversity of thought that one gets to the best solutions. FAMILY: Married, with two very pampered cats. INTERESTS: Cooking and traveling. FAVORITE CHARITies: Alzheimer’s Association; Tree House Humane Society; Minnesota Zoo

COMPANY: Ovations Insurance Solutions (UnitedHealth Group) HEADQUARTERS: Minnetonka, Minnesota WEB SITE: www.ovationshealth.com BUSINESS: Health & well-being. ANNUAL REVENUES: $6 billion EMPLOYEES: 775

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At the time I went to college, it was not very common for women to enter more technically oriented fields, which was a closer match to my academic skills and interests. I was very fortunate to have unwavering support from my parents, who believed and encouraged me to become anything I wanted to be, instead of what might have been viewed by others as more traditional or expected. I was lucky to have found the actuarial profession, which allowed me to utilize my technical and analytic skills, but broadly apply them to real business issues. The rigor to become certified gave me a foundation of recognized achievement. At the time there were very few female actuaries and even fewer involved in health care.

“…my success is a reflection of the quality and strength of my team and those around me.” My early career was performing more technical work in an insurance company. I quickly realized that drawing on some of my other skills would be necessary to wield real influence and become a leader. What took a while longer to learn was that my style of being a leader would be different than many of the role models around me. Developing a variety of relationships and building teams of people with diverse training, education, and work experiences was critical for me in developing and executing a vision and strategy around my passion. Having worked in health insurance for most of my career, I became passionate about overcoming the challenges in providing access and choice to quality, affordable health care for older Americans, and creating solutions that are understandable and sustainable. Health care can be incredibly complex. Being successful means understanding all of the dependencies and interactions. This process of cultivating relationships and embracing diverse ways of thinking across various disciplines and stakeholders is a key component for a successful leader. The environment is ever-changing; expectations change and bars are constantly raised; therefore, one must continually evolve and anticipate those changes to meet those demands. I truly acknowledge that my success is a reflection of the quality and strength of my team and those around me. By championing diversity in yourself and those around you, you can significantly expand your circle of knowledge and influence.

September/October 2009


OUR COMPANY

>

THE SUM OF ITS PARTS

BE WHO YOU ARE. CREATE WHO WE’LL BE. UnitedHealth Group is working to create the health care system of tomorrow. One that will work better for more people in more ways than ever. A goal of this magnitude requires transformative ideas from a collective of diverse talent. At UnitedHealth Group, our commitment to diversity is clearly visible in the high-performing people we hire, in the health care services we provide, and in our dedication to social responsibility. We support and applaud the efforts of those who work to promote fairness, equality and opportunity. Uniting our individual efforts and abilities toward our common goal, we’re making a difference. Learn more about us at unitedhealthgroup.com

Diversity creates a healthier atmosphere: equal opportunity employer M/F/D/V. UnitedHealth Group is a drug-free workplace. Candidates are required to pass a drug test before beginning employment. © 2009 UnitedHealth Group. All rights reserved.


women worth watching in 2010

Nina J. Mullins

B

Salt River Project (SRP)

TITLE: Manager, Water Business Management EDUCATION: Bachelor’s degree, Northern Arizona University; MBA, Western International University FIRST JOB: Social Services administrator WHAT I’M READING: Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln, by Doris Kearns Goodwin MY PHILOSOPHY: Never, Never, Never Give Up!! At times we are content to take “no” or “it can’t be done” for an answer. If you have the passion to make something a reality, don’t give up on your dreams and aspirations. FAMILY: Married for 15 years; two wonderful children: Madison, 11, and Mason, 9. INTERESTS: Family sports, boating, skiing, reading, and spending time with my family. FAVORITE CHARITy: Child Crisis Center in Mesa, Arizona

COMPANY: Salt River Project (SRP) HEADQUARTERS: Phoenix, Arizona WEB SITE: www.srpnet.com BUSINESS: SRP is the largest provider of electricity to the greater Phoenix area, providing electric service to more than 930,000 customers. SRP is also the Phoenix metropolitan area’s largest supplier of water, delivering about one million acre-feet to agricultural, urban and municipal water users. ANNUAL REVENUES: $2.73 billion (2008) EMPLOYEES: 4,461

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Being a pioneer can be challenging, but I wouldn’t have it any other way. My first job at Salt River Project, the largest provider of power and water in the Phoenix metropolitan area, was reading meters. I soon moved up to relay technician, installing protective systems for substations, transformers, and distribution lines. As only the second woman to enter this field, and working outdoors in the 100-plus degree heat, all eyes were on me to drop out of the program. I proved them wrong and stayed for 10 years.

“…continually learn and prepare for the next opportunity. In the midst of working long hours as a technician, I worked on my MBA, got married, and had two children. My experience in the field and the MBA helped land my first supervisory position, overseeing the control and data acquisition system for SRP’s electrical grid. Soon I was given the opportunity to be part of a mentoring program, an offer I gladly accepted, and never regretted. The mentoring relationship helped me overcome hurdles and laid the foundation for my role as a mentor today. With each promotion and subsequent mentor, I gleaned insight about myself while dealing with industry issues. Sometimes I’ve had to unlearn things from prior mentors, but I feel strongly that each one helped me become the diverse manager I am today. I have always approached my mentoring relationships as opportunities to learn from others. From these relationships comes a conviction to continually learn and prepare for the next opportunity. Three important traits of a competent leader I try to follow are: • Be a leader of diversity. Always demonstrate you have the ability to work with all types of people and readily support equal and fair treatment for all. • Be a leader who has the ability to deal with important issues. Strive to understand the key components of individuals and group processes, and focus on what’s important to meet the desired outcomes. • Be a leader with ethics and values. Stand up for what you believe in, and consistently act in line with those values. Over time, I moved from SRP’s Power Division to the Water Group. Today, I am the Manager of Water Business Management, with 24 years of experience under my belt. Not only do I mentor others, but I too have a mentor. There’s still much to learn and so much I can offer to individuals coming up through the ranks. My excitement comes from watching these young men and women, and helping them develop into the SRP leaders of tomorrow. September/October 2009


PROUD TO SUPPORT THE PEOPLE AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS THAT MAKE THE PHOENIX METRO AREA A GREAT PLACE TO LIVE. srpnet.com/community


women worth watching in 2010

Claire Beth Nogay

K

Verizon Communications

TITLE: Senior Vice President & Chief Network Officer, Network Services Group EDUCATION: Degree in Civil Engineering, Princeton University; completed several Verizon executive programs with coursework at Wharton, and the Center for Creative Leadership.

Keep your head down, work hard and success will find you. That’s the rocksolid philosophy that has anchored my career at Verizon. From my very first job as an outside plant engineer, to now serving as the Chief Network Officer for Verizon’s global landline network, the “no excuses” focus on results is something that continually drives me. To do that, I have always found it important to build a great team that embraces a “never shoot the messenger” approach to leadership. When people are encouraged to shine the light on what’s not working, and highlight the problems—that’s when things can get better in a hurry.

FIRST JOB: Outside Plant Engineer WHAT I’M READING: Cities of the Plain, by Cormac McCarthy MY PHILOSOPHY: Keep your head down, work hard and success will find you. FAMILY: Husband and two children: daughter and son.

“Get noticed by having the courage to tackle the tough problems and then deliver.”

INTERESTS: Showing horses. FAVORITE CHARITy: American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals

COMPANY: Verizon Communications HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEB SITE: www.verizon.com BUSINESS: Telecommunications (broadband and other wireless and wireline communications services). ANNUAL REVENUES: $97 billion EMPLOYEES: 237,000

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As I take on any new organization, and I meet with my frontline work groups, I always want to hear about the things that are broken. At first, they only want to tell me about what’s working well and all their achievements, so it takes a little while to build that trust. But after a while, as you build it, all the creative ideas and innovative approaches to problems begin to surface. When people can work in an environment where they are not afraid to take a little risk, and are allowed to make a mistake now and then, they begin to stretch themselves. That’s when great things can happen! I have seen too many organizations crippled by leadership styles that never want to hear the bad news. So when you build teams that relish the challenge of fixing the toughest of problems, and trust that you will be there to support them, you will undoubtedly improve the business. When people ask me what the secret to career advancement is, I always say the same thing: Get noticed by having the courage to tackle the tough problems and then deliver. And when you do that often enough, success will find you— wherever you are.

September/October 2009


Bring It

Monica, Verizon Telecom

At Verizon, we want you to bring your diverse talents, experiences, backgrounds, and viewpoints to work. It’s your smarter, bolder, and faster ideas that will move our business forward at the speed of FiOS! Bring it in and bring it on – bring your diversity to work at Verizon.

At Verizon, we’re changing the way the world lives, works and plays. We open doors to opportunities and rewards that rival your ambition. From having the most reliable network, to the outstanding service we provide our customers, to our unparalleled FiOS technology, we’re dedicated to being the best at what we do. Whether your interests lie in sales, marketing, finance, IT, HR, customer service, engineering, or operations, we offer careers as ready as you are.

Careers For Everything You Are www.verizon.com/telecomjobs Verizon is an equal opportunity employer, m/f/d/v.


women worth watching in 2010

Deb Oler

I

W. W. Grainger, Inc.

I was fortunate to start my career in sales, because I learned one thing very clearly from the beginning—everything revolves around the customer.

TITLE: Vice President, Grainger Industrial Supply Brand EDUCATION: Bachelor’s degree, Education, University of Maryland FIRST JOB: Inside sales coordinator, I. Feldman and Co. WHAT I’M READING: Building the Brand-Driven Business, by Scott M. Davis; The Heart of Change: Real-Life Stories of How People Change Their Organizations, by John P. Kotter MY PHILOSOPHY: Family first. I believe in working hard, but dedicating my “family time” to family. While there are times when work bleeds over into nights or weekends, in general I find I achieve better balance when I leave the office to be fully in the moment with my family. FAMILY: Husband, two daughters. INTERESTS: My dogs, reading, and cooking. FAVORITE CHARITy: UMass Pancreatic Cancer Foundation

COMPANY: W. W. Grainger, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Lake Forest, Illinois WEB SITE: www.grainger.com BUSINESS: North America’s leading broad line distributor of facilities maintenance products. ANNUAL REVENUES: $6.9 billion (2008) EMPLOYEES: 18,000

Positioning your product or service is essential to earning your customers’ loyalty. If you don’t have a compelling value story, you better get one quickly or your competition will pounce. That same sense of urgency applies to women looking for a successful career in business, no matter what your field. Your primary focus should be on being excellent at the job you’re doing right now. By focusing your energy on being excellent, flexible, and displaying a willingness to take on additional challenges, you set the stage for career progression, often in positive ways you wouldn’t have anticipated.

“To me, excelling includes being willing to adapt to change…” To me, excelling includes being willing to adapt to change, because change is a constant in today’s workplace. Your ability to collaborate and rally people around a common cause enhances your value to the organization. I’ve also found that seeking out a mentor is an excellent way to increase your personal portfolio of competencies, so long as you are targeted in your selection. When I first moved into a management position with responsibility for P&L results, for example, I knew I needed more in-depth knowledge. I went to the VP of Finance for my operating unit; he agreed to a monthly meeting to help me learn all the intricacies and considerations behind the numbers, making me a more valuable business leader to my team. He was the perfect mentor for the competency I needed to gain. I mentor a great deal today, because organizations are made up of people, and I believe the future health of the business depends on it. I rarely say “no,” but I always ask people to articulate what they’re looking for to ensure that I’m the best person for the topic. A final bit of advice is to work for a company that values diversity and inclusiveness, because they will give you an opportunity to flourish and reach your potential. Grainger, for example, really means it when they say they are a “people company.” We demonstrate our commitment to people through our training, our talent management, and the creation of employee networks, like our Women’s Business Resource Group, of which I am honored to serve as president. When you find the right environment, and dedicate your efforts to being the best at the job you’re doing today, your future will be bright indeed.

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women worth watching in 2010

Joan O’Shaughnessy

M ARAMARK Ireland

My career began when I decided to study hotel and catering management in college. My first job was in a five-star hotel in the centre of Dublin. It was an “old world” hotel with an exclusive clientele, which prided itself on the amount of repeat business it was able to capture. The hotel motto was “you never get a second chance to make a first impression.” Excellence was the key business driver, and it was a good grounding for me so early on in my career. I moved into the contract catering side of the industry at a time when Ireland was chosen by many firms as a successful location for Foreign Direct Investment. Global companies were beginning to outsource their employee catering, and I had stepped into a growth area in the industry. I enjoyed the challenges and innovation that came with delivering an outstanding solution to the varied clients in these companies.

“Be open to change and embrace it…” I was lucky to have a mentor and supporter in my early years with Campbell Catering (which is now ARAMARK Ireland). He was a focused, driven visionary who set out and executed demanding goals, while also being a positive motivator who actively encouraged me to step outside my comfort zones. The initial challenge in my career was achieving a good work-life balance. I was managing a home with two children and a career at the same time—an ongoing issue for many couples. There were times when it was overwhelming, but the positive support I received, and my passion for the business, ensured that I was able to keep moving forward. Winning my first major contracts was a turning point for me. I soon transferred to the U.K., and experienced the integration of four Campbell Catering companies into the ARAMARK Organisation. I then returned home and was appointed Managing Director of their Ireland operation.

TITLE: Chief Executive Officer EDUCATION: BA, Hotel & Catering Management, DIT Dublin, Ireland FIRST JOB: Assistant housekeeper at the five-star Hibernian Hotel, Dublin, Ireland WHAT I’M READING: Stepping Stones, by Seamus Heaney MY PHILOSOPHY: There is no shortcut to any place worth going. FAMILY: Husband, Maurice; two grown children, Donal & Kate. INTERESTS: Travel, fitness, entertaining. FAVORITE CHARITY: The Catering Trust

COMPANY: ARAMARK Ireland HEADQUARTERS: Dublin, Ireland WEB SITE: www.aramark.ie BUSINESS: Contract catering and facilities management. EMPLOYEES: 4,100

My advice is that, no matter what position you fill, you need to understand the financial drivers of the business and be uncompromising in maintaining standards and good ethics. Be prepared to challenge yourself to broaden your knowledge and experience. Be open to change and embrace it—“If you do what you’ve always done, you’ll get what you’ve always gotten!” Seek out a mentor, someone who will give you feedback on your performance and management style, as this will also help you to understand the organisation and its structures.

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women worth watching in 2010

Nereida (Neddy) Perez

W National Grid

TITLE: Vice President, Inclusion & Diversity EDUCATION: Master’s, Human Resources & International Business, Nova Southeastern University, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida FIRST JOB: Elementary School Teaching Assistant, was 16 WHAT I’M READING: The Medici Effect, by Frans Johansson; Infidel, by Ayaan Hirsi Ali MY PHILOSOPHY: “What lies behind us are small matters to what lies within us”— RW Emerson FAMILY: Mom, Margarita; and brother, Miguel. INTERESTS: Traveling, reading, photography, sketching. FAVORITE CHARITies: American Cancer Society; Salvation Army

COMPANY: National Grid HEADQUARTERS: U.K. with corporate offices in Massachusetts and New York WEB SITE: www.nationalgrid.com BUSINESS: International energy delivery company. ANNUAL REVENUES: $8.2 billion in U.S. in 2006, $16.6 billion globally EMPLOYEES: 27,500 (63% in the U.S., 37% in the U.K.)

We came to the U.S. from Cuba when I was very young. We were dirt poor, so my Christmas gifts came from the Salvation Army or the thrift store. (To this day, I still have my first doll from the thrift store.) My mom worked two jobs almost all of my life. There was a time when we were on food stamps because she could barely make ends meet to take care of two kids. I know it was very hard on her, because she did not write or speak English. I learned it watching “Sesame Street” and going to the adult English classes at Columbus Hospital in Chicago (my grandfather was the janitor, and would take me to work with him after school. The teacher let me sit in her class until my aunt was finished with her cleaning shift; she would pick me up, and we would walk home).

“…short of death, there is no obstacle in life that you can’t overcome.” While my grandfather did not read or write, he was an incredibly wise man who helped me to understand, very early on, that people have value—regardless of where they come from, what they do, or where they live. I have been blessed to have many people in my life who served as formal or informal mentors. But the greatest mentor/teacher in my life, aside from my mom, was my grandfather because he taught me that, “short of death, there is no obstacle in life that you can’t overcome.” At age seven, I came face-to-face with racism, when a teenage boy threw a rock at the window of our home because we were Hispanic. The glass broke where my brother and I were playing. My grandfather did not think twice about confronting the family of the boy, even though he didn’t speak their language, nor the language of the police. Fortunately, I spoke enough of both to translate. Being bi-cultural over the years, I have seen, heard, and even personally had to confront, people whose behavior has been less than professional. Each time, those experiences have made me more determined to remove obstacles for others, and work at leveling the playing field regardless of race, gender, gender orientation, and/or ethnicity. To this day, the image of my grandfather standing up for what is right still resonates with me. Prior to joining National Grid, I asked our leadership team some tough questions about their commitment to Inclusion & Diversity, because I wanted to make sure they were serious. Our executive team gets it, they are champions for inclusion and diversity, and they have a sincere commitment about doing the right thing by our employees. Having worked at various companies, and with many leaders, it is wonderful to be part of an organization that really values its people.

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women worth watching in 2010

Cathy Plummer Hill

T

Georgia Power

The most significant influences on my life were my parents. They ingrained confidence, optimism, and family values into my core. Because of their influence, I value authenticity. I believe that you must define success for yourself; don’t let others define it. With authenticity, you can be grounded in personal values that align with professional success. I began my career as an engineer, and moved through many different management positions including electric transmission planning, distribution operations, fleet operations, and customer operations. I was often the first woman or minority to be given these leadership responsibilities. My mentors for these positions were usually white male executives. While these men were genuinely interested in my success, they often didn’t realize the personal and professional challenges that I faced. Nevertheless, one early mentor strongly influenced my approach to mentoring. He counseled me regarding the tremendous responsibility that I had self-imposed because of being “the first— again.” He could not fully understand what I was experiencing; however, he shared a perspective that reinforced the importance of outstanding performance and authenticity.

“Take responsibility for your reputation; remember, do not let others define you.” Now, when I mentor others, I first emphasize the importance of defining your measures for success. Take responsibility for your reputation; remember, do not let others define you. To do this, you must be grounded in personal values and beliefs that align with your work. And, of course, your work must display outstanding performance and credibility. I also explain why it is important to mentor, and receive mentoring, from individuals representing a broad range of diversity dimensions, not just from those in your comfort zone. This gives you perspectives you may not have considered, and allows you to benefit from different backgrounds and experiences. Finally, I emphasize the importance of being very intentional in knowing where your career is going. Your current position should bridge to opportunities in other areas. You should be clear on what you need to accomplish in your current position, and have in mind thoughts for the “next” position and how your background, skills, and talents can help the company. This is not to be mistaken as manipulative selfinterest; your professional growth and accomplishments serve the company and strengthen the team around you. Your own career development and the interests of the company are not mutually exclusive. Rather, in a healthy organization, an advance in one should help the other.

TITLE: Region Vice President EDUCATION: Bachelor of Electrical Engineering, Georgia Tech; MBA, Georgia State University; Executive Management Program, Harvard Business School FIRST JOB: (Ages 12 – 16) Yard work and errands for elderly neighbors; (Age 16) McDonald’s Restaurant; (Age 19) Georgia Power WHAT I’M READING: Them, by Nathan McCall; Hot, Flat, and Crowded, by Thomas L. Friedman MY PHILOSOPHY: “Lead, Lift, and Grow:”

· Lead: Have a vision for the future. · Lift: Support and encourage those around you.

· Grow: Learning and challenging are needed to contribute and develop to your highest potential.

FAMILY: Husband, Mitchell; daughter, Candace, 9; son, Matthew, 13. INTERESTS: Theater, college football— “Go Yellow Jackets!” FAVORITE CHARITY: Women’s Legacy of United Way

COMPANY: Georgia Power HEADQUARTERS: Atlanta, Georgia WEB SITE: www.georgiapower.com BUSINESS: Electric utility. ANNUAL REVENUES: $8.4 billion (2008) EMPLOYEES: 8,552

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women worth watching in 2010

Teri Plummer McClure

M UPS

My first mentor was probably my grandfather, the first lawyer in our family. Unable to support his family in private practice during the years of segregation, he worked for over 30 years for the U.S. Postal Service. After his retirement, he opened a law practice.

TITLE: Senior Vice President, Legal, Compliance and Public Affairs, General Counsel and Corporate Secretary EDUCATION: BS, Marketing and Economics, Washington University (St. Louis); JD, Emory University (Atlanta) FIRST JOB: Marketing intern, Hallmark Cards WHAT I’M READING: The Noticer, by Andy Andrews MY PHILOSOPHY: I can do all things through Christ, who strengthens me. FAMILY: Husband, two daughters. INTERESTS: Traveling, reading, community service, and church-related activities. FAVORITE CHARITY: The Atlanta Legal Aid Society

COMPANY: UPS HEADQUARTERS: Atlanta, Georgia WEB SITE: www.ups.com BUSINESS: Transportation and logistics. ANNUAL REVENUES: $51.5 billion EMPLOYEES: 415,000

Growing up, I spent many evenings in my grandfather’s sitting room, debating a wide range of issues from sports and entertainment to politics and local affairs. He taught me the value of being able to articulate a well-reasoned opinion and to never back down when my position is challenged. I learned to speak up for the things that are important to me.

“…don’t be afraid to push beyond your comfort zone.” I knew as a young teen that I wanted to go to law school. I had many opportunities to hone my debate skills in that sitting room, and I thought that I would make a great trial attorney. I also believed that I wanted to work with businesses, to help them operate profitably within the constraints of laws and regulations. My parents and grandparents drilled into me that a good education creates options, and options allow you to pursue your passions. I learned to establish a plan to reach my goals and prepare for my success. During the course of my career, I’ve had many wonderful experiences that contributed to my professional growth and development—the best of which involved committed, hard working, courageous, and caring people—but I’ve also had challenging situations, which became stepping stones. Early in my career, I had to learn to be comfortable and thrive in work environments where I was often the first or only female, or the first or only minority. Later, transitioning from a law firm environment to a corporate environment, I had to learn how to adopt and embrace a strong corporate culture. And now, as a wife, a mother of teen-aged daughters, and a senior vice president at a Fortune 500 company, I face the constant challenge of balancing family, work, and community involvement. I’ve learned to let obstacles become tools for success. I realize today that I am very fortunate to work for a company that shares many of my core values, including a commitment to people. UPS is dedicated to developing leaders through initiatives and formal programs that offer tremendous opportunities for employees to grow professionally and personally. My final words of advice: Be open to new opportunities and don’t be afraid to push beyond your comfort zone. You will find a new world of possibilities and will be rewarded by your efforts and accomplishments.

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women worth watching in 2010

Elizabeth W. Powers

P

Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP

“Possunt quae volunt” 1 Women who have the will to succeed, as reflected in the Ashley Hall1 motto, have the ability to succeed. However, will and ability must be coupled with mentoring. Providing women with integral skills, guidance, role models, and opportunity is critical.

TITLE: Partner, Member of the Executive Committee, and Chair of the Women’s Initiatives Committee EDUCATION: AB, History, Mount Holyoke College; JD, University of South Carolina, Executive Editor, Law Review FIRST JOB: Latin teacher WHAT I’M READING: In Search of Our Roots, by Henry Louis Gates, Jr.; Pauline Bonaparte, by Flora Fraser; Sacred Geometry, by Stephen Skinner; The Snowball: Warren Buffett and the Business of Life, by Alice Schroeder MY PHILOSOPHY: Have the courage of your convictions and never give up. FAMILY: Husband, Harry. INTERESTS: Reading, opera, bridge. FAVORITE CHARITies: My schools

COMPANY: Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEB SITE: www.dl.com BUSINESS: Law firm. ANNUAL REVENUES: Over $1 billion EMPLOYEES: Approximately 1,300 attorneys

Mentoring begins with teaching. Rigorous education is essential to creating women who will be successful. In the law, we must teach our attorneys, not only through formal training sessions, but also in daily practice. Training is comprised of hard work and often long hours, but without a solid knowledge of their practice areas, attorneys, and particularly women attorneys, will not become successful.

“It takes only one person to make a difference.” In addition to skills, women need guidance in solving problems, making choices, and understanding the rules. Each organization has its own rules, which are often unwritten. Helping women comprehend these rules is essential. Guidance also includes fostering a sense of commonality of goals and support among women. Women also need role models who serve in positions of leadership and power within their firms. Unfortunately, the average number of women partners remains around 16% or 17%, and partnership per se does not equate to power. The most essential part of mentoring, however, is opportunity. I attended a girls’ school, Ashley Hall, and a women’s college, Mount Holyoke, which provided a very empowering beginning. After teaching Latin for several years, I attended the University of South Carolina Law School, where I was honored to be selected as Executive Editor of the Law Review and to clerk for a South Carolina judge after my second year of law school. After graduation, I began practicing with a Wall Street law firm. I had the will and the ability, but in those days, women often did not have the guidance, role models, or opportunity. For me, it took only one person whose generosity provided the opportunity for success. I consider myself to be very lucky. We who have had these opportunities should make them available to other qualified women. It takes only one person to make a difference. Each of us can choose to be that one person. Open the door!

1Ashley

Hall is a girls’ school in Charleston, South Carolina, founded in 1909, and now celebrating its centennial year. “Possunt quae volunt” is the school’s motto. I received the Crandall Close Bowles ’65 Award for Professional Achievement in the law from Ashley Hall in April 2009.

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women worth watching in 2010

Anne R. Pramaggiore

D ComEd

Despite being nicknamed the “Second City,” Chicago is a city of many firsts— from the nation’s first skyscraper, to the first controlled nuclear reaction, to the first elevated railway system. And while an event that occurred in Chicago on May 11, 2009, likely won’t make it into history books, ComEd made history of its own that day, with the appointment of the first female president and chief operating officer in its 100-plus-year history. I am honored to be that “first female,” and I’m proud to work for a company that welcomes diverse voices by fostering a culture of inclusion. ComEd not only recognizes the value of diversity among its workforce, but also encourages diverse voices to speak up and be included in our business decisions. A trained lawyer leading a major utility in a traditionally male-dominated industry may seem like an aberration, but I’ve always been willing to express a different viewpoint. In college, I was a theatre and communications major—hardly the conventional route to a leadership role in an electric utility. But with intellectual curiosity as a driving force, I followed a career path that took me from retail, to law, to a career with the largest electric utility in Illinois.

TITLE: President, Chief Operating Officer EDUCATION: Bachelor’s degree, Communications and Theater, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio; JD, DePaul University School of Law, Editor-in-Chief, Law Review FIRST JOB: Assistant department manager, Elder Beerman department store WHAT I’M READING: Nudge, by Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein MY PHILOSOPHY: Innovation, creativity, and empowerment are critical elements to success in a dramatically changing business environment. FAMILY: Married, with one son, 13.

“…I’ve always been willing to express a different viewpoint.” Some may view my lack of an engineering or operations background as a detriment to my position, but I’ve always embraced the idea of looking at issues from new perspectives. I firmly believe that diversity of thought and diversity of experience are valuable assets for any business. Fortunately, this ideal is shared by the senior leadership of ComEd and our parent company, Exelon Corporation. For the past 11 years, I’ve had the pleasure of working alongside John W. Rowe, chairman and CEO of Exelon, and Frank M. Clark, chairman and CEO of ComEd. Both John and Frank welcomed me into the fold from the start—non-traditional career track and all.

INTERESTS: Animals, theatre. FAVORITE CHARITY: The Firehouse Community Arts Center in Chicago’s Lawndale neighborhood

COMPANY: ComEd HEADQUARTERS: Chicago, Illinois WEB SITE: www.comed.com BUSINESS: Electric utility. ANNUAL REVENUES: $6.1 billion EMPLOYEES: 6,000

Their support of me and their unwavering commitment to include diverse voices continually inspires my efforts to ensure ComEd is prepared to meet the challenges of a 21st century business environment. Among those challenges is the reality that our industry is changing. Our ability to go beyond conventional thinking—to boldly step outside the box—will be key to our success. Our ability to achieve our goals depends on our openness to different voices, and our willingness to include such input in our business blueprint.

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women worth watching in 2010

Lori Raya

M Safeway Inc.

TITLE: Group Vice President, Strategic Initiatives EDUCATION: Attended Mesa State University in Grand Junction, Colorado FIRST JOB: Courtesy clerk at Safeway WHAT I’M READING: The Adversity Advantage: Turning Everyday Struggles into Everyday Greatness, by Paul G. Stoltz, Erik Weihenmayer; The Shack, by William P. Young MY PHILOSOPHY: Be genuine, caring, and loyal to the people on your team and you will be rewarded with their loyalty. This is a dynamic that makes the team stronger and more successful. FAMILY: Husband, Sam; stepdaughter, Sami; two Jack Russell terriers. INTERESTS: Golf, softball, travel. FAVORITE CHARITy: American Heart Association

COMPANY: Safeway Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Pleasanton, California WEB SITE: www.safeway.com BUSINESS: Supermarket. ANNUAL REVENUES: $44.1 billion EMPLOYEES: 192,000

Much has changed in the 22 years since I joined the corporate world. Not so long ago, a woman executive was the stuff of headlines. Today, one expects large companies to have women in their upper ranks. However, some things are still constant and need to evolve as we take our rightful places as leaders in corporate America. I hope women will become more confident to take credit for their hard work and successes. If you don’t sell yourself and your work, no one will. And, now, more than ever, we should reach out to other women who need the benefit of our counsel and experience on this step, and other important steps/ skills that attribute to one’s success.

“…by mentoring, we’re not just paying it forward; we’re paying it back.” Everyone knows the importance of taking on difficult tasks to showcase your abilities, organizational skills, leadership qualities, and the other important attributes of a seasoned professional. Yet delivering a superior outcome doesn’t ensure that your efforts are visible to the right person or people. Oftentimes the corporate world, hectic schedules, and tight deadlines require the focus to be more on the result, and less on the person who was responsible for that result. You have the ability to put the focus on both. For example, if you’re proud of a specific accomplishment, a successful project that you undertook, or an event that you chaired, give a written recap to your boss for him/ her to pass along to the executive team or other key players within the organization. If you were the leader of a project team, send a message thanking the team for their work, and copy their bosses. This not only lets them shine, but lets you shine as the person at the helm. Once you’ve achieved certain self-determined goals, remember the importance of sharing your lessons with other women. Be a mentor. I know that it is my responsibility to not only elevate in my career, but to help other women do the same. Had someone not mentored me, I probably would not be where I am today. Early in my career, I was mentored by someone who recognized certain qualities and strengths that I myself did not recognize. I worked hard and applied myself, but I wasn’t able to see my potential as broadly as someone else could. Most of us can say the same. Our accomplishments were achieved largely because of the advice and mentorship of others, so by mentoring, we’re not just paying it forward; we’re paying it back.

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women worth watching in 2010

Nancy Reagan

I

Campbell Soup Company

I grew up in a small town of about 20,000 people. My family was quite involved in the community, so it felt like we knew just about everyone. After I graduated college—again, in a small town environment—I began my career in the consumer packaged goods industry. As part of my first assignment, I was transferred to “the big city”—Seattle, Washington—and I didn’t know anyone. I found that in most meetings, I was one of a handful of women in a room of 100 people. I was in a new job at a new company in a new (big) city. This was when I first began to understand the importance of mentoring.

“…my mentors have been more helpful to my development than any training class I’ve ever taken.” I recognized the need to seek out people who could help me establish a comfort level, navigate the waters of the corporate world, and chart a course for my future. Early on, most of my mentors were informal mentors. I would bounce ideas off them, or ask for advice on how to handle a specific situation. I would also watch these mentors, observe how they handled themselves in various situations, and learn by example. There was a special bond and a support system that developed from these mentoring relationships. These relationships opened doors, widened my networking circle, and increased my confidence, helping me expand my comfort zone. Later on in my career, I had access to formal mentoring relationships. But whether formal or informal, my mentors have been more helpful to my development than any training class I’ve ever taken. Because of the benefits I have realized through my mentors, I felt it was important to “give back” and mentor others. Throughout my career, I have shared my knowledge and experiences to help guide the development and growth of those I’ve mentored. I’ve witnessed remarkable growth and development in these individuals, and take great satisfaction in knowing that I have helped influence and shape another’s career path.

TITLE: Vice President, Growth Channels EDUCATION: BS, Business, Boise State University FIRST JOB: Account manager, Chesebrough Ponds WHAT I’M READING: Leadership Secrets of Attila the Hun, by Wess Roberts MY PHILOSOPHY: Act with integrity, always work towards a win/win, and maintain a sense of humor. FAMILY: A close family, I’m one of eight kids. I enjoy spending time with my nieces and nephews. INTERESTS: Most outdoor activities, including biking and gardening; reading. FAVORITE CHARITies: Sports 4 Kids; The Humane Society

COMPANY: Campbell Soup Company HEADQUARTERS: Camden, New Jersey WEB SITE: www.campbellsoup.com BUSINESS: Global manufacturer and marketer of high-quality foods and simple meals, including soup, baked snacks, and healthy beverages. ANNUAL REVENUES: $7.9 billion EMPLOYEES: 19,000

Moreover, I am a firm believer that mentoring is a two-way street. I have learned a lot from those that I have mentored—and I hope I’ve offered the same to my mentors. I look forward to continuing my mentoring relationships—both as a mentee and a mentor—and I urge others to seek out mentees and mentors of their own. Mentoring relationships are immensely gratifying and, in my opinion, necessary for maintaining a well rounded view and an informed approach to work, life, and everything in between. Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

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women worth watching in 2010

Ann P. Reeves

W

Waste Management, Inc.

We all face personal and professional challenges as we maneuver our way through life’s twists and turns. It’s how we handle those challenges that’s important.

TITLE: Vice President, Collection Operations Support EDUCATION: BA, Southern Methodist University; ME, Lamar University FIRST JOB: While in high school, started my own business teaching private swimming lessons WHAT I’M READING: Three Cups of Tea, by Greg Mortenson MY PHILOSOPHY: Work hard, put your heart and soul into the effort, treat others with respect and appreciate their efforts, be willing to accept a challenge and take a risk, and learn from your mistakes. Hold yourself accountable and remember to have fun during the adventure. FAMILY: Husband, Boyce; a rescued Labrador, Laurie Darling. INTERESTS: Besides reading and gardening, I find golf both inspiring and humbling. FAVORITE CHARITies: Those that support families, women, and children.

COMPANY: Waste Management, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Houston, Texas WEB SITE: www.wm.com; www.thinkgreen.com BUSINESS: Leading provider of waste collection, transfer, recycling and resource recovery, and disposal services in North America. Also, a leading developer, operator and owner of waste-to-energy and landfill gas-to-energy facilities in the United States.

I guess you could say that I’m a “pull yourself up by the bootstraps” kind of gal. Life doesn’t always work out exactly like you had planned, and when that happens, you have choices to make. After working for years as a successful elementary school teacher, an unexpected, but pivotal change in my personal life led me to a career-changing choice to enter the business world. It was risky, but now I realize that a leap of faith, coupled with determination, hard work, and a willingness to learn and grow, is what success is all about.

“You may need to pull yourself up by the bootstraps periodically…” While observing other people you respect—both in and out of the business world—you’ll see they have similar attributes with which to meet life’s challenges: honesty and integrity, understanding the value of teamwork, ability to attract and promote talent, a willingness to teach and help others, and recognition of their own strengths and weaknesses. When my brother, sister, and I get together, we often talk about how lucky we are to have had such great parents. We realize that they taught us these basic values through their own actions. Not everyone is so fortunate to have had such wonderful role models, but if you are willing to learn and grow, you’ll find that other great teachers surround you. And you don’t always need to have a formal or personal relationship with these leaders. You can learn just from watching how they handle certain situations and reflecting on their good and bad attributes. My mother once wrote this about life: “the shell was worn by the ebb and flow of many tides—the shape imperfect, but its colors burnished by sand and sea until it glowed in my hand.” Think of your life and career as that shell. Neither will always be perfect. You may need to pull yourself up by the bootstraps periodically, but with effort, perseverance, and a little bit of luck, both can glow in your hand. And when you see the shells of others you have worked with over the years begin to glow in their hands, smile as you reflect on the true meaning of success.

ANNUAL REVENUES: $13 billion EMPLOYEES: 45,000

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women worth watching in 2010

Deborah L. Rice

T

Highmark Inc.

Through more than 25 years with Highmark, I’ve learned to focus on the importance of working with people. My advice to women who want to advance their careers is to carefully develop “people skills,” including interpersonal, leadership, and self-evaluation skills. For example, be inclusive. I believe in the power of many perspectives and contributors. As a leader, I embrace the opportunity to bring people together who have ideas different from mine. This way we can look well beyond our own viewpoints and incorporate the best ideas. With the collaboration of others, there can be bigger, more exciting accomplishments.

“…carefully develop ‘people skills,’ including interpersonal, leadership and self-evaluation skills.” Welcome the opportunity to work with as many different people as possible. I began my career with Highmark in prescription drug administration. I’ve since worked in various administrative divisions—information technology, customer service, strategic development, many parts of operations, sales, and account management. It’s true that I’ve gained a lot of cross-functional knowledge. I now have the ability to connect how the organization works, but most importantly, I’ve learned how to work with many different kinds of people. I’ve learned how to build confidence and trust with the people in our diverse work force, as well as with customers, suppliers, and the people with whom we partner in the community. Also, be critical of yourself by doing self-assessments. Ask yourself: Who am I? How am I doing? What is going well? Where can I improve? Then go to others— peers, mentors and managers—and ask them the same questions. You’ll gain valuable insights about how you’re perceived, you’ll open empathetic ears to your ambitions, and you’ll build advocates. In addition, when you’re in a leadership role, turn around and make sure that those you want to be following you are. If not, gain their buy-in. And finally, always look for new opportunities. I’ve found that corporate leaders are constantly on the lookout for talent; you should be on the lookout for opportunity. I’ve been proactive in my career about seeking new challenges, and I’ve been receptive when asked to accept new assignments. Look ahead and form mutually beneficial relationships that will move you in the direction that fuels your passions. Also, don’t be afraid to try new, unexpected challenges that are perhaps outside of the box from where you thought you’d be going next.

TITLE: Executive Vice President, Health Services EDUCATION: BS, Business Management, Carlow University FIRST JOB: Blue Cross of Western Pennsylvania in prescription drug administration WHAT I’M READING: Never Give Up!: Relentless Determination to Overcome Life’s Challenges, by Joyce Meyer MY PHILOSOPHY: Treat everyone with respect and value their unique contributions. As a leader, inspire others to use their creativity, and to participate at their highest level of potential for the good of the team. FAMILY: Husband, Harry; our daughter and my two step-daughters; and our Bichon. INTERESTS: Spending time with my family, running, golf, and travel. FAVORITE CHARITY: Wesley Spectrum Services (supports children with developmental, educational, or behavioral health challenges)

COMPANY: Highmark Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania WEB SITE: www.highmark.com BUSINESS: Largest health insurance company in Pennsylvania, based on membership. ANNUAL REVENUES: $13 billion EMPLOYEES: 19,000

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women worth watching in 2010

Janet L. Robinson

M

The New York Times Company

Moments of reflection are essential. When I look back on my life there emerge patterns, themes, and an underlying logic, and it becomes apparent that much of what I have done is rooted in my desire to embrace risk, listen to a wide diversity of opinion, make important decisions, and align personal and institutional values.

TITLE: President and Chief Executive Officer EDUCATION: BA, Salve Regina University; Executive Education: Tuck School of Business FIRST JOB: Hospital Aide WHAT I’M READING: Three Cups of Tea, by Greg Mortenson; Outliers, by Malcolm Gladwell FAMILY: Single. INTERESTS: Collecting antiques, reading. FAVORITE CHARITY: Salve Regina University

COMPANY: The New York Times Company HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEB SITE: www.nytco.com BUSINESS: Media. ANNUAL REVENUES: $2.9 billion EMPLOYEES: 7,733

This long process of discovery began when I graduated from college near the end of the Vietnam War. It was the early 70s: the economy was in the midst of a recession, jobs were scarce, and there was anxiety in the air—all very reminiscent of where we are today. Yet, guided by ambition and curiosity, I decided that my ongoing venture into the future was going to be the beginning of an extraordinary journey.

“…Business challenges make us smarter and stronger…” Initially, I became a teacher, a profession I greatly admire. Yet, after 11 rewarding years, I decided to change careers and enter the publishing industry. This was not an easy decision. I took enormous pride and pleasure in contributing to many young people’s lives, but I knew I wanted a new chapter in my life that included a career in business. Therefore, it was important for me to become more risk-oriented and move forward to pursue a new career experience. I applied for jobs in New York City and became an advertising sales executive for one of The New York Times Company’s magazines. While facing innumerable new experiences, I quickly learned that business challenges make us smarter and stronger and that they have substantial bearing on the leaders we eventually become. These life lessons are particularly applicable to the current environment. As marketplace competition becomes more intense, technology goes through numerous cycles of reinvention, and consumers demand more innovation, effective leadership needs to seek an even broader diversity of analysis and opinions. With so much uncertainty these days, listening to the opinions of the best minds available is absolutely necessary. Having a varied and deep pool of talent enables an executive to better manage risk and anticipate the countless scenarios that the business may confront in the future. Over the years, my career has come full circle. I now frequently talk with newly minted college graduates about taking risks and appreciating a wide range of opinion. My best advice is that values matter and that they should work for organizations with a clearly stated philosophy that aligns with their own principles. I love working for The New York Times Company because I deeply respect its commitment to treating its staff with dignity, its high standards of excellence, and its relentless pursuit of world-class journalism. I regularly encourage young professionals to find places of work that will provide similar meaning and satisfaction.

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The New York Times Company

salutes

the honorees who have been recognized as the WomenWorthWatching速 in 2009 by Profiles in Diversity Journal速. Our company is committed to diverse and inclusive leadership now and for the future.


women worth watching in 2010

Lauventria Robinson

M

The Coca-Cola Company

TITLE: Vice President, Diversity Business Development EDUCATION: BS, Applied Economics and Business Management, Cornell University; MBA, The Wharton School FIRST JOB: Cashier at Everyone’s Discount Store in the Bronx, New York WHAT I’M READING: The Breakthrough, by Gwen Ifill MY PHILOSOPHY: Be true to yourself. You will face many challenges personally and professionally, but if you know who you are and what you stand for, you will ultimately make the right decisions. At times these decisions may be difficult and unpopular, but if you are clear about what’s most important to you, you will be at peace with your choices.

My career has spanned numerous industries, roles, and companies, and along this path I have encountered both positive and challenging experiences that have shaped and developed my professional (and personal) growth. I base my career choices on a philosophy to honor my ethical standards, integrity, and values. I also strongly believe in adhering to a personal pact to stay true to myself—to who I am—while understanding and maintaining the needs of the company, my position, and my responsibilities and commitments outside of the workplace. Working for Coca-Cola, a company with ubiquitous brands, has allowed me the opportunity to have a variety of experiences across many geographies and functions. I have not followed the “traditional” path to my current role in diversity, but I have always been passionate about the importance of multiculturalism as a tool for growth in the evolving North American marketplace and workplace. I am fortunate to work for a company that recognized my passion and was open to giving me an opportunity to act upon it.

“…be proactive, learn all you can and be flexible.”

FAMILY: Son: Cameron, 10, and daughter: Kennedee, 5. INTERESTS: Collecting art, interior design, travel, reading. FAVORITE CHARITies: Boys & Girls Clubs of America

COMPANY: The Coca-Cola Company HEADQUARTERS: Atlanta, Georgia WEB SITE: www.thecoca-colacompany.com BUSINESS: World’s largest beverage company. ANNUAL REVENUES: $31.9 billion EMPLOYEES: 92,400 (worldwide)

Throughout my journey, I have sought out colleagues and other professionals to serve as my mentors. With each relationship, I learned more about my strengths and weaknesses and gained a better understanding of how I could effectively help my employers achieve their goals and objectives—along with my own. Mentoring played an integral part in my progression as a female business leader, woman of color, and a single mother. I am often asked to serve as a mentor or coach. It is a role I enjoy, and I take pride in providing honest counsel. My advice to professionals entering the everevolving workplace today is to be proactive, learn all you can, and be flexible. The traditional notions of what defines a career are changing…and you, too, will change. Be curious and reach out across functions and departmental boundaries, because you may be surprised by what you will learn about the company and about yourself. Success Tips: • Take the time to learn who you are and what is best for you, professionally and personally. • Maintain work/life balance. • Set achievable goals/objectives. • Be coachable and become a coach.

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Diversity is Refreshing

Congratulates

Lauventria Robinson on being named a “Woman Worth Watching” in 2010

©2009 The Coca-Cola Company. “Coca-Cola,” the Red Disk Icon and the Contour Bottle design are registered trademarks of The Coca-Cola Company.


women worth watching in 2010

Donna Sams

M CVS Caremark

TITLE: Vice President, Corporate Systems EDUCATION: BA, Psychology/Sociology, Clark University; candidate for Master’s, Divinity and Pastoral Counseling, Amridge University FIRST JOB: Youth counselor (teenagers and their families) WHAT I’M READING: Return to Love: Reflections on the Principles of a Course in Miracles, by Marianne Williamson MY PHILOSOPHY: Wake up every day with gratitude, and live my purpose in everything that I do. FAMILY: Two daughters: Thais, 34, a lawyer; Brianna, 17. I am also raising my 14-year-old nephew, Kaseem. INTERESTS: Volunteer in community organizations serving children and young adults, e.g., YearUp and Big Sisters. FAVORITE CHARITy: United Way Community Impact Fund

COMPANY: CVS Caremark HEADQUARTERS: Woonsocket, Rhode Island WEB SITE: www.cvscaremark.com BUSINESS: Health care. ANNUAL REVENUES: Approximately $87 billion EMPLOYEES: 215,000

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My response to obstacles has always been resilience; knowing that overcoming obstacles builds strength and teaches great lessons. For me, resilience has been about having a vision and a plan for me and being flexible and open enough to allow new opportunities and other perspectives to enhance my vision. If I had been “stuck” in the box that was my vision when I started my career, I would have missed many professional and personal opportunities. Resilience is also about challenges and disappointments, and how I have chosen to “accommodate” them in my life. Challenges and disappointments have been personal, professional, and sometimes both. Seventeen years ago, I had the privilege of giving birth to a very special child, Brianna. She was diagnosed with cerebral palsy and “global” developmental delays. One of the major lessons that I learned through this experience is that I never really have to do anything alone. There were people who had been down this road before me. Finding them, reaching out to them, and admitting that I needed assistance was key. Since then it has gotten easier each time, at work and in other aspects of my life, to say I can’t do this by myself; I need assistance.

“Be open to all perspectives and trust your own voice.” Another lesson: I may not have known the answers to a lot of questions, but I knew what was right for me and what wasn’t. Be open to all perspectives and trust your own voice. Both putting Brianna in an institution and giving up my career were unacceptable to me. There were not a lot of examples of women with high-powered careers doing this, so I had to just step out there, trust myself, depend on others, and make mistakes. Finally, I learned that one of the most amazing and powerful women that I know is me; always listen to yourself. Part of my favorite book passage is, “Authentic success is feeling good about who you are, appreciating where you’ve been, celebrating your achievements, and honoring the distance you’ve already come…” Defined this way, authentic success is my constant companion.

September/October 2009


CVS Caremark celebrates successful women in business. CVS Caremark believes in celebrating women’s achievements as industry leaders. That’s why we are joining Diversity Journal in honoring some of the most successful women in business. We are proud to support the women who challenge us to care and inspire us to lead. We congratulate one of our most valuable CVS Caremark leaders for being recognized as a Woman Worth Watching for her accomplishments: Donna Sams, Vice President of Corporate Systems

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women worth watching in 2010

Sue Ann Schweitzer

D

Textron Defense Systems

TITLE: Vice President, Business Operations EDUCATION: BBA, University of Oklahoma; MBA, University of St. Thomas (Houston, Texas) FIRST JOB: Associate Analyst, Conoco Inc. WHAT I’M READING: The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression, by Amity Shlaes MY PHILOSOPHY: Keep it simple—the simplest solutions are more likely to sustain over time. FAMILY: Brother and sister; two nieces and four nephews. INTERESTS: Windsurfing, reading, and walking. FAVORITE CHARITies: Providence Animal Rescue League; Rhode Island Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals

COMPANY: Textron Defense Systems HEADQUARTERS: Wilmington, Massachusetts WEB SITE: www.textrondefense.com BUSINESS: Aerospace and defense. EMPLOYEES: 980

During the last 20 years, I have had opportunities to work across a handful of industries in positions spanning a broad range of disciplines, including procurement, finance, training and development, marketing, and continuous improvement. As vice president of business operations for Textron Defense Systems, I have drawn on all of these experiences to gain perspective, strategize, and develop multidisciplinary solutions that help drive business success. Looking back, my career path makes a lot of sense—but that wasn’t always the case. In my first job after college, I was an analyst in a management development program at Conoco Inc., then DuPont’s energy subsidiary. I struggled during that first year. I just didn’t understand how to be successful. Mercifully, two of my peers in the program helped to show me the way. As with so many experiences during my career, the challenges of that first role taught me valuable lessons. Chief among these is the importance of asking questions, listening to others, and involving people in what you’re trying to accomplish. I simply wouldn’t have survived my first job without the help of my colleagues. Consequently, I continue to solicit ideas and input from others to achieve business goals. The success of a business is not dependent solely on any individual, but on a team working together toward collective goals.

“…I continue to solicit ideas and input from others to achieve business goals.” As I learned Six Sigma and Lean methodologies at GE and Textron, I saw the value of simplicity and transparency of information. Sometimes people believe that the best solution is a complex one; however, simple solutions foster acceptance and are easier to sustain over time. Transparency of data and processes also is essential, because decision-making is easier and faster when everyone shares the same knowledge base. In addition, you allow others to feel more confident about making decisions and offering ideas by increasing transparency when data and processes aren’t well understood or routinely communicated. Ultimately, I am the product of the extraordinary people I’ve been able to work with at Conoco, GE, and Textron. I also am fortunate to have a network of talented friends who make themselves available when I ask for advice. At the end of the day, I take greater pride in the friendships I’ve made, and the work we’ve accomplished together, than simply in the career goals I’ve achieved.

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women worth watching in 2010

Patricia B. (Pat) Shrader

T BD

There are a number of people who taught me some important lessons that have helped shape my life and my career. The first was my father, who always said, “Work hard, tell the truth, and don’t borrow or lend money”—values I have always tried to incorporate in work and in life. He also said the three best careers for women were secretary, nurse, or teacher; he had a slight preference for teaching, because it provided child-friendly hours and summers free. Although I tried out all three roles at various points in my early career, I discovered that my father was dead wrong about careers, at least in my case. Coincidentally, four of my five daughters are teachers.

“…unless you understand the politics of an organization, career goals may elude you.” A second mentor was my advanced-biology teacher in high school, who worked his senior students like dogs, during a year when most other seniors were coasting toward the finish line. In addition to a rigorous class schedule and the usual homework assignments, we were assigned a series of “projects” during the year. These required us to put in extra hours before and after school and on the weekends, which we spent wading through streams, walking through fields being bitten by bugs, etc. He was unrelenting and unforgiving; we thought he was the most monstrous teacher ever encountered. What some of us eventually realized years later was that he had an incredible passion for his subject—a passion he wanted to instill in others. Although I had applied to colleges intending to major in English or languages, I ended up changing my major to biology. Ultimately, the college science background gave me a real advantage in the highly competitive market of Washington, D.C. law firms.

TITLE: Senior Vice President, Corporate Regulatory and External Affairs FIRST JOB: 10th grade biology teacher WHAT I’M READING: Life Sentences, by Laura Lippman MY PHILOSOPHY: Depends on the day that you ask. FAMILY: One husband, six children (of whom I am exceptionally proud), six grandchildren, and four dogs. INTERESTS: Reading, politics, women’s issues. FAVORITE CHARITy: March of Dimes

COMPANY: BD HEADQUARTERS: Franklin Lakes, New Jersey WEB SITE: www.bd.com BUSINESS: Medical technology. ANNUAL REVENUES: $7.2 billion EMPLOYEES: 28,000

Another noteworthy mentor was the head of the practice group at the law firm where I spent eight years, prior to joining BD. He was, and is, a brilliant man who not only taught me a great deal about the law, but also forced me into public speaking, which I had expertly avoided until that time. He also taught me the value of motivating a team to achieve outstanding results, as well as the importance of political savvy. Even when you work hard and do well, unless you understand the politics of an organization, career goals may elude you. I also learned the value of being able to make difficult decisions and take responsibility for seeing them implemented. While science has been an underlying theme throughout my career, the variety of jobs I’ve held have led me through several different fields of work, and I’ve learned something valuable from each of these experiences. Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

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women worth watching in 2010

Deborah M. Soon

M Catalyst

TITLE: Vice President, Marketing & Executive Leadership Initiatives EDUCATION: BA, Mathematics, University of California at San Diego; MBA, Harvard Graduate School of Business FIRST JOB: Systems Analyst, EDS WHAT I’M READING: Twilight, by Stephenie Meyer (to keep up with my daughter!) MY PHILOSOPHY: Never have regrets. FAMILY: Married; one daughter (adopted from China). INTERESTS: Movies, finding “hole in the wall” restaurants, fast cars. FAVORITE CHARITy: The 1990 Institute Spring Bud Program

COMPANY: Catalyst HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEB SITE: www.catalyst.org BUSINESS: Nonprofit focused on advancing women in the workplace. Catalyst has received the highest rating from the American Institute of Philanthropy for maximizing the effectiveness of every dollar contributed. ANNUAL REVENUES: $10.15 million EMPLOYEES: 74

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Mentors have made a huge difference in my career. I still remember the words of my first manager and mentor: “Deb, you’re great at what you do, but it takes more than just being good to advance. You need to make your influence felt!” That advice has stayed with me, helping me maneuver successfully through the corporate world. Finding the right way “to make my influence felt” has often been difficult. It has been tricky to navigate between my Asian values of self-effacement, and the workplace expectations of self-promotion, in order to succeed. It is trickier, still, to balance both against the stereotypes of women, and in particular, Asian women, in business. Making my influence felt hasn’t meant dancing on tables to draw attention to myself—it is about leadership. For me, that means “quiet” leadership, the many ways I choose to bring out the best in people, whether directly or indirectly.

“…great leaders are selfless…” I started working with my second mentor, the director of internal audit for a multibillion-dollar paper company, when I helped develop the organization’s first processes for auditing financial software. This mentor became my champion and helped me move into a core business unit. When I was accepted by the Harvard Business School, but lacked the money to attend, he persuaded the company to provide me with a full scholarship. It was a major turning point in my career. After obtaining my MBA, I decided that I wanted to run a company, so that I could have significant impact on a business. To do so, I needed other skills and experiences, especially in sales and marketing. Again, I was fortunate to find a mentor who was willing to guide me, and who ultimately recommended me to the board as his successor to the CEO position. In this way, I got my shot at running a company, and I eventually took it public. I am forever in debt to these wonderful people who invested in me. I truly believe that great leaders are selfless, as were these gentlemen. I only hope that I can do for others as they did for me—look for the best in people; seize opportunities to coach, facilitate, and develop them; and remove any barriers that might prevent them from reaching their potential.

September/October 2009


women worth watching in 2010

Mary Stoddart

I

Best Buy Co., Inc.

I have always felt a calling to develop deep connections with others, recognizing every relationship as an individual thread in the tapestry of my life. This focus on leveraging supportive networks, building relationships, and engaging others has been greatly beneficial to my success. From an early age, my parents instilled in me the belief that the opportunities for my life were boundless and that anything was possible. Their belief in me gave me great confidence and made me realize the importance of having a strong support system of advocates on your behalf. Taking on leadership positions in school and athletics, I began to live out that mindset, acting as a role model to peers, and paying forward the vote of confidence that was so inherently passed on to me.

“…realize the importance of having a strong support system of advocates on your behalf.” Early in my career, I recognized that same connectedness as being an essential element of success in the business world as well. I began participating in the Menttium Program, a mentorship organization dedicated to advancing professional development by creating personal connections across networks. My mentor was a retired SVP of Sears, deeply passionate about empowering women to break the glass ceilings existing in business life. The program facilitated a one-year mentoring relationship, but the connection I fostered with my mentor lasted much longer and made a significant impression on my personal and professional development. My climb up the corporate ladder was enhanced by supportive relationships like this, and as a leader, I believe it is essential for me to pass along to others a positive experience, similar to what I received when someone took a chance on me. I continued my involvement with Menttium, only this time as mentor to a young woman from Texas, working in the corporate field across the border in Mexico. The significance of mentorships became even more evident as I saw the lack of development opportunities available to my mentee, and I realized the immense importance of ensuring advocacy for women in all stages of professional development.

TITLE: Vice President and Territory General Manager EDUCATION: Mount Holyoke College and IMD school of Business in Switzerland FIRST JOB: Hotel housekeeper, Marriott, Newton, Massachusetts WHAT I’M READING: To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee MY PHILOSOPHY: The only constant in life is change. FAMILY: Married for 23 years with four children: Will, Haley, John, and Carly. INTERESTS: Decorating, sewing, restaurant exploration, art. FAVORITE CHARITies: American Cancer Society

COMPANY: Best Buy Co., Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Richfield, Minnesota WEB SITE: www.bestbuy.com BUSINESS: Consumer electronics retailer. ANNUAL REVENUES: $45 billion (2009) EMPLOYEES: 155,000 worldwide

Now, as newly appointed co-leader of the Women’s Leadership Forum (WoLF) at Best Buy, I believe the vitality of mentorship will come to fruition even more, with WoLF acting as the catalyst for engaging and inspiring individuals through a network of strong supporters. And it is through a solid foundation like this that individuals can relate to one another, help each other succeed, and become better leaders in the process.

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women worth watching in 2010

Cathy Suever

F

Parker Hannifin

TITLE: Group Vice President, Controller EDUCATION: BS, Accounting, University of Dayton FIRST JOB: Working a 4-ton press to assemble fittings WHAT I’M READING: Any mystery I can escape into. MY PHILOSOPHY: Do the best you can with what you have. FAMILY: A supportive husband and an amazing daughter. INTERESTS: Most spare time is spent watching my daughter play soccer and making great friends on the sidelines. FAVORITE CHARITies: American Red Cross; Susan G. Komen Foundation

COMPANY: Parker Hannifin HEADQUARTERS: Cleveland, Ohio WEB SITE: www.parker.com BUSINESS: Parker Hannifin is the world’s leading diversified manufacturer of motion and control technologies and systems, providing precision-engineered solutions for a wide variety of commercial, mobile, industrial and aerospace markets. Annual Revenues: Over $10 billion EMPLOYEES: 52,000

For each of us, there are many different experiences and events we can point to when defining what drives success. Terms such as good mentors, having passion, building trust, and solid ethics, often come to mind. These could be considered pre-requisites for success. For me, the whole package of what drives success comes down to people. I believe success is strongly influenced by respecting the people around us, whether they are customers, superiors, peers, the team working for us, or even people not directly involved. I grew up with seven siblings, so there were ten of us in a one-bathroom home. Respecting each other wasn’t an option, but rather a matter of survival. I learned at an early age that respecting the knowledge others have, and understanding how I could use that knowledge, would help me accomplish things faster and better, and could provide me great rewards.

“Stop, listen, and learn from every person you meet.” This is one of the important homegrown lessons that I’ve taken into the workplace with me. Valuing what others can contribute, whether it’s the person delivering the mail, or the highest leader in the company, has taught me that respecting what they have to offer helps me even more than it helps them. Everybody approaches a problem with different perspectives, backgrounds and opinions. Respecting what everyone has to contribute is a terrific learning opportunity. Don’t let that opportunity escape. Stop, listen, and learn from every person you meet. Appreciate their contribution and recognize them for their value, no matter who they are. Put yourself in their shoes and look at a situation from their standpoint. Practicing this in your professional life will not only help you grow, but will also demonstrate a respect that will drive rewards all around. However, success doesn’t arrive by simply respecting the people you see every day. I also believe in the principle of exceeding others’ expectations—every day. Always go a step further. Make them notice the job you’ve done. Demonstrate you’re ready for the next level. And you can’t do it alone. There are very few jobs, if any, that I could do without the support of the team working with me, for me, or above me. That includes support from home, from friends, and from many others we don’t even see. Respect and value what they do for you, and you could go a very long way.

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women worth watching in 2010

Sandy Swider

A

Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc.

A 20-year hospitality career has led me to a special place. I am developing the Global Citizenship function within Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc. Global Citizenship is Starwood’s tag for Corporate Social Responsibility and it encompasses taking good care of the environment plus taking good care of people. I grew up in a loving family tenaciously committed to working hard, standing by their word, and helping others along the way. My eighth grade teacher, Mrs. Stanczak, appreciated those characteristics, instilled confidence in me, and nurtured my instinct to do the right thing. As a result, I won the Good Citizenship award at my eighth grade graduation. It all started there! Acting on these basic principles has served me well over the years.

“Staying on the right path can be simple if we let it be.” When things start to feel too complicated, I remind myself to stick to the basics…to stay focused on the task at hand and to treat people the way I want to be treated. Staying on the right path can be simple if we let it be. That understanding helped me navigate through the early days coaching and counseling associates, re-stocking the Sunday brunch buffet, or conducting a hotel quality assurance review. In 2001, I took on my first role at Starwood’s headquarters. My, how things can feel overly complicated at the “Corporate Office.” It became essential to work hard to keep things simple. I was privileged to learn from a distinguished group of mentors full of warmth, creativity, and smarts. They shaped my management and leadership approach by teaching me that a problem halved is a problem solved, to stay positive, that everything communicates, and to enjoy loads of laughs along the way. In various leadership roles that followed, I learned that in-person dialogue is more impactful than e-mail, to solicit ideas from every level of the organization, to never stray too far from the frontline of our business, and that there is always time to say thank you.

TITLE: Vice President, Global Citizenship EDUCATION: BS, Penn State Hotel School FIRST JOB: Camp counselor for children with special needs WHAT I’M READING: Just Good Business: The Strategic Guide to Aligning Corporate Responsibility and Brand, by Kellie McElhaney MY PHILOSOPHY: Everything communicates; work hard; stay true to yourself. FAMILY: I have a large, loving family that includes a ten pound Shih Tzu. FAVORITE CHARITies: Choey Memorial Pentathlon; The Smile Train

COMPANY: Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: White Plains, New York WEB SITE: www.starwoodhotels.com BUSINESS: Hospitality. ANNUAL REVENUES: $5.9 billion EMPLOYEES: 145,000

An especially memorable role at Starwood was working to revitalize our Four Points by Sheraton brand. That work started with listening to guests and then focusing on the basics to drive improvements. Our uncomplicated approach resulted in unprecedented guest satisfaction scores and unit growth. And now, I have the extraordinary opportunity to help mobilize Starwood’s global scale and harness the incredible passion of our people to take good care of the environment and give back to our communities. With a portfolio of 1,000 hotels and 145,000 associates in 100 countries and nine brands, things could get complicated. Here’s to the friends, mentors, and experiences that will help keep us on the right path!

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women worth watching in 2010

Sharon C. Taylor

E

Prudential Financial, Inc.

Everyone’s career path is different. But you can count on one thing—there will be challenges along the way. That’s why it’s important to have a support system in place, one you can look to for guidance and direction. No one can succeed alone. I certainly didn’t, which is why I believe so passionately in the power of mentoring.

TITLE: Senior Vice President, Human Resources EDUCATION: BA, Foreign Languages, Temple University FIRST JOB: Short-order cook WHAT I’M READING: Outliers, by Malcolm Gladwell; Stormy Weather, by James Gavin MY PHILOSOPHY: “Service to others is the rent we pay for living.” –Marion Wright Edelman FAMILY: Married with one child INTERESTS: Reading, traveling, and cooking. FAVORITE CHARITY: EUPC Scholarship Fund

COMPANY: Prudential Financial, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Newark, New Jersey WEB SITE: www.prudential.com BUSINESS: Financial services. ANNUAL REVENUES: $29 billion in 2008

Early in my career, I developed a network of people who helped me learn about Prudential’s businesses, about people, and about myself. No one called it mentoring at the time, but that’s what it was. They shared insights on how to navigate the organization and learn the unwritten rules of the corporate world. They provided constructive feedback and delivered hard messages that were sometimes difficult to hear. When I felt stalled, they helped me identify strategies to grow and encouraged me to take on difficult but developmental assignments. Without my mentors, I may not have made those key decisions that helped me advance. Having experienced the power of mentoring first-hand, I try to do the same for others in my professional and personal life. I mentor several emerging leaders within Prudential and work closely with our business resource groups to help reinforce the importance and impact of professional development and building supportive networks. I am also active in external organizations like the Executive Leadership Council’s NextGen Network, which seeks to support high-potential African American professionals at critical stages in their careers. One story particularly close to my heart is that of Kory and Kia Saunders, twin sisters and scholarship recipients from a not-for-profit organization I chair outside of work that provides financial assistance and guidance to students of color. Kory, one of my mentees, graduated summa cum laude from Hampton University and is now a marketing professional with Newsweek. Kia is an attorney who recently passed both the New York and New Jersey bar exams.

“No one can succeed alone.”

EMPLOYEES: 41,000

These accomplished sisters are now sharing their gifts with young high school and college students. To me that’s what it’s all about—helping others overcome obstacles to achieve their own success so that they can become part of the next generation to give back. There’s an African proverb that says, “He who learns, teaches.” I believe this is both a responsibility and a gift. We all have the ability to leave a unique and lasting legacy within our families, professions, and communities—a legacy that will benefit those who follow us. This is the virtuous cycle of leadership.

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energized by

DIVERSITY

With more than 7 million customers and 27,000 employees, National Grid is one of the largest investor-owned utilities in the world. And, our greatest strength comes from the power of inclusion and diversity in our workforce. The value of an individual’s skills, special talents, multicultural experiences, and alternative life styles is an integral part of our corporate culture. So is our commitment to preserving the environment as we address the energy needs of our customers. Whether you are interested in future employment, or are a small business entrepreneur, we welcome your perspective. Learn more about career and business opportunities at www.nationalgridus.com.


women worth watching in 2010

Jamie K. Thorsen

I

BMO Capital Markets

TITLE: Executive Managing Director & Head, FX Products and China Capital Markets EDUCATION: BS, Psychology, Denison University; MBA, Benedictine University; working on graduate Gemology degree FIRST JOB: Trading food for money (grocery store cashier) WHAT I’M READING: The Ascent of Money: A Financial History of the World, by Niall Ferguson. Always read anything by Janet Evanovich. Her Stephanie Plum character is beyond funny. MY PHILOSOPHY: Always trade money for time. You can always figure out how to get more money, but there is no way to expand your defined time on earth. FAMILY: Married, three children.

I was fortunate to enter the foreign exchange (FX) business in the late ‘70s. Even though FX trading is one of the world’s oldest professions, it suddenly became very meaningful to international investors and multi-national corporations when President Nixon floated the dollar by removing it from the gold standard. FX lacked the defined “old boy” structure, so promotions and opportunities were based on performance first. Working in a meritocracy has allowed me to grow professionally and personally—doing what I enjoy. I try to create that environment for my team. I have found that if you are consistent in your behavior, clear in your expectations, and have integrity regarding your interactions with people, getting results becomes an easier task. In addition, having a passion for your work, an ability to continue learning, and a sense of fun, will keep everything new and exciting. Most importantly I have found that looking for ways to re-invent yourself and your career keeps you from getting tired or complacent.

“…taking risks and ‘being in the game’ is the only way to encounter opportunity and obtain results.”

INTERESTS: Skiing; jewelry design; running; core training. FAVORITE CHARITy: Children’s Memorial Hospital

COMPANY: BMO Capital Markets HEADQUARTERS: Toronto, Canada WEB SITE: www.bmo.com BUSINESS: Financial services. ANNUAL REVENUES: $10.2 billion (Canadian) EMPLOYEES: 37,000

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In every challenge I have found opportunity and growth. Everything that has been a struggle has turned into a learning experience, where each hurdle has brought both expected and unexpected benefits. I have learned that taking risks and “being in the game” is the only way to encounter opportunity and obtain results. To me, success at work is enjoying what you do and being able to take ownership of a business or a role, so by my definition I consider myself successful. I always caution people that work success is only a part of the equation. To be truly successful, I believe you need to be able to balance your career with family, friends and outside interests. While not an easy task, I believe that this balance is something that is “job one” in terms of being good at what you do and happy with whom you have become. I do think you can “have it all.” One’s lifestyle is governed by balancing things that you love to do with things that are necessary to do. Steer yourself into a position where both are satisfying. A career is more than a job; it’s a way to express yourself to the world and be creative in your own very special way. Enjoy every moment.

September/October 2009


women worth watching in 2010

Susan Thrope

T

New York Life Insurance Company

The road I traveled to reach my goals started in my parents’ kitchen, where I was consistently taught that I would achieve my dreams if I trusted in myself, worked hard, and made informed decisions, even if they might not always be well received. This is the foundation of my success: “To thine own self be true.” The basic tenet of my philosophy is that you are responsible for your career path. There is rarely a prescribed and direct path to success. Here are some guiding principles I’ve learned and applied: Be completely engaged. Remain focused on your current assignment and job responsibilities, rather than looking ahead to the next opportunity or promotion. Be prepared for any opportunity. Educate yourself both formally, with advanced degrees and certifications, and informally, by joining industry groups or attending industry-related seminars and functions. Be flexible—say yes. Be open to assignments that may be outside your expertise. Opportunities that have been most helpful for my growth have been those outside of my comfort zone. They broadened my skills and reinforced my self-confidence. Be clear about setting expectations. When you assume a new assignment outside your area of expertise, fully understand what the expectations are, and don’t pretend to know more than you do. Request coaching, staff support, or other reasonable assistance to help you acclimate to the new role.

TITLE: Senior Vice President, Deputy General Counsel & Secretary EDUCATION: BA, Economics, Boston University; JD, Brooklyn Law School; LLM, New York University School of Law; MBA, Columbia University School of Business FIRST JOB: Beachbrook Day Camp counselor, for children with special needs WHAT I’M READING: The Tipping Point, by Malcolm Gladwell MY PHILOSOPHY: To thine own self be true. FAMILY: Husband, Michael; children, Brandon and Rebecca. INTERESTS: Music (Bruce Springsteen), dance (tap, ballroom, jazz), Girl Scouts (Brownie Leader for my daughter’s troop), sports (Jets, Mets and my son’s teams). FAVORITE CHARITies: Girl Scouts

“…you are responsible for your career path.”

COMPANY: New York Life Insurance Company HEADQUARTERS: New York City

Be a professional. Act and dress professionally. Be a good communicator. Effective and influential speaking and writing skills are essential to success. Invest time to enhance these skills. The smartest people may not be the most successful if they aren’t able to communicate in a clear, concise, and credible manner. Be decisive. Being able to make well-informed (and possibly unpopular) decisions is a true sign of a leader. Be willing to take a risk and to make mistakes. Taking well-informed, reasonable risks is an integral part of a successful career. Turn adverse situations into learning experiences.

WEB SITE: www.newyorklife.com BUSINESS: Insurance. ANNUAL REVENUES: Operating Revenue: $14 billion EMPLOYEES: 8,932 U.S.-based employees (as of May 31, 2009)

Being responsible for your career path includes learning from others: your family, teachers, mentors, mentees, friends, and colleagues. Listen, observe, and absorb. What works; what doesn’t? Finally, be patient. Success may not follow the time frame that you envision. It is better to be promoted one year “late” than one year too “early.” As I learned from my parents, “To thine own self be true.” Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

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women worth watching in 2010

Suzzanne Uhland

L

O’Melveny & Myers LLP

TITLE: Partner, Policy Committee Member, and Chair of the Restructuring Practice EDUCATION: AB, Economics and Linguistics, with distinction, Phi Beta Kappa, Greenberg Prize for Outstanding Linguistics Graduate, Member of Council of Presidents, Stanford University; MA, Linguistics, Stanford University; JD, Yale Journal on Regulation, Co-Editor-in-Chief, Yale University FIRST JOB: Working at Kentucky Fried Chicken WHAT I’M READING: The Dream of Scipio, by Iain Pears MY PHILOSOPHY: Put yourself in the other person’s shoes. FAMILY: Two daughters, 13 and 10. INTERESTS: Skiing, ancient Rome, word games. FAVORITE CHARITY: World Wildlife Foundation

COMPANY: O’Melveny & Myers LLP HEADQUARTERS: Los Angeles, California WEB SITE: www.omm.com BUSINESS: Law Firm. ANNUAL REVENUES: $907.5 million EMPLOYEES: 2,172 (935 attorneys)

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Looking at my career now (particularly in light of today’s economy), it appears to have been a plan well executed. But neither the path I have traveled, nor the degree to which I have succeeded, were what I expected, and are in large part due to my mentors, who helped me find my strengths and maintain and achieve greater perspective. Like many women of my era, I started out believing that “professionalism” was equated with “toughness” and maintaining aloofness. But one cannot develop professionally (or probably in any other way) in isolation. Mentoring relationships can enable those starting out, to see what they cannot see, in their performance and themselves. It was my mentors who led me to understand that my viewing an issue in an unconventional way, and my habit of speaking in metaphors, were expressions of creativity I should not suppress, but combine with discipline to strengthen my analysis. Perhaps more importantly, each of my mentors pushed me to pause before reacting, and look at issues and situations from the perspectives of others involved. Though sometimes this is a challenge for independent achievers, it is in fact the key to true success.

“…be aware of other views when confronted with a new or difficult situation…” My mentors have been a varied lot with greater and lesser roles in my development—senior partners, the women in leadership in my organization, the judge for whom I clerked, and, later in my career, my clients who cared enough to provide me feedback. To this day I stop and think, “What if I were the supervisor being handed this work product, the judge ruling on this argument, the client hearing this advice?” And now that I am myself the supervisor, I think, “What if I were the junior lawyer getting these instructions or that feedback?” These reflections have enabled me to reach greater levels of communication, teamwork, and results. To those beginning their careers, look for mentoring in a variety of relationships, and allow others to help you see in yourself what might be obscured for you. And be aware of other views when confronted with a new or difficult situation—as your mother would say, stop for a moment and put yourself in the other person’s shoes.

September/October 2009


Together, we can bring people and ideas together. At Parker, some of our greatest successes happen when we bring people with different backgrounds and perspectives together. The ideas ow and innovation begins. As the global leader in motion and control technologies, we recognize the importance of a positive culture that promotes diversity, community and ethical behavior. And, we are proud to support ProďŹ les in Diversity Journal and its eighth annual Women Worth Watching special issue.

www.parker.com


women worth watching in 2010

Mary D.Van de Kamp

M Kindred Healthcare

TITLE: Senior Vice President, Clinical Operations EDUCATION: MS, Communication Disorders, University of Wisconsin FIRST JOB: Certified nursing assistant WHAT I’M READING: Franklin D. Roosevelt biography MY PHILOSOPHY: It is a choice I make to see joy and fun in each person, situation, and experience I encounter. FAMILY: Husband of 35 years, Mike; and our four sons and daughter-in-law. INTERESTS: Politics, reading, sports. FAVORITE CHARITY: The HOPE Fund (company’s employee assistance fund)

COMPANY: Kindred Healthcare HEADQUARTERS: Louisville, Kentucky WEB SITE: www.kindredhealthcare.com BUSINESS: Diversified post-acute healthcare services. ANNUAL REVENUES: $4.2 billion EMPLOYEES: 54,500

My number one leadership rule is something I learned from my 93-year-old father. He has been a judge for over 40 years. After high school, I would walk to his office to catch a ride home. Usually, he would be meeting with someone in his chamber. They would be in deep conversation while sharing afternoon tea. As I watched, I thought there must be some very important legal matter being discussed. Maybe there was, but what really stood out to me was this observation: My dad listened intently, smiled warmly, shared a kind word, and included a firm handshake. After the discussion, each person left with a wide smile and seemed to step a little lighter. This scenario played out time after time. “Giving people a little more than they expect is a good way to get back a lot more than you’d expect.” —Robert Half I strive to practice this leadership skill each day, and have seen a positive impact on our team.

“…positive interaction, direction, and energy increase productivity.” I read the book How Full Is Your Bucket?, by Tom Rath and Donald O. Clifton; they describe the importance of positive impact in the workplace through The Theory of the Dipper and the Bucket. Everyone has an invisible bucket. We are at our best when our buckets are overflowing. Everyone also has an invisible dipper. In each moment, we can use our dipper to fill or to dip from another person’s bucket. Good leadership requires you to have someone to follow you. Studies have demonstrated that positive interaction, direction, and energy increase productivity. In healthcare, our employees are required to give to their patients and customers all day long. They finish up for the day and head home to give to their families. Without leaders who provide recognition or praise of a job well done or provide a moment of encouragement, their employee buckets are pretty empty at the end of the day. Industry surveys say many employees leave their jobs because they don’t feel appreciated. By increasing positive energy in our organizations, we can improve job satisfaction, customer and employee retention, increase productivity, and maybe even the unthinkable—allow…work to be fun. My experience taught me success is built on taking every opportunity to really listen, provide a bit of praise, fill someone’s bucket. Employees are happier and more productive, business is strong, and even life is better. In retrospect, I now know that I watched my father fill many buckets. And as the author stated, “Don’t waste another moment—another bucket is waiting for you to fill it.”

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women worth watching in 2010

Amy E. Wagner

F

Burger King Corp.

For many years after earning my MBA, I worked in a very male-dominated discipline and industry—finance within a transportation and logistics company. There were very few females in positions of power to learn from and to be mentored by. But I quickly learned that mentors are everywhere, and you can learn and grow in every situation. I probably learned the most from two individual bosses; one good and one not so good. The “good boss” taught me the power of communication, team building and the importance of applying a critical thought process to each and every situation. The “bad boss” taught me how to deal effectively with difficult personalities and circumstances, and how to navigate the corporate political environment. You can learn just as much from a good boss as you can from a bad one—even if it is what not to do! I also quickly learned that a great attitude is the key to success. Faced with difficult odds in succeeding in a predominately male-dominated industry, I chose to come to work every day with a positive attitude and a desire to succeed. Abraham Lincoln said, “Always bear in mind that your own resolution to succeed is more important than any other one thing.” You choose your attitude each and every day, and I’ve chosen a positive one—one that fosters great relationships both in and out of work.

“Don’t try to be someone you’re not or work in an environment that does not inspire and challenge you.” I saw many of my male colleagues thrive professionally by taking calculated risks, while I also witnessed many of my female colleagues not willing to leave their comfort zones. Being open to new opportunities and taking on new and different responsibilities has served me well. I began my career in finance, and now I head up Investor Relations and Global Communications for a multinational consumer brand.

TITLE: Senior Vice President, Investor Relations and Global Communications EDUCATION: BA, School of Public Affairs; and MBA, International Business and Finance, Florida International University FIRST JOB: Age 12: Papergirl for an afternoon community paper MY PHILOSOPHY: Life is too short not to be happy—love what you do, and do it well! FAMILY: Married 14 years, with two boys, ages 10 and 11. INTERESTS: Cooking, travel. FAVORITE CHARITies: HAVE IT YOUR WAY® Foundation; American Diabetes Association

COMPANY: Burger King Corp. HEADQUARTERS: Miami, Florida WEB SITE: www.bk.com BUSINESS: Quick service restaurant chain. ANNUAL REVENUES: $2.5 billion EMPLOYEES: 27,000 corporate- and company-owned restaurant employees

But the biggest lesson I’ve learned is to be myself and to have fun. Don’t try to be someone you’re not, or work in an environment that does not inspire and challenge you. And most of all—be happy. Life is too short not to be happy— love what you do, and do it well!

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women worth watching in 2010

Tina Waters

T

Comcast Corporation

Throughout my life, my mom has been my number one mentor and role model. She taught me by example that “to whom much is given, much is expected,” and to take the blessings of my life and give them to others. I have carried those lessons with me throughout my personal life and professional endeavors.

TITLE: Senior Vice President of Customer Care, Comcast Cable EDUCATION: BS in Business Administration, Villanova; MS, Organizational Dynamics, University of Pennsylvania FIRST JOB: Call Center Assistant Manager at Bell Atlantic WHAT I’M READING: Lipstick Jihad, by Azadeh Moaveni; my monthly Vanity Fair magazine MY PHILOSOPHY: To whom much is given, much is expected. FAMILY: I live with my husband Thomas, my stepdaughter Jazmine, and my mother, Patty; my sister and brother, nieces and nephews, and grandmother all live close by; my father, Voyer, resides in LA. Family is very important! INTERESTS: Tennis, indoor rock climbing, reading, shopping, family time, doubledutch, international travel. FAVORITE CHARITies: Montgomery County Head Start; Urban League of Philadelphia

COMPANY: Comcast Corporation HEADQUARTERS: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania WEB SITE: www.comcast.com BUSINESS: Cable, internet, and phone communications. ANNUAL REVENUES: $34.3 billion EMPLOYEES: Approximately 100,000

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In addition to my mother, I’ve had many people in my life that have mentored me and influenced me to be the person that I am today. From my days as a teenager working at a neighborhood restaurant, to my current position at Comcast, there have been many people along the way who have served as mentors to me and have shown me that being a leader is about more than giving instruction. Mentoring is about taking people’s potential and guiding them toward reaching their goals, which ultimately leads to us reaching our collective goals. It is also about being an advocate for others. Additionally, it is about being a leader versus a manager. I’ve learned great lessons from family, friends, colleagues, supervisors, and even those whom I have supervised.

“…be persistent while leaning on the wise council of mentors.” My career path began at Bell Atlantic right out of college. I entered their management training program and learned to manage people at call centers. From there, I honed my skills at PECO Energy, a consulting firm called Gartner Group, and for a brief time, a start-up called Software Consulting Group. I then joined Comcast, where I have been for 10 years, doing what I am really passionate about—helping others by connecting how a business can positively impact a person’s experience. I have gained much knowledge from these experiences, including learning the value of negotiation skills, how to find common ground, the ability to think systematically and how to coach and develop others. I also overcame some hurdles. I realized that leadership is hard work and is never easy when you work in a people-centric environment. I also experienced challenges in some instances of not being taken seriously by others because I am a woman and a person of color. But my perspective was always positive, looking for the lesson in each situation. I have so much that I want to do in my life. And my advice to young women is to be persistent while leaning on the wise council of mentors. They can act as a strong support system and can help move you toward reaching your fullest potential.

September/October 2009


Diversity powers innovation. Innovation powers Comcast. We power dreams in our communities. And we live and breathe innovation every day. By embracing diversity of thought, philosophy and experience, we have become the nation’s leading provider of entertainment, information and communication products and services. By embracing diversity of communities, we have become an employer and a provider of choice.

Comcast congratulates our own Tina Waters for being featured in the 8th Annual WomenWorthWatching® Issue. Here’s to her strength and persistence to be an authentic leader and mentor.

To learn more about our commitment to diversity, go to www.comcast.com/diversity


women worth watching in 2010

Stephanie Gaillard White

W MWV

When I was a little girl, my mother instilled in me a core value that I have upheld my entire life. She said, ‘‘No matter what you do, help other people.” Those words have played a vital role in my personal and professional development.

TITLE: Vice President, Diversity and Leadership Management EDUCATION: BS in Business Administration, University of South Carolina FIRST JOB: Computer Programmer WHAT I’M READING: Mystery novel by Walter Mosley and the Bible MY PHILOSOPHY: The Golden Rule: “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you,” and “To whom much is given, much will be required.” FAMILY: Husband, Mario; and sons, Andrew and Austin. INTERESTS: Spending time with family, travel, music, and reading. FAVORITE CHARITies: Various youth and education charities

I began my career at MWV as a computer programmer. I excelled at my role and was quite happy with the career path I had chosen. But, as fate would have it, my career would take a different turn when one of my early mentors said to me, “Stephanie, you are a star in computer programming, but you have an even greater gift—developing others. Don’t ever lose that.” Those words resonated deeply with me, and I began to look for opportunities that combined my skills with my passions. In my current role, I am able to develop others on a daily basis and it is exciting work. I help hone the skills of promising up-and-coming talent and also assist senior leaders in maximizing their strengths. I’m grateful for the opportunity to build and fortify relationships with colleagues, students, suppliers, and the community. I also seize the opportunity to mentor others whenever possible. Mentors have played an important role in my life and giving back is essential.

“…a mentor should stretch the mentee and challenge them to become a better person.”

COMPANY: MWV HEADQUARTERS: Richmond, Virginia WEB SITE: www.mwv.com BUSINESS: Packaging. MWV is a global packaging company that provides packaging solutions to many of the world’s most admired brands in the healthcare, personal and beauty care, food, beverage, media and entertainment, and home and garden industries. ANNUAL REVENUES: $7 billion EMPLOYEES: 22,000 worldwide

In my opinion, a mentoring relationship is not meant to be comfortable. On the contrary, a mentor should stretch the mentee and challenge them to become a better person. No matter how amazing a mentee may be, I’ve always found the following to be true: First, everyone has strengths and development opportunities. Second, building and maintaining positive relationships is a vital component in one’s development. And last, but certainly not least, listening is a crucial skill. Over the years, my mentors have provided me with feedback that might not have been easy to listen to…but it was necessary for me to hear. The most important changes I’ve made in my life have been because of strong mentors who spoke openly and honestly with me. Those changes have helped me become the woman I am today. In my opinion, development never ends. As I continue to grow both personally and professionally, I will always look for those mentors who can help me improve myself in my life journey. And, as my mother wisely recommended many years ago, I will also always look for opportunities to help others along the way.

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A company of innovation A culture of inclusion As a global leader in packaging solutions, our customers constantly seek innovation. At MWV, we deliver bold new ideas by creating a diverse and inclusive work environment. More than 21,000 employees contribute to our growth, help us maintain our competitive edge, and keep us connected to the dynamic marketplace we serve.

mwv.com


women worth watching in 2010

Frederica M.Williams

I

Whittier Street Health Center

TITLE: President & Chief Executive Officer EDUCATION: BS, Business Administration, London School of Accountancy, Fellow of the Institute of Chartered Secretaries and Administrators, UK (ICSA); Graduate Certificate in Administration and Management (CSS), Harvard University Extension School; MBA, Anna Maria College FIRST JOB: My mother’s family-owned business WHAT I’M READING: Resonant Leadership, by Richard Boyatzis MY PHILOSOPHY: We should aspire to live an abundant and joy-filled life, celebrating who we are and where we are at the moment, even when our days are far from perfect. Our joy should not be dependent on the circumstances surrounding us, on what we own, who we are with, or how successful our career happens to be. Joy comes from being the real you! FAMILY: Three sons. INTERESTS: Reading, traveling abroad, interior decorating, wellness. FAVORITE CHARITY: Whittier Street Health Center

COMPANY: Whittier Street Health Center HEADQUARTERS: Roxbury, Massachusetts WEB SITE: www.wshc.org BUSINESS: Urban health care and social services, serving 12,000 low income patients from medically underserved communities.

I was born in Freetown, Sierra Leone, in West Africa, and immigrated to London to attend college. I moved to Boston in 1984. Leaving the security of my parents’ home at a young age was scary, and I have had to confront and overcome numerous challenges. I have been able to follow my dreams and overcome adversities because of the values of hard work, determination, perseverance, hope, and faith my parents had instilled in me. These values, and my clear vision for what I wanted in my life, have helped me to build my skills as a leader dedicated to serving others. As an immigrant and full-time working mother of three sons, persevering through challenging times has taught me patience, made me stronger, and helped me maintain the energy and motivation it takes to keep moving forward even when there are obstacles. Also, my important role as a parent means that I have to be efficient and effective so I can successfully balance work and life.

“…I make it a personal priority to create energy in others…” My progression from working as a bank clerk when I first moved to Boston, and not having any family and friends to support and guide my career, to being in my current position where I am making a difference in the lives of 12,000 vulnerable residents in the communities my organization serves, has required discipline, a steady focus, and a willingness to evaluate my experiences and learn from them. I continue to look for opportunities to remain current and appropriate so I can serve as a role model to others. As a leader, I make it a personal priority to create energy in others, make things happen, pave the way, inspire a shared vision, challenge the process, and empower others to act. I did not have a mentor to rely on, but had the strong support and example of my parents, especially my mother’s wisdom. I also joined several professional organizations that gave me access to resources and learning. Because of my experiences, I believe great leaders must be teachers, and should make the mentoring of others a priority. When I speak with young people, I encourage them to pursue their dreams with a clear vision, determination and plan of execution; to make active changes when needed; and stay focused in spite of adversity and challenges.

ANNUAL REVENUES: $16 million EMPLOYEES: 165

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September/October 2009


Diversity makes us stronger. Your talents make us better.

At ARAMARK, our mission is to be a company where the best people want to work…people from all backgrounds, perspectives and experiences. That mission is reflected throughout our organization, from our executive offices to our operations at ballparks, universities, elementary schools and beyond. We are comprised of a rich mosaic of individuals — who together make us Since 1998, FORTUNE magazine has consistently recognized ARAMARK as one of the top three most admired companies in its industry. Headquartered in Philadelphia, ARAMARK has approximately 260,000 employees serving clients in 22 countries.

Recognized as one of the “40 Best Companies for Diversity.”

For more information about ARAMARK, professional opportunities available, and application procedures, please visit www.aramark.com

Black Enterprise magazine, 2008

Consistently listed since 1998 among “World’s Most Admired Companies.” Fortune magazine, 2009

www.aramark.com An equal opportunity/affirmative action employer committed to workforce diversity.


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| HOW DO YOU TELL THEM YOU’RE BACK? |

| COME WITH IT. |

THE ALL-NEW 2010 FORD TAURUS Empower the driver with technology. Be flawless in every detail. From SYNC,Ž* the hands-free, voice-activated communications system, to Multi-Contour front seats with Active Motion™* to the eight other class-exclusive technologies, it all adds up to the most innovative full-size car in America.** Smarter, leaner, sexier than ever before. *Available features. Driving while distracted can result in loss of vehicle control. Only use mobile phones and other devices, even with voice commands, when it is safe to do so. **Class is full-size, non-luxury cars.

Š2009 Ford Motor Company


women worth watching in 2010

Barbara S. Wood

G KBR

Growing up in a farming community in northern Indiana, one of eight children, the philosophy instilled was clear: work hard, do your best, and be practical. That led me to accounting and becoming a CPA. Working in public accounting for a couple of years was a great experience, allowing me to see different businesses, hone my skills in juggling priorities, and work for a variety of bosses and clients. In the early 1980s, I went to work in accounting for an international offshore drilling company. Mentoring was not universally practiced, so I used opportunity—and observation of bosses, peers, and business contacts as models, both good and bad—to help shape my business practices and approach. Although mentoring is a very important tool, if you cannot find one, there are alternative approaches to continue to advance your business skills. Working in the oil industry during the downturn of the 1980s taught me a great deal, including the “Serenity Prayer.” You have to focus on what is within your sphere of influence and apply your energy there. Teamwork and cooperation are vital and need to be deliberately fostered. While people may take a job for a variety of reasons, I believe they stay because of the people they work with and their ability to feel like they can make a positive contribution, especially when a business is going through difficult times.

“You have to focus on what is within your sphere of influence and apply your energy there.”

TITLE: Vice President and Chief Information Officer EDUCATION: Bachelor’s degree in Accounting, Indiana University at South Bend; Certified Public Accountant (Indiana - inactive) FIRST JOB: Various positions at a nursing home during the summer before high school WHAT I’M READING: The Appeal, by John Grisham MY PHILOSOPHY: If you take “good care” of today, tomorrow will take care of itself. A person must be able to live, work, and enjoy the daily journey, treating people with integrity and value, making the best judgments and choices they can at the time. If they do, they will be able to be proud of the outcome, whatever it is. FAMILY: Husband of five years, Jim, and my three children, ages 26, 24 and 20. INTERESTS: Spending time with family, including travel, good food, wine, and entertainment. FAVORITE CHARITY: Susan G. Komen for the Cure

Developing my career in global companies, I have come to respect and appreciate how differing cultures and points of view are a vital part of making a company successful over the longer term. I’ve also learned that when dealing with such diversity, one should not underestimate the amount of planning, patience, and persistence required to successfully enact change. Although not raised to be particularly adventurous, as my career advanced, I learned to be willing to explore different paths, leaving a comfort zone for an opportunity to have a positive impact. When I accepted my first position as Chief Information Officer, I had the opportunity to learn a great deal about technology, and I taught a great deal about business and process to my team. The company, the team, and I all gained from the exchange of experiences, and I continue to strive to learn and teach every day.

COMPANY: KBR HEADQUARTERS: Houston, Texas WEB SITE: www.kbr.com BUSINESS: KBR is a leading global engineering, construction and services company supporting the energy, hydrocarbon, government services, and civil infrastructure sectors. ANNUAL REVENUES: $11.6 billion total revenue in 2008 EMPLOYEES: More than 57,000

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women worth watching in 2010

Ellie Yi-Li Yieh

A

Applied Materials, Inc.

At age 15, my parents gave me the best gift imaginable—the chance to immigrate to the United States—with the hope of giving me and my three siblings a future with more opportunity than the one we had in Taiwan. This event altered the direction of my life.

TITLE: Corporate Vice President, Division General Manager, Etch Business Unit EDUCATION: BS, Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley FIRST JOB: Working for Baskin-Robbins at 16 years old. It was a great opportunity for me to learn English. WHAT I’M READING: Better: A Surgeon’s Notes on Performance, by Atul Gawande MY PHILOSOPHY: Never give up; do the best you can with your job and life, so that there are no regrets. FAMILY: Husband; daughter, 6; and son, 4. INTERESTS: The symphony. FAVORITE CHARITY: Doctors Without Borders

COMPANY: Applied Materials, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Santa Clara, California WEB SITE: www.appliedmaterials.com BUSINESS: World’s leading semiconductor, flat panel, and solar equipment maker. ANNUAL REVENUES: $8.13 billion EMPLOYEES: Approximately 12,800 worldwide

Throughout high school, I excelled in math and science, and UC Berkeley’s College of Chemistry seemed like the perfect fit. At Berkeley, I was exposed to an environment that was predominately male. As an Asian female, I had to adapt quickly to thrive. After many years of dedication, sacrifice, and hard work, I am now the first female to hold my current position as corporate vice president and division general manager of the Etch business unit for Applied Materials.

“…I’ve learned that it is a must to establish trust and respect with my team…” This past March, I celebrated my twentieth anniversary with the company. Looking back at my career, I was constantly given the challenges to develop or turn around products. Under my leadership, I consistently grew revenue and market share with high profitability for several different product groups. Management recognized my abilities; this resulted in increased scope and responsibilities. I find it exciting to work in the semiconductor industry, navigating through fast-changing technical challenges, business environments, and customer needs. To win each business, one needs to meet not just the technical and cost requirements, but to understand the competition and customer. I enjoy this big puzzle of working with people and fixing problems. These characteristics work well for this industry, and with a company and customer base as diverse as Applied Materials. I was initially shy and introverted by nature, so it took many years of growing to hone my leadership skills. As I watched leaders I’ve worked with throughout the years, I’ve learned that it is a must to establish trust and respect with my team and colleagues in order to effectively drive the progress or change needed to achieve success. There may not always be an answer for any given situation, but if you have an open mind and think in terms of what is best for the company, customer, or your family, you will end up on the right path to success.

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women worth watching in 2010

Ann Ziegler

T

CDW Corporation

The road from Wall Street M&A lawyer to CFO of an $8 billion revenue company is neither straight nor obvious. From a mentoring perspective, I always make clear that, in building a career for yourself, you must be willing to take (calculated) risks, and you must also find roles about which you can be passionate, and people with whom you enjoy working. If you had told me 15 years ago that I would be sitting in the chair I occupy today, I would have laughed at you! I enjoyed what I was doing, was good at my job (by then I was in-house counsel at Sara Lee Corporation), and liked the people with whom I worked. Then opportunity came knocking in the form of a much higher profile role on the M&A/Strategy team at Sara Lee. With some trepidation, I leapt, and learned quickly that I enjoyed the business side even more than the legal side—and that with hard work, I could be successful at it as well. That was the last time that I waited for opportunity to “come knocking.” From then on, I kept a keen eye out for what I would enjoy doing next and what I needed to do to put myself in a position for growth.

TITLE: Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer EDUCATION: BA, The College of William & Mary; JD, University of Chicago Law School FIRST JOB: Bank teller WHAT I’M READING: Fat Envelope Frenzy, by Joie Jager-hyman (my older daughter is a junior in high school) MY PHILOSOPHY: If you are comfortable in your role, it is time to find your next role. FAMILY: Daughters Emma, 16; Reba, 13.

“…you must be willing to take (calculated) risks…” I am a firm believer in Madeleine Albright’s quote that “there is a special place in hell for women who don’t help other women.” It is important to me that her message is clearly heard, and that other young women are aware of the power and support they can give and receive from each other. It is with this expectation that I mentor and help young women along in their career so that when the opportunity presents itself, those who have benefited from my help will do the same for some one else.

INTERESTS: My daughters, biking, travel. FAVORITE CHARITY: Mark A. Orloff Teacher’s Award (award set up in my husband’s memory to fund further education of day-school teachers)

COMPANY: CDW Corporation HEADQUARTERS: Vernon Hills, Illinois WEB SITE: www.cdw.com BUSINESS: Technology hardware, software, and services. ANNUAL REVENUES: $8.1 billion EMPLOYEES: 6,400

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Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month AXA

Burger King

Halliburton

IBM

ITT

KPMG

Hispanic Heritage Month begins September 15th, the anniversary of independence for five Latin American countries: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua. Today, more than 35 million people in the United States identify themselves as Hispanic or Latino. We asked our Hispanic readers to share their stories with us. We wanted to know who influenced them early on, what they value right now, and what they share as mentors. We are proud to introduce these individuals to you; we applaud their efforts and celebrate their achievements.

Pitney Bowes

Shell

Sodexo

USPS

Vanguard

Verizon

Victor Andrade

We hope you’ll enjoy meeting them.

Wal-Mart

Waste Management

Wellpoint

Senior Vice President, Information Technology

AXA Equitable Life Insurance Company Headquarters: New York City Web site: www.axa-equitable.com Primary Business: Life insurance, annuity and investment products and services. Employees: Approximately 11,000 employees and sales personnel

In your opinion, what are the attributes of a great leader that you have employed in your career?

What I’m reading: The Geography of Bliss, by Eric Weiner My philosophies: Be true to yourself. Set high standards and live by them. Interests: Boating and fishing.

Honesty and integrity are critical attributes of a great leader, and necessary to build an environment of trust and respect. Other leaders have taught me that listening is as important as communicating, and teams respond to a leader who is approachable. The decisiveness of some great leaders has inspired me when I am faced with making a tough, risky decision. What is your most rewarding professional accomplishment?

One of the first large projects I managed was the implementation of an electronic banking product to gain market share and increase revenues. Some of my colleagues were skeptical about the feasibility of my proposed solution. I was given the opportunity to explain the concept and, ultimately, senior management agreed to adopt my approach. I worked with a great team and the project was very successful, exceeded expectations and received a lot of recognition. What is the best advice you have ever received in your career?

“In business, perceptions are reality.” It sounds a bit harsh, but it taught me that the more effective we are in communicating with our customers and people we work with, the narrower the gap between perception and reality.

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Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month

Armando Jacomino

President, Latin America & Caribbean Region

Burger King Corp. Headquarters: Miami, Florida Web site: www.bk.com Primary Business: Fast food hamburger restaurant. Employees: Approximately 27,000 corporate- & company-owned restaurant employees in the U.S.

In your opinion, what are the attributes of a great leader that you have employed in your career?

To me, a great leader is someone who exceeds expectations, is committed to excellence and is fully accountable for everything he or she does. In my career, I’ve worked hard to build solid relationships with the company leadership team, my colleagues and my team. I also support my team and motivate them to perform at their best. What obstacles have you overcome in your career to date, and how has this made you a better leader?

A long career with one company has many benefits, but can also present some challenges. When you begin working with a company at a higher level, you are viewed as an experienced professional and are recognized for your expertise in your particular area. I began my career with the BURGER KING® brand as a restaurant team member. I worked hard to obtain the experience I needed, so that I could be successful and achieve recognition for my professional development. My experience over the years has definitely made me a well-rounded leader for my team today.

Education: Business degree, Miami Dade Community College What I’m reading: Good to Great, by Jim Collins My philosophy: Be an example all of the time. Interests: Sports, spending time with family.

What is the best advice you have ever received in your career?

To understand and appreciate the importance of a team in your overall success. I am fortunate to have a team that provides me with a solid foundation, so that I can concentrate on implementing the strategies that will help move our business forward.

Roberto Munoz

Vice President, Latin America Region

Halliburton Headquarters: Houston, Texas, and Dubai, United Arab Emirates Web site: www.halliburton.com Primary Business: Energy services. Employees: 50,000 plus

In your opinion, what are the attributes of a great leader that you have employed in your career?

• Ethics. I am convinced that we must act with integrity, whether in our work or in our personal life. Nobody should be considered a role model if they don’t act ethically in all aspects of life. • Dedication. Whatever the activity, it will produce greater results if it is done with dedication. This involves focusing all your senses, energy, and efforts on the task at hand, whatever it is. • Commitment. Leaders distinguish themselves when they are committed to the values, objectives, and practices of the company for which they work. If a person is not committed to his or her company, that person will hardly achieve the goals set by their employers. • Ability to adapt. Committed leaders know how to easily adapt to changes, and help others to feel committed as well. In fact, leaders have the responsibility to produce changes, and to ensure those changes are properly managed. What obstacles have you overcome in your career to date and how has this made you a better leader?

Education: Electrical Engineering degree, University of Chile What I’m reading: When Markets Collide, by Mohamed El-Erian My philosophy: Constancy of Purpose. Interests: Music, outdoor sports.

I don’t see them as obstacles. I visualize my career path as a steeplechase, in which I must not stop in front of any hurdle, but jump them at the right moment, at the right speed, and at the right height to overcome each of them. Those “hurdles” have helped me to teach others that anything is possible. And that is what others expect from me. Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

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Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month

Patt Romero Cronin

General Manager, Global Technology Delivery and Delivery Excellence

IBM Corporation Headquarters: Armonk, New York Web site: www.ibm.com Primary Business: Information technology. Employees: 398,455 worldwide (2008)

When giving advice or mentoring, what strategies and principles do you communicate?

Education: BS, Combine Science; MBA, Information Systems What I’m reading: Jack: Straight from the Gut, by Jack Welch and John A. Byrne My philosophy: Go for it! Interests: Spending time with my family.

Mentoring has been critical to my success. I advise my mentees to have a “board” of mentors so they get multiple perspectives. I also tell them that they need to be proactive and reach out to their mentors as it is important to keep these relationships active. I provide support by helping them to network, identify opportunities, offer advice on approaches, and counsel them to watch and learn from others. What is your most rewarding professional accomplishment?

I was asked to take an assignment to lead a critical project that had fallen behind its necessary schedule. The project involved the development and integration of the software technology required to support the Olympic Games in Sydney, Australia. The effort involved a team from multiple nations, spanning four continents, cutting across both geographical and cultural boundaries. Through my experience and expertise in software development, command of the Spanish language and culture, and my diversity training with cultures of different countries, I, with my team, not only got the project back on track, but we delivered flawless performance of the technology support for the highly successful Sydney Summer Olympic Games. What obstacles have you overcome in your career to date, and how has this made you a better leader?

Realizing that it is okay to ask for help.

Frank R. Jimenez

Vice President and General Counsel

ITT Corporation Headquarters: White Plains, New York Web site: www.itt.com Primary Business: High technology engineering and manufacturing. Employees: 40,000

In your opinion, what are the attributes of a great leader that you have employed in your career?

Education: BS, Biology, University of Miami; JD, Yale Law School; MBA, Finance & Strategic Management, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania; MA, National Security & Strategic Studies, U.S. Naval War College What I’m reading: The Bottom Billion: Why the Poorest Countries are Failing and What Can Be Done About It, by Paul Collier; The Wine Bible, by Karen MacNeil My philosophy: Trust in God more than you trust in anything else.

When they hear the words “great leader,” most people envision a charismatic, larger-than-life figure. Although there’s nothing necessarily wrong with charisma, I believe leadership is much more about humility, respect, and centeredness. People like to follow leaders who are comfortable in their own skin, who treat them kindly (if firmly), and who don’t inflict their own personal problems upon them. Great leaders put the organization ahead of themselves, and run the risk of making themselves dispensable by building a team that can function in their absence—a team filled with the next generation of leaders. Ironically, there’s no greater way to ensure longevity than to be other-minded; the more that leaders try to make themselves indispensable, the more their teams will long to see them leave. What obstacles have you overcome in your career to date, and how has this made you a better leader?

My obstacles pale in comparison to those of my parents, who came to this country from Cuba without money, power, college diplomas, or English skills. Their example makes me a better leader, for it’s a reminder that a team member’s heart and passion are more indicative of future success than their resume.

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Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month

Gabriel de la Rosa

Audit Partner

KPMG LLP Headquarters: New York City Web site: www.us.kpmg.com Primary Business: Audit, tax and advisory services. Employees: 22,000

How has your understanding of diversity and inclusion helped you become a better leader?

Diverse perspectives enable you to see challenges through different lenses. Team members bring a variety of experiences to the table and it is important to draw out those experiences with relevance to the objectives of the team. I have been rewarded with stronger teams by creating an inclusive environment where all team members are encouraged to share their views. When giving advice or mentoring, what strategies and principles do you communicate?

When mentoring someone, I think it’s important to share as much relevant information about yourself as possible to demonstrate your empathy to the mentee. I think it’s also important to be candid, and to examine strengths and weaknesses, to help build trust within the relationship. Once you’ve established that trust, you can better help your mentee develop his or her short- and long-term goals. What obstacles have you overcome in your career to date, and how has this made you a better leader?

Going to a small school. Because I chose to do so, I didn’t have the networks developed by many of those who went to large universities. To overcome this, I was diligent about establishing relationships with clients and prospects to help me build my own network.

David R. Ornelas

Education: BS, Azusa Pacific University What I’m reading: Lessons on Leadership: The 7 Fundamental Management Skills for Leaders at All Levels, by Jack Stahl My philosophy: Work hard, but play hard. Interests: Golf, spending time with my family.

Vice President, Customer Operations

Pitney Bowes Inc. Headquarters: Stamford, Connecticut Web site: www.pb.com Primary Business: Mailstream technology. Employees: 35,000

How has your understanding of diversity and inclusion helped you become a better leader?

The whole notion of inclusion is very motivating. It is one thing to have diversity within a workforce, but inclusion inspires people to think about the benefits that can be gained by participating in different cultures or traditions, rather than creating the perception of “winners and losers.” What/who has most influenced you in your career to date?

Leading a human resources organization greatly influenced my career. I was exposed to a variety of different functions, from human performance systems to diversity initiatives to workforce development. It was eye-opening as I came to understand the different techniques and skills required to mobilize a large workforce. Active engagement with front line employees across all levels was another experience as a senior manager that greatly shaped my decision-making approach. To this day, I try not to make decisions solely from World Headquarters. I constantly go out into the field to connect with individuals and most of all, listen. The closer to the customer I can get, the more likely I am to make the right decisions. What is the best advice you have ever received in your career?

If you want to be successful and achieve great things, go as hard as you can, but when it’s time to rest, it’s time to rest. In addition, be kind and respectful to others and everything else takes care of itself. Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

Education: BA, Economics, College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts; MBA, The Fuqua School of Business, Duke University What I’m reading: Angels and Demons, by Dan Brown My philosophy: Have vision and passion for what you are doing. Interests: Golf.

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Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month

John M. Esquivel

Chief Ethics & Compliance Officer and Associate General Counsel

Shell Oil Company, a member of the Royal Dutch Shell Group of Companies Headquarters: Houston, Texas Web site: www.shell.com Primary Business: Energy. Employees: 22,000 U.S.; 102,000 worldwide

What/who has most influenced you in your career to date?

Education: BBA, St. Mary’s University; JD, University of Michigan What I’m reading: The Last Lecture, by Randy Pausch; Halftime®: Moving from Success to Significance®, by Bob Buford My philosophy: Life is a series of choices—be intentional about your choices. Interests: I’m a bass player that still likes to “lock the groove” with just about any garage band.

Ricardo Diaz

As I reflect on the most significant influences in the development of my leadership skills, I must acknowledge my grandfather, a Mexican immigrant with very little formal education who worked with a pick and shovel for the City Water Board, and taught me the most important fundamentals of being a good leader. He taught me that there is dignity in all labor. Even if you are digging a ditch, be proud of your work and do the best job you can do. I also learned from him that we are all interdependent. The biggest house is not very useful if someone has not laid the plumbing. I learned to acknowledge the contributions of others, and let people know how their contributions relate to the larger project so that they can be proud of the accomplishments of the team. He also taught me the need, if not the obligation, to give back to the community. Though his family was of very limited means, he always found a way to help people. I can still remember when he literally gave the hat off his head. Because of him, I see the importance of giving back to the community, whether it is the community in which I work, or the community where I live or which I am a part of. When giving advice or mentoring, what strategies and principles do you communicate?

I encourage people to seek out learning opportunities—whether it is formal education, modeling great leaders in your organization, or working with consultants—but don’t underestimate the value of what you can learn from those around you, even from a Mexican immigrant with broken hands from decades of manual labor.

Director of Business Development, K-12 Education Market

Sodexo Headquarters: Gaithersburg, Maryland Web site: www.Sodexousa.com Primary Business: Leading provider of integrated food and facilities management services in North America. Employees: 120,000

How has your understanding of diversity and inclusion helped you become a better leader?

You can influence people to work with you, or to do business with you, when you are sensitive to their points of view and the lenses they use to see reality. If you recognize and respect individuality and celebrate the differences among people they will follow your lead. Education: BS, Business Administration; MBA, Marketing and Sales Specialist What I’m reading: The Leader in Me, by Stephen R. Covey My philosophy: Always do the right thing, all the time. Interests: Reading, golf.

When giving advice or mentoring, what strategies and principles do you communicate?

I always recommend: to act with integrity, to be loyal, to be disciplined, and never give up. Always be positive, and be willing to accept constructive criticism. What obstacles have you overcome in your career to date, and how has this made you a better leader?

As a foreigner, coming into the American society and business environment, having to overcome the language and the cultural barriers were good challenges. It is possible to accomplish your goals if you know where you want to go and take the steps to get there. It is not always easy. What is the best advice you have ever received in your career?

Know exactly where you want to go, and set challenging but attainable goals for you personally and professionally. Once you set those goals, do whatever it takes to get there, always doing the right thing.

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Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month

Gregory G. Graves

District Manager, Los Angeles District

United States Postal Service Headquarters: Washington, D.C. Web site: www.usps.com Primary Business: The Los Angeles Postal District collects, processes, and delivers 14 million pieces of mail daily to four million residences and 158,000 businesses. Employees: Nearly 10,000 in the Los Angeles District

How has your understanding of diversity and inclusion helped you become a better leader?

Education: BS, Business Degree, Columbia College; Graduate Business Studies, Colorado University What I’m reading: Human Sigma, by John H. Fleming and Jim Asplund My philosophy: Live to serve others well in the greatest capacity you can master. Interests: I like to analyze data and build analysis models. I also like to play golf with friends, peers, and team members.

Alba Martinez

Great ideas come from individuals, but no best idea has ever come from a single individual. Once an idea or principle is brought forward and presented to a group, the greatest limitation is already established if the group is not totally inclusive and diverse. From each person’s experience and world view, a single idea can be viewed from every possible angle and all things considered. I am known for saying, “I’ve often had a good idea, but I’ve never had the best idea.” The best idea comes from the group who is fully diverse and completely inclusive. This is a guiding principle of mine When giving advice or mentoring, what strategies and principles do you communicate?

As a leader and in everything you do—be a “finisher.” With this are two rules. Rule#1. Anyone can take on a challenge or task and anyone can get things started, but the key to being successful is to finish the things you start. Don’t let perfection lord over and prevent you from crossing the finish line. Allow the extraordinary efforts of your timely and personal best to be the finish line. Rule#2. Never say that you cannot do something because you lack the specific experience. Go into every opportunity with an open mind and be the catalyst to change to the status quo. A true leader doesn’t walk in someone else’s exact steps; they take greater strides and find new ways to do things better. When I start a new job, all I really need are the keys to the office and a current organizational chart. The rest is gaining understanding of the dynamics of each of the parts and determining how to make them operate more efficiently.

Principal

Vanguard Headquarters: Malvern, Pennsylvania Web site: www.vanguard.com Primary Business: Financial services. Employees: 12,500

How has your understanding of diversity and inclusion helped you become a better leader?

Education: Bachelor’s Degree, University of Puerto Rico; Law Degree, Georgetown University Law Center What I’m reading: Outliers, by Malcolm Gladwell; Enough, by John C. Bogle; The Soloist, by Steve Lopez My philosophies: Always give your best. Perform in your current role with passion and excellence. Interests: Family time, music, and reading on the beach.

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When people can be their true and open selves, they feel and perform their best. Inclusive workplaces have higher morale, better retention, better access to talent, and ultimately, stronger business results. I would never accept an environment that is not committed to practicing and promoting the values of inclusion and diversity to the fullest. What/who has most influenced you in your career to date?

My core values were shaped by the inspiring life example of my grandmother, Panchita Miranda. A farmer in Puerto Rico with a second grade education, she relentlessly pursued an unlikely goal for the times—getting six children through college. She understood the connections between her life on a mountain and the rest of the world. Despite her poverty, she was the most generous woman I have ever met. What is your most rewarding professional accomplishment?

I have had the opportunity to make a real difference in people’s lives in every job I’ve ever had. As a lawyer, I represented the poor. As head of Philadelphia’s child welfare system, I helped protect children from abuse and find them permanent families through adoption. As president of a United Way agency, I connected people with means to people with needs. And now, at Vanguard, the business I lead helps families all across the U.S. save for their children’s college education. Having a positive impact on people’s lives is what makes my work meaningful to me.

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Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month

Pedro Correa

Vice President, Multilingual Consumer and Business Sales

Verizon Communications Headquarters: New York City Web site: www.verizon.com Primary Business: Entertainment/telecommunications. Employees: 240,000

When giving advice or mentoring, what strategies and principles do you communicate?

Education: University of Delaware What I’m reading: The Post-American World, by Fareed Zakaria My philosophy: Be the best servant I can be.

What is the best advice you have ever received in your career?

The best advice I ever received was a composite of sound, sincere interest on my behalf: “Believe in yourself and believe in others. Deliver more than you promise. Create opportunities for people to develop and grow, and always recognize and demonstrate genuine appreciation for their accomplishments.” One of my mentors touched me and inspired me with this advice “Be a Servant Leader. Be there for others; it is very important to have balance in life and take time out to have fun and be there for your family.”

Interests: Golf.

Carmen Bauza

I view coaching and employee development as a business imperative. My prescription is simple: Help others achieve and be their best. I candidly share my experiences (including non-successes), and attempt to help others avoid the pitfalls I’ve already experienced. I remind people that we’re always on stage, and with that come opportunities for learning and growth. Being a strong communicator, providing “straight-talk” feedback, and if necessary, delivering a “tough love” message are critical for successful mentoring and coaching. Respecting, valuing and providing service to others are the foundation for giving advice and mentoring. One other thought, I tell mentees that they have to be “In or Out”—you can’t be half-in or half-out—you have to be fully committed.

Vice President and Divisional Merchandising Manager, Beauty

Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. Headquarters: Bentonville, Arkansas Web site: www.walmartstores.com Primary Business: Retail. Employees: 2 million worldwide

When giving advice or mentoring, what strategies and principles do you communicate?

Education: BS, Fashion Merchandising and Business, Seton Hill University What I’m reading: Womenomics, by Claire Shipman & Katty Kay; Outliers, by Malcolm Gladwell My philosophies: Things do happen for a reason. Have fun. Be yourself always! Interests: Travel, reading, walking.

Have the courage to do the right thing because it builds character. I often tell people to be yourself and find a career that fulfills you. When you set personal and professional goals, stay focused in achieving those goals. Finally, I advise mentees to live every day like it will be their last. It’s good to be focused, but it’s important to be positive and enjoy your work. What/who has most influenced you in your career to date?

I have been fortunate to have worked for several outstanding people, each of whom has a gift or trait that makes them a great leader. I have adapted my leadership style from the lessons learned from those leaders. Personally, my father-in-law was a great influence to me. He was a driven man with a tremendous work ethic and passion for life, as well as for his career as a physician. He always said that “you won the lottery every day, by being alive and in good health.” That could not be more true. What obstacles have you overcome in your career to date, and how has this made you a better leader?

In a previous role, I felt I was perfect for a particular position, but when I wasn’t the one selected, it was tough to pause and reflect. When that happened, I learned to be resilient and humble; I listened to feedback and learned that you can’t become overly confident.

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CHEVRON, the CHEVRON HALLMARK and HUMAN ENERGY are registered trademarks of Chevron Intellectual Property LLC. Š 2009 Chevron Corporation. All rights reserved.

Our people are as diverse as their ideas.

tplace, rldwide marke To work in a wo represents workforce that Chevron has a siness, we rever we do bu the world. Whe r our y is essential fo believe diversit . Because d partners alike employees an human ts of view, our with more poin er. es even strong energy becom om. visit chevron.c To learn more,


Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month

Alex Oseguera

Area Vice President, Sacramento/Nevada

Waste Management, Inc. Headquarters: Houston, Texas Web site: www.wm.com Primary Business: Environmental services. Employees: Approximately 50,000

In your opinion, what are the attributes of a great leader that you have employed in your career?

Education: BA, Economics, Magna Cum Laude, California State University, Stanislaus; MS, Foreign Service, Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University What I’m reading: Talent is Never Enough, by John C. Maxwell My philosophy: “Destiny is not a matter of chance, it is a choice; it is not a thing to be waited for, it is a thing to be achieved.”—William Jennings Bryan Interests: Current affairs; golf, coaching soccer, spending time with my wife and children.

Linda Jimenez

I have discovered that great leaders are passionate, curious, and constantly learning. They must have a perspective of the world at-large that allows them to break down complex issues into understandable trends. This ability allows the leader to utilize trends to gauge opportunities, challenges or obstacles, and create the strategies needed for success. Strong leaders must develop exceptional listening skills that allow them to gain perspective from multiple points of view, and they must never forget to be authentic. Finally, a true leader must be introspective and understand that most successes and failures are a direct consequence of one’s leadership. When giving advice or mentoring, what strategies and principles do you communicate?

I routinely convey to leaders that they must spend considerable time developing strategy, that they must create the necessary operational mechanisms to ensure success, and that they must not forget to have strong follow-up mechanisms to review the progress and appropriateness of their strategies. Finally, and most importantly, the positive engagement of their people will ultimately decide the success of their strategy. What is the best advice you have ever received in your career?

I have a quote that was given to me by a college professor and that I always keep and constantly remember: “Edison did not complain about darkness.”

Staff Vice President, Inclusion & Workforce Mobilization

WellPoint, Inc. Headquarters: Indianapolis, Indiana Web site: www.wellpoint.com Primary Business: Health insurance. Employees: 42,000

In your opinion, what are the attributes of a great leader that you have employed in your career?

Education: BA, University of Texas at Austin; JD, University of Texas School of Law What I’m reading: Womenomics, by Claire Shipman & Katty Kay; Swimsuit, by James Patterson My philosophy: The best way to predict your future is to create it. Interests: Painting pottery, reading, and taking vacations to exotic beach locations.

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I have several Keys to Success: • Believe in your ability to succeed—“no person can consistently perform in a manner that is inconsistent with the way he sees himself.” • Get rid of your pride—pride keeps you from trying new things or asking questions because you are afraid of looking incompetent. It makes you stay in your comfort zone. It makes you focus on appearance rather than potential. • Cultivate “constructive discontent”—complacency never brings success. Find a way to constructively overcome your frustration and dissatisfaction, either by creating something new or by improving what already exists. • Escape from habit—a habit is something we do without thinking; when we stop thinking, we stop questioning and dreaming. Habit can cause you to simply go through the motions without thinking about the possibilities. • Engage in continuous learning—this doesn’t mean continually taking courses; but rather, it is about refining and developing new skills through reflection and inquiry. It is about taking your work and life experiences and making them your learning lab. • Network and build relationships—everyone is your mentor!

Pro f i les i n Di ve rsit y Journal

September/October 2009


When does diversity of people become diversity of thought? Imagine an environment where all professionals are valued, involved, supported and respected. Imagine working on interdisciplinary, diverse and inclusive teams. Imagine your unique ideas, perspectives and background playing a vital role improving the lives of millions.

At Pfizer, the largest research-based biomedical and pharmaceutical company in the world, we don’t imagine these things- we embody them. We embrace diversity and inclusion because we believe our greatest strength is our ability to leverage the different ideas, talents, and cultures of our people. Together, their unique view of the world benefits the health and quality of life of people everywhere. To learn more about our people, our products, and our plans for the future, visit www.pfizer.com

We’re proud to be an equal opportunity employer and welcome applications from people with different experiences, backgrounds and ethnic origins.

Working together for a healthier world™

®


stories

microtrigger stories editors notebook

Have You Experienced These Kinds of Triggers?

By Janet Crenshaw Smith

Ego vs. Super-Ego Double Whammy Last year, I attended the I recently attended a MicroTriggers are those subtle gala of an industry event. I presentation of a well-known called in some favors to be industry speaker. I was talking behaviors, phrases and inequities seated at the table of a famous, with the speaker about his historic figure. All who were remarks, when another person that trigger an instantaneous lucky to be assigned to that in the audience came up to negative response. Here are some table listened in awe to the us and immediately asked the stories and best practices he speaker his question. The person samples for you to consider. shared with the group. interrupting didn’t say anything to me or even acknowledge me. The My admiration soon turned speaker immediately engaged in to disbelief when I noticed he conversation with the other person, and I was livid! I had began stating his opinion as fact. Being knowledgeable a hot button pushed, but at the time, I wasn’t sure which about some of the topics, I began indulging the speaker one. As I reflected on the interactions, I recognized that I with facts and figures. He then ‘retaliated’ by referring felt disrespected by both people. I now know that being to me as ‘dear’ and ‘sweetie,’ and then engaging in disrespected is a significant hot button for me.” side conversations as I continued to talk. Talk about -Stephen Barry, MD egotistical!”

-Lauren White, MBA Spanish for Beginners I am a middle-aged Latino man. I despise when people (at work, the club, or any other social setting) greet me with ‘HOLA,’ particularly when it is not done to non-Latinos in the room. This happens more often than I would like: to me, and other Latinos I know.”

-Michael Fernando

The Invisible Man I had just started working for a new company, which in this economy is a good thing. I was having a discussion with my friend/former boss, and I was telling him about some of the things that annoy me at my new job. For instance, I am triggered when I hold the door for someone and they don’t say thank you, or when people walk past my desk, look at me, but don’t speak. What am I, invisible? I’m in an administrative role, but I would hate to think that has anything to do with this behavior.”

-Wade Robinson

Janet Crenshaw Smith is president of Ivy Planning Group, LLC, a consulting and training firm that specializes in diversity strategy and leadership. Her book is titled, MicroTriggers: 58 Little Things That Have a BIG Impact. Have a MicroTrigger story to share? Send it to: JSmith@ivygroupllc.com. 156

Pro f i les i n Di ve rsit y Journal

September/October 2009


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2010 Editorial Calendar In Every Issue: Catalyst Ɣ MicroTriggers Ɣ Momentum Ɣ Perspectives Ɣ thoughtLeaders

_______________________ JANUARY / FEBRUARY

Articles In Nov 13, 2009

Ad Space / IO Nov 30, 2009

Ad Materials Dec 11, 2009

African-American Heritage Month – Leadership Series Stories and Advice from Influential African American Leaders in Business Habits of Highly Effective Diversity Trainers Lessons in Developing a Commitment to Diversity and Effectively Managing It CEO/Company D&I Leadership Feature – Paid Advertorial ________________________________

MARCH / APRIL

Articles In Jan 15, 2010

Ad Space / IO Jan 29, 2010

Ad Materials Feb 19, 2010

Leading Companies for Supplier Diversity Dos and Don’ts for Promoting Diversity Outside the Organization Best Practices in Multicultural Marketing Critical Components and Why Companies Need Experts in this Area Generations Upon Generations Recruiting, Developing and Motivating the Four Generations CEOs Worth Watching – The Best Advice I Ever Received CEOs Share the Secrets for Success CEO/Company D&I Leadership Feature – Paid Advertorial ________________________________

MAY / JUNE

Articles In Mar 19, 2010

Ad Space / IO Mar 26, 2010

Ad Materials Apr 16, 2010

Asian/Pacific-American Heritage Month – Leadership Series Stories and Advice from Influential Asian/Pacific American Leaders in Business The Power of GLBT Employees The Business Case for Developing a Strong Network Group CEO/Company D&I Leadership Feature – Paid Advertorial ________________________________

JULY / AUGUST

Articles In May 14, 2010

Ad Space / IO May 28, 2010

7th Annual International Innovations in Diversity Awards Philanthropic Success Stories of the Year Leading Companies for Corporate Giving Diversity Communications from Human Resource Experts “How-tos” on Effectively Getting the Word Out on Diversity CEO/Company D&I Leadership Feature – Paid Advertorial ________________________________

SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER

Articles In Jul 16, 2010

Ad Space / IO Aug 13, 2010

Ad Materials Jun 18, 2010

Ad Materials Aug 27, 2010

9th Annual WomenWorthWatching® Issue – Top Companies for Women in Leadership Hispanic Heritage Month – Leadership Series Stories and Advice from Influential Hispanic American Leaders in Business ________________________________ Articles In Ad Space / IO Ad Materials

NOVEMBER / DECEMBER

Sep 17, 2010

Sep 24, 2010

Oct 15, 2010

National American Indian Heritage Month – Leadership Series Stories and Advice from Influential National American Indian Leaders in Business Network / Affinity Groups Their Agendas, How They Impact the Bottom Line, and How They’re Measured Leading Companies for Disabled Employees Why Hiring and Retaining Disabled Employees is Good for Business CEO/Company D&I Leadership Feature – Paid Advertorial

KEY TO FEATURES: Momentum Announcements profiling senior executives on the move. Perspectives Columns Successful Diversity & Inclusion strategies from industry leaders thoughtLeaders Articles written by executives who have their “fingers on the pulse” of what is new and now in diversity & inclusion.

9th Annual WomenWorthWatching® Issue Each year we bring together some of the most extraordinary women leaders in business and put them all in one great issue. These talented leaders have a deep sense of passion and some of the most exceptional abilities that enable them to empower many others inside their organizations as well as outside. The mission of this issue is to enhance the leadership in organizations for everyone, and we invite you to share in this experience. INFORMATION: CONTACT Profiles in Diversity Journal 1991 Crocker Rd., Gemini Towers 1 Cleveland, OH 44145 800-573-2867 / 440-892-0444 Fax: 440-892-0737 Marketing: Damian Johnson damianjohnson@diversityjournal.com

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www.diversityjournal.com Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

September/October 2009

159


corporate spotlight featured

featured organizations

BOLD denotes Advertiser

Aflac. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108

Perini Building Company. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63

American Airlines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61

Dickstein Shapiro LLP. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 26

Pfizer Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75, 155

Amway. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90, 91

Dow Chemical Company, The. . . . . 27, 54

Pitney Bowes Inc.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 60, 147

Applied Materials, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .142

Eastman Chemical Company . .. .. 84, 85

Procter & Gamble Company, The . .. .. .. .. 68

www.aflac.com www.aa.com

www.amway.com

www.appliedmaterials.com

ARAMARK. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103, 139

www.deweyleboeuf.com

www.dicksteinshapiro.com www.dow.com

www.eastman.com

www.periniwest.com www.pfizer.com www.pb.com www.pg.com

www.aramark.com

Eastman Kodak Company. . . . . . . . . 6, 66

Prudential Financial, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .126

www.kodak.com

www.prudential.com

AXA Equitable Life Insurance Company. . . . . . . . . . . . . 40,144

Ecolab, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95

Raytheon Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45, 56

www.ecolab.com

www.raytheon.com

Ford Motor Company . . . . . . . . . . . 76, 140

Rockwell Collins, Inc.. .. .. .. .. .. .. 88, 89

www.ford.com

www.rockwellcollins.com

Freddie Mac . .. .. . 93, Inside Back Cover

Royal Dutch Shell . 62, 148, Back Cover

www.freddiemac.com

www.shell.com

Georgia Power Co., a Southern Company . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 105

Ryder Systems, Inc.. .. .. .. .. .. .. 29, 107

www.axa-equitable.com

Bank of the West . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 www.bankofthewest.com

Bausch & Lomb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 www.bausch.com

BD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121 www.bd.com

BDO Seidman, LLP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4, 64 www.bdo.com

Best Buy Co., Inc. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 123 www.bestbuy.com

Blisk Financial Group, The, a Spire Investment Partners, LLC company. .. .. .. .. 34 www.spireip.com

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .151 www.bcbsnc.com

BMO Capital Markets . . . . . . . . . . .17, 128 www.bmo.com

Burger King Corp.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .133, 145 www.burgerking.com

CA, Inc. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 25 www.ca.com

Campbell Soup Company. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 111 www.campbellsoup.com

Catalyst. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 22, 24, 122 www.catalyst.org

CDW Corporation. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 143 www.cdw.com

Chevron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .153 www.chevron.com

Cisco Systems, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73, 87 www.cisco.com

Citigroup Inc. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 52 www.citi.com

Coca-Cola Company, The . .. .. . 116, 117 www.coca-cola.com

Comcast Corporation . . . . . . . . . 134, 135 www.comcast.com

ComEd, an Exelon Company. . . . . . . . . . . . .109 www.comed.com

Computer Sciences Corporation. . . . . . . . . . 67 www.csc.com

Constellation Energy . .. .. .. .. .. .. 65, 72 www.constellation.com

Corning Incorporate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 www.corning.com

CSC . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 67 www.csc.com

CVS Caremark. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118, 119 www.cvs.com

Deloitte LLP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 www.deloitte.com

160

Pro f i les i n Di ve rsit y Journal

www.georgiapower.com / www.southernco.com

Google. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 www.google.com

Graybar Electric Co., Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 www.graybar.com

www.ryder.com

Safeway Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110 www.safeway.com

Salt River Project. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 98, 99 www.srpnet.com

Halliburton . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 30, 31, 145

Science Applications International Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74

Harris Corporation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

Sodexo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15, 53, 148

Highmark Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55, 113

Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 125

www.halliburton.com www.harris.com

www.highmark.com

IBM . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 146 www.ibm.com

ITT Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48, 49, 146 www.itt.com

Ivy Planning Group. .. .. .. .. .. . 156, 157 www.ivyplanningllc.com

KBR, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13, 141 www.kbr.com

Kelly Services, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 www.kellyservices.com

Kindred Healthcare, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .132 www.kindredhealthcare.com

KPMG LLP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19, 42, 147 www.kpmg.com

MeadWestvaco Corporation. . . 136, 137 www.meadwestvaco.com

Microsoft Corporation. . . . . . . . . . . . 70, 81 www.microsoft.com

Monsanto Company. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 www.monsanto.com

National Grid. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 104, 127 www.nationalgridus.com

Neal, Gerber & Eisenberg LLP . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 www.ngelaw.com

New York Life Insurance Co.. . . . . 33, 129 www.newyorklife.com

New York Times Company, The.114, 115 www.nytimes.com

Northwestern Mutual. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 44 www.nmfn.com

NYSE Euronext. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78, 79 www.nyse.com/nyseeuronext.com

O’Melveny & Myers LLP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .130

www.omm.com

Parker Hannifin. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 124, 131 www.parker.com

September/October 2009

www.saic.com

www.sodexousa.com

www.starwoodhotels.com

SunGard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 www.sungard.com

Terex Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 www.terex.com

Textron Systems Corporation, a Textron Inc. company . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 120 www.textron.com

U.S. Postal Service. . . . . . . . . . . 58, 77, 150 www.usps.com

Unilever . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35, 69 www.unilever.com

UnitedHealth Group. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96, 97 www.uhc.com

UPS . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 106 www.ups.com

Vanguard . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 36, 37, 150 www.vanguard.com

Verizon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100, 101, 152 www.verizon.com

W.W. Grainger, Inc.. . . . .Inside Cover, 102 www.grainger.com

Walgreens Co.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 www.walgreens.com

Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.. .. .. .. 50, 51, 152 www.walmart.com

Waste Management, Inc.. . 23, 112, 154 www.wm.com

WellPoint, Inc. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 32, 71, 154 www.wellpoint.com

Wells Fargo . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 82, 83 www.wellsfargo.com

Whittier Street Health Center. .. .. .. .. .. 138 www.wshc.org


Rise to new

heights.

Every day brings different challenges. Luckily, we have a diverse set of solutions.

Every day, thousands of people from all over the world come to us for the solutions they need to get their jobs done right. Their issues are diverse. And so are we. That’s why we’ve brought together a team that includes a variety of backgrounds, strengths and perspectives. For over 80 years, that’s been the best solution for the ones who get it done.

Join us as we play a key role in Making Home Affordable. We’re a vital part of President Obama’s initiative to stabilize the housing market. For you, that means exciting challenges and an opportunity to have a real impact on our nation’s economy – and your neighbors’ lives. We’ll provide a solid platform for your career and the tools to assist your professional growth. Explore the many opportunities we offer in:

Audit | Compliance | Default Asset Management | IT When you join the Freddie Mac team, you’ll discover an inclusive, empowering culture with an equal opportunity employer who recognizes the value of diversity. You’ll also find a total rewards package that supports your success both at work and in your personal life. We encourage you to visit us at upcoming diversity conferences, which are listed on our career site. Visit us online at:

Congratulations to Deb Oler for being named a Woman Worth Watching. That’s getting the job done.

FreddieMacDiversity.jobs careers with impact


Also Featuring an Introduction by Ilene H. Lang, President & CEO of Catalyst • A Celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month

CAREERS AT SHELL The most successful problem solvers look at things differently and see solutions no one else can. Who would have thought to use fish protein to stop gas freezing in subsea pipes? One of our people did. And right now we’re looking for more people who can bring a fresh perspective to the energy challenge. We’ll provide training, support and career choices to develop your potential. We’ll get you working with some of our most accomplished problem solvers. And together we can help build a responsible energy future. Think further. For more information and to apply online, please visit www.shell.com/careers. Shell is an equal opportunity employer.

Gloria Wang Environment Officer – HSSEQ Department

Jasmine Tiwari Senior Associate Researcher

Kishoore Jehan Marketing Executive

September / October 2009 • VOLUME 11 NUMBER 5

“With the open career progression opportunity, every employee of Shell can choose his/her own field as per their interests.”

“The best thing about working in Shell is the balance between life and work; between exposure and depth of experience offered to employees, and between making profits and caring for its employees and the community.”

25.00 U.S.

$

PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

“Shell provided me with the opportunity to handle challenges and manage issues in a dynamic refinery environment. I count it a privilege to be part of this globalized entity and I was convinced that my journey in Shell will be filled with continual learnings, growth and never-ending opportunities to contribute.”

Volume 11, Number 5 September / October 2009

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Diversity Journal - Sep/Oct 2009  

Profiles in Diversity Journal's September/October 2009 issue

Diversity Journal - Sep/Oct 2009  

Profiles in Diversity Journal's September/October 2009 issue