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Also … Front-Runner of Entergy The World of CDOs • Perspectives Catalyst AlsoFeaturing Featuring… Front-Runner Robert Shirley Spencer Davis of Jr. SHRM • Black• Leaders Leading • Linda Jimenez • • Catalyst © 2008 KPMG LLP, a U.S. limited liability partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 14678STM

Volume 10, Number 2 March / April 2008 $ 12.95 U.S.

Our differences.

PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

What we value is the same.

March / April 2008 • VOLUME 10 NUMBER 2 www.diversityjournal.com

At KPMG, we’re committed to providing an environment of inclusion that encourages employees to be successful. It’s an approach that benefits our people and our clients. By valuing our differences, we build upon our individual, team, and firm strengths. And that can make all the difference in the world.

our differences areour strength

kpmgcareers.com

Diversity at KPMG


Warrior,

oh beautiful Warrior. Breast cancer wages war on women’s bodies every day. Surprisingly, many of those who are diagnosed are under 40. Once diagnosed, African-American women have a disproportionately high mortality rate. But there is hope. If breast cancer is found and treated early, women have a good chance of surviving. So it’s important, really important, that you do monthly breast self-exams, have regular physical checkups and, eventually, annual mammograms. To help raise awareness and funds, Ford created Warriors in Pink wear. 100% of the net proceeds from sale of the clothing goes to support Susan G. Komen for the Cure®. To find out more about African-American women and breast cancer, Komen for the Cure and Warriors in Pink, visit fordcares.com.


Vie w p o i n t s Viewpoints P e r s p eP c te i v ers s p e c O p i n i o n s O p i n i o n reading that makes you THINK

T

James R. Rector P U B L ISHER

John Murphy

MANAGING EDITOR

Cheri Morabito

C REATI V E DIRE C TOR

Damian Johnson

MARKETING DIRE C TOR

Laurel L. Fumic

C ONTRI B UTING EDITOR

Two of our main features in this issue describe the results of a company’s deep-seated commitment to diversity. Our cover feature looks at the commitment to personal development at KPMG under the leadership of Chairman and CEO Tim Flynn. In a similar vein, our Front-Runner for March/ April, Robert Spencer Jr. of Entergy, describes the lasting commitment that Entergy has made to the NAACP’s Fair Share Principles. Both companies have a rock-solid commitment to diversity that is unshaken in turbulent economic times. Both are reaping the benefits that come with such commitment, as seen in their narratives. This idea of commitment keeps coming up in our conversations and correspondence, especially as the economy slips closer to a recession. With corporate budget cuts looming, more and more diversity practitioners are being asked to make reductions, not just in expenses, but often in staff and programs as well. Many feel the pressure to reassert their business case for diversity. Still others wonder if their CEO is a fair-weather devotee of diversity or a committed crusader. Money talks. We want to bring all of these sometimes-conflicting ideas out into the open. Catalyst (p. 12) is an outstanding source of timely information, but we’ve also sought the opinions of thought-leaders like Carlton Yearwood, Janet Crenshaw Smith, Melanie Harrington, Linda Jimenez, Susan Meisinger, Marie Y. Philippe, PhD, and Shirley A. Davis, PhD, to address some of the day’s most pressing issues. It’s important to know what’s being tossed around the board rooms and water coolers of corporate America. By profiling different practitioners—such as the CDOs featured in this issue—we can let you in on the conversation and introduce you to those who are making diversity work every day. Enjoy the issue!

Alina Dunaeva

Ov e r s e a s C o r r e s p o n d e n t

Jason Bice

W E B MASTER

L ETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Commentaries or questions should be

addressed to: Profiles in Diversity Journal, P.O. Box 45605, Cleveland, OH 44145-0605. All correspondence should include author’s full name, address, e-mail and phone number. DIS P L AY AD V ERTISING

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John Murphy Managing Editor

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diversityjournaledit@mac.com Photos & Artwork:

diversityjournalart@mac.com

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Goodstein


At UnitedHealth Group, unique is everywhere. In our approach to health care. In each segment of our business. In every professional. In the career opportunities we offer. As a global leader in health care, UnitedHealth Group is committed to creating a workforce of unique individuals. Their unique perspectives bring about innovative ideas. It is the unique backgrounds, lifestyles and beliefs our professionals bring to their work that fuels innovation, creates a healthy environment and drives us towards our goal of creating a better health care system. Founded in 1974, UnitedHealth Group has since grown into a Fortune 100 company. Our family of businesses work tirelessly to advance the quality and access to care while making services more affordable and easier to use for everyone. Our work impacts the lives of nearly 55 million people and helps coordinate care for more than 20 million more. As unique as the many businesses that unite to form UnitedHealth Group, are the career opportunities they offer. From accounting to marketing, clinical to claims, the employment experience at UnitedHealth Group is second to none. Regardless of their unique talents, our professionals are united to improve health care for everyone.

Let us hear your unique voice in these careers available nationwide throughout our family of businesses.

• Business Analysts • Customer Care Professionals • Financial Analysts • Information Technology • Inside & Field Sales • Product Associates • Underwriting Analysts Through innovative leadership in health care, UnitedHealth Group provides ongoing career opportunities for diverse individuals, enriching the employment experience and creating a healthier atmosphere for all. UnitedHealth Group is an equal opportunity employer and employs individuals based on job-related qualifications regardless of race, religion, sex, national origin, age, or other protected characteristics. M/F/D/V.

To view current career opportunities, and to apply online, visit our CAREERS page at www.unitedhealthgroup.com.


Volume 10 • Number 2 March / April 2008 Special Feature

17

features 17 On the Cover / KPMG

Tim Flynn, Chairman and CEO of KPMG, knows that the collective strength of his people is the key to achieving success. Our cover story reveals the extraordinary commitment KPMG has made to its people and the extraordinary results it has produced.

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KPMG

our differences areour strength

Diversity at KPMG

49

Front-Runner / Robert Spencer Jr. Robert Spencer Jr. is Director of Talent Management and Inclusion at Entergy. The company has held fast to its commitment to the NAACP’s Fair Share Principles for more than 20 years. What a difference Entergy is making in New Orleans!

58

58 Special Focus:

The World of Chief Diversity Officers We’ve compiled a collection of personal profiles of those who toil daily in the trenches, making D&I programs thrive. Enjoy this fun feature as you meet some of today’s thought leaders.

departments

6 Momentum 12

Diversity Who, What, Where and When

Catalyst Gender Diversity in Fortune 500 Leadership

84 MicroTriggers

More Instruction Stories from Janet Crenshaw Smith

perspectives 4

10

From My Perspective by Linda Jimenez, WellPoint, Inc.

14 Thoughts Through the Office Door … 45 Viewpoint 46

by Melanie Harrington, AIMD

My Turn by Shirley A. Davis, PhD, SHRM

xx

56 Guest Column 88

by Carlton Yearwood, Waste Management, Inc.

by Susan Meisinger, President and CEO, SHRM

Last Word by Marie Y. Philippe, PhD

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Thanks to you, each of these women can navigate their health care plans to obtain the services specific to their needs.

At WellPoint, we are addressing tomorrow’s health care issues today. Women account for approximately 70-85% of health decisions made in U.S. households, yet still face barriers that make the acquisition of basic health care services difficult. WellPoint takes women’s health seriously. Our vision is to move women to choose better health through education and wellness initiatives that address multicultural and multigenerational women and their unique needs. Working to better people’s lives is not something you do every day. But it can be – at WellPoint.

Better health care, thanks to you. Visit us online at wellpoint.com/careers and wellpoint.com/diversity EOE

®Registered Trademark, WellPoint, Inc. ©2007 WellPoint, Inc. All Rights Reserved


Global Lead Names Oris Stuart Chief Executive Officer Cincinnati, Ohio—Global Lead, LLC, an international managementconsulting firm, has announced the appointment Stuart of Oris Stuart as managing partner and chief executive officer. In his new role, Stuart will assume strategic and operational responsibilities previously shared by the firm’s founding partners, Janet Reid, Samuel Lynch, and Vincent Brown, who will serve clients, expand the company’s global services, and continue to develop innovative human capital solutions. Stuart brings more than 19 years of strategic organizational skills to his new position. He joined Global Lead in 2002 as chief operating officer and in 2004 was named managing partner, assuming responsibility for the firm’s consulting and e-learning functions. In May 2006 he helped lead the team that secured investment capital from Goldman Sachs Urban Investment Group to accelerate the company’s growth and to provide capital for future acquisitions. Prior to joining Global Lead, Stuart held senior positions with organizations such as Deloitte Consulting and Wingspan Technology. He also served as Vice President for Providian Direct Insurance where he managed a $130 million division of the company. He received an MBA from Duke University and an electrical engineering degree from the University of Virginia.

ACT Names Ramirez Director of Talent Acquisition and Diversity IOWA CITY, Iowa—Alfred Ramirez has been named director of talent acquisition and diversity at ACT. At ACT, Ramirez Ramirez develop and carry out strategies for attracting, retaining, and expanding ACT’s talented workforce. Ramirez previously served as executive director for Diversity Focus, an organization that promotes better multicultural awareness and understanding in the Iowa City-Cedar Rapids corridor. He is the former president of the National Community for Latino Leadership, Inc., in Washington, D.C. Ramirez held several White House appointments in the 1990s, including special assistant to the President and associate director in the White House Office of Presidential Personnel. He earned a BA in political science and urban studies from Columbia University, New York, and attended graduate studies in public administration at Bernard M. Baruch College, City University of New York. He is originally from East Los Angeles, California, and currently resides in Cedar Rapids.

Suzanne van Staveren Joins AXA Equitable NEW YORK— AXA Equitable Life Insurance Co. has hired Suzanne van Staveren as a vice president and chief operating officer van Staveren

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of Corporate Markets, the company’s newly created distribution channel, which provides retirement plan strategies and solutions to Fortune 1000 companies and their employees. Van Staveren is responsible for the overall business operations, financial and organizational management, and administration for the Corporate Markets business. She also is charged with managing the implementation of the channel’s strategic business plan and annual operating plan. Van Staveren spent the past 13 years with Fidelity Investments in the areas of operations, finance, business analysis, and client services. She earned an MBA with a concentration in finance from Northeastern Graduate School of Business in Boston, Mass.

Dunkin’ Brands Names Cirabel Lardizabal Olson Senior Director CANTON, Mass.—Dunkin’ Brands, Inc., the parent company of quick service brands Dunkin’ Donuts and Olson Baskin-Robbins, has named Cirabel Lardizabal Olson senior director of community relations and multicultural initiatives. Olson will work closely with senior management to ensure organizational alignment on multicultural initiatives, while also leading the company’s outreach efforts to national, state and community-based organizations that represent important constituencies. Olson brings to Dunkin’ Brands more than 10 years of leadership experience in the foodservice industry. In her seven-year tenure at


Burger King Corporation, she led all multicultural, diversity, community relations, and government relations efforts for the company’s 11,100 restaurants in the United States and more than 65 countries. Olson received an MBA from the University of Michigan and a bachelor’s degree in marketing from Florida Atlantic University.

Bozeman Leads Product Development for Harley-Davidson’s Advanced Manufacturing MILWAUKEE, Wis.—Dave Bozeman has been promoted to vice president of advanced manufacturing for HarleyBozeman Davidson Motor Company, Milwaukee, Wis. Bozeman is responsible for developing and overseeing the implementation of advanced manufacturing technology. In particular, he is the manufacturing voice at the concept phase of product development. This includes directly supporting the product plan and manufacturing objectives on cost and flexibility. Bozeman’s strong engineering background has led to many technical and production-related positions within the Harley-Davidson organization. Prior to leading advanced manufacturing, he was vice president and general manager of Capitol Drive Powertrain Operations. Bozeman received a bachelor’s degree in manufacturing engineering technology, mechanical design, from Bradley University and a master’s degree in engineering management from the Milwaukee School of Engineering. Currently, he serves

on the Manufacturing and Industrial Engineering Advisory Board for Bradley University and is the vice president of the board of directors for the Next Door Foundation.

Ed Magee Named GM at Harley Davidson Powertrain Operations WAUWATOSA, Wis.—Ed Magee has been promoted to general manager, Capitol Drive Powertrain Operations, Magee Harley-Davidson Motor Company, Wauwatosa, Wis. Magee continues to play a prominent role in strategy and development at Harley-Davidson. In his new position, Magee is responsible for the company’s remanufacturing program and for the production of transmissions and engines for all Sportster and air-cooled Buell motorcycles. Magee’s first position at HarleyDavidson was at the York Vehicle Operations facility in York, Pa., where he worked for the materials organization developing and mapping material process flow, while contributing to the start up of the Softail plant. In his previous role as director, service strategy and technical communications, Magee developed and launched Digital Technician II, the next generation electrical system diagnostics tool to more than 1400 Harley-Davidson dealerships around the world. Magee earned a bachelor’s degree in mathematics in 1987 from the U.S. Naval Academy. He received a master’s degree in public administration from George Mason University and an MBA from Duke’s Fuqua School of Business.

John Comissiong Promoted to Director in Harley-Davidson North American Sales MILWAUKEE, Wis.—HarleyDavidson Motor Company has named John Comissiong director, sales administration, of North comissiong American Sales. He is responsible for overseeing HarleyDavidson’s motorcycle allocation policy and North American Sales’ programs and promotions. Comissiong began his career at Harley-Davidson in 2003 as a project lead where he helped lead the efforts to install the Material Velocity distribution centers at the Kansas City and York final assembly plants. Subsequently, he served as analyst to the insurance group and then as strategic planning manager for the Performance Network Program for Harley-Davidson Financial Services (HDFS) in Chicago. Comissiong earned a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from Cornell University and a master’s degree in mechanical engineering from Stony Brook University. He also received an MBA from Duke’s Fuqua School of Business.

B’nai B’rith International to Honor Eastman Kodak Company Washington, D.C.—B’nai B’rith International (BBI), one of the world’s oldest and largest human rights, community action, and humanitarian organization, will recognize Eastman Kodak Company and its chairman and chief executive officer, Antonio M. Perez, with the

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prestigious Corporate Distinguished Achievement Award at a gala in New York City on June 18, 2008. B’nai B’rith will honor Kodak for its commitment to innovation, diversity, and philanthropy, values that BBI has been committed to since its founding in 1843. “Eastman Kodak Company’s commitment to diversity, one of the great cornerstones of this nation, is to be lauded and emulated,” said Daniel S. Mariaschin, executive vice president of B’nai B’rith International. “B’nai B’rith International and Mr. Perez and Kodak share a vision that education and tolerance can combat bigotry.” B’nai B’rith International, the global voice of the Jewish community, is the most widely known Jewish humanitarian, human rights, and advocacy organization. BBI works to aid the victims of disaster, improves the lives of senior citizens through housing and advocacy, promotes health initiatives and education, provides youth leadership training, serves community members in need, and fights intolerance around the world. Visit www.bnaibrith.org.

Macy’s Names Aubyn Elaine Thomas Senior Vice President, Marketing Services NEW YORK— Macy’s Inc. has appointed Aubyn Elaine Thomas as senior vice president of marketing services. In her new role, Thomas will thomas be responsible for driving growth and service excellence for Macy’s financial services businesses. This encompasses credit and loyalty marketing as well as

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multicultural marketing for one of the world’s most recognized and respected brands. In her previous assignment, Thomas was vice president of the brand and acquisition marketing group at Harrah’s Entertainment, Inc. in Las Vegas. Her responsibilities included leading the growth and development of the industry’s largest distributor of casino brands, generating over $9 billion in sales annually. She also served as a leading member of the corporate diversity strategy team for the office of the CEO. Thomas holds two bachelors degrees: one in mathematics from Spelman College, and one in electrical engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology. She also holds an MBA in marketing from Clark Atlanta University.

Littler Mendelson Announces Four New Shareholders in Cleveland San Francisco, Calif.—Littler Mendelson, P.C. (Littler), the nation’s largest employment and labor law firm, has announced the promotion of four associates to shareholder status. Timothy Anderson, Linda Hauserman Harrold, Bonnie Kristan and Shannon Patton are new shareholders in Littler’s Cleveland, Ohio, office. Anderson’s practice is focused on employment litigation, labor arbitrations and assisting employers in resolving employmentrelated issues. He has handled a wide anderson variety of employment cases ranging from age, gender, race, religion, and

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disability discrimination to issues involving the Family and Medical Leave Act, the Fair Labor Standards Act, and employee harassment, as well as class and collective action litigation. He earned his Juris Doctor from the University of Michigan, cum laude, in 1999, and his bachelor’s degree from the University of Miami (Phi Beta Kappa), magna cum laude, in 1996. Harrold’s practice is focused on employment law matters in judicial and administrative proceedings with an emphasis on equal employment opportunity, FMLA, wage and hour, and nonharrold compete issues. She has substantial experience as a mediator and arbitrator and serves several courts on arbitration panels and in mediations, including the Alternative Dispute Resolution Panel for the United States District Court for the Northern District of Ohio. Harrold earned her Juris Doctor from Case Western Reserve University School of Law (Order of the Coif ) in 1979, and earned a master’s degree from Oberlin College in 1970 and a bachelor’s from Grinnell College (Phi Beta Kappa) in 1969. Kristan’s practice is focused on the areas of workers’ compensation, OSHA, unemployment and employment litigation. Kristan earned her Juris Doctor from the University of Pittsburgh School of Law in 1998, kristan where she received a Law Fellows Scholarship. She earned two bachelor’s degrees from Miami University in 1993.


Patton’s practice is focused on labor relations law and employment litigation, with an emphasis on wage and hour issues. She frequently lectures on the Fair Labor Standards Act, the Family and Medical Leave Act, and the Americans with Disabilities Act. Patton earned her Juris Doctor from Ohio State University in 1998 and a bachelor’s degree, cum patton laude, from Miami University in 1995.

New York Life Announces Scholarship Winners NEW YORK—For the fourth year in a row, New York Life Insurance Company has awarded scholarships to college students who have achieved academic success and who play an active role in their communities. The Cirilo A. McSween—New York Life—Rainbow/PUSH Excel Scholarship awards are given in honor of New York Life’s first African American agent, who started working for the company over 50 years ago. Besides being a member of the Rainbow PUSH Coalition’s board of directors, McSween is also president of Cirilo’s Inc. and a renowned civil rights activist who worked closely with the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. He was national treasurer of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference during the time Dr. King was president of the organization. The Rev. Jesse Jackson Sr. presented the awards to the scholars at a luncheon recently.

Olympus Announces New VP of Human Resources CENTER VALLEY, Pa.—Olympus, a precision technology leader offering opto-digital solutions in healthcare, life science and consumer electronics products, has announced that it has appointed Pamela Thompson as vice president of human resources for Olympus America Inc. Thompson will utilize her 20 year-career leadership skills in human resources to lead the learning and development efforts on behalf of the 2,300 employees of Olympus in the Americas. Thompson is a human resources generalist and organizational development specialist who brings to Olympus expertise in corporate culture change and maximizing human capital, among other critical skills. She has experience in the pharmaceuticals, precision medical devices, biotechnology, and financial services industries and has led human resources operations across multi-national organizations. Thompson joins Olympus from Tandem Labs, where she was the vice president of human resources. Thompson earned a master’s degree in human resource development with distinction, and a bachelor’s degree in business, summa cum laude, from Webster University in St. Louis. She maintains professional affiliations with the Society of Human Resource Management, the Greater Philadelphia human resources planning group, and the International Coaching Federation, among other organizations.

PDJ New York Life Scholarship Winners, pictured with the Rev. Jesse Jackson Sr., founder and president of the Rainbow/PUSH Coalition, left to right: Jermell Smith of Chicago, Ill., a freshman at Florida A&M University; Jasmine Shaw of Chicago, Ill., a freshman at Spelman College; Lorielle Hondras of South Holland, Ill., a freshman at Florida A&M University; and Cameron Thomas-Shah of West Bloomfield, Mich., a freshman at Morehouse College. Not pictured: Tamara Latham of Brooklyn, N.Y., a sophomore at Buffalo State College.

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from my perspective…

Diversity is the “Change” We See in the 2008 Election By Linda Jimenez

O

Chief Diversity Officer & Staff Vice President—Diversity Leadership WellPoint, Inc.

On Tuesday, February 19, in my home state of Texas, on the first day of early voting, election officials across the state reported a record turnout. In just one day in the state’s 15 most populous counties, some 65,000 plus voters went to grocery stores and bank lobbies, recreation centers, and libraries to vote. One thousand students of Prairie View A&M, a historically black college/university in a rural area west of Houston, marched seven miles to the nearest early voting stations. In my perspective, the diversity in this year’s election process is startling and forms the framework for discussions, debates, and dialogue on gender, race, age, language, and media advertising. “Change” is the big buzz word in this campaign from both Democrats and Republicans. In November, we have the opportunity to embark on a national evolution of change simply through our focus on diversity. We could elect the first female President, or the first black President, or the second President from the same marital family, or a 70+ year-old President who’s not afraid to buck the old guard of his political party. As a diversity practitioner, I am thrilled to see so many people engaged in the political process, and I am even more excited about the diversity dynamics unfolding during this period. It is encouraging to have the dialogue and debate around why we support our respective candidates. As a woman, I’ve asked myself and others, “Is a vote for Hillary Clinton a vote because she is a woman and the first female to be elected President, or because we truly believe she is the better candidate?” As a minority, I’ve asked myself and others, “Is a vote for Barack Obama a vote because he is black and the first minority to be elected President, or because we truly believe he is the better candidate?” As a baby boomer, I’ve asked myself and others, “Is a vote for John McCain a vote because of my perception that with his age comes wisdom and experience, or because we believe he is the voice of change in the Republican party?” 10

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As an American, I’ve asked myself and others, “Is this country ready for a change that challenges a traditionally white power structure?” Diversity and election mania is gripping the entire country, and that’s good. We have broken down silos and barriers to have political discussions taking place on television, talk radio, in blogs, on YouTube, and even on CraigsList. Some 7.6 million viewers tuned in to the CNN debate between Obama and Clinton, and that doesn’t include an unaccounted Latino audience who listened to the debate on Spanish-language Univision. There is even diversity within “Camelot” with Caroline Kennedy and Ted Kennedy and Maria Shriver supporting Barack Obama, and Robert F. Kennedy Jr. supporting Hillary Clinton. When, I’ve wondered, was the last time we were all so driven to be involved in this process, whether through listening and watching the debates, or by being sponges for gathering any and all information about our candidate and the others in the competition? U.S. elections grab attention around the world in ways that no other elections do, because the outcome of the race to lead the last economic and military superpower could have consequences everywhere. The connection is even more pronounced in Mexico, where the government estimates that fully half of the population has family in the United States. And many of the issues being debated by the candidates—immigration, NAFTA, and a war in Iraq that Mexico was asked to support—are important concerns for the Mexican people. Our political future is ripe with possibilities. Our nation stands on the precipice of greatness. It will be the beginning of the end and the start of something new. And it will involve multigenerational, racial, and gender differences and most importantly, courage. Isn’t that what diversity is all about?

PDJ

Linda Jimenez is a native of San Antonio, Texas, and attended the University of Texas at Austin where she received her BA with honors. She is also a graduate of the University of Texas School of Law and has spent 20 years specializing in labor and employment law.


She could be anything she w ants at Sodex o Sodexo is Being Recognized as a Leader 2008: Top 50 Entry Level Employers – CollegeGrad.com • Top 200 Intern Employer – CollegeGrad.com 2007: 2007 Best Places for Minorities to Work – Atlanta Tribune • 2007 Innovations in Diversity – Profiles in Diversity Journal • 50 Best Companies for Latinas in 2007 – LATINA Style • Top Company for Diversity – Hispanic Business • Top 15 Best Companies for Workforce Diversity – Black Enterprise Magazine • Top 20 Companies for Women of Color – Working Mother Magazine • Top 50 Entry Level Employers – CollegeGrad.com • Top Company for Diversity (#13) – DiversityInc • Top Company for African Americans (#9) – DiversityInc • Top 20 Companies for Asian Pacific Americans – Asian Enterprise Magazine • Top 50 Companies for Supplier Diversity – Hispanic Trends Magazine • Five Star Employer – U.S. Department of Defense 2006: Top 40 Companies for Hispanics – Hispanic Business Magazine • Top 50 Companies for Latinas – LATINA Style • Top 50 Companies for Diversity – DiversityInc • Top Companies for Women Executives – DiversityInc • Top 10 Companies for Asian Americans – Asian Enterprise Magazine • Top Companies for People with Disabilities – DiversityInc • Top Employer for African American Graduates – Black Collegian Magazine • Corporate 100 List of Best Places to Work for Latinos – HISPANIC Magazine


Gender Diversity in Fortune 500 Leadership Catalyst Census Reveals Women Gaining Board Committee Chairs

T By Catalyst

The 2007 Catalyst Census of Women Corporate Officers and Top Earners of the Fortune 500 and the 2007 Catalyst Census of Women Board Directors of the Fortune 500, both released by Catalyst late last year, reveal little change in the overwhelmingly male leadership of the top U.S. companies. However, the censuses, which account for corporate officers and board members in the Fortune 500 for the period April 1, 2006, through March 31, 2007, do show a few bright spots for women. For example, in 2007, women held more powerful board committee chairs than they did in 2006. In fact, women’s share of nominating/governance committee chairs surpassed their 14.8 percent share of all board positions.

Women’s Share of Board Committee Chairs

2006 2007 14.7%

Nominating/ Governance

15.1% 8.2%

Audit

9.9% 10.0%

Compensation

10.9% 0%

5%

10%

2007 Directors

Nevertheless, little change occurred in the percentage of women board directors; the number of companies with zero, one, two, and three or more women board directors; and the percentage of women of color board directors.

15%

20%

Women 2006 Men 14.8% N=831/5628 In 2006, this number was 14.6 percent.

85.2% N=4797/5628

Number of Companies with Zero, One, Two, and Three or More Women Directors 200

176 172

2006 2007

Women of Color Share of Director Positions

Women of Color Number of Companies with Zero, One, Two and Three or All Other Directors More Women Directors

(Based on data from 337 companies.)

182 186

3.0% N=113/3809

150

In 2006, this number was 3.1 percent.

100

84 58

83

59

50 0

12

Zero Women

One Woman

Two Women

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Three or More Women

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97.0% N= 3696/3809


2006 2007

71.0% 72.8%

Looking at corporate officer positions,

29.0%

Catalyst found that the percentage of women officers in line jobs, often a gateway for promotion to top leadership, decreased 1.8 percentage points—or 6 percent. Women are significantly less likely to hold line positions than men are: slightly more than one-quarter of women officers held line positions, but one-half of men did.

27.2% 50.8% 49.5% 49.2% 50.5%

Little change occurred in the percentages of corporate officer and top earner positions held by women. Women 2006 Men

2007 Corporate Officers

2007 Top Earners

Women 2006 Men

6.7% N=142/2134 In 2006, this number was 6.7 percent.

15.4% N=1344/8745 In 2006, this number was 15.6 percent.

84.6% N=7401/8745

93.4% N=1992/2134

In 2007, 74 companies had no women corporate officers—a 15.6 percent increase from 2006. In addition, 30 fewer companies had three or more women. Number of Companies with Zero, One, Two, and Three or More Women Officers 250

2006 2007 234 203

200 150 100

100 64

111

102

112

74

50 0 Zero Women

One Woman

Two Women

Three or More Women

PDJ

About Catalyst Founded in 1962, Catalyst is the leading nonprofit corporate membership research and advisory organization working globally with businesses and the professions to build inclusive environments and expand opportunities for women and business. For more information about this report and to see its appendices, which list the companies with highest and lowest percentages of women board directors and corporate officers, visit www.catalyst.org/knowledge/metrics.shtml.


thoughts through the office door…

Diversifying Your Workplace Assets By Carlton Yearwood Chief Ethics and Diversity Officer Waste Management, Inc.

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Rush-hour traffic was amazingly thin, for a change, as I threaded my way home some days ago. With little worry about stop-and-go congestion, I flicked through radio stations for interesting programming for the quick ride back to dinner. Music? No, not tonight. Local news? No, not that either. Ah, the financial market wrap-up… now that should be interesting! The day had closed on yet another roller-coaster ride for Wall Street. Market indices crossed a warning threshold, recovered, only to fall again. A panel of three finance gurus offered commentary for bewildered investors. From the many opinions offered, one certainly struck home: “There’s no one answer or solution to the challenges of today’s complex market. Just do what smart investors do. Make sure you are diversified in your portfolio. It assures maximizing your potential and minimizing your downside.” And everyone agreed. Later that evening, much later, with my e-mails and voice mail messages behind me, I circled back to that slam-dunk financial advice about diversity in investments. How could it be that diversity precepts could be so widely embraced and understood in personal business, yet be supported only hesitatingly by the same people in their corporate world? Put more bluntly, how is it that some people don’t accept or fail to recognize the value of diversified assets for the workplace? As a matter of course, C-suite executives and others stay in close contact with their trusted financial advisor. These trusted advisors periodically conduct asset allocation reviews—a core tool for portfolio diversity. Beginning with one’s unique personal goals, each asset is examined. Is there too much emphasis on one or two stocks? What kind of contribution is possible from adding others to the mix? What opportunities are being missed by excluding investments not considered? More

to the point, what risks are you incurring by not broadening the investing horizon? What struck me as interesting is that the review is personal and the “what’s in it for me” factor is obvious. Bridging to our own work as diversity professionals is pretty obvious, isn’t it? We work hard for the top- and bottom-line values of inclusion, of bringing people assets to our corporate homes from the full scope of knowledge, skills, and abilities out there. We work tirelessly to convince management of the market-building advantages of a workforce varied in style, perspectives, capabilities, and opinions. In our roles as CDOs, are we the valued and trusted

how is it that some people don’t accept or fail to recognize the value of

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Pro f i les i n Di ve rsit y Journal

march/april 2008

diversified assets

for the workplace?

company diversity advisor? If the answer is yes, congratulations. If not, we might seriously consider adopting another gambit from the financial professionals: make it personal, and make the “WIIFM” obvious. Without diversity, consequences are pretty much the same for the individual and the corporation’s investment portfolio: lack of growth, hindered opportunities, a thwarted future. In this day when every penny counts— whether for family finances or the corporate ledger—the full practice of diversity and inclusion should be cheered for its obvious contribution to the robustness of portfolios, financial or human.

PDJ

Waste Management, Inc. is the leading provider of comprehensive waste and environmental services in North America. The company is strongly committed to a foundation of financial strength, operating excellence, and professionalism.


Who knows where the next great dream will find its voice. Where future leaders might find their inspiration. We salute those who inspire the great minds of today so that they can become the great visionaries of tomorrow.


I connect the dots differently. That brings value to the work I do. I have a passion for marketing, and I love what I do. At Hallmark, I have the opportunity to be a great marketer in an industry I believe in—one that enriches people’s lives. I work in a collaborative environment that celebrates the individual and values me as a whole person. Our multiple perspectives make our work stronger. It’s a rewarding opportunity to be part of a brand that helps people define and express the very best in themselves. aviva ajmera hebbar customer strategy and planning director

l i v e yo u r pa s s i o n . l o v e yo u r wo r k .



for i n for m at i on on h a l l m a r k c a re er opp ort u n i t i e s , v i s i t w w w. h a l l m a r k . c om / c a re er s . © 2 0 0 6 h a l l m a r k l i cen s i n g , i n c .


Special Feature

KPMG

our differences areour strength

Diversity at KPMG


Special Feature

KPMG

tim flynn chairman and ceo

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Foreword

In my 28 years with KPMG LLP (KPMG), I have had the opportunity to work with a broad spectrum of talented people and to experience firsthand what happens to a team when we bring together individuals with diverse skill sets, knowledge, experiences, and backgrounds. Their unique perspectives and differences strengthen the team and help the individuals to learn more, grow more, and accomplish more. The results are extremely powerful. In fact, I truly believe the diversity of our people, and the collective strength it brings to our everyday work, is not only critical to achieving our strategic business goals, it is essential to making KPMG a great place to build a career.

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I am extremely proud of the work we’ve done to create an environment that is inclusive and embraces the differences of our people. Our diversity networks are a valuable part of this environment. Our networks — including the African-American Network, the Asian Pacific Islander Network, the Disabilities Network, the Hispanic/Latino Network, KPMG’s Network of Women, and pride@KPMG, which focuses on the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender (GLBT) community — are helping us to further the professional development opportunities for members of these groups, and provide them with a forum through which they can build professional relationships and leadership skills.

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Special Feature

“The unique perspectives and differences of our people strengthen our teams... In fact, I truly believe the diversity of our people, and the collective strength it brings to our everyday work, is not only critical to achieving our strategic business goals, it is essential to making KPMG a great place to build a career.”

KPMG

Our commitment to all of our diversity initiatives is a logical extension of our core values. That is why I am also very proud of KPMG’s longstanding commitment to making a difference in the communities where we do business and reaching out to support the development of future minority and female leaders through such programs as The PhD Project and our partnership with Major League Baseball’s Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities™ (RBI™) program. In 2007, we became the presenting corporate sponsor of Major League Baseball’s RBI program, which is designed to increase youth participation in baseball and softball in inner cities across America. The RBI program encourages academic achievement, promotes the inclusion of minorities in the game, and demonstrates the power of corporate citizenship. The mission of The PhD Project is to increase the diversity of business school faculty by helping African-Americans, Hispanics, and Native Americans to enter and complete business Ph.D. programs. In only 13 years, The PhD Project has contributed to a dramatic increase in the number of minority business school faculty — from 294 to 889, with nearly 400 more candidates currently immersed in doctoral studies. In terms of our profession, we have strong relationships in place with such national accounting associations as the National Association of Black Accountants, Inc. and the Association of Latino Professionals in Finance and Accounting. I am particularly proud of our relationship with Howard University’s Center for Accounting Education. These organizations address the under-representation of minorities in business, higher education, and the accounting profession. In 2007, we established the Diversity Advisory Board (DAB), a national team of business partners and leaders from various functions to help ensure that diversity is a top priority. The DAB advises KPMG’s management committee and the board of directors, and sees to it that our diversity strategy is carried out consistently throughout the firm. All of KPMG’s diversity networks are represented. At KPMG, our focus on diversity also extends to our procurement and vendor partnerships. Our firm does business with minority- and women-owned businesses, and we have expanded the scope to include veteran-, special disabled-veteran-, disabledowned, and GLBT-owned businesses. The feedback I often receive about the culture at KPMG — one that values the contributions of all our people — is extremely rewarding and resonates beyond our offices. In addition to other awards we’ve received, the firm consistently is ranked each year by the Human Rights Campaign Foundation as one of the Best Companies and among the Best Places to Work for GLBT professionals. Year after year we achieve 100 percent on the Human Rights Campaign’s Equality Index score. We’ve also been recognized as one of the top 10 organizations for working mothers by Working Mother magazine, and recognized as one of its “100 Best Companies” 11 times since the list’s inception. While receiving these accolades is gratifying, what is most important to me is that we are living our core values and helping to ensure that KPMG is a great place to work and build a career, for all our people.

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Special Feature

KPMG

Contents

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Chairman’s Foreword

21

Diversity Advisory Board Managing a Golden Opportunity

22

Commitment to An Inclusive Culture

26

Commitment to the Community

30

Commitment to Professional Development

36

Commitment to Future Leaders

Jack Taylor, executive vice chair, Operations, and co-chair of the KPMG Diversity Advisory Board.

Kathy Hopinkah Hannan, Midwest Area managing partner, Tax,    co-chair of the KPMG Diversity Advisory Board, and chair of the Women’s Advisory Board.


Special Feature

KPMG

Diversity Advisory Board Managing a Golden Opportunity

Most organizations understand the importance of diversity. And, most will acknowledge that pockets of their organizations leverage diversity well. The broader challenge lies in establishing diversity as an operating principle that is followed consistently throughout an organization. At KPMG, we are driving this effort through our Diversity Advisory Board (DAB), which was set up to deliver a unified strategy around diversity and make it an integral part of our organization. The board, which was established in 2007, helps the firm achieve three key objectives: • Align the activities of our national diversity networks and better leverage best practices; • Advise the KPMG management committee and board of directors on our diversity strategies and objectives, the progress we’re making, and the ways we can continue to integrate diversity and inclusion in our business strategy; and • Provide support and ensure that we continuously enhance the recruitment, retention, and advancement of a diverse team of professionals.

“As someone who helps lead KPMG’s business operations, I understand the importance of diversity and inclusion to our business. By valuing our differences — as well as our similarities — we build upon our individual, team, and firm strengths.” —Jack Taylor By bringing together the individual ideas, skills, and leading practices of each of the firm’s national diversity networks, the DAB serves as a “center of excellence” and enables us to better execute against our goals as one firm, for the benefit of all our people. Also of note is the makeup of the DAB’s membership — many serve as co-chairs of our six diversity networks. Not only are these individuals passionate about diversity, they have significant responsibilities for leading key parts of our business. Their involvement demonstrates how seriously KPMG takes the issue.

“As a woman and a Native American, I am proud of KPMG’s diversity efforts and delighted to help lead them.” —Kathy hopinkah Hannan

As KPMG partners, DAB members also have clear insight into the firm’s operations and processes and can call on a variety of resources to create and implement initiatives. The board is well positioned to advise firm leadership about diversity issues, and also to advance the firm’s efforts to recruit, retain, and develop our people. We believe we have captured something special and exciting in the DAB, and we are committed to making the most of it — whether we’re helping one manager with a local decision or counseling the firm’s chairman about diversity policies that will affect every employee and partner. Large or small, every move we make reflects the essence of our firm. With diversity, we’re talking about nothing less.

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Special Feature

KPMG

Commitment to an

Inclusive Culture Diversity is not only a business imperative, it is the right thing to do. At KPMG our commitment to building a diverse and inclusive environment is a collective effort that draws on the talent and experience found throughout our organization. As Yasuko Metcalf, an Audit partner and member of our Asian Pacific Islander Network notes, “None of us is a bystander when it comes to diversity.”

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BRUCE PFAU

That is why I am so proud of the diversity networks that our partners and employees have created, and KPMG has supported, over the past several years. These networks, now in offices across the country, are a key component of our diversity strategy, and support KPMG’s Employer of Choice strategy. No doubt the networks contribute to the strength and cohesiveness of our culture. In fact, our latest Work Environment Survey results reflect that the majority of our people think KPMG is a great place to work and build a career. KPMG has three primary goals for our diversity networks:

1. Help us meet our diversity goals. Today, we serve clients nationally and globally, and they expect us to understand and appreciate the complexities of their cultures and customs. The diversity networks help us to meet the needs and expectations of our clients. Senior Associate Amber Jackson, a member of the African-American Network, says, “Los Angeles is such a multicultural community. Clients want to see diversity in their business partners — and they tell me how much they appreciate working 22

with our team because it is diverse. Working with such a mix of people, we get a blend of perspectives.”

2. Foster a diverse and inclusive work environment. The networks extend into the job market and onto college campuses, so they help support our efforts to hire a diverse workforce. They provide a welcoming experience for new hires. And they help their members grow personally and professionally by offering them support and guidance through networking, personal and career development, and mentoring opportunities. The KPMG Network of Women (KNOW) is extremely effective at addressing the professional development needs of its members. When the firm introduced Employee Career Architecture to provide employees with enhanced career development support, KNOW was among the first groups to create a training toolkit and set up meetings where members could learn how to use the tool. The National Association of Black Accountants, Inc. (NABA) is helpful in career development. Director Earl Fagan, a

Pro f ile s in Dive rsit y Journal M a r c h / a p r i l 2 0 0 8

Vice Chair, Human Resources

member of the African-American and Hispanic/Latino networks, says, “I have seen my career, and those of others, develop at the firm through KPMG’s support for NABA. KPMG’s relationship with NABA has afforded me the opportunity to strengthen my technical skills, enhance my interpersonal skills, and expand my personal and professional network.” Discussing the Disabilities Network, Principal-in-Charge, Operations Services, Stephen Clemente says, “Whether from a physical or developmental disability perspective, the firm hires and creates an environment for all to succeed.”

3. Educate people at KPMG. The networks seek to raise diversity awareness and inclusiveness among leaders and colleagues by organizing cultural events, community support projects, and other activities. Senior Manager Suzette Longfellow says, “Through the Hispanic/Latino Network, we are raising awareness of our cultural differences so we can all understand each other in the firm.”


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KPMG

Diversity Networks at KPMG African-American Network Asian Pacific Islander Network Disabilities Network Hispanic/Latino Network KPMG’s Network of Women pride@kpmg (GLBT)

Yasuko metcalf Partner, chicago

Diversity Is a Business Imperative

“As a parent of a child with special needs, I am proud to serve as co-chair of KPMG’s new Disabilities Network. It is indicative of the firm’s inclusive culture and its commitment to helping our people, as well as their families and loved ones, achieve their full potential.” —Shaun Kelly

Because she is a Japanese native, 70 percent to 80 percent of Yasuko Metcalf’s clients are Japanese companies with operations in the Chicago metropolitan area, where she is based.

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“Our clients want us to be well-versed in the U.S. market, but also to understand the Japanese business culture and language,” says Metcalf, who joined KPMG in 1990 and became an Audit partner in 2000. She also is a member of the Asian Pacific Islander Network. “A diverse workforce,” she says, “is more than nice — it is a business imperative. Our clients are global and, therefore, diverse. They expect the same from KPMG. “Diversity is not something you can accomplish with rules and regulations. It is part of our culture, how each of us acts, thinks, and feels — and how we all interact. It is how we maintain and energize this dynamic organization.”

shaun kelly vice chair, tax co-chair, Disabilities Network

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C ommitment to an

Inclusive Culture

Gaining Global Perspectives As part of an international organization, KPMG recognizes that its workforce should be diverse in its appearance as well as global in its perspective. The firm is aggressively expanding the opportunities for its partners and employees to work and live abroad.

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KPMG member firms are encouraging their people to take short- and long-term international job rotations through a revitalized rotation program called Global Opportunities, or GO. In 2007, about 2,400 KPMG professionals — including 441 from the United States — took advantage of these opportunities in 57 countries. The goal is to double that number by 2010. “Living and working in another country gives you an in-depth understanding of how the rest of the world works,” says Aidan Walsh, partner-in-charge, International. “You develop a greater appreciation for different cultures and the different ways in which people manage and grow their business. Generation Y wants to explore the world. Our international assignment programs make KPMG a more desirable place to launch and build a career.” Rotational assignments usually run from three to 18 months but occasionally go longer. Stephen Johnson, a partner with the U.S. Capital Markets Group, is halfway through a three-year rotation in Tokyo and has learned a great deal since leaving the Detroit office. “I have a newfound understanding of the multiple, unique Asian nationalities and cultures,” he says. “I am seeing up close how the Chinese differ from the Japanese or from the Malays, for instance. They all think, work, speak, and live very differently. Logistics, sales, and marketing all have to be specific to the market, which may be different in each country.”

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john tantillo Global training KPMG member firms offer numerous training programs designed to broaden global perspectives. In 2007, KPMG launched an International Internship Exchange Program, giving summer interns the chance to gain a real-world perspective on a global career with KPMG (see “New Hire on a Global Path,” page 9). Compass, KPMG’s global training and

development initiative, is launching programs that expose colleagues to a diverse mix of people and cultures through sessions held around the world. In 2007, these programs included: •

New Manager Training, which brought together KPMG professionals from North and South America and Europe.

• An Experienced Manager Conference that drew nearly 140 managers, from more than 35 countries, to New Delhi, India. • The Global Awareness Seminar that held two sessions for the first time, in Barcelona, Spain, and in Shanghai, China. Senior managers from more than 30 countries attended the sixday program. • Audit’s new Global Audit Fundamentals program in Madrid, which attracted more than 300 newly hired associates from five countries, including 100 from the United States. The firm plans to triple the number of participants in 2008.

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partner, new york Co-chair, pride@kpmg

Pride@KPMG During his first 19 years with KPMG, John Tantillo kept his lifestyle to himself.

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hen three years ago, a Human Resources representative who knew him well asked Tantillo if he would establish the New York Office pride@kpmg, a network for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender (GLBT) employees and partners. Tantillo faced an important and deeply personal question. Accepting the role would be tantamount to having him come out — to announce to the KPMG world that he was gay. “Many people didn’t know I was gay but I decided it was the right thing to do,” Tantillo says. “Being an owner of the firm, I have an obligation to serve as a role model for our employees. If I am not out and open with who I am, how could I expect our employees to be open?” Furthermore, Tantillo now mentors many pride@kpmg members, counseling them and providing career guidance. Tantillo believes there is a great deal of sincerity and understanding at the firm for its GLBT employees and partners, especially among the senior leaders. “Pride’s board has the firm’s full support,” he says. “The leaders ask me, ‘What else should we be doing to support GLBTs in our workforce?’” Looking back, Tantillo says, “Being out at KPMG has made my work life a lot easier, knowing I can bring my whole self to work every day.”


Special Feature

Karima Warner associate, new york

KPMG

“I got the opportunity to meet people… from four European countries, as well as the United States. I was able to establish international relationships just as I was beginning my career.”

New Hire on a Global Path

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Karima Warner joined KPMG full time in September 2007 and already sees herself on a global career path. Warner’s interest in an international career was triggered while studying in Spain as a college student. She talked to her KPMG recruiter about her interest during the interview process, and he told her she had a chance to participate in the global new hire training program that was soon to debut in Madrid. Fortunately for Warner she was accepted into the program, and in October, less than a month into her career with KPMG, she found herself in Madrid with 300 other new hires from five countries.

“I got the opportunity to meet people at all levels from four European countries, as well as the United States,” she says. “I was able to establish international relationships just as I was beginning my career.” As much as Warner appreciates the business contacts, she also gained some insights into the cultural diversity of the other participants.

“People were quite different there. They opened my mind to other cultures,” she says. “I was surprised to see so many of the new hire employees from the European countries who hadn’t majored in accounting as I had. Instead, they studied things like history, art, and music. They seemed so well-rounded that it motivated me to expand my horizons. “I realized how glad I was to have chosen KPMG,” Warner says, “because the firm invested so much in me and my career from the very beginning.”

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KPMG

Latoria Carroll manager, Chicago, and a recipient of the 2007 National Chairman’s Award for Excellence in Volunteerism

Commitment to

The Community

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At KPMG, serving our clients and communities is a privilege, and with that privilege comes responsibility. KPMG’s efforts impact the community and give those in need access to a better future, whether the firm is partnering with such national non-profit organizations as the American Red Cross and Junior Achievement, helping inner-city kids learn the values of life through Major League Baseball’s Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities™ (RBI™) program, or fostering diversity in the world of commerce through supplier diversity initiatives.

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Says Lord Michael Hastings, global head of Citizenship and Diversity: “Diversity is a richer, more significant and multilayered issue today. Countries are rapidly becoming multi-cultured and multicolored. That change, which is affecting every part of the developed world, means that for KPMG to attract and retain the best people, as well as grow the business, we need an open approach

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to people of different cultures, different colors, and a sustained effort to attract women to the firm.”

Corporate citizenship at its best KPMG’s Corporate Citizenship program addresses local needs in the United States while also lending support to initiatives worldwide. To generate aware-


Special Feature

KPMG

“Diversity is a richer, more significant and multilayered issue today. Countries are rapidly becoming multi-cultured and multi-colored...” —lord Michael Hastings ness of the program, KPMG was the first of the Big Four public accounting firms to create a comprehensive annual review documenting all of its corporate citizenship programs. The review illustrates the firm’s commitment to the community and includes a wealth of information on involvement programs, corporate and individual giving initiatives, and efforts to promote and facilitate volunteerism. As part of its Corporate Citizenship program, KPMG collaborates with non-profit organizations on national events, volunteer activities, and fundraising events. Its outreach efforts are far reaching.

class the last two years,” Carroll says. “I switched to kindergarten because it was my favorite class in elementary school and I adored my kindergarten teacher.” Shortly after her last visit to Newberry Academy, where she taught, Carroll received a gigantic thank-you letter from Mrs. Furuta and the kindergarten class. “The first sentence read, ‘We love you! Thank you for giving us all the stuff!’” she says. “The letter is decorated with their names and pictures so my co-facilitator and I would remember them. It is the most beautiful, heart-warming letter I have ever received. I keep it to remind me of what’s really important.”

lord Michael Hastings Global Head of Citizenship and Diversity

Getting involved “Our national community involvement program, Involve, has been around roughly 15 years,” says John-Anthony Meza, associate director, National Community Involvement. “At each KPMG office we have Involve coordinators, and through their work and the work of the committees they’ve formed, we engage in more than 800 local volunteer projects a year.” KPMG also supports its employees’ efforts to fulfill their own personal vision of volunteerism and citizenship by recognizing them with the National Chairman’s Award for Excellence in Volunteerism. “The National Chairman’s Award highlights the amazing work our people do in their communities and throughout their everyday lives,” Meza says. Manager Latoria Carroll recently received the 2007 National Chairman’s Award for her volunteer work with children and those in need in Chicago. “I have supported Junior Achievement for the last three years. I taught a fourth-grade class my first year, and I taught a kindergarten

National Partnerships

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PMG partners with and sponsors six national organizations: American Cancer Society (ACS), American Red Cross, National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Junior Achievement, American Heart Association, and March of Dimes.

The firm helps raise funds for the American Cancer Society primarily through its support for ACS’s signature “Relay for Life” activities. Last year, KPMG helped raise $650,000 for cancer research, education, and advocacy through The Relay for Life, Making Strides for Breast Cancer, and Daffodil Days. Joining forces with the American Red Cross, KPMG professionals dedicate countless hours to provide relief to victims of disasters and help people prevent, prepare for, and respond to emergencies. Many KPMG partners and employees participate in more than 40 blood drives across the country, collecting more that 1,900 pints of blood, and helping to save an estimated 5,700 lives. As a National Partner of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, KPMG recently was recognized as the top contributor in its peer group. Whether cycling, walking, or running, nearly 600 KPMG participants trained for months and contributed 6,000 hours to raise $265,000 at their local walks and bike rides last year to help those affected by multiple sclerosis. In addition to other fundraising events, corporate philanthropy, and the KPMG Community Giving Campaign, the firm donated more than $370,000. KPMG has a distinguished relationship with Junior Achievement. More than 25 KPMG teams participated in classroom mentoring in 2007, providing more than 4,700 hours of instruction time to help young people understand the economics of life. The KPMG Community Giving Campaign leverages firmwide technology and provides an easy and effective way for partners and employees to make secure contributions to their charities. It provides a wide range of charitable options, while also recognizing the history and tradition of our commitments to these national organizations.

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C ommitment to

the Community

A Real Business Advantage: KPMG Buys

Into Supplier Diversity

KPMG is building on its commitment to the community by ramping up its efforts to increase supplier diversity, which encourages the use of minority-owned; women-owned; veteran-owned; disabled veteran-owned; disabled-owned; and gay-, lesbian-, bisexual-, and/or transgender-owned businesses.

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ast year Jack Taylor, executive vice chair, Operations, made a commitment through the Diversity Advisory Board to raise the bar and increase KPMG’s current spend on supplier diversity from 6 percent to 10 percent. There are a number of steps that need to be taken to reach this goal. “The first step is to complete an assessment of our current spend,” says National Director of Firmwide Procurement Joseph Reynolds. “The step after that is to bring a supplier diversity leader on board to manage the process moving forward.” The firm also is expanding its external partnerships to include various Chambers of Commerce and non-profit organizations that support and certify diverse business owners. “By building these external relationships we will be able to grow the base of diverse suppliers and vendors,” says National Director of Diversity Nereida “Neddy” Perez. “The good thing about our supplier diversity program is that we are not starting from scratch,” says Procurement Director Bob Ernst. “We already have a diverse supply base and recognize the business scalability. We just need to be more proactive, improve our business model, and optimize our diverse supplier portfolio.”

The keys to a successful supplier diversity program “A successful program needs to have a solid commitment from leadership, be based on a strategy, and supported by strong internal partnerships,” Reynolds says. “That’s what we have and will continue to drive forward at KPMG.” “We also need to bring qualified new suppliers on board and manage the relationship,” Perez adds. Supplier diversity is evolving rapidly and adapting to the changing demographics of the country. According to Reynolds, ”Not only are minority- and women-owned business enterprises among the fastest-growing segments in the U.S. economy, but KPMG clients are looking to ensure that their professional service providers have diverse spend.” Cognizant that its own client base is diversifying rapidly, KPMG attempts to meet client needs through a mix of services, many of which are generated by diverse suppliers. “We want to purchase from a supplier base that represents our employees, communities, and clients,” Ernst says. Improving KPMG’s supplier diversity program is a concerted effort to build new relationships with diverse suppliers. “We care about our local community, and we want to give our local suppliers a chance to succeed,” Perez says. “As we grow as a firm, we will help the community and our clients grow with us.” 28

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barbara carbone partner, san francisco

Dedicated to Women’s Business Enterprises KPMG is a proud sponsor of the Women’s Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC).

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BENC was founded in 1997 and is the nation’s leading advocate of women-owned businesses as suppliers to America’s corporations. KPMG Audit Partner Barbara Carbone plays an active role in WBENC and is on the board, serving on the program committee and as the chair of the audit committee. It all started in 1998. Carbone was national partner-in-charge of Human Resources for the Assurance practice, reporting to Tim Flynn, then the vice chair, Human Resources. “The controller of a longtime Audit client was the chair of the WBENC board, and he recommended that KPMG get involved,” she recounts. “The board was looking for someone with an accounting background.” WBENC works to foster diversity in the world of commerce with programs and policies to expand opportunities in the marketplace for women business owners.


Special Feature

KPMG’s Procurement Group also was engaging female professionals and partners in its diversity supplier program. “I didn’t know much about procurement or supplier diversity. Over time, I learned about a side of the corporate world that I never knew — where promoting diversity is truly good for business,” Carbone says. Carbone was named by the San Francisco Business Times as one of the “100 Most Influential Women in Business” in 2006 and 2007, one of the “100 Women Impacting Supplier Diversity” by Women Enterprise USA, and the “First Lady of Supplier Diversity” by Minority Business News. Carbone enjoys attending the WBENC gala each March, coinciding with National Women’s History Month, because she is able to see the connections attendees make. “My most memorable WBENC moment occurred a few years ago,” she says. “I attended an event at the White House where we honored the top companies demonstrating exceptional efforts and commitment to supplier diversity. I was able to see how other organizations give back to women business owners.” In support of WBENC’s 10-year anniversary, Jack Taylor, executive vice chair, Operations, not only attended a special dinner in Dallas honoring the WBENC founding members, he agreed to help raise funds for WBENC by having a “power lunch” with a lucky woman business owner who won it in a silent auction. This is just one example of KPMG’s commitment to supplier diversity. With Carbone playing an active role in WBENC, she seeks to engage other KPMG professionals, either by helping support local councils or volunteering. “In addition to looking for ways to increase our spending with diverse suppliers, there are lots of things we can do to get involved — from volunteering time locally to attending a networking event. Anyone can do his or her part and be an advocate of supplier diversity.”

KPMG

KPMG Goes to Bat for America’s Youth For 18 years, Major League Baseball’s Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities™ (RBI™) program has been helping America’s inner-city kids build their skills in baseball and life.

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tarted in 1989, the RBI program now includes more than 100,000 boys and girls in more than 200 cities around the world. RBI’s goal is to help these children by teaching the value of teamwork, helping them develop self-esteem, encouraging academic participation and achievement, increasing participation and interest in baseball, and promoting greater inclusion of minorities in mainstream baseball. “KPMG is extremely proud to sponsor RBI,” says Bruce Pfau, vice chair, Human Resources. “Our goals, and those of the program, are well aligned. As a firm, our people are committed to making a difference in our communities, and our involvement with RBI enables KPMG volunteers to provide girls and boys in local programs with things like on-field assistance and mentoring in the classroom, to help them develop important life skills while they’re playing softball or baseball.” And, as RBI’s presenting corporate sponsor, KPMG provides money for program support, sponsors regional RBI tournaments as well as the RBI World Series, and funds scholarships for deserving inner-city girls and boys. Some KPMG partners and employees have been involved with local RBI programs for some time, and feedback from both the community and KPMG volunteers has been very positive. “When you see a program like this with a 95 percent high school graduation rate, you know you’re involved in something that works,” says Rob Arning, office managing partner, New York, who has been involved in the Harlem, New York, RBI program for several years. “I’m proud that KPMG is a sponsor,” says Tax Partner Tim Gillis, who has volunteered with the RBI program in Washington, D.C., for the past several years. “It’s a positive, productive experience for the kids and for people like me who have the privilege to be able to mentor and help kids grow to their full potential. And it’s fun.” KPMG and Major League Baseball will continue to reach out to inner-city youth, not only through the common language of America’s favorite pastime, but also by encouraging the children to look toward their futures. In addition, KPMG and Major League Baseball will take a more active role in promoting diversity and bringing communities together to support children — our most valuable resource for the future.

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Special Feature

KPMG

Bobby Bennett Senior Associate, Atlanta

Commitment to

Professional Development Back in 2002, when Bobby Bennett was an accounting student at Clark Atlanta University, he had a wide variety of job options in front of him. But it was a particular assignment he had while interning at KPMG through the INROADS program that convinced him the firm was the place where he wanted to build a career.

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Bennett, who was in his junior year, was given the opportunity to do a multi-week rotation at the firm’s Global Services Centre in Montvale, New Jersey, working on a project involving international accounting standards conversion.

me the opportunity to sit alongside them at the table. As an intern, having that kind of exposure to leadership made a huge impression on me, and it made me see KPMG as a place where I could really grow and excel as a professional.”

“There was a team of partners and senior managers from all over the world, and I was by far the most junior person in the group,” Bennett says. “But they took an interest in my views and gave

After graduation, Bennett took a full-time position with the firm, and today he’s an Audit senior associate in Atlanta, focusing primarily on manufacturing clients, including one of the firm’s largest

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Fortune 500 accounts. “I feel like I grew up in the firm. Every success I’ve had to date is the result of individuals who took an interest in me, gave me advice, and taught me best practices. Now my longterm goal is to remain at KPMG and aim for the partnership.”

Bobby Bennett, who got his start at KPMG as an INROADS intern, has his sights set on building a long-term career at the firm.

The firm’s diversity recruiting efforts take place on multiple fronts, including an ever-growing relationship with INROADS, the non-profit organization that trains and develops minority youth for professional careers in business and industry. In 2007, the number of INROADS interns employed by KPMG surpassed 100, resulting in the firm being named one of the group’s Top 10 Clients for 2007.

National Association of Black Accountants, Inc. (NABA) and the Association of Latino Professionals in Finance and Accounting (ALPFA).

Bennett’s story is just one of the many that can be told by INROADS alumni throughout the firm. And it’s indicative of KPMG’s ongoing commitment to building a more diverse and inclusive workforce by recruiting talented minority and female candidates.

Recruiting a more diverse workforce Since a significant number of KPMG’s new employees are hired from college campuses, the firm’s Campus Recruiting team has a large role to play in the firm’s efforts to increase diversity. “We strive to continually increase the pool of qualified candidates who are diverse,” says Manny Fernandez, KPMG’s national managing partner, University Relations and Recruiting, and co-chair of the Hispanic/Latino Network. He notes that in the last few years his team has added recruiters who focus specifically on diversity hiring and work closely with the firm’s diversity networks as well as external organizations such as the

Meanwhile, the campus recruiting team has established a “Diversity 20” program to focus on 20 schools across the country that have high minority enrollment. This program complements regular recruiting activities that focus on the top accounting schools in the United States. Then there’s the new Future Diversity Leaders program, which offers scholarships and internship opportunities each year to high-achieving college students who have demonstrated a commitment to diversity. Fifty students will be selected per year, with the goal of having more than 200 students in the program by 2010. KPMG’s efforts on campus also include working closely with both NABA and ALPFA to sponsor National Case Study competitions that provide minority finance and accounting students with the opportunity to showcase their business, accounting, research, and presentation skills. All of these efforts clearly are having an impact, as evidenced by the fact that minority candidates now account for 30 percent of the firm’s full-time campus hires, up from 24 percent only two years ago.

KPMG

Eyeing an overlooked group More recently, KPMG has joined forces with the National Business & Disability Council and will be participating in its Emerging Leaders Conference, which connects talented college graduates with disabilities with corporations and businesses. “This community often is overlooked in the general marketplace as a viable employment pool,” says Neddy Perez, national director of Diversity. “We know that there is talent in this resource pool, and as part of our efforts to create an inclusive workplace we are committed to tapping into it.” Aside from KPMG’s efforts on campus, each of the firm’s experienced hire recruiters also incorporates diversity into his or her overall recruiting strategy and goals. Minority candidates accounted for 41 percent of all experienced hires in 2007. The firm also has a dedicated resource to coordinate participation in national diversity conferences and events such as ALPFA, national MBA conferences, the National Association of Asian American Professionals, the National Asian American Society of Accountants (Ascend ), NABA, Out & Equal, and the Out for Work Conference.

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Helping People Build Great Careers Recruiting a more diverse pool of professionals is only the first step in building a more diverse organization. Once people join, it is critical that the firm provides the right development programs, training, and support so they will want to build careers at KPMG.

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Mentoring plays a large role in this effort, with more than 9,500 formal mentoring relationships across the firm to provide people opportunities to network with more senior colleagues, receive personalized feedback and encouragement, and ask questions and seek advice. For many of the firm’s minority professionals, these mentoring relationships are closely aligned with the activities of the diversity networks, which provide opportunities year-round for partners and employees to expand their professional circles, and participate in training and professional development seminars. In addition, the launch last year of KPMG’s Employee Career Architecture helps employees map out potential career paths by better informing them about professional opportunities available at the firm.

Career support Firm leadership also identified a need to provide entry-level minority recruits with a more hands-on approach to career management. The result was the creation of a new position — Executive Director of Early Career Counseling and Development — to work with leadership, the Diversity Advisory Board (DAB), and the firm’s national Human Resources team to enhance the support provided to minority new hires. John Honor, Jr., a senior Human Resources executive at the firm, was personally tapped by KPMG Chair32

man and CEO Tim Flynn to fill this new role, which initially is focusing on early careers of African-American employees. Key objectives include increasing retention of early-career minority employees, providing them with access to quality coaching and mentoring, and getting more minority professionals into the pipeline for senior positions. Momentum for the latter is already strong, as the number of minority employees in manager roles has increased by 20 percent from 2006 to 2007. During that same period, the number of minority employees in senior manager, director, and managing director roles also increased by 20 percent. Aside from traveling around the country to meet minority new hires and better understand their needs, Honor and his team have put together a series of workshops to provide advice in areas such as career planning, working with mentors, and having more productive conversations with performance managers. Meanwhile, Honor also works with KPMG’s senior leadership to identify ways to utilize client engagements more strategically to help people develop their skills. “Often, the more complex engagements offer professionals a broader range of learning and development experiences, so it’s a matter of making sure people have access to the right opportunities,” Honor says. Even with this enhanced early-career support, a longer-term commitment to diver-

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sity only can be successful if employees can look to the other end of the career spectrum and see leaders with similar backgrounds and experiences to whom they can relate and emulate. That’s one of the reasons why the DAB has taken on the responsibility of revamping the firm’s “partner pipeline” process to expand the number of diversity leadership candidates included in succession planning. To do this, the DAB has set up a work group that focuses on identifying and evaluating diverse candidates in the pipelines of each of KPMG’s three businesses to better understand and support their specific development needs.

Role models Having role models with similar backgrounds was one of the things that helped Partner Maria Olide. “Having someone like Lou Miramontes (San Francisco office managing partner) to look up to throughout my career has been inspirational, and he has been a fantastic role model for me,” she says. Olide, who got her start at KPMG through the INROADS program (see article on page 17), looks forward to returning the favor by serving as a mentor and role model for younger minority professionals. “I’ve grown up with KPMG, and I believe it’s a great firm. Now I’m looking forward to being a leader and helping to motivate other people who may be where I was years ago.”


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KPMG

From the Mailroom to the Partnership Maria Olide’s career trajectory at KPMG has all the makings of an inspirational Hollywood movie — an inexperienced college student who starts out as a mailroom intern and, thanks to hard work, dedication, and just a little bit of good fortune, works her way up to become a partner.

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That’s why she’s decided to help support the recruitment and mentoring of Hispanic/Latino professionals and play a leadership role in the firm’s Hispanic/Latino Network. “I never would have gotten to partner if it weren’t for the fact that I had extraordinary support from the partners I worked with. So now I feel like it’s my turn to focus and give back.” Olide, who grew up in Central Valley, California, and attended the University of California, Berkeley, interned through the INROADS program after hearing about the program from a fellow student. “I wasn’t even an accounting major, and I didn’t know a lot about KPMG,” she says. “But I thought it could be interesting and figured I should try it out.” Olide spent the next three summers interning at the firm, and during that time she took advantage of as many networking and training opportunities as she could. That approach paid off, since

Maria olide partner, mountain view

she was hired into the firm’s Audit practice full time in January 1992 and quickly rose through the ranks to become a manager. “Fortunately, I’d been able to find great mentors both within and outside the Hispanic community. I didn’t find that diversity was a barrier, which says a lot about KPMG.” In 1997, Olide decided to leave the firm to pursue an advanced degree, primarily because she wanted to feel more comfortable speaking to C-level executives about their businesses. After getting an MBA from Stanford, she worked in strategy consulting for a few years and moved to Europe with her husband, who also is a strategy consultant. There she had two daughters and even took a shot at opening her own business — the first chain of childcare centers in Milan, Italy. She returned to the United States in 2004 and started looking for a new career opportunity. But with two young daugh-

ters, work/life balance had become a key priority. Fortunately, Olide’s past networking opened the door to a new opportunity when a former KPMG colleague suggested she look into joining the Advisory practice. “At that point, I had some other opportunities at other firms, but I felt a lot of loyalty to KPMG for giving me those opportunities early on.” Olide joined the firm’s Internal Audit Services practice in 2005 and picked up right where she left off, with a quick rise up the ranks that ultimately led to being admitted to the partnership last September. Today, when mentoring younger professionals, Olide has a simple message: “Work hard, but not at the expense of who you are. Make sure you don’t compromise your values. I don’t hide who I am and I think that helps me quite a bit.” For more career information, visit www.us.kpmg.com/careers

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Women’s Advancement When KPMG conducted its annual employee Work Environment Survey in 2004, about two-thirds of women employees said they considered the firm a great place to build a career. Only three years later, the response from women to this same question had jumped to 81 percent.

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This dramatic improvement in employee satisfaction is the result of a strategy that began several years ago to enhance career opportunities for women. And it’s a critical component of KPMG’s longterm success, considering women now represent almost half of the total workforce, half of all new hires, and close to 40 percent of the management roles among employees who serve clients directly. The firm’s key driver in promoting women’s initiatives is the Women’s Advisory Board (WAB), which was established to create national and local initiatives to support, advance, and retain women. Since the formation of WAB in 2003, there has been a 30 percent decrease in female turnover. And more than 2,000 women were promoted in fiscal year 2007, a 12 percent increase over the previous fiscal year.

Supportive programs KPMG is increasing efforts to support women in a number of areas, including communications, metrics and accountability, employee and partner advancement, and strategic market relationships. Among the key areas identified was the need to retain more women at the critical senior associate level so they can get

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themselves into the running for more senior positions. Women currently make up more than 18 percent of KPMG’s overall partner population, as well as 26 percent of the firm’s 2008 new partner class. While this leads the profession, our goal is to increase the number of women who make it into the partner pipeline and all the way to partner. (See “Managing Career/Life Choices,” page 19). WAB’s support doesn’t end once a woman is admitted to the partnership. The new “2-Up” program provides female partners with opportunities for face time with partners who are two levels above them. By giving more women partners access to leadership, there is a better chance they’ll be called on when more senior roles or development opportunities open up. WAB also is sponsoring a workshop called Valuing Workstyle Diversity to teach professionals to value diverse workstyles and recognize how they can add to a group’s overall strength.

A knowing network Meanwhile, KPMG’s Network of Women (KNOW) continues its rapid expansion, growing to 54 chapters in 2007 and delivering nearly 300 professional

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development and career advancement programs to almost 12,000 KPMG women. “Networks like KNOW provide a place for our women to recognize and celebrate their own and each other’s achievements, to network, and to access professional development opportunities that are focused on the unique needs of our female professionals,” says Anna Baird, an Advisory partner and member of the WAB and the Diversity Advisory Board (DAB). Another area where the network has placed much emphasis is mentoring. More than 4,700 KPMG women participate in mentoring relationships, many of them supported by the KNOW Mentor Program Outreach, which presents mentor/mentee lunches, group mentoring discussions on career advancement, and educational programming on maximizing relationships. “If you’re a good woman leader, you should be mentoring other women and men, and you should build a diverse network of mentors for yourself,” says Kathy Hopinkah Hannan, Midwest Area managing partner, Tax, co-chair of the DAB, and chair of the WAB. “Having a diverse set of mentors helps people learn how to work with different personalities and workstyles, and identify qualities, skills, and traits they want or should develop.”


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KPMG

Managing Career/ Life Choices

Katie cunningham senior associate, houston

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For many of KPMG’s female professionals, the senior associate level is a critical milestone — a time when they are on their way to building their careers but begin facing the increasing pressures associated with making the arduous jump to manager. Add in the fact that so many of these women are at the cusp of major personal life changes, getting married and/or starting families, and it’s no surprise that turnover for this group is among the highest in the firm.

The Women’s Advisory Board recently launched a program to support this important population. Managing Career/Life Choices has a simple objective: Help female senior associates better understand their short- and long-term goals, both personal and professional, and realize that they don’t have to sacrifice one set of goals for another. It covers topics such as identifying career decision drivers, communication, using values-based decision making based on personal priorities and career goals, and setting boundaries to balance the two. “The reality is that unless you go through some of these exercises, you might not realize how out of balance you are,” says participant Katie Cunningham, an Audit senior associate and a member of KNOW’s Houston chapter. “The course brings to life what our individual needs are — how you as an individual think, what your priorities in life are, and where you are currently in relation to where you want to be. Then it helps you to form a structure to improve work/life balance.” Participants learn how to use “life mapping” exercises to decide what they want their career and personal lives to look like, and create a five-year action plan to get there based on existing work/life options and programs within the firm. The initiative also offers ongoing support in the form of individual coaching sessions and access to group coaching conference calls to strengthen support networks. To date, more than 20 percent of KPMG’s senior associate women have attended the program, and survey responses show that 100 percent of participants would recommend it to other colleagues. And, perhaps even more telling, about a quarter of the participants surveyed reported being at a point in their careers where they were considering leaving the firm because of personal life changes, but have since decided to stay.

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KPMG

Commitment to

Future Leaders

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At KPMG, we believe we have an obligation to encourage diversity among the next generation of accounting professionals and business leaders. Through a range of programs — including the KPMG Foundation’s PhD Project and Future Diversity Leaders — KPMG is bringing its diversity best practices to hundreds of students across the United States. And we are seeing results. When Kevin Jackson graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 1991, he was one of 16 African-American business students in a class of 600. That is something Jackson, now an assistant accounting professor at the University of Illinois, and The PhD Project are working to change, one student at a time. The PhD Project — founded by the KPMG Foundation in 1994 and launched as a separate legal organization in 2005 — encourages bright, motivated diverse candidates to pursue doctoral programs and careers as business professors. After working for KPMG and another Big Four public accounting firm, Jackson decided to pursue his doctorate. He found out about The PhD Project through his alma mater and, 10 years later, still remembers first reading about the project. “The ad said, ’Your job may satisfy you, but does it sustain you?’ I thought, ‘Wow, this is where I need to be.’”

Kevin Jackson Assistant accounting professor at the University of Illinois, credits the KPMG Foundation’s PhD Project with helping to surround him with ”people like me.”

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He applied and was accepted to The PhD Project annual conference in 1997. “When I was in school, there weren’t many African-Americans in my classes,” he says. “When I worked in Houston, there weren’t many African-Americans there either. The PhD Project conference was the first time I’d been surrounded by people like me.” At the conference, Jackson gained more confidence about his decision to return to

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school for his doctorate. He then participated in The PhD Project Doctoral Student Association and attended its annual conferences and American Accounting Association Annual Meetings — all sponsored by The PhD Project. The KPMG Foundation also awards Accounting Minority Doctoral Scholarships, which Jackson received throughout his doctoral program. Jackson received his Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin and has been a professor at the University of Illinois’ Urbana-Champaign campus since 2004. “It’s a privilege to influence young minds and a real responsibility,” he says. “I’m in a position where I can model tolerance, respect, understanding, and a strong work ethic. “It’s very positive to have a diverse circle of influence in young people’s lives,” Jackson adds. “I am hopeful that having under-represented groups in front of the classroom will encourage students from those same groups to pursue business degrees. There is still a lot to be done, but The PhD Project and KPMG are taking big steps in the right direction.” Bernie Milano, president of The PhD Project and the KPMG Foundation, agrees, pointing out that, “Since the program’s inception in 1994, the number of underrepresented minority professors has grown from 294 to 889, out of 26,000 business professors — an increase of more than 200 percent.”


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KPMG

Fast Forward Simba Machona, a senior at the University of Georgia, says the summer of 2007 had one major highlight for him: the time he spent in Los Angeles as part of KPMG’s Fast Forward program.

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Fast Forward, a leadership development conference, is offered to more than 100 high-achieving college students each year. The goal is to make an impression on top college prospects before their first internship.

Simba Machona Senior at University of Georgia

Machona got to know 100 students from across the country, networked with KPMG leaders, and developed business, interpersonal, and leadership skills. He also learned a lot about KPMG. ”We attended sessions about KPMG and each of its three business functions,” he says. “And Manny Fernandez [national managing partner, University

Future Diversity Leaders Program

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n just one year, the future diversity leaders program is off to a great start. It’s helping KPMG expand the pool of outstanding diverse students, strengthening relationships between campus recruiters and students, and engaging former participants from The PhD Project. Here’s how it works: Student leaders with strong GPAs and involvement in diversity and campus organizations are identified for the program and sponsored by professors from their schools. In many cases, the professors who work closely with the students are former participants in The PhD Project.

Relations and Recruiting, and co-chair, Hispanic/Latino Network] also talked about some of the diversity programs and initiatives KPMG supports. That really made an impression on me.” Machona had a bit of a head start though. His cousin had worked for KPMG and told Machona about the firm. “Everything I heard at Fast Forward confirmed the great things I heard from him.” Machona interned with KPMG this past winter and is looking forward to “the challenge of working in a fast-paced environment, especially during busy season.”

Machona is looking forward to the challenge of working in a fast-paced environment…

KPMG held the inaugural Future Diversity Leaders Conference in Hollywood this past summer. The program focuses on leadership development, teamwork, networking, interviewing, and professionalism. It also includes information about the profession and the firm, and about diversity and inclusion at KPMG, something of increasing importance to prospects and new recruits. Participating students who successfully complete the leadership program are invited for an office visit, formally interviewed, and possibly extended an internship offer. These internships provide invaluable experience as students rotate through different KPMG teams and shadow teams within their top three practice choices. There are financial rewards as well. If students complete the full four-year program, they not only have relevant work experience on their resumes, they will have received up to $6,000 in scholarship money. And that’s an investment KPMG is happy to make. “The long-term goal is to have a pool of 200 students every year at different stages of the program,” says Blane Ruschak, national director, Campus Recruiting. “That’s a pipeline of 50 new diverse students each year. And this will make a difference in diversity and inclusion at KPMG and in the profession.”

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Reaching Out

Lou Miramontes and Angela Avant Connect with Key Diversity Groups

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In his 31 years with the firm, Lou Miramontes has had a front-row seat as KPMG, the profession, and the global marketplace have come to recognize the necessity of diversity. In fact, he has played an important role in developing KPMG’s culture and commitment to diversity and inclusion. Office managing partner for San Francisco and co-chair of KPMG’s Hispanic/Latino network, Miramontes is a vocal supporter of KPMG’s diversity networks and works closely with external groups, including the Association of Latino Professionals in Finance and Accounting (ALPFA).

Miramontes joined KPMG’s Northern California practice in 1976. “It was a place and a pace that matched my skills,” he says. “I also felt comfortable with the environment, the people, and the clients.” In 1994, he worked for KPMG in Mexico, and in 1998 he was named regional executive partner for KPMG’s Latin America region. Miramontes returned to the U.S. practice in 2003. He can speak to the importance of diversity in career choices, as they’ve played an essential role in his development.

Reflecting diversity “The world continues to change,” Miramontes says. “We’re working with multiple countries, languages, ethnicities, backgrounds, and geographies. Our clients are more diverse. The KPMG team needs to reflect that diversity. “Leadership awareness, understanding, and focus on diversity are so important,” he says. “While tracking the pace of globalization and the pace outside KPMG, our leaders have stepped up and enacted changes to embed diversity into our organization.” According to a recent Public Accounting Report survey, college professors ranked KPMG number one among Big Four public accounting firms when it comes to diversity. Miramontes says, “To have that kind of impact on professors is amazing. That will help with recruiting, retention, and perception.”

lou miramontes office managing partner, san francisco co-chair, hispanic/latino network

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Encouraging and supporting diversity also is essential to employee retention and to KPMG being a great place to work

March/april 2008

and build a career. To that end, KPMG has a long-standing relationship with ALPFA that benefits its people and the next generation. In 2007, KPMG and ALPFA co-sponsored the two-day national Audit Case Study Competition for the seventh year. About 40 students from seven schools looked at complex accounting problems, identified issues, researched problems, and presented their solutions. For many years, KPMG also has served as a corporate sponsor of the ALPFA national convention. “ALPFA is the premier networking and leadership organization for Latinos,” Miramontes says. “We have a strong relationship with the organization because we share their values.”

Enhancing the chance for success “An affiliation with a diversity group, internal or external, can really enhance our people’s chance for success,” he says. “In the case of ALPFA, our people can interact with other people like themselves, share challenges, discuss opportunities, and build their business and social networks. “Clearly there are cultural differences between groups,” Miramontes says. “Some people might say that’s a barrier, but I disagree. Recognizing those differences, leveraging them, and turning them into opportunities falls in line with what I believe in and what KPMG stands for. Appreciating differences has definitely helped me in my career.”


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Angela Avant didn’t start her career at KPMG. But it didn’t take her long to find her way to the firm, begin a quick rise to partner, and become a leader of KPMG’s African-American Network and the National Association of Black Accountants, Inc. (NABA). Today, Avant points to the creation of the African-American Network in 2006 as a demonstration of the firm’s commitment to diversity. “This national network works to unearth, understand, and act on issues. We’ve made great progress.” She also is proud of KPMG’s long-standing relationship with NABA. Avant served as the national president of NABA for three years and is encouraged by KPMG’s continued commitment to diversity groups, inside and outside the firm.

Like Miramontes, Avant knows diversity is essential. “For KPMG to serve its global clients well, we need a global workforce. Today, clients demand to work with people that mirror their organizations. And diversity enables us to do that.

Many of the KPMG events at the NABA Convention focused on making connections and on career development. “The convention is a valuable networking and learning opportunity,” Avant says. “Our professionals make important connections both inside and outside the firm.” African-American Network member Stanley Beckley, a senior associate in Miami, attended the NABA Convention and helped run an effective interviewing seminar for students from the Audit Case Study Competition.

“KPMG encourages diversity in the workplace,” Beckley says. “I believe encouraging diversity is much more than just having it written in a policy. KPMG puts its money where its mouth is, and that shows we’re really committed.” “We have a good national infrastructure in place,” Avant says. “To supplement those national activities and the NABA events, one of our 2008 goals is to increase the number of local networks. This ensures continuous learning, development, and networking.”

At the 2007 NABA Convention, KPMG sponsored more than 200 partners’ and professionals’ attendance, the largest KPMG turnout so far. KPMG also sponsored the fourth annual National Audit Case Study Competition at NABA. (See Miramontes, opposite page).

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angela avant partner, washington, d.c. co-chair, African-American network

“With a diverse workforce, we have the opportunity to expand the realm of thinking and the perspectives that come into play. We end up with better solutions because of the thinking of diverse people.” “It’s important to remember that no two people think alike,” she continues. “With a diverse workforce, we have the opportunity to expand the realm of thinking and the perspectives that come into play. We end up with better solutions because of the thinking of diverse people. And that has a powerful outcome for our firm, our people, and our clients.”

What’s the most rewarding part of being affiliated with NABA and the firm’s diversity networks? Avant says it’s seeing the progress people make. “As I see people advance in their careers, and develop professionally and personally, it’s rewarding to know that I played a small role in that. It confirms that our efforts are worth it and making a difference.”

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The Howard Relationship A strong, long-standing relationship between KPMG and Howard University has enriched both institutions, says Barron Harvey, dean of the university’s School of Business.

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“KPMG is very involved here — you can see the firm’s presence all over the campus. If KPMG just wrote a check, Howard’s School of Business would not be the school it is today.” Howard, based in Washington, D.C., is one of the nation’s oldest and most prestigious Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Harvey has been at Howard’s business school for 24 years, the last 15 as dean. “Over the past decade, KPMG has been one of the two most involved public accounting firms on campus,” Harvey says. “Our relationship enables us to provide a more qualitative education to our students and faculty. KPMG benefits through its recruiting efforts here, attracting more and better educated minorities — AfricanAmericans in particular.” KPMG sponsors the school’s Executive Leadership Honors Program, which pro40

Barron harvey dean, howard university school of business

vides students with leadership training, mentoring, and a business case competition. The firm also provides scholarships, works with the Beta Gamma Sigma Business Honor Society at the school, schedules field visits, and supports the National Association of Black Accountants, Inc. on campus.

An instrumental figure in developing both the firm’s relationship with the school, and the school itself, is Frank Ross, who retired from KPMG five years ago as Midatlantic Area managing partner for Assurance and managing partner of the Washington, D.C., office.

“KPMG is very involved here — you can see the firm’s presence all over the campus.” To help students learn about the latest developments in the world of accounting, KPMG shares some of its most recent business cases with the school. “KPMG doesn’t just help us update our classes,” Harvey says. “It also helps us develop new classes that capture the latest trends in the business world.”

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Ross began to work with the School of Business in 1979, when he took over Howard’s account. The following year, he began teaching at the school. Upon retiring from KPMG, Ross accepted Harvey’s offer to be visiting professor and director at the business school’s Center for Accounting Education. The center seeks to increase the number and retention


Special Feature

KPMG

Frank Ross: Pioneer rate of minorities within the accounting profession, and to raise the number of minority CPAs. A small number of “stakeholders,” including KPMG, sponsor the center. “Frank is a trailblazer,” Harvey says. “He has taught here for 26 years and is one of our most popular teachers. Frank is not just an asset to Howard but also to the profession.” One of Ross’s many achievements at the school occurred in 2002, when the KPMG Foundation helped create the KPMG Frank Ross Professorship, underwriting it with a $650,000 endowment. Harvey is the first recipient of the professorship, which he calls “one of the highlights of my career.” Harvey says, “KPMG understands our mission and our goals. The firm is helping our school give our students a strong academic foundation along with the essential life skills they need to enter the profession and successfully progress through the rest of their lives.” Harvey recalls how Tim Flynn, KPMG chairman and CEO, came to Chicago some years ago to address a professional development program the school was sponsoring. “The students were so impressed with Tim’s enthusiasm, what he had to say, and his interest in them. They came away saying, ‘He really wants us to be successful.’”

In December 1969, nine African-American accountants met in Frank Ross’s living room in New York and created the National Association of Black Accountants, Inc. (NABA).

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Three years earlier, Ross had joined Peat Marwick, a forerunner of KPMG, as the firm’s second black accountant. The major accounting firms had, for the first time, cracked open their doors to African-Americans. Ross believed, once inside, he should help open the doors wider. Helping to found NABA — he also served as its first president — was an important step. He took many more at KPMG, until he retired in 2003, and at Howard University’s School of Business, where he has taught since 1980. “There were no role models in accounting when I grew up,” Ross says. He had to navigate his own way.

frank ross

director, center for accounting education In 1979, Ross transferred to the howard university school of business Washington, D.C., office, where he would eventually rise to managing partner and become a member of KPMG’s board of directors and chairman of the board for the KPMG Foundation.

In Washington, D.C., Ross became partner on the Howard University account, and he began to cultivate the relationship between the firm and one of the nation’s foremost Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Through Ross’s guidance, Howard and KPMG fostered several programs over the years for top students. In 1980, Ross accepted a pro bono adjunct faculty position to teach auditing at Howard’s School of Business. After retiring from KPMG, Ross took over as director of the school’s Center for Accounting Education. “My goal,” he says, “was to re-establish the center so it focuses on helping African-Americans to enter and remain in the accounting profession, to become CPAs as soon as possible, and to help their upward mobility.” At the end of Ross’s autobiography, Quiet Guys Can Do Great Things, Too, he wrote, “The greatest contribution any of us can make to mankind is to find a way to make a difference, to leave this world a better place than we found it. We do that by touching another human being in some significant way.”

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Special Feature

KPMG

The KPMG Diversity Advisory Board The following partners serve on the Diversity Advisory Board.

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Special Feature

First row, left to right:

third row, left to right:

Angela Avant

Milford McGuirt

African-American Network co-chair partner, advisory

African-American Network co-chair partner, audit

ANNA BAIRD

Lou Miramontes

women’s advisory board member partner, advisory

Hispanic/latino Network co-chair office managinig partner, san francisco

Manolet Dayrit

Bruce Pfau

Asian Pacific Islander Network co-chair principal, advisory

Vice Chair, Human Resources

Manny Fernandez Hispanic/Latino Network co-chair national managing partner, University Relations and Recruiting

KPMG

Tim Stiles Pride@KPMG (GLBT) co-chair principal, tax

fourth row, left to right: second row, left to right:

Dana Foote Disabilities Network co-chair partner, audit

Kathy hopinkah Hannan diversity advisory board Co-chair women’s advisory board chair midwest area managing partner, tax

lord michael hastings

John Tantillo Pride@KPMG (GLBT) co-chair partner, advisory

Jack Taylor diversity advisory board Co-chair executive vice chair, operations

Norio TAkeda Asian Pacific Islander Network co-chair partner, audit

global head of citizenship and diversity

Shaun Kelly Disabilities Network co-chair Vice chair, tax

To learn more about diversity initiatives at KPMG, visit www.us.kpmg.com/about/diversity.asp For career information, visit www.us.kpmg.com/careers

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viewpoint

A Downturn Economy = Greater Need for Effective Diversity Management By Melanie Harrington President American Institute for Managing Diversity, Inc.

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Like many of you, I have listened to the news pundits banter back and forth over the leading economic indicators. Whether they conclude that we are or are not yet in a recession, everyone seems to be hunkering down for a pretty bad economic spell. So what does this mean for the Chief Diversity Officer and her team? She may be asked to demonstrate the bottom-line benefits of her diversity management strategy. We often lecture organizations that cut resources to the diversity office or whose diversity efforts have sputtered and stalled. Many of the lectures are warranted. However, by the time the lectures are given, the damage and lost momentum have already occurred. The CDO finds herself having to start all over again, gathering resources, fostering buy-in, and establishing credibility. Challenging times provide an opportunity for a leader to show her true value to the organization. This is when wellinformed, strategic contributors from the diversity office must offer a way to advance the survival plan. Here are some thoughts on how best to proceed. STEP 1: Revisit your business case for diversity management. For the CDO whose case for diversity was never really put to the test or based on “the right thing to do,” she should immediately pull out her business case statement and determine if it is relevant to the organization’s objectives and if it adequately enumerates a solution that the diversity office is uniquely suited to address. The solution should have measureable consequences that are relevant to achieving the desired state. If the organization never created a business case for its diversity work, then it is time to get started. STEP 2: Revisit your current diversity management strategy. The CDO should review her strategy and ask these questions. Is the work a hodgepodge of initiatives that individually may be interesting and fun but do not collectively evidence a strategy designed to advance the organization’s desired state? Is the strategy a great piece of literature that should be on the must read lists of universities but impractical for the business? Does the strategy connect the dots between the proposed work and the organization’s mission? Does the strategy have the right balance of specifics and flexibility? Does it include metrics to assess whether the strategy is working?

STEP 3: Assess the execution of the diversity management strategy. The CDO should assess the results of the organization’s past and current diversity work. If the organization has diversity practitioners managing pieces of the organization’s diversity strategy, she should pull everyone together and examine the results against the strategic objectives. If the organization has expended a great deal of time and energy on numerous activities that have not advanced the objectives, the CDO’s challenge at the decisionmaking table may be more difficult but not insurmountable. Businesses are in a constant search for today’s formula for success. The CDO should commence work on steps 1 and 2 and devise a stronger implementation plan with accountability measures. If the execution of your strategy has resulted in successes that have advanced business objectives, whether by inches or leaps and bounds, add this evidence to your business case. Leverage the wins to justify support for the current strategy. STEP 4: Go to the decision-making table prepared. When departments are fighting over limited resources, the CDO may find herself negotiating to secure the budget, resources, and authority that she needs. If the CDO is invited to the decisionmaking table or if she invites herself, she should have a request list prepared and prioritized. She should demonstrate a thorough understanding of the new economic environment and its impact on the business. She should know exactly what resources she will need and offer ideas and even compromises that position her as a team player. She should be prepared to justify each requested item and articulate, with specificity, the consequences if she is not provided the sufficient support and resources needed. In a time when the global marketplace is waiting for the next shoe to drop, this is the time for the CDO to empower the workforce with the ability to access the diverse range of talent in the workforce and opportunities in the marketplace. If your business is stymied by its inability to manage differences and similarities effectively, then it will be eclipsed by others that can.

PDJ About AIMD The American Institute for Managing Diversity, Inc. is the nation’s leading nonprofit think tank dedicated to furthering the field of diversity management. Founded by Dr. R. Roosevelt Thomas, Jr., in 1984, AIMD conducts educational programs including leadership education through the Diversity Leadership Academy®, does cutting edge research, and hosts an array of conferences around the world. AIMD creates unique learning environments for the public and produces research, tools and information that facilitate diversity management among its organizations, communities, and the general public. Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

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my turn

What Keeps Diversity Professionals Up at Night? By Shirley A. Davis, PhD

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Director of Diversity and Inclusion Initiatives Society for Human Resource Management

I am honored to have been asked to write a series of articles on the hot topics that diversity and inclusion practitioners say are the most relevant issues and challenges they face today. As director of D&I initiatives at the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), I have the unique opportunity to travel across the United States and around the world speaking about this important work. Everywhere I go, people are keenly interested in the business value proposition of diversity and inclusion (D&I) work. They want to know the specific ways in which D&I work helps achieve an organization’s business objectives. I am asked this same question over and over. At a recent diversity conference, one of my colleagues and a recognized pioneer in the field, Mary-Frances Winters, pointed out that “after 25 years in this field, practitioners are asking the same questions they were asking 25 years ago.” What a powerful observation. The most common questions I am asked include the most basic, such as, what is diversity? or, what is the business case for diversity? Others who may have just been tapped to create a diversity strategy ask, how do I get started? Others want to know how to recruit diverse talent, how to get senior leaders engaged in diversity, or how to get white men to embrace diversity. Still others ask, how do I articulate the value of our diversity efforts? Do these questions sound familiar? These questions and similar challenges are literally keeping HR and D&I professionals up at night as they confront and agonize over these issues. The daunting tasks diversity practitioners take on stay with us long after we leave the office. They are present on our commute home, at the dinner table, in the shower, and as we lay down for the night. It has become a common practice to ask CEOs, “What keeps you up at night?” But it has become evident that D&I practitioners may be suffering from insomnia themselves.

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Having reflected on the array of questions that practitioners keep asking, I have identified ten issues or challenges that keep us up at night. Briefly summarized below (in no particular order), I’ll be addressing each topic in subsequent issues this year. • Becoming more strategic and less transactional. Many HR and diversity professionals spend most of their time on administrative transactions, tactics, and putting out fires. We should be devoting 80 percent of our time on strategy with the CEO and senior line leaders. • Aligning with key business objectives. We all say that CEO and senior leadership engagement is critical to the success of diversity initiatives. However, when I ask an audience how many of you can name the top three business objectives in your organizations, less than 10 percent of them admit that they can. Herein lies part of the problem of getting buy-in. When our work directly and clearly aligns with these objectives, the CEO and senior leaders will want to be engaged. • Recruiting top talent and building a pipeline with leadership capability. Demographic shifts, marketplace competition, and globalization place more complex demands on recruiting. Attracting talent and building leadership capability start with creating an organizational culture that makes candidates want to come and employees want to stay. • Establishing an inclusive culture. Inclusion at SHRM is defined as the state of the workplace where all individuals can contribute fully towards the organization’s success, where they are treated fairly and respectfully and have equal access to opportunities and resources. Achieving this requires a disciplined systems approach to cultural and behavioral change. • Globalization. This affects you, regardless of whether your organization is located entirely in one building or around the world. Consider your organization’s talent pool, supply chain, product and service development processes, markets, and competitors. Some aspects are inevitably global. Your employees must be effective communicating and working in this increasingly interconnected global business environment.


It has become a common practice to ask CEOs, “What keeps you up at night?” But it has become evident that D&I practitioners may be

suffering from insomnia themselves.

• Practitioners’ skills, competence, and personal well-being. Diversity practitioners typically have several roles and wear many hats. Many of us have suffered from what some diversity experts (i.e., Dr. R. Roosevelt Thomas, Jr., and Dr. Johnetta B. Cole) refer to as “diversity fatigue.” We must manage our own personal and professional development as well as manage our own stress while helping our organizations become stress-less. • The rising health care costs. In 2006, health care expenses for U.S. companies were estimated to be $8,400 per employee! We must find ways to manage this while ensuring that care is provided in culturally-appropriate ways to our increasinglydiverse workforce. • Religion and spirituality. This is about personal deeply-held beliefs that may or may not relate to an organized religion and that may or may not include God or a higher power. Conversation about religion, spirituality, and faith is increasing in the workplace. As practitioners, we will be called on to address issues such as holiday observances, food, prayers, complaints, and affinity groups in our workplaces. • Immigration. Immigration is certainly a mainstream issue and is likely to be a major issue in this year’s elections. Our challenge is to be aware of these evolving trends and issues and to ensure that the right people in our organizations stay current on new laws and regulations and plan accordingly.

• Legal risks and reputation. Over the past 10 years, race and gender discrimination lawsuits have cost U.S. corporations more than $974 million in settlements alone, not including attorney fees, decreased market capitalization and other costs. Likewise, religious discrimination complaints are on the rise; the fight for equal rights and fair treatment of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender workers has become more pronounced; and people with disabilities continue to feel misunderstood and underutilized in the workplace. As a result, we have to develop collaborative working relationships across the organization and establish consistent and inclusive policies, practices, and programs to help manage these risks and our organization’s reputation. Our choice as practitioners is either to ignore these issues and let them come knocking at our door or to understand them and take action by building and implementing the appropriate management plans. Choosing the latter may help us sleep better at night.

PDJ Shirley A. Davis, PhD, is Director of Diversity and Inclusion Initiatives for the Society for Human Resource Management in Alexandria, Virginia. She can be reached at sadavis@shrm.org. Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

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DIVERSITY determines a company’s success.

Eastman Kodak Company is committed to becoming a truly diverse corporation. Embracing the ideals of diversity enables us to better meet the needs of our customers, employees, suppliers, and the communities in which we live and work. All of which ensures our continued success in the global marketplace.

www.kodak.com/go/supplierdiversity Š Eastman Kodak Company, 2007


&

questionanswer

with

Robert Spencer Jr. Entergy’s Director of Talent Management and Inclusion gives us a glimpse of what the company stands for and what it is doing to advance diversity, inclusion, and opportunity in some of the most poverty-stricken communities of the country. Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

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Interview

Robert Spencer Jr.

Entergy

In 1987, Entergy became the first electric utility holding company to commit to the NAACP’s Fair Share Principles. The company has never lost sight of its commitment to diversity and has continued to invest in programs and initiatives that benefit the communities it serves. Please describe your company’s global presence and the scope and scale of Entergy Corporation to a reader who may not be familiar with it.

Entergy Corporation is an integrated energy company engaged primarily in electric power production and retail distribution operations. Entergy owns and operates power plants with approximately 30,000 megawatts of electric generating capacity, and it is the second-largest nuclear generator in the United States. Entergy operates twelve nuclear units at ten plant sites: • Arkansas Nuclear One, Units 1 and 2, near Russellville, Ark. • Cooper, in Brownville, Neb. • James A. FitzPatrick, in Oswego County, N.Y. • Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, in Port Gibson, Miss. • Indian Point Energy Center, Units 2 and 3, in Westchester County, N.Y. • Palisades, in Covert, Mich. • Pilgrim Nuclear Station, in Plymouth, Mass. • River Bend Station, in St. Francisville, La. • Vermont Yankee, in Vernon, Vt. • Waterford 3, in Taft, La. Entergy delivers electricity to 2.7 million utility customers in Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas. Entergy has annual revenues of more than $11 billion, and approximately 14,300 employees. Please give us your definition of diversity and inclusion, as it relates to the efforts within your organization.

The mission of Entergy is to create a winning culture that can only be achieved in an environment that fosters the creativity, productivity, and mutual respect of all people. This culture is supported from the office of the CEO and down throughout the organization. At Entergy, diversity and inclusion is valued and fostered through numerous programs and initiatives that position the company as an employer of choice, a business partner of choice, and a good corporate citizen. At Entergy, we recognize that diversity is a business imperative that helps to achieve business results. We understand that in order to be a leader, not only in our industry but also across all businesses, we must go

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beyond simply accepting “equal opportunity” as a legal requirement. We must value and embrace diversity as a strategic competitive advantage. In order to do this, we must develop and promote leadership capable of managing in a diverse environment. Diversity is important because we are changing. The U.S. population is becoming increasingly diverse, and the traditional definition of diversity—race, gender, and age—has evolved appropriately to include anything that makes us different from one another. We are a “melting pot,” not only of ideas, but also of various races, religions, languages, and cultural groups. We are collectively stronger through an inclusive culture. Entergy is committed to not only create and maintain, but also leverage and value the richness of a diverse workforce so that every employee has an equal opportunity to contribute in significant ways to the effectiveness of the organization. Our employees are highly regarded for valuing others and promoting the right of every person to reach his or her full potential; that means integrating our values into our daily interactions and behaviors.

COMPANY Name: Entergy Corporation Headquarters: 639 Loyola Avenue, New Orleans, La. 70113 Web site: www.entergy.com Primary Business or Industry: Utility Industry ranking: Fortune #225 Annual Revenue: $11 billion


Interview

Robert Spencer Jr.

Entergy

An animated Robert Spencer Jr. (right), Director, Talent Management and Inclusion, discusses staffing strategy with his team (left to right): Ramona Kudla, Bryan Rivera, and Angelina Simmons.

In today’s marketplace, does Entergy have any particular cultural, socioeconomic, or demographic challenges to selling, producing, or delivering services? What particular challenges do you face in hiring and retaining good people?

Entergy serves one of the most poverty-stricken regions of the nation. The devastating storms of 2005, hurricanes Katrina and Rita, only compounded the socioeconomic challenges within Entergy’s utility service territory. Between 20 and 30 percent of Entergy’s 2.6 million utility customers fall below the poverty line. Many factors contribute to this pervasive problem. In Entergy’s utility region there has been a persistent lack of jobs, quality education and health care for decades. Our company’s focus has been on advocating and supporting actions that offer substantive, lasting solutions such as public benefit funds, weatherization and energy efficiency programs, and support for Individual Development Accounts, the child tax credit and the earned-income tax credit, which can all make a meaningful financial difference in our customers’ lives. The company also invests in programs that address educational opportunities for those living in our service area. These programs not only benefit our customers, but also add to the pool of potential candidates from which we can hire. Most recently the company has taken major steps to increase our partnerships with high schools and vocational and technical schools, in addition to colleges and universities. These partnerships, and our collaboration on curriculum to build a skilled workforce, ensure a future talent pool. Competition for this valuable skilled labor will only be compounded as we face the bubble of Baby Boomers entering retirement in the utility industry. Do you have any examples of how tapping employee diversity has yielded significant product or profit breakthroughs? Inter-business synergies?

Actually the best example of us tapping diversity as a business advantage is the relationship we have developed with the NAACP. In 1987, Entergy became the first electric utility holding company in the nation to commit to the NAACP’s Fair Share Principles. Since then Entergy has made a concerted effort to partner with the NAACP in our efforts to increase our supplier diversity efforts and connect to the diverse community we serve. Entergy sponsors a dinner for the local NAACP chapters within our service territory at the national NAACP conference. This dinner has been very well received over the years and continues to grow. This relationship has proven to be extremely beneficial to Entergy.

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Interview

Robert Spencer Jr.

Entergy

Does Entergy address diversity in its annual Is it important to talk about diversity with shareholders?

report?

The company’s commitment to diversity is addressed in the 2006 annual report, which states: “As we refined our financial aspirations, we also reaffirmed our societal aspirations. We are convinced that being a leader in environmental excellence, meeting the particular needs of our low-income customers and fostering a safe, inclusive work environment are more important than ever to the long-term success of our company and our society.

CORPORATE LEADERSHIP What resources (financial and manpower) are allocated on diversity? How do these reflect your company’s leadership commitment to diversity?

At Entergy, corporate inclusion initiatives are directed primarily by the Talent Management and Inclusion organization, under my leadership as the director, and with the assistance of the manager of inclusion initiatives. The CEO has also commissioned an executive diversity council, comprised of leaders from major business units within the company. Diversity and inclusion efforts are supported at the grassroots level by the company’s 20-plus diversity and inclusion councils and affinity groups. Our goal is to integrate diversity and inclusion as part of Entergy’s everyday business practices. We work diligently to give the message to management and line employees that we expect every employee to take ownership of creating a diverse and inclusive environment. We feel that every employee possesses the capacity to be a champion of diversity and inclusion.

We also aspire to a workforce that reflects the diversity of our communities. We have a diversity strategy that positions our company as an employer of choice, a business partner of choice and a good corporate citizen. The commitment to create an environment that fosters creativity, productivity and mutual respect for all people reaches from the office of our CEO throughout our entire organization. We believe there is no substitute for the experience and insight of a diverse, focused Entergy team.”

The company’s societal goals as well as diversity and inclusion efforts are also addressed in a companion to our annual report—the 2006 Sustainability Report. Do you have any programs in place to increase the cross-cultural competence of your senior management team? Can mid-level managers acquire similar training?

When we began our diversity and inclusion journey several years ago, all senior management completed face-to-face diversity and inclusion training titled “Leading a Diverse Organization.” In subsequent years, Entergy has provided an intensive face-to-face training for the rest of our company leaders. Once all leaders completed this training, refresher training in the form of Web-based diversity and inclusion modules was made available, and we mandated that all new employees complete a similar Web-based training program, as well. Additionally, all company leaders have access to the Diversity Manager’s Toolkit. The Toolkit, which is updated regularly with new features, provides Entergy supervisors with direct access to a host of online resources related to diversity management. How are decisions about diversity made in your organization? Is there a diversity council and who heads it up? Who participates?

Linemen working hard to get the lights back on.

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Entergy has adopted a firm commitment to inclusion that is supported by our executive diversity council and the other 20-plus diversity and inclusion councils across Entergy, which are comprised of a broad array of employees from executive management to frontline employees and from every business unit. Diversity and inclusion issues are acknowledged and addressed at each level of the company, with the employeesponsored councils responsible for planning events, training seminars, and programs that support inclusion and corporate diversity. Entergy has also endorsed affinity groups within the organization. These are also employee-led with executive sponsorship.


Interview

Robert Spencer Jr.

Entergy

Robert Spencer Jr. Company: Entergy Title: Director of Talent Management and Inclusion Years in current position: Five Education: Bachelor’s degree in business from the University of HoustonDowntown; master’s degree in management from Texas A&M University and a law degree from South Texas College of Law. Advice to “new” diversity leaders: Sleep Less, Be Organized, and Have the Right Support First job: Grocery sacker in high school. Philosophy: Under-Promise Over-Deliver What I’m reading: The Purpose-Driven Church, by Rick Warren Family: Single Interests: Horseback riding, the stock market, politics Childhood hero: Wide Receiver Drew Pearson—Dallas Cowboys “Best” picture (film/art): Raiders of the Lost Ark My music: Kenny G

Desk-drawer munchies: Nature Valley Sweet and Salty Nut Granola Bars Favorite charity: Volunteer Houston

Favorite game: Any sports video game

Person (historical/fictional/actual) I’d like to get to know over lunch: Bill Clinton

How did you get to your present position? What was your career path? I began my career as an HR professional for a Fortune 500 natural gas company. In those days, HR managed diversity by default without a position focused on this area. After law school, I had a position focused on ethics and corporate social responsibility. It was at that time that I saw the value of including diversity as an important principle in the building of effective business practices.

How are you (as a manager) measured in terms of performance? Is your compensation related to diversity performance? Our Chairman and CEO is known for saying he believes support for diversity and inclusion by any leader at Entergy is a condition of employment. We measure how leaders achieve results, not just the results they achieve. My performance is measured on how well I impact the company’s ability to achieve its business objectives as well as how I improve the programs and processes in my area of responsibility.

Who were/are your mentors? What about their business skill or style influenced you? How did they help in your professional and personal life? Are you mentoring anyone today? Two of my early key mentors were administrators in student services at my undergraduate school. Their influence convinced me that I wanted to work in a people-oriented profession. Later I had a mentor who impressed on me the importance of looking the part and managing the impressions of those around you, even while you focus on flawless execution. Today I mentor a former staff member of mine who keeps in touch on a regular basis.

What are your specific responsibilities for advancing diversity and inclusion in your organization? What are the strategies you employ to move inclusion forward? I have oversight of the recruitment, staffing, succession planning, and workforce planning functions for Entergy. Through our recruitment and staffing functions, I have the ability to ensure that we are attracting the most talented and diverse pool of candidates available. Having oversight of our succession planning process gives me influence in how diverse talent moves throughout our organization. In my interactions with management at all levels of the organization, including our board of directors and executives, I leverage this responsibility to push the principles of diversity and inclusion across the company. In addition, I have a manager of inclusion initiatives who works directly with our 25 diversity and inclusion councils, as well as our affinity groups, to promote these same principles at the local level.

Are there particular areas/employee sectors you feel still need improvement? As a utility we work in an environment traditionally dominated by males. We must continue our efforts through mediums such as the Entergy Women of Color and Women in Nuclear affinity groups to attract and retain more female candidates.

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Interview

Robert Spencer Jr.

Entergy

Entergy crews repairing hurricane-damaged lines.

EMPLOYEE INCLUSIVENESS How does Entergy gauge inclusion of employees? What are the tests, measurements and benchmarks (metrics) that indicate where the company is on the inclusion graph?

In addition to assessing regular diversity representation reports, Entergy conducts companywide employee surveys every 18 months or so to gauge employee satisfaction and engagement. This survey includes various questions related to inclusiveness, developmental opportunities, and employee empowerment. To help facilitate the successful attainment of Entergy’s diversity mission, the company has created a companywide diversity and inclusion scorecard. The scorecard measures each business unit’s adoption of Entergy’s inclusion strategy. It also provides guidelines and activities for management to demonstrate leadership in creating an inclusive environment. The scorecard helps business units develop initiatives that align with the diversity mission and the company’s business plan by directing them to target the following focus areas: • Leadership Initiatives—Focusing on opportunities identified by the leadership that promote an inclusive workforce; promoting diversity and inclusion internally as well as externally. • Communication and Education—Focusing on activities that the leadership and diversity councils are engaging in to communicate and educate the workforce on diversity and inclusion initiatives. • Diversity and Inclusion Training—Focusing on training activities and utilizing available training resources such as mandatory training for newly hired full-time employees, optional ongoing training resources for all employees, and a soon-to-be-released diversity toolkit for all supervisors and above. • Career and Succession Planning—Focusing on activities to develop the talent in the organization and utilizing available resources such as the career planning tool, mentoring program, succession planning tool, cross functional development. • Diversity and Inclusion Council Effectiveness—Ensuring that business units have an active and engaged diversity and inclusion council that is supported by their leadership.

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• Recruiting and Retention—Focusing on activities to bring new employees into the workforce and proactively promote, transfer, develop, and retain the existing workforce. • Employee Engagement—Focusing on activities to ensure that employees are engaged and satisfied with their work and with the company. • Employee Demographics—Focusing on activities the business unit is engaging in to make progress toward creating a more diverse workforce. We were extremely pleased in 2005 when Profiles in Diversity Journal recognized us for the development of our company-wide scorecard. We were named as a winner of the 2005 International Innovation in Diversity Award. Are employees more involved in the company than they were two years ago? In what ways? How are their opinions solicited and valued? Do you have an employee ‘suggestion box’ or other system, and who monitors and responds?

Entergy has embraced social media within the organization. Employees are encouraged to respond with questions on any employee communication via a feedback link on all online employee articles. Face-to-face employee meetings with key leaders within the company are commonplace, including CEO/employee meetings and leadership conferences, which are held every few years.


Interview

Within the company’s nuclear organization, employee concern teams are available to directly address employee questions, feedback, suggestions for improvement, etc. In addition, we develop action plans based on the feedback we receive from our periodic employee surveys. Many of our senior leaders have “Ask Me…” links on their business unit Web pages where employees can send questions directly to their business unit leader for response.

Robert Spencer Jr.

Entergy

Safety is Entergy’s #1 priority.

Can you name specific ways your company supports upward development toward management positions?

The company has a strategy called “Developing U” in which employees have access to career planning courses and tools for all employees, succession planning tools for each business unit, and mentoring programs. A specialized management-training course is available through the company’s employee development department, and employees have access to an executive training course facilitated by the The Hayes Group, an employee tuition reimbursement program, and specialized MBA programs. What is Entergy’s commitment to minority suppliers? Do you have specific goals for spending, either in dollars spent or a percentage of money spent with various suppliers?

In 1987, Entergy became the first electric utility holding company in the nation to commit to the NAACP’s Fair Share Principles. Since then, the company has backed that commitment with consistent performance, spending over $2 billion with minority- and women-owned firms. As the procurement business has moved more to electronic transactions, Entergy has developed a program to incorporate minority- and women-owned firms into its e-commerce plans. Facilities such as our Indian Point Energy Center, located in Westchester County, N.Y., embody Entergy’s commitment to minority- and women-owned business. In 2006 alone, Indian Point spent over $22 million with diverse suppliers. These collective efforts have also won Entergy accolades on the local and national levels. In 2005, Entergy was selected as one of the top 25 companies among 500 major American corporations for our focus on African American representation in senior and middle management, corporate board diversity and overall workforce diversity and inclusion initiatives. In addition, in 2005, our Indian Point Energy Center was recognized as a Champion of Diversity by the New York Urban League. The honor was given to us for our outstanding corporate citizenry, as well as our hiring, vending, promotion and philanthropic practices.

PDJ

The reports mentioned in this article are available on Entergy’s web site: 2006 Annual Report http://www.entergy.com/content/investor_relations/pdfs/2006ARFINAL.pdf 2006 Sustainability Report http://www.entergy.com/content/our_community/pdfs/sustainability_report_06.pdf Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

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guest column

Diversity: More Than Just Representation By Susan Meisinger President and CEO Society for Human Resource Management

D

Diversity. Both the term and poor customer service, and lawsuits. Indeed, more and the concept have become integral more successful leaders see diversity as a necessary part of to the global social and business sustaining the enterprise. landscape. However, despite grow- This isn’t to say that diversity management is easy. On ing recognition that the manage- the contrary, it’s full of complexities and ambiguities. But ment of a diverse workforce is a business imperative, the complexity should not deter organizations from moving concept continues to evolve. We know from our research forward and integrating diversity management into busithat many organizations are still grappling with what diver- ness objectives such as talent acquisition and retention, market expansion and penetration, globalization, learning sity is and what it is not. Even today, many organizations focus their diversity ef- and change, new products and services development, and forts solely on issues around representation and compliance. customer acquisition and quality service. If their workforce includes a certain number of women, The organization’s chief executive should be the champion for valuing diversity and blacks, Hispanics or inclusion and must establish this other ethnic minorities The organization’s chief executive attitude and the associated beand their hiring polihaviors as a standard for everyone cies are in strict comshould be the champion for in the organization. HR should pliance with the law, then they believe their valuing diversity and inclusion ensure that the chief executive understands the importance of this “diversity strategy” is and must establish this attitude role. There is no question that our a success. understanding of the challenges But a successful and the associated behaviors and opportunities presented by diversity strategy also as a standard for everyone in a more diverse workforce has must focus on achievsignificantly advanced over the ing strategic business the organization. past decade. The world around results and look for us continues to change, and new ways to leverage dibusiness strategies are needed. verse groups of workers to create new opportunities for success. Inclusion must be Human resource and diversity professionals must a key output of this process. A truly inclusive workplace, ensure that their organizations and their leadership where each employee’s contributions are valued, leveraged teams are prepared for a rapidly transforming population and appreciated, generates opportunities for growth, flex- and business climate. The ability to effectively manage ibility, greater adaptability and, often, more creative prob- diversity—in a business context—will be a key lever for creating a competitive advantage and building lem solving. When employees’ differences are not valued or man- organizational sustainability. aged effectively, the results can include reduced productivity, disengaged workers, high turnover, lost customers or

PDJ

Susan Meisinger is President and CEO of the Society for Human Resource Management in Alexandria, Virginia. This article is reprinted with permission from SHRM. 56

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Some call it diversity. To us, it’s a business plan.

When you serve over 200 million weekly customers, including 13 markets outside the U.S., diversity isn’t an option. It’s not only the right thing to do – it’s the right way to build your business. Our 1.9 million associates need leadership in merchandising, marketing, information services, finance, and logistics. So we actively recruit leaders with diverse backgrounds, individual skills, and lots of enthusiasm. If that sounds like you, please visit us at walmartstores.com/careers.


Leadership. Everyone says it is essential for the success of any diversity practice. No one knows this better than the chief diversity officers who toil daily in the business trenches, making D&I programs thrive. But who are these diversity warriors, and what makes them tick? To find out, we asked several diversity practitioners to share their backgrounds and ideas with us. We didn’t just want their business perspectives—that would be too easy. Instead, we hoped to capture some personal details that would bring each person to life before our eyes. We asked 15 simple questions and got a most fascinating array of answers! We think this collection of personal profiles will help shed light on the common, and not so common, traits shared by these individuals.

Welcome to the world of

Chief Diversity Officers


Who are/were your mentors? What lessons did you learn from them?

My grandmothers, my mother, my brother and the man who hired me for my first professional position all have inspired me to work hard, never give up and to treat everyone with respect.

Anise D. Wiley-Little

Chief Diversity Officer

allstate

Do you teach anything different to those you mentor? If so, what is it?

To learn the organization, its subtleties and how things get done. To keep their standards high and maintain their ethics.

Who in your family had the most impact on your upbringing and success?

My father, a USDA executive and one of the first African-Americans in its finance area, was one role model of many. He taught me that life has no limits, only the limitations that are self-imposed. What are your favorite books/authors and what impact have they had on your career?

White Like Me, by Tim Wise, gave me an early understanding of privilege and how to cope with being a black person first, before any other title. Enlightened Power—How Women Are Transforming the Practice of Leadership, edited by Lin Coughlin, Ellen Wingard and Keith Hollihan, stressed the integration of work and life. As a woman and mother, I don’t have to choose.

Whom do you admire most?

I have been happily married for 23 years to my husband, who is also an executive. I admire his compassion and wisdom. What is your favorite phrase?

“An excuse is a tool of incompetence.” When I was a child, my father said it many times. Today, I never give excuses, nor accept them from others. What is your biggest challenge today – personally, professionally or both?

There can be invisible obstacles for people of color. This requires you to manage your life and career like a chess game, staying one step ahead and making the right moves. Who are your real-life heroes?

My real-life heroes are my kids. They are my harshest critics but give me the most significant praise. Who was your childhood hero?

I admired Billy Holiday and Mahalia Jackson. Tough times disappeared when I listened to their music. What does it take to succeed in your position?

You must understand the business, be open to ideas and perspectives, and be willing to take risks to succeed. What is your first thought when you hear the term “diversity?”

Inclusive diversity is the collective mixture of all our differences and similarities. At Allstate, we respect inclusive diversity as one of our core values. We hold each other personally and professionally accountable.

How are you involved with your community?

I serve as the board president of my local YWCA. What is your philosophy of life?

Make choices, but make them wisely. Learn how to integrate work and life, and always enjoy every moment. You can’t turn back time so don’t take life for granted. What is your most rewarding accomplishment?

Becoming Allstate’s first chief diversity officer, a significant opportunity at a 75-year-old Fortune 50 company. 60

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Anise Wiley-Little reflecting on the topic of women and empowerment with attendees at the YWCA Lake County 6th Annual Circle of Women Luncheon and Symposium


Who are/were your mentors? What lessons did you learn from them?

What was your first paying job?

The best manager I’ve ever worked with told me I needed to leave my job after 13 years. “I don’t think we’re ready for your ideas here,” he said. He gave me the permission I needed to try something new. Do you teach anything different to those you mentor? If so, what is it?

Besides baby-sitting, it was steaming clothes in the most prestigious boutique in my hometown. I hated it, but it made me respect people who work in those kinds of jobs.

I encourage people to figure out who they are, what they want and to be brutally honest with themselves. You can have it all, just usually not at the same time.

What is your biggest challenge today – personally, professionally or both?

Who in your family had the most impact on your upbringing and success?

My parents. I was the oldest girl and the first in my family to attend college. My parents challenged us to learn as much as we could, to question the status quo and to strive for excellence. What are your favorite books/authors and what impact have they had on your career?

Personally, it’s work-life balance. I work too much. Professionally, it’s the knowledge that in many cases the attitudes and business practices I’m trying to change have been years in the making.

Lisa J. Gutierrez Executive Director, Global Diversity

Cummins Inc.

Who are your real-life heroes?

I’ve recently been fascinated by Tom Rath’s and Donald Clifton’s book, How Full Is Your Bucket? It really helped me pilot innovative solutions and strategies that resonated with a highly technical population.

My mom and dad. They sacrificed for their children without hesitation, even moving away from family and friends so their kids would get a better education.

How are you involved with your community?

Who was your childhood hero?

Mainly through Cummins. Many of my volunteer efforts over the years have involved mentoring younger generations in the Hispanic community.

My dad.

What is your philosophy of life?

Be true to God and yourself. Live as if tomorrow were your last day. Do the things today that make a difference. What is your most rewarding accomplishment?

Identifying, interviewing, developing and/or promoting individuals to positions that match their career dreams. Whom do you admire most?

My dad. I think he is one of the most brilliant, visionary, strategic people I have ever met. He never loses sight of his values and principles, and he lives life with the utmost integrity. What is your favorite phrase?

Become the change you want to see in the world.

What does it take to succeed in your position?

You have to know your organization, how it works and who has the influence to make change. I think my experience in sales helps. You identify the customer’s problem and you look for options and consensus. What is your first thought when you hear the term “diversity?”

“Calibrate the gray.” I think that diversity is such a gray area that to be competent at this work, you have to acknowledge up front that this gray is diversity, and then figure out solutions within the gray.

Gutierrez celebrates the Chinese New Year with Cummins Chinese Affinity Group and the public.

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Who are/were your mentors? What lessons did you learn from them?

Terry Yancey-Bragg, EdD Director of Global Employee Engagement and Inclusion

Dupont

I have had many mentors, sometimes as many as seven at a time. No one person can provide everything you may need. The biggest challenge is finding the time, understanding the purpose of the mentoring relationship and making the commitment to the relationship. Do you teach anything different to those you mentor? If so, what is it?

To tell the truth and be open to the truth. Who in your family had the most impact on your upbringing and success?

God doesn’t bless me to keep it to myself. It’s important to share the gifts that God has given me. What is your most rewarding accomplishment?

My most rewarding accomplishment was acquiring my doctorate degree. It was something I had wanted for a long time. It took a while to get there, but with support and love from a lot of people I was able to reach that goal. Now I can share that knowledge with others. Whom do you admire most?

It’s not any one person. I admire people who can be authentic and true to themselves, who feel free enough to be honest with themselves and with others. What is your favorite phrase?

Resistance to what is causes stress. What is your biggest challenge today – personally, professionally or both?

My mother. She struggled through so much adversity in her adult life, but somehow she was able to survive in spite of it. Her adversity made me stronger and more committed to be the best I could be, regardless of adversity.

Professionally, it’s accepting that I can’t change the world all at once. What keeps me up at night is the fact that it’s 2008 and many companies still don’t understand the value of diversity, inclusion and the need for full engagement. Personally, it’s not having enough time with my family.

Who are your favorite authors/books and what impact have they had on your career?

What does it take to succeed in your position?

When and Where I Enter, by Paula J. Giddings, had a profound impact on me as an African-American woman. It was filled with examples of the strength of black women. My favorite author is Maya Angelou. Her adversity and struggles shaped her character and strengthened her as a leader. She didn’t let adversity stop her from believing in herself. How are you involved with your community?

I am active in my church and on several boards, including the March of Dimes, Reading Assist and the International Education Advisory Board. I also teach part time on the college level.

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What is your philosophy of life?

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Building strong relationships, understanding the critical needs of the business and being able to think strategically to impact real change in the organization. What is your first thought when you hear the term “diversity?”

Opportunity and potential.


I AM Patricia Suarez HR Manager Carhartt Member since 2007 “As a SHRM member, I know I am just a click away from the latest trends and developments in HR management from the SHRM online resources.�

Leading People. Leading Organizations. www.shrm.org

08-0083


Kathy Clements Vice President, Culture and Inclusion

Ecolab Inc.

Who are/were your mentors and what lessons did you learn from them?

What is your favorite phrase?

Steve Fritze, Ecolab’s CFO. He helped me understand the power of relationships and encouraged me to get out of my office and network with people.

What was your first paying job?

Do you teach anything different to those you mentor? If so, what is it?

I advise people to network, to hire people who are smarter than they are and different from them, and to delegate.

Who in your family had the most impact on your upbringing and success?

My dad taught me about a strong work ethic and how to balance work and family. He had two jobs but always made it home for dinner. What are your favorite books/authors and what impact have they had on your career?

Earlier in my career, it was Steven Covey’s The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People. More recently, Good to Great, by Jim Collins. How are you involved with your community?

Treat others the way you want to be treated. Waitress at Bridgeman’s Ice Cream Parlor. What is your biggest challenge today – personally, professionally or both?

Professionally, it’s leading the culture and inclusion change initiative at Ecolab. Personally, it’s adjusting to an empty nest for the first time in 21 years! Who are your real-life heroes?

Ordinary people who overcome personal tragedies. Who was your childhood hero?

My mom. She knew how to multitask before that word was coined. She dedicated her life to taking care of our family, and she knew how to keep things together. What does it take to succeed in your position?

Executive alignment on the culture-change vision, a strategy linked to business needs and organizational commitment. Also to make sure we hear the voices of our associates. What is your first thought when you hear the term “diversity?”

The many different characteristics of people. Leveraging diversity is being able to seek out the different voices and perspectives of all people.

I am on the board of the YWCA, involved at church and enjoy mentoring others. What is your philosophy of life?

Take care of your reputation. At the end of the day, that’s all you have. What is your most rewarding accomplishment?

From a professional standpoint, launching Lean Six Sigma (LSS) at Ecolab. Whom do you admire most?

My dad. He started a very successful printing company. His motto was, “Never make money on customers’ mistakes,” or, said another way, “The customer is always right.” 64

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Clements meeting with her mentee at Ecolab.


Who are/were your mentors? What lessons did you learn from them?

One of Ernst & Young’s retired partners was an important mentor to me for the following lessons: 1) Do your best at the assignment you have been given; everything else will take care of itself; and 2) If you don’t look after your own career, no one else will. Do you teach anything different to those you mentor? If so, what is it?

You always have a chance to make an impression or not make an impression. I try to teach people to take the opportunities given to them to shine. Who in your family had the most impact on your upbringing and success?

I believe my parents—and their work ethic—had the most impact on my success. What are your favorite books/authors and what impact have they had on your career?

Good to Great, by Jim Collins. Throughout my career, I’ve seen the importance of creating a culture focused on developing people and top talent, which is discussed in this book. The right people need to be on the bus, and the wrong people need to get off the bus to really go from good to great. How are you involved with your community?

One of the organizations I’m actively involved with is the Toronto Region Immigrant Employment Council (TRIEC), a joint effort by private sector, government and not-for-profit agencies to help immigrants gain employment in their chosen field. What is your philosophy of life?

Doing what is right will work out in the long run. What is your most rewarding accomplishment?

It is especially rewarding to see very capable women and minorities making it to partnership at Ernst & Young and to know that a little nudge, such as mentoring, can really contribute to someone’s longterm success.

Whom do you admire most?

I admire people who give back to their community, especially those who have the ability to get things done. What is your favorite phrase?

“Just do it,” or “Get it done.” What was your first paying job?

I worked in my family’s Chinese food restaurant business. What is your biggest challenge today – personally, professionally or both?

Allan Mark Americas Director, Diversity Strategy and Development

Personally, I am always trying Ernst & Young to balance my travel schedule and family time. Professionally, my biggest challenge—and greatest excitement—comes from getting leaders fully engaged and willing to work on changing small, everyday behaviors. Who are your real-life heroes?

Canada’s former Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau for his intellect, principles, charisma and love of life. One of his greatest legacies is Canada’s multicultural policy. Who was your childhood hero?

Bobby Orr, the great Boston Bruin hockey player, for his skill, team play, sportsmanship and positive attitude. What does it take to succeed in your position?

The ability to be a consensus builder, persistence and a healthy dose of passion about diversity. What is your first thought when hear the term “diversity?”

Fairness and equity.

Mark speaks to senior leaders and minority partners, principals, and directors at Ernst & Young’s Minority Leadership Conference. Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

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Who are/were your mentors? What lessons did you learn from them?

My four grandparents. Each one instilled the value and necessity of social responsibility and looking beyond my own needs. Do you teach anything different to those you mentor? If so, what is it? Jignasha Patel Director, Global Talent Sourcing and Inclusion

Freescale Semiconductor

To recognize strengths and align them to the right roles. To be accountable and follow through on commitments. Who in your family had the most impact on your upbringing and success?

What is your most rewarding accomplishment?

When I was still in law school, I had the opportunity to take an asylum case to court for a Bangladeshi woman. Domestic violence is not often viewed as one of the ways to seek political asylum, but we built a strong case and won! She called years later and said one of her daughters was going to study law because of the difference I had made in her life. Equally rewarding was becoming a mother and fully understanding why it is important to leave the world a better place than I found it. Whom do you admire most?

The impoverished children in India who appreciate the mere gift of existence, give unconditionally of their spirit and generosity, and are so grateful for the opportunities to learn. What is your favorite phrase?

Be the change that you want to see in the world.

My maternal grandmother, who would take me with her to community service projects on a regular basis. These childhood experiences shaped my strong belief that we must help and develop others and be committed to the greater good.

Delivering newspapers in New Jersey. I captured each customer’s delivery preferences on a manual spreadsheet, the first customer-service tool I created. It taught me a great life lesson.

What are your favorite books/authors and what impact have they had on your career?

What is your biggest challenge today – personally, professionally or both?

Geetanjali, by Rabindranath Tagore, various poems in the genre of the human spirit, for capturing the essence of the human spirit. A Fine Balance, by Rohintan Mistry, for beautifully articulating how human beings can have extreme hope even in times of extreme despair.

To be a positive agitator in all aspects of life. To maintain a healthy balance between my professional and personal lives.

How are you involved with your community?

What was your first paying job?

What is your first thought when you hear the term “diversity?”

Diversity is always about having the right people at the table, not having everyone at the table.

I sit on the board of the Miracle Foundation in my community, an organization that strives to end children’s suffering. I also sit on the national board for the Center for Women in Technology and the managing board for the Ravi Foundation. What is your philosophy of life?

Leave the present in better condition. Strive to do my personal best every day, not only as a leader but also as a mother, spouse, daughter and friend. Patel with Caroline Boudreaux, founder and executive director of the Miracle Foundation. 66

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Who are/were your mentors? What lessons did you learn from them?

What was your first paying job?

My mentors range from family members to professional colleagues. They taught me to be authentic in my leadership and personal styles, to keep all things (including crisis) in perspective and to have a good sense of humor.

Telemarketing, attempting to sell additional insurance coverage for washers and dryers.

Do you teach anything different to those you mentor? If so, what is it?

The value of relationships, professional and personal. Who in your family had the most impact on your upbringing and success?

My mother had a strong work ethic and taught me to stand behind the decisions I made. She would say, “If you’re big enough to do it, be big enough to stand behind it.” What are your favorite books/authors and what impact have they had on your career?

One of my favorite books is the Bible. In addition to spiritual guidance, the historical content is fascinating. The examples of ordinary individuals doing the extraordinary remind me that anyone can be called to do great things. How are you involved with your community?

I have recently completed terms on the board of director for two organizations in Kansas City, Mo., and currently volunteer through my daughter’s school and for community activities. What is your philosophy of life?

Be true to yourself. Own up to your mistakes. Live in a way that makes you happy and hurts no one.

What is your biggest challenge today – personally, professionally or both?

My biggest challenge professionally is sustaining the momentum for our diversity initiatives. We have been at this work for more than 20 years, but there is still work to be done. My challenge personally is keeping the right balls in the air for the right amount of time, and remembering it’s OK to remove a ball or two!

Vickie Harris

Director of Corporate Diversity

Hallmark Cards, Inc.

Who was your childhood hero?

My childhood cartoon hero was Bugs Bunny, who had a strong sense of right and wrong and only got into trouble when absolutely necessary (smile). Bugs also used his brains and quick wit to outsmart his foes. What does it take to succeed in your position?

Passion, tenacity, influence and flexibility. Passion is critical. Tenacity, because the wins often come slowly. Influence, because we’re educating and persuading. Flexibility, because we are all at different points in our diversity journey.

What is your most rewarding accomplishment?

What is your first thought when you hear the term “diversity?”

The birth of my daughters. Being blessed to bring forth life and to raise people who are so much like you, yet so different, is a blast (most of the time).

Jelly beans and crayons. Each brings its uniqueness to make the whole yummy and colorful. My other thought is “difference, and that’s great.”

Whom do you admire most?

Outside of family and friends, I admire individuals who stand firm in the face of adversity.

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© 2008 Lockheed Martin Corporation

BETWEEN THE CHALLENGE AND THE SOLUTION, T H E R E I S O N E I M P O R TA N T W O R D : H O W.

Diversity. It’s not a goal. It’s a necessity. When facing down the most important projects in the world, you need fresh ideas. And unique perspectives. Delivering the most complete answers to solve complex problems is all a question of how. And it is the how that makes all the difference. lockheedmartin.com/how


Who are/were your mentors? What lessons did you learn from them?

One of my mentors, a naval chief petty officer, said, “While the captain may be at the helm, it is the crew that makes the ship go…without the crew, nothing happens.” Unless the people in the trenches are engaged in diversity, true change will not happen. Do you teach anything different to those you mentor? If so, what is it?

You do not need a job title to be a leader; leadership is defined by a person’s actions and reactions, especially in a crisis. Just because someone tells you, “No,” it doesn’t mean you should give up. Where there is a vision and will there is a way. Who in your family had the most impact on your upbringing and success?

My grandfather used to say, “There is always a solution to any problem. Sometimes it is around it, over it, through it or under it.” He was right. What are your favorite books/authors and what impact have they had on your career?

D.A. Benton’s book, How to Think Like a CEO, helped me understand the basics of business as a firstgeneration Latina in corporate America. Sun Tzu’s Art of War helped me understand negotiations. How are you involved with your community?

Mentoring other women of color who, like me, are the first in their families working in corporate America. Helping to bridge the technology gap in underserved communities.

What is your favorite phrase?

A quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson: “What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us.” What was your first paying job?

I was a teacher’s aide at the age of 15 at an elementary school. What is your biggest challenge today - personally, professionally or both?

Patience. I remind myself every day that true change does not happen overnight. Who are your real-life heroes?

Nereida (Neddy) Perez National Director of Diversity & AA/EEO

KPMG LLP

My mom, who left Cuba at the age of 27 and faced many challenges as a single parent in pursuit of freedom and a better life for her two children. Actor Christopher Reeve and Stephen Hawkins, astrophysicist, who advanced humanity and science despite physical limitations. What does it take to succeed in your position?

Empathy, humility, patience and persistence. What is your first thought when you hear the term “diversity?”

A society/organization that acknowledges and values the uniqueness of each person.

What is your philosophy of life?

Each day is an opportunity to make a difference. What is your most rewarding accomplishment?

The strong progress made in diversity efforts at KPMG after less than a year. We’ve strengthened support to our internal minority networks, created a firmwide diversity scorecard, improved supplier diversity practices, established a disabilities network and strengthened our external partnerships. Whom do you admire most?

Mahatma Gandhi, Desmond Tutu and Jimmy Carter because of their grounded, strategic leadership that transformed public policy and mobilized nations for the greater good of others.

National speaker and columnist Maria Marin and Perez pose for a photo during the National Hispana Leadership Institute Conference. Perez serves on the board of directors of the organization. Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

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[ BANK OF THE WEST ]

WANT TO WORK FOR A TRULY GREAT BANK?

AT BANK OF THE WEST, WE BELIEVE OUR CUSTOMERS ARE WELL SERVED BY EMPLOYEES WHO ARE WELL SERVED. Different perspectives generate fresh ideas. That’s why at Bank of the West, we value diversity and equal opportunity for all our employees. Year after year, we continue to grow stronger thanks to our unique blend of people. After all, in today’s competitive banking environment, it is our employees with innovative ideas that keep us a step ahead of the rest.

www.bankofthewest.com

Bank of the West and its subsidiaries are equal opportunity/affirmative action employers. M/F/D/V

© 2007 Bank of the West. Member FDIC.


Who are/were your mentors? What lessons did you learn from them?

My parents, who helped define the possibilities for me as a young person. Also, the people who inspire all of us: Mother Teresa, Ghandi, Martin Luther King Jr. Do you teach anything different to those you mentor? If so, what is it?

I try to pass along the wisdom that I would have found helpful. Who in your family had the biggest impact on your upbringing and success?

My father, who had the courage to move his family from India for our best interest, and my mother, who showed extraordinary courage when my father passed away. What are your favorite books/authors and what impact have they had on your career?

version: “You don’t need to settle for just changing the oil because, if you believe you can, you can change the world.” What was your first paying job?

I worked in an automated carwash earning $2.20 an hour and 70 cents a day in tips. What is your biggest challenge today – personally, professionally or both?

To reinvigorate and reenergize in a way that continues to add new value. It becomes more and more difficult to ask, “What can I do next?”

Punam Mathur Senior Vice President of Corporate Diversity and Community Affairs

MGM Mirage

I don’t get to read for pleasure often. On my next vacation, I plan to lose myself in the latest John Grisham novel.

Who was your childhood hero?

How are you involved in your community?

What does it take to succeed in your position?

Any organization where I can uplift the lives of children is important to me. What is your philosophy of life?

If I equate life to a five-pound bag, like the one you put your groceries in, I’m going to put 10 pounds in. What is your most rewarding accomplishment?

I haven’t had it yet, but I look forward to the day my three children become fully independent human beings. If they can live in the world with a sense of wonder and a commitment to do something for the time they are here, that will be my biggest accomplishment.

My parents. They taught me about courage and strength and that the world was full of possibilities. Adaptability and exhilaration about change. To never stop viewing the possibilities is the highest responsibility of a leader. What is your first thought when you hear “diversity?”

Opportunity. The possibility of what can be created. If we can unleash a culture where diversity is alive everywhere, we will be a better, higherperforming company.

Whom do you admire most?

I admire my parents, my sisters and the mentors I have had in my life. What is your favorite phrase?

My friend’s adaptation of the tag line to the minutelube commercial: “We don’t want to change the world, we just want to change your oil.” My friend’s

At the company’s last Annual Diversity Report, Punam Mathur heralded the achievement of the company’s diversity efforts that are better preparing the company’s workforce to embrace its multicultural customer base. Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

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When we’re all equals, things really start to add up.

9.75"

CHEVRON is a registered trademark of Chevron Corporation. The CHEVRON HALLMARK and HUMAN ENERGY are trademarks of Chevron Corporation. ©2008 Chevron Corporation. All rights reserved.

7"

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Who are/were your mentors? What lessons did you learn from them?

My mentors were D.S. Bajpai, the principal of my school in India, and R.S. Chaudhary, a senior lecturer. They counseled me to work hard, get the best education, aim high and work for big ideas that will improve the lives of many people. Do you teach anything different to those you mentor? If so, what is it?

Learn others’ cultures to work harmoniously with diverse people. Understand the goals, priorities and styles of decision makers. Work in a collaborative manner so you win as a team. Who in your family had the most impact on your upbringing and success?

My father. He held high expectations for me, and I grew up wanting to fulfill them. What are your favorite books/authors and what impact have they had on your career?

Deepak Chopra’s The Seven Spiritual Laws of Success reaffirmed my worldview with the Law of Karma, i.e., cause and effect. Stephen Covey’s The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People reinforced my values and principles from Hindu concepts of Dharma. How are you involved with your community?

When the Dot Busters gang menaced the AsianIndian community in Jersey City, I started a chapter of the Indian American Forum, worked with other minority groups and brought attention to racial harassment. As a result, a bill against racial harassment became law. I continue to champion the issues of Asian-American ethnic communities and other minority communities.

Whom do you admire most?

Growing up in India, I admired Mahatma Gandhi, the father of civil rights who practiced non-violence and freed India from British colonial slavery. After migrating to the United States, I admired Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., who followed Gandhi’s principles to lead the American civil rights movement. What is your favorite phrase?

Serenity prayer: “God, give me the strength to change what I can, accept what I can’t and the wisdom to know the difference.”

Ved P. Chaudhary, PhD Assistant Commissioner, Office of Management and Budget Chief Diversity Officer

New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection

What was your first paying job?

I was a soil conservation engineer in the Himalayan mountain region 7,000 feet above sea level in Ranikhet, India. What is your biggest challenge today - personally, professionally or both?

Having spent my career in the private sector in high-tech companies where diversity is the norm, I find it challenging to bring the same level of awareness, acceptance and appreciation for diversity to government. Who are your real-life heroes?

What is your philosophy of life?

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Bobby Kennedy for their vision and commitment to create a just, equitable society.

Happiness lies in helping others.

Who was your childhood hero?

What is your most rewarding accomplishment?

Helping the Asian-Indian immigrants become successfully assimilated and helping unite Asian immigrant communities in New Jersey.

Hindu King Raam, who ruled ancient India. From childhood, he set the example of the highest moral standards and strongest family ties.

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Who are/were your mentors? What lessons did you learn from them?

Susan L. Johnson Vice President, Strategic Talent Management and Diversity Leadership

Pitney Bowes Inc.

My mentors include people I have worked with and for: bosses, skip-level bosses, former professors and professionals in my field. The lessons I learned over my career include an incessant desire for achievement, which means continuously setting goals, working hard to achieve them and then picking a new goal to focus on. Do you teach anything different to those you mentor? If so, what is it?

I tell people that you don’t get what you don’t ask for and to never leave money on the table. (The second one was a lesson I learned from a mentor.) Who in your family had the most impact on your upbringing and success?

My two older sisters were terrific role models and very inspirational. What are your favorite books/authors and what impact have they had on your career?

The Other Boleyn Girl, historical fiction by Philippa Gregory, has stayed with me forever. I have since become hooked on reading the history of the Tudor and the Elizabethan eras. In addition, I admire author Pearl Cleage, a Spelman College woman, whose writing makes being a black woman come alive! How are you involved with your community?

I am an active member of The Links, Inc., a nonprofit organization, and very involved with groups related to my church, the First United Methodist Church in Stamford. I also participate in youth leadership development with my family through Jack and Jill of America Inc.

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What is your philosophy of life?

You never know who your boss is going to be, so it’s important to portray your best skills and behaviors 100 percent of the time. What is your most rewarding accomplishment?

I have two: bungee jumping and raising an absolutely fabulous boy. Whom do you admire most?

Any pioneer who was the first to accomplish something, for example, Sir Edmund Hillary, Thurgood Marshall, Rosa Parks, Bill Gates, Lewis and Clark, etc. What is your favorite phrase?

“I know God won’t give me anything I can’t handle. I just wish he didn’t trust me so much.” – Mother Teresa What was your first paying job?

I was a maid in a hotel. What is your biggest challenge today – personally, professionally or both?

My biggest challenge is work-life balance. Who are your real-life heroes?

My son, my professional staff and Barack Obama, because of his “audacity of hope.” Who was your childhood hero?

Chris Evert. What does it take to succeed in your position?

It takes vision, focus, diplomacy and attention to detail. What is your first thought when you hear the term “diversity?”

A group of people who look very different from each other and who are all beautiful in their own way.


Who are/were your mentors? What lessons did you learn from them?

What is your most rewarding accomplishment?

I worked at AT&T earlier in my career. Two senior vice presidents at the time, Larry Garfinkel and Joe Ramirez, were great mentors to me. They taught me the power of networking and made me feel comfortable sharing my professional dreams. They also stressed the importance of being accountable for my career.

Effectively integrating diversity requirements into our business and human resources processes.

Do you teach anything different to those you mentor? If so, what is it?

I strive to help others understand that confidence drives effective effort and that it’s not only the positions you hold in your career, but also your disposition that lays the groundwork for success. Who in your family had the most impact on your upbringing and success?

My parents. They were very smart people who did not have much in the way of formal education but stressed the importance of excelling in school. What are your favorite books/authors and what impact have they had on your career?

Scott Turow’s book, One L, describes how tough it is to compete among the best and brightest at Harvard Law School. I start each day with Max Lucado’s Grace for the Moment, a series of reflections that keep me grounded. How are you involved with your community?

I’m vice chair of the American Conference on Diversity. I am also involved in a variety of activities at my local church. What is your philosophy of life?

My philosophy of life is threefold. First, to have purpose. For me, it is the work I do at Prudential to help ensure all people feel a sense of equitable treatment. Next comes excitement, which for me is driven by my passion for opening minds to new possibilities. Finally, I need to have inner peace, knowing that the work I am doing is for the greater good.

Whom do you admire most?

Mahatma Gandhi. What was your first paying job?

A paper route. What is your biggest challenge today – personally, professionally or both?

Emilio Egea

Chief Diversity Officer

Prudential Financial, Inc.

My biggest professional challenge is moving our company to what I call “internalization,” where understanding and using the power of diversity are second nature to our people, our processes and our business strategies. Who are your real-life heroes?

My parents. They made tremendous personal sacrifices so that their children would have opportunities that were not possible for them. Who was your childhood hero?

Roberto Clemente. What does it take to succeed in your position?

The ability to facilitate mindset shifts for people, especially senior leaders, to help them better understand the issues of bias in the workplace, the dynamics of the diverse marketplace and what is takes to be world class. What is your first thought when you hear the term “diversity?”

All the ways we are different, all the ways we are similar and how that comes together to build a productive, inclusive environment.

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Who are/were your mentors? What lessons did you learn from them?

The most influential individuals were those who were truthful, particularly in delivering constructive counsel. Do you teach anything different to those that you mentor? If so, what is it?

I believe in being honest and straightforward as a mentor and a leader. However, I think Senior Vice President of Human Resources and that one of the most important Chief Diversity Officer skills of a mentor is listening, Reliant Energy hearing and understanding the issues from your protégé’s point of view and providing appropriate, relevant counsel.

Karen D. Taylor

Who in your family had the most impact on your upbringing and success?

My mother, who was a member of senior leadership at a small public university at a time when there were few women at that level. As an adult, I have realized the impact of her role-modeling in my career. What are your favorite books/authors and what impact have they had on your career?

Working With Emotional Intelligence, by Daniel Goleman, because it reinforces so much of my own experience and observation about what leadership really means. Good to Great, by Jim Collins, as a reference for staying grounded in what is important if you want to be great. How are you involved with your community?

I am a board member of the Texas Diversity Council, and I am involved with a variety of programs that the company supports as part of our diversity initiatives. What is your philosophy of life?

Don’t take yourself too seriously.

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What is your most rewarding accomplishment?

Personally, my family. Professionally, being a part of a senior leadership team that has taken a company from near bankruptcy to financial stability, an experience that was rewarding as much for the learning as for the business outcome. Whom do you admire most?

Those who overcome hurdles or adversity in order to make a better life for themselves and their families. What is your favorite phrase?

“The essence of profound insight is simplicity.” – Jim Collins, Good to Great What was your first paying job?

Packing peaches at an orchard in North Louisiana. What is your biggest challenge today – personally, professionally or both?

Professionally, I welcome the challenge of continuous learning. I have been fortunate to have had opportunities throughout my career where I could stretch, grow and learn. Who are your real-life heroes?

My family, for their support of my career in spite of the sacrifices it has imposed upon them. Who was your childhood hero?

Several of my extraordinary teachers from elementary through high school. What does it take to succeed in your position?

Self-awareness, accessibility.

sound

judgment,

authenticity,

What is your first thought when you hear the term “diversity?”

Diversity is a complex, multidimensional concept. To embrace diversity is to be inclusive, aware, respectful, sometimes courageous, sometimes vulnerable and always open to possibility.


Who are/were your mentors and what were the lessons learned?

A former boss taught me the importance of defining success on my terms and not being seduced into going after things that bring only financial rewards or increased visibility. Do you teach anything different to those you mentor?

I try to share my stories and lessons with my mentees and allow them to see my flaws. In addition, I try to impart the importance of self care and self acceptance. Who in your family had the most impact on your upbringing and success?

My mother was and continues to be the most influential person in my life. No sacrifice was ever too big, and her unconditional love and acceptance allowed me to dream big, take risks, and make mistakes. What are your two favorite books/authors and what impact have they had on your career?

My two all-time favorite books are The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho and the Holy Bible. The Bible provides life instruction, and The Alchemist inspires me to follow my dreams. How are you involved with your community?

I serve on the board of directors of the Philadelphia Workforce Investment Board and the Covenant House of Pennsylvania. In addition, I lead initiatives to feed and clothe members of the homeless community in Philadelphia. What is your philosophy of life?

You will never be happy if you continue to search for what happiness consists of. You will never live if you are looking for the meaning of life.

What phrase is your favorite?

“You must be the change you wish to see in the world.” What was your first paying job?

I owned and operated a Water Ice business on the lawn of my parents’ home when I was nine years old. I was the vendor of choice among my peers. What is your biggest challenge today, personally, professionally or both?

My biggest challenge is maintaining a proper balance among personal, home, and work interests.

Stacey Adams Global Diversity Director

Rohm and Haas Company

Who are your real life heroes?

One of my heroes is Dr. Catherine Hamlin. She is co-founder of Addis Ababa Fistula Hospital, the world’s only medical center dedicated to poor women suffering from childbirth injuries. Who was your childhood hero?

Harriet Tubman and Sojourner Truth. I was awed by powerful black women who fought for the rights of others, specifically those members of society who are “invisible.” What does it take to succeed in your position?

Vision, commitment, self awareness and courage. What is your first thought when you hear the term diversity?

Imagine the possibilities!

What is your most rewarding accomplishment?

My most rewarding accomplishment is raising my seven-year-old daughter. Having the ability and responsibility of nurturing, molding, and guiding a child through the various stages of life is extremely humbling and gratifying.

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Who are/were your mentors? What lessons did you learn from them?

Be authentic and transparent; don’t just step up to the plate; be ready to swing the bat and aim for a homerun. Do you teach anything different to those you mentor? If so, what is it? Shirley A. Davis, PhD Director of Diversity and Inclusion Initiatives

The Society for Human Resource Management

I can’t teach what I don’t know, and I can’t lead where I don’t go. When I’m mentoring others, I teach tried and proven strategies and techniques that have resulted in success. Likewise, I share what didn’t work.

Who in your family had the most impact on your upbringing and success?

My parents. They taught me how to be resourceful, independent and strong, and they validated my strong sense of self-worth. What are your favorite books/authors and what impact have they had on your career?

Enjoying my daughter, 13, grow into a talented, beautiful, self-confident honors student. Balancing my career and parenthood in a way that allows me to share in all of her most important moments. Completing my PhD by age 40 as a single parent and while continuing to be recognized as a high performer in very demanding roles in my career. Whom do you admire most?

Oprah Winfrey, for what she’s been able to accomplish as a woman of color who wasn’t born with a silver spoon in her mouth. Anyone who beats the odds, achieves success and opens doors for others. What is your favorite phrase?

Personally, “Love you, mom.” It makes being a mom the most rewarding role in my life. Professionally, “Leadership effectiveness is about being visible, vocal and adding value.” What is your biggest challenge today – personally, professionally or both?

Meeting the demands of my current role while balancing expectations, time and personal demands. Who are your real-life heroes?

Books on leadership by Steven Covey, Ken Blanchard and Warren Bennis played important roles in shaping my ideals on leadership.

Those who are willing to sacrifice their own life to ensure that we enjoy life, liberty, safety, peace and happiness—our soldiers, police officers, rescue workers, parents, good Samaritans and the like.

How are you involved with your community?

What does it take to succeed in your position?

I’m very involved in my church and on the board of directors for Dress for Success in Metro D.C.; I worked with Welfare to Work for five years; and served as a facilitator at maximum and medium security prisons across the country for seven years. What is your philosophy of life?

It’s better to be prepared for an opportunity and never have one than to miss an opportunity because you weren’t prepared. Treat every opportunity as a God-given gift.

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What is your most rewarding accomplishment?

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Courage. To stand for something that may not be popular. To be the target of criticism. To ask and answer the tough questions. To hold people accountable. What is your first thought when you hear the term “diversity?”

Opportunity.


Who are/were your mentors? What lessons did you learn from them?

What is your philosophy of life?

From a former supervisor, I learned the lessons of integrity and humility and of standing up for what is right. Another mentor taught me the importance of taking risks and dreaming big.

To be grounded in who you are, to be authentic and true to yourself and to live life as though there were no tomorrow.

Do you teach anything different to those you mentor? If so, what is it?

I am more of a sounding board, sharing what has made me successful as well as my stumbling blocks. Who in your family had the most impact on your upbringing and success?

When I was 19, my father supported my going to the United States for my master’s at a time in India when the expectation was that women would get married and not pursue careers. More immediately, my spouse and my children have been critical to my success; their unequivocal support has allowed me to grow into my career. What are your favorite books/authors and what impact have they had on your career?

Good to Great, by Jim Collins, and The Leadership Challenge, by James M. Kouzes and Barry Z. Posner. Both articulate leadership practices that endure. I constantly draw best practices from both these books.

What is your most rewarding accomplishment?

To see an organization as large and geographically dispersed as Sodexo embrace diversity and inclusion Whom do you admire most?

Rohini Anand, PhD Senior Vice President and Global Chief Diversity Officer

Sodexo

Aung San Suu Kyi, winner of the 1991 Nobel Peace Prize and leader of the nonviolent movement for human rights and democracy in Burma. What is your favorite phrase?

“We must be the change that we want to see.”— Mahatma Gandhi. “Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.”—Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

How are you involved with your community?

I enjoy the CDO community outside of work and get tremendous sustenance from it. Being a first-generation immigrant, I am actively involved in the South Asian community in the United States. I am also involved in communities in India, where I was born and where I still have immediate family, including my parents.

Dr. Anand preparing for Sodexo’s Diversity Business Roundtable Conference. Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

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Who are/were your mentors? What lessons did you learn from them?

My good friend Brennan in nonprofit health care taught me to be exceptional as a professional—ambitious, rigorous and excellent—and to never compromise integrity or the human connection. Do you teach anything different to those you mentor? If so, what is it?

Laura Swapp Global Director, Diversity and Inclusion

Starbucks

Hopefully, I teach people that fun is a worthy pursuit and can be found within any job. I try to help people see what their strengths and possibilities are.

Who in your family had the most impact on your upbringing and success?

My paternal grandfather was the most influential person in my life, offering me unconditional love and support.

Whom do you admire most?

My kids: Marley, 9, and Grady, 5. They are completely confident, live in the moment, and exude fearlessness and fun. What is your favorite phrase?

“One Love”. Bob Marley’s famous song, sung at his revolutionary peace concert in 1978 when he brought together opposing parties during a political civil war in Jamaica. What was your first paying job?

I worked at a florist shop. What is your biggest challenge today – personally, professionally or both?

Personally, it’s giving quality time to work, kids and my relationships. Professionally, it’s competing for limited mind share and resources in a business that’s moving at the speed of light. Who are your real-life heroes?

My neighbors, who both extracted themselves from straight marriages to claim their reality as gay men. They share actively in the parenting of their children from their prior marriages.

What are your favorite books/authors and what impact have they had on your career?

Who was your childhood hero?

The Autobiography of a Yogi, by Paramahansa Yogananda. This book speaks to the possibility that transcendence is possible and accessible. It’s an important belief to hold in this work.

What does it take to succeed in your position?

How are you involved with your community?

I am on the board of Powerful Voices, a local nonprofit that helps adolescent girls, and I’m a member of the Conference Board’s Council on Workforce Diversity. What is your philosophy of life?

We are all part of one spirit and are only temporarily divided by our lives. Because of that, we are all equally deserving of love, happiness, acceptance and opportunity.

By the time I was 10, I was a huge John Lennon fan. I admired his music and revolutionary spirit. A genuine openness to and curiosity about people. An ability to influence a very large spectrum of people and groups. Perseverance. What is your first thought when you hear the term “diversity?”

I think of diversity, in its purist form, as differentiation. In the context of my work, I think about equity and innovation across a large spectrum of difference.

What is your most rewarding accomplishment?

Having happy, lively kids and the role I’m currently in. Neither was promised, and I’m grateful for both.

Swapp at a Starbucks-sponsored forum on Diversity and Inclusion. 80

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© 2007 Pfizer Inc Printed in USA

In a time of rapid change for our company and for our industry, we believe that the unique perspective of each Pfizer employee is vital. Why? Because the tough health care challenges people are facing today call for new, different, and diverse ways of thinking. That’s why we’re implementing a global strategy to ensure Pfizer’s culture not only respects, but also leverages each individual employee’s background, character, and life experiences. We’re putting those unique perspectives to

work to find new, innovative solutions for patients, and better ways of working with our customers, our partners, and the communities we serve. At Pfizer, we believe diversity means an inclusive and empowering work environment. The result? A happier, healthier tomorrow for us all.

www.pfizer.com


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Who are/were your mentors? What lessons did you learn from them?

What is your most rewarding accomplishment?

Notable mentors have included my immediate supervisor, Ed Rogel, senior vice president of human resources; and my wife, Helen. I have learned that success is a never-ending journey.

The birth of my three sons, my marriage to my wife, Helen, and my recent speech to the General Assembly of the United Nations.

Do you teach anything different to those you mentor? If so, what is it?

Whom do you admire most?

Don’t look for accolades from others. Seek them from within.

My late parents, Horace and Katie Lee Henderson.

Who in your family had the most impact on your upbringing and success?

What is your favorite phrase?

My mother, who died when I was 14. She gave me a kerchief with all her savings shortly before she died. She instructed me to hold onto it until she came home. She never did, but the lesson she imparted was one of trust and unconditional love. After she died, my father continued to raise my 11 siblings and me. He taught us the value of sacrifice, teamwork and endurance. We knew that if we stood together and prayed together as a family, we would endure, overcome obstacles and prosper. He also taught me that love for brother and sister is more important than silver and gold. What are your favorite books/authors and what impact have they had on your career?

What Is the What, by David Eggers, the story of Achak Deng, a young Sudanese refugee who migrated from Sudan after overcoming insurmountable odds. The book teaches one about hardship, opportunity, struggle and survival. It reminds me of how blessed we are in the United States. How are you involved with your community?

I am a trustee of my church, a member of the Urban League board, a former school board member and a member of the United Negro College Fund advisory board, among others.

A mind is a terrible thing to waste.

Effenus Henderson

What was your first paying job?

Chief Diversity Officer

A laborer on a tobacco farm.

Weyerhaeuser

What is your biggest challenge today – personally, professionally or both?

Continuing to help build a more diverse and inclusive culture for all employees at Weyerhaeuser. Who are your real-life heroes?

My wife, Barack Obama, Denzel Washington and Oprah Winfrey. Who was your childhood hero?

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X. What does it take to succeed in your position?

Good grounding in the technical aspects of the work, effective interpersonal skills, good communication skills, effective leadership skills. What is your first thought when you hear the term “diversity?”

Diversity is about the mix of people, while inclusion is about how to make this mix work.

What is your philosophy of life?

Learn to listen, to love and to appreciate the people, places and moments that you have. Don’t take yourself too seriously.

Henderson with U.S. Senator Barack Obama. Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

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What Happens When You Don’t Look Like Their Definition of Success? Our first MicroTrigger

stories reflect the challenges of the diversity change process. Many organizations have made progress with people of color, women, and others who have previously been underutilized. But that doesn’t mean that individual perceptions have changed. It’s easy to get triggered when you are reminded that you still don’t “look like success” to some people.

“YOU Are Meeting with That Exec?” I am a senior manager at a large consulting firm. As one of few Latino managers, I have grown accustomed to being a minority here. Part of my job involves establishing relationships with clients at high levels. One day during lunch with some coworkers, I mentioned that I was meeting with a senior official of our state, a common occurrence in my job since I run the public sector unit that handles multi-million dollar projects. “YOU’RE meeting with him? Wow. How did YOU get to do that?” The question came from someone who knows that meeting with senior executive clients is the norm for a person at my level. So the message came through loud and clear: In spite of your title and function, how can YOU be qualified to do that? —Anonymous, New York, NY

Where’s Waldo? One of my responsibilities as a manager is to join the recruiting team that interviews MBA students from my alma mater. The recruiting team includes hiring managers from around the country and people from human resources. As the only woman of color in management at my office, I am probably “overused” in the role, so I am sometimes asked to participate in recruiting trips that don’t involve my line of business, functional area, or my alma mater.

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Recently I was asked to join such a recruiting team—not my line of business or alma mater. We were asked to meet at the school’s Office of Campus Recruiting. When I arrived at the office, I noticed a group of guys on the other side of the room talking—a few carrying bags with our company logo—so I knew they were part of the team. Since we were early, I pulled out my Blackberry and checked e-mail. When the campus recruiting contact came downstairs to greet us, she went straight to the group of guys. They introduced themselves and prepared to go upstairs. She then said, “there’s supposed to be another person, (my name), is she coming?” They looked around the lobby, quickly past me, searching for their missing team member. It never crossed their minds that I could be part of their recruiting team. I waited much longer than was necessary—quietly triggered and resentful. I finally gave in and introduced myself, professional as usual, and joined the team. —Anonymous, Chicago, IL Mandating “Voluntary” Behavior I work for a small nonprofit agency where all staff members are deeply committed to the organization’s mission. It is routine for staff to stay late at the office and to work on weekends, either from home or from the office. We put in these hours voluntarily, just to get the work done.

March/April 2008

Recently, the head of the agency developed a draft document describing the work culture he hoped to perpetuate. Among the items listed was a statement suggesting that we were expected to work more than 40 hours each week, especially if we wanted to advance. Suddenly, our voluntary commitment to the agency felt like a mandate. When asked why that was necessary, he reported that some people weren’t at their desks by 9 a.m., and he wanted to make it clear that he valued on-time behavior. There was little acknowledgement of the many, many unpaid hours staff gives to the organization, nor recognition that an individual who came in at 9:15 instead of 9 a.m. may have been at the office until 9:00 p.m. the evening before. Many of us felt devalued by this MicroTrigger. To his credit, the organization’s leader withdrew that statement from the next draft of the document, for our displeasure with it was palpable. —Anonymous, Washington, DC

PDJ Janet Crenshaw Smith is president of Ivy Planning Group LLC, a consulting and training firm that specializes in diversity strategy and leadership. Her book is titled, MicroTriggers: 58 Little Things That Have a BIG Impact. Have a MicroTrigger story to share? Send it to: JSmith@ivygroupllc.com


In 2007 our difference

made a difference.

Here’s to

Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

March/April 2008

Ivy Planning Group : Strategy and Training : www.IVYGROUPLLC.com : 877.448.9477

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PepsiCo Celebrates the Life of Edward F. Boyd 1914 – 2007 Edward F. Boyd helped place Pepsi in the hearts and hands of many Americans. And in doing so, he became an innovative leader and true pioneer in marketing. It’s been 60 years since Ed was hired to form the very first team of African-American marketers, opening up African-American communities across the nation. He defined target marketing — the way many businesses today meet consumer needs with products and services. Brave, distinguished and endearing, Ed Boyd helped move America and business to greater racial equality. Today, his spirit still inspires us. To learn more about Ed Boyd and all his accomplishments, read The Real Pepsi Challenge by Stephanie Capparell or visit careerjournal.com, go to the left column under Article Search and type in: Ed Boyd.

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Bank of the West. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

Ivy Planning Group. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85

SHRM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63

www.bankofthewest.com

www.ivygroupllc.com

www.shrm.org

The Boeing Company . .. .. .. .. .. .. . 15

KPMG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Back Cover

Sodexo . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 11

www.boeing.com

www.kpmg.com

www.sodexousa.com

Chevron. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72

Lockheed Martin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68

UnitedHealth Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

www.chevron.com

www.lockheedmartin.com

www.unitedhealthgroup.com

Eastman Kodak Company . . . . . . . . . 48

PepsiCo, Inc. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 86

Wal-Mart. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 57

www.kodak.com

www.pepsico.com

www.walmart.com

Pfizer, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81

Waste Management . . . . . Inside Back

www.pfizer.com

www.wm.com

Hallmark Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Rohm & Haas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

WellPoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

www.hallmark.com

www.rohmhaas.com

www.wellpoint.com

Ford Motor Company www.ford.com

Inside Front, pg 1

Shell Oil. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 www.shell.com

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March/April 2008

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last word

Diversity Success: Retrospection Shaping Our Vision By Marie Y. Philippe, PhD

I

It has been nearly 25 years since Dr. Roosevelt Thomas, Jr. created the American Institute for Managing Diversity. At the time, few corporations and firsttime diversity practitioners could articulate with clarity what requirements would be needed to produce a successful diversity strategy. There were no roadmaps to guide these early diversity pioneers, nothing to go on but instinct, common sense, and guts. We have learned much in the last two and half decades. Volumes have been written about how to lead a successful initiative, and the topic of diversity management has been dissected and analyzed from a wide range of viewpoints. We have learned that there is no one-size-fits-all approach that will work. Yet, I have found by observation throughout my career that there are, in fact, ten identifiable elements that I consider absolutely essential for success. These elements are so important that without them, you will likely fail; but with them, success is nearly guaranteed. 1. Have a committed CEO and senior management team that can encourage the entire enterprise to embrace change and hold managers accountable. 2. Build on existing organizational structures. It is more efficient and practical to expand on what is already present, rather than to reinvent the wheel. Initial programs gain traction when they utilize structures already in place. 3. Establish financial justification and business relevance. The business case for diversity needs to be promulgated and reinforced to all stakeholders throughout the organization. 4. Allocate dedicated resources. The diversity leader needs to be focused on that one initiative. “Second hat� responsibility for someone with another functional purpose is a short cut that short-changes the outcome.

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March/April 2008

5. Establish a budget. Each functional area in an organization needs a budget. The diversity budget ought to reflect its importance. As progress is achieved, further investments should be made in staffing, program expansion, and support. 6. Monitor progress. A diversity scorecard should be put in place to monitor both qualitative and quantitative objectives. Furthermore, it should be shared with everyone in the organization. 7. Establish community partnerships. The selection of relevant business partners in the communities where the organization conducts business should become part of a long-term strategy. 8. Get regular feedback. At a minimum, survey employees once a year to gather anonymous feedback on their perceptions of the organization’s culture and its diversity and inclusion efforts. 9. Seek organizational alignment. A well-designed diversity strategy builds on current succession planning and leadership development programs. These programs are adjusted for greater inclusion. 10. Have a contingency plan. Anticipating potential difficulties should not be seen as a lack of confidence, but rather as smart planning, similar to the way sales forecasting takes into account different scenarios. Where do we go from here? Clearly, we have learned much over the last twenty plus years. Diversity initiatives will continue to evolve in the workplace. I believe, however, that the elements described above will stand the test of time and be central to diversity success well into the 21st century.

PDJ Marie Y. Philippe, PhD, is known for her contribution in corporate diversity and organizational change management. Her credentials include community awards, executive board leadership, television appearances, and contributions to professional magazines. She is currently exploring next steps in her career where she can merge her passion for cultural transformation and organizational effectiveness. She can be reached at: ask_dr.phil@yahoo.com.


Warrior,

oh beautiful Warrior. Breast cancer wages war on women’s bodies every day. Surprisingly, many of those who are diagnosed are under 40. Once diagnosed, African-American women have a disproportionately high mortality rate. But there is hope. If breast cancer is found and treated early, women have a good chance of surviving. So it’s important, really important, that you do monthly breast self-exams, have regular physical checkups and, eventually, annual mammograms. To help raise awareness and funds, Ford created Warriors in Pink wear. 100% of the net proceeds from sale of the clothing goes to support Susan G. Komen for the Cure®. To find out more about African-American women and breast cancer, Komen for the Cure and Warriors in Pink, visit fordcares.com.


Also … Front-Runner of Entergy The World of CDOs • Perspectives Catalyst AlsoFeaturing Featuring… Front-Runner Robert Shirley Spencer Davis of Jr. SHRM • Black• Leaders Leading • Linda Jimenez • • Catalyst © 2008 KPMG LLP, a U.S. limited liability partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 14678STM

Volume 10, Number 2 March / April 2008 $ 12.95 U.S.

Our differences.

PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

What we value is the same.

March / April 2008 • VOLUME 10 NUMBER 2 www.diversityjournal.com

At KPMG, we’re committed to providing an environment of inclusion that encourages employees to be successful. It’s an approach that benefits our people and our clients. By valuing our differences, we build upon our individual, team, and firm strengths. And that can make all the difference in the world.

our differences areour strength

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Diversity Journal - Mar/Apr 2008  

Diversity Journal's March/April 2008 issue

Diversity Journal - Mar/Apr 2008  

Diversity Journal's March/April 2008 issue