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Also Featuring ... Chrysler Financial’s Front Runner William F. Jones Jr. • Multicultural Programs for Women

Volume 9, Number 6 NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2007

12.95

$

U.S.

PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2007 • VOLUME 9 NUMBER 6

and woman-owned businesses is a win-win proposition for us all. Vendors win by partnering

www.diversityjournal.com

At Halliburton, we’ve found that putting significant trust—and business—in the hands of minority-

with one of the world’s leading companies. Halliburton wins by receiving first-class service from these quality-driven firms. If you have a minority- or woman-owned business, we want to talk to you! Please contact us at supplierdiversity@halliburton.com or visit www.halliburton.com/supplierdiversity.

HALLIBURTON

Featuring These Leading Suppliers for Halliburton H e l p i n g

b u i l d

s u c c e s s

t h r o u g h

s u p p l i e r

d i v e r s i t y.

Back row, left to right:

CHERYL LAWSON, DUNCAN INDUSTRIAL SOLUTIONS;

OTIS ANDERSON, MICRO-SMART SYSTEMS, INC.; BARBARA PAULL, GENERAL TRUCK BODY; P.D. MORRISON, PDME © 2007 Halliburton. All rights reserved.

Front row:

VIMAL KOTHARI, SYSTEL INC.; E. JEAN JOHNSON, LEGALWATCH INC.


Thanks to you, each of these women can navigate their health care plans to obtain the services specific to their needs.

I

Our neighborhood was always built around music. So it’s good to see everyone pick up the beat. Now the band keeps playing on.

My dream is to get the good times rolling again in my hometown. Life’s calling. Where to next?

At WellPoint, we are addressing tomorrow’s health care issues today. Women account for approximately 70-85% of health decisions made in U.S. households, yet still face barriers that make the acquisition of basic health care services difficult. WellPoint takes women’s health seriously. Our vision is to move women to choose better health through education and wellness initiatives that address multicultural and multigenerational women and their unique needs. Working to better people’s lives is not something you do everyday. But it can be – at WellPoint.

Better health care, thanks to you. Visit us online at wellpoint.com/careers and wellpoint.com/diversity Starting at $35,420* *As shown: 2008 Lincoln MKX with optional equipment, MSRP $41,500. Destination, tax, title and license fees extra. **Available feature.

EOE

®Registered Trademark, WellPoint, Inc. ©2007 WellPoint, Inc. All Rights Reserved


It Takes A Village. The music and musicians of New Orleans have always been the city’s heart and soul. Thanks to the dedication of Harry Connick Jr. and many of his hometown friends, Musicians’ Village is the best way to ensure that the Crescent City lifts itself up with heart and soul intact.


Glancing back... looking ahead

James R. Rector PUBLISHER

John S. Murphy

MANAGING EDITOR

Closing out a year’s final issue always makes me look back to review what we’ve

Linda Schellentrager C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R

accomplished. We came into 2007 with a goal of giving our readers new

Damian Johnson

perspectives on diversity. And we did so with our collection of essays from the

Laurel L. Fumic

true Pioneers of Diversity in our July/August issue. What’s more, we published

Cheri Morabito

MARKETING DIRECTOR

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

ART DIRECTOR

our International Diversity and Inclusion Lexicon, that is being used in training

Alina Dunaeva

OVERSEAS CORRESPONDENT

programs around the world.

Jason Bice

We also introduced you to more than one hundred important women who are changing the face of diversity, in our giant Women Worth Watching issue. And, in this issue, we’re serving up an inside look at Halliburton’s laudatory work in supplier diversity. We’re also introducing you to our newest FrontRunner of Diversity, William F. Jones Jr., COO of Chrysler Financial. Looking ahead, in 2008 we celebrate our tenth year of publishing. Ten years of shining the light on the people behind the initiatives, from CEOs to frontline managers. We have much in store for 2008, but to catch it all, you’ll have to read us regularly. I urge you to make one resolution for 2008, and that is to continue

WEB MASTER

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Commentaries or questions should be addressed to: Profiles in Diversity Journal, P.O. Box 45605, Cleveland, OH 44145-0605. All correspondence should include author’s full name, address, e-mail and phone number. D I S P L AY A D V E R T I S I N G

Profiles in Diversity Journal Gemini Towers #1 1991 Crocker Road, Suite 320 Westlake, OH 44145 Tel: 440.892.0444 Fax: 440.892.0737 profiles@diversityjournal.com

to learn about the people who are launching and executing the exciting SUBSCRIPTIONS

programs that draw out the best in people. We can help you do that. So holiday wishes to all of you! Enjoy this issue, and know that we look forward to serving you again in 2008.

U.S. $49.95 one year / $89.95 two years; in Canada, add $15 per year for postage. Other foreign orders add $20 per year. U.S. funds only. Subscriptions can be ordered at: www.diversityjournal.com or call customer service at 800.573.2867 from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. EST. SUBMISSIONS

REPRINTS:

John Murphy Managing Editor

profiles@diversityjournal.com EDITORIAL:

diversityjournaledit@mac.com PHOTOS & ARTWORK:

diversityjournalart@mac.com 2

P RO F I L E S I N D I V E R S IT Y J O U R N A L

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2007


She co anything she w uld be ants at Sodex

ho

Sodexho is Being Recognized as a Leader 2007: Top Company for Diversity – Hispanic Business • Top 15 Best Companies for Workforce Diversity – Black Enterprise Magazine • Top 20 Companies for Women of Color – Working Mother Magazine • Top 50 Entry Level Employers – CollegeGrad.com • Top Company for Diversity (#13) – DiversityInc • Top Company for African Americans (#9) – DiversityInc • Top 20 Companies for Asian Pacific Americans – Asian Enterprise Magazine • Top 50 Companies for Supplier Diversity – Hispanic Trends Magazine • Five Star Employer – U.S. Department of Defense 2006: Top 40 Companies for Hispanics – Hispanic Business Magazine • Top 50 Companies for Latinas – LATINA Style • Top 50 Companies for Diversity – DiversityInc • Top Companies for Women Executives – DiversityInc • Top 10 Companies for Asian Americans – Asian Enterprise • Top Companies for People with Disabilities – DiversityInc • Top Employer for African American Graduates – Black Collegian Magazine • Corporate 100 List of Best Places to Work for Latinos – HISPANIC Magazine


Volume 9 • Number 6 November/December 2007

21 On the Cover / Special Feature The Transformation of Supplier Diversity at Halliburton Dozens of companies owe their success to the opportunities given to them by this giant. Halliburton has written the book on supplier diversity.

50

William F. Jones Jr. William F. Jones Jr., chief operating officer at Chrysler Financial, discusses the company’s attitude, culture, and efforts to advance diversity and inclusiveness throughout the company.

4

P RO F I L E S I N D I V E R S IT Y J O U R N A L

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2007


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Volume 9 • Number 6 November/December 2007

59

Opportunities Growing for Women Multicultural programs to help women advance are growing to keep pace with this fastest growing segment in the U.S. workforce. More companies and organizations are cultivating their professional development, opening doors of opportunity that were closed just a few years ago.

departments

8 14

Momentum Diversity Who, What, Where and When

From My Perspective by David Casey David Casey reflects on Race—The Power of an Illusion, on PBS.

16 Catalyst

The Bottom Line: Corporate Performance and Women’s Representation on Boards

76 MicroTriggers

Real-Life MicroTriggers MicroTriggers are those subtle—and not so subtle—behaviors, phrases and inequities that trigger an instantaneous negative response. Here are more examples submitted by real people whose identities and places of business are being protected for obvious reasons.

6

P RO F I L E S I N D I V E R S IT Y J O U R N A L

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2007


At UnitedHealth Group, unique is everywhere. In our approach to health care. In each segment of our business. In every professional. In the career opportunities we offer. As a global leader in health care, UnitedHealth Group is committed to creating a workforce of unique individuals. Their unique perspectives bring about innovative ideas. It is the unique backgrounds, lifestyles and beliefs our professionals bring to their work that fuels innovation, creates a healthy environment and drives us towards our goal of creating a better health care system. Founded in 1974, UnitedHealth Group has since grown into a Fortune 100 company. Our family of businesses work tirelessly to advance the quality and access to care while making services more affordable and easier to use for everyone. Our work impacts the lives of nearly 55 million people and helps coordinate care for more than 20 million more. As unique as the many businesses that unite to form UnitedHealth Group, are the career opportunities they offer. From accounting to marketing, clinical to claims, the employment experience at UnitedHealth Group is second to none. Regardless of their unique talents, our professionals are united to improve health care for everyone.

Let us hear your unique voice in these careers available nationwide throughout our family of businesses.

• Business Analysts • Customer Care Professionals • Financial Analysts • Information Technology • Inside & Field Sales • Product Associates • Underwriting Analysts Through innovative leadership in health care, UnitedHealth Group provides ongoing career opportunities for diverse individuals, enriching the employment experience and creating a healthier atmosphere for all. UnitedHealth Group is an equal opportunity employer and employs individuals based on job-related qualifications regardless of race, religion, sex, national origin, age, or other protected characteristics. M/F/D/V.

To view current career opportunities, and to apply online, visit our CAREERS page at www.unitedhealthgroup.com.


8

Barbara Goodstein Becomes AXA Equitable’s Chief Innovation Officer

ING Names Debbie Holcombe Head of U.S. Workforce Diversity

Bank of the West Appoints Maria Lazzarini, Fran Lopez to Senior Roles

NEW YORK— Barbara Goodstein has been appointed chief innovation officer of AXA Equitable Life Insurance Company. Ms. Goodstein is Goodstein also executive vice president of marketing and a member of the company’s executive management committee. The announcement was made by Christopher M. “Kip” Condron, chairman and CEO of AXA Equitable, to whom Ms. Goodstein reports. “With her creative talent and outstanding project execution skills, Barbara is the ideal candidate to develop and lead AXA Equitable’s enterprise-wide innovation strategy,” he said. As chief innovation officer, Ms. Goodstein is responsible for growth initiatives across AXA Equitable. She heads a newly-formed marketing and innovation business group that serves as an incubator for new business ideas, where concepts are explored, tested, and brought to market quickly. Ms. Goodstein joined AXA Equitable in July 2005 as executive vice president, marketing and product development. She earned her MBA in marketing from Columbia University Graduate School of Business and her BA from Brown University. She holds NASD Series 7, 63 and 24 registrations.

ING U.S. Financial Services announced today that it has named Debbie Holcombe to head U.S. Workforce Diversity. Holcombe Holcombe previously served as head of brand development. In her new role, Holcombe will be responsible for advancing the company’s diversity initiatives, including talent recruitment, retention and development. She will partner with executive leadership, business management, stakeholders and employees to foster a diverse and inclusive work environment. She will also serve as the U.S. representative on ING’s Global Diversity Council. “Debbie has been a driving force promoting the company’s core values around diversity,” said Larry Milan, head of human resources, ING U.S. Financial Services. “Her knowledge of the industry, coupled with her passion and broad perspective of the organization, positions her well to help strengthen the company’s culture and reputation as an employer that embraces diversity.” Ms. Holcombe has over 20 years of experience in the financial services industry. In her previous role as head of Brand Development, her primary responsibilities included brand standards and employee engagement. Ms. Holcombe attended Temple University in Philadelphia. ING is a global financial institution of Dutch origin offering banking, insurance and asset management to more than 75 million private, corporate and institutional clients in more than 50 countries. For more information, visit www.ing.com.

SAN FRANCISCO —Bank of the West announced that Maria Lazzarini has been promoted to executive vice president and will take Lazzarini responsibility for management of the bank’s Northern California Division, a 102-branch network providing consumer and business banking services, predominantly in the greater Bay Area. Executive Vice President Fran Lopez was named to head the bank’s Community and Public Relations function, responsible Lopez for the bank’s corporate philanthropy and for internal and external communications. Lazzarini, a distinguished 24-year Bank of the West veteran with roots in East Bay branch banking, served in international, commercial and corporate banking positions before rising through the management ranks. Lopez, who joined Bank of the West in 1993, most recently managed the corporate marketing function and previously managed retail banking administration. She was formerly a Citibank manager, both in New York and in California. Both executives will continue to be based at the San Francisco headquarters. Founded in 1874, $58.4 billion-asset Bank of the West (www.bankofthewest.com) offers a full range of personal, business, trust and international banking services and currently operates more than 700 retail and commercial banking locations in 19 western and midwestern states.

P RO F I L E S I N D I V E R S IT Y J O U R N A L

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2007


Bring out the best in everyone,

and you can achieve great things. The men and women of Lockheed Martin are involved in some of the most important projects in the world. Though naturally diverse, our team shares a common goal: mission success. Our differences make us stronger because we can draw on the widest possible range of unique perspectives. Resulting in innovative solutions to complex challenges. Lockheed Martin. One company. One team.

www.lockheedmartin.com Š 2007 Lockheed Martin Corporation


Lourdes F. Diaz Joins Sodexho’s Diversity Office Lourdes Diaz has recently joined the diversity office at Sodexho, in Gaithersburg, Maryland. She is a senior director of diversity relaDiaz tions, part of the executive team. Under her new role, she is responsible for driving the diversity and inclusion message to internal stakeholders and managing external relationships. Lourdes holds a leadership role in representing Sodexho within the marketplace, and is committed to promoting best diversity practices. Before joining Sodexho Ms. Diaz was the vice president for corporate relations and the director of the procurement council at the National Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce (NGLCC). Lourdes joined the NGLCC in the spring of 2006 and directed the corporate relations and supplier diversity departments. She holds a BA in marketing from Loyola University in Chicago.

Machelle A. McAdory Named VP at Chrysler Financial Machelle A. McAdory was appointed vice president, human resources and administrative services, for Chrysler Financial in July 2007. Prior McAdory to this position, Ms. McAdory was senior manager, human resources, global procurement and supply, at Chrysler Group. She reports to Paul Knauss, president and chief executive officer for Chrysler Financial. McAdory is responsible for all aspects 10

P RO F I L E S I N D I V E R S IT Y J O U R N A L

of human resources strategic planning and implementation including organizational effectiveness, employee relations, diversity, employment, compensation and benefits, leadership and professional development and facilities services. McAdory joined the company in 1987 as a placement and development coordinator. She has a bachelor’s degree in industrial administration from GMI Engineering and Management Institute and a master’s degree from the University of Michigan.

Mr. McMahon joined AXA Equitable in April 2005 as senior vice president to launch the company’s strategic initiatives group. In that role he was responsible for the development and implementation of strategies to increase revenue growth in the company’s retail and wholesale distribution channels. He was promoted to executive vice president and elected to the company’s executive management committee in September 2005. Mr. McMahon earned a BS from Fairfield University and an MBA from Columbia Business School.

Andrew McMahon Appointed Chairman of AXA Advisors, LLC David L. Nelson Named NEW YORK— VP, Treasury, at Andrew Chrysler Financial McMahon, executive vice president of AXA Equitable Life Insurance Company, has McMahon become chairman of AXA Advisors, LLC, the company’s retail distribution channel and broker/dealer. He will succeed Robert S. Jones, ChFC, CLU, who retired from the company on June 30 after a successful 41-year career. Most recently, Mr. McMahon held the position of chief operating officer of retail distribution. He will continue to serve as a member of the company’s executive management committee. The announcement was made by Christopher M. “Kip” Condron, chairman and CEO of AXA Equitable, to whom Mr. McMahon continues to report. Mr. McMahon is responsible for the company’s retail distribution channel, including approximately 6,000 financial professionals and 60 branch offices nationwide and in Puerto Rico. In his role as chairman, he will continue to drive strategy for profitable growth across retail distribution, focusing on management development, recruiting, retention, and development of new and experienced financial professionals, and veteran productivity.

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2007

David L. Nelson was appointed vice president, treasury, Chrysler Financial, in July 2007. Prior to this position, Nelson was director, Nelson investor relations, North America, with Chrysler Group. Mr. Nelson reports to the chief financial officer for Chrysler Financial. Nelson is responsible for all treasury functions for the company. This includes capital markets funding, cash management, asset-liability and pension management, interest rate risk management and development of financing structures that optimize the company’s capital structure. In addition, as a management spokesman, Nelson maintains relationships with rating agencies, banks and institutional investors. Nelson joined the company in 1990 as a financial analyst. He has both a master’s degree in economics and an MBA in finance from the University of Detroit.


Pfizer Hires New Vice President and Chief Talent Officer

President of National Center for Cultural Healing Joins Ivy Planning Group

Theresa Cropper Joins Perkins Coie as Director of Diversity

NEW YORK— Pfizer has announced that Dr. Tanya Clemons, a senior executive with extensive experience in leadership Clemons and organization change at Microsoft and IBM, will join Pfizer as vice president and chief talent officer in November. Dr. Clemons will report to Mary McLeod, the senior vice president for human resources. She will be a member of the HR leadership team and Pfizer’s senior management team. Dr. Clemons will have responsibility for enterprise-wide organization development, talent and learning strategies and play a critical role in shaping the new culture. She will lead the company’s senior executive talent development, global people development and succession processes. Dr. Clemons is currently a corporate vice president for Microsoft, where she is responsible for leadership development, talent management, employee learning and training, organization development, and change initiatives. Prior to joining Microsoft, she held leadership roles at IBM, Georgia-Pacific and Anheuser-Busch. Dr. Clemons earned a BA in psychology from the University of New Orleans and a PhD in organizational psychology from Louisiana State University.

ROCKVILLE, Md.—Ivy Planning Group LLC (Ivy), a fullservice management consulting firm headquartered in Rockville, Carrillo Md., has announced that David Bear Carrillo, founder and president of The National Center for Cultural Healing, has joined Ivy as a senior consultant. An American Indian originally from Utah, Mr. Carrillo contributes to Ivy his talents in the areas of cultural diversity, cultural competence and organizational development. He is widely known as an expert facilitator of highly interactive learning environments. Mr. Carrillo has worked with organizations that include Texaco, Johnson & Johnson, AmeriCorps VISTA, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Indian Affairs. The National Center for Cultural Healing and Ivy collaborated jointly on a project in 2006, and found their partnership to be valuable and rewarding. According to Ivy’s president, Janet Crenshaw Smith, Mr. Carrillo “represents a special addition to our diversity consulting and training practice. His expert knowledge of diversity and inclusion, organizational dynamics and culture, and of the unique American and American Indian relationship and experience, will prove invaluable to Ivy and to our clients.”

CHICAGO— Perkins Coie is pleased to announce that Theresa Cropper has joined the firm as its new director of diversity and Cropper professional development. She joins the firm from DLA Piper Rudnick Gray, where she was the national director of diversity responsible for coordinating the efforts to recruit, retain and promote the diverse attorney. “At Perkins Coie, we value diversity as part of our culture and pride ourselves on our diversity initiatives. Theresa’s wealth of experience will be invaluable as we continue to develop a workforce that reflects the richness of diversity within our communities,” said Robert Giles, managing partner. With more than 650 lawyers in 15 offices across the United States and in China, Perkins Coie serves companies ranging in size from start-ups to FORTUNE 100. Many of the firm’s clients are market leaders in traditional industries and emerging technology markets.

Dreier Stein & Kahan LLP Announces 2007 California Bar Foundation Scholarship Recipient SANTA MONICA, Calif.—Dreier Stein & Kahan LLP has announced that Catherine Pugh, aspiring civil rights Pugh attorney, is the recipient of the firm’s 2007 California Bar Foundation Scholarship. Dreier Stein & Kahan LLP, along with five other law firms in California, has pledged $30,000 to the

P RO F I L E S I N D I V E R S I T Y J O U R N A L

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2007

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scholarship program over three years. Ms. Pugh’s commitment to social justice led her to attend California Western School of Law, where she continued her path of improving the lives of those around her. Ms. Pugh was selected from a nationwide pool of applicants as an associate with the Council of Legal Education, a program that pairs minority students in criminal justice programs with attorneys of color. In addition to her professional accomplishments, Ms. Pugh is in the top of her law school class, a breast cancer survivor, a mother of three and a foster parent to a number of foster children. “Catherine embodies all of the qualities that Dreier Stein and Kahan LLP embraces—perseverance, the drive to get things done and a desire to use her legal training to help others,” said Stanton “Larry” Stein, partner at Dreier Stein & Kahan LLP.

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The California Bar Foundation is distributing $187,500 in law school scholarships to 39 students from 17 California law schools. Recipients are nominated based on their dedication to public service, academic performance, and financial need. Dreier Stein and Kahan LLP is national full-service law firm headquartered in Santa Monica’s Water Garden complex, with a second west coast office at Fox Plaza in Century City.

Bryan Murphy Receives Silver Vanguard Award From Chief Learning Officer Magazine LOS ANGELES— Bryan Murphy, executive vice president and chief claims officer, Farmers Insurance Group, has received the 2007 Learning In Practice

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2007

Silver Vanguard Award sponsored by Chief Learning Officer (CLO) magazine. The magazine recognizes industry leaders for Murphy excellence in enterprise learning. The awards ceremony was held at the Loews Ventana Canyon Resort in Tucson, Arizona on Tuesday, Oct. 2 in conjunction with the Fall 2007 Chief Learning Officer Symposium. “This is really an honor, not just for me or the claims department, but for Farmers Insurance,” Mr. Murphy stated. “It shows Farmers’ continued pursuit of learning in order to serve our customers. I am very proud of the Farmers team effort and the recognition given us by

PDJ


by David Casey

Why Some Think Barak Obama is Not Black Enough

W

ell folks, here we are at the end of 2007. Many of you reading this are full time practitioners of diversity management or at least have it as a significant part of your occupation. I’d be interested to know how many of you feel that our country’s dialogue around what we call race has evolved. I don’t believe it has. We are often times all too eager to discuss the sexier issues related to diversity management—multicultural markets, global economies, cultural competency, balanced scorecards, etc. Yet, we still find ourselves grappling with why people think Barak Obama is not black enough or shocked to find that Rev. Al Sharpton and Strom Thurman may be distant relatives. Unfortunately, we have never fully vetted the issues surrounding how we got to this point. The fact is that there is no biological basis for defining ourselves along racial lines as most of us know them. While the notion of race is not grounded in biological reality, it nevertheless has a very real historical and sociological basis in our country’s culture. I had the opportunity to catch a series titled, Race—The Power of an Illusion on PBS. This series outlines how we have come to categorize ourselves as different races as a means of expressing social distinctions within a population that has considerable physical variation.

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Consider a couple of facts/thoughts discussed during the series— 1. Race is a modern idea. 2. Race has no genetic basis. 3. Human subspecies don’t exist. 4. Skin color really is only skin deep. 5. Most variation is within, not between, races. 6. Slavery predates race. 7. Race and freedom evolved together. 8. Race justified social inequalities as natural. 9. Race isn’t biological, but racism is still real. 10. Color blindness will not end racism. I have told many people that saying that one is color-blind is not a good aspiration. To those of you who have heard me say that, can I have a takeback? Given that skin color is truly only skin deep, I’m ready to sign up for the Color-Blind Society. This does not negate the relevance of cultural distinctions or the impact of practices and policies steeped in racism; it negates only supposed racial distinctions based on biology. I am very proud of my African cultural heritage, yet I also realize and appreciate those of African heritage with skin tones as light as Colin Powell and as dark as Wesley Snipes. Far be it for me to try to cover all there is to cover in a few paragraphs, so let me point you to some resources and things to do that will help to shift our paradigms around what we think of as ‘race’:

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2007

• PBS Series: Race—The Power of an Illusion. Go to www.pbs.org/race to learn more about the science, history and societal impacts of this thing we call race. • While many think the world has been shaped by racial differences among world cultures, the book Guns, Germs and Steel, by Jared Diamond, explores the cultural evolution of world cultures by climactic zones and their relationship to today’s world order. • Be conscious about using the term ‘race’ to define and characterize people by physical variations among groups. One of my goals with this series of articles was to move the dialogue around diversity management forward and to spark new thoughts and paradigms. If I have done nothing else, I hope to have accomplished that. On that note, I would like to thank Jim Rector and the staff at PDJ for inviting me to share various perspectives with you this past year. This will be my last in this series, as I am pleased to transition the role of Chief Diversity Officer to Linda Jimenez, as I take over new responsibilities. Linda will be taking over this series in the new year. I also want to thank you for the positive response to this series and for your passion for moving this work and the profession of diversity practitioner to new heights. I wish you all the best and hope to continue these conversations as our paths cross in the future. PDJ David Casey is VP of Talent Management at WellPoint, Inc. His column appears in each issue of Profiles in Diversity Journal.


TM

GET MORE OUT OF YOUR CAREER NOW AT DELL At Dell, w e’re committed committed tto o bringing ttogether ogether indiv viduals At we’re individuals witth diverse diverse back grounds, thinking, leadership and ideas, with backgrounds, d arming them with the bes tools to to ensur e their the eir sucsucand bestt tools ensure cesss. We We belie ve this helps drive d e innovation driv innovation and mak kes Dell cess. believe makes m e dynamic c mor ompany. Through Through career career de velop pment, a more company. development, me entoring i programs, network netw work k groups groups and d products produc d cts like like mentoring programs, e Dell Latitude Latitude D630 D630 with h Intel Intel® Centrino Centrino® Duo Processor Proc o essor the Technology, we offer every employee T ec echnology chnology, w e off er the resources ressources to to help e very em ployee achieve potential. ensure ach hieve their pot ential. Ourr goal is tto o ensur e that that Dell D is a great work, grow and gr e t place ea place tto ow ork, gr ow a nd aspire. aspire. Success time.. Captur Capture Suc ces e s rreal eal time e it at at Dell.

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Dell Dell and and the the Dell Dell llogo ogo are are trademarks trademarks of of Dell Dell Inc. Inc. ©2007 ©2007 Dell Dell Inc. Inc. All All rights rights reserved. reserved. Intel, Intel, the the Intel Intel logo, logo, Intel Intel Inside, Inside, the the Intel Intel Inside Inside logo, logo, Centrino Centrino and the Centrino are countries. Centrino logo ar e trademarks trade emarks or registered registered trademarks trademarks of Intel Intel Corporation Co orporation or its subsidiaries in the United United States States and other c ountries. Dell Inc. part Inc. cannot cannot be be held held responsible responsible for for errors errors in in typography typography or or photography. photography. Dell Dell is is an an AA/EO AA/EO employer. employer. Workforce Workforce diversity diversity is is an an essential essential p art of of Dell’s Dell’s commitment commitment to to quality and to to the future. future. We We encourage encourage you you to to apply, apply y, whatever whatever your w your race, race, gender, genderr, color, colorr, religion, religion, national national origin, age, age, disability, disability y, marital status, status, sexual sexual orientation, orientatio on, or veteran veteran status. status.

Dell recommends Windows Vista Business


The Bottom Line: Corporate Performance and Women’s Representation on Boards By Catalyst

T

he Bottom Line: Corporate Performance and Women’s Representation on Boards,” Catalyst’s most recent study, finds that, on average, financial performances at Fortune 500 companies are higher at companies with higher percentages of women on their boards of directors.

The study looked at three commonly used measures of financial performance—return on equity (ROE), return on sales (ROS), and return on invested capital (ROIC)—from 2001 to 2004, in conjunction with women board director data from Catalyst censuses from 2001 and 2003. It found that, in

terms of ROE, companies with the highest percentages of women board directors outperformed companies with the lowest percentages of women board directors by 53 percent (see Figure 1). For ROS, the number was 42 percent (see Figure 2), and for ROIC, the number was 66 percent (see Figure 3). continued on page 18

Figure 1 Return on Equity by Women’s

Figure 2 Return on Sales by Women’s

Representation on the Board

Representation on the Board

Companies with more WBD outperform those with the least by 66%

+42%

ROE

ROS

ROIC

+53%

9.1%

13.9%

Top Quartile WBD

© Catalyst 2007

16

Women’s Representation on the Board

Companies with more WBD outperform those with the least by 42%

Companies with more WBD outperform those with the least by 53%

Bottom Quartile WBD

Figure 3 Return on Invested Capital by

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9.7%

Bottom Quartile WBD

13.7 %

Top Quartile WBD

© Catalyst 2007

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2007

+66%

4.7%

7.7 %

Bottom Quartile WBD

Top Quartile WBD

© Catalyst 2007


In a time of rapid change for our company and for our industry, we believe that the unique perspective of each Pfizer employee is vital. Why? Because the tough health care challenges people are facing today call for new, different, and diverse ways of thinking. That’s why we’re implementing a global strategy to ensure Pfizer’s culture not only respects, but also leverages each individual employee’s background, character, and life experiences. We’re putting those unique perspectives to

work to find new, innovative solutions for patients, and better ways of working with our customers, our partners, and the communities we serve. At Pfizer, we believe diversity means an inclusive and empowering work environment. The result? A happier, healthier tomorrow for us all.


Women’s Representation on Boards continued

Figure 4

Table 1

Financial Performance at Companies With Three or More Women Board Directors (WBD)

Consumer Discretionary Consumer Staples Financial Healthcare Industrials Information Technology Materials

ROE

ROS

ROIC

* * — * * * *

* * * * * * —

* * — * * * *

16.7%

16.8%

Average

Average

11.5%

11.5% 10%

%

Average

6.2%

* Top quartile outperforms bottom quartile — Top quartile does not outperform bottom quartile ROE © Catalyst 2007

These numbers aren’t just a result of a few high-performing companies or industries. As you can see from Table 1, the link between corporate performance and women board directors holds across industries. In addition, corporate performance is stronger than average at companies with at least three women board directors, as Figure 4 illustrates. These results follow Catalyst’s 2004 report, The Bottom Line: Connecting Corporate Performance and Gender Diversity, which showed that the Fortune 500 companies with the highest percentages of women corporate officers

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ROS

ROIC

© Catalyst 2007

experienced, on average, a 35.1 percent higher return on equity (ROE) and 34.0 percent higher total return to shareholders (TRS) than did those with the lowest percentages of women corporate officers. While none of this data proves or implies causation, the fact that women board directors and women corporate officers go hand-in-hand with high corporate performance adds to the business case for diversity at organizations, which Catalyst continues to study. This study was authored by Lois Joy, Ph.D., Director, Research, and Nancy M. Carter, Ph.D., Vice President, Research, at Catalyst Inc. and by

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2007

Harvey M. Wagner, Ph.D., Professor, Kenan-Flagler Business School, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and Sriram Narayanan, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Eli Broad School of Business, Michigan State University, East Lansing. PDJ Founded in 1962, Catalyst is the leading nonprofit corporate membership research and advisory organization working globally with businesses and the professions to build inclusive environments and expand opportunities for women and business. For more information on this report and to see its appendices, which list the companies with highest and lowest percentages of women board directors, visit www.catalyst.org.


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22 Supplying Halliburton 26 Internal Champion Profiles 34 Supplier Profiles


PHOTO • JIM

SYSTEL INC.


Special Feature

Halliburton

T H E T R A N S F O R M AT I O N O F S U P P L I E R D I V E R S I T Y

Supplying Halliburton

O

nly a few multinationals can get a firm handle on supplier diversity. Their size and scale of operations often present challenges that slow the pace of change. And who can fault them? After all, blending the culture and norms of dozens of countries into a cohesive plan is daunting, to say the least. That’s why Halliburton’s work in supplier

diversity is so remarkable. The company has embraced every aspect of supplier diversity and taken each aspect to a new level. Scores of companies owe their existence to the opportunities Halliburton brought to them. Take a look at what Halliburton has wrought; you’ll be impressed and inspired.

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Halliburton

Supplier Diversity

Step Changes: Halliburton Transforms Supplier Diversity Program into Diverse Global Supplier Base

W

ith record-breaking global consumption of oil and gas, Halliburton is enjoying robust demand for its oilfield

products and services. As its operations expand to meet customer needs, the company is extending the growth opportunities to its own suppliers. Those who want to grow and globalize have an unprecedented opportunity with Halliburton. “We need a diverse supply chain organization to meet the demands of the ever-growing worldwide marketplace,” said Len Cooper, senior vice president, supply chain, and Halliburton’s primary executive focal point for supplier diversity. “We are committed to creating a business environment where diverse suppliers are encouraged to participate and get a fair and equal chance to compete for our business based on the

Snapshot of Halliburton

relative value they bring to Halliburton.”

OVERVIEW Halliburton adds value across the entire lifecycle of oil and gas reservoirs, starting with exploration and development, moving through production, operations, maintenance, conversion and refining, and finally to infrastructure and abandonment. Operating in nearly 70 countries working in two major business segments: Drilling and Evaluation; Completion and Production. These segments offer a broad array of products and services to upstream oil and gas customers worldwide, ranging from integrated software and services to drilling tools, logging, and perforating technology, from manufacturing of drill bits and other down-hole and completion tools to pressure pumping services. Halliburton’s vision is to be the preferred upstream service company for the development of global oil and gas assets.

HALLIBURTON’S SUPPLIER DIVERSITY FOCUS

Redefining Supplier Diversity

H

alliburton has operations in approximately 70 countries. Sourcing close to the customer improves Halliburton’s

ability to deliver products and services in these countries when and where they are needed, and at the right price. Further, it helps develop communities around the world where Halliburton operates. This sustainable sourcing, of which supplier diversity is a key component, is one of the four elements of Halliburton’s global sustainability strategy. Outside the United States, Halliburton offices locally procure more than $1 billion in spend. The company is devel-

Creating mutually beneficial business relationships that deliver value

oping local supply chain organizations in Europe, Eurasia,

to our company and our customers.

Africa, the Middle East, Asia Pacific, Canada and Latin

HALLIBURTON’S DEFINITION OF SUPPLIER DIVERSITY

America. These regional organizations will source closer to the

Supplier diversity is a proactive business process which seeks to

customer, with the goal of improving logistics capability and

diversify our supplier base, expand business opportunities, and

cost structure.

develop a supply chain that reflects the diversity of the communities and countries where we work.

In light of this growing regional supply chain organization, Halliburton is redefining what it means to be a “diverse” supplier.

EMPLOYEES

“What is considered diverse in the United States is not

50,000 in 70 countries.

necessarily diverse in Africa or Asia,” said Halliburton

COMPANY HEADQUARTERS & WEB SITE

Health, Safety, Environment and Sustainability Director

Houston, Texas

Helen O’Connor.

www.halliburton.com

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“Supplier Diversity for Halliburton now encompasses

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Special Feature

Halliburton

“We need a diverse supply chain organization to meet the demands of the ever-growing worldwide marketplace.” LEN COOPER, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, SUPPLY CHAIN

national and local content suppliers, small-to-medium business

its U.S. supplier diversity initiative and expanding its global

enterprises (SMEs) and ethnic minority businesses (EMBs), in

presence. Activities include conducting internal training,

addition to women’s business enterprises (WBEs) and minority

expanding second-tier diverse supplier reporting by some of its

business enterprises (MBEs).”

top suppliers, establishing local champions across the United

Halliburton is establishing country-specific criteria to identify

States with a regional structure to follow in 2008, designing

quality suppliers around the world that can support the

and executing targeted local content strategies, and developing

company’s growth in international markets. It also is develop-

strategic suppliers over the next five years.

ing an innovative supplier coaching program that will help U.S. suppliers move into international areas with Halliburton’s support and expertise. In exchange, these suppliers will mentor national content suppliers in underdeveloped markets. “Diverse suppliers and national content suppliers can learn from each other while growing their businesses internationally,” said O’Connor. “Getting to this next level also means challenging ourselves to lead in undefined and uncharted territory,” Cooper pointed out. In this broader view of the world, Halliburton’s vision is to be recognized as a global leader in supplier diversity and national supplier development in countries with open markets. Its mission is to enhance competitive positioning in global markets by identifying, developing and ensuring the inclusion of diverse and national suppliers as an integral component of the supply chain. Toward these ends, in 2007-2008 Halliburton is refining

Building Supplier Competencies for Globalization

T

o support and encourage the development of diverse suppliers who have global capabilities or the potential to

be a global provider, the company introduced the BEST program in late 2006. BEST—Business Education and Supplier Transformation—is a program intended to foster closer relationships with diverse suppliers that will play a key role in Halliburton’s future. “BEST suppliers are a unique group,” said Ingrid Robinson, senior manager of Global Supplier Diversity. “These are suppliers who are equipped to meet our future growth needs. We bring them ‘behind the curtain’ to understand Halliburton’s supply chain strategies. We want to increase alignment with them, foster talent development in their organ-

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Halliburton

Supplier Diversity

1

H A L L I B U R T O N

Halliburton’s Three-Tiered

Internal Champion Profiles

1 MARK McDANIEL Healthy suppliers are good for business. As a major oilfield services provider, Halliburton understands this and knows that strengthening its own supplier base is key to its sustainability. “We are always on the lookout for diversity in our supply base, and we want our suppliers to be as healthy as possible,” said Mark McDaniel, vice president of procurement and logistics for Halliburton. “We look for opportunities to help them grow their businesses. Some of our diverse suppliers have ‘hit the wall’ in terms of growing and expanding their business capacity. They may need access to capital, mentoring or business consulting. We give them training and mentoring to get over that wall and take their business to the next level if they are interested.” Many Halliburton customers require their suppliers to have active supplier diversity and local content programs in place. With its commitment to developing diverse suppliers, Halliburton has taken the requirement a step further. “Our supplier diversity program is on a par with most of our customers and it has become a differentiator for us,” McDaniel said.

Executive Advisory Board (EAB) comprised of senior executives who influence the company’s strategic direction

izations and build diverse supplier competency in our core business areas,” she said. “Networking events create opportunities for BEST suppliers and Halliburton senior leaders to get to know each other. Participants also attend training sessions taught by Halliburton subject-matter experts and external partner organizations.” Currently, 10 diverse supplier companies are participating in BEST and enjoying unparalleled access to Halliburton management and business growth opportunities. In its first year, the program has already generated positive results for BEST suppliers. For example, the chief executive officer of MicroSMART Systems Inc., a manufacturer of state-of-the-art oilfield tools, attended a supplier trip with the company’s chief procurement officer. Custom truck manufacturer General

KELL LEWIS For Kell Lewis, being a Halliburton Supplier Diversity Champion is about opening doors. Lewis is the senior supply chain manager for Halliburton’s Gulf of Mexico operations. Based in Lafayette, La., he is responsible for procurement and logistics for all continued on page 28

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Truck and Body, a Halliburton supplier for more than 20 years, has proposed exploring the creation of a new business line in partnership with the company. As a BEST supplier, Icon Information Consultants discussed opportunities for increasing its contract service levels directly with the company’s chief information officer. And being part of the BEST program enabled LegalWATCH Inc. to expand the legal training it provides Halliburton in the United States to some international locations.


Special Feature

Halliburton

Supplier Diversity Corporate Support Structure

2 3 The Supplier Diversity Council (SDC) comprised of directors and managers

Supplier Diversity Champions

who oversee day-to-day business management

provide on-the-ground assistance for minority, women and small businesses navigating Halliburton’s organization in the United States

Building Ownership for Supplier Diversity

The SDC identifies barriers to supplier diversity and imple-

alliburton’s supplier diversity vision and initiatives are ambi-

H

ments strategies to ensure the success of various supplier

tious, and the company realizes they can be achieved only

diversity initiatives.

if managers take ownership for them. Its three-tiered supplier diver-

“Many of our program ideas, including the need for a supplier

sity corporate support structure is designed to build this sense

capacity building program like BEST, have come from the supplier

of ownership.

diversity council,” explained Robinson. “They understand how dif-

The top tier of the structure is the Executive Advisory Board (EAB), comprising senior executives who influence the company’s strategic direction. As Halliburton’s chief advocates for supplier diversity, EAB members ensure support for the vision, mission and programs at all levels. During quarterly meetings, the advisory board reviews supplier diversity performance metrics to assure alignment with business strategies, advises on policies and assists in removing roadblocks. EAB members build accountability for supplier diversity in their own organizations and ensure that management and departments support supplier diversity. The Supplier Diversity Council (SDC), comprised of directors and managers, forms the

“Networking events create opportunities for BEST suppliers and Halliburton senior leaders to get to know each other. Participants also attend training sessions taught by Halliburton subject-matter experts and external partner organizations.”

second tier of the structure. The SDC meets quarterly as well, prior to each EAB meeting.

INGRID ROBINSON, SENIOR MANAGER OF GLOBAL SUPPLIER DIVERSITY.

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Halliburton

Supplier Diversity

Internal Champion Profiles KELL LEWIS, continued

2

materials moving offshore. Lewis represents Halliburton on the board of directors for the Women’s Business Council Gulf Coast. “Sending purchasing agents to meetings of these organizations has helped to open their eyes to the benefits of working with diverse suppliers,” said Lewis. These same purchasing agents have long, well-established supplier relationships, so bringing new suppliers into the mix requires work on both sides of the table. “I try to open the doors for diverse suppliers to come in and tell us what their capabilities are, but it’s up to them to sell themselves. They need to be able to show us the value of doing business with them,” Lewis said. “We owe it to our communities to figure out how we can work with small businesses and businesses owned by minorities and women,” he added. “There are a lot of ingenious folks out there with innovative ideas, new approaches and ways to do things better, faster and cheaper.”

The company will soon provide Web-based training for all employees and currently provides training to the Strategic Training Exchange Program (STEP) participants to develop local supply chain leadership in every region.

ferent initiatives impact profitability and they know how to ensure buy-in. When the council takes ownership and drives programs to support business goals, they embed supplier diversity throughout the company. With this structure, the role of the supplier diversity organization is to facilitate and administer the initiatives that the council puts forward.” At the third tier of the internal structure, Supplier Diversity Champions provide on-the-ground assistance for

VERONICA BROWN As Halliburton’s Procurement Center manager responsible for $100 million in total annual spend, Veronica Brown believes in the value of supplier diversity. Brown routinely looks for diverse suppliers when her internal clients in information technology, corporate and support functions need products and services. “When Tier One opportunities are not available, we try to negotiate contracts that require our suppliers to provide subcontracts to diverse suppliers,” she said. “We just renegotiated a $4 million-a-year continued

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minority, women and small businesses navigating Halliburton’s organization in the United States. “We have to understand departmental sourcing processes so we can connect diverse suppliers with key decision-makers,” said Kell Lewis, senior manager of procurement, materials and logistics for the Gulf of Mexico region, which includes coastal Louisiana, Texas, Mississippi and Alabama. “Next year, we plan to have about 40 champions active in our regional structure, including field procurement and logistics, manufacturing, product service lines (PSLs), support functions and international sourcing groups.” In addition to this demonstrated leadership, Halliburton relies on policies, training, communication and recognition to educate its workforce of almost 50,000 about supplier diversity resources and processes. The company will soon provide


Special Feature

Halliburton

“We have to understand Internal Champion Profiles

3

departmental sourcing

VERONICA BROWN, continued

processes so we can

contract. There is a clause requiring that 15 percent of the supplier’s purchases be from MBEs (Minority Business Enterprises) or WBEs (Women’s Business Enterprises).” Non-traditional suppliers have proven to be highly flexible and able to accommodate Halliburton’s needs. “They are happy to have the opportunity to work with a company of our size and really go the extra mile to give us good customer service,” Brown said. “A company that is not big and does not have a famous name can still provide the quality of service that we’re looking for.”

connect diverse suppliers with key decision-makers.” KELL LEWIS, SENIOR MANAGER OF PROCUREMENT, MATERIALS AND LOGISTICS FOR THE GULF OF MEXICO REGION

GREG SMITH Halliburton Strategic Sourcing Manager Greg Smith is in a unique position to influence supplier diversity, to the benefit of suppliers and the company alike. Through Halliburton’s methodical sourcing process, Smith and his team have identified suppliers that qualify as minority- or womenowned businesses and could gain an advantage from certification. “We encouraged a long-time supplier to become certified as a Women’s Business Enterprise (WBE),” he said. “As a WBE, she is now able to look for opportunities to win contracts that her company had not previously pursued because of the procurement leads and contacts provided by WBENC.” Smith also helps suppliers navigate Halliburton’s organization. “We occasionally find an MBE or WBE that is a niche supplier for one segment of our business, but is also capable of serving other areas. We look for opportunities within the company and direct continued

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Halliburton

Supplier Diversity

Internal Champion Profiles

4

GREG SMITH, continued

them to the Supply Chain category managers who can help grow their business.” Some of these suppliers have put strategic sourcing to work in their own companies, Smith pointed out. “After attending our BEST (Business Education and Supplier Transformation) training program, one of our suppliers hired staff to implement strategic sourcing. By applying the training, they should realize lower costs, and in turn be positioned to pass on lower costs to Halliburton.” SHERRY WILLIAMS In her role as co-chair of Halliburton’s Supplier Diversity Executive Advisory Board, Sherry Williams attended the 2007 Women’s Business Enterprise National Council annual conference. It was the first time Williams, vice president and corporate secretary for Halliburton, understood the extent to which women-owned businesses contribute to the economy. “It really opened my eyes when I saw the number of talented women doing quality work and making quality products, with significant manufacturing and revenuegenerating capacity,” she recalled. “Yet, large business does not gravitate to them naturally. One of the most important aspects of supplier diversity programs is that they help these businesses be successful. “There is connectivity among large businesses, small businesses, and small-business employees and their livelihoods. I knew this in the abstract, but to see it up close was meaningful to me,” she said.

instructor-led and/or Web-based training for all employees and currently provides training to the Strategic Training Exchange Program (STEP) participants to develop local supply chain leadership in every region. The supplier diversity organization awards its Quarterly Advocate Recognition to an employee who demonstrates a thorough understanding of supplier diversity and exceeds expectations for supporting supplier diversity objectives. Each year, one quarterly award recipient represents Halliburton at the national conference of the National Minority Supplier Development Council (NMSDC) and the Women’s Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC). “This exposure drives home the value of supplier diversity and helps to solidify the advocate as a true champion of supplier diversity,” Robinson commented. “The advocates who have attended a national conference have all awarded multimillion dollar contracts to diverse suppliers as a result.” Employees who create new opportunities of significant value or assist diverse suppliers in resolving an issue may receive

continued on page 32

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a Halliburton MVP (Maximizing Value-Added Performance)


Special Feature

Halliburton

Photo courtesy of Grady Carter

financial award. Through September, a number of employees

Each year, one quarterly

had received MVP awards for their impact on a supplier’s relationship with Halliburton.

award recipient

Sharing the Responsibility

represents Halliburton

H

at the national

alliburton sets annual targets to drive performance and deliver supplier diversity results. Key performance indicators

(KPIs) measure progress and success in supplier diversity in the following areas: • Percent of annual expenditure increase with new minority-, women- and small-business enterprises • Percent of annual expenditure increase with existing

conference of the National Minority Supplier Development

minority-, women- and small-business enterprises • Number and percent increase of first-tier suppliers reporting second-tier diverse spend

Council (NMSDC) and the Women’s Business

• Number and percent of new and existing diverse suppliers • Number and percent increase of suppliers certified as minority-, women- or small-business enterprises in the United States

Enterprise National Council (WBENC). P RO F I L E S I N D I V E R S I T Y J O U R N A L

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Supplier Diversity

Internal Champion Profiles

5

SHERRY WILLIAMS, continued

Williams knows that many perceive her industry as insensitive to diversity. “It is important to know that Halliburton senior executives are concerned with these issues. Diversity is a company priority and a value. We believe we can support supplier diversity across the board and not sacrifice quality and integrity.” HELEN O’CONNOR Having diverse suppliers is critical, not because it’s fair or helps a department or business unit achieve the right metrics, but because it breeds choice and opportunity. “Diversity throughout our business breeds different ways of thinking and solving problems,” explained Helen O’Connor, director of health, safety, environment and sustainability for Halliburton. “If we are all like-minded, there is only so much value we can bring. If our suppliers are all the same, then what we get will be the same. We become stunted and can’t relate as effectively to our customers and communities wherever we are operating in the world.” “It makes good business sense to support choice through diversity in our suppliers. Diversity is good for us, our clients and the industry because it encourages different perspectives and offers increased opportunities for meeting our needs. I think this makes us stronger,” she said. Halliburton is in a position to offer choices and opportunities to suppliers, as well. “We are increasingly expected to bring value to local economies in the different regions

• Tracking departmental diverse supplier utilization rates by function • Incorporating supplier diversity metrics in supplier scorecards and bid evaluations. Supplier diversity reporting metrics are automated and incorporated into supply chain metrics, increasing their visibility across the organization. Metrics are reported by division, function, country, geographic region, and minority/women affiliated council in the United States. Using indicators built into the SAP system, Halliburton reports spend by gender, ethnicity, certification status and many other measures. “Our reporting system provides robust, accurate, concise and detailed reporting on a global basis,” explained Robinson. “In addition to corporate goals, some employees have formal, personal supplier diversity goals built in to their annual performance planning tool,” said Cooper. “We provide training, resources and information to business units and individuals to help them achieve their targets. The ultimate message is that diversity is not one person’s

continued

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job. It is a shared responsibility.”


Opportunities to expand its supplier base continue to present themselves as Halliburton opens new technology and manufacturing centers around the world. This brand new facility in Pune, India, is the first globally focused technology center outside North America and Europe.

Special Feature

Halliburton

Internal Champion Profiles

6

HELEN O’CONNOR, continued

where we work. Halliburton is creating regional supply centers, developing suppliers around the world and supporting local content. Through this diversified supply chain, we can expand the economic value we bring to a region,” O’Connor said. “This is one of the major ways we can ensure our sustainability as a company.”

“The ultimate message is that diversity is not one person’s job. It is a shared responsibility.”

LAWRENCE POPE Recognizing that executive buy-in influences culture change in an organization, Halliburton established an Executive Advisory Board (EAB) to oversee supplier diversity. Lawrence Pope, vice president of human resources and operational excellence for Halliburton, co-chairs the EAB. “We champion supplier diversity and ensure that Halliburton leadership is driving it as a core process,” Pope said. “The executive advisory board also ensures that supplier diversity efforts are aligned with business strategies.” Some oil and gas companies make supplier diversity a requirement when their suppliers, such as Halliburton, compete for work. What’s more, the company has a goal to go beyond compliance and lead the oilfield services industry in supplier diversity. “We do not have special criteria for diverse suppliers. We evaluate diverse suppliers based on quality, cost and capabilities. Like any supplier, they have to bring value to Halliburton and our customers,” Pope said. “If they bring value, we have programs to help develop their capabilities. The stronger our suppliers are, the better it is for Halliburton, our customers and the industry.”

LEN COOPER

PDJ

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BARBARA PAULL


Special Feature

Halliburton

SUPPLIER PROFILES

General Truck Body arbara Paull is the third generation of her family to run General Truck Body (www.generalbody.com). Her grandfather founded the business in 1919 as a blacksmith shop and then a maker of horse-drawn carriages. Today, the Houston-based company designs, manufactures, installs, repairs and refurbishes customized vehicles to meet specialized customer requirements. When Paull purchased ownership and leadership of the company in 1984, aluminum van bodies were its primary product. Paull soon identified a niche market for custom truck bodies and established a custom manufacturing division to meet its needs. Building a 40-foot trailer for Halliburton’s Alaska operations helped launch General Truck Body as a designer and manufacturer of custom truck bodies for oilfield services. “Currently, the custom manufacturing division builds tech command centers, quality control vans, control houses and trailers for Halliburton,” said Paull, president and chief executive officer of General Truck Body. “The Custom Division also manufactures homeland security intervention vehicles, mobile laboratories and clinics, and mobile command and information centers. The division serves a wide range of market sectors. Customers include the city of Houston, NASA, Med-Shred and Spay-Neuter Assistance Program. “We also have a truck equipment division that represents wellrespected lines of truck equipment including service bodies, flatbeds, cranes, dump bodies, bucket trucks, liftgates, tool boxes, truck accessories and van shelving. Our truck equipment division designs and provides the right equipment combination for any commercial truck application,” Paull said. General Truck Body is a commercial truck pool for General Motors, Ford and Dodge. “Since 2004, our company has won the Ford Directors Award. We are so proud to provide quality products to our Ford fleet customers,” she added. In recent years, General Truck Body has doubled its manufacturing capacity. Revenues have continued to grow, increasing 35 percent in 2006 compared to 2005. General Truck Body has more than 150 employees working in Houston and Arlington, Texas.

B

Focus on Quality Throughout the past quarter-century, General Truck Body and Halliburton have forged a strong working relationship. “General Truck Body’s products are designed to meet our technical and functional needs in environments that range from desert to arctic,” explained Carl Wood, Halliburton senior category manager—industrial equipment. “They have been able to respond to our increased requirements and have worked diligently to resolve performance issues with some major component suppliers. The engineering departments at Halliburton and General Truck Body collaborate on equipment designs for new products and improvements to existing products.” Quality has been a consistent focus of the relationship. To improve quality, General Truck Body implemented total quality management and process controls conforming with ISO 9001 quality standard requirements. “In working with Halliburton, we have added detail and improved our quality checklist,” Paull said. “We now have production and engineering each conduct separate quality checks both during production and at the completion of each project. Each department check is performed independently. Any noted discrepancy is communicated to the appropriate team leader for corrective action. “Open, honest and clear communication continues to be key to our relationship with Halliburton. Many of our employees have visited Halliburton’s Duncan Technology Center in Oklahoma. Staff members have attended Halliburton technical programs and quality/ procurement training in Houston and Duncan.” “General Truck Body has shown their willingness to address and resolve issues both within their organization and with component providers,” Halliburton’s Wood added. “We continually strive to have a relationship which makes both of our companies better.” Paull said that communication on quality issues continues to improve as a result of General Truck Body’s participation in the Halliburton Business Education and Supplier Transformation (BEST) program. She concluded, “The combination of resources within Halliburton and General Truck Body has helped us build a better product.”

PDJ

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CHERYL LAWSON


Special Feature

Halliburton

SUPPLIER PROFILES

Duncan Industrial Solutions uncan Industrial Solutions (www.DuncanIndustrial.com) and Halliburton have more in common than deep roots in the small town of Duncan, Oklahoma. Gene Nelson worked for Halliburton before founding his business, then known as Duncan Equipment Company, in 1948, and Halliburton has been a Duncan customer ever since. Duncan Industrial Solutions is a single-source supplier of name brand industrial equipment and maintenance, repair and operations (MRO) supplies and equipment to manufacturers of any size. Its specialized integrated services unit develops tailored solutions for inventory management and production requirements. Headquartered in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, Duncan has 180 employees working in offices and client facilities in Oklahoma, Texas, Missouri, Michigan, Indiana, Virginia and New Jersey. “Duncan’s core value is to make our customers successful by creating cost savings that improve their profitability,” said Cheryl Lawson, president of Duncan Industrial Solutions. “We reward all of our employees with incentives when Duncan achieves its own financial goals.”

D

Duncan employees are actively involved in cost savings programs and process improvements that continue to provide value to Halliburton manufacturing operations. They bring experienced resources to sustain daily operations and dedicated teams to seek out and manage these value-added initiatives.” Duncan added 40 employees to its workforce to service the Halliburton contract. “It is a challenge to keep up with Halliburton’s changing requirements and the rapid growth in production we have experienced over the past two years,” Lawson acknowledged. “The new contract significantly increased the size and geographic reach of our company. It also helped give credence to our organization as a national player in our marketplace. This helped us to land a significant contract with another customer in 2007.” Another advantage Duncan has in the marketplace is certification to the ISO 9001:2000 quality standard. “Duncan is in a select group of distributors that not only has its distribution center certified, but also has certified customer integration sites. ISO 9001 certification is a requirement of Halliburton, but it helps prospective customers recognize the value of Duncan Industrial’s quality system, as well,” she said.

Keeping up with Growth

Benefiting from BEST

In 2005, Duncan was awarded a contract to service and supply five Halliburton manufacturing facilities in Oklahoma and Texas. Duncan provides MRO supplies and equipment and manufactures pumps, throttles and valve assemblies. Duncan and Halliburton work together to develop an annual cost savings goal, Lawson explained. “We work with each of Halliburton’s plants to align their savings goal with production budget requirements. Our savings goal for 2007 is $1.5 million,” she said. As part of the contract, Duncan personnel are onsite at Halliburton manufacturing facilities to manage inventory and provide point of use, product issuance, product application, technical support and other services. “Duncan employees have very close interaction with Halliburton employees,” said Andy Smith, category manager for MRO and fuels at Halliburton. “Their onsite personnel and inventories make them an integral part of our manufacturing productivity.

In 2007, Halliburton invited Duncan Industrial to participate in its Business Education and Supplier Transformation (BEST) program, and both companies will benefit. “The BEST strategic sourcing course was very valuable,” Lawson said. “It taught us a systematic method for evaluating our supply chain that will result in cost savings.” BEST also allows Duncan Industrial access to utilize key functional skills within Halliburton to develop our business with Halliburton as well as other key customers. “Throughout the years, Halliburton has treated Duncan Industrial Solutions as a partner,” Lawson added. “Halliburton is a very innovative, world-class company, and has challenged us to become a world-class organization. This provides us with opportunities for growth within Halliburton and positions our company to be a strong competitor in our marketplace.”

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E. JEAN JOHNSON


Special Feature

Halliburton

SUPPLIER PROFILES

LegalWATCH Inc. s an in-house attorney working for a Fortune 100 company, E. Jean Johnson saw employees unwittingly cause costly settlements, regulatory sanctions and even litigation through their actions and communications. “I realized there was a need to teach employees how to communicate on the front end to help them avoid lawsuits, government sanctions and negative press on the back end,” she said. In 1997, Johnson established LegalWATCH Inc. (www.legalwatch.com), a company that offers training in risk mitigation, antitrust for laymen, contracts and procurement, cultural diversity and sensitivity, discipline and performance documentation, employment law and ethics. “LegalWATCH is the only company that specializes in training management on strategies to prevent liability,” said Johnson, president and chief executive officer of LegalWATCH. As with many unique products and services, companies often do not know they need risk mitigation training. “It’s non-traditional, so it’s not on their purchase list,” Johnson said. “It is hard for people to understand what the training is until I get in front of them and describe it.”

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Getting in the Door Halliburton’s supplier diversity group became aware of LegalWATCH through the Houston Minority Business Council (HMBC) and provided Johnson the forum she needed to get in front of the company’s decision-makers. “Halliburton invited me to speak at a ‘Lunch and Learn’ program. It helped the managers grasp the value of our training, and they started asking me to train their groups. It was an innovative way to get my foot in the door,” she said. Since Halliburton began offering Risk Mitigation 101 in 2002, more than 700 employees have taken the course. “For our young professionals just starting their careers with Halliburton, the LegalWATCH training gives them insight into the legal process and the risk associated with their communications while on the job. It is a wake-up call,” said Jim Haney, manager of development initiatives. “We have made Risk Mitigation 101 a part of our technical training program, which includes engineering trainees and business development associates just starting with the company. I have taken the course myself and I believe I have taken a more cautious approach in my communications as a result.” Based on past performance and the potential of LegalWATCH to be part of its growth, Halliburton chose to include the training company among the initial group of suppliers in its Business Education and Supplier Transformation (BEST) program. “So far, I’ve gone to a two-day training program for BEST companies,” Johnson commented. “We were introduced to department heads and learned how Halliburton selects suppliers. It helped me refine my approach to marketing to companies like Halliburton.” In addition to Halliburton, LegalWATCH’s clients include public entities such as the city of San Antonio and the Houston Metropolitan Transit Authority, professional sports teams and Fortune 100 corporations in a variety of industries. Johnson has trav-

eled to Argentina, the Czech Republic and Russia to do training, and led courses for people in the U.K. via satellite.

Thinking Bigger Passionate about her subject matter, Johnson did the majority of training herself for years and hired contractors to supplement her work. “Because my company was so small, I didn’t go after big contracts with big companies,” she explained. “But then I realized that was silly thinking. I can do it. The first thing I had to do was change my thinking.” Now, Johnson focuses on marketing and growing LegalWATCH while licensed attorneys who are experts in their fields teach the courses. “We select our trainers very carefully. They use the knowledge and expertise they acquired practicing law to help our clients avoid mistakes,” Johnson said. “They undergo a rigorous training program, complete with an examination and mock class evaluations. In the classes, they utilize adult learning principles that help our clients grasp, retain and apply the information.” To ensure quality, Johnson awards bonuses to trainers who receive very high scores on course evaluations. “All the trainers have gotten the extra bonus,” she added. Johnson draws on her background to design training that helps companies avoid mistakes. She practiced law in a Fortune 100 company, the United States Department of Justice and an international law firm. During her career, she spearheaded governmental audits and negotiated settlements with third parties and government regulators. Johnson’s academic background includes a Juris Doctor degree; a master of laws degree in energy, environmental and natural resource law; a bachelor of science degree in business administration; and an associate degree in criminal justice. She is certified in training and development and is a senior professional in human resources.

Making Connections Johnson is active in numerous professional organizations, including serving on the National Bar Association’s Board of Governors. During a three-year term on the National Women’s Business Council, she was an advisor to the President of the United States, the U.S. Congress and the U.S. Small Business Administration on economic issues relevant to women’s business enterprises. Most recently, Johnson was appointed to the board of directors of Women Impacting Public Policy (WIPP). Through her volunteer leadership positions, Johnson has experienced the value of diversity and inclusiveness. “As a past board member for both the Minority- and Women’s-Business Councils, I have seen how diverse suppliers bring diverse perspectives, markets and opportunities,” she said. She has also made connections that helped her build a staff of 11 full-time and contract employees and compete for her first large global contract. “People see me working hard, being professional and diligent, and putting my heart and soul into everything I do. When they see that, they will think of you when they have a need to fill,” Johnson said.

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OTIS ANDERSON


Special Feature

Halliburton

SUPPLIER PROFILES

Micro-SMART Systems, Inc. hile many large companies in the energy industry have substantial technology budgets, small suppliers play a key role in augmenting their technology capabilities. Micro-SMART Systems, Inc. (www.microsmart.com) plays such a role in the oilfield. Founded in 1989, the research and development-based engineering company provides state-of-the-art technology products to support oil and gas production. “Innovation is what we do best,” said Otis Anderson, MicroSMART CEO. “We’re always trying to produce different tools and use leading-edge technology to develop solutions to downhole problems. We look for products that can create niches for us.” Micro-SMART’s products include downhole memory pressure gauges, memory logging tools, permanent surface read-out gauges, electric-line surface read-out gauges, slickline perforators/explosive triggers, downhole shut-in tools (DHSIT) and surface instruments. This Minority Business Enterprise (MBE) manufactures, tests, calibrates and repairs products at its Houston facilities.

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Going Beyond the Bottom Line Halliburton has been a Micro-SMART customer for 16 years and currently purchases its slickline perforating tools, DHSITs and other downhole test tools. Micro-SMART products are used in Halliburton operations in Algeria, Angola, Brazil, Holland, Malaysia, the U.K. and the United States. The benefits of being a valued supplier to Halliburton go far beyond the financial bottom line for Micro-SMART. “Through Halliburton, we have access to some of the most sophisticated test facilities in the world for vibration, shock, high pressure and temperature,” Anderson said. “Halliburton’s staff is very knowledgeable. We get regular feedback from their senior engineers and managers and the opportunity for informal training.” Josmar Haddad, global advisor for data acquisition systems for Halliburton Completion Tools, gives Micro-SMART high marks for

reliability, an important metric in the oilfield. “In the Reservoir Information group, Micro-SMART is our main supplier for downhole shut-in tools,” Haddad explained. “We have been working with them for about three years in locations such as Brazil, Alaska and Algeria. Their DHSITs have proven to be reliable in production and injection wells. Micro-SMART has been very professional, and we look forward to expanding the DHSIT market worldwide.”

Expanding Business Competencies Though Micro-SMART has only 20 employees, the staff brings more than 75 years of combined experience in designing, testing and manufacturing oilfield products. Every employee is carefully chosen. “Selecting smart, talented people with a team-spirited personality and great problem-solving abilities has helped define our direction as a company,” Anderson said. In addition to the staff ’s dedication to product development, testing, technical support and quality, Anderson credits MicroSMART’s success to “stick-to-it-tiveness and financial planning for periods of insufficient cash flow.” Yet, Anderson admits that Micro-SMART’s focus on engineering and customer service is often at the expense of product marketing. This is an area where he believes participation in Halliburton’s Business Education and Supplier Transformation (BEST) program can make a difference. “BEST is opening our eyes to different aspects of tool development and marketing that we hadn’t considered,” Anderson said. “We’ve been talking more about problem-solving and getting things to market.” Supplier diversity initiatives such as BEST are another avenue for improvement that Halliburton offers Micro-SMART. “Compared to other oilfield services companies, Halliburton’s Supplier Diversity program is definitely more assertive and extends a genuine helping hand,” Anderson added.

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P.D. MORRISON


Special Feature

Halliburton

SUPPLIER PROFILES

PDME .D. Morrison’s grandparents owned a grocery store, and by the age of seven, Morrison knew he wanted to own a business and be his own boss. At 20, he bought his first company, an auto detailing franchise. In 1994, Morrison purchased an office supplies company near Austin, Texas. Today known as PDME, the certified Minority Business Enterprise (MBE) is dedicated to leading-edge Tier One and traditional office products solutions. PDME has been a leading Historically Underutilized Business (HUB) supplier to the University of Texas at Austin and leading supplier to the State of Texas. The U.S. Department of Commerce Minority Business Development Association and U.S. Small Business Association have recognized PDME for excellence. In Austin and Houston, PDME offers a traditional business model, performing all supply chain functions, including delivery. Morrison also developed a unique Tier One model with Office Depot in 2002 that proved pivotal to the growth of his business. “PDME handles everything except the delivery of the product, which Office Depot does,” explained Morrison, president and CEO of PDME. “This alliance provides Tier One solutions for companies that have MBE supplier diversity goals. We combine our benchmark supply chain management with Office Depot’s broad national distribution network to provide one of the most comprehensive Tier One programs in the country.” Through this strategic alliance, PDME won the office supplies contract for Halliburton’s U.S. operations. PDME provides all supply chain functions, and Office Depot handles delivery to all locations nationwide. The PDME-Office Depot strategic alliance was a perfect solution for Halliburton, said Halliburton Procurement Center Manager Veronica Brown. “This gives us the opportunity to use Tier One spend for these purchases,” said Brown, who was responsible for the three-year contract signed with PDME in June 2007. “I am very pleased with PDME so far. They take immediate action when we have an issue. Their employees are always in our

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Houston office asking questions, trying to make sure we are happy and improving their service. And the whole contract saves us about three percent.”

Unexpected Opportunities Impressed with PDME’s Tier One model, quality and service, Halliburton Supplier Diversity Manager Ingrid Robinson invited Morrison to join her at a Louisiana Minority Business Council meeting in New Orleans and a best practices conference held by Diversity Information Resources in Atlanta. Robinson spoke about sourcing diverse suppliers; Morrison’s topic was PDME’s strategic alliance and Tier One business model with Office Depot. “The interest generated in those meetings was unbelievable,” Morrison said. “PDME has already won one account as a result of the presentations, and we have multiple opportunities for requests for proposals. Some are with existing Office Depot customers who want to convert their accounts to the Tier One model.” Halliburton also asked Morrison to develop an international Tier One program to accommodate its global expansion. “Halliburton has a team committed to promoting supplier diversity that produces end results,” Morrison added. “If your company can provide true value and has a product or service that Halliburton needs, you will have a positive experience working within their supplier diversity program.” PDME recently hired a chief financial officer and initiated an internship program to help manage the growth it anticipates from the Halliburton account and the additional opportunities its Halliburton relationship is generating. Morrison rewards his growing workforce, which currently stands at 30 employees, with breakfast every Friday, a monthly luncheon and the continuation of PDME’s 100 percent companypaid health insurance and dental insurance. Buying from diverse suppliers promotes healthy business and provides jobs and benefits for their employees,” Morrison said. “In turn, healthy businesses will buy products from you.”

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VIMAL KOTHARI


Special Feature

Halliburton

SUPPLIER PROFILES

Systel Inc. imal Kothari, president of Systel Inc., wants to do business with the best companies in the world – and he is achieving his goal. Systel manufactures specialized computers, displays and peripheral equipment for rugged environments, tailoring each system to exactly meet the customer’s requirements. Its customers include some of the best companies in the oilfield services, military, process automation and telecommunications industries. “Working with large customers brings stability and rewards,” Kothari said. “If you are a responsible vendor, and your performance exceeds expectations, then you hope your customers will bring new opportunities, based on the investments both companies have made.” It’s this type of relationship that has made Halliburton a significant part of Systel’s growth since Kothari founded the Sugar Land, Texas-based firm in 1994. Early in its history, Systel produced a series of rack mounts for Sperry Drilling Services, which Halliburton later acquired. Today, Systel provides a fully integrated 2U Rack Mount Computer for Halliburton’s Wireline group and its Duncan Technical Command Center vans. “Learning how to do business with Halliburton has made Systel a better company for all of our customers,” Kothari said. “Over the years, the association with Halliburton has had a positive impact on our employees. Many of them have interacted directly with Halliburton, and have come to understand the importance of how Halliburton measures our performance. This awareness has spilled over, and, as a result, awareness of customer priorities is increased across the board.”

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Measuring Performance The scorecard that Halliburton uses to evaluate its suppliers is an important internal focus area for Systel. Suppliers start each quarter with 100 points on their scorecard. Over the course of the quarter, suppliers can either add to or subtract from the point total based on their performance on delivery, quality and cost. “We review our scorecard data with our Halliburton buyers about once each quarter,” said Randy Lane, Systel sales manager. “Halliburton wants us to excel in every area, every quarter. We manage our internal processes to meet their requirements. We know that for the Halliburton-Systel relationship to work, it is paramount for us to have a complete understanding of the Scorecard and the importance it plays internally at Halliburton. We are still learning and continue to do more training.” With another Systel customer introducing a scorecard system, both Kothari and Lane expect the experience with Halliburton to ease their uptake of the performance measurement tool. “We understand why they’re using a scorecard and we are ready to embrace it,” Lane said.

Halliburton buyers also evaluate Systel on its technical contributions. “They look to see if we have done something better or cheaper, or if we have brought them new technology that they weren’t aware of,” Lane added. “This metric shows the effort on our part.” Systel constantly monitors the marketplace for technologies that might benefit Halliburton. The companies work jointly on product development in an evolutionary, but controlled process. “As new technology emerges, products become obsolete,” Kothari explained. “We start communicating with Halliburton about end-of-life issues and decide when to go to the next level. But Halliburton has the ultimate say in sign-off and testing once we build a prototype. We cannot change any component without Halliburton’s approval.” Systel focuses on quality in all aspects of the customer relationship. “Our quality policy states that Systel is committed to providing total customer satisfaction,” Kothari said. “Regular departmental and management reviews enable Systel to review current trends of metrics and make adjustments. Employee involvement in the reviews is key to our success and uniqueness.”

Overcoming Challenges Kothari’s first entrepreneurial venture was the engineering consulting firm Ktronics Research Inc., which he founded in 1988. He changed the focus of the business to manufacturing in 1994 based on client interest. “We were designing solutions for our clients and they kept asking if it was possible for us to build the products. We saw the opportunity and we jumped on it,” Kothari said. Although the market for Systel’s manufactured products clearly existed, building a product-based business was not easy. “It was difficult establishing credibility and convincing potential customers that the business was here to stay and that we were serious about our commitment to build a world-class company,” he recalled. With persistence and a positive attitude, Kothari successfully developed Systel’s product and client bases. “There were many challenges along the way,” he said. “The most challenging time occurred in 2004, when we lost a major customer who accounted for more than 50 percent of our revenues. We lost the business because of internal issues at the customer end. “We had done everything possible to retain the business. We had no regrets about our efforts and the service we provided. We survived the challenge with luck and hard work. We did not have any ‘economic’ layoffs. This experience also strengthened our belief that we have to continue to do the right thing for our employees, customers and vendors, irrespective of the challenges and the financial outcome,” he added. “Systel has grown from seven people to more than 50. Our company goals will continue to drive that number in a positive direction,” Kothari concluded.

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“Supplier Diversity for Halliburton now encompasses national and local content suppliers, small-to-medium business enterprises (SMEs) and ethnic minority businesses (EMBs), in addition to women’s business enterprises (WBEs) and minority business enterprises (MBEs).” HELEN O’CONNOR HEALTH, SAFETY, ENVIRONMENT AND SUSTAINABILITY DIRECTOR, HALLIBURTON

DUNCAN INDUSTRIAL SOLUTIONS


Who knows where the next great dream will find its voice. Where future leaders might find their inspiration. We salute those who inspire the great minds of today so that they can become the great visionaries of tomorrow.


Interview

William F. Jones Jr. Chrysler Financial Jones with Michigan Congressman John Conyers.

Jones with Barack Obama.

GLOBAL / MARKET / INDUSTRY ISSUES

Please describe Chrysler Financial’s global presence. Describe the scope and scale of the company to a reader who may not be familiar with it. Chrysler Financial offers automotive financial products and services to both dealers and consumers of Chrysler, Jeep® and Dodge vehicles in the United States, Canada, Mexico, Puerto Rico and Venezuela. In addition to offering vehicle wholesale and retail financing to more than 3,600 Chrysler, Jeep and Dodge dealers, Chrysler Financial also provides fleet management and lines of credit to dealers. Currently, nearly three million drivers in the United States enjoy the benefits of leasing or financing with Chrysler Financial. Chrysler Financial has an employee base of around 4,000 and supports a global portfolio of $75 billion. How does Chrysler Financial define diversity and inclusion, as it relates to the efforts within the company? At Chrysler Financial, inclusion is our process to better live our core values and develop a distinct competitive advantage by recognizing, valuing, and respecting the diversity of our employees, customers, business partners, and the communities in which we operate. The elements we value go beyond traditional and familiar factors and include business unit, culture, employee group, employment status, family status, language, marital status, regional origin, sexual orientation, thinking styles and veteran status. Given all those variables, what are the main components of your D&I program? Is the management of D&I programs largely U.S.-based or present throughout the worldwide organization? Chrysler Financial has taken a three-pronged approach to the strategic development of diversity and inclusion throughout the organization: There is a diversity council comprised of the top internal senior executives and external business and community leaders; an inclusion forum, representing executives and/or mid-level managers from each functional area and physical location; and our employee resource groups, representing all levels of employees choosing to support the overall business objectives of the organization through diverse programming.

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This strategic infrastructure (diversity council, inclusion forum and employee resource groups) is guided by the organization’s core values of integrity, openness and respect; financial and social responsibility; customer focus; commitment to excellence; and inspired and empowered people. In today’s marketplace, does your company have any particular cultural, socioeconomic, or demographic challenges to selling, producing, or delivering services? What particular challenges do you face in hiring and retaining good people? Our challenges are not unlike any other business. Within the financial services industry, we are constantly working to evaluate and pro-actively adapt to meet our customer needs and demands (dealers and consumers). By internally mirroring our customer base through diverse employees, we are better able to meet and serve our customers needs. Hiring and retaining diverse candidates allows us to have a foundation for constructive dialogue with different viewpoints. Therefore, attracting and retaining top talent is critical to our success as a company.

Headquarters: Chrysler Financial, 27777 Inkster Road Farmington Hills, MI 48334-5326 Web site: www.corp.chryslerfinancial.com Primary business or industry: Automotive Finance Portfolio: $75 billion


Interview

William F. Jones Jr. Chrysler Financial

customer service center located in Monterrey, Mexico. All customer calls from across the Americas requiring Spanish speaking customer service agents are seamlessly transferred to this location.

William F. Jones Jr. at the Hip-Hop Summit on Financial Empowerment 2005 kickoff.

Do international issues ever get in the way of corporate support for diversity objectives and processes? What kinds of strategies does the company employ in dealing with them? At present, Chrysler Financial does not have any issues that hinder corporate support of diversity objectives. To ensure a global perspective in the development of diversity objectives, the inclusion forum has a diverse international membership. This group strives to understand and address the cultural needs within each region of the Americas and takes both a local and centralized approach to developing and executing diversity objectives. At Chrysler Financial, we do not take a onesize-fits-all approach to diversity and inclusion— all factors are taken into consideration for the successful development and execution of programs and initiatives. CORPORATE LEADERSHIP

How do you keep diversity a priority throughout Chrysler Financial? Specifically, how do you energize people or get their buy-in for diversity throughout the company? Communication serves as the vehicle to promote diversity program results, thereby highlighting the benefits of a diverse and inclusive corporate culture. Through consistent communication and focus placed on key diversity programs, employees are engaged in diversity on a regular basis and diversity is consistently at the forefront. Are there unique opportunities in your particular industry for implementing diversity programs? As a service-based organization, with dealer and consumer touch points, we need to ensure we are able to effectively manage our customer needs. These needs can vary from language requirements at the consumer level to product marketing to multiple ethnic groups. To meet these varied needs, we have a dedicated diversity marketing manager within our sales and marketing operations to help communicate our value proposition to both dealers and consumers. Additionally, due to the ever-increasing growth of the Hispanic consumer in the United States, we identified an opportunity to enhance our customer service programs through a dedicated

What resources (financial and manpower) are allocated to diversity? How do these reflect your company’s leadership commitment to diversity? Resource allocation for diversity is significant and has increased in commitment year-over-year. Through the diversity council, the company’s strategic direction for diversity and inclusion is developed and communicated. William F. Jones, Jr., chief operating officer, also serves as the chairman of the diversity council. In this role, he is instrumental in setting the overall direction and message development for diversity at Chrysler Financial. Machelle McAdory, vice president, human resources, implements diversity policies within the workforce for the Americas region. Since 2005, Chrysler LLC has operated a consistent and strategically oriented system of global diversity management, which is led by Anne Cooper, JD, senior manager, human resources. Cooper is also the chairperson of the inclusion forum and reports directly to the Chrysler Financial diversity council. The diversity office follows guidelines and measures that have been in practice since 1988. Financial budgets are allocated based on strategic plan and business cases designed to drive the business forward. Diversity is considered a strategic business driver for Chrysler Financial.

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Interview

William F. Jones Jr. Chrysler Financial

Jones volunteering time at a Hollywood, Florida Park.

Does Chrysler Financial address diversity in its publications? Diversity and inclusion is consistently communicated in both internal and external publications and reflected in the organization’s commitment to social responsibility. An example is Chrysler Financial’s financial literacy program—a program designed to provide personal financial management information to consumers. Since 2004, Chrysler Financial has worked in partnership with the Hip-Hop Summit Action Network to offer personal financial management information to urban youth in a unique and engaging format. Additionally, financial literacy information is offered to underserved communities through partnerships with community and non-profit organizations such as the National Urban League, Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, SER, Aspira, and Univision. Is diversity a compensable annual objective for the executive management team? How do you reward special initiatives? What accountability do you employ to meet objectives? Diversity is part of Chrysler Financial’s strategic business objectives as well as a tracked goal on the organization’s balanced scorecard. The diversity goal is tracked on a monthly basis and is comparable in importance with profit and sales targets. Executive and senior managers are held accountable to meet all their goals with personal financial implications if goals are not met. Do you have any programs in place to increase the cross-cultural competence of your senior management team? Can mid-level managers acquire similar training? Yes, we do. To ensure cross-cultural competence throughout the management ranks, all Chrysler Financial senior managers have participated in cross-cultural training. We regularly encourage executives to gain international experience as part of their personal and professional development, leading to better management and decision-making. Additionally, the inclusion forum, with its diverse membership, provides managers with cross-cultural experiences and 54

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exposure. When hiring or promoting people, how do you ensure that the individual selected was chosen from a diverse group of candidates? We require a diverse slate for all employee placements. Recruiting strategies help ensure qualified diverse candidates are sought. Internal succession plans are in place to identify high-potential candidates throughout the organization, with an emphasis on diversity and professional development opportunities. Let’s talk about how decisions about diversity are made at Chrysler Financial. It is expected that diversity and inclusion are considerations in all decisions made within the organization. With the structure we have in place, we strive to ensure diversity is visible at all levels of the organization. The Chrysler Financial Diversity Council sets the strategic direction and then teams up with the inclusion forum to encourage ownership and accountability of diversity programs at the management levels. The Chrysler Financial Diversity Council is made up of both internal and external members. Internal members from the Chrysler Financial leadership team include: • Tracy Hackman, Vice President—General Counsel and Secretary • William F. Jones Jr., Chief Operating Officer • Mark Manzo, Vice President—Sales and Marketing • Machelle McAdory, Vice President—Human Resources and Administrative Services • Pat Milantoni, Vice President—Customer Service and Collections • Bill Porter, Director—Corporate Communications External membership is composed of prominent business and community leaders to provide a third party independent perspective on our corporate diversity efforts. External members include: • Dennis W. Archer, Chairman—Dickinson Wright, a Detroitbased law firm • Carl Brooks, President and CEO—The Executive Leadership


Interview

William F. Jones Jr. Chrysler Financial

William F. Jones Jr. Personal Profile Title: Chief Operating Officer—Chrysler Financial Years in current position: Recently promoted to COO, spent two years as VP, Chrysler Financial Education: BA in Psychology and MBA in Finance from Columbia University First job: Management Consultant at Metropolitan Life Family: Wife, Marion, and three wonderful sons Interests: Farm in Virginia, golf My music: Jazz Favorite game: Basketball as a spectator. Golf as a participant. Favorite charity: Chairman of the board of Focus: HOPE in Detroit, on Walsh College Board of Directors and an avid spokesperson for financial education. Person I’d like to get to know over lunch: Gordon Parks. His life was so rich. How did you get to your present position? What was your career path? I joined the company in 1981 as a corporate analyst. Over the years, through hard work and commitment, I progressed through the company to my current role as chief operating officer. Who were/are your mentors? I have too many mentors to call out other than my father whose work ethic and basic decency and dignity I hold out as a gold standard. If you are willing to listen and learn, you can and will absorb from everyone around you. How do you advance diversity and inclusion in your organization? As Chairman of the Chrysler Financial Diversity Council, I am responsible for setting the stage for diversity and inclusion across the organization. I work jointly with the top leadership of Chrysler Financial in concert with the membership of the diversity council, inclusion forum and the employee resource groups to ensure the diversity strategy is developed, communicated, implemented and embraced. I also work to ensure diversity is a consideration in our daily decision-making. Is compensation related to diversity performance? Diversity is part of Chrysler Financial’s strategic business objectives as well as a tracked goal on the organizations balanced scorecard. The diversity goal is tracked on a monthly basis and is comparable in importance with profit and sales targets. Executive and senior managers are held accountable to meet all their goals with personal financial implications if goals are not met. What has been your proudest moment as leader in this company? One of my proudest moments was my active involvement in helping to revitalize the African American Network at Chrysler. I was also engaged in developing the African American Senior Leadership Forum at Chrysler. Are there particular areas/employee sectors you feel still need improvement? As an organization, we have made tremendous progress. We can never stop looking forward and addressing new needs—we need to look to our customers and employees alike and their shifting needs and change as necessary. Do you have any words of advice to anyone who wants to rise in their organization? Diversity is a business imperative. Make sure you understand the facts. Make sure you understand the challenges and opportunities it poses for your organization and the nuances of your environment. Your words and your actions will let everyone around you know where you stand. So be sincere.

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Interview

William F. Jones Jr. Chrysler Financial

Jones surveying dealership damage from Hurricane Katrina in Louisiana.

Council and Foundation, located in Washington, D.C. • Sylvia de Leon, Partner—Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP • Fernando Falcon, Owner—Champion Chrysler-Jeep-Dodge in Indianapolis, Indiana • Jesse J. Greathouse, Jr., President and Owner—Cross Road Chrysler-Jeep in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; President— Chrysler Minority Dealer Association. • Peng-Li Liu, President and CEO—PLL Group and Management Consultant; President and founding member—Asian Pacific American Chamber of Commerce • Reverend Doctor William Perkins, President-Dean of the Morehouse School of Religion in Atlanta, Georgia

mally and informally. Some people perceive inclusion programs for underrepresented groups as being exclusionary for others. Have you encountered this attitude? Not unlike many organizations, we have encountered various attitudes toward diversity. To manage negative perceptions we work with key leaders in the organization to provide factual information based on our business objectives and core values. This educational process aids in better understanding the need for inclusion programs, often leading to those individuals embracing diversity and inclusion and in turn helping us educate others regarding the business case for diversity and inclusion. The inclusion forum, comprised of managers, consistently promotes diversity within their areas of responsibility, thereby helping to maintain a culture that embraces diversity and inclusion.

EMPLOYEE INCLUSIVENESS

How does Chrysler Financial gauge inclusion of employees? What are the metrics that indicate where the company is on the inclusion graph? Employee inclusiveness is gauged through a number of initiatives. The most strategic and formal measure is the annual Great Place to Work Survey. Results from the 2006 survey indicate that 82 percent of employees feel the company values diversity in the workforce. Some say diversity is a “numbers game.” How do you know that Chrysler Financial’s culture is not just tied up in numbers? At Chrysler Financial, it is much more than numbers. The culture of the organization celebrates diversity and encourages diverse perspectives. Through the formation of the inclusion forum, diversity is taken into consideration on a daily basis as decisions are made and programs executed. Additionally, employee resource groups work together with senior managers to develop opportunities designed to drive the business and attract new stakeholders. Our success is measured by employees using and maximizing their talents in the work environment. Tell me a little about how employee opinions are obtained and valued. We are committed to finding the best solutions and are constantly striving to be the best at what we do. Through our commitment to open, two-way dialogue, we capture the innovative ideas of employees in the organization. Employees feel a sense of pride and that their opinions are valued. Employee suggestions are captured both for56

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Can you describe your method for orienting new hires into your culture? How do you educate new employees about the importance of diversity? New hires are oriented to the organization through a formal new hire program entitled Navigate. This program is designed to help new employees feel more at home, learn our corporate culture, and to help them better understand our organization. Navigate is a sixmonth program that begins with an in-depth, one-day orientation followed by monthly information sessions and an assigned employee guide to help the new hire navigate through the organization. After six months, a graduation event is hosted where the new hire presents new ideas or feedback about the organization to a team of executives. All new hires are required to complete diversity training within 90 days of hire. Can you name specific ways your company supports upward development toward management positions? We have career-path development and succession planning for all employees. We identify high-potential candidates at every level of the organization based on performance, mentoring, and individual coaching. How do you educate/promote diversity and inclusion for vendors, customers, or the general public? We consistently promote diversity in the marketplace with our customers, vendors and dealers through our communications vehicles, community outreach programs to diverse audiences and our strong relationships with the Chrysler Minority Dealers Association. PDJ


I never imagined I’d find myself saying the words “career” and “love” in the same sentence. But at Hallmark, I do it all the time. Here, I feel empowered as a Latina and as editorial director for Sinceramente Hallmark, our Spanish-language card line, to infuse all I do with the passion and substance of my heritage. At Hallmark we have one purpose—to enrich people’s lives. But I didn’t know that in fulfilling that purpose, my life would also be enriched in so many ways. So now I can truly say that meaningful work and purposeful life come together for me every day. And I can also say that at Hallmark— and in Kansas City—I’ve found my home. arlette torres – editorial director

l i v e y o u r pa s s i o n . l o v e y o u r w o r k .

F O R M O R E I NFO RMATIO N O N H AL L MARK C AR EER OPPORT UNI T I ES , V I S I T WWW. HALLMAR K. C OM /CA REERS. © 2 0 07 h a l l ma r k c a rds , in c .


[ BANK OF THE WEST ]

WANT W A TOO WOR ANT WORKK FOR A TTRULY TRUL LLYY GREA GGREAT AATT BANK??

AATT BA BANK ANK OF THE WEST WEST, T, WE BELIEVE OUR O CUSTOMERSS ARE WELLL SERVED BY EMPLOYEES EM MPLOYEES WHO ARE WELL SERVED. SERVVED. WELL Different perspectives p generate freshh ideas. That’ That’ss why at Bankk of the W West, est, we value dive diversity ersity and equal opp ortunity for all our employe ees. YYear ear after year conttinue to grow stronger thanks thannks to our opportunity employees. year,, we continue unique ble end of people. After all, in to oday’s competitive banking environment, e it is our emplo oyees with blend today’s employees innovativee ideas that keep us a step aahead head of the rest. rest

www.bankofthewest.com www .bankofthewest.com

Bank of the W West est and its subsidiaries subsidiariees are equal opportunity/affirmative action employers. employeers. M/F/D/V

© 2007 Bank of the W West. est. Member FDIC.


Opportunities Growing for Women


Accenture Embracing Multiculturalism…Leveraging Diversity By Andre Hughes, ACCENTURE, managing director, Human Capital & Diversity – U.S.

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uilding, maintaining and expanding an inclusive culture is central to Accenture’s success. Drawing together diverse qualities enables us to deliver innovation, which paves the way for sustainable growth and helping clients achieve high performance. Indeed, for Accenture, inclusion and diversity are a call to action. It is about learning from others who are not the same and about creating a workplace environment that captures the advantage of diverse perspectives—drawing on a basic credo embedded in our organizational culture to make differences work. We believe it is imperative to help our women understand what opportunities exist for them. Women across the spectrum of diversity need aspirational roles, and if we can create a high performance mindset, their performance will surely soar. Fostering what I call a “can-do, will-do, have-done, can-do-again disposition,” therefore, is a very powerful incentive. And often it predicts who is likely to become a star performer. Diversity Solutions The drive to achieve, however, may be held back by cultural and language barriers that must be overcome for diversity programs to succeed. How, then, do we nurture that desire in all our people to achieve high performance? It is up to us to suggest behaviors a multicultural workforce can build on to create success. It is our responsibility to focus on viewpoints that serve as change agents and to offer guidelines for more effective execution. Accenture values high performance. Our approach to training, therefore, is to create an awareness that will move people from where they are to where they could be. Combining a high performance mindset with passion creates a winning formula that enables women to highlight their strengths, not their weaknesses. Accenture’s Inclusion Initiatives As Nellie Borrero, global inclusion and diversity director at Accenture, explains, “We have developed an innovative, multifaceted bottom-up and up-down approach to embrace and train our women, ensuring they get the tools they need to be successful, while—at the same time—we educate our leaders on how to lead a diverse workforce. “We have designed a comprehensive and empowering curriculum with programs focusing on strategic learning around issues of leadership, business strategy, corporate finance, relationship management, global marketing and branding and intercultural competence.” The bottomline: Our workshops provide high potential women executives across the spectrum of diversity with the

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skills required to succeed as leaders in this organization. We work to ensure companywide integration of our diversity programs, not as a nice-to-have, but as part of an integral mission that says everyone can be high performers, no matter their cultural differences. The challenge is to cut across the specNellie Borrero, global inclusion and trum of workplace diversity director at Accenture. diversity, which can encompass race, gender, ethnic group, age, organizational function and educational background. Moving Forward Because inclusion and diversity not only involve how people perceive themselves, but also how they perceive others, we embrace a strong commitment to ensuring our people are representative of the broader communities we serve. Our environment, therefore, consistently celebrates inclusion and openness and promotes diversity up through leadership positions. Our Minority Leadership Development Program, Developing High Performing Women workshop, and the International Women’s Day events, help to position our people early on for high performance. It is a source of pride that Accenture now stands at the industry forefront, recognized for our vision of inclusion and diversity. We can’t take our eye off the ball, however, and in coming years we must continue to lead the charge in addressing issues of communication, adaptability and change. Clearly, corporate America must displace bias and stereotype with respect for the individual and the unique competencies each person brings to bear, or suffer the consequences. Accenture welcomes the opportunity to share, discuss and continually improve our approach, which is designed not just to transform our diverse workforce, but to infuse all our people with energy and optimism for the future.

PDJ


DIVERSITY determines a company’s success. Eastman Kodak Company is committed to becoming a truly diverse corporation. Embracing the ideals of diversity enables us to better meet the needs of our customers, employees, suppliers, and the communities in which we live and work. All of which ensures our continued success in the global marketplace.

www.kodak.com/go/supplierdiversity Š Eastman Kodak Company, 2007


ArvinMeritor Women are Major Players at ArvinMeritor

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rom the board room to corporate offices to the plant floor, ArvinMeritor embracesdiversitywithimpressiveresults;andwomenaremajorcontributors.A leadingglobalproviderofinnovativecustomersolutionsthatenhancemobility, safety andtheenvironment,theautomotivesupplierisharnessingthecreative power that comes from bringing together top talent with diverse backgrounds. ArvinMeritor is one of the largest and most geographically expansive automotive suppliers in the world, and is by its very nature a culturally diverse organization. The company defines diversity as respecting the uniqueness of each individual as it relates to their different personal attributes, experiences and organizational roles. ArvinMeritor provides opportunities for its employees in 24 countries to maximize their potential. Diversity initiatives focus on three main areas: Workforce Diversity, Behavioral and Cultural Diversity, and Structural Diversity. Key initiatives include: recruitment, diversity and cultural awareness training programs, and Worldwide Diversity Week. By embracing these initiatives, ArvinMeritor continues to ensure its workforce is representative of the world in which it does business. Diversity councils with executive and regional champions ensure that the company’s guidelines for diversity are consistently followed at all levels in the organization. For example, the diversity council in Bangalore, India organized an Ethnic Day to celebrate their rich culture there. Women in the Workforce

sales in Asia and with Asian OEMs within the next three-to-five years—representing more than $1 billion in added sales and sourcing in the region. ArvinMeritor’s female employees will play a big part in achieving that goal. The San Luis Potosí México facility has initiated unique ways to promote its female workforce. There is no salary differential between men and women, and today 27 percent of leadership positions are occupied by women. Other benefits for women include union agreements that protect pregnant employees and provide nursing mothers with an hour during their shift to feed their babies. The plant celebrates Mothers Day in Mexico with cake and flowers to recognize the effort working mothers make to balance their professional careers with their personal lives. ArvinMeritor’s diversity programs have received outside recognition as well. The ArvinMeritor Light Vehicle Systems facility in Puebla, Mexico received the “2007 Great Place to Work for Women” award, issued by the Great Place to Work Institute, for its supportive hiring and work practices. At the corporate level ArvinMeritor offers special benefits to address the unique career and life needs of its diverse workforce. Flexible work options such as compressed work weeks, flex time, job sharing, part-time positions and telecommuting may be available within a specific ArvinMeritor function. The company is a platinum sponsor of Inforum, a Detroitbased organization dedicated to the career development and advancement of women professionals in business. In addition, ArvinMeritor supports the Society of Women Engineers (SWE), the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) and the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE) at the campus and national levels. At the corporate level, ArvinMeritor is an active member of the Michigan Minority Business Development Council and participates in the National Association of Black Automotive Suppliers events. Supporting diversity initiatives is the right thing to do and it makes good business sense. The company operates on the philosophy that diverse people and ideas lead to innovative processes that lead to better business results.

In October, ArvinMeritor became the first company from the automotive manufacturing sector to be named an “MVP” by the 2007 Women’s Leadership Index study conducted by the University of Michigan. To achieve elite MVP status, ArvinMeritor was recognized for the number of women it has at the board and executive officer level. ArvinMeritor has several initiatives in place to promote women that span the globe. At the company’s Osasco, Brazil facility, machine operator Marisa Vieira (center in photo), is the first woman to participate in the plant’s Team Leader Training Program. Vieira serves as a liaison between supervisors and operators coordinating operational activities. She has developed About ArvinMeritor ArvinMeritor, Inc. is a premier global supplier skills in leadership, communiof a broad range of integrated systems, modules cation, negotiations, teamwork and components to the motor vehicle industry. The company serves commercial truck, trailer and and conflict resolution. specialty original equipment manufacturers and certain The company celebrated aftermarkets, and light vehicle manufacturers. Headquartered in Troy, Mich., ArvinMeritor International Women’s Day employs approximately 18,000 people in 23 countries. at its facilities around the ArvinMeritor common stock is traded on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker symbol ARM. world. ArvinMeritor’s global For more information, visit the company’s Web growth strategy is to triple its A celebration at ArvinMeritor facilities in Xuzhou, China. site at: http://www.arvinmeritor.com/. PDJ 62

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finally Training that Moves Beyond Diversity... Your workplace has become more diverse . . .

But is it inclusive? Our Subtle Behaviors Workshop teaches you the simple words, small behaviors, even body language, that can have significant meaning to individuals and groups. Based on the book, 58 little things that have a BIG impact: What’s Your MicroTrigger?, this workshop has become the favorite for those who want to move beyond diversity to become inclusive.

For additional information, E-Mail TSmith@ivygroupllc.com or call 1.877.448.9477 Join companies including MetLife, Progress Energy, L’Oreal, UBS Investment Bank, Herman Miller and Hyatt Hotels who hold MicroTriggers™ Workshops for their managers and associates.

to Inclusion!


KPMG LLP KPMG’s JP KNOW Helps Japanese Women Working in the U.S.

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PMG LLP’s Japanese Practice employs some 300 professionals in the United States, with more than half of them women. Since these professionals work in a culturally diverse environment, with varying approaches to women in the workplace, the Big Four accounting firm has created an internal organization to address the issues faced by many Japanese women working in the United States. The Japanese Practice’s KPMG Network of Women, or JP KNOW, is an offshoot of KPMG’s Network of Women (KNOW), a firm-wide initiative designed to help women to connect with their peers, meet mentors and share career experiences. “We felt that the women professionals working for the Japanese Practice are in a slightly unique position in the firm in that they have to work bi-culturally,” said Yuki Tobinaga, associate director of marketing for the Japanese Practice. “I think that most people know that gender relations are a little different in a U.S. business environment than in a Japanese one.” The idea for JP KNOW came about during a partner meeting the firm held in 2005. KPMG’s Women’s Advisory Board gave a presentation about the firm’s initiatives to create a more compelling work environment for women. They noted that the firm’s two-year-old KNOW program was growing, with local networks being set up in KPMG offices around the country. Three Japanese Practice partners—Michiko Yano of Mountain View, Yasuko Metcalf of Chicago and Masako Carpenter of Los Angeles—realized that the Japanese Practice would benefit from a KNOW organization specifically for its members, to provide them the opportunity to meet other women in similar situations.

“We just thought that, even though people within the Japanese Practice would also be a part of the KNOW network in their individual offices, it would be appropriate to have a network specifically for the Japanese Practice as well,” Yano said. KPMG’s Japanese Practice is a group of professionals in the U.S. firm, located in various offices across the country, who provide tax, audit and advisory services primarily to U.S. companies that are subsidiaries of larger Japanese corporations. The practice has been in existence since 1973. Roughly 80 percent of the professionals in the Japanese Practice are native Japanese. In addition to common backgrounds from having lived in Japan or with Japanese families, members of the Japanese Practice share the unique experiences and concerns of working with Japanese clients. But their knowledge of the American culture and business environment varies widely. Of the women in the practice, some have been in the United States since they were children, while others came to the U.S. after college. The objectives of JP KNOW align with those of the broader KNOW organization: to provide a forum for women to network, foster mentoring relationships, further professional development opportunities, support work-life balance and highlight career opportunities. However, while the KNOW chapters are organized at the local, office level, JP KNOW is a national association. To accomplish its objectives, JP KNOW hosts lunches, dinners and team-building activities throughout the year in various venues. For example, senior partners regularly host dinners to meet and mentor younger staffers. Yano also noted that the men of the Japanese Practice are invited to events as well. “We feel that a lot of the issues that the women face, the men face as well,” she said. “Also, it’s really important, even if they don’t share the issues, for them to understand them so they can support their colleagues or support their spouses.”

PDJ

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our power comes from our people Pratt & Whitney.

Committed to Diversity. Committed to Excellence. Pratt & Whitney has 38,000 employees in 253 locations worldwide and for more than 80 years, we’ve drawn our real power from our employees’ individual talents and multitude of backgrounds. That’s why we’re so proud to receive “A Best Diversity Company” award from the readers of

Diversity/Careers in Engineering & Information Technology Magazine. At Pratt & Whitney, our strength comes not just from our similarities, but from our differences.

THE EAGLE IS EVERYWHERE. www.pw.utc.com


MGM MIRAGE MGM MIRAGE Women of Color Conference Breaks New Ground

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GM MIRAGE was a presenting sponsor of the Women of Color Conference, the first event of its kind in Las Vegas. Members of the corporate diversity department were catalysts in creating the event along with the four ethnic chambers of commerce— American Indian, Asian, Latin and Urban.This historic event attracted more than 500 minority women and men who gathered to participate in workshops ranging from health and wellness to personal finance, beauty From left to right: Debra Sillik of American Indian Chamber of Commerce, Vida Chan Lin of the and self-esteem, career development and leadership Asian Chamber of Commerce, Victoria Napoles of the Latin Chamber of Commerce and Hannah Brown of the Urban Chamber of Commerce welcome 500 attendees to the first-ever Women of skills. Color Conference in Las Vegas. The day-long event featured leadership, networking and learning The conference attracted local and national opportunities through a variety of workshops. leaders including Marilyn Johnson, vice president of market development for IBM; Juana Bordas, author and pres- bers and presenting sponsors, was formed to oversee the developident of Mestiza Leadership International; Terrie Williams, ment and execution of the event. The committee included several entrepreneur and motivational speaker; Sachi Koto, president sub-committees to focus on areas such as finances, logistics, media and CEO of Sachi Koto Communications; Brenda Perryman, relations, sponsor relations, and speaker relations. The program was developed and included a networking breakauthor and performance poet; Nevada First Lady Dawn fast, morning and afternoon Gibbons; and Nevada Attorney workshops, luncheon, roundGeneral Catherine Cortez Masto. table discussion and a mixer. MGM MIRAGE execuConference panelists included tives that participated in the authors, executives, motivaWomen of Color Conference tional speakers, community included: Michelle DiTondo, leaders and others. vice president of human The Women of Color resources at New York-New From left to right: Doretha Easler, Manager of Community Relations for Nevada Conference received a tremYork Hotel & Casino; Holly Power; Wai Ling Eng, McDonald’s franchise owner and operator; Punam Mathur, Senior Vice President of Corporate Diversity and Community Affairs for MGM endous amount of positive Gagnon, president & COO of MIRAGE; Rose McKinney James, President of Energy Works Consulting; response. Surveys were filled the Gold Strike Resort & Catherine Cortez Masto, Nevada Attorney General; and Lori Nelson, Director of Corporate Communication for Station Casinos, Inc., participate in a panel out by conference attendees, Casino; Barbara Hewitt, execudiscussion at the first-ever Women of Color Conference in Las Vegas. rating the conference on qualtive director of MGM Grand The workshop, entitled “Cultivating Women Leaders: Skills for Success in the Community, at Work and at Home,” discussed how women balance the ity of speakers, timing of University; Rose McKinney commitments and demands of leading busy lives. events, relevance of discussion James, MGM MIRAGE board topics, etc. Overall, attendees of directors; Punam Mathur, senior vice president of corporate diversity and community affairs; felt informed and inspired, and looked forward to future events. Debra Nelson, vice president of corporate diversity, communica- The conference attracted participants from around the country, tions and community affairs; and Patricia Norman, director of and several attendees have expressed interest in hosting similar events in their local communities. Additionally, MGM MIRAGE administration for corporate diversity and community affairs. MGM MIRAGE Vice President Debra Nelson saw a need for is considering hosting this event on an annual basis and has begun dialogue among minority women in the Las Vegas community. the planning process for next year. Women of all ethnicities, professions and social backgrounds She approached the chambers of commerce with the idea, and they overwhelmingly agreed. From there, a day-long event was cre- from throughout Nevada and across the country participated in the ated to bring women together from across Southern Nevada and Women of Color Conference. Conference attendees included stubeyond. The goal of the event was to provide leadership, network- dents, young professionals, seasoned executives and business owners in ing and learning opportunities through a variety of workshops. numerous fields and industries. Perhaps the biggest beneficiary, howAdditionally, event organizers hoped that the success of the event ever, was the Las Vegas community, as the conference was a demonstration of the collective power of the local minority chambers of comwould lead to it becoming an annual event. A planning committee, made up of representatives of the cham- merce to enact a program that benefited women across the city. PDJ

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PepsiCo Celebrates the Life of Edward F. Boyd 1914 – 2007 Edward F. Boyd helped place Pepsi in the hearts and hands of many Americans. And in doing so, he became an innovative leader and true pioneer in marketing. It’s been 60 years since Ed was hired to form the very first team of African-American marketers, opening up African-American communities across the nation. He defined target marketing — the way many businesses today meet consumer needs with products and services. Brave, distinguished and endearing, Ed Boyd helped move America and business to greater racial equality. Today, his spirit still inspires us. To learn more about Ed Boyd and all his accomplishments, read The Real Pepsi Challenge by Stephanie Capparell or visit careerjournal.com, go to the left column under Article Search and type in: Ed Boyd.


National Hispana Leadership Institute NHLI Offers New Program for Latinas

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or nearly 20 years, the National Hispana Leadership Institute has offered the premiere leadership development program for Latinas in the United States. Based on the impact of our Executive Leadership Institute for Latina professionals, NHLI launched the Latinas Learning to Lead Summer Youth Institute in 2001. This pilot program is making a difference in the lives of college-age Latinas (ages 17 to 22) around the country. NHLI’s mission is to develop Hispanic women as ethical world leaders through training, professional development, community and world activism, and relationship building. NHLI helps professional and college-age Latinas develop leadership experience to prepare them for roles as community business and political leaders. NHLI offers training in public policy, strategic management and team building, and issues such as gender, race and class. Graduates are required to mentor at least two Latinas for two years and develop a leadership project benefiting at least 25 Latinas. More than 5,000 Latinas have gained valuable leadership skills through NHLI’s programs since 1987. Program boasts many impressive alumnae • Irene Martinez (Class of 1992)—Irene had a vision of building a facility that her organization, El Centro de Delhi Community Center, could call its own. Ten years later, Irene cut the ribbon on a 27,000-square-foot facility that serves 20,000 families a year in Orange County, California. The center has doubled the number of licensed home-based care providers in Santa Ana, helping providers start and build successful businesses and giving working mothers peace of mind. • Becky Barrera (Class of 1997)—Becky started the National Latino Children’s Institute, which lends voice to Latino children by identifying best practices and models, and shapes policies and programs that promote healthy environments for children. • Denise Perez (Class of 2006)—Denise organized a fitness awareness 5K Walk targeting Latina women to engage them in the importance of daily exercise. She also organized a group of 2006 alumnae to create a team for the Seattle triathlon in August of 2007, and currently trains other Latinas for the triathlon via email.

Hispanics are the largest ethnic minority in the country. According to the 2000 Census, the U.S. Hispanic population grew by a staggering 58 percent in the last 10 years, four times faster than the total population. The Latina labor force has also experienced tremendous growth. However, 75 percent of Latinas earn less than $30,000 annually. Less than one percent earn more than $75,000 annually. A U.S. Department of Labor study found that minorities and women have made substantial gains in entering the workforce, but they are not equally represented at the midlevel and senior levels of management in government or corporate sectors. While Hispanic women continue to progress in all sectors of society, they are grossly underrepresented in the corporate boardroom, in the political arena and in management and senior-level positions within the private sector. 68

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NHLI youth and adult alumnae

Innovative and strategic methods must be developed to educate and train Hispanic women for leadership in order for them to participate and lead in a complex and changing global market. If they are to impact public policy and create positive change, Hispanic women must have the knowledge, life skills training, personal empowerment and experience to move into the highest levels of decision-making and leadership. To address this lack of Latinas in leadership positions, NHLI, based in Washington, D.C., was created in 1987. The Institute’s goals are to ensure that Hispanic women are in leadership positions and have the access and power needed to influence public policy and shape an equitable and humane society, and to enhance and develop leadership abilities among Hispanic women. By providing Hispanic women with educational, leadership and professional development opportunities and access to role models and mentors, NHLI helps Latinas advance and grow as leaders, become even more vital contributors to the economy and create healthy communities. Recent Accomplishments In the last year alone, NHLI has received a number of national awards for its groundbreaking work, such as: • The Center for Creative Leadership 2005 Distinguished Alumni Award. The center typically designates an individual alumnus to receive its annual award; this is its first award made to honor an organization. • The Independent Sector 2005 Leadership Award. The award honors outstanding organizations for their leadership in investing in the people of the independent sector as they work to build community. • The Cesar Chavez Award. The United States Hispanic Leadership Institute selected NHLI for its Outstanding Community Service award. This award—named after Cesar Chavez, founder of the United Farmworkers Union—recognized NHLI’s outstanding service on behalf of the Hispanic community, advocating for civil rights, social and economic justice, and equal opportunity.

PDJ


                        

                           

                              

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Raytheon Raytheon Women’s Network and Employee Resource Groups Supporting Women of Color

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he Raytheon Women’s Network (RWN) is a membership of women and men who strive to create a work environment that allows each woman to achieve her fullest potential. Specifically, RWN provides tools to network, mentor, plan, and develop careers and achieve work/life balance. RWN-ES, the Raytheon Women’s Network-El Segundo, is one of six networks active at Raytheon’s Space and Airborne Systems’ El Segundo, Calif.-based business. The networks support Raytheon’s goals for a diverse and inclusive culture and Raytheon’s vision to be an employer of choice. RWN-ES has two sponsors from the Space and Airborne Current multicultural Raytheon Women’s Network-El Segundo (RWN-ES) Board. Systems leadership team: Dina Hyde, vice president of Supply Photo includes five of the RWN board members (front row), and four of the other Chain Management, and Bobbi Pollack, vice president of legal. diversity group leads (back row). Both women have been supportive mentors to RWN-ES Another was on the topic of “Disability—A leaders and members. Forgotten Aspect of Diversity” and helped promote RWN-ES is also part of the Raytheon Global a better understanding of the special needs of those Women’s Network (RGWN), an employee with various disabilities. The third was the annual resource dedicated to serving as a strategic business celebration for Women’s History Month. partner in building and maintaining a diverse To Kim Chacon, president of RWN-ES, workforce. RGWN provides a forum for local net“Being part of the Raytheon diversity teams has works to share common experiences and lessons given me a forum for greater interaction with the learned, acting as a catalyst between those local diverse, multicultural group of women across RWN logo: Many women networks and other employee resource groups. consider pink a color that Raytheon. In addition, being an RWN officer has RGWN is committed to increasing the visibility symbolizes their strength and not only helped me further grow my own leadership and contributions of Raytheon. bonding. As such, the pink figures in the RWN logo and collaboration skills, but it has also given me an Diversity at Raytheon is about inclusiverepresent the strength in opportunity to help develop and provide a true ness—providing an atmosphere where everyone numbers provided by our women’s networks. The blue resource group for these other women.” feels valued and empowered to perform at a peak figures signify that RWN is In the most recent Women’s History Month level, regardless of the many ways people are differsupported by Raytheon’s program, 250 men and women Raytheon employees men, and the red star repreent, including but not limited to age, race, gender, sents RWN's commitment to attended RWN’s presentation of actress Ella Joyce in sexual orientation, family history or physical ability. Raytheon’s values. her one-woman play on the life of Rosa Parks. “As a The diversity networks are mostly run by volwoman leader at Raytheon, I was very moved by this unteers who are elected by their members. The presentation,” Chacon said. network leader then appoints committee heads for important topOther successful RWN programs have included the UCLA ics, such as career development, mentoring or innovation. The Women’s Leadership program. Raytheon sponsored 50 women in network leadership then works with other networks to share and the 3-day class. One attendee four years ago was Mercy O’Hoyt, support programs. That results in a broad group of employees parwho has since become chief engineer for Advanced Concepts and ticipating in the Raytheon Black Employee Network (RAYBEN) Technologies in El Segundo. events, for example, and that same collaboration and participation “I am fortunate to have the opportunity to explore many for all diversity events. Women of color do not have a specific netcareer venues in Raytheon, and further blessed by having many work; rather, they have the opportunity to participate in RWN awesome people around me who helped and shaped me as a proand any other resource group that interests them. fessional and as a person. These groups included my superiors, my RWN has sponsored three major programs so far in 2007. peers and my subordinates,” says Mercy. “My success thus far is a These programs were open for all Raytheon SAS employees, both testament to Raytheon’s culture of inclusiveness. There is always women and men, to attend. One was on the topic of “Why Some someone willing to extend a hand in difficult times and challenges.” of Us Tick and Others Tock” and discussed how our inherent values play a key role in our diversity, and understanding this can help us communicate more effectively with one another. PDJ

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perspectives

backgrounds

We each have a unique story to tell

thoughts

experiences

Our different backgrounds, experiences, thoughts and perspectives have helped shape us into who we are today. As we help you protect the things that matter most to you, we know one approach won’t work for everyone. Truly listening to our customers is at the heart of our On Your Side® promise. And at Nationwide, we care about helping you meet your unique needs.

Nationwide, the Nationwide framemark and On Your Side are federally registered service marks of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. 1-877-On Your Side is a service mark of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. © 2007 Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company, All Rights Reserved.


U.S. Postal Service USPS Clears Away Hurdles for Women to Succeed

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s one of the largest employers in the nation, the U.S. Postal Service recognizes that a workforce that reflects the diversity of the communities it serves is critical for continued success in the 21st century. The Postal Service’s vision is for every employee to have an opportunity to move up in the ranks of the organization through outstanding performance and career development opportunities. Opportunities for women, including those from diverse cultural and racial backgrounds, have never been greater within the Postal Service. Women hold key managerial and executive positions at the Postal Service. Currently, eight officer positions within the organization are held by women. There are three high-ranking senior level executives who are women of color: Delores Killette, vice president and consumer advocate; Kathleen Ainsworth, vice president, delivery and retail; and Marie Therese Dominguez, vice president, government relations. National Women’s Program For more than 30 years, the organization’s National Women’s Program has helped to improve career advancement opportunities for women. The program can be traced back to the 1959 appointment of Mrs. Cecil M. Harden as the Post Office Department’s first Special Assistant for Women’s Affairs. By 1964, the Post Office Department had a plan to increase opportunities for women, and the first Postal Service Women’s Action Committee was born. Integrated Approach In 2005, the Postal Service implemented an innovative approach to managing the development of a diverse talent pool. This approach combined various functions to create one department that integrated employee development programs with diversity programs, including the National Women’s Program. Women from diverse backgrounds have benefited from developmental opportunities through programs such as the Associate Supervisor Program, Advanced Leadership Program, and Career Management Program. These programs have provided women with advancement opportunities at all levels of the organization and at different stages within their postal careers. But it does not stop there. The Postal Service recognizes the benefit of attracting talent from outside the organization. We offer management opportunities to candidates through the Management Intern Program. Today, the Postal Service has more than 100 diversity professionals involved in attracting diverse talent to the organization and encouraging upward mobility through the various postal-career development programs and processes. Our goal is to continue to build a performance-based culture and improve the skills of our workforce. We are proud of our employees’ achievements. Here are

Delores Killette

Chu Falling Star

just a few examples of how the Postal Service’s commitment to developing employees has benefited the organization’s women of color: • Chu Falling Star, Cincinnati, Ohio, postmaster, began her career as a clerk. She took advantage of training and supervisory opportunities, including the Career Management Program and the Advanced Leadership Program, to obtain positions requiring higher accountability and responsibility. • Lilly Jung-Burton, Triboro, N.Y., district manager, received a postal executive appointment in 1988, one of the first Asian American female executives. She cites several programs that affected her career, including the management trainee program, a two-year structured program that provided a comprehensive view of Postal Service functions. • Elizabeth Johnson, Mississippi district manager, entered the Postal Service as a management associate after receiving a master’s degree in business administration. She had a fabulous education, but not much practical job experience. Through the management program, she found ways to grow and contribute to the organization. • Maria Lourdes Pell-Stockman, manager of human resources, integrated communication and branding, credits her success at the Postal Service to having a mentor. “The organization embraces diversity by offering various paths to success as long as individuals are willing to work hard and set themselves apart as leaders and achievers,” said Pell-Stockman. Building on Success for the Future Building on its legacy of diversity, the Postal Service will continue to expand recruitment efforts and continue to promote workplace practices that provide career opportunities for the best and brightest talent available. The Postal Service is committed to providing all employees with the tools and knowledge needed to do their jobs today and prepare them for the leadership challenges of tomorrow.

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MFHA’S 2007 CONFERENCE HIGHLIGHTS BOOK IS NOW

AVAILABLE! visit our website www.mfha.net to download it now

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Real-Life Holiday MicroTriggers

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icroTriggers are those subtle behaviors, phrases and inequities that trigger an instantaneous negative response. The holidays are ripe with opportunities for triggers: from subtle messages at work that say, “You’re celebrating the wrong holiday,” to shopping experiences that make you want to leave your purchase at the register and dinner conversations that are troubling enough to give you indigestion. This holiday season remember that little things matter a LOT! Here are some recent submissions from our readers.

Good Thing He’s an Ex I have struggled with my weight most of my life. The last thing I want to hear before sitting down to a fat- and cholesterol-laden holiday feast is how much weight I have gained. Right before dinner, my ex-father-in-law would take the opportunity to remark on how heavy I was and how many pounds I had put on. He is also hard of hearing, and as a result, he speaks very loudly and all his weight comments were heard by all the dinner guests.”

RSVP For the holidays, I take a little extra effort to set a special dining table. For me that means taking the time to think about the plates and glasses. I also try to add something special like a personalized ornament at each place setting. Everyone appreciates that I took the time do something festive. Knowing how many guests I’ll have for Christmas dinner matters. I always cook more than enough food. But I want to make sure that I have enough place settings and special trinkets for each person. So when I call my sister to ask if she’s coming for the holiday, she responds, ‘I don’t know yet—I’ll let you know.’ That’s fine. It’s only the first week of December. Who knows? She’s entitled to have other plans like anyone else in our family. The following week, I call. Same thing. “I’ll let you know.” I email her a few days later and she’s still not sure. When do I find out? Christmas Eve! And guess what? She is NOT coming.”

“ Christmas Time is Here I love Christmas time. Yes, I said it. ‘Christmas!’ My MicroTrigger is when, under the guise of diversity and political correctness, I am viewed as an insensitive unsophisticate and treated as if I have committed a crime for saying Merry Christmas and celebrating the true meaning of the holiday.”

My Hand is Cleaner Than a Dollar Bill

I was shopping and paid with cash. When I handed the money to the cashier, she laid the change back on the counter instead of putting it in my hand. I told her that all money is spendable, regardless of the customer’s race. I asked her if she thought my hand was too dirty to touch. I also informed her that it’s not good customer service or respectful to lay change on the counter when a customer puts it directly in your hand.”

Now That I Have You in the Store It annoys me when a company runs an advertisement indicating a really good deal and then has a sign in the store upon your arrival apologizing for the misprint. It may be legally correct, but it sure ticks me off.”

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_________, Dressing, and All the Trimmings We have several good cooks in our family, so we divide up the responsibilities for making different dishes for Thanksgiving dinner. Even those who do

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2007

not cook seem to find great places to buy prepared food, so it’s wonderful. There’s one thing that burns me up, though. It’s my brother. He always promises to bring something central to the meal. Last year it was the turkey— but then he showed up 2 hours late!”

A Long Full Winter I love my grandmother’s cooking and she knows it. So I always get seconds of anything that she makes. But last year when I brought my new boyfriend to Thanksgiving dinner, she embarrassed the heck of out me. She asked my sister if she wanted seconds, and she said that she was already full. But when she got to me she said, “Oh, I know you want an extra helping. You’ve always eaten like you’re squirreling food away for the entire winter!”

Hey Santa, I’m down here!

The holidays are here and what better way to celebrate than to run for cover. Don’t get me wrong; I love the gift of giving. It’s just that I’m vertically challenged, and it seems that during the Christmas holiday all the tall people come out to the malls in droves just to trample me. I feel like I’m playing dodge ball. I’m ducking from swinging shopping bags, being suffocated by a wall of people like trees, left in the middle of the aisle like the old video game, Leap Frog, trying not to get hit by in-coming pedestrians. With all the hustle and bustle and holiday cheer musically sprayed through the mall sound system, please look out for the short people. Much obliged.”

Janet Crenshaw Smith is president of Ivy Planning Group LLC, a consulting and training firm that specializes in diversity strategy and leadership. Her book is titled MicroTriggers: 58 Little Things That Have a Big Impact. Have a MicroTrigger story to share? Send it to: JSmith@ivygroupllc.com


Bausch & Lomb

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www.bankofthewest.com The Boeing Company

Hallmark

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Ivy Planning

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19

www.chevron.com

Lockheed Martin

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5

www.cisco.com

MFHA

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15

www.dell.com

MGM MIRAGE

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www.kodak.com

National City Bank

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Nationwide Insurance

www.nationwide.com

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Sodexho

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Shell

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UnitedHealth Group

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www.nationalcity.com

www.ford.com

Pratt & Whitney

www.shell.com

www.mgmmirage.com

Eastman Kodak Company

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www.sodexhousa.com

www.mfha.net

Dell, Inc.

Pfizer Inc

www.pw.utc.com

www.lockheedmartin.com

Cisco

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www.ivygroupllc.com

Chevron

PepsiCo, Inc.

www.pepsico.com

www.hallmark.com

www.boeing.com

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www.halliburton.com

Bank of the West

Ford Motor Company

Halliburton

WellPoint

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Thanks to you, each of these women can navigate their health care plans to obtain the services specific to their needs.

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Our neighborhood was always built around music. So it’s good to see everyone pick up the beat. Now the band keeps playing on.

My dream is to get the good times rolling again in my hometown. Life’s calling. Where to next?

At WellPoint, we are addressing tomorrow’s health care issues today. Women account for approximately 70-85% of health decisions made in U.S. households, yet still face barriers that make the acquisition of basic health care services difficult. WellPoint takes women’s health seriously. Our vision is to move women to choose better health through education and wellness initiatives that address multicultural and multigenerational women and their unique needs. Working to better people’s lives is not something you do everyday. But it can be – at WellPoint.

Better health care, thanks to you. Visit us online at wellpoint.com/careers and wellpoint.com/diversity Starting at $35,420* *As shown: 2008 Lincoln MKX with optional equipment, MSRP $41,500. Destination, tax, title and license fees extra. **Available feature.

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®Registered Trademark, WellPoint, Inc. ©2007 WellPoint, Inc. All Rights Reserved


Also Featuring ... Chrysler Financial’s Front Runner William F. Jones Jr. • Multicultural Programs for Women

Volume 9, Number 6 NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2007

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PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2007 • VOLUME 9 NUMBER 6

and woman-owned businesses is a win-win proposition for us all. Vendors win by partnering

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At Halliburton, we’ve found that putting significant trust—and business—in the hands of minority-

with one of the world’s leading companies. Halliburton wins by receiving first-class service from these quality-driven firms. If you have a minority- or woman-owned business, we want to talk to you! Please contact us at supplierdiversity@halliburton.com or visit www.halliburton.com/supplierdiversity.

HALLIBURTON

Featuring These Leading Suppliers for Halliburton H e l p i n g

b u i l d

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Back row, left to right:

CHERYL LAWSON, DUNCAN INDUSTRIAL SOLUTIONS;

OTIS ANDERSON, MICRO-SMART SYSTEMS, INC.; BARBARA PAULL, GENERAL TRUCK BODY; P.D. MORRISON, PDME © 2007 Halliburton. All rights reserved.

Front row:

VIMAL KOTHARI, SYSTEL INC.; E. JEAN JOHNSON, LEGALWATCH INC.

Profile for Diversity Journal

Diversity Journal - Nov/Dec 2007  

Diversity Journal's November/December 2007 issue

Diversity Journal - Nov/Dec 2007  

Diversity Journal's November/December 2007 issue