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Also Featuring ... Providence Health System’s Front-Runner • FOX News • Black History • David Casey • Catalyst

Thanks to you, whenever Shirley thinks about her Medicare savings, she feels like she’s struck gold. Unfortunately, her teammates suspect that’s the closest she’ll ever come to a strike.

Volume 9, Number 1 JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2007 $

12.95 U.S.

PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2007 • VOLUME 9 NUMBER 1

At WellPoint, you can be addressing tomorrow’s health care issues today. Significant issues, like creating momentum for reform on specific government programs like Medicare. In Shirley’s case, she wasn’t aware that she was even enrollment eligible. This is where you come in. Each and every day people like you are helping people like Shirley understand how to access their health care options. We are out to make a difference. We are out to shrink the ranks of the uninsured by taking the initiative for what needs to be done. And you should be a part of it. The Shirley’s of the world think so, too.

Better health care, thanks to you. Visit us online at wellpoint.com/careers EOE

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In support of Black History Month, WellPoint proudly recognizes the positive contributions of African Americans to our past, present, and future.


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Dig in Welcome to our inaugural issue of 2007. Despite its often cruel weather, January is a fine month, one full of promise for the year ahead. And we have a year full of surprises and new opportunities for you. But first, my thanks to all of you for your comments to our spectacular Women’s Worth Watching issue. Your response has been most gratifying!

James R. Rector PUBLISHER

John S. Murphy

MANAGING EDITOR

Linda Schellentrager C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R

Damian Johnson

MARKETING DIREC TOR

We especially thank the 100 plus executives who nominated a slate of women of extraordinary achievement—women who ought to be recognized and honored for their contributions to the business world. This keepsake issue grows every year. Indeed, it defines us as the peoplecentered magazine of organizational diversity. We expect our 2007

Laurel L. Fumic

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Alina Dunaeva

OVERSEAS CORRESPONDENT

Jason Bice

WEB MASTER

edition will be just as inspiring. If you missed this grand issue, it’s not LET TERS TO THE EDITOR

too late to order a copy from our Web site: www.diversityjournal.com. The issue you are holding—the largest January/February issue in our history—is packed with information and insight on topics ranging from Black History Month to employee network groups. You’ll find within its pages the names of today’s and tomorrow’s diversity leaders, all sharing their best practices with you. Priceless! We’re especially pleased to showcase AARP and its CEO Bill Novelli. (See page 19). All of us at PDJ were excited and enthralled by AARP’s outstanding diversity efforts. If you’re not familiar with AARP, this is an eye-opener. You’ll never see AARP the same way again.

Commentaries or questions should be addressed to: Profiles in Diversity Journal, P.O. Box 45605, Cleveland, OH 44145-0605. All correspondence should include author’s full name, address, e-mail and phone number. D I S P L AY A D V E R T I S I N G

Profiles in Diversity Journal Gemini Towers #1 1991 Crocker Road, Suite 320 Westlake, OH 44145 Tel: 440.892.0444 Fax: 440.892.0737 profiles@diversityjournal.com

We also have a new From My Perspective column by David Casey, vice president of diversity and workplace culture at WellPoint, Inc., and an interesting look at MicroTriggers, courtesy of Janet Crenshaw Smith of Ivy Planning. So dig in. It’s a new year full of new ideas, fresh faces, and in the East, abundant snow. So who said life was perfect?

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Innovation has many faces. At Lockheed Martin, that includes everyone. Whether it’s breakthrough technology for fighter jets, spacecraft that explore the cosmos, or information systems that keep government running smoothly, Lockheed Martin has important work to do. We need the sharpest minds available. And when we find them, we welcome them.

www.lockheedmartin.com


19 On the Cover / Special Feature Bill Novelli, Chief Operating Officer, AARP, leads this 38-million member organization with a focus on outreach, advocacy and education. Take a look at AARP’s strategies to build engagement in its diverse workforce and its efforts with supplier diversity. There’s a lot to like about AARP besides its magazine and discounts. FRONT COVER PHOTO OF BILL NOVELLI • JIM CUMMINS

.

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Front-Runner, Baruti L. Artharee, Regional Director, Office of Diversity, Providence Health System – Oregon Region A lover of jazz and a devotee of African American history, Artharee has a clear vision of what needs to be done to honor the inherent value of every person.

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Working for a healthier world™

DEDICATION

At Pfizer, our goal is to become the world’s most valued company to patients, customers, colleagues, investors, business partners and the communities where we work and live. We are dedicated to helping people live longer, healthier, happier lives — adding both years to life, and life to years.


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FOX Channel News News Channel FOX Program to help FOX News News creates creates Apprentice an Apprentice Program to minorities get ahead. RogerRoger Ailes, Ailes, Chairman help minorities get ahead. Chairman and and CEO, CEO, was was frustrated frustrated by by the the lack lack of of progress progress minorities minorities were were making making in in the the news news business business and and decided decided to to do do something something about about it. it. He He launched launched aa breakthrough breakthrough mentoring mentoring program program that’s that’s producing producing tangible tangible results results and and changing changing lives. lives.

62 Leaders on Black Leaders

We We asked asked companies companies about about their their views views of of black black history—its history—its importance, importance, the the people people who who make make itit meaningful, meaningful, and and how how itit isis observed observed in in their their organizations. organizations. Savor Savor these these ideas! ideas!

Many Habits of Highly Effective 81 The Employee Network Groups Inspired Inspired by by Stephen Stephen Covey’s Covey’s book, book, we we look look at at the the strategies strategies employed employed by by organizations organizations to to make make their their ENGs ENGs vibrant, vibrant, effective effective and and accountable. accountable.

departments departments Momentum

8 8 Momentum From my Perspective 16

Diversity Who, What, Where and When

Diversity Who, What, Where and When David Casey: Know what you mean, Say what you mean, and Mean what you say!

Catalyst 47 47 Catalyst

Is Is PCAST PCAST Keeping Keeping You You Awake Awake at at Night? Night? Parental Concern about After-School Parental Concern about After-School Time Time (PCAST) (PCAST) isis serious serious business. business.

88 88 MicroTriggers

Your Your Trigger, Trigger, Your Your Story Story Here isis aa new new feature feature inspired inspired by by Ivy Ivy Planning’s Planning’s diversity diversity strategist strategist Janet Janet Crenshaw Crenshaw Smith’s new book, 58 Little Things Here Smith’s new book, 58 Little Things That Have a BigThese Impact: What’provide s Your MicroTrigger? That Have a Big Impact: What’ s Your MicroTrigger? stories real-life insight into the subtle behaviors that can These stories provide insight work and play.into the subtle behaviors that can derail derail relationships at real-life relationships at work and play.

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[ PROUD SPONSOR ]

BANK OF THE WEST IS PROUD TO SUPPORT BLACK HISTORY MONTH

DIVERSE BACKGROUNDS. NEW IDEAS. ONE GREAT BANK. Different perspectives generate fresh ideas. That’s why at Bank of the West, we value diversity and equal opportunity for all our employees. Year after year, we continue to grow stronger thanks to our unique blend of people. After all, in today’s competitive banking environment, it is our employees with innovative ideas that keep us a step ahead of the rest.

www.bankofthewest.com Bank of the West and its subsidiaries are equal opportunity/affirmative action employers. M/F/D/V

Member FDIC


Exelon’s Peggy Davis Receives “Women With Vision” Award

Left to right: Judge Ann Williams, Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals, presented Peggy Davis, vice president, diversity, Exelon with the “Women With Vision” award for law from the Women’s Bar Association of Illinois on November 16.

CHICAGO – Peggy A. Davis, vice president, diversity, Exelon, was honored by the Women’s Bar Association of Illinois (WBAI) as one of its five 2006 “Women With Vision.” The award recognizes women who have demonstrated visionary approaches in their professional careers by making contributions to the well-being and empowerment of women. “Peggy is an extraordinary lawyer, but it is her relentless commitment to the advancement of community and sound public policy that sets her apart,” said William A. Von Hoene, Jr., senior vice president and general counsel, Exelon. “Her superb work with the Chicago Public Schools, the Metropolitan Pier and Exposition Authority and the Lawyers Trust Fund are illustrative of the broad impact she has had.” Davis spent six years as a board member of the Lawyers Trust Fund (LTF) where unprecedented gains were made in LTF’s ability to increase funding for civil legal programs. At LTF, Davis led and supported the completion of a statewide legal needs study that quantified the unmet legal problems faced by those unable to afford a lawyer. She also championed the adoption of a Supreme Court rule to promote pro bono work among lawyers, technology improvements for all legal services programs, and the creation of statewide initiatives to 8

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make the promise of equal justice a reality for all citizens of Illinois. As vice president of diversity for Exelon, Davis oversees all Exelon diversity and compliance initiatives. Prior to her current position, she was associate general counsel at Exelon responsible for the development and implementation of the company’s corporate compliance program, including investigations of potential violations of Exelon’s code of business conduct and reporting on these matters for Exelon’s audit committee. She also developed programs for ethics and compliance case management, training, and communications. She holds a bachelor’s degree in social welfare and a J.D., both from the University of Wisconsin. Exelon Corporation is one of the nation’s largest electric utilities, with approximately 5.2 million customers and more than $15 billion in annual revenues. Exelon is headquartered in Chicago and trades on the NYSE under the ticker EXC.

Gibson Dunn Promotes 11 Lawyers to Partner Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP has named 11 new partners, effective January 2007. The new partners represent a diverse range of practice areas and geographical regions. “We are pleased to welcome as partners such an accomplished and talented group of attorneys,” said Ken Doran, managing partner of Gibson Dunn. “They bring a wealth of knowledge and experience that will help ensure that we will continue to provide the best legal services to our clients. They also exemplify our firm’s core values of excellence, professionalism and collegiality.” The new partners are: Michael J. Collins – Collins’s practice focuses on executive compensation and employee benefits. He graduated summa cum laude from Notre Dame Law School in 1995.

Ethan Dettmer – Dettmer practices complex commercial litigation, with an emphasis on securities, professional liability and appellate matters. He received his law degree from the University of Michigan Law School in 1997. Rashida K. La Lande – La Lande practices corporate law with an emphasis on mergers and acquisitions and private equity. She received her law degree from Columbia Law School in 1998. Jeffrey A. Le Sage – Le Sage practices corporate law with a focus on domestic and international mergers and acquisitions, private equity transactions, venture capital transactions and corporate securities matters. He graduated cum laude from Loyola Law School, Los Angeles, in 1998. Cromwell Montgomery – Montgomery practices finance law, with a focus on a broad variety of secured and unsecured credit transactions. He received his law degree from Boalt Hall School of Law at the University of California, Berkeley in 1997. Trey Nicoud – Nicoud practices antitrust and trade regulation law. He received his J.D. with honors in 1982 from the University of Texas School of Law. G. Charles “Chip” Nierlich – Nierlich practices complex commercial litigation and antitrust law. He graduated magna cum laude from Harvard Law School in 1997.


Sophie ResplandyBernard – ResplandyBernard practices corporate law, with a focus on mergers and acquisitions, private equity, offerings and international transactions. She is a graduate of HEC business school, where she obtained Europe’s leading master’s degree in management, and received her master’s in private law at the University of Paris X, Nanterre, in 1994. Michael J. Scanlon – Scanlon practices corporate law, with an emphasis on securities regulatory and corporate governance matters. He received his law degree cum laude from Georgetown University Law Center in 1997. Jason C. Schwartz – Schwartz practices labor and employment law. He graduated magna cum laude from Georgetown University Law Center, completing his studies in 1998. J. Christopher Wood – Wood practices antitrust and international trade regulation and compliance law. He graduated with high honors from the University of Texas School of Law in 1997. Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP is a leading international law firm. Gibson Dunn has 800 lawyers and offices in Los Angeles, New York, Washington, D.C., San Francisco, Palo Alto, London, Paris, Munich, Brussels, Orange County, Century City, Dallas and Denver. For more information, please visit www.gibsondunn.com.

Harley-Davidson Hires Two African American Directors— Executives join Marketing and Human Resources departments MILWAUKEE – Harley-Davidson has

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added to their diverse employee base with the addition of Deborah Ashton as the director of diversity and Lynn Bonner as the director of market outreach. Deborah Ashton has joined the human resources team and is responsible for managing Harley-Davidson’s diversity and inclusion efforts. In her Ashton role, Ashton will foster a culture of ownership to integrate diversity and inclusion into all aspects of the company. Ashton’s expertise in diversity and human resources comes from over 20 years of work experience. Most recently, she was president of New Explorations Unlimited, a company she formed that focused on executive coaching, leadership development, diversity and multiculturalism. She holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Clarke College in Iowa and a doctorate in clinical psychology and public practice from Harvard University. She is a recipient of the Centurion of Diversity Award from the Hispanic Engineers & Information Technology and the U.S. Black Engineers & Information Technology. Lynn Bonner, director of market outreach within the customer relations and motorcycle product planning group, is responsible B o n n e r for creating, promoting and implementing strategic close-to-the-customer programs for the company. Bonner is focused on ensuring Harley-Davidson’s reach and relevance within the African American and Hispanic markets. Prior to joining Harley-Davidson, Bonner held a number of positions at Ford Motor Company on the Ford, Jaguar and Land Rover brands, including national pre-owned brand manager, cultural marketing manager, new dealer launch manager

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007

and owner loyalty program manager. Bonner holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Columbia Union College in Takoma Park, MD. Harley-Davidson, Inc. is the parent company for the group of companies doing business as Harley-Davidson Motor Company, Buell Motorcycle Company and Harley-Davidson Financial Services.

Highmark Receives New Freedom Initiative Award PITTSBURGH – Highmark Inc. has received the U.S. Department of Labor’s prestigious New Freedom Initiative Award from U.S. Secretary of Labor Elaine L. Chao. This is the award’s fifth anniversary, presented during National Disability Employment Awareness Month. (See photo next page.) The award recognizes Highmark for its exemplary and innovative efforts in training and mentoring programs for people with disabilities. The company is also recognized for its efforts in making technology available to give employees with disabilities an opportunity to succeed in all aspects of the workplace and the community. “Hiring, training and promoting diversity in all its aspects is what an inclusive workforce is all about,” said Kenneth Melani, MD, Highmark president & CEO. “Highmark has made a significant commitment to people with disabilities. Together, we can strive for a workforce that reflects not only the diversity of the communities we serve, but also a dynamic culture that will contribute to our business success.” Highmark is proud of its commitment to employing people of all abilities. More than 100 employees at Highmark have self-identified that they are disabled. Employees with disabilities have careers at Highmark in the areas of information technology, health care informatics, accounting, claims processing, customer service and mail operations. Highmark has created partnerships with organizations dedicated to training, accommodating and promoting the


When you bring all kinds of people together, good things are bound to happen.

The world is full of people who have made extraordinary contributions. We want the benefit of that extraordinary talent. That’s why we’re committed to developing and implementing a corporate strategy that focuses on enhancing work force diversity and inclusion. We also support and partner with minority- and woman-owned businesses.

Visit us at NationalCity.com/Diversity for more information.

NationalCity.com Member FDIC • ©2007, National City Corporation CS-25080

®


Left to Right: U.S. Secretary of Labor Elaine L. Chao; Ty Alexander, Executive Vice President, Human Resources & Administrative Services at Highmark; Assistant Secretary of Labor W. Roy Grizzard, Jr. Photo source: U.S. Department of Labor

employment of people with disabilities, including the University of Pittsburgh Center for Assistive Technology, Blind and Vision Rehabilitation Services of Pittsburgh, Life’s Work, The Pittsburgh Disability Employment Project for Freedom and Goodwill Industries. As one of the leading health insurers in Pennsylvania, Highmark Inc.’s mission is to provide access to affordable, quality health care enabling individuals to live longer, healthier lives. Based in Pittsburgh, Highmark serves 4.6 million people through the company’s health care benefits business. Highmark contributes millions of dollars to help keep quality health care programs affordable and to support community-based programs that work to improve people’s health. The company provides the resources to give its members a greater hand in their health. Highmark Inc. is an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association, an association of independent Blue Cross and Blue Shield Plans. For more information, visit www.highmark.com.

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MTV Networks Appoints Marva Smalls Executive Vice President of Global Inclusion Strategy NEW YORK – MTV Networks (MTVN), a division of Viacom (NYSE: VIA, VIA.B), announced that Marva Smalls has been named the Smalls company’s first executive vice president of global inclusion strategy. In this new position, Smalls will drive efforts to champion a diverse, multicultural and inclusive workforce and to develop the next generation of leaders across its worldwide brands. She will report to Judy McGrath, chairman and CEO, and will become a member of the company’s senior strategy team. Smalls also will retain her current responsibilities as executive vice president of public affairs and chief of staff for the Nickelodeon/MTVN Kids & Family Group. “Diversity, multiculturalism and inclusion are core values for our company —they are at the heart of our business success, our programming strategy and

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our culture,” said McGrath. “There’s no person better suited than Marva to implement this vision across MTV Networks and help develop our next generation of leaders.” MTVN has also announced that it is restructuring its day-to-day approach to diversity leadership, with the introduction of a new internal advisory team. Members of the team will reflect the leading business units of MTV Networks, including domestic and international channel management, operations, programming, ad sales, corporate responsibility, creative and others. The advisory team will help set priorities, develop strategies and implement policies that advance MTVN’s core values throughout the company. As a result of the restructuring, the position of Chief Diversity Officer (CDO) has been eliminated. “Given our unique company culture with multiple stakeholders in our diversity efforts, we’ve come to realize that a team approach will best serve us in a global and now multi-platform environment,” noted McGrath. Among the initiatives Smalls has led has been the development of Nickelodeon’s strategies to combat the growing obesity epidemic among chil-


dren. She has testified and spoken at leading governmental and industry forums on the topic, and has partnered closely with advertisers, child advocates and academics to help advance a proactive movement on this issue. Smalls has a master’s degree in public administration and a bachelor’s degree from the University of South Carolina. Smalls is a recent recipient of an Honorary Doctorate of Humanities from Francis Marion University, and Coker College; and is a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority and Trinity Baptist Church in Florence, South Carolina. MTV Networks is one of the world’s leading creators of programming and content across all media platforms.

Judith Vance Joins New York Life as Senior Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer NEW YORK – New York Life Insurance Company has announced that Judith

Vance has joined the company as senior vice president and chief human resources officer, reporting to Executive Vice President Sheila K. Davidson. Va n c e Ms. Vance will be responsible for all aspects of New York Life’s human resources activities, including talent management, compensation and benefits, human resources consulting, and the Human Resources Service Center. “Judy is an accomplished human resources executive with insurance industry experience and a proven track record in talent management,” said Sy Sternberg, chairman and chief executive officer, New York Life Insurance Company. “We are extremely pleased to have Judy joining New York Life and look forward to her contributing to New York Life’s continued success.” Ms. Vance began her career at Aetna where she served in both line and

human resources functions, including head of new business for the life insurance, annuity and retirement businesses and head of human resources for the financial services division. After more than two decades with Aetna, Ms. Vance moved to Prudential Financial, where she served seven years in a number of senior human resources positions. Ms. Vance was most recently senior vice president and chief human resources officer with Moody’s Corporation. Vance is a magna cum laude graduate of Assumption College with a B.A. degree. New York Life Insurance Company, a Fortune 100 company founded in 1845, is the largest mutual life insurance company in the United States and one of the largest life insurers in the world. Headquartered in New York City, New York Life’s family of companies offers life insurance, annuities and long-term care insurance. Please visit New York Life’s Web site at www.newyorklife.com for more information.

No barriers. Just opportunities. Bring your leadership, strategic thinking, and commitment to excellence to one of the world’s largest investment management companies. You’ll enjoy a comprehensive total rewards program, long-term career growth, and best-inclass training from Vanguard University, ranked as one of Training magazine’s “Top 100” programs. Join a company where diversity is a core value, backed by mentoring, monthly awareness activities, community volunteer programs, and a Diversity Leadership Team.

Connect with Vanguard™ www.vanguardcareers.com Vanguard is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Named one of Training magazine’s “Top 100” programs, March 2006. Vanguard, Connect with Vanguard, and the ship logo are trademarks of The Vanguard Group, Inc. All other marks are the exclusive property of their respective owners. © 2007 The Vanguard Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

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PDJ


“OUR GREATEST ASSET IS OUR DIVERSITY. TOGETHER, WE DRIVE INNOVATION.” Earl Exum, Director, Global Repair Services

At Pratt & Whitney, you’ll find diversity at the core of who we are and what we offer. With so many different talents and perspectives, we continue to find a better way. From design to manufacturing to service, from commercial flight to space exploration, we help our customers grow and prosper. Working together, we all succeed. The Eagle is everywhere.

www.pw.utc.com


by David Casey

Whether your organization is just starting its journey down the road of diversity management or has been at it for years, there are three crucial tenets that provide a solid foundation: Know what you mean, Say what you mean, and Mean what you say! Know What You Mean One of the greatest challenges to managing diversity is sifting through the different definitions and meanings we ascribe to the word “diversity.” Whether your organization is just beginning or well on its way, resist the temptation to make it about so much that it is ultimately about nothing. Take the time to build conceptual clarity throughout your organization. The American Institute for Managing Diversity defines diversity as “any collective mixture characterized by differences, similarities, and their related tensions.” Instead of trying to capture the myriad aspects of what makes us different, this definition provides a framework to address the diversity mixtures that matter most to you, your organization, and/or your community. Say What You Mean The push for political correctness has hindered the ability of individuals,

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organizations and communities to have meaningful dialogue about overcoming our differences and leveraging our similarities. Don’t get me wrong—that doesn’t mean that anything goes, but it does mean that we can forgive ourselves for not always being perfect. If you say you want “diverse” hires, say what you really mean. Or as my 12-year-old son would say, “Keep it real, dad!” For example, if you want to increase your representation of women and minorities, don’t be afraid to say so, but also be clear as to why that matters. If you believe that more women and minorities should be given opportunities because they have been historically disenfranchised, then let that be your platform. If you believe that increased diversity will offer insights into new markets, product innovations, increased service capabilities or economic development, then let that be the cornerstone of your approach to managing diversity. EVERY leader in your organization should believe in and be able to articulate why diversity matters. I would offer that your work is not done until that is the case.

Start by setting meaningful, yet realistic goals. Strive to strike a balance between your workplace (culture and environment), your workforce (people), and your marketplace (consumers and community). When you achieve milestones, make sure everyone knows it! And lastly, don’t go it alone. Every employee in your organization has the capability to be a diversity leader from where they are. While top-down leadership is instrumental, grassroots support from frontline employees helps to weave diversity management into the fabric of your organizational culture. Even though I think we make it too hard at times, understanding the complexities and leveraging the benefits of managing diversity can admittedly be daunting in a world that is changing at the pace it is today. There are days that I sit at my desk and wonder what the heck I have gotten myself into! Let me leave you with a quote that helps me eat this elephant in bite-sized chunks:

Mean What You Say Today’s employees and consumers are very savvy. They can easily see past the rote platitudes of organizational commitment to diversity.

Thank you and enjoy the rest of your day!

“EVERY leader in your organization should believe in and be able to articulate why diversity matters.”

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007

I am only one; but still I am one. I cannot do everything; but still I can do something. I will not refuse to do the something that I can do. – Helen Keller

David Casey is vice president of diversity and workplace culture at WellPoint, Inc. His column will appear in each issue of Profiles in Diversity Journal.


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20 Outreach, Advocacy, and Education 27 People Strategy 32 Aligning Operations 36 Building on a Strong Foundation 40 A Common Bond 42 Supplier Diversity


PHOTO • JIM CUMMINS


Special Feature

AARP

rom establishing one of the world’s largest public relations firms, Porter Novelli, to his work with the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, CARE, the Peace Corps and other organizations, AARP Chief Executive Officer Bill Novelli’s personal and career experiences all affect his outlook on diversity. As he leads the 38 million member AARP into the future of an increasingly diverse population, Novelli continues to build on AARP’s rich tradition of diversity and inclusion to help all people age with independence, dignity and purpose.


Bill Novelli

Chief Executive Officer

What influenced your personal philosophy and approach to diversity? BILL NOVELLI: I’ve always had a sense of wanting things to be fair. I don’t know why I’ve always felt this way—whether it’s innate or was taught by my parents through their examples. I did a senior thesis in college on what was known at that time as the “Negro market.” I went around Philadelphia interviewing people like the publisher of the African American newspaper, business owners and community leaders, trying to understand what this market purchased, what it wanted to purchase, how it was growing, how it had been limited. My thesis was motivated by a desire to see fairness throughout all segments of our society. Working at CARE taught me to broaden my lens on the world. The thing about CARE is you’re working in the developing world, and the developing world is 99.9 percent people of color. So you’re out there thinking, “Okay, who’s the minority here?” One day I was talking with a colleague about minorities and we both started laughing, because we worked in 45 countries and in those countries Americans are the minority, and white Americans are the minority among the minority. So, you learn to see the world in a totally different way. It gives you perspective. Unfortunately, it’s not an education that most people get in our country. I think it’s a really important education for kids to get. When my kids were little, we took them to Mexico. That was a learning experience they’ve never forgotten … different culture, different kinds of people, different kinds of food. Yet, we get so secure in our little cocoons right where we are. Organizations like AARP can help. For example, many people who were not born in this country have no clue about the civil rights movement. And many young women who are career professionals are not sensitive to the fights that their mothers and grandmothers fought. But through our publications, our programs, our speeches and sharing our experiences, AARP can help foster greater understanding of where we came from and how to make the future better for everyone.

in the minority. She was the first female high school principal in California, the daughter of an immigrant and an inclusive, visionary woman whose ideas were far ahead of her time. In 1916, she became principal of the rough, heavily immigrant East Los Angeles High, which she insisted be renamed Abraham Lincoln High. From her time at Lincoln High to her later founding of the National Retired Teachers Association and AARP, she was guided by the belief that everybody ought to have a fair shot. And that’s really what we’re talking about. Dr. Andrus gave us the motto we live by today, “To serve, not to be served.” And an important part of our service is to acknowledge the diverse culture of the nation and our 38 million members.

AARP is well-known for representing the needs and interests of 50+ Americans, and it also has a rich tradition of diversity. How did that tradition get started … what’s the source of that commitment? BILL NOVELLI: Diversity goes back to the roots of AARP. I think it’s fair to say that diversity is in the DNA of the organization. Our founder, Dr. Ethel Percy Andrus, was, in a sense,

Is this view shared by your Board of Directors? BILL NOVELLI: Absolutely. Our board cares very deeply about this subject. And it comes up at every meeting. I don’t care if the subject is finance, or volunteers or social impact, diversity is either implicitly or explicitly on the table. And I think that’s important because it serves as a constant reminder of what we care about as an association.

How is diversity significant as AARP enters the 21st century? BILL NOVELLI: There are different reasons to consider diversity. First, it’s part of our fiber; it’s who we are as a nation. As a country, we believe in diversity and inclusiveness. That belief has not come easily, nor has it come without a price. Still, we are a nation of diverse cultures. Second, there’s a moral imperative to all of this. We all deserve a fair chance—if not at the

“With diverse views and opinions on the table, we do a better job of sorting through different strategies and approaches, and end up with a better product.”

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BILL NOVELLI

finish line, certainly at the starting line. And third, it makes very good business sense, for at least two reasons: One, with diverse views and opinions on the table, we do a better job of sorting through different strategies and approaches and end up with a better product. Two, our members are diverse. In order to reach them, we need to have people, as part of AARP, who look like, think like, act like and relate to whatever population it is.


Special Feature

AARP

Bill Novelli with AARP President Erik Olsen.

How does AARP put its diversity plans into action? BILL NOVELLI: When it comes to making diversity operational, talk is easier than implementation. It’s one thing to believe in diversity philosophically or strategically. It’s another thing to execute it. It’s fair to say we’ve wrestled with how best to do this for a long time. AARP has always been diverse. We’ve had different diversity groups and different diversity strategies. And I pay homage to my predecessor, Horace Deets, who nurtured AARP’s commitment to diversity. I’ve always been proud of our diversity. But I’ve never been as pleased as I am now about how we’ve begun to implement diversity throughout our programs and initiatives and across the association at all levels. We’re talking about members, volunteers throughout the states, as well as our board members. We’re talking about employees. I think we’ve got the right approach. We’ve got a solid plan and we’re doing the right thing, but there are still gaps. For example, I meet regularly with staff at various levels and have breakfast with them. It’s a chance for me to get to know people, and for them to ask me frank questions. During one of those meetings last year, an African American staff member with substantial expertise in workforce issues said candidly that we were not fully promoting our diversity goals across all facets of the organization. She said we needed more expertise in how we develop our plans to promote greater diversity among employers. My response was, “Go get it. And if we don’t have the expertise on staff—and I’d be surprised if we don’t—go buy it. That’s what we do if we need expertise on information or health policy. Why should diversity be any different? We cannot say, well, gee, we don’t have the right thinking on staff so

Snapshot of AARP OVERVIEW AARP is a nonprofit, nonpartisan membership organization that was founded in 1958 by retired educator Ethel Percy Andrus. The AARP Foundation is AARP’s charitable organization, with emphasis on those at social and economic risk. AARP Services, Inc. is a wholly owned taxable subsidiary of AARP. It manages the wide range of products and services offered as benefits to AARP members.

MEMBERSHIP More than 38 million Americans aged 50 and older are members of AARP. Nearly half of them work full-time or part-time. Most AARP members (89.5 percent) are white, while 5.6 percent are African American, 2.6 percent are Hispanic and 2.5 percent are Asian, Native American or Pacific Islanders.

PUBLISHING AARP The Magazine is published bimonthly. AARP Bulletin is a monthly newspaper. AARP Segunda Juventud is a bimonthly magazine published in Spanish and English. NRTA Live & Learn is a quarterly newsletter for 50+ educators. In addition, 17 titles have been published by AARP Books.

STAFF AND OFFICES More than 2,300 people work for AARP in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

CONTACT INFORMATION AARP 601 E Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20049 www.aarp.org

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Bill Novelli Chief Executive Officer

we can’t really inject diversity into XYZ plan. We have to get it. The staffer put her finger on it—we have to do a better job. AARP’s membership is growing. One of your goals is to ensure that your members mirror the whole 50+ population. How do you plan to meet that goal? BILL NOVELLI: While our membership remains predominately white, growing numbers of African Americans, Hispanics and people of Asian descent are filling out AARP’s ranks. Diversity is expanding beyond the bounds of ethnicity,

be members.” And I thought that’s really profound. It’s not just “send me $12.50 and I’ll send you a magazine and provide you with benefits.” It’s about the whole range of ways to participate in and influence the work of AARP. Does that lesson apply to other diverse populations as well? BILL NOVELLI: Yes it does. It all comes down to offering people what they want, when they want it and in a manner that appeals to them. And it’s often pretty basic. Most people want financial security, good health care, the option to work as long as they want, involvement in their community—and they want to relax and have fun. We just have to reach out, make sure we’re talking in the right voice to the right audiences. And we have to let people know we truly care about what they value. We have to demonstrate this through our advocacy, our programs, our products and advertising, our activities, our volunteer opportunities and through our staff, volunteers and service providers who interact with our members and potential members. For example, when we team up with the Library of Congress and the Leadership Council for Civil Rights to launch the Voices of Civil Rights project, it served multiple purposes, but especially to preserve history in the stories of people BILL NOVELLI who lived through the Civil Rights era, no matter their racial background. Today, most of them are midlife or older. Our participation also expressed AARP’s acknowledgement that this was one of the most significant periods in the lives of African Americans. Likewise, through our contribution to building the Martin Luther King, Jr., National Memorial, we honored a historic national figure, an African American, beloved the world over. And we have to understand that one size doesn’t fit all. Like when we talk about Asian Americans, they are a smaller piece of the population yet represent many vastly different cultures— people with roots in India, China, Japan, Vietnam, the Pacific Islands and other places—some new to the U.S., others who’ve lived here several generations. So, we must carefully consider all of these aspects. Ultimately, we want our membership to be a reflection of the greater U.S. 50+ population and we’re not there yet, so we have to keep raising the bar for ourselves.

“We created a bimonthly magazine published in English and Spanish that celebrates second youth: AARP Segunda Juventud.” as well, and outreach to unique segments of the aging population is a challenge that we gladly take on. None of this is easy. If you look, for example, at the 50+Hispanic American market, you’ve got a language difference. Hence, we created a bimonthly magazine published in English and Spanish that celebrates second youth: AARP Segunda Juventud. It’s a fact that there’s little awareness of AARP among older Hispanic Americans. And that stands to reason because many of them come from other countries, where there are no organizations similar to AARP. So we must make a concerted effort to reach out, to work with, to recruit, to retain Hispanics. It is a worthwhile investment. On this front, I was reminded of an important lesson recently from Fernando Torres-Gil, a noted academic with extensive government and public policy experience, and the son of migrant farm workers who serves on the board of the AARP Foundation. I mentioned to him that AARP planned to undertake a Hispanic membership development program. And he said something like, “Wait a minute. If you want Hispanic people—us—to be your members, you don’t just go out and invite them to join AARP. We need to be included in your policy-making and program decisions. And then we will

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You say that you’re not there yet, but you are making progress. How do you measure that progress in reaching your diversity goals? BILL NOVELLI: AARP’s Board of Directors resolved several years ago that we should take steps to achieve a membership base that mirrors the U.S. 50+ population. It’s an ambitious


Special Feature

AARP

PHOTO • STAN KOTECKI

The AARP Executive Team

In October 2006, AARP CEO Bill Novelli published his first book, a call to arms for 50+ Americans to become involved in social change. All proceeds from the book, written with Boe Workman, go to the AARP Foundation.

goal, and we’re going to succeed in reaching it. We had a glimpse of what that success looks like last October, when more than 24,800 AARP members gathered in Anaheim for Life@50+ AARP’s National Event & Expo. The demographics of those who attended nearly matched the overall population in terms of age breaks and ethnicity. Most importantly, it meant that a whole lot of people from different backgrounds and cultures came together to enjoy the entertainment, educational sessions, fitness opportunities, exhibits and lifestyle workshops that we’d tailored to them. In terms of the AARP staff, we’re doing well but can do better. When it comes to African Americans, we’re above the norm. When it comes to women, we’re above the norm. When it comes to Hispanics, we’re probably at about the norm. And, our workforce is older than those of most other employers, according to the Saratoga Institute, which said the average age of most workers in 2005 was 40. We were at 46. I think we’re behind with Asian Americans and people with disabilities. But not all diversity can be measured. For example, it is extremely difficult for AARP as an employer to measure our performance in terms of hiring and retaining lesbians, gays, and bisexual and transgender individuals. A lot of people aren’t

Robin Talbert, executive director, AARP Foundation; Emilio Pardo, chief brand officer; John Rother, group executive officer – policy and strategy; Shereen Remez, group executive officer – membership; Thomas Nelson, chief operating officer; Ellie Hollander, chief people officer; Bill Novelli, chief executive officer; Christopher Hansen, group executive officer – state and national initiatives; Dawn Sweeney, president, AARP Services, Inc.; Kevin Donnellan, chief communications officer; Robert Hagans, chief financial officer; Nancy LeaMond, group executive officer – social impact; and (seated) Joan Wise, general counsel.

The AARP Website got more than 39 million hits in 2006.

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Bill Novelli Chief Executive Officer

(Left to right) AARP Board Member Clarence Pearson, AARP New York State President Madeleine Moore, AARP New York volunteer Gene Barrett (honored with the state’s 2006 Andrus Award for his extensive service) and Bill Novelli.

Bill Novelli with volunteer Josephine Collins, president of AARP’s Peachtree Chapter in New Bronx, NY.

going to say “that’s who I am,” so it’s hard to measure. But what we can measure, we benchmark. And as we look at the data and study it, it’s very encouraging. But we can do much better. It takes involvement, investment and commitment. And that’s what we’re trying to do. We’ve got to crank all of these factors into involving a more diverse mix of people into the fabric of our association, so that we’ll become a valued part of their lives. Last fall, you traveled around the country promoting your new book, 50+: Igniting a Revolution to Reinvent America. With all of the people you talked to, did the topic of diversity come up? BILL NOVELLI: I don’t think Americans talk about diversity per se. I think Americans are diverse. We have a diverse culture. There is continuing public discussion about immigration, affirmative action and other issues; but overall, America is doing well. What I found particularly inspiring in talking to people during my book tour was discovering the ways in which people with diverse backgrounds are using their own experiences—both positive and negative—to contribute to improving the fabric of society and making our country better for all people. For example, when I was in San Francisco, my colleagues in the AARP California office and I met with leaders of the gay and lesbian community. I knew they had a network, but I didn’t realize how extensive it is. The most compelling portion of our discussion focused on their experiences with and observations about long-term care. Many persons in the GLBT community face unique challenges as they age, such as with affordable housing or appropriate long-term care, particularly if they don’t have a partner or child to care for them. They’ve given deep and careful thought to these challenges. And they have a lot of policy ideas, for example fostering low-cost solutions such

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as group housing. We plan to continue the discussions and develop relationships with them to further these solutions. How do you feel about AARP’s tradition of diversity and inclusion looking forward? BILL NOVELLI: I’m very optimistic about AARP’s diversity, and diversity in the United States. I like where we are. I especially like going to the holiday party and seeing what we look like. I like to walk through the halls and go to the cafeteria and see what we look like—a truly diverse and interesting group of people. I like going to our annual member event and seeing what we look like—it’s like a Little AARP. At this year’s event, I think people of color accounted for nearly 20 percent of attendants, not to mention people with varying disabilities. So, I think, as an organization, we can take pride in ourselves. Our outreach, advocacy, education, information all go far beyond serving our members—our 38 million members only account for about half everyone 50 and older in the United States. We put a lot of effort into low-income concerns, like Medicaid, low-income energy assistance programs and legal advocacy and tax preparation assistance for older men and women who can’t afford it. And look at Social Security. Nearly every citizen will receive Social Security once they reach retirement age, but it’s a particularly significant source of financial security for people with low incomes, and many are people of color, people with disabilities and women. It really brings us back to our founder, Dr. Andrus, and her efforts to serve people—mainstream, on the fringes, different social or ethnic backgrounds, it didn’t matter. And that’s the tradition we live out today. We still believe everyone ought to have a fair shot at the American dream. I believe at AARP we champion that cause and help bring dignity, respect and purpose to all people as they age.

PDJ


Special Feature

AARP

t AARP, focus on employees goes well beyond the traditional human resources and organizational development activities normally associated with the “people side� of the enterprise. Throughout its nearly 50-year history, AARP has established a national reputation for helping improve the lives of people as they mature. In 2002, AARP executives committed themselves and the organization to establishing a highly integrated employee engagement strategy.


AARP

People Strategy

AARP President Erik Olsen

Frances Butler, a chapter member, joined AARP President Erik Olsen (center) and Mark Kitchens, the association’s media relations director, in renovating a hurricane-damaged home in New Orleans on their 2006 Day of Service.

Creating a World Class Atmosphere for Success AARP’s People Strategy is an integral part of its strategic planning. By using WORLD CLASS as an acronym, the Association spells out the cultural attributes for creating an environment conducive to success. Staff are reminded about these values in several ways. For example, many of the conference rooms at AARP’s National Office in Washington, D.C., feature large color photos of AARP staff with a large letter and one-word description of various WORLD CLASS attributes. In addition, staff are encouraged to use attractive note cards embossed with various letters from WORLD CLASS to thank or acknowledge each other for a job well done.

W

We walk the talk, lead by example and model the behaviors consistent with a WORLD CLASS culture.

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We are open to ideas and freely share knowledge and information.

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We take the time to recognize, celebrate and reward our successes and lessons learned.

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We continually learn and apply new knowledge and skills to all that we do.

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We make and impart timely, informed and effective decisions and are willing to change and adapt.

C

We value and encourage innovation, creativity and risk-taking.

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We listen, trust and respect one another’s views and opinions.

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We hold ourselves accountable for using resources wisely and for the results we commit to achieving.

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We commit to providing valuable service to members and society.

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We share collective responsibility for AARP’s success.

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This strategy is fully supported, from the most experienced Executive Team member to the newest employee joining the AARP team. Through its enterprise-wide “People Strategy,” AARP created a framework with which to shape the employee experience, spanning everything from information technology and facilities to human resources, knowledge management, organizational learning and performance, diversity and a myriad of other activities. “We are relentless in our efforts to foster a work environment and culture that inspires each person to perform at their full potential,” said Ellie Hollander, who in 2002 became AARP’s first Chief People Officer. “Not only is this the right thing to do,” Hollander said, “but we understand fully that recruiting, developing, and retaining a dedicated, diverse, and high-performing workforce is a strategic necessity in today’s highly competitive environment.” AARP employs more than 2,300 employees in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. More than 40 percent of AARP staff are racial or ethnic minorities. Considering factors such as the gender, age and generational differences, sexual orientation, disability, religion, and geography of the workforce, AARP is rich in diversity. This unique blend adds up to a wealth of experiences, abilities and perspectives that helps AARP better serve its members and drive its social mission. “No matter where employees work or what they do for our organization—as state directors,


Special Feature

AARP

Felicia Perkins, senior operations administrator for AARP Louisiana, works on Brenda Poché’s home.

legislative specialists, accountants, spokespersons or Web developers—we want them to come to work knowing that the contributions they make each day will positively affect the lives of our broad and diverse membership,” says Hollander. “We recognize that to earn that type of a personal commitment, we’ve got to be a terrific place to work. That’s what our People Strategy is all about.”

“We are relentless in our efforts to foster a work environment and culture that inspires each person to perform at their full potential.”

Culture of Success

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ike many other large organizations, AARP creatELLIE HOLLANDER ed a process to summarize its operating plans CHIEF PEOPLE OFFICER and establish easily understood measures of success. “One of our People Strategy metrics is tied to how well we involve staff and our corps of volunteers in meeting AARP’s goals, including attracting and retaining a membership base that reflects the U.S. 50+ population,” says Hollander. The People Strategy began by identifying and defining full-time non-exempt staff. Compensation is based not only on cultural attributes and behaviors that would embody AARP’s individual performance, but also on the success of the organization as a whole. goal of having a world-class workforce. (See sidebar, left.) Another keystone was to clearly articulate AARP’s vision, mission and strategic goals so that all employees understand the Taking the Pulse contributions they make to overall success. Every employee develops yearly individual performance objectives that align “ ince the true test of the success of our People Strategy is in with AARP’s goals, including a performance objective tied to the eyes of our employees, we survey all staff annually to what it calls WORLD CLASS behaviors. measure how well they think we are reaching our People goals,” An annual incentive compensation program ensures that Hollander explains. The survey goes to one-third of staff three high performers at all levels are rewarded for their contributions. times per year, and getting feedback at several intervals enables Unlike most organizations, AARP makes incentive compensa- AARP to be responsive and adjust as needed to make the organtion available to all employees—including part-time and ization an even better place to work. While individual confi-

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AARP

People Strategy

“It is by including considerations of the diversity implications in all of our policies, plans, products and services, programs, relationships, and operations that we assure relevance in the various subgroups that make up the general population.”

dentiality is scrupulously maintained, results can be analyzed by age, tenure, gender, work location and other factors to provide a comprehensive snapshot of perceptions throughout the organization. “Employees are well-engaged throughout AARP, which is a positive sign that we’re on the right track,” Hollander said. “The employee opinion pulse surveys also have shown us areas where there was room for improvement, and actions have been taken. Our People AN EXCERPT FROM AARP’S Strategy is the roadmap for bridging the “WORKPLACE GUIDELINES.” gaps between where we are (as per our employee surveys) and the WORLD CLASS workplace to which we aspire.” Establishing employee resource groups (ERGs) has provided networking opportunities and additional visibility for employees who have unique backgrounds or life experiences. The ERGs also help AARP Workplace Guidelines advance AARP’s mission. For example, in 2006 members of the Disability Interest Resource Group played pivotal roles AARP is committed to creating and maintaining a workplace culture that respects in organizing a 16th “birthday” event for the Americans and values individual differences, enabling employees and volunteers from diverse with Disabilities Act, which featured remarks by backgrounds to perform and contribute to their full potential. Diversity is a core former U.S. Rep. Tony Coelho (Calif.), who sponsored the value for AARP. As stated in our People Strategy, we listen, trust, and respect one another’s original legislation, and senior officials from several national views and opinions. Our diverse views and opinions are based in large part on the disability rights groups. cultural backgrounds from which we come. Each of us is unique and special, and AARP has extended many employee benefits to domestic AARP benefits when we bring our “whole selves” to work. It is through openly partners, and all employees can use two personal holidays for offering, and then considering and acting on, our diverse perspectives that we special religious or cultural observances of their choice. reach sound conclusions and make enriched decisions related to our strategic Each year, four employees receive AARP sponsorship in direction in support of our vision and mission. New Ventures in Leadership, a 12-month program that promotes leadership development for professionals of color in the area of aging. GUIDELINES AND PROCEDUR ES Recognizing the importance of support professionals, The term “diversity” means simply: the characteristics and experiences that make AARP provides an annual conference around professional develeach of us unique individuals. These characteristics and experiences include both opment, networking, motivation and recognition. Support staff similarities and differences and they can be internal (dimensions one is born with), external (dimensions that can change over time), or situational (dimensions that can from around the country gather together to build their skills and change based on employment or some other factor). hear updates from leadership. As a result, they feel more closely It is by including considerations of the diversity implications in all of our policies, aligned with the goals and mission of the organization. plans, products and services, programs, relationships, and operations that we assure Mentorship is another important aspect of AARP’s People relevance in the various subgroups that make up the general population. Strategy. Mentors get the opportunity to share their experience, skills, organizational knowledge and issue expertise. Mentees get RESPONSIBILITIES feedback from an objective source on everything from how to Managers at all levels—particularly the chief executive officer and members of the gain skills and experiences needed to enhance their careers to Executive and Leadership Teams—are responsible for ensuring that diversity is learning about unique aspects of the AARP culture. Established embedded in our strategic priorities and the business we conduct toward that end. in 2006, AARP’s mentoring program is dedicated to the memAARP’s commitment to diversity should be evident in all of its policies and ory of Jerry Florence, an AARP executive who, through inforpractices. Similarly, employees at all levels are responsible for demonstrating diversitymal and structured mentoring, helped employees at all levels friendly behaviors to their work at AARP. They will be provided education and take steps to explore and realize their career aspirations and grow training to assist them in developing these behaviors. personally and professionally. 30

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Special Feature

AARP

AARP Continues to Bear Witness to Struggle for Civil Rights

Best Practices for Workers

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ts heritage as a social mission-driven organization positions AARP as a go-to organization for human resource professionals seeking to emulate many of its best practices. For example, AARP is one of only a few organizations offering a formal phased retirement program that provides options for employees age 62 to reduce their hours, step into a role of lesser responsibility or opt for other flexible arrangements. “This program enables us to give these valued employees choices in terms of rewarding career options where they can make a difference and have some flexibility,” notes Hollander. “It’s a win-win; we retain expertise and organizational knowledge, and valued staff stay with us longer in roles they enjoy. Equally important, we serve as a model to other organizations on how to structure and implement a phased retirement program. We are working to help make this a workplace norm, rather than the exception.” Another innovation is “Renewal,” which invites AARP employees who meet certain service and performance criteria to take four consecutive weeks of paid time away from work. Hollander says the program is unique because it isn’t limited to executives or managers. Staff at all pay grades are eligible for this sabbatical-like program, and they can use the time off however they wish to renew, refresh and rejuvenate. With management approval, employees may extend the Renewal beyond the four weeks by using accrued vacation. An added benefit for other employees is that there are substantial cross-training opportunities for staff who backfill for colleagues out on Renewal. AARP is developing a new Talent Development Integration system to give employees additional ways to network within the organization, build skills and advance their careers. The Association also continues to refine its diversity education programs so good practices around diversity and inclusion are woven into the fabric of the Association. “Our People Strategy focuses on fostering employee engagement as a means to achieving outstanding personal, professional and organizational goals. Total commitment to this holistic approach serves the best interests of our staff, our members and society as a whole. At AARP, we truly believe that we each have the power to make it better. And through our People Strategy, we do,” adds Hollander. PDJ

MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR., NATIONAL MEMORIAL AARP President-elect Jennie Chin Hansen (right) at the groundbreaking for a memorial on the National Mall honoring the life and work of Dr. King. AARP pledged $1 million toward its construction. “AARP’s leaders share and promote Dr. King’s national and international commitment to world peace through non-violent social change,” explained AARP CEO Bill Novelli. “America’s true strength lies in its diversity of people. The vision of the memorial captures Dr. King’s message of freedom, democracy and opportunity for all.” “We must not forget how far we have come as a nation,” Novelli added. “This memorial is one more way we can honor those who lived through the struggle and continue to ensure their stories are not lost forever.”

PHOTO • STIRLING ELMENDORF

AARP also has expanded opportunities for upward communication. Senior executives meet with staff at all levels, often in small-group settings such as breakfast meetings, as well as in large town-hall exchanges that are available to all offices via video or audio conferencing. As part of the People Strategy’s Active for Life health & wellness program, association executives may lead employee walks or participate in exercise boot camps.

VOICES OF CIVIL RIGHTS In 2004, AARP teamed up with the Library of Congress and the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights to capture and preserve the memories of thousands of people who lived through the civil rights movement. In August of that year, AARP launched a 70-day bus tour that started on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., and wound through 39 cities, following part of the route of the 1961 Freedom Rides to Jackson, Miss., and beyond. The goal of the project wasn’t to make history, but to save history. At each stop, AARP set up a “digital front porch” to interview people and assist others in recording their stories of pain, anger, determination and hope. The History Channel’s cameras were along, too, capturing the people, places and events of the “Voices of Civil Rights” tour. In 2006, the History Channel’s documentary, Save Our History: Voices of Civil Rights, won the prestigious Peabody Award, whose judges called the documentary “eloquent, moving and invaluable.” The Voices’ website (www.voicesofcivilrights.org) won the much-sought-after Webbie Award.

MONTGOMERY BUS BOYCOTT STORY In 2005, AARP teamed up with the Smithsonian Institution and the Troy University Rosa Parks Library and Museum to help commemorate the 50th Anniversary of Rosa Parks’ courage and idealism, and the momentum she gave to America’s civil rights movement. AARP underwrote 381 Days: The Montgomery Bus Boycott Story, an exhibit that is touring around the U.S. through the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibit Services (SITES) program. Photographs, quotes and historical text described the 381-day boycott of the Montgomery, Ala., bus system following the arrest of Parks, an African American woman, for refusing to give up her seat. “As an advocacy organization for social change, we hope that our participation in this exhibit serves as a reminder that activism is an American tradition—one that many of our members who lived through this era experienced, and one that we want to pass down to future generations,” said AARP Chief Diversity Officer Percil Stanford.

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oven throughout the fabric of AARP are efforts to align its operations to promote diversity and inclusiveness. AARP’s chief operating officer, Tom Nelson, oversees implementation of the association’s major initiatives and coordinates projects among work units.


Special Feature

Executives who report directly to Nelson head the departments of People Strategy, Business Operations, Diversity and Inclusion, Strategic Planning, State and National Integration, Social Impact, Member Value, Integrated Communications, Information Technology Systems and the AARP Foundation. A veteran staffer, Nelson has risen through the ranks since he joined AARP in 1980 to establish its consumer program. He brought years of experience as a staff member at the Federal Trade Commission, where he had worked on the investigation and subsequent regulation of the funeral industry, as well as inquiries related to nursing homes and other consumer issues facing older persons. In 1982, he assumed additional responsibility for AARP’s health activities and went on to direct the association’s educational and community service programs and, later, its state and national initiatives. He was appointed chief operating officer in 2002. Nelson, who holds a Ph.D. in gerontology, is determined to eliminate stereotypes about people over 50. “AARP members are vibrant, dynamic, energetic and creative. They’re using the Internet, going to rock concerts, trying new food, pursuing second and third careers and giving back to their communities in remarkable ways,” he emphasized. The key to AARP’s success in achieving positive social changes and giving each member what he calls a “wow” experience hinges on understanding and reflecting its members’ diverse needs and expectations. Nelson noted, “When we look at the converging trends of an aging America and an increasingly diverse America, suddenly the issues AARP has been addressing all along are becoming more relevant to all populations. And at the same time, we as an organization are becoming more cognizant of the need to create more specific programs that address unique needs that we may have overlooked before,” Nelson said.

AARP

AARP’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion serves as a liaison and matrix manager within AARP, and to outside audiences, in order to operationalize diversity. Social Impact

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ARP is dedicated to achieving social change (or “social impact,” as AARP terms it) in five topic areas: economic security, health and supportive services, livable communities (housing and mobility), global aging and navigation (improving access to needed information and resources). Outreach on the new Medicare prescription drug benefit is one example of how AARP leverages its resources and integrates diversity throughout its operations, according to Nelson. The association’s approach was modeled, in part, on its successful efforts to persuade Congress not to carve private accounts out of Social Security. Consumers—especially those at the lower end of the economic scale—care about the cost of prescription drugs. AARP used its advocacy power to help persuade Congress to add a prescription drug benefit to Medicare in 2003. AARP’s aggressive outreach in 2005 and 2006 to inform millions of people about Medicare Part D is a good example of the association’s diversity commitment at work. For example, AARP and the National Alliance for Hispanic Health (NAHH) launched a joint advertising campaign in Hispanic newspapers nationwide to tell the stories of real people who were benefiting from Medicare’s new prescription drug plans. An estimated 3.1 million Hispanics are eligible for the new Medicare prescription drug program, and six in 10 are eligible for extra help paying for their coverage. The ads encouraged seniors to sign up for the coverage before the deadline. In addition, the chief executives of AARP and NAHH participated in a nationwide satellite media tour to further promote the prescription drug benefit. AARP’s Integrated Communications department produced video and audio news releases in English and

“AARP members are vibrant, dynamic, energetic and creative. They’re using the Internet, going to rock concerts, trying new food, pursuing second and third careers and giving back to their communities.”

TOM NELSON, CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER

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Tom Nelson Chief Operating Officer

Spanish, prepared articles for placement in African American and Hispanic newspapers and arranged interviews for national and state spokespersons. The National Indian Council on Aging teamed with AARP on a series of fact sheets that were distributed among all American Indian and Alaska Native tribes. AARP’s radio public service announcements were widely broadcast in their communities. The National Asian Pacific Center on Aging co-sponsored a series of local newspaper ads describing how Asian Pacific adults could avail themselves of the new Medicare benefit; call-in assistance was available in a number of languages, including Vietnamese and Laotian. The AARP Foundation, the association’s charitable and philanthropic arm, got the word out to low-income individuals via supportive local organizations that they might qualify for Medicare to pay for almost all of their drug costs if they enrolled in Medicare’s Extra Help Program. The Foundation even provided information about the Medicare Part D program to Gulf-state hurricane evacuees who were living in temporary housing. “We’ve talked to and heard from thousands of people who told us that they had been paying $40 or more for a particular prescription, and were now paying $3 or $5,” Nelson said. “That’s powerful stuff.” Member Value

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elson recognizes that the most important item of business that AARP conducts each day is delivering value to members. “Currently, that value is strong, and as the population of people over 50 shifts even more dramatically and as technology evolves, people will find new ways to live their lives and thus demand a different mix of products and services,” Nelson said. “That’s one reason why we have made significant investments in research, which leads to attracting and serving more Americans 50 and older.” And one of AARP’s goals is to attract and retain a membership base that mirrors the demographic make-up of the entire U.S. population. Careful analysis of the nation’s 50+ population, as well as younger generations, is pivotal to the success of this effort, he said. AARP’s research is available far beyond its own membership. “AARP offers phenomenal resources for researching a wide array of diversity trends,” Nelson said. “Thanks to the

Internet, much of this research is available online, and free of charge, through our AgeLine® Database.” A recent, informal search of the AgeLine® Database yielded abstracts on diversity topics ranging from cultural differences in family caregiving, to telephone support groups for HIVpositive persons aged 50+, and multicultural experiences with elder law. Another leading source of data, market analysis and advice is Focalyst, a joint effort between AARP Services, Inc. (a wholly owned subsidiary of AARP) and Kantar, a research and consultancy company. Targeted Outreach

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n recent years, AARP has sought to attract and retain more African American, Hispanic, disabled, gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender members. “Second youth” is recognized and celebrated by AARP among Hispanic households through publication of AARP Segunda Juventud, a magazine published by AARP in Spanish and English. The publication keeps readers up-to-date on important social issues and lifestyle trends, while introducing them to fascinating people who are living and loving the second halves of their lives. This publication for Hispanics aged 50+ debuted in Houston, New York City, Los Angeles, Miami and Puerto Rico in 2002, and ramped up to national distribution early in 2003. And 2007 will bring another first—AARP’s first member event to be held in Puerto Rico, entirely in Spanish. The “Feria de la Segunda Juventud” will be held in May. In 2005, AARP’s Media Relations department joined with one of the most powerful voices in the African American community to raise awareness about aging issues. AARP and the National Newspaper Publishers Association hosted five regional workshops for NNPA publishers that helped to provide timely and relevant information to their readers about economic security, affordable prescription drugs, caregiving and fighting age discrimination. People Power

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ne of Nelson’s passions as COO is leveraging the deep reservoir of human capital within the AARP membership that can be tapped for volunteer service. Nelson noted that AARP volunteers fill many of the gaps in service that families, community and government are unable to address, while also helping people over 50 maintain their independence and dignity. For example, volunteers with the AARP Foundation’s Tax-Aide program provided free taxpreparation help to more than 2 million taxpayers in 2006 alone. Many of those who seek help from TaxAide find it difficult to pay for such assistance. To reach them, Tax-Aide volunteers have reached out to community-based organizations that serve persons

One of AARP’s goals is to attract and retain a membership that mirrors the demographic make-up of the entire U.S. population. 34

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AARP

As part of its commitment to serving others, AARP has teamed with Rebuilding Together to rehabilitate homes damaged by hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

with disabilities, contacted Spanish-language radio stations, opened assistance sites at historically black colleges and made other efforts to assist underserved individuals. “In the coming years, there will be millions upon millions of mature, experienced Americans who will live longer and healthier lives than ever before,” he said. “Many people look to shift or wind down their paid employment in their second half of life, in order to do something more creative or more meaningful. We’re doing our best to tap into those diverse experiences.” AARP’s annual “Day of Service” symbolizes the Association’s commitment to serving others. Every year since the tragedy of Sept. 11, 2001, the entire AARP organization—staff members and volunteers—have taken a work day and devoted it to serving others in their community. In 2006, for example, AARP Louisiana teamed with Rebuilding Together to rehabilitate the home of AARP volunteer Brenda Poché after it was destroyed by hurricane Katrina. “I worked alongside a team of volunteers to rebuild Brenda’s home, which had been submerged for more than three weeks. There is no way to describe the overall physical devastation in New Orleans,” Nelson said. “But when you talk to the people, you hear over and over again, that it wasn’t just the houses and historic buildings that made the city great. What really mattered was the wonderful diversity of the people who lived there. We were proud to be part of that rebuilding, and to help align our resources to support their success.” In all, more than 32,000 AARP staff and volunteers fanned out nationwide on the 2006 Day of Service, filling care packages at food pantries, entertaining seniors at community centers, delivering nutritious meals to homebound persons, building playgrounds and tackling administrative tasks at shelters.

Human Resources

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he matrix manager for diversity and inclusion initiatives is AARP’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion, which, like the Office of People Strategy, reports to Nelson. Nelson is proud that AARP was among the first organizations to offer benefits for domestic partners, and that many of its innovative offerings—including a new program that offers a four-week paid sabbatical to all employees in good standing with at least seven years of service—are available to employees at all pay grades. The association is carefully tracking how its phased retirement program is working, in order to improve the experience for participants and to share lessons learned with businesses and other nonprofit associations. The program is open to employees in good standing age 62 or older. Participants can stay in their own positions and work reduced hours, work from home or organize other flexible work arrangements; explore a formal job-sharing agreement; or look for new opportunities at AARP in which their skills might fill an existing need. “Passion and commitment to work are very important to all of us who work at AARP. It is a very unique place to work, in that we’re all working in a climate of enlightened selfinterest—we want to make the world a better place, not only for us, but for future generations,” Nelson said. PDJ

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or AARP, building a culture of diversity and inclusiveness is a journey that began with the organization’s founding almost 50 years ago. AARP was one of the first major nonprofit organizations focused on serving older persons. Since 1958, it has been a catalyst for positive change, built on the principles of collective purpose, collective voice and collective purchasing power.


Special Feature

AARP continues to build a culture of diversity and inclusiveness—a journey that began with the organization’s founding. Almost 50 years ago, AARP changed the marketplace by being one of the first major nonprofit organizations focused on serving and showing the value of older persons. With the changing face of 50+ America, the case for diversity is essential to AARP’s future, which represents more than 38 million people age 50 and older. “An aging society that is increasingly diverse requires us to consider how changing demographics affect the way we organize programs, deliver services, develop product offerings and develop public policy,” said AARP Chief Diversity Officer Percil Stanford. As a long-standing diversity practitioner, Stanford, who holds a Ph.D. in gerontology, is recognized for his expertise on issues associated with diversity and aging, and helped establish many of the nation’s training and education programs related to aging and diversity. Since being appointed chief diversity officer in 2005, he has focused on several areas to ensure better integration of diversity into all aspects of AARP. “For AARP, it is not business as usual; it is a major part of AARP’s business—it is how we do business,” said Stanford. “The structure of the Office of Diversity and Inclusion (ODI) reflects the importance and evolving role of diversity within AARP,” Stanford explained. “We are organized to ensure key interaction and alignment within the organization, allowing for maximum influence on how AARP’s strategic goals are met.” His office looks at diversity both internally, through corporate diversity initiatives including developing training and managing the Employee Resource Groups (ERGs); externally, by establishing relationships with community partners, opinion leaders and others to enhance AARPs member value and social impact agendas. The office also focuses on public policy, advocacy and

AARP

marketing efforts to help ensure integration and alignment of strategic goals. Stanford joined AARP’s staff in 2002 as regional director for the western region. He also served as interim director of AARP’s State Affairs Department, which focuses on advocacy at the state level. Stanford reports to Chief Operating Officer Tom Nelson and has a dotted line to AARP CEO Bill Novelli. Stanford recognized when he accepted the position that there was, and continues to be, a willingness on the part of AARP’s staff to be good diversity practitioners. “The challenge is to provide the appropriate tools to ensure success in a timely manner,” he said. “It was also clear that, in spite of the stellar history of the organization’s involvement in diversity work, there was a need for a long-range, sustained effort that would be appropriate for the new millennium.” In the 1960s, AARP backed the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA), which protected all workers between age 40 and 65 from discrimination in hiring, firing and promotion on the basis of age; in the 1970s, AARP backed amendments to the ADEA that expanded coverage under the law to workers age 70, implicitly abolishing mandatory retirement at the traditional retirement age of 65. The association focused on long-term care and income security in the 1980s and specifically addressed the particular needs of minorities and older women. During that time, the first Hispanic was elected to the board, and Dr. Kermit Phelps became the first African American elected as chairman of the board. Then-executive director Horace Deets established a formal diversity initiative in the 1990s, Margaret Dixon became AARP’s first African American president and AARP began holding cultural awareness events for staff. In 2000, AARP’s board declared diversity to be a crosscutting strategic goal and directed the association to work on ensuring that membership mirrors the nation’s 50+ population. Since then, AARP launched a magazine in Spanish and

“An aging society that is increasingly diverse requires us to consider how changing demographics affect the way we organize programs, deliver services, develop product offerings and develop public policy.”

PERCIL STANFORD, CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER

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Percil Stanford Chief Diversity Officer

During AARP’s 2006 Diversity Summit, Chief Diversity Officer Percil Stanford (left) talks with AARP Hawaii State Director Barbara Stanton, while AARP President-elect Jennie Chin Hansen (below) addresses participants.

“Each person at AARP must be answerable to himself or herself regarding the extent to which they are good and reliable diversity practitioners.”

PERCIL STANFORD, CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER

English, established employee resource groups and expanded other diversity initiatives. Under Stanford’s leadership, ODI is tackling several challenges to make AARP what Stanford calls “world class.” The first, he said, is to get key leaders at organizational levels to utilize diversity and inclusion as a business tool that is essential to the association’s long-term success and sustainability. “We look at diversity and inclusion as a key ingredient—a tools to ensure the work we do is reflective of their values, needs and expectations.” “Our guiding principle is the ‘TIE’ factor—which means each of us must practice trust, inclusion and equity. This means that our members and volunteers trust AARP to deliver programs, services, policies and products tailored to meet their unique needs. They must realize these efforts are inclusive because they have been designed and implemented with them in mind. And equity is involved because one size does not fit all and everyone is provided a comparable opportunity.” Stanford’s primary responsibility is with AARP’s leadership, staff and volunteers. Partnering with colleagues throughout the organization on the best possible programs, policies

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and services—especially those for members from diverse communities and backgrounds—is imperative. “Each person at AARP must be answerable to himself or herself regarding the extent to which they are good and reliable diversity practitioners. Only the individual really knows whether an honest effort has been made to foster trust, inclusion and equity,” he said. Another major role the Chief Diversity Officer undertakes is working with key AARP executives and other leaders to determine what they incorporate into their annual performance objectives that can be measurable from a diversity and inclusion perspective. In addition, he assists managers at all levels with developing strategies and objectives to more visibly ensure diversity and inclusion are a part of their programs, services, recruitment and offerings. “With the commitment and leadership of enthusiastic colleagues, diversity and inclusion is becoming a centerpiece for the brand of the organization,” Stanford says. “But we must continue to be more diligent in our understanding of diversity and in the execution of our work.” PDJ


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AARP

Wisdom

Wisdom from AARP’s Founder, Ethel Percy Andrus

Ethel Percy Andrus was the first female high school principal in California. When she retired, she quickly realized that the pensions teachers received were grossly inadequate—not only in California, but nationwide. In 1947, she formed the National Retired Teachers Association to unite many individual state organizations into a cohesive national federation to work on behalf of retired teachers. Dismayed that affordable group health insurance was not available to retired teachers, Dr. Andrus knocked on dozens of doors until she found a company willing to take what was then considered a risk—offering group health insurance to retired persons. After hearing from older people who were not retired teachers but who wanted and needed similar benefits, Dr. Andrus founded in 1958 what would become the largest membership organization for 50+ Americans: AARP. Here are excerpts from some of the hundreds of editorials this social innovator wrote for the official publications of the National Retired Teachers Association and AARP. DIVERSITY HAS ITS VALUES “As we travel through life we should seek to learn, and learn to respect what constitutes for others, purposeful living. We, too, will grow in flexibility as we note the varied life patterns of other folk. I believe that we are on the way, and that this should be our commitment.”

A CALL FOR SERVICE “Accepting as our slogan, ‘To serve, not to be served,’ through publications, chapters, and the dedicated service of thousands of volunteers, we are developing challenges and opportunities for constructive community action; nourishing a mounting concern, care and capacity for the welfare of others, and helping in myriad of ways those who need and are lacking in love, self-confidence, and faith in their future. “Our leadership, too, explores opportunities to hasten the general acceptance of the emerging profile of the older American, as that of a person using his expertness and experience in assuming responsibility, not only for self, but, with equal status with that of the younger American, continuing to be a master workman in the vanguard of the American tradition as a builder and a curator of American standards and values. Our nation needs the accumulated experience, knowledge, wisdom and skills of all older adults. “We all realize that society usually accepts a person at that person’s own evaluation. Our respect and dignity are not given us. Status is not conferred upon us; it is won, and won first

Lily Liu, AARP historian/archivist

through our conviction of the need of others, then through our action for service to those others, and then, at long last, by others because of our cooperation and commitment. . . . We can serve our fellows only as we care for them and feel with them and mingle with them.”

POSITIVE SOLUTIONS “Independence—economic and familial—is greatly to be desired, to be planned for and hopefully to be realized. The man-made tragedy of compulsory retirement has not only deprived many of their work but also of all of its concomitants—the feeling of contributing to the common wealth, the satisfaction that comes of ‘pulling one’s own weight,’ the comforting conviction that one’s work was better done because he did it, the solace of the companionship of fellow workers (a boon he perhaps never rightfully valued until he lost it), the routine and responsibility of a duty, the pride of family recognition as its financial support, the awareness of social acceptance of a producer and last, but far from least, the joy that comes from work well done.” “Dr. Paul Moody is quoted as saying, ‘The measure of a man is not in the number of his servants but in the number of people he serves.’ The oldster who loves his family, who shares with his neighbors of his time and of himself, who helps his community become a happier, healthier place because he is in it, is truly successful. For him, aging ceases to be a problem—he has become the answer to it.”

Ethel Percy Andrus is a member of the National Women’s Hall of Fame. Their Website is: www.greatwomen.org

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mployee Resource Groups (ERGs) are one method through which AARP engages and involves employees as part of its overarching People Strategy. These groups enable employees to help transform the association’s culture and business practices and, by doing so, help AARP become more inclusive and open.


Special Feature

Employees, not association management, form resource groups around mutual interests. ERG members generally share a common interest in, or characteristic of, diversity, such as age, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender, disability or work/life situation (such as single parents). While they generally share demographic similarities, ERGs endorsed by AARP are not exclusive or restricted to members of “protected groups.” Instead, they are open to all AARP employees who want to participate. AARP provides modest budget support for the employee group it endorses and allows members of the group to meet during and after work hours and judicious use of AARP facilities, audio/video conferencing and other resources. Carmelita Tursi, director of corporate diversity, oversees the nine ERGs at AARP and helps coordinate their activities. “Employee resource groups offer personal and professional growth opportunities to staff, while also providing AARP a means to gain additional insights that might lead to development or refinement of the products, programs and services we offer our members,” Tursi said. “On occasion, ERG members are invited to participate in focus groups or attend functions geared toward targeted audiences.” Here is a snapshot of the nine employee resource groups currently endorsed by AARP: Asian Pacific American Staff Resource Group: Membership in this group is open to any full- or part-time AARP employee with experience and/or interest in the Asian/Pacific region and global aging. Activities have included observances for Asian American Heritage Month (May), a 2005 call to help for victims of a major tsunami and an armchair tour of Thailand. Black Employee Resource Group: African Americans and other employees in this group meet monthly for professional growth as well as fellowship. Some of its special activities include those held during Black History Month (February), AARP-membership recruiting events for friends and families and educational tours of Washington, D.C. Caregivers Support and Resource Group: This group is open to any AARP staff in any location with experience, interest and/or expertise in caring for others—including grandparents, parents, siblings, children or friends. The Caregivers ERG meets every month, via a one-hour brown-bag luncheon held at the National Office.

AARP

Disability Interest Resource Group: Members of the group serve as a resource and a support network for employees who have disabilities of any kind, or for employees with a personal or professional interest in disability. Its members support and advise AARP in accommodating members, guests and staff with disabilities, such as securing sign-language interpreters. The Disability IRG also helped to organize “16 Candles for the ADA,” a forum held at AARP’s National Office to observe the 16th birthday of the Americans with Disabilities Act. Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Employee Resource Group: Its members are dedicated to advancing recognition, acceptance and inclusion of AARP staff, members, volunteers and others who are gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender. As part of its continuing efforts to identify how its GLBT members can be better served, a person who becomes a member of AARP receives a complimentary membership for his or her domestic partner. La Tertulia: Established in March 2003, La Tertulia members serve as advisors and integrators of AARPwide initiatives and projects on Hispanic/Latino interests and issues. It offers relevant professional development for members and participants through networking, educational workshops and other special activities. Stepping Into Retirement: Members of this ERG help each other focus on what they want after leaving AARP’s staff, and how to reach their retirement goals. They undertake holistic retirement life planning, including where to live, activities and interests to pursue and how to plan for financial and legal needs. Vitality: These active staffers promote health and longevity within the AARP community. They help create an environment in which people can work consistently toward achieving their physical and mental goals, such as through group activities, as in lunchtime walking tours or fun fitness activities during Life@50+ AARP’s National Event & Expo. Women’s Resource Group: Leveraging the diverse experiences, talents, cultures and perspectives of women is central to the Women’s Resource Group. Its members play significant roles in advancing awareness and understanding of the interests and needs of women, and supporting AARP’s efforts to recruit and retain members. PDJ

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he AARP Supplier Diversity Program promotes the award of business to minority- or women-owned, local, small or disadvantaged business enterprises.


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“AARP benefits from this program because we extend the base of suppliers capable of meeting our business needs,” said George Santoro, director of procurement and contract management. “In addition, our Supplier Diversity Program mirrors the association’s outreach to diverse communities for member recruitment and retention.” For many years, suppliers that worked with AARP were self-identified. In 2005, AARP undertook an outreach effort to specifically identify suppliers that could be certified and validated as diverse. In addition, the association’s procurement staff shifted the focus of its supplier diversity program from participating in gatherings such as business meetings and luncheons to identifying suppliers, working with diversity councils and tracking results. AARP now includes language that specifies diversity requirements in requests for proposals and other contract appeals, thus enabling the association to expand its supplier diversity outreach to a “second tier” network of vendors. The association purchases 100 percent of its office supplies through Concerto Office Products, an Asian Pacific-owned business that is owned in part by Office Max, an office supply distributor. When AARP staff around the country need to purchase office supplies, they use an AARP electronic procurement system to create an electronic request which is routed to Concerto, which fulfills the order via next-day delivery. The organization also expects to decide soon on bids from a number of applicants that include diverse suppliers for other services, including the cafeteria serving its National Office. Santoro teamed up with AARP’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion to hold a “Business

AARP

Diversity Opportunity Fair” in December 2006 at AARP’s National Office, where 15 local diversity suppliers with solid track records and capabilities suited to AARP’s business needs met with directors and managers from a wide range of departments. The National Capital Area Minority Business Opportunity Center helped identify the suppliers and organize the event. “The fair was important because, by ourselves, we in procurement can do only so much. By encouraging staff from a wide range of business units to sit down and meet with a diverse group of suppliers, we expanded their awareness,” Santoro said. “We don’t give business away. AARP doesn’t have a set-aside. But we encourage diverse suppliers to compete and win our business based on price, service, quality and overall value.” Other collaborations that AARP has fostered have helped enhance its efforts to promote supplier diversity. Through the Institute for Supply Management, AARP is a member of the Minority and Women’s Business Development Group. Santoro explained, “Membership in this group gives us access to best practices, and enables us to network with other companies and diversity suppliers.” In addition, Santoro serves on the Board of Directors of the Maryland/District of Columbia Minority Supplier Development Council. This affords opportunities to develop new contacts, increase AARP’s exposure within the target communities and meet with diversity suppliers to assess their potential for doing business with AARP. The Supplier Diversity team in AARP’s Procurement and Contract Management department also maintains relationships with other groups including the National Minority Supplier Development Council, the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, the D.C. Mayor's Office of Local Business Development, the Women's Business Enterprise National Council and the National Association of Woman Business Owners.

“We encourage diverse suppliers to compete and win our business based on price, service, quality and overall value.” GEORGE SANTORO, DIRECTOR OF PROCUREMENT AND CONTRACT MANAGEMENT

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George Santoro Supplier Diversity

Santoro is pleased with the increased level of activity supporting the Supplier Diversity Program—among the procurement staff, as well as among the senior leaders.

Snapshot of the U.S. 50+ Population POPULATION TREND: In 2000, 77 million persons were age 50 or older, comprising 27 percent of the U.S. population, according to the Census Bureau. In 2030, the 50+ population will have increased by 70 percent— to 131 million. • This means that more than one-third (36 percent) of the U.S.

Santoro’s goal is to expend 5 percent of the procurement spending for AARP’s National Office among diverse suppliers. He noted, “We’re not yet world class in terms of supplier diversity, but AARP has certainly gone beyond where many traditional organizations are, in part because of a strong leadership commitment.” Tracking the total amount spent on diverse suppliers has been made easier, as a result of a monthly Key Performance Indicator report. Currently, the report tracks mostly expenditures for diverse suppliers made through the National Office in Washington, D.C. In 2007, however, the tracking will extend to AARP’s state offices, as well. “Much of what the state offices purchase either directly or through p-cards is not currently captured in our reporting, so it’s difficult to assess how much of that is going to diversity suppliers. We want to make an effort during 2007 to include it as appropriate so it can count toward our goals”, Santoro said. Santoro joined the AARP staff in 2004, having spent much of his career in the telephone industry. His first professional job was with New York Telephone Company; from there, he was placed on loan to AT&T and moved to Illinois, where he conducted employee technical training. He transferred to Bell Atlantic, ending up in one of its offices in a suburb of Washington, D.C. He left the company in 1997 after a 26-year career to manage procurement and facilities for American Management Systems in Fairfax, Virginia. Santoro is pleased with the increased level of activity supporting the Supplier Diversity Program—among the procurement staff, as well as among the association’s senior leaders. “I am really proud of the relationship I’ve developed with Percil Stanford, who heads our Office of Diversity and Inclusion. We meet frequently and swap information about current contracts and fresh opportunities,” he said. Santoro added, “(AARP CEO) Bill Novelli leads the way on management’s commitment to supplier diversity. I have worked for top corporations for more than 30 years, and I can tell you that he is the most personally engaged on this stuff and will help us to do more in future months and years.” The association and the diverse suppliers it contracts with are not the only beneficiaries, Santoro noted. “The communities in which we operate benefit, too, through job creation and an increased understanding within AARP of the communities we serve,” he said. “It’s a win-win all around.” PDJ 44

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population will be 50+ by 2030.

DIVERSITY TODAY: According to the Census Bureau’s 2005 American Community Survey, America’s 50+ population is: • 9.4 percent black or African American alone • 8.7 percent Spanish/Hispanic/Latino • 3.7 percent Asian alone, Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander alone • 0.5 percent American Indian alone or Alaska Native alone

Graphics: AARP; 2000 Data

Graphics: AARP; ThoughtForm Inc.


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AARP’s Spanish-language-only event, the “Feria de la Segunda Juventud,” will be held in May 2007.

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Is PCAST Keeping You Awake at Night? What parents and employers can do to relieve stress about after-school care

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new report by Catalyst, After-School Worries: Tough on Parents, Bad for Business, identifies a stress factor that cuts across all range of employees, affecting men and women, all race/ ethnic groups, and all levels of the organization, from the lower ranks to the executive suite. The term PCAST stands for Parental Concern About After-School Time and refers specifically to working parents with school-aged children. Of particular worry is the gap between the time the school day ends at 2 p.m. or 3 p.m. and the time most full-time employed parents get home from work at 6 p.m. or 7 p.m. It amounts to 15 to 25 hours each week. As a U.S. Department of Labor report notes, “Using the most generous calculations, only about 64 percent of a fulltime worker’s standard work schedule is covered by the hours children are typically in school.” Many parents also have long commutes home from work, adding to the time their children must be cared for. Unfortunately, affordable highquality after-school programs are scarce. As they sit at their desks or go about their tasks, these parents are wondering if their children are safe, if the afterschool arrangement they made are reliable, and if their children are spending their after-school time productively. While PCAST may seem a normal parental concern, employers should be paying attention. Worker stress is estimated to cost American businesses between $50 billion and $300 billion annually in healthcare and lost job productivity alone. There is good news, however. The following recommendations for employers and employees can be use to make PCAST one less stress to worry about in the workplace.

What employers can do to lower PCAST. 1. Develop “The Agile Workplace.” Catalyst research shows that negative PCAST effects can be interrupted before they begin. Working parents rate flex-time and flex-place policies as among the most effective workplace supports. Existing research shows that companies offering flexible scheduling options enjoy bottomline benefits including enhanced recruitment and retention, lower health-care costs, productivity gains, and increased shareholder returns. 2. Expand supports that are specifically related to after-school care. Invest in and advocate for community services that support after-school care programs. Since the amount of time children spend unsupervised is linked to parents’ increased stress about after-school time, programs that directly address the issue of children’s after-school hours can provide a buffer against PCAST and help prevent its negative effects. Employers can invest locally to community programs and supports that provide after-school care for the children of their employees. They can also support social policies that help fund community supports nationally and statewide. 3. Transform workplace culture by better educating supervisors and managers about the benefits of an agile workplace. Regardless of their current level of stress, respondents identified a supervisor’s and management’s understanding of personal and family matters as the single most important type of support to address caregiving concerns. Through specialized trainings, companies can increase management’s understanding of working parents’ concerns as part of a larger cultural change within the organizations where supervisors and supervisees alike come to understand and accept the “dual” advantages (to employees and organization) of creating a more flexible, agile organizational culture.

4. Actively communicate the availability of supports and openly address misperceptions about any consequences of their use. A strategy will only succeed if it is communicated throughout the organization. This study shows that many employed parents—even those in more need—were not aware of whether their companies offered useful supports, such as volunteer leave, subsidies for after-school care, and referral services for such care. These are all programs that were rated as particularly helpful to decrease afterschool stress.

What working parents can do: The PCAST Ten As noted above, employees are unaware of what options may be available to them. These questions help pinpoint the workplace supports that are especially appreciated by high-PCAST parents. 1. Do I have the ability to telecommute on a regularly scheduled basis? 2. Do I have a subsidy for after-school care? 3. Do I have volunteer leave—time off from work to be involved in children’s school on a regular basis? 4. Do I have backup after-school care? 5. Do I have reimbursement for backup care? 6. Do I have the ability to bring my child to work if necessary? 7. Is there on-site after-school care? 8. Do I have bankable hours? 9. Are there resources/referrals for after-school care? 10. Are there networking/support groups for parents or family-related education and support programs available? Catalyst is the leading research and advisory organization working with businesses and the professions to build inclusive environments and expand opportunities for women at work. As an independent, nonprofit membership organization, Catalyst conducts research on all aspects of women’s career advancement and provides strategic and web-based consulting services globally. With the support and confidence of member corporations and firms, Catalyst remains connected to business and its changing needs. In addition, Catalyst honors exemplary business initiatives that promote women’s leadership with the annual Catalyst Award. With offices in New York, San Jose, and Toronto, Catalyst is consistently ranked No. 1 among U.S. nonprofits focused on women’s issues by The American Institute of Philanthropy.

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NAME:

Providence Health System — Oregon Region

HEADQUARTERS:

Portland, Oregon

WEB SITE: www.providence.org/oregon

PRIMARY BUSINESS:

INDUSTRY RANKING:

Health Care

Largest health care system in

Oregon; part of Providence Health and Services, a five-state ministry (Oregon, Washington, Alaska, California and Montana). Privately held, not-for-profit.

Baruti L. Artharee (right) with (from left) Terry Smith, COO/CFO, Providence Health System – Oregon Region, and Martin Luther King III.

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Interview Baruti Artharee Providence Health System

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ew organizations can touch an individual on a more personal level than a health care provider.

In this issue, we talk with the man responsible for driving much of the diversity initiatives in Providence Health System – Oregon Region. This lover of jazz and devotee of African American history has a clear vision of what his organization needs to do to honor “the inherent value of every person.” P RO F I L E S I N D I V E R S I T Y J O U R N A L

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Interview Baruti Artharee Providence Health System

GLOBAL / MARKET / INDUSTRY ISSUES

Please describe the scope and scale of your company to a reader who may not be familiar with it. ARTHAREE: We have more than 15,000 employees in Oregon (second-largest private employer in the state). Providence Health System in Oregon provides an organized system of care with its seven hospitals, 38 clinics, a health plan, elder care facilities, and centers of excellence. How do you define diversity and inclusion, as it relates to the efforts within your organization? ARTHAREE: The executive leadership team of Providence Health System in Oregon met in 2004 to clarify what we mean when we talk about diversity. Within Providence, they concluded, our commitment to diversity is “the belief in the inherent value of every person that is demonstrated by our behaviors of humility, listening, openness, willingness to change and inclusion, resulting in successful relationships.” With that definition in mind then, what would you say are the main components of your D&I program? Who is primarily responsible for the management of D&I programs throughout the organization? ARTHAREE: The main components of our diversity program are respect for the diversity of our patients, respect for the diversity of our workforce, and respect for the diversity of our communities. The diversity program is Oregon based. The regional director of the office of diversity reports to Russ Danielson, CEO of the Oregon region. Russ also chairs the diversity council that approves and oversees the work plan for the office of diversity. In today’s marketplace, does your company have any particular cultural, socioeconomic, or demographic challenges to selling, producing, or delivering services? What particular challenges do you face in hiring and retaining good people? ARTHAREE: In Oregon and Southwest Washington, 50 percent of the population has migrated from other states and seven percent from abroad. Approximately nine percent of the population is Latino and another nine percent are other minority populations. Latinos are the fastest growing group followed by Asians.

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In 2006, Providence sponsored three college scholarships totaling $11,500 awarded recently by Portland’s Hispanic Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce. Shown here Alex Duarte, chamber board chair, scholarship winner Laura Magaña, and Baruti L. Artharee.

With less than 20 percent of the area population being persons of color, it can be challenging for corporations to attract and retain minorities. However, Providence Health System is one of the founding members of “Partners in Diversity,” which is dedicated to the advancement of women and people of color in the workplace. The organization hosts a quarterly reception to welcome new professional persons of color to the community. It also holds bi-monthly breakfast meetings for diversity practitioners; prepares minorities to serve on private and public boards; and has established a communication portal for members to share information. Currently, there are 55 public- and private-sector organizations that have joined in this effort. How do you keep diversity a priority throughout your company? Specifically, how do you energize people or get their buy-in for diversity throughout the organization? ARTHAREE: Providence Health System – Oregon Region has adopted diversity as a key business priority along with mission, people, service, quality, growth and finance. Senior leaders of the organization have incorporated each of these priorities in their individual work plan and, thereby, are a part of the performance evaluation process. As part of the workplace diversity strategy, diversity has been incorporated in the new employee orientation program. There is a 2-hour module that informs new employees about the ways diversity ties to both the organizational mission and our business success. Each of the seven hospitals and every major facility has a diversity committee in place. The committees are made up of a cross section of employees with a senior-level executive sponsor. The committees are responsible for celebration and education about diversity and inclusion. Programs have included diverse speakers, videos, music, exhibits and seminars.


Interview Baruti Artharee Providence Health System

CORPORATE LEADERSHIP

EMPLOYEE INCLUSIVENESS

What resources (financial and manpower) are allocated to diversity? How do these reflect your company’s leadership commitment to diversity? ARTHAREE: We have in place a regional director and executive assistant to staff the office of diversity. Diversity orientation is delivered by a trained staff of 20 under management of Providence Academy, the organization’s education department. Responsibility for meeting our diversity contracting metrics is spread among senior leaders in construction, marketing, and materials management. The recruitment of more people of color among professionals and managers is led by the employment department within the human resources department. Financial resources committed to the advancement of diversity include monies for community outreach for scholarships for under-represented students, sponsorship of diverse non-profit organizations that serve the community, interpreter services for nonEnglish speaking patients, and a variety of speakers and programs.

How does your company gauge inclusion of employees? What are the tests, measurements and benchmarks (metrics) that indicate where the company is on the inclusion graph? ARTHAREE: There are three gauges for employee inclusion. First, we track on a quarterly basis the percentage of people of color in EEO-1, the category that represents managers and professionals. Second, we conduct an annual employee opinion survey which includes a baseline question that asks, “Does my supervisor respect my opinion?” We believe that you cannot accept diversity of opinion if you do not value diversity. Finally, our diversity orientation program in Oregon is an overwhelming success, with more than 2,000 new employees completing this education emphasis each year. How are their opinions solicited and valued? Do you have an employee ‘suggestion box’ or

“We believe that you cannot accept diversity of opinion if you do not value diversity.”

Do you have any programs in place to increase the crosscultural competence of your senior management team? Can mid-level managers acquire similar training? ARTHAREE: In January 2005, PHS launched a “Cross Cultural Caregiving Task Force” with the charge of identifying ways to increase the cultural competence of our care providers. The task force has divided into four subcommittees to address the major barriers and opportunities: access to care and health disparities, language and interpreter services, staff development and training, and data and evaluation. Each sub-committee recently presented ideas to improve cultural competence. There have been and continue to be many silo efforts to address cultural competence; the goal is to leverage these efforts for the benefit of the entire region. The task force has established an electronic filing system to store and share the reams of data on the subject.

How are decisions about diversity made at Providence Health System? Is there a diversity council and who heads it up? Who participates? ARTHAREE: The diversity council for the Oregon region leads the diversity program. They approve and oversee all aspects of the diversity work plan. The CEO chairs the diversity council and members include the chief of human resources; the regional director of mission integration; the chief administration officer; our regional director of materials management; regional director of communications; two hospital administrators; and the program director of the Ethics Center.

BARUTI L. ARTHAREE

other system, and who monitors and responds? ARTHAREE: Our annual employee opinion survey is particu-

larly important. Within the annual employee opinion survey there are questions that address diversity. These questions have some of the highest ratings among our employees. Can you name specific ways your company supports upward development toward management positions? ARTHAREE: We do this in a number of ways. For example, we have an education reimbursement program, and we have plans to launch an internal mentoring program. We also insist that there are diverse applicant pools for all management positions. What is the company’s commitment to minority suppliers? Do you have specific goals for spending, either in dollars spent or a percentage of money spent with various suppliers? ARTHAREE: Our supplier diversity goals count the percentage of total dollars spent with a business that is woman- or minority-

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Interview Baruti Artharee Providence Health System

Nicole Maher, executive director of the Native American Youth and Family Center, with Sheraon Sweet of the Office of Diversity and Robin Dennis of the Native American Youth and Family Center after a presentation to staff.

ground working at the senior level fit what PHS needed in my current position.

(Above) John Bertrand, member of the Providence Academy staff, received special recognition at the annual Providence diversity recognition luncheon for his work in educating employees about disabilities in the workplace. (Right) Lolita Burnette, diversity education manager, with Dr. John Pham, vice president of the Oregon Vietnamese Community Association.

owned. The goals are: 10 percent for construction; 14 percent for marketing and communications; and 6 percent for vendor services and materials management. Where does your personal belief in diversity and inclusion come from? ARTHAREE: I am an African American mixed with Mexican and Caucasian. My parents raised all five of their children to respect everyone regardless of their differences—and to fear no one. How did you get to your present position? What was your career path? ARTHAREE: I have had a diverse career in the private and public sectors. My past positions include working in sales and marketing for a Fortune 500 company; president of one of Oregon’s oldest and largest minority-owned firms; serving on the cabinet of two Oregon governors; deputy director of the development commission for the City of Portland; and now regional director with PHS – Oregon. I applied for my current position after working with the chief executive of PHS – Oregon on The Portland Workplace Diversity Taskforce. He convinced me that my varied back-

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Who were/are your mentors? What about their business skill or style influenced you? How did they help in your professional and personal life? Are you mentoring anyone today? ARTHAREE: My first mentor was Peter Norrie, former senior vice president at Boise Cascade. What influenced me the most about his business style was his ability to focus on the delivery of results with a keen eye on the bottom line. The only color that Pete acknowledged was the color of money—green. He afforded me many key opportunities for advancement and growth including being appointed one of the youngest regional managers within Boise Cascade. My other great influence has been the writings, teachings and words of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. I received the opportunity to be the first in my family to attend college, thanks to a scholarship program for minority students. I learned from Dr. King the importance of working to make our communities and our nation a place where everyone is judged by the content of one’s character. I have served as a mentor for dozens of young professionals and/or college students. I also received recognition from Linfield College, my alma mater, which presented me the “Mentor of The Decade Award.” What business books or journals do you read regularly or recommend for aspiring leaders? ARTHAREE: I read the Wall Street Journal, Profiles in Diversity Journal, Portland Business Journal and the Harvard Business Review. Tell us about your leadership style. How would you describe it? ARTHAREE: I’m results-oriented. I believe in building successful relationships at all levels and leading by example.


DIVERSITY determines a company’s success. Eastman Kodak Company’s commitment to diversity and inclusion involves our employees, customers, suppliers and communities worldwide. In our global marketplace, Kodak’s innovations reflect the creativity and rich tapestry of our diverse workforce and winning culture.

www.kodak.com/go/careers © Eastman Kodak Company, 2006


Interview Baruti Artharee Providence Health System

“Be the change that you want to see in the world.” GANDHI What are your specific responsibilities for advancing diversity and inclusion in your organization? What are the strategies you employ to move inclusion forward? ARTHAREE: I am a member of the Oregon Management Council which includes senior level executives. My primary role has been working with these senior leaders in understanding and promoting diversity and inclusion. We have brought in speakers, held off-site seminars and co-sponsored local diversity conferences. Have you any “mottos” to rally your team regarding D&I? ARTHAREE: “Be the change that you want to see in the world.” – Gandhi How are you (as a manager) measured in terms of performance? Is your compensation related to diversity performance? ARTHAREE: My performance is measured by the successful accomplishment of the diversity work plan. The plan has three components: 1) workplace diversity; 2) community partnering; and 3) cultural competence in care giving. Are there particular areas/employee sectors you feel still need improvement? ARTHAREE: We are developing more educational offerings beyond new employee orientation. So far, two courses have been introduced: Understanding Generational Differences and Cross-cultural Conflict Resolution. More course offerings are needed to reach more mid-level managers. And we’re always working to continue to improve cross-cultural giving within our hospitals and clinics. What advice would you give to “new” diversity leaders facing today’s business challenges? ARTHAREE: Diversity and inclusion truly must be work done from the top down in order to be successful. No organization has been successful pushing diversity and inclusion from the bottom up. Senior leaders must walk the walk and talk the talk. The CEO is the most instrumental in the success or failure of a diversity program. PDJ 54

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TITLE: Regional Director, Office of Diversity YEARS IN POSITION: Four years EDUCATION: Linfield College—B.A.; University of

California, Berkeley—Executive Program; Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government— Executive Program. FIRST JOB: Delivering newspapers in Compton, Calif. PHILOSOPHY: “Failing to prepare is preparing to fail.” WHAT I’M READING:

The Audacity of Hope by Senator

Barack Obama FAMILY: Married 30 years to my wife, Bernadette;

father of one adult child; two grandsons. INTERESTS:

Public speaking, study of African American history, supporting organ and tissue donations, and mentoring young professionals. BEST PICTURE (film/art):

Heaven Can Wait

FAVORITE MUSIC: Jazz, gospel or old school R&B FAVORITE GAME: Dominoes FAVORITE CHARITY: Center for Medically Fragile

Children at Providence Child Center PERSON I’D LIKE TO KNOW OVER LUNCH: Dr. Martin

Luther King, Jr.


Dell Celebrates Black History Month At Dell, we’re committed to bringing together individuals with diverse backgrounds, thinking, leadership and ideas, and arming them with the best tools to ensure their success. We believe this helps drive innovation and makes Dell a more dynamic company. Through career development, mentoring programs, network groups and our products using Intel™ Centrino™ Duo Mobile Technology, we offer the resources to help every employee achieve their potential. Our goal is to ensure that Dell is a great place to work, grow and aspire. Success real time. Capture it at Dell.

CAREERS AT DELL. CONSIDER THE POSSIBILITIES.

TM

Dell is proud to sponsor Avoice, the first website that chronicles the political history and legislative legacy of African Americans. For more information, visit www.avoiceonline.org

www.dell.com Dell and the Dell logo are registered trademarks of Dell Inc. ©2007 Dell Inc. Intel, Intel logo, Intel Inside, Intel Inside logo, Intel Centrino Mobile Duo Technology and the Centrino logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the United States and other countries. All rights reserved. Dell Inc. cannot be held responsible for errors in typography or photography. Dell is an AA/EO employer. Workforce diversity is an essential part of Dell’s commitment to quality and to the future. We encourage you to apply, whatever your race, gender, color, religion, national origin, age, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, or veteran status.


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Trained and Ready to Move Up By April W. Klimley

FOX News creates an Apprentice Program to help minorities get ahead; New mentoring model leads to success.

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OX News Channel has created a new kind of “apprentice” program. No, it’s not a cutthroat television series like Donald Trump’s dramatic The Apprentice. In fact, it is not a television program at all. It’s a merit-based, internal training program aimed at helping qualified minority employees move up the ladder into a more successful career path. The FOX Apprentice Program is unique and very focused. It’s a proactive part of the company’s overall diversity initiative, and everyone who participates and completes the program is guaranteed a job at FCN, the number-one cable news channel in the United States. So far, 13 employees have participated. All have gone on to better positions. Each one has moved from an entry-level job or non-professional position into a job with far more potential and pay: from security guard to viewer-services coordinator, from cleaning lady to make-up artist, from intern to assistant producer.

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1. Cory Howard, Booker, On the Record with Greta Van Susteren 2. Roger Ailes speaking to the third Apprentice Program class at their graduation ceremony. Also in attendance are their mentors and supervisors 3. Keith Hemmings, Tech Op Engineer, FOX & Friends, FOX Live 4. Fouzia Bouanane, Make-Up Artist 5. The 2006 graduating class, with Roger Ailes: Keith Hemmings, Mark Terry, Cory Howard, Codie Brooks, and Victor Garcia hold their Certificates of Achievement 6. Mark Terry, Production Assistant, FOX & Friends 7. Codie Brooks, Production Assistant, Special Report with Brit Hume 8. Victor Garcia, Production Assistant, The O’Reilly Factor and The Radio Factor

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FOX News Channel

Apprentice Program

“We invented this program to retain qualified people who want to get ahead, but need more skills to do that,” explains Roger Ailes, chairman and CEO—the force behind the initiative. Ailes felt the number of minorities at FOX was not increasing fast enough, despite a very active summer internship program. “There seemed to be a gap between bringing in our interns and taking on job responsibilities at a national network in the real world,” he says. “It struck me that a step was missing.”

shows nationwide; Kayleaser Moss, a freelance production assistant who is now an associate producer for FOX News Channel in New York; and Tisha Lewis, who is now working at an NBC affiliate as a reporter. In 2004 the program consisted of another four apprentices, and in 2006 it expanded to five. All 13 of the people who have gone through the program are still in the broadcast business: 12 at FOX and one at the NBC affiliate. All have worked their way up from their initial jobs, some from the position of production assistants paid $12-per-hour to jobs with salaries ranging from $40,000 a year to much higher.

The Apprentice Program receives funding iles decided to fill that gap. He had watched talented minority employees at the company remain in positions that were not equal to their potential. One of these was Fouzia Bouanane, a Moroccan cleaning lady who worked on the executive floors. Bouanane had been talking about her desire to become a make-up artist for several years. Everyone discouraged her, but Bouanane began taking courses after hours despite the time constraints of being a single, working mom. Ailes spotted her, admired her drive, and after talks with Program selects talented people ow does the apprentice program work? Executives identify Human Resources, set in motion the new program in 2003. promising minority employees who have demonstrated “Fouzia was our first apprentice,” says Maureen Hunt, vice president of human resources. “She was taking make-up classes after talent, drive, and potential. It’s clear that what they need is menwork and told someone about her dream to become a make-up toring and training to move up the ladder, and that is what the artist.” To achieve that, Fouzia was moved into the make-up program can provide. Once the employee is nominated and department and began intensive work learning all the necessary joins the program, he or she spends 12 months as an apprentice, skills and being mentored by one of the top make-up artists. either in one department or several areas. The apprentice works By the end of her 12-month “intensive” apprenticeship, she alongside the rest of the staff doing a variety of tasks and taking was ready to move into a permanent position as a make-up on increasing responsibility. Apprentices are welcomed because artist. Today, she is one of the network’s most sought-after they are an extra pair of hands in a very time-pressured business. Also, they are paid out of a different pot of money. make-up artists. Each apprentice has a formal mentor (frequently the appren“Fouzia provides make-up for some of our top talent like Bill O’Reilly, who insists on using her,” says Hunt. “This apprentice tice’s supervisor) who meets regularly with the apprentice to program was the only way she could make the leap into the provide feedback, ideas, and coaching on how to build skills and move ahead. Sharri Berg, now senior vice president of news make-up department.” Hunt points out that FOX—like many other broadcast operations for the FOX Television Stations Group, was mentor organizations—likes to cultivate people from the ground up. to Franky Cortes, one of the employees in the first apprentice “We’re really a homegrown group,” she says. When it comes to class. Cortes says that the mentoring he received from Berg was achieving a major increase in the number of minorities at FCN, critical in his ability to move ahead from the freelance work he she comments, “The only way we’d be successful on that scale was doing when he entered the company to his present position would be to grow them internally.” That is exactly what the as a manager. Cortes met like clockwork with Berg regularly apprentice program sets out to do: identify high potential each week on Fridays. minority employees and then give them the additional training The key is good mentoring needed to move up. e shared and talked about issues and problems,” says Fouzia was joined by three other employees joined in the first “ Berg looking back. “I gave him my advice and take on apprentice class: Francisco Cortes, a production assistant who is now in charge of the graphics interfaces for 32 FOX news things. How he could step up and take more responsibility. I

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Roger Ailes, Chairman and CEO, wanted to create a program that helps talented minorities move ahead in his company. “I call it a unity program. It gives opportunity to people who should have it. And one day each of these people will reach back and pull others along.” also talked about his future. I told stories about the beginning of my career and tried to explain how I responded to different situations.” Cortes recalls the meetings the same way. “We talked about things that came up in the news and pressures of handling things,” he reminisces. “Sharri gave me advice on all that,” But then he adds, “She really has all the knowledge in the world about this business.” The apprentice program provides other benefits to participants. It has offered seminars on supplemental skills such as how to present yourself in business situations. And with Roger Ailes’ support and encouragement behind it, the apprentices have had unusual access to upper management and advice from senior executives. The graduation ceremony his year the largest class ever graduated from the program—four African Americans and one Hispanic employee. FOX held a graduation ceremony on September 27 for the class in one of its corporate dining rooms. Roger Ailes was there along with FOX News senior staff, each apprentice, and their mentors. Ailes addressed the entire group and his remarks were followed by comments from each apprentice. Those at the event say that two apprentices, Victor Garcia and Keith Hemmings, gave particularly moving speeches. Each graduate received an engraved crystal star from Tiffany, a certificate and a check worth $500. Even more important, all five now have jobs with more responsibility and potential than they started out with—thus fulfilling the aim of the program. That is an impressive track record for a new program still in its pilot stages. It suggests that traditional internships and diversity programs should be supplemented with a combination of practical training and proactive coaching—a good way to increase minority representation in broadcasting. However, some might say that the apprentice program is only a drop in the bucket. After all, it has only graduated 13 people. Or they might point out that more minorities are already enter-

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Greta Van Susteren FAME AND SUCCESS DOESN’T STOP THIS ANCHOR FROM BEING A COMMITTED MENTOR For generations, men have mentored men. This has usually meant white men mentoring young white men—an activity which conferred great advantages on the participants, and left women and minorities out in the cold, even as they were entering the work force in larger numbers. Now, that paradigm is changing. As more women and minorities climb the corporate ladder they are reaching back and pulling women and those of color along with them. A case in point is FOX News Greta Van Susteren. Yes, Van Susteren is a hard-nosed news anchor, one of the most prominent, tough, and insightful anchors on prime time television with her own show, On the Record with Greta Van Susteren. But she is also committed to diversity in the newsroom. “There are still too many white people in the media,” she explains. “We need diversity. We don’t want to look at the news through only one ethnic background.” Most recently, Van Susteren helped change that mix by encouraging her own assistant, Cory Howard, to get out of her “comfort” zone and advance. She describes Cory as “very capable and unflappable” and says she wrestled with the possibility of losing her. Finally, she decided to push the young woman up and out of the nest. “I told her she couldn’t stay so long as my assistant,” Van Susteren says. Soon after that Cory was asked to join the FOX Apprentice Program, and move to New York from Washington, D.C. to take part in it. Now over a year later, Howard is back in D.C., where she is an associate producer/booker for On the Record with Greta Van Susteren. Van Susteren is delighted to have her back. “You get so bound up in work that sometimes you forget you need to take time to bring people up through the ranks,” Van Susteren says. “Now I get to watch them win.”

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Inspiring graduates Francisco (Franky) Cortes, PRODUCTION MANAGER AND GRAPHICS PRODUCER Franky Cortes started out as a freelancer in the overnight tape department. His first day of work at FOX News coincided with the Columbine shooting. Instead of deterring him, the event made him more committed. Franky became part of the first apprentice class of 2003, and that experience helped him move ahead quickly. Today, he leads a team of nine people and is responsible for the graphics interfaces with 32 FOX news shows nationwide. His advice to others: “You have to have a work ethic. You can’t expect the door to open for you if you don’t have a positive attitude.”

Fouzia Bouanane, SENIOR MAKE-UP ARTIST Fouzia Bouanane inspired the Apprentice Program. For seven years she worked at FOX News in the cleaning department on the executive floor. Although she started taking courses to train herself as a make-up artist, her dream of changing careers seemed far away. But things changed for this Moroccan single mother and when Roger Ailes himself noticed her, and, soon after, FOX created the Apprentice Program and asked her to join it. The training she received enabled her to land a good job as a senior make-up person. Her advice: “You should follow your dream. It’s not easy, but when you like something it’s worth it. You have to be good at your job, show your supervisor respect, be on time. If you want to move on, this is a great company to ask about it.”

Cory Howard, ASSOCIATE PRODUCER/BOOKER, ON THE RECORD WITH GRETA VAN SUSTEREN Cory Howard joined FOX News as an intern in Washington, D.C. right after graduation from Howard University. Her talent and drive were recognized almost immediately and she soon became assistant to one of FOX’s most prestigious anchors, Greta Van Susteren. Then she was asked to join the Apprentice Program which required a move to New York, so that she could be part of the formal program and gain experience there. Now she’s back in Washington working for Van Susteren as an associate producer/booker for On the Record with Greta Van Susteren. Cory’s advice: “Take advantage of opportunities like this. Put yourself in a position to jump start your career, and follow your mentor’s advice.” [See Van Susteren box on previous page.]

Keith Hemmings, TECH OP ENGINEER FOR FOX & FRIENDS AND FOX LIVE At Boston College, it looked like Keith Hemmings was headed for a football career. But when an injury cut those hopes short, he decided to major in communications and seek out a broadcasting career. He joined FOX 5’s training program and was then invited to join the 2006 apprentice class. After stints in several departments, Keith graduated in October, and is now a Tech Op Engineer for FOX & Friends and FOX Live. His advice: “Once you are in a good place, you make your own path. It’s up to you what direction you want to go in. A lot of people don’t understand this or see the big picture. That’s what I see right now.”

“You want to have some success that lives beyond you. I’ll be very proud of it for the rest of my life.” - ROGER AILES

ing newsrooms in entry-level, internship-type positions. These critics might also take a swipe at FOX News, since it is considered a very conservative in its news coverage. Roger Ailes takes issue with such thinking. He is very clear about the need for this type of program: to provide greater opportunity than summer internships or entry-level jobs. He wanted to create a program that helps talented minorities of different ages and backgrounds move ahead in his company. And, in fact, when people ask him about his “diversity” apprentice program, he shoots back, “I call it a unity program. It gives opportunity to people who should have it. And one day each of these people will reach back and pull others along.” Ailes believes the program could be a model for other companies. “I believe that private industry has to step up. All progress is made by some individual who follows through,” he observes. “This program could one day be a model for American business. You wouldn’t need so much government interference.” Clearly, Ailes feels strongly about this program on a number of levels, and that is why he stays so involved. It may be surprising for someone who has already achieved so much as a top broadcast executive and influential political advisor. But the Apprentice Program is close to his heart. “You want to have some success that lives beyond you. These kids are smart. I’ll be very proud of it for the rest of my life,” he explains.

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EXISTING, SURVIVING AND SUCCEEDING in a Multicultural Marketplace

MFHA’s MULTICULTURAL MARKETING GUIDE a toolkit to understand the concept of multiculturalism in the foodservice environment

has launched! Go to www.mfha.net to order this unparalleled industry guide to help your business. Be sure to watch the related video and hear what top managers and executives in the industry have to say about the Hispanic market.

“Companies who are successful have learned

“It starts first of all internally, appreciating the

to incorporate cultural competencies into their overall business strategies.”

creativity and passion that comes alive from a diverse workforce and costumer base. It’s not only about selling products – it’s about understanding and appreciating their cultural values.”

Gerry Fernandez Founder and President MFHA

Chris Furman President PepsiCo Foodservice

Marie Quintana Vice President Ethnic Sales Development PepsiCo

“The growth rate for the Hispanic-Latino market is

“The rapid growth of the Hispanic consumer

four times that of the non-Hispanic market. This toolkit provides consumer insights and strategies that are

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mainstream and institutionalize everything that we do. We call this the “Hispanic Business Vision”.

Tony Suarez Vice President Multicultural Marketing McDonald’s Corporation

COMING SOON: AFRICAN-AMERICAN MARKETING TOOLKIT If you’d like to submit a case study, please contact: Szilvia Szegedi • 401.461.6344 • silvia@mfha.net Sumi H. Paek • 914.253.3318 • sumi.paek@pepsi.com

PEPSI, PEPSI-COLA and the Pepsi Globe design are registered trademarks of PepsiCo, Inc. FRITO LAY and FRITO LAY logo are registered trademarks used by Frito-Lay, Inc. ©2006 Frito-Lay North America, Inc. TROPICANA® is a registered trademark of Tropicana Products, Inc. ©2006 Tropicana Products, Inc. Gatorade and the lightning bolt are registered trademarks of Stokely-Van Camp, Inc. ©2006 The Quaker Oats Co.


very year, we ask companies to share with us their views of black history—

E

its importance, the people who make it meaningful, and how it is observed in their

organizations. Again and again we are touched by the personal notes received from our readers. Here are their thoughts for you to read, reflect on, and take to heart.


Listed in alpha order by company name:

Rueben M. Stokes Executive Director of Diversity & Community Affairs

ADT SECURITY SERVICES, INC.

During Black History Month, I like to celebrate by learning about the lesser-known African American pioneers who were able to make progress and succeed against overwhelming odds. I think it is very important that we remember the impact of well-known leaders like Martin Luther King, Jr., W.E.B. DuBois and Rosa Parks, as well as groups like the Tuskegee Airmen, the Buffalo Soldiers and the “Golden Thirteen.” But it is also important that we recognize the unsung and often unrecorded contributions of the millions of “everyday African Americans.” These are not the famous, prominent or celebrated people. These are the families, like mine, that taught their children and grandchildren the values of education, honest hard work, respect for all people, love for the United States of America and pride in their African American heritage. These were and are the unnamed heroes and heroines who did whatever they could, no matter how small or seemingly insignificant, to help break down barriers and create opportunities for other African Americans. They toiled in the fields of slavery, died on the battlefields, manned the picket lines, organized voter registrations, started businesses, mentored children and endured the indignities, challenges and expectations of being “the first, or the only.” They did all this willingly and without fanfare for the benefit of those African Americans who would come after them. I am one of those beneficiaries. This is what Black History Month means to me. We should celebrate Black History every month, by remembering and honoring the little noted, but very important sacrifices and contributions of the unsung African American heroes and heroines upon whose shoulders we all stand.

Horace F. Jones, Ed.D. President/CEO

ADVANCED RESOURCE TECHNOLOGIES, INC. (ARTI)

Black History Month in our country was largely conceived to recognize and highlight the overlooked or forgotten contributions of African Americans

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to our great democracy. Traditionally, Black History Month has been seen as a time for celebrating the accomplishments of the likes of Martin Luther King, Jr., Rosa Parks, Thurgood Marshall and all of the other great African American leaders and heroes before and after them. Of all the black leaders that I admire, I feel compelled to place my parents at the very top of the list. I grew up in the segregated Jim Crow south in the 1950s. During those formative years, my parents were faced with racial discrimination on a routine basis. Nevertheless, they, like many other African American families, “kept hope alive” and provided their children with strong, hardworking role models that formed the foundation for any success we have achieved in business and in life. During February at lunch-hour diversity celebrations, headquarters employees participate in a series of ethnic quizzes and create static displays of photos and memorabilia that represent their ethnic identities. These activities are culminated with speeches and a pot luck lunch of various ethnic dishes. By broadening our Black History Month this way, we have become more enlightened about how we all contribute to our humanity.

Vanessa Washington Executive Vice President, General Counsel & Corporate Secretary

BANK OF THE WEST

Early in my career, I had the opportunity to hear Ken Chenault, Chairman and CEO of American Express Company, speak at the annual conference of the National Bar Association. Chenault had just transitioned from being a lawyer in the legal department to a line position in the green credit card division, a division that was underperforming and going through major transition. He said that many questioned why he would join a division obviously in trouble, rather than associate with a well-managed and successful area of the company. He gave a piece of advice that I’ve remembered to this day. Never be afraid to go into a group or institution that is growing or changing, he told the audience. It represents an opportunity for you to become a change agent and be measured by your performance. He encouraged us to join organizations experiencing a high period of transition and to work hard to make an impact. Throughout my career, I have found this advice to be invaluable. Change is a good thing. Response to change drives per-


formance that makes an impact, produces results and rewards individuals professionally and personally. That’s what I call success.

Jon E. Barfield Chairman and CEO

THE BARTECH GROUP

During Black History Month I am reminded of the contributions of notable African Americans who have advanced the cause of fairness, inclusion, and equality for all. Most often I recall our historic great leaders; however, I and others also celebrate the accomplishments and commitment of our emerging leaders. Bruce Gordon, named last year as president and CEO of the NAACP, comes immediately to mind. Bruce Gordon defines commitment to fairness, to equality, and to the inclusion of African Americans in the social, educational, and economic mainstream of America. I met Bruce in 1995, the year he agreed to join our outside board of directors at The Bartech Group. At that time, Bruce was a senior executive at Bell Atlantic, served on a Fortune 100 board and, by policy, could not serve on another board. Bruce was so committed to helping me take Bartech to the next level; he asked and was given the green light by his CEO to serve on our board. This demonstrated Bruce’s commitment to Bartech and to minority supplier development, and examplifies his strong commitment to diversity initiatives throughout his distinguished career as head of a 35,000 person business unit at Verizon. Bruce retired from Verizon in 2005 and had no plans to re-start his career. When approached to lead the NAACP and upon learning of the board’s need for bold, new leadership, he was driven to accept this important challenge. Bruce’s spouse, Tawana Tibbs, is his partner in this effort, and they work closely and effectively together as leaders committed to the mission and expansion of the NAACP. During this Black History Month I and others greatly admire the important work of Bruce Gordon as one of our dynamic, new leaders, and the job that he and Tawana Tibbs perform, together as a team.

Quentin L. Roach VP, Global Customer Strategy and Process Management

BAUSCH & LOMB

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people in my life—nieces, nephews, children of friends, and all those who I encounter. My personal hero has always been Martin Luther King, Jr. I’m continually amazed by his courage, faith, bravery and commitment to leading our nation through a time of so much turmoil and hatred. His leadership and ability to inspire so many to embrace the non-violent movement is truly a marvel of modern times. His belief that we must all take care of one another is the inspiration behind my community and charitable efforts. I aspire to exhibit a fraction of the passion, patience and caring that he bestowed so selflessly on our world. Since starting in 1926 with Dr. Woodson’s Negro History Week, the United States’ observance allows us to remember and celebrate the tremendous contributions African Americans have made to this great country. It is a shame that we don’t have it more fully integrated into the studies of American history. Frankly, it is American history! Just as important, you’ll now find observations in Canada, the United Kingdom and other countries throughout the year to educate and celebrate the contributions of people of African ancestry. Celebrating these contributions each and every day allows us to realize how truly intertwined we are in life, in our history, in our dreams and our potential.

Kevin Cox Regional Vice President CARMAX , ATLANTA REGION

While February is the month that we nationally recognize black history, this recognition should not be limited to the month of February. Black history is a continual celebration of cultural awareness. Black history is my history. Black history is your history. Black history is everyone’s history. February is a time to reflect on the importance of family and togetherness. It is a time for family reunions, family gatherings, and “soul food” Sunday dinners, sharing foods that my parents were raised on. February is also a time to bring awareness to the youth in my family by exposing them to museums and historical sites such as the Martin Luther King Center. My family and I


make an annual visit this time of year to reflect on the contributions of civil rights leaders of the past. One African American leader that I admire is Colin Powell. Colin Powell was the first African American to become U.S. Secretary of State. I respect and admire him because of his leadership abilities and his dedication and commitment to the revitalization of the African American community. Powell helped develop America’s Promise – The Alliance for Youth, a charitable organization to help needy and at-risk children. Also, he is building the Colin Powell Youth Leadership Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The Youth Center will help underprivileged African American youth by offering them educational opportunities for success. We can all learn a tremendous amount from Colin Powell. His leadership and oratory skills have made him one of the greatest leaders of all time.

“The commemoration of our black history and heritage must not be limited to the month of February. Our culture, our heritage, and the contributions of our black forefathers are cause for us to celebrate Kenneth Gaines the entire year.”

Kenneth Gaines Area Vice President, U.S. Enterprise, Atlantic Area

Sheila Talton

CISCO SYSTEMS, INC.

Vice President, Advance Services

(Member of Cisco’s Worldwide Diversity Executive Council)

The commemoration of our black history and heritage must not be limited to the month of February. Our culture, our heritage, and the contributions of our black forefathers are cause for us to celebrate the entire year. I celebrate our rich inheritance by striving to be a leader and a pioneer in my own industry, working to build upon our rich legacy of accomplishment. I endeavor to be an example and an inspiration to young African Americans, to illustrate that there are no barriers that we cannot overcome. The only real limitations we face are the limits of the depth and breadth of our own dreams. I commemorate our black history by remembering the past achievements of my people, and then, taking hold of the “accomplishment baton” and proudly running my leg of the relay, with dignity, charity, and a keen sense of the legacy we will leave behind.

CISCO SYSTEMS, INC. (Member of Cisco’s Worldwide Diversity Executive Council)

I celebrate the history of African Americans throughout the year. This year I am particularly focused on an event that occurs during Black History Month—one that acknowledges and honors leaders in the IT industry who are working to fill the executive pipeline with the next generation of African American IT professionals. This year Cisco is hosting the Information Technology Senior Management Forum (ITSMF) meeting, presenting awards to its members who have made significant contributions to diversity in the IT industry, developing future leaders. On a more personal level, I honor African American women who have motivated me throughout my life and career, women who may not have risen to prominence nor had the choices and opportunities I have as a female executive today. I think of the women in my family who were inspirational to me, and I honor them by working every day to motivate and inspire the people around me. Black History Month is an excellent time to recognize and P RO F I L E S I N D I V E R S I T Y J O U R N A L

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examine what characterizes our leaders throughout history, to emulate and learn from them, and to develop and demonstrate our own leadership style in all that we do.

Mary Ann Mitchell President/CEO

COMPUTER CONSULTING OPERATIONS SPECIALISTS, INC. Chair of National Black Business Council

For nearly half a century, Dr. Booker T. Washington was one of the nation’s most respected advocates for black economic advancement. Dr. Washington also knew that entrepreneurial success not only elevated one’s economic status, but is also the leverage for greater influence in mainstream society. This belief has great significance for me today. I have also used the knowledge, skills and abilities gained in management positions in the aerospace industry to launch my own information technology consulting company. With offices in California, Washington, D.C., and Florida, my multi-million dollar business provides services in both commercial and governmental markets. Dr. Washington’s example of providing education is another reason I have been inspired by him. The mission of my nonprofit organization, the National Black Business Council (NBBC), is to create and support programs that will close the economic and digital divide between minority- and majorityowned businesses. In providing practical education for businesses and potential business owners, NBBC can, as Dr. Washington did, lift up the entire community.

Ben Hasan VP, Corporate and Product Group Information Technology

DELL INC.

Black History Month is more than an occasion to recognize a select few who made great strides and contributions to American society. It is an ongoing vision and commitment to making a difference in the lives of others. At Dell, we value the contributions of past, present and

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future African American leaders by integrating diversity into the fiber of our business. Our commitment to diversity is embraced by our leaders and throughout the organization. We understand that diversity is vital to our success. On a personal level, Thurgood Marshall, the first African American on the United States Supreme Court, has been a great inspiration to me. Justice Marshall dedicated his life to improving race relations by using the law as a means of advancing social justice. At Dell, we honor those who have demonstrated excellence in advancing diversity and inclusion while embracing the limitless possibilities of the ones who will follow.

Earl Shipp President, India/Middle East/Africa

THE DOW CHEMICAL COMPANY

My current role at The Dow Chemical Company allows me the advantage of travel and an opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of the history of Africa and the Middle East, which is, in many cases, black history. More importantly, it gives me the opportunity to better understand the positive impact of black people on the world as it exists today, not just in the United States. I have always enjoyed history. As a student in college I toyed with the idea of becoming a historian. Even though I pursued a career in engineering, I never lost my interest in history, and continue to be its student. I do not celebrate Black History Month, but I enjoy the study of history, including black history, as a personal hobby. When many people consider black history, they think about slavery and the civil rights movement of the 50s and 60s. When considered from a perspective of the history of black cultures, this 300-year span is a very, very short period of time. What is notable is that while these years are proportionately few, they brought a dramatic societal transformation to U.S. society and influenced the rest of the world. In addition, this period is one of the few times in history in which significant social changes were created without a war or revolution. Similar societal changes elsewhere in the world have taken considerably longer and have involved extensive violence and tragedy. This is proven true every day when I read a newspaper. Looking back in time, leaders like Nelson Mandela and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. are to be revered for having the


“I often sit in my office and

courage and wisdom to guide society toward change in a peaceful and non-violent manner. Looking forward, I am convinced that some of the teachings of Malcolm X and Marcus Garvey will be equally important. Their emphasis on pride, selfworth, self-respect and selfreliance seem very appropriate in today’s global business environment, which features fewer trade and political barriers, fiercer competition, instantaneous communications and exponential technical advances and offers opportunities for success to the brightest, most adaptable and most entrepreneurial among us.

quietly thank the many people whose names I will never know, for without their commitment for a better tomorrow, I would not be here.”

George Hamilton President

DOW AUTOMOTIVE

Hard work, compassion and courage are three of the characteristics that I personally try to emulate. I am inspired by leaders like Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Harriet Tubman, who committed their lives for their causes. They fought for freedom and equality for an entire race of people. Their caring, compassion, courage and tireless work ethic are truly amazing. I use Black History Month as a time to acknowledge and learn more about the contributions of black leaders as they relate to the advancement of humankind and equality. I personally look up to many local corporate pioneers, past teachers and people who have made a difference in our community. I appreciate the opportunity to reflect on the achievements of people like Darwin Davis (recently deceased), a pioneer at Equitable Insurance; Eddie Ray Munson, who recently retired from KPMG; Frank Slaughter, who recently retired from DaimlerChrysler; and Keith Cooley, who serves at FOCUS:HOPE. These men’s lives have all demonstrated the importance of hard work, compassion and courage, while they stayed true to their values. I believe that Black History Month is important for us all, as a time of celebration and reflection. If we recognize the leadership and contributions of others around us, whether they are

Michael A. Mason

well-known public figures or people who help make a difference in our communities, then we are inspired. If we can raise the awareness of the history and contributions of blacks in America, it can contribute to a more inclusive society, which brings strength, benefit and pride to all Americans.

Michael A. Mason Executive Assistant Director Criminal, Cyber, Response and Services Branch

FBI HEADQUARTERS

I must confess to longing for a time when there will be no need to celebrate Black History Month because our history is America’s history. Blacks have made positive contributions to this country since the beginning of its existence. Our history cannot be separated from that of our country. We are all the sum total of our life’s experiences and the same is true of our country. It cannot be divided into components along racial or religious lines. I admire many black leaders, but I most admire the thousands of other unheralded black people who sat in at lunch counters, sent their children to integrate schools, protested inequalities on the job, stood up to hatemongers and actively participated in a host of other activities because they believed in a better tomorrow for our country. I often sit in my office and quietly thank the many people whose names I will never know, for without their commitment for a better tomorrow, I would not be here. Black History Month represents an opportunity to P RO F I L E S I N D I V E R S I T Y J O U R N A L

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remind those coming behind of the enormous sacrifices many common people made to give us opportunities that did not exist 40 years ago.

Gina F. Adams Corporate Vice President, Government Affairs

FEDEX CORPORATION

Black History Month is a vital but unsatisfying opportunity to celebrate the historical and present-day accomplishments of African Americans, to educate others about a rich heritage and culture and to inspire others who will benefit from this knowledge. These achievements must be noted to mark our place in America’s growth; however, this record should, ideally, fit seamlessly into the larger history of this country. Setting aside one month in any given year—and the shortest month at that—isolates our noteworthiness in much the way we have been and are marginalized in this society. What is most often and most graphically identified and promoted in this culture are those things that reflect our true history the least and which are the things about our history that we would least want shown and shared. I’m speaking about the negative stereotypes or superficial milestones that permeate the media and incite fear and loathing among those who pay attention. We are not blameless here—often our own media outlets and efforts perpetuate images and values that are not those of most African Americans, but which become self-fulfilling prophecies for our youth. Likewise, the disenfranchised, undereducated and the poor among our people embrace these parts of pop culture as a true representation of our lives—not because we don’t suspect there is more, but because it is, too much of the time, the only thing to be consumed. We are NOT one size fits all, although we, out of a misguided sense of ethnicity, often look upon differences in our ranks as

undesirable. This convoluted thinking has many origins, which are debated endlessly. But only African Americans can change this crippling perception about themselves. Thus, our greater obligation is to ourselves and our communities. Perhaps a less self-conscious effort to empower ourselves is a way to enrich our lives and revitalize our spirits and values so that others can’t help but notice that, despite superficial differences, we are all very much the same. But, to paraphrase the late Emperor Haile Selassie, until the color of a man’s skin is of no more significance than the color of his eyes, we must preserve that which distinguishes us—and that’s a war we fight every day.

Bennie Fowler Vice President, Advanced and Manufacturing Engineering and Global Quality

FORD MOTOR COMPANY

Ford Motor Company’s commitment to diversity is evident year-round, but Black History Month provides a special opportunity to recognize the contributions of its African American employees and the value they bring to the company. Ford has had a Black History Month celebration for the past 25 years, started by a small number of African American employees which evolved into a Ford employee resource group with 2,500 members globally. I am honored to serve as president of FAAN (Ford-employees African Ancestry Network) and look forward to expanding our presence within the company and in the community. Among the myriad of pioneering African Americans who’ve had a tremendous impact on society, I often reflect on the Tuskegee Airmen. They flew behind fighter pilots in WW II— using their extraordinary skills to pick off the enemy, enabling the fighter pilots to complete their missions. The fighter pilots

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diversity is our competitive advantage. We, at ITT, are committed to building a workforce that mirrors the world in which we do business. This will lead to improved creativity, innovation, decision-making and customer service, and is essential to achieving premier status. Our concepts of inclusion and diversity embrace differences in race, religion, gender, disability, nationality, age, sexual orientation, ethnic background and more. Our culture, work practices and programs will value and support the contribution of each individual that results from diverse work and life experiences. The ITT Management System, including our common Vision and Values, will allow us to leverage differences and generate innovation that results from a diverse and inclusive culture and sustain our success in the global marketplace.

www.itt.com/careers

The “ITT Engineered Blocks” symbol and “Engineered for life” are registered trademarks of ITT Industries. © 2007


were immortalized for their heroism. But it wasn’t until a half century later that the Tuskegee Airmen got their just due. Acts of tremendous courage by African American men whose names aren’t widely known have been a major source of inspiration, privately and professionally.

Chris Womack EVP, External Affairs

GEORGIA POWER

Race and racism will always be an issue and an unproductive distraction in our society. One of my big concerns is that our social infrastructure does not allow continuous interaction among races so that we can better understand and appreciate each other. There was a time when we said Sunday was the most segregated day in America. Game-day Saturday is pretty segregated, too. Although the players on the field may be diverse; the fans, well…that’s another issue. We still tend to segregate ourselves in social settings, whether it’s church, a college game, or in our housing choices. Many within the majority race have not had any interaction since high school with people of different races. Many folks live their whole lives without having friendships or contact with people from backgrounds different from theirs. Then, they enter the workforce and may find themselves working on a team or even being managed by a person of color. How do we correct this so that such a tremendous adjustment is not required when they enter the workplace? At that point, beliefs and stereotypes have been well formed. Integration has been around for a long time. It has provided social access, but that’s not the same as continuous interaction. What will it take to make it happen? We can all make an effort to get to know each other. Black History Month reminds me that it will take this kind of continuous personal engagement before we can become a society that is not hindered by race so we can live the dream of Dr. King— to be judged not by the color of our skin, but by the content of our character. I continue to admire Dr. King, and similarly, I’m excited by the leadership of Senator Barack Obama.

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“There were thousands of people just like my parents, who, while not on the front lines of the movement, did the best they could with what they had at the time.” Sherry D. Williams, Esq.

Sherry D. Williams, Esq. Vice President & Corporate Secretary

HALLIBURTON

During Black History Month, I am very proud of the country’s focus on the history and accomplishments of African Americans. My personal celebration, however, is less focused on the famous or well-known in our community and more on everyday men and women, like my mother and father, whose stories are not the thing of history books. My mother had a sixth-grade education and my father was functionally illiterate. By the time the civil rights movement was in full swing, my parents were already in their mid-30s. By 1960, my mother had had seven children, and had to balance her obligation to care for her family with the hope of full equality in the land of her birth. So although she never marched and was never jailed, she worked with her church to feed and house civil rights workers and organizers and joined church vigils to pray for their safety and to thank God for their dedication and sacrifice. Though my father never stood in a picket line or protested at a lunch counter, he sacrificed his personal dignity by dropping his eyes to white men half his age, not out of fear, but out of hope that his passing on that battle would allow him to win the war of feeding his family and educating his children, so that we could change the world in a way that he believed he could


not. There were thousands of people just like my parents, who, while not on the front lines of the movement, did the best they could with what they had at the time. During Black History Month, I pay homage to those unknown souls whose quiet strength and silent dignity contributed to and paved the way for those whose names are, in fact, written in history.

Mal W. Warrick Director, Operations Logistics

HALLMARK INC.

Black History Month is a good opportunity for my family to share stories about the world’s great black leaders— like Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Nelson Mandela—who should be remembered for the time, energy and blood they sacrificed in their historical journeys. On a level closer to home, we have a great deal of respect for Missouri Congressman The Reverend Emanuel Cleaver, whose church I attended growing up. I’ve been inspired by his speaking style, his community involvement and the way he engages youth. And he has set a good example for me to follow in my interactions with teenagers—whether I’m coaching, preaching or speaking in public. I think it’s important for us to truly understand the impact made by these people, and commemorate their struggles—not just through the month of February, but throughout the entire year. This is especially true at a time when the constant barrage of technology, instant gratification and general busyness in today’s society has created generations of kids who sometimes lose sight of our history—and how far we’ve come thanks in large part to the efforts of our great black leaders.

Tammy Seals Vice President, Diversity

KELLY SERVICES, INC.

As I reflect on my African American heritage, its history and significant contributions, it is a privilege to honor a culture draped in a legacy of strength, courage and the determination to prevail over unimaginable obstacles. Community and political leaders like Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Rosa Parks and Thurgood Marshall effected change by

working within the social and judicial systems at a time when our country was divided by racial, moral and societal issues. Today, corporate leaders such as Ken Chenault are working within corporate America to create opportunities and to address issues of difference for all diverse groups. Through his tenacity, perseverance, and leadership, Chenault encourages us to embrace the talents, contributions and heritage of all individuals and inspires us to reach even further. During Black History Month, we honor the heroism and commitment of so many African American leaders who removed barriers and continue to open doors for not only other African Americans but for all diverse groups and, in so doing, change the fabric of America and create opportunities for all rather than just a few.

Bettye Smith Director, Ethics and Business Conduct

LOCKHEED MARTIN ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS

In a perfect and all-inclusive society, we would not need separate days, weeks or months to celebrate the significant contributions and accomplishments of African Americans or other minority groups. Black history would be taught as an integral part of American and world history; and the many achievements and contributions of African Americans would be consistently noted and deemed valuable by other Americans and the world at large. Today this is not the case. The commemoration of black history serves to fill the gaps, and move us closer to true history. For without black history, Americans and others around the world have incomplete and inconsistent stories—ones that lack inclusion, acknowledgment and appreciation of the worth of a vital group of individuals who have made significant contributions to the world and helped define what it means to be American. We have made progress on the journey toward inclusion, but have not yet arrived. Until we get there, we must continually commemorate black history to provide points of reference, stories of inspiration and encouragement, reminders and examples of what we have achieved and how we have overcome, and acknowledgement of the fact that we can and do make a positive difference.

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Candi CastleberrySingleton Vice President, Global Inclusion and Diversity

MOTOROLA, INC.

When I think of Black History Month, I’m reminded of Oprah Winfrey’s “Legends” celebration—an awe-inspiring event and a wonderful appreciation of African American women for their contributions to the entertainment field. I’m also reminded of the many lessheralded African Americans who may not be known as legends, but whose excellence and leadership has opened so many doors for so many of us. Thank you all! This Black History Month, as we honor those who came before us, we should be mindful that their achievements serve as a call for us to open new doors for the next generation. Let’s renew our commitment to the African American community by reaching back, by mentoring and sponsoring others, and by taking our achievements to new levels. Let us focus on black teachers becoming principals and superintendents; black actors becoming producers and directors; black sportscasters becoming news anchors; black running backs becoming coaches; black coaches becoming owners; black senior managers becoming chief executive officers; black senators becoming presidents. Like Oprah, let us celebrate the legends in our personal lives, and may we become legends for those who follow us. Together we can deepen the rich legacy of African American contributions in America and all over the world. Success is ours … pass it on!

Mark Rodges Associate Comptroller

THE NEWBERRY GROUP, INC.

For my wife (Pier) and myself, the celebration of Black History is not a particular month, but it’s in everything we do. It is part of who we are, and it has to be lived 24/7, 365 days a year. We have ways in which we pass on our heritage to our son. For example, we have a book of black inventors, and as we’re driving around we’ll point to a particular object and say, “A black person invented that.” We talk about both extremes in the political spectrum…from Malcolm X to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

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We also enjoy going to museums. Recently we made a trip to Kansas City to visit the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum and the Jazz Museum. We want our son to have full exposure of his heritage including the cultural, athletic and political sides. Why? If we want to shape him to be the person we would like him to be, he needs to know from whence he came. This year he is twelve years old and we’re very proud that he has gone to vote with us six of those twelve years. We are also proud that both sides of our family are deeply rooted and wish to pass on the stories of our heritage. We know the story of our family for several generations because of the stories that were told to us. We have a quilt from my great-great aunt that she gave to me. My wife occasionally brings it out of storage and we talk about it as a family. And as a family, we attend the special program honoring Black History Month at church. In addition to this, Pier works for the Sisters of the Most Precious Blood and each year they ask her to do a special presentation and we participate as a household. I work for The Newberry Group, a growing, global IT consultancy. Being a minority-owned, woman-owned company has naturally made us a diversity-sensitive company, but we are also constantly exercising that sensitivity as we come into contact with other cultures and races. As Dr. King said, we want to be judged not by the color of our skin but by the content of our character. This is the heritage we want to pass on to future generations.

Gaye Adams Massey General Counsel OVATIONS , a UnitedHealth Group Company

Black History Month focuses the nation’s attention on a part of our history that for many years was overlooked in history books and popular understanding. The struggle of African Americans for citizenship, civil rights and economic success in this country is an experience every American should honor; and Black History Month provides a time for us to reflect and celebrate together. Most importantly, it is an opportunity to teach our children about the richness of African American history. Growing up during the civil rights movement and studying African American history in college exposed me to both historical and modern day heroes. There are so many who serve as inspirations to me, among them Harriet Tubman, Ida B. Wells,


Frederick Douglass, Richard Allen, Fannie Lou Hamer and Martin Luther King, Jr. As I face challenges in life and work, I draw on their wisdom and example, remember that my challenges pale in comparison to the obstacles they faced, and appreciate anew how their struggles made many of the opportunities I enjoy possible. Celebrating black history throughout the year certainly helps to reinforce the old adage about the importance of “learning your history or else risk being doomed to repeat it.” Given America’s struggle with race and inclusion, it is essential that black history be recognized as a core part of America’s history. So commemorating black history isn’t just to educate or inspire the leaders of today and tomorrow. The reason to commemorate black history is to pursue candid conversations about diversity and to achieve genuine appreciation of all people. Acknowledging and commemorating the contributions of African Americans as a part of our country’s history helps to create a better right now and an even better tomorrow for all of society.

John C. Compton Chief Executive Officer

PEPSICO NORTH AMERICA

At PepsiCo, we recognize the accomplishments of our past and present African American leaders, using their inspiration to weave diversity and inclusion into every fiber of our business. As CEO of PepsiCo North America and sponsor for African Americans across PepsiCo, I am proud to tell the story of an exceptional PepsiCo leader who empowered African American associates, strengthened our business and made it more relevant to consumers. Harvey C. Russell (1918 – 1998) was an extraordinarily gifted salesman who excelled at connecting with people and building bridges. These skills served him well as he pioneered PepsiCo’s outreach to diverse community groups some fifty years ago. He was one of 10 college graduates on a minority sales team that promoted and sold Pepsi to the African American market. Their full story is told in a new book: The Real Pepsi Challenge: The Inspirational Story of Breaking the Color Barrier in American Business, by Stephanie Capparell. Harvey’s work was trailblazing. He faced the challenges of segregation, at a time when separate water fountains were designated for blacks, as were seats in the backs of buses. Black marketing representatives were simply unheard of—and the team’s

work was a testament that new things were possible. As Harvey himself modestly put it, “It was a pleasure to be able to travel around the country, to stay in hotels when we could meet people and be an ambassador to people around the country.” Recognizing Harvey’s great ability, PepsiCo co-founder and past President and CEO Donald Kendall sent him overseas with the company’s international arm. Harvey set up Pepsi franchises in Nigeria, Ghana and Sierra Leone. When Harvey was promoted to vice president, the first African American vice president of a Fortune 500 company, the Ku Klux Klan organized a national boycott against Pepsi. The company held fast, standing by its decision to promote an exemplary leader. Harvey has been called the Jackie Robinson of the boardroom. “To get to this point required that we were not thinskinned, that we not carry a chip on our shoulder, and at the same time, do it with great dignity. We knew we were up against some tremendous odds,” he once said. PepsiCo established its annual Harvey C. Russell Award in 2003 to honor Harvey’s spirit in driving change in the name of diversity. The award recognizes individual employees, teams and partners who have demonstrated excellence in advancing diversity and inclusion. We’re proud to share Harvey’s story among a growing number of stories from all across America, celebrating leaders who build business cultures that will thrive in an increasingly multicultural world.

Earl Exum Sales Director, Global Repair Services

PRATT & WHITNEY

When I was a child in the 1970s, there weren’t many visible African Americans at senior levels in corporate America. My own career reminds me that, every day, we have the responsibility to consider how different life would be if it were not for pioneers like the Tuskegee Airmen of World War II—the first African American military pilots. I’ve met members of this distinguished group of heroes, 450 of whom served in combat. They flew WWII bomber escort missions and never lost a bomber under their protection. They destroyed 251 enemy aircraft, and earned 850 medals. The tails of their P-40 Warhawks were painted red. Few in the air knew that the pilots of the “red-tailed fighters” were black, but they

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did know they were really good. Soon many bomber crews were requesting them to be their escorts. I often reflect on the privilege of having met these men who changed the course of history and influenced my own life. I marvel at how they performed their missions flawlessly, with extraordinary courage, pioneering new opportunities and being role models for generations to come. Few of these great red-tailed fighter pilots are still with us. But, obviously, other African Americans continue to overcome past oppression and break barriers for the betterment of all Americans. I’m pleased that Black History Month helps people reflect on a heritage that includes such national heroes. I’m also pleased to work at Pratt & Whitney, a company where I’ve had many opportunities. African Americans are still changing history, and we should celebrate that every day.

John W. Comford Director of Human Resources

SAKS INCORPORATED

Saks Incorporated recognizes the tremendous achievements made by African Americans throughout history. It is fitting that we pause and recognize this not only during Black History Month, but throughout the year. Our company values the strength inherent in diversity. Black History Month is a time of celebration and a time of rejuvenation. It is a time where I am personally reenergized as I reflect on the works and achievements of past and present leaders such as the late Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and John Johnson, founder of EBONY and JET magazines, former Secretary of State General Colin Powell, and entertainment icon Oprah Winfrey. Their accomplishments are legendary, and I use them as examples to illustrate to my children and reaffirm to myself the value of perseverance and the limitless possibilities that await us. There are many great institutions dedicated to educating us on black history. An example is the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute where America’s civil rights struggle is chronicled. No matter how many times I tour the institute and hear the words of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I have a dream,” my soul is stirred. I would encourage you to use Black History Month as a beginning point to explore, appreciate, and celebrate diversity and the great accomplishments of these dedicated leaders each and every day.

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“African Americans are still changing history, and we should celebrate that every day.” Earl Exum Sharmeen Caldwell Hawkins Vice President, Client Relations

SODEXHO CAMPUS SERVICE Chair AALF

At Sodexho, our teams go all out in planning events for Black History Month! On both the national and regional levels, our African American Leadership Forum (AALF) plans events that raise awareness and celebrate black history and culture in the United States. In addition to hosting a national membership meeting, other events have included a jazz café, blood drives, culinary experiences, performances by the Kankouran West African Dance Company and an Oasis Market featuring a variety of vendors and products. The black leader I most admire is Mary McLeod Bethune. Mary McLeod Bethune said, “If I have a legacy to leave people, it is my philosophy of living and serving....I pray now that my philosophy may be helpful to those who share my vision of a world of peace, progress, brotherhood, and love.” Among Bethune’s many achievements was the creation of Bethune-Cookman College in 1923. She also founded the National Council of Negro Women (NCNW) in 1935, making it possible for women’s organizations to pool their resources and thus work effectively on funding schools for the youth. The goal was to support and encourage ways to improve the quality of life for multitudes of children and young adults. All of Bethune’s hard work in championing education and job training was on behalf of black social and economic advancement. Sodexho celebrates and recognizes the contributions of all of our diverse employees, including African Americans, throughout the year to raise awareness and celebrate the unique customs and culture of our team members. Raising this awareness allows us to better serve our customers and foster collaborative work environments in our operations.


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Enthusiasm. Spirit. Passion. Clinicians at Evercare give wholeheartedly to their patients. And in return, they experience a career ďŹ lled with rich personal rewards and true satisfaction. As a UnitedHealth Group company, Evercare has access to worldwide resources and expertise and has become one of the nation’s largest providers of integrated acute and long-term care plans that optimize the health and well-being of people who have long-term or advanced illness, are older or have disabilities. Evercare’s success is driven by people who share an ultimate goal of caring for the needs of the whole person. Evercare would like thank our entire team of dedicated professionals and extend an invitation to diverse healthcare clinicians everywhere to join them in their mission. We invite you to make a difference.

Evercare NURSE PRACTITIONERS, in collaboration with a primary care physician, provide direct care to our members in their places of residence. Requires a NP with national certiďŹ cation in Adult, Family or Geriatrics. Long-term care experience, gained either as a NP or RN, is highly preferred. We are also seeking to ďŹ ll CLINICAL CARE MANAGER roles, requiring a RN with long-term care, case management, and/or state/federal program experience. Many of these roles are based out of a home ofďŹ ce and offer the opportunity to plan your own schedule within a 40-hour workweek. Explore www.theheartofcaring.com, a resource designed with you in mind. Apply online or, if you prefer, contact Mina Kouklan at (877) 835-3156, ext. 2596, or fax your information to (877) 4643239. Evercare offers full range of comprehensive beneďŹ ts.

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Paul Fant President and Chief Operation Officer

SOUTH CAROLINA PIPELINE CORPORATION, A SUBSIDIARY OF SCANA CORPORATION

I admire Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. for his convictions and his vision. During Black History Month, I am inspired to re-visit many of Dr. King’s speeches. I also have come to appreciate Malcolm X, who I believe was ahead of his time. It’s incredible to see where he came from and what he came to believe before his untimely death. These two men epitomize the kind of people who flat out inspire me to “put it on the line” for what I believe in. I try to pass along to any young person who will listen the knowledge and experiences I have gained from living in the South and being black; those experiences made me who I am today. I constantly try to impress on my family, especially my children, the importance of becoming all God created them to be—to make a difference in everything they involve themselves in. I applaud those who had the vision to push for Black History Month. I believe it’s important to remember the past and the profound impact it has had on who we are as Americans. One of SCANA’s core values is to “respect diversity and care for each other.” SCANA is a recent recipient of the Secretary of Labor Award, which recognizes organizations that are considered “Best in Class” at ensuring equal employment opportunity and diversity. Our leadership encourages divergent thinking and embraces differences without prejudice. We define diversity as everything and everyone in our organization that makes us unique and successful.

Charles Johnson Vice President of Global Consulting

SYMANTEC

I expect more of myself because I know what it means to be a leader as a person of color. The life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. inspired me to be a leader who creates a vision, inspires others, fosters

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collaboration and inclusion, and achieves the seemingly impossible. I thought of the courage of Dr. King when I married my wife at a time when biracial marriages were still considered criminal in some states; when I started my own company, Secure Network Consulting, Inc. (SNCi); and when I then sold it twice into what is now Symantec, the world’s fourth largest independent software company. All of us should honor the life of Dr. King. Black history must be remembered so future generations can understand and respect his efforts. Dr. King’s principles are really American principles in their truest form.

Dean Henry Principal, Corporate Systems Integration Management, Information Technology Division

VANGUARD

I don’t celebrate Black History Month in the same way every year. However, Vanguard’s various diversity committees coordinate year-round themed celebrations, as they do for Black History Month, and I attend whenever possible. These events help bring people together who might not ordinarily meet, break down barriers that may have divided us in the past, and lead to better understanding and ongoing relationships. I’ve also celebrated Black History Month by participating in events at my undergraduate alma mater, the University of Pennsylvania. Last year, Penn’s Black Alumni Society sponsored a year-long celebration of the graduation of the first black graduate from a Penn school: James Brister, a dental school graduate. In February, a Black History Month program was presented that highlighted the achievements of blacks at Penn, entitled “Our International History of Excellence.” While designating a specific month for celebration helps to serve as the catalyst for annual reflection, it is important to celebrate events in black history throughout the year, just as we do any other American historical events. These celebrations can serve as reinforcement for positive actions for people of all colors, faiths, origins, and backgrounds. For me, personally, the study of family history through genealogical research creates a sense of pride and a desire to expect more of myself by recognizing the accomplishments of my ancestors who had much less opportunity. PDJ


We preserve millions of families’ most valued possession; their history. For every wedding, graduation or new addition to your family; history is being made. And this is the reason Nationwide understands the importance of celebrating Black History Month. We’re always on your side to help protect the things that mean the most to you; your family, your treasures... your history.

1-877-On Your SideSM Nationwide, the Nationwide Framemark, Nationwide is on your side and the Nationwide jingle are federally registered service marks of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. On Your Side, Life Comes at You Fast and 1-877-ON YOUR SIDE are service marks of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. Subject to underwriting review and approval. Nationwide is an Equal Housing Opportunity Insurer. Life insurance underwritten by Nationwide Life Insurance Company, Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company and Affiliated Companies, Home Office: Columbus, OH 43215-2220. ©2005 Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company.All Rights Reserved.


Creativity means taking a chance. And that’s the only way to grow. I’m interested in a lot of different things. At Hallmark— working in several different departments— I’ve had the chance to explore all those interests. With every job, I came in as a beginner and grew to be an expert. Within one opportunity, there is always another. As a creative person, advancing in my career gives me even more freedom to express myself. I use my mind in ways I never imagined. That’s what lets me say I love where I am and I love what I do. rachel britt—production art supervisor

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for infor mation on hal lmar k c areer opp ortunities, v isit www.hal lmar k.com/careers. © 2007 hal lmar k licensing , inc.


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nspired by Stephen Covey’s book, we asked several companies to describe the strategies they use to make employee network groups successful. We found that organizations of all types work hard to make their ENGs vital, integral to the business, and rewarding for employees. Most companies gave us detailed accounts of the strategies they use, and space limitations prevent us from publishing all of them. Here, then, are highlights of strategies used by companies whose ENGs are functioning well. Our thanks to the individuals featured here for participating.

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Listed in alpha order by company name:

Formally establish employee networks

Maximize professional contribution of the represented groups

Victoria Boyd Global Diversity Director

AIR PRODUCTS & CHEMICALS, INC.

Employee networks are a vital part of the diversity initiative and are intended to assist Air Products in developing an inclusive culture. They are grass-roots organizations that are formed and governed by employees. In order to be sanctioned as an Employee Network, groups must submit a proposal to the Global Director of Diversity. A template for the proposal of the formation of an Employee Network is available through the diversity department. First and foremost, the proposal is required to describe the value the group can bring to Air Products and outline how they plan to deliver that value. The proposal form also requires the group to define the group’s mission, scope of activities, and its initial organization structure and decision-making process. The Global Diversity Director reviews the proposal and accepts or rejects it within one month. That review is based upon the group’s ability to bring business value to the organization, alignment and consistency with business and diversity goals and objectives.

Link network strategy to business objectives Clay Osborne VP, Human Resources

BAUSCH & LOMB

It is vitally important to link the employee network’s strategy to the company’s business objectives. This ensures that the networks process and work is inextricably linked to achieving the company’s key objectives. Use senior leaders as champions and organizational mentors for networks as a means of communicating senior management support and ensuring alignment with business strategy.

Damian James SVP – Experience Developmental Group

BEST BUY

We find it is important to provide opportunities for employees to demonstrate their unique abilities, contributions and leadership skills in a myriad of ways. Best Buy has had (what we call) Employee Resource Groups for several years. They include groups for Women, Asians, Blacks, Hispanics, GLBT Community and even a group called INCLUDE for those employees with disabilities. The groups are designed to grow leaders, enhance our business strategy and provide an environment of support. People do not need to be members of a group in order to participate in the network; anyone who has an interest in a group may be a part of it. In the past, our employee resource groups have been available to Best Buy’s 4,000 corporate employees. Just this past year, we began expanding the employee resource groups into our store, district and territory offices. Our first groups have just launched in the Washington, D.C. market. Our employee resource groups bring insights from their various communities and backgrounds into the business so Best Buy can better reach and relate to customers. Additionally, they bring their communities to us by sponsoring events and educating our employees about things important to their communities.

“Use senior leaders as champions and organizational mentors for networks as a means of communicating senior management support and ensuring alignment with business strategy.” Clay Osborne

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Enable employees to educate the entire company about Boeing’s Integrated Global Diversity and EEO Compliance Strategy Joyce Tucker Vice President, Global Diversity & Employee Rights

THE BOEING COMPANY

The Strategy enables the affinity groups to design and implement programs contributing to cultural awareness, leadership development, and involvement in community relations programs. These programs are offered at Boeing sites and are open to all employees. Boeing has seven affinity groups with 86 local chapters. Boeing’s affinity groups host a variety of events and training for their members and other employees throughout the year. Topics include: communication styles, team building, networking, problem solving, prioritization, speed mentoring, business development, etc. Some programs provide certifications or professional credits, and can be co-hosted with community organizations and universities. Our Affinity Groups also partner with the company’s community relations teams at different sites to support local programs. These can include presentations at local schools (often with an emphasis on math, science and engineering), tutoring, rehabbing homes in low-income areas, and other volunteer activities. Affinity group members also attend professional conferences.

Involve the network groups in mentoring

community service projects and events each year. Organizations supported include those for youth, the underprivileged and women. The ERGs also collaborate with other ERGs on projects, considerably increasing their impact on the organization serviced.

Strive for full membership and executive engagement Rolando Balli Diversity Strategist

DELL INC.

The employee networking group members have to decide what programs will add the most value to the professional and personal growth of its membership. All networking groups periodically survey their membership for feedback and interests. A core team takes this input to set the goals of the employee networking group that will drive the most engagement towards the company’s goals. Employee engagement is also increased, as they have a forum to work with Executives they might not have had exposure to otherwise. Executive engagement is necessary to help drive networking group retention and recruitment efforts. Executive sponsors provide leadership that helps networking group members to realize individual potential and fully contribute to Dell’s objectives by providing opportunities for development, mentoring, networking and best practice sharing.

EcoEssence Business Council

Janet Marzett

Diana Lewis

VP, Human Resources and Administration

Human Resources Senior Vice President

DAIMLERCHRYSLER FINANCIAL SERVICES AMERICAS

ECOLAB INC.

Our ERGs are members of the DaimlerChrysler Financial Services’ Mentoring Committee, providing process input and mentor and mentee nominations. Mentoring is a strong and effective development tool. The ERGs’ involvement in the company’s mentoring program ensures the principles of diversity and inclusion are part of the mentoring process. Our Employee Resource Groups also take social responsibility seriously. Each ERG organizes and participates in

Ecolab associates recently launched three affinity groups that are organized around a particular shared interFrom left to right: est. The groups are initiated by Andrés Meza, Pauline ECOLABand INC.focus on a common employees Whelan, Julie Carroll, interest characteristic suchlaunched as race, Ecolaborassociates recently Toni Duberry, Kasey ethnicity or even gender. Each group’s main intent is to create an Comnick, Jim Miller, three affinity groups that are open and to strengthen the linkage to Reeseforum Dyer, for Yawidea exchangeorganized around a particular and withinHilke diverse communities. Boateng, shared interest. The groups are iniRiechardt-Martinez, Ecolab’s three business tiated and social employee by employees andnetworking focus on a Jim Jarman.

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groups focus on helping drive thesuch company’s growth common interest or characteristic as race,aggressive ethnicity or even goals through the recruitment retention of forum a diverse gender. Each group’s main intent isand to create an open for workforce. idea exchange and to strengthen the linkage to and within diverse EcoEssence is a network of dedicated Ecolab associates communities. committed enhancing world-class organizational Ecolab’sto three businessEcolab’s and social employee networking status by positively influencing thecompany’s recruitment, development, groups focus on helping drive the aggressive growth and retention African Americanand employees. goals throughofthe recruitment retention of a diverse EcoEssence strives to be a catalyst within Ecolab by serving workforce. as theEcoEssence African American subjectofmatter expertEcolab as Ecolab moves is a network dedicated associates forward withtoitsenhancing global diversity initiatives and acts as a bridge committed Ecolab’s world-class organizational between andinfluencing the Africanthe American community in the status by Ecolab positively recruitment, development, company’s recruitment and retention of Africanefforts. American employees. EcoEssence strives to be a catalyst within Ecolab by serving as the African American subject matter expert as Ecolab moves forward global diversity initiatives and acts as a bridge Buildwith a its highbetween Ecolab and the African American community in the performance culture company’s recruitment efforts.

Jignasha Patel Director of Global Winning Culture Build a high-performance culture and Inclusion

FREESCALE SEMICONDUCTOR, INC. Jignasha Patel Director Global Winningis Culture Inclusionof at Freescale a key and Inclusion

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FREESCALE SEMICONDUCTOR, performance culture. Inclusion at INC.

Freescale is about the creation of a Inclusion at Freescale is healthy, a key work environment which is element to building a highpositive and productive for all employees, where everyone is performance culture. Inclusion at included and no one’s talents are ignored or wasted. We want Freescale about the creation every employee to feel valued and tois contribute to his orofhera work environment which is healthy, fullest potential. positive and productive for all employees, where everyone is How do we do this? By encouraging a sense of community included and no one’s talents are ignored or wasted. We want among participants, by supporting the personal and professionevery employee of to ERG feel valued and and to contribute his oravailher al development members, by makingtoERGs fullest potential. able to all employees. How do currently we do this? a sense of community Freescale hasBy sixencouraging Employee Resource Groups: Asian among participants, by supporting the personal and professionCulture Team (ACT); Black Achievement and Leadership Team al development ERG members, and by ERGsTeam; avail(BALT); Equal –ofGay, Lesbian, Bisexual andmaking Transgender able to all employees.

Hispanic Education Awareness Team (HEAT); Women’s Freescale currently and has six Employee Resource Groups: Asian Leadership Team (WLT); andAchievement Native American Team (NAT). Culture Team (ACT); Black and Leadership Team (BALT); Equal – Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Team; Hispanic Education and Awareness Team (HEAT); Women’s Leadership Team (WLT); and American Team (NAT). Set guidelines forNative employee affinity

groups that address formation, membership, office, affinity Set guidelinesholding for employee trainingthat andaddress rules offormation, conduct groups membership, holding office, Frank McCloskey training and rules of conduct VP of Diversity

GEORGIA POWER

Frank McCloskey For example, employee affinity VP of Diversity groups are formed

through grassroots efforts. Any Georgia Power employee can initiate the process. For example, employee affinity Employees submit a business groups are must formed through grasscase toefforts. the Affinity Group Review roots Any Georgia Power Board with objectives that employee can initiate the process. support Georgia Power’s mission, visionmust and corporate and Employees submit a goals business provides education, awareness growth for case toand the professional Affinity Group Review employees. Board with objectives that Group leaders give mission, a short presentation before the board support Georgia Power’s vision and corporate goals and before approval is granted by theand Review Board. Each affinity provides education, awareness professional growth for group chooses an executive champion who will act as an employees. adviser to the group facilitate communication between Group leaders giveand a short presentation before the board senior management and thebygroup. before approval is granted the Review Board. Each affinity Georgia and/or Southern Company or groupAny chooses an Power executive champion who will actfullas an part-time employee can facilitate be a member of any between group. adviser to the group and communication Participation in an Affinity senior management and theGroup group. is strictly voluntary. To hold office,Power an employee have Company had a satisfactory Any Georgia and/or must Southern full- or performanceemployee on the most of part-time canrecent be evaluation, a memberhadofa minimum any group. one year of service in any ofGroup the Southern Participation in an Affinity is strictlyCompany voluntary.operating companies or affiliates andemployee not currently on positive To hold office, an mustbehave had a discipline. satisfactory performance on the most recent evaluation, had a minimum of one year of service in any of the Southern Company operating companies or affiliates and not currently be on positive discipline. GEORGIA POWER

“We want every employee to feel valued and to “We want every employee to feel valued and to contribute to to his his or or her her fullest fullest potential. potential. How How do do contribute we do do this? this? By By encouraging encouraging a a sense sense of of community community we among participants, by supporting the personal and professional development of ERG members, and by making ERGs available to all employees.” Jignasha Patel 84

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Focus on professional development opportunities and keep the dialogue going Elaine Weinstein Senior Vice President of Human Resources, Chief Diversity and Ethics Officer

KEYSPAN CORPORATION

Affinity Groups at KeySpan focus on providing opportunities for members to flourish and grow through mentoring, accessibility to corporate executives, “Lunch & Learn” sessions on a wide range of subjects (often with outside speakers), the support of fellow members, and more. Continuous learning opportunities are offered, and taken advantage of, with proven results in the area of career development. The establishment of Affinity Groups signals the start of not only continuous activity, but continuous dialogue, at the very highest level of the Company, in some cases. Affinity Group leaders, for example, meet quarterly with the Office of the Chair (KeySpan’s top four executives) to review issues, accomplishments and goals. This two-way dialogue keeps both sides informed and engaged.

“Affinity Groups at KeySpan focus on providing opportunities for members to flourish Elaine Weinstein and grow ...” ing, research, and presentation skills to a panel of diverse KPMG partners and business leaders. Many KPMG partners and employees currently hold national and local leadership positions in both organizations. Over the past year, KPMG hosted face-to-face events for the African American network at the annual NABA convention and for the Hispanic/Latino network at the annual ALPFA convention. Historically, and in the case of the face-to-face network events, KPMG sponsors our diverse professionals to attend external career development events.

Clearly establish mission and objectives Verna Ford Executive Consultant

NOVATIONS GROUP, INC.

Leverage relationships with external professional diversity organizations Joe Maiorano Executive Director of Human Resources

KPMG

We have successfully done this with the National Association of Black Accountants (NABA) and the Association of Latino Professionals in Finance and Accounting (ALPFA). We encourage our employees to meet face-to-face while attending career development seminars and networking with industry leaders. The NABA and ALPFA conventions are great venues to host our face-to-face network events, since KPMG is a corporate sponsor of the NABA and ALPFA Student Case Study Competition. This competition gives finance and accounting students the opportunity to showcase their business, account-

Employee Network Groups first develop a straight-forward, businessoriented statement about why the group exists. Objectives are stated in terms that clearly serve both the membership and the company—for example, professional development of members, information sharing regarding reaching ethnic and other targeted markets, serving as a communications vehicle for disseminating information about company initiatives, leadership changes, policy updates, etc., and an organized way of giving voice to group concerns at the appropriate levels. Goals are updated annually to take into account the evolving needs of the people and the organization’s priorities. Show no tolerance for incompatible personal agendas. Novations Group is a consulting and training company that helps clients develop the strengths, capacity and performance of their most important asset, their people. We provide businesses worldwide with a broad range of proprietary consulting and training services, proven to dramatically improve the contribution made by individuals and organizations at all levels.

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Alignment

numerous community events designed to reach children and to assist other community-based organizations. Examples of external organizations include: the Human Rights Campaign, Asian Shinder Dhillon Corporate Leadership Network and other noted organizations. Director In addition, BRG members assist with marketing workshops, Global Diversity & Inclusion prospecting, building and maintaining business relationships in the PFIZER GLOBAL community and mentoring. They also help to bring together key PFIZER GLOBAL RESEARCH & RESEARCH &stakeholders from Prudential’s business divisions and corporate DEVELOPMENT DEVELOPMENT centers to highlight specific opportunities within the community. Currently within Prudential, there are five BRGs: Abled and “One of our key strategies to leverage and maximize the Disabled Associates Partnering Together (ADAPT), Asian value of employee network Pacific American Association (APAA), Black Leadership groups to Pfizer is alignment,” Forum (BLF), Employee Association of Gays, Lesbians, says Shinder Dhillon, Bisexuals and Transgenders (EAGLES), and Hispanic Heritage Director, Global Diversity & Inclusion, Pfizer Global Research Network (HHN) BRGs have an active role within Prudential and serve as a & Development. Dhillon serves as the focal point for her division’s Diversity and Inclusion efforts and is charged with over- great resource for employees. seeing the 28 employee network groups in her division. One key strategy to ensure this all-important alignment was the Employee Network Group Summit recently held in Let employees drive November. Bringing together network leads and executive sponsors from as far away as Japan and the UK, the meeting providDr. Daniel L. ed an opportunity for the division’s leadership to acknowledge Sullivan the value of the networks and their impact on Pfizer’s bottom line. Speakers, breakout sessions and roundtable discussions EVP, Human Resources allowed leaders of the diverse groups—African American, QUALCOMM Women’s, GLBT, Asian-Pacific and Latino—to share best practices and align their local strategies. All of QUALCOMM’s One of the breakout sessions focused on the question, Where Employee Network Groups can networking groups make an impact on our D&I strategy? (ENGs) are employee driven noted Dhillon. “This created so much energy, enthusiasm and and inspired. This approach lively discussion and we now have some great ideas that we plan allows members to define to implement. The meeting was an opportunity to ensure that their own goals and determine local activities are aligned and working toward achieving our how they run the groups. When employees themselves drive overall strategy.” these groups, it allows them to agree on the types of issues they

Leverage internal and external business partnerships Gloria McDonald Director, Diversity

PRUDENTIAL FINANCIAL

Business Resource Group (BRG) members participate in community events that help to raise brand recognition and sales impact through lead generation and volunteer in

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discuss and choose their level of activity. QUALCOMM HR representatives help foster the structure and growth of ENGs by sharing their administrative knowledge with the groups, helping them connect with other employees and departments and making recommendations to help further the groups’ goals. Providing cooperative HR support helps demonstrate the company’s commitment to both individual employees and the ENGs to promote a diverse and inclusive culture. QUALCOMM stresses the importance of ENGs being open to all employees. We ensure that ENGs operate fairly and allow any employee access to membership. This is specifically articulated in the company policy on employee groups.


Professional development and mentoring Richard Macedonia Director of Diversity Initiatives

SODEXHO

Network Groups constituents most frequently mention professional development and mentoring as key reasons for joining. To that end, the Office of Diversity offers a number of programs to support this need. Sodexho’s professional development conference is offered annually in different cities where Sodexho has a concentration of business, offering top-notch keynote speakers and concurrent sessions to hone leadership skills. A cadre of network group volunteers in the regional area work with the office of diversity to ensure successful conference execution, offering a leadership opportunity to those who volunteer. Along with network group and diversity council members, managers and clients in the local vicinity gain exposure to Sodexho’s diversity and inclusion initiatives and the network groups. Sodexho’s Spirit of Mentoring initiatives offer mentoring through a variety of channels to include our formal program entitled IMPACT and through more informal programs to include BRIDGE which is offered within the business lines, and Peer2Peer, our network group offering. While each of the network groups is at a different stage in developing their mentoring program, the objectives for Peer2Peer include professional development, increased depth and diversity of management bench strength, improved employee retention, and bringing new managers on board more effectively.

Foster crosscollaboration among ERGs Gary Forsee President and CEO

SPRINT NEXTEL

Sprint Nextel’s four ERGs may focus on different markets, but many common themes arise during their work. For this reason, ERGs are encouraged (and even expected) to partner with

fellow ERGs on projects, particularly those that involve employee engagement and community involvement. Our ERG Mentoring Program is a testament to the strength of ERG partnership, as it involves all four of Sprint Nextel’s ERGs. Sprint has four ERGs with a total of eight chapters across the country and more than 2,000 members. Existing ERGs Diamond Network (African American-focused) and Enlace (Hispanic-focused) have recently been joined by OASIS (Asian Pacific American-focused) and Sprint Pride (GLBT-focused). However, regardless of the individual focuses, each ERG is open to ALL employees; the only requirement is a willingness to see Sprint Nextel and its employees succeed.

Establish tailored education and development programs Dr. Mona Siu-Kan Lau Group Head of Diversity

UBS AG

Ensuring that members have access to unique leadership and development programs has been a key driver of our employee networks. Additionally, we recognize that our networks are not monolithic and as such provide tailored programs for people in different business groups and of different ranks. The League of Employees of African Descent (LEAD), for example, hosted a workshop for junior-level members on how to have effective year-end performance review conversations with their managers. UBS’s women’s networks are responsible for hosting 4 major women’s leadership conferences annually in New York, London, Zurich and Frankfurt. Additionally, this year the Cultural Awareness Networks in the Americas and the UK have offered an education series on doing business in the BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India and China) and PRIDE EMEA has just rolled out a personal development program for members called “Finding Your Own Voice.” At UBS, we have nearly 20 employee network groups around the globe which have become an essential means to building cross-business relationships as well as ensuring an inclusive culture. These networks, which have been growing exponentially through grass-roots efforts since 2001, regularly support one another by sharing best practices across businesses and regions.

PDJ

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Your Trigger, Your Story How MicroTriggers Derail Relationships

T

his month we launch a new column called MicroTrigger™ Stories. These stories submitted by you, our readers, will provide real-life insight into the subtle behaviors that can derail relationships at work and play. Inspired by diversity strategist Janet Crenshaw Smith’s new book, 58 Little Things That Have a Big Impact: What’s Your MicroTrigger?, we will share the experiences of trying to make inclusion work in organizations today. Telling your story—be it an annoying phrase such as “Great Job Kid” or a damaging micro-inequity such as always questioning your qualifications—could help all of us in our diversity journey. These stories may come from the viewpoint of the person who was actually triggered (receiver), someone who observed a situation (observer), or the person who uttered the phrase or hit someone’s hot button (sender). We will hear what happened and the lessons learned from these experiences. This issue’s stories come from corporate America and a school principal. From receivers and an observer. Thank you for helping us to understand the impact of subtle behaviors. People get ticked off every day. And quite often, no one says anything. Here’s an opportunity to vent and let off some

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steam. Or simply share and open someone’s eyes. You’ll find yourself saying, “Oh no. I do that all the time! I had no idea I might be offending someone.” We hope that by sharing these stories, we’ll be improving your daily interactions—one trigger at a time!

Jeff Carroll Principal Weems Elementary School Manassas, Virginia

O

ne morning my front office greeter came to my office. She wanted to know why a laptop had been placed at her desk the previous day. I explained to her that she would be trained to use our school’s student database. After the training I wanted her to input and/or update student information from the Emergency Cards into the database. She responded, “But that’s secretary work.” I slowly counted to ten. I explained to her that I believe we must have a “Whatever it takes” attitude at my school. Our challenge is too great to think within traditional roles. I shared examples of tasks I complete that are not “principal’s work.” I assured her she would receive proper

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007

training and that I believed she could accomplish this task successfully. I think I responded better due to my MicroTrigger training. In the past I may have been short with this person in response. I also learned that my work to change the culture of my school is ongoing. The attitudes I desire the organization to have still do not permeate the building.

Maria D’Ambrosio Choice Hotels

I

am in a room full of people, a networking event. This is a common occurrence as I attend many networking functions in my role as the manager of diversity and corporate engagement. As I begin to have a conversation with someone, the person seems to be looking beyond me rather than at me. This has happened before, and it always annoys me. This person is looking for someone more influential to talk with. This is my MicroTrigger. During a brief discussion of MicroTriggers with a colleague, I used this incident to explain MicroTriggers. Although my colleague continued


mgmmir a g ed iver sity.com N e v a d a : B e l l a g i o • M G M G r a n d • M a n d a l a y B a y • T h e M i r a g e • Tr e a s u r e I s l a n d • M o n t e C a r l o • N e w Yo r k - N e w Yo r k • L u x o r • E x c a l i b u r • C i r c u s C i r c u s Railroad Pass • Primm Valley Resorts • Silver Legacy • Circus Circus Reno • Colorado Belle • Edgewater • Gold Strike • Nevada Landing O u t s i d e N e v a d a : B e a u R i v a g e • G o l d S t r i k e - Tu n i c a • G r a n d V i c t o r i a • M G M G r a n d D e t r o i t


understood the concept, she was quick to point out to me that there could be other reasons why someone would look around a crowded room while talking to me. Could it be that there was another explanation? Of course! Perhaps the person needed to meet someone or connect with a particular person who was hard to contact. This viewpoint of the other party had never occurred to me. I was so focused on my own view. I am so glad that someone pointed out another version of my personal trigger. I will attend those networking sessions with a new view from now on.

Tujuanna B. Williams Director, Diversity & Inclusion Freddie Mac

T

he MicroTrigger that I have experienced repeatedly as the receiver is number 11—singling me out to ask for ID. During my travels for work I found myself staying two to three times a month in a small, quaint hotel on the east coast that offered corporate discounts and transportation to my corporate office. This facility was often booked to capacity with my company’s employees. Many of them are repeat customers such as myself; few of them are people of color. When I would make my normal monthly or weekly visits to this facility invariably my room key would cease to work at some point during my stay. When returning to the hotel via hotel transportation after a very long day in the office, I would take the elevator to my room and find that my key was not working. I am positive it was the magnetic strip. However, when I would go to the front desk, they would ask for identification before reprogramming the key. I initially understood the need for this and appreciated the security that it provided, until about the fifth time in five consecutive

weeks. That’s when it became personal. On this occasion I took the opportunity to ask the front desk manager, “Why are you asking me for identification? Clearly when I call for transportation you know that I am a registered guest, you pick me up at my company, five minutes later I am back in the lobby telling you my that my key is not working. At what point do you recognize me as a frequent guest, considering that each time during my stay my key has to be reprogrammed? Additionally, in five weeks time I have only seen one other person of color in your hotel.” I advised the manager that his actions and that of his staff were sending a message that as an African American female, I do not belong in this exclusive hotel. The manager apologized profusely and did his best to assure me that was not the intention. The ‘aha’ has been that on subsequent visits I have been personally addressed by my name and have witnessed a more consistent adherence to this policy.

Audrey Martin UBS Investment Bank

M

i c r o Tr i g g e r s come in many forms. These are actions of one individual which create a negative response in another individual. The Micro- Triggers can be in the form of comments made or signals sent through body language such as a sigh or condescending glance. We deal them every day at home, at work, in hallways, on the streets, in meetings, at the gym—anywhere. Micro-Triggers are all around us, and not reacting negatively can be challenging at times. For me, when I hear people use the phrase “you people…..” my blood pressure instantly rises 20 points. Whether the phrase is directed at me or a total stranger, followed by an insult or compliment—it

doesn’t matter—it still forces me to take a deep breath to prevent myself from making a negative comment of my own. I’m not sure why this phrase sends me into oblivion, but it does. Perhaps it’s the idea that the sender is clearly separating himself from the receiver and then grouping people together with an assumption that they are all the same. The idea is simply unacceptable to me. On occasion in Human Resources, we need to hold firm to a policy that an employee might oppose. Years ago in a prior firm where I was working in the benefits department, a client I was supporting was not happy with the policy surrounding flexible benefit plan reimbursement of some vitamins. Instead of allowing me to talk through the rationale behind the policy, the client immediately became very upset. She instantly grouped me together with the insurance company who administered the plan, the IRS who wrote the ERISA regulations and the senior management team of the firm who would not want to break the ERISA regulations. She grouped us together by launching into, “You people are just trying to ….” Needless to say our relationship was more than strained going forward. Clearly that comment was intended to provoke a heated dialogue. Conversely, in the same company I was faced with a new manager who was anxious to win over his new group with positive reinforcement. He pulled us all together to say “You people did a great job with….” This time a compliment was intended, but I was disappointed that he couldn’t highlight the contributions by different individuals. The signal I received was that he wasn’t focused on us as individuals, and I would always be seen as just one person in a group regardless of my personal contribution. Do you have a story to tell? Send it to JSmith@ivygroupllc.com and receive a MicroTrigger Gift Pack.

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AARP

46

www.aarp.com

Hallmark

80

www.hallmark.com

Bank of the West

7

www.bankofthewest.com

ITT

18

www.boeing.com

Ivy Planning

71

65

www.chevron.com

Lockheed Martin

91

17

www.cisco.com

MFHA

3

55

www.dell.com

MGM Mirage

61

53

www.kodak.com

National City Bank

89

77

Nationwide Insurance

www.theheartofcaring.com

www.nationwide.com

Ford Motor Company

PepsiCo, Inc.

cover 2, pg 1

www.ford.com

Shell Vanguard WellPoint

11

Weyerhaeuser

www.weyerhaeuser.com 79 13

www.pepsico.com

We can’t grow without you. And you. And you. And you. Your ideas, your talent, your unique perspective. We’ve got a place for you at Weyerhaeuser, a forest products company with business strengths from forestry to manufacturing. We recognize that the fastest way to grow as a company is to seek out diverse, creative people and provide opportunities to lead. From engineering to sales, from I.T. to operations, you can have a voice in our growth. To learn more, visit us at www.weyerhaeuser.com/careers.

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9 14 cover 4

www.wellpoint.com

www.nationalcity.com

Evercare / Ovations

cover 3

www.vanguard.com

www.mgmmirage.com

Eastman Kodak Company

Sodexho

www.shell.com

www.mfha.net

Dell, Inc.

15

www.sodexhousa.com

www.lockheedmartin.com

Cisco

Pratt & Whitney

www.pw.utc.com

www.ivygroupllc.com

Chevron

5

www.pfizer.com

www.itt.com

The Boeing Company

Pfizer

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Diversity Journal - Jan/Feb 2007  

Diversity Journal - January/February 2007 issue