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PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

Susan Hodge Royal Dutch Shell

Stephanie Valdez Waste Management Inc.

Pamela Huggins Parker Hannifin Corporation

Julie Fasone Holder The Dow Chemical Company

R.Adm. Nancy Elizabeth Brown United States Navy

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Rebeca Johnson Brinker International

Laurie Burns Darden Restaurants / Bahama Breeze

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Terri Hamilton Brown National City Corporation

Patricia Elizondo Xerox Corporation

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Katherine O’Brien New York Life Insurance Company

Susan M. LaChance United States Postal Service Susan D. Waring State Farm

Anne Kaiser Georgia Power

Dijuana Lewis WellPoint

Susan Cischke Ford Motor Company

Sandra Phillips Pfizer Inc.

NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2006 • VOLUME 8 NUMBER 6 www.diversityjournal.com

Rebecca R. Rhoads Raytheon

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Gale V. King Nationwide

$ Sheila Talton Cisco Systems Inc.

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Kathryn L. Nelson Whirlpool Corporation

Cassandra M. Chandler FBI

Karen Quintos Dell Inc.

Bonnie Soodik The Boeing Company

Margaret E. Carriere Halliburton

Mary Jane Hellyar Eastman Kodak

Lois Cooper Adecco

Maj. Gen. Larita Aragon United States Air Force

Katherine Greene Verizon Wireless

Carol L. Alesso Sodexho

Kim Griffin-Hunter Deloitte & Touche LLP

June R. Shrewsbury Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company

Carmen C. Allen Bausch & Lomb Inc. Lurita Doan U.S. General Services Administration

Deirdre C. Drake Harris (BMO Financial group) Nanette DeTurk Highmark Inc.

Poppie Parish KeyBank

Madeleine Kleiner Hilton Hotels Corporation

Renee West MGM MIRAGE

Debra Hunter Johnson American Airlines


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Also Featuring: A Preface from Ilene Lang • National American Indian Heritage Month • Catalyst

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Volume 8, Number 6 November / December 2006

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PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

Susan Hodge Royal Dutch Shell

Stephanie Valdez Waste Management Inc.

Pamela Huggins Parker Hannifin Corporation

Julie Fasone Holder The Dow Chemical Company

R.Adm. Nancy Elizabeth Brown United States Navy

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Rebeca Johnson Brinker International

Laurie Burns Darden Restaurants / Bahama Breeze

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Terri Hamilton Brown National City Corporation

Patricia Elizondo Xerox Corporation

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Brig. Gen. Anne F. Macdonald United States Army

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Katherine O’Brien New York Life Insurance Company

Susan M. LaChance United States Postal Service Susan D. Waring State Farm

Anne Kaiser Georgia Power

Dijuana Lewis WellPoint

Susan Cischke Ford Motor Company

Sandra Phillips Pfizer Inc.

NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2006 • VOLUME 8 NUMBER 6 www.diversityjournal.com

Rebecca R. Rhoads Raytheon

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Gale V. King Nationwide

$ Sheila Talton Cisco Systems Inc.

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Kathryn L. Nelson Whirlpool Corporation

Cassandra M. Chandler FBI

Karen Quintos Dell Inc.

Bonnie Soodik The Boeing Company

Margaret E. Carriere Halliburton

Mary Jane Hellyar Eastman Kodak

Lois Cooper Adecco

Maj. Gen. Larita Aragon United States Air Force

Katherine Greene Verizon Wireless

Carol L. Alesso Sodexho

Kim Griffin-Hunter Deloitte & Touche LLP

June R. Shrewsbury Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company

Carmen C. Allen Bausch & Lomb Inc. Lurita Doan U.S. General Services Administration

Deirdre C. Drake Harris (BMO Financial group) Nanette DeTurk Highmark Inc.

Poppie Parish KeyBank

Madeleine Kleiner Hilton Hotels Corporation

Renee West MGM MIRAGE

Debra Hunter Johnson American Airlines


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Also Featuring: A Preface from Ilene Lang • National American Indian Heritage Month • Catalyst

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PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

Susan Hodge Royal Dutch Shell

Stephanie Valdez Waste Management Inc.

Pamela Huggins Parker Hannifin Corporation

Julie Fasone Holder The Dow Chemical Company

R.Adm. Nancy Elizabeth Brown United States Navy

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Rebeca Johnson Brinker International

Laurie Burns Darden Restaurants / Bahama Breeze

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Terri Hamilton Brown National City Corporation

Patricia Elizondo Xerox Corporation

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Katherine O’Brien New York Life Insurance Company

Susan M. LaChance United States Postal Service Susan D. Waring State Farm

Anne Kaiser Georgia Power

Dijuana Lewis WellPoint

Susan Cischke Ford Motor Company

Sandra Phillips Pfizer Inc.

NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2006 • VOLUME 8 NUMBER 6 www.diversityjournal.com

Rebecca R. Rhoads Raytheon

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Gale V. King Nationwide

$ Sheila Talton Cisco Systems Inc.

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Kathryn L. Nelson Whirlpool Corporation

Cassandra M. Chandler FBI

Karen Quintos Dell Inc.

Bonnie Soodik The Boeing Company

Margaret E. Carriere Halliburton

Mary Jane Hellyar Eastman Kodak

Lois Cooper Adecco

Maj. Gen. Larita Aragon United States Air Force

Katherine Greene Verizon Wireless

Carol L. Alesso Sodexho

Kim Griffin-Hunter Deloitte & Touche LLP

June R. Shrewsbury Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company

Carmen C. Allen Bausch & Lomb Inc. Lurita Doan U.S. General Services Administration

Deirdre C. Drake Harris (BMO Financial group) Nanette DeTurk Highmark Inc.

Poppie Parish KeyBank

Madeleine Kleiner Hilton Hotels Corporation

Renee West MGM MIRAGE

Debra Hunter Johnson American Airlines


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PHOTO • SAM ADAMO

PUBLISHER James R. Rector

The word mentor comes to us from Greek mythology.

MANAGING EDITOR John S. Murphy

In Homer’s Odyssey, Mentor was the trusted advisor and teacher of Odysseus’s son, Telemachus, when Odysseus went off to the Trojan War. By the time the word mentor made its way into English as a noun, it had come to mean a trusted advisor, friend, teacher and wise person. Mentoring is a form of human development where an individual invests time helping another person to grow. And that’s what the 102 women featured in this issue do via their mentoring essays. By sharing their knowledge and experience, they guide, inspire and instruct others who will follow them in boardrooms around the world. It’s too bad that space confines their essays to a few hundred words. Many of these women have much more to offer than a single essay can convey. Yet their words are powerful, even without the luxury of a more thorough examination. Collectively, they represent a tremendous learning opportunity for anyone—male or female—willing to peruse them in depth. These women are battle-tested. They’re smart, savvy and driven to succeed. We applaud their generosity in sharing their views with us. As much as this issue recognizes women who bear watching, it is also a tribute to the companies that give them the opportunity to succeed, to rise to their full potential. Many of the most desirable companies to work for are found within the next 188 pages. Our profiles begin on page 34 with an introduction written by Ilene H. Lang, president of Catalyst. In a speech before the Cleveland City Club in October, Ms. Lang identified one of the barriers to advancement that women have consistently identified in surveys: lack of role models. The pages of this issue are rife with such models. We hope you’ll take time to get acquainted with the more than 100 WOMEN WORTH WATCHING in 2007.

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Linda Schellentrager

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Laurel L. Fumic OVERSEAS CORRESPONDENT Alina Dunaeva WEB MASTER Jason Bice

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Commentaries or questions should be addressed to: Profiles in Diversity Journal, P.O. Box 45605, Cleveland, OH 44145-0605. All correspondence should include author’s full name, address, e-mail and phone number. DISPLAY ADVERTISING

Profiles in Diversity Journal Gemini Towers #1 1991 Crocker Road, Suite 320 Westlake, OH 44145 Tel: 440.892.0444 FAX: 440.892.0737 profiles@diversityjournal.com SUBSCRIPTIONS U.S. $49.95 one year / $89.95 two years; in Canada, add $15 per year for postage. Other foreign orders add $20 per year. U.S. funds only. Subscriptions can be ordered at: www.diversityjournal.com or call customer service at 800.573.2867 from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. EST.

SUBMISSIONS Reprints: profiles@diversityjournal.com

Catalyst President Ilene H. Lang spoke to a Cleveland, Ohio, City Club audience about gender diversity. She is shown here with PDJ Publisher James Rector. 2

MARKETING DIRECTOR Damian Johnson

John Murphy Managing Editor

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

Editorial: diversityjournaledit@mac.com Photos & Artwork: diversityjournalart@mac.com


On the cover

2 Editor’s Notebook

26

B Y J O H N M U R P H Y, M A N A G I N G E D I T O R

10 Momentum 14 Catalyst

ANNOUNCEMENTS

N E T WO R K G R O U P S

21 Women Worth Watching Preface B Y I L E N E L A N G , C A T A LY S T

23 Women Worth Watching S P E C I A L 182 ADvantage 188 Spotlight 4

28

F E AT U R E

A D V E RT I S E R S ’ I N D E X

F E AT U R E D O R G A N I Z AT I O N S

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

30


Melanie is a Process Engineer with Shell in Australia

“I wanted to be involved in real projects right from the start – and working at a refinery was the perfect way to develop my practical skills. Equally, there’s plenty of formal training; I’ve attended four courses in the last 18 months, ranging from the week-long Shell Life development programme to technical courses in process engineering. New challenges emerge every day and solutions have to be found. It’s not always easy, but the culture is highly supportive and you’ll always get help when you need it.”

Shell is an Equal Opportunity Employer www.shell.com/careers

Test it The strength of our commitment


Women Worth Watching 34

Leslie Abi-Karam

59

PITNEY BOWES INC.

35

Carol L. Alesso SODEXHO

36

38

42

62

CORPORATION

FINANCIAL SERVICES

Terri Dean

86

Donnalee DeMaio Nanette DeTurk

64

Roslyn Neal Dickerson

66

Donna M. Boles R.Adm. Nancy Elizabeth Brown

AFLAC

88

Terri Hamilton Brown

89

Laurie Burns

90

AERONAUTICS COMPANY

92

Patti M. Dodge CORPORATION

93

Margaret E. Carriere

Carol L. Dow VANGUARD

94

Coleen Ceriello

Deirdre C. Drake HARRIS (A PART OF BMO

96

Janice Chaffin

COMPANY

72

Candace Duncan KPMG LLP

98

Cassandra M. Chandler

Patricia Elizondo XEROX CORPORATION

Helena B. Foulkes CVS/PHARMACY

76

Pam Gardner HOUSTON ASTROS BASEBALL CLUB

Julie Gilbert BEST BUY

Susan Cischke

Katherine Greene VERIZON WIRELESS

Lois Cooper

Kim Griffin-Hunter DELOITTE & TOUCHE LLP

CON-WAY INC.

102 Debra Hunter Johnson 104 Marsha Johnson 106 Rebeca Johnson 108 Anne Kaiser GEORGIA POWER

82

Elizabeth Hackenson LUCENT TECHNOLOGIES

ADECCO

6

100 J. Pat Jannausch

BRINKER INTERNATIONAL

81

FORD MOTOR COMPANY

58

CORPORATION

SOUTHERN COMPANY

80

ADT SECURITY SERVICES INC.

56

Pamela Huggins

AMERICAN AIRLINES

78

OF INVESTIGATION

Nancy E. Chisholm

99

PARKER HANNIFIN

75

FEDERAL BUREAU

54

Mary L. Howell TEXTRON INC.

74

SYMANTEC CORPORATION

52

Julie Fasone Holder THE DOW CHEMICAL

FINANCIAL GROUP)

KEYSPAN CORPORATION

51

Barbara Hoffnagle SALT RIVER PROJECT (SRP)

70

HALLIBURTON

50

Susan Hodge ROYAL DUTCH SHELL

68

AMERICAN RED CROSS

49

Deborah Hockman, Ph.D. NALCO COMPANY

BAHAMA BREEZE

Carmen S. Canino

Stephanie C. Hill LOCKHEED MARTIN

NEW CENTURY FINANCIAL

DARDEN RESTAURANTS /

48

Chris A. Hill SPRINT NEXTEL CORPORATION

NATIONAL CITY CORPORATION

46

Mary Jane Hellyar EASTMAN KODAK

UNITED STATES NAVY

44

Angie Hart

U.S. GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION

67

Sharon Hall

Lurita Doan

BD

43

87

INTERCONTINENTAL HOTELS GROUP

Tracy L. Hackman

SPENCER STUART

HIGHMARK INC.

Karen BerchtoldHanlon SEAGATE TECHNOLOGY

DAIMLERCHRYSLER

METLIFE BANK, N.A.

Sheree Bargabos OWENS CORNING

40

61

Maj. Gen. Larita Aragon UNITED STATES AIR FORCE

84

VERIZON BUSINESS

Carmen C. Allen BAUSCH & LOMB INC.

37

60

Jennifer Daley, M.D. TENET HEALTHCARE

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

110 Catherine King KELLY SERVICES INC.


The most important thing about a promise is who’s making it. At New York Life, we offer a

Guaranteed retirement paycheck. A promise to last a

Lifetime backed with 160 years of financial strength, integrity and humanity. For a steady

Income for the rest of your life, trust The Company You Keep.

Learn more about Guaranteed Lifetime Income Annuities from New York Life. For information about our products and services, or to contact an agent call 1-866-NYL- 4-YOU or visit new yorklife.com/4income.

Guaranteed Lifetime Income refers to certain annuity contracts issued by New York Life Insurance and Annuity Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of New York Life Insurance Company. The guarantee is backed by the claims-paying ability of issuer. In some jurisdictions, depending on the availability of certain riders, the contract may be issued by New York Life Insurance Company. Š 2006 New York Life Insurance Company, 51 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10010


Women Worth Watching 112 Gale V. King NATIONWIDE

113 Madeleine Kleiner HILTON HOTELS CORPORATION

114 Susan M. LaChance UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE

116 Dijuana Lewis WELLPOINT

117 Brig. Gen. Anne F. Macdonald UNITED STATES ARMY

134 Sandra Phillips PFIZER INC.

136 Vickie Piner LEAR CORPORATION

137 Wendy Pinero STARBUCKS COFFEE

138 Melisa Quinoy MTV NETWORKS

139 Karen Quintos DELL INC.

140 Alison Quirk STATE STREET CORPORATION

118 Charmaine Mesina APPLIED MATERIALS

142 Brenda Reichelderfer ITT CORPORATION

119 Sarah L. Meyerrose FIRST HORIZON NATIONAL CORPORATION

120 Michelle Miller MEDTRONIC INC.

144 Christine "Chris" Reilly

NORTHROP GRUMMAN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

124 Ellen J. Moore CHUBB GROUP OF INSURANCE COMPANIES

125 Kathryn L. Nelson WHIRLPOOL CORPORATION

146 Frances Resheske

ECOLAB INC.

128 Katherine O'Brien NEW YORK LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

148 Rebecca R. Rhoads

VERIZON COMMUNICATIONS

CISCO SYSTEMS INC.

163 Geri P. Thomas BANK OF AMERICA

164 Janet B. Toronski DAIMLERCHRYSLER FINANCIAL SERVICES

166 Valarie A. Udeh WACHOVIA

168 Stephanie Valdez WASTE MANAGEMENT INC.

170 Michelle VanDyke FIFTH THIRD BANK – WESTERN MICHIGAN

172 Susan D. Waring STATE FARM

174 Linda M. Watt LONGS DRUG STORES CORPORATION

RAYTHEON

150 Chris Rother

175 Renee West MGM MIRAGE

CDW GOVERNMENT INC. (CDW-G)

151 Susan Seestrom LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL

152 June R. Shrewsbury

176 Terri West TEXAS INSTRUMENTS

177 Anne M. Wilms ROHM AND HAAS COMPANY

178 V. Cheryl Womack

LOCKHEED MARTIN

LEADING WOMEN

AERONAUTICS COMPANY

ENTREPRENEURS

154 Katherine Sierra THE WORLD BANK

130 Marilyn O'Connell

162 Sheila Talton

CONSOLIDATED EDISON

LABORATORY

126 Susan Nestegard

THE BOEING COMPANY

CIT GROUP INC.

COMPANY OF NEW YORK

122 Linda A. Mills

160 Bonnie Soodik

155 Irina Simmons

OF THE WORLD

179 Phyllis Worley OKLAHOMA NATURAL GAS COMPANY (ONEOK)

EMC CORPORATION

132 Kathy Paladino SYMBOL TECHNOLOGIES INC.

133 Poppie Parish KEYBANK

156 E. Follin Smith CONSTELLATION ENERGY

158 Darlene J.S. Solomon, Ph.D. AGILENT TECHNOLOGIES

8

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

180 Jennifer B. Wuamett FREESCALE SEMICONDUCTOR INC.

181 Cynthia Hardy Young ENCOMPASS FINANCIAL GROUP LLC (ALLSTATE)


diversity is our competitive advantage. We, at ITT, are committed to building a workforce that mirrors the world in which we do business. This will lead to improved creativity, innovation, decision-making, and customer service and is essential to achieving premier status. Our concepts of inclusion and diversity embrace differences in race, religion, gender, disability, nationality, age, sexual orientation, ethnic background and more. Our culture, work practices and programs will value and support the contribution of each individual that results from diverse work and life experiences. The ITT Management System, including our common Vision and Values, will allow us to leverage differences and generate innovation that results from a diverse and inclusive culture and sustain our success in the global marketplace.

The “ITT Engineered Blocks” symbol and “Engineered for life” are registered trademarks of ITT Industries. © 2006


New York Life Promotes Agency Department Executives NEW YORK — New York Life Insurance Company has announced that Elizabeth W. McCarthy was promoted to first vice president in ELIZABETH W. MCCARTHY the agency department. In addition, Marijo F. Murphy and Michael A. Yashnyk were promoted to vice presidents MARIJO F. MURPHY in the same department. Ms. McCarthy is now responsible for the company’s sales promotion and communicaMICHAEL A. YASHNYK tions division, which oversees the strategic communications planning that supports more than 10,000 licensed New York Life agents in 150 offices nationwide. Ms. McCarthy joined New York Life in 2003 as vice president of agency communications. Prior to joining New York Life, she was a first vice president at Morgan Stanley, where she served as the director of marketing communications for the individual investor group. Ms. McCarthy received an A.B. in Economics cum laude from Harvard College, where she was an editor of The Harvard Crimson, the university’s daily student newspaper. She currently resides in South Orange, N.J., with her husband, Brian O’Leary, and their three children. Ms. Murphy is now responsible for the development and implementation of field supervisory systems in the agency standards division. Ms. Murphy rejoined New York Life in 1996 from Whitman Breed Abbott & Morgan, where she worked for two years as an 10

associate attorney. She has worked as an associate legislative vice president in the office of governmental affairs, served as assistant general counsel and as a corporate vice president in the NYLIFE Securities’ standards division. Ms. Murphy earned a bachelor’s degree from SUNY at Albany and a juris doctorate from St. John’s University School of Law. She currently resides in Yorktown Heights, N.Y., with her husband, Patrick, and their three children. Mr. Yashnyk, as vice president in the agency department and chief operating officer of NYLIFE Securities and Eagle Strategies, is now responsible for overseeing various divisions, including financial management and reporting, administration, investment advisory services, financial planning, product development, marketing, communications and sponsored-marketing divisions. Mr. Yashnyk re-joined New York Life in 1995. He was named director in corporate audit in 1996 and was promoted to vice president in 1999 in the agency department. He assumed his current responsibilities as chief operating officer at NYLIFE Securities and Eagle Strategies at the end of 2004. Mr. Yashnyk earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Bowling Green State University in Bowling Green, Ohio. He resides in Farmingdale, N.Y., with his wife, Liz Yashnyk, and their three children. New York Life Insurance Company, a Fortune 100 company founded in 1845, is the largest mutual life insurance company in the United States and one of the largest life insurers in the world. Please visit New York Life’s Web site at www.newyorklife.com for more information.

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

Susan C. Caldwell Named Director at DaimlerChrysler Financial Services Americas LLC

Susan C. Caldwell was appointed director, Southwest Business Center, for Chrysler Financial in May 2006. Her previous position was regional dealer services manager in the Great Lakes Business Center. She reports to Pat Milantoni, vice president, Chrysler brands sales. In her current position, Ms. Caldwell is responsible for all financial services activities in the Chrysler Financial Southwest Business Center. Ms. Caldwell joined the company in March 1982 as a collection stenographer in Houston. She has a bachelor’s degree in management from Our Lady of the Lake University, Houston.

Aflac Names Chief Marketing Officer in Newly Created Position COLUMBUS, Ga. – Jeffrey M. Herbert joined Aflac in October in the newly created position of senior vice president, chief marketing officer. A 20-year marketing and branding veteran, Herbert is responsible for leading the U.S. operations strategic marketing efforts, which include national advertising, product development, market development, consumer research and sponsorships. Ron Kirkland will continue to be in charge of the day-to-day management of the sales force. Prior to joining Aflac, Herbert held executive positions at The Coca-Cola Company where he served as senior vice president of marketing, providing strategic direction for the company’s North American portfolio, and as vice president, marketing and innovation, where he assumed the leadership role for the company’s second largest business group. He has also served in executive marketing positions for the Campbell Soup Company, the Zyman Group, and Kraft General Foods. Herbert holds an MBA


She’s a woman worth watching.

Jennifer B. Wuamett Freescale is proud of Jennifer Wuamett’s achievements. She is responsible for all aspects of Freescale worldwide intellectual property legal operations, including patent procurement and portfolio management, intellectual property licensing and enforcement, intellectual property defensive matters, IP transactional matters, trademark legal matters and management of both internal and external legal counsel. Jennifer is making the world a smarter place and changing the future and demonstrates what leadership means at Freescale.

Jennifer B. Wuamett Vice President and Chief Intellectual Property Counsel Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.

For more go to freescale.com/careers

Freescale™ and the Freescale logo are trademarks of Freescale Semiconductor, Inc. All other product or service names are the property of their respective owners. Freescale is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. We welcome and encourage diversity in our workforce. © Freescale Semiconductor, Inc. 2006


from the University of Houston and a BBA from the University of Texas at Austin. “I am excited to join Aflac, a company with one of the most highly recognizable and innovative brands in recent history,” said Herbert. “With my new role comes the opportunity to work for one of the best companies within the insurance industry, having created a successful niche market with quality product offerings.” For more than 50 years, Aflac products have given policyholders the opportunity to direct cash where it is needed most— when a life-interrupting medical event causes financial challenges. Aflac is the number one provider of guaranteedrenewable insurance in the United States and the number one insurance company in terms of individual insurance policies in force in Japan. Aflac Incorporated is a Fortune 500 company listed on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol AFL. To find out more about Aflac, visit aflac.com.

Shirley Davis Named Diversity Director at SHRM The Society for Human Resource Management announced the appointment of Shirley Davis to the position of director of diversity. Davis was introduced at SHRM’s Workplace Diversity Conference held in Los Angeles, California, in October. There she expressed her excitement of her new role and outlined the exciting work that she will lead for SHRM. Ms. Davis will act as the SHRM staff “thought leader” on global diversity issues and will design and implement innovative diversity initiatives that both serve the HR professional and advance the HR profession. She will also serve as advisor to SHRM’s internal diversity advisory council and will play an active role in setting strategic direction for internal and external diversity programs for SHRM.

Ms. Davis also announced that SHRM has engaged the expertise of Dr. R. Roosevelt Thomas Jr. and the American Institute for Managing Diversity. Together they will launch a research study to identify opportunities and gaps in knowledge and strategy in the diversity industry. “As we move forward, we will engage the thought leadership of HR and diversity practitioners, and our members, chapters, and state councils around the world. We’ll also engage leaders from business, government, and the education communities,” she added. The study will allow HR professionals, diversity practitioners and other business leaders to better utilize the talents and skills of the nation’s diverse workforce. Ms. Davis holds a pre-law bachelor’s degree from the University of Maryland and a master’s in human resource management from Central Michigan University. She is pursuing a doctorate in business and organizational management. The Society for Human Resource Management is the world’s largest association devoted to human resource management. Representing more than 210,000 individual members, the Society’s mission is to serve the needs of HR professionals by providing the most essential and comprehensive resources available. Visit SHRM online at www.shrm.org.

KPMG’s Louis Miramontes Honored with 2006 Latino Business Leadership Award NEW YORK Louis P. Miramontes, managing partner for KPMG’s San Francisco office, was honored with a 2006 Latino Business Leadership Award, presented by the San Francisco Business Times, San Francisco Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, and Wells Fargo.

The Latino Business Leadership Awards highlight increasingly powerful achievements in corporate America, entrepreneurship, nonprofit/philanthropy, healthcare, and the public sector, according to the San Francisco Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. Timothy P. Flynn, chairman and chief executive officer of KPMG LLP, the U.S. audit, tax and advisory firm, said, “Louis provides tremendous leadership at KPMG with his clients and his colleagues. We support and are very proud of his efforts to increase Latino awareness of corporate opportunities.” Miramontes, 52, who has been active in the national Association of Latino Professionals in Finance and Accounting (ALPFA) and currently is in the process of being selected for its advisory board, was honored in the corporate category. He was cited for his leadership role at KPMG, for his efforts in increasing Latinos’ awareness of opportunities in the corporate world, and for his help in recruiting Latinos to KPMG. Miramontes credits his success to a dedicated work ethic and a supportive network of mentors at KPMG. “KPMG provided me with the opportunity to cultivate many excellent role models, sponsors and mentors and to develop my professional and leadership skills,” he said. “I feel very fortunate and I’d like other Latinos to become aware of the opportunities that are available to them.” As managing partner of KPMG’s San Francisco office, Miramontes’s responsibilities include oversight of the KPMG San Francisco office, client relationship management, attracting talent to the firm, and serving as audit partner on various client engagements. Miramontes has over 30 years of experience with KPMG, including 20 years as partner. He started his career in the firm’s Northern California practice in 1976. He earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration from California State University, East Bay.

PDJ 12

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006


Cathy Arnett, President, Utility Support Systems, Inc., Distribution Engineering Services; Vickley Raeford, President, Raeford Land Clearing, Inc., Grading and Right-of-Way Clearing; Rajana Savant, President, Mesa Associates, Inc., Engineering and Research Development; Elizabeth Gats, President, Stag Enterprises, Inc., Commercial and Industrial Supplies Distributor.

Y O U M I G H T B E S U R P R I S E D W H AT T H E Y C O N S I D E R W O M A N ’ S W O R K .

These businesswomen have prevailed in nontraditional fields because they met challenges head-on and took advantage of opportunities that came their way. Opportunities like becoming a vendor for Georgia Power, a subsidiary of Southern Company, the South’s premier energy company. Through our Supplier Mentor Program and other diversity initiatives, we have assisted qualified female and minority-owned companies acquire the experience, knowledge, and contacts to help grow their businesses. At Georgia Power, we believe that their success will contribute to the economic success of all the communities we serve. To learn more, visit us at southerncompany.com/suppliers/diversity.asp.


Informal Networks of Women of Color Different strategies have different effects. By Catalyst

As many in the

business commu-

working strategies used by African

difficulties that disadvantage them. These

nity are aware, the demographics of both

American women, Asian women, and

difficulties drive women of color to form

the talent pool and consumers are shift-

Latinas, and how those strategies affect

networks using different strategies.

ing. Because there are many more women

their rates of promotion and organiza-

and people of color in the labor pool than

tional commitment.

Some women of color blend in by seeking

in the past, it is critical for business

recruitment to attract the diversity of tal-

Challenges for Women of Color in Forming Informal Networks

ent that exists. Fostering a diverse and

Because corporate environments typically

inclusive environment helps companies

do not reflect the behavioral norms com-

increase productivity by tapping top tal-

mon to the cultural backgrounds of

ent, motivating employees to do their

women of color, these women may have

personal best, and maximizing the value

to go to great lengths to adjust to the cor-

of diverse teams regarding innovation,

porate environment and to network

creativity, and quality.

effectively. However, there are few

organizations to expand traditional

To this end, the business community

women or people of color in influential

needs to understand an important com-

positions at most business organizations.

ponent of its talent pool: women of color.

Therefore, women of color who want to

In Connections that Count: The Informal

make connections with others with

Networks of Women of Color in the United

whom they have little in common face

States, Catalyst investigates different net-

14

“Blending In” Strategy

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

a network that reflects the characteristics of those in power. In U.S. organizations, this typically means white and/or male colleagues. “Blending in” can also mean choosing to network with colleagues from the same company, rather than with people from outside of the organization. A motivation for choosing to go to colleagues for job advice is that those who know the organization will likely provide better advice on the organization than others.


“Sticking Together” Strategy Some women of color build networks composed mainly of people of their own race/ethnicity and/or gender. One motivation is the assumption that greater similarity between an informal network member and a woman of color will lead to better advice and support. Another motivation for networking with similar others may be the difficulty involved in forming relationships with dissimilar others, especially those from dominant groups such as whites. Depending on the work environment, it may be difficult to form relationships at all with dissimilar colleagues, which would then lead a woman of color to turn to similar colleagues or people from outside the work

Different Women Use Different Strategies to Different Effect

The different strategies had different effects on each group’s promotion rates and organizational commitment.

By surveying more than 1,700 women of color from 30 Fortune 1000 companies,

For Asian women:

Catalyst found that there seems to be a

• Having men in their networks was positively linked to organizational commitment.

continuum of usage of strategies from “blending in” to “sticking together” for Asian women, Latinas, and African American women. • Asian women had the highest number of whites and men in their networks. • Latinas had a high number of whites in their networks, but more than one-half of their networks were women. • African American women had the highest number of other AfricanAmericans in their networks, and also the highest number of women of their racial/ethnic group.

• Having whites and colleagues in their networks was positively linked to promotion rates.

For African American women: • Having colleagues in their networks was positively linked to organizational commitment. • Having women, particularly other African American women, in their networks was positively tied to promotion rates.

organization for advice. continued

Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2006

15


For Latinas:

networking programs, there are clear

• Having colleagues in their networks was positively linked to organizational commitment.

opportunities to:

• Nothing we measured about Latinas’ network characteristics was linked to their rates of promotion.

What Can Companies Do to Help Women of Color? Unless companies take proactive steps to create a more inclusive work environment, they risk losing and/or not developing potential top talent. Through the creation of formalized mentoring and

• Facilitate contacts between women of color and key influential leaders within a company. • Institute and/or expand formal networks. • Increase the recognition of competence and potential of women of color, thereby advancing a greater portion of talent to positions of leadership throughout the organization. • Eliminate cultural norms that give one group an advantage over others. This can be done through identification, by a diverse team, of critical norms in the dominant culture; leadership commit-

ment to change/lead change; intense communication; modeling by influential champions at every level; formal guidelines where appropriate; and enforcing accountability. • Increase understanding of differences and similarities through education and informal dialogues, one-on-one and in groups. Catalyst is the leading research and advisory organization working with businesses and the professions to build inclusive environments and expand opportunities for women at work. For more information about informal networks, and to download free copies of our research reports, visit www.catalyst.org. You may also sign up to receive our issue-specific newsletter, Perspective, and our monthly email updates at news@catalyst.org.

PDJ

Information is the currency of today’s global economy. Safeguarding it is more important and more challenging than ever. Individuals and organizations need a partner who can help them understand and manage all of the many risks to their information.

I CHOOSE <to ensure> INTEGRITY As the fourth largest software company in the world, Symantec provides solutions to help assure the security, availability, and integrity of information. We’re able to do this through the varied backgrounds, experiences and perspectives of the high achievers who choose to work here. In turn, we provide them with an environment where their uniqueness is valued and empowered. Discover the many reasons to choose a career at Symantec. Visit us and apply online at:

www.symantec.com

Symantec is proud to be an equal opportunity employer.

16

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006


I connect the dots differently. That brings value to the work I do. I have a passion for marketing, and I love what I do. At Hallmark, I have the opportunity to be a great marketer in an industry I believe in—one that enriches people’s lives. I work in a collaborative environment that celebrates the individual and values me as a whole person. Our multiple perspectives make our work stronger. It’s a rewarding opportunity to be part of a brand that helps people define and express the very best in themselves. aviva ajmera hebbar customer strategy and planning director

l i v e yo u r pa s s i o n . l o v e yo u r wo r k .



to lear n more a b out care ers in w r it ing/editor i al, desig n, il lu st rat i on, s culp t ing, photo g raphy or let ter i ng,

go to www.hallmar kcreat ive care ers.com © 2 006 h al l m ar k l i ce n s i n g , i n c .


Harris (part of BMO Financial Group) is driven by corporate values that foster a diverse workforce and an equitable, supportive workplace in which all employees are given the opportunity to meet their professional goals. At the very heart of Harrisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ongoing initiative towards a fully inclusive workplace is our unwavering commitment to create a high-performance culture for all employees. This determination energizes our company and allows us to reap the benefits of an engaged and diverse workforce. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s called leading by example. Please complete your online profile and enter your resume information at www.harrisbank.com while reviewing our career opportunities.


By Ilene H. Lang

Recently, I asked

the CEO of a Fortune 500 company what he thought was the most important factor enabling the United States to stay ahead in this increasingly competitive, global business environment. I expected a long and complicated response. Instead, he answered in just one word: Women. For this CEO, the answer is that simple. He’s right. In today’s competitive marketplace, women represent a vital talent pool—one that smart companies know they cannot ignore. Women in senior leadership positions bring a diversity of thought, perspective and expertise. They even bring enhanced financial performance, as

Catalyst’s recent study of Fortune 500 companies revealed. The study found that companies with the greatest representation of women in senior management financially outperformed those with the least, with a 35 percent greater return on equity and a 34 percent better total return to shareholders. Indeed, the answer is women! But most importantly, more women in senior leadership positions bring… more women in senior leadership positions! It is for this reason in particular that I’m delighted to celebrate Profiles in Diversity Journal’s 5th annual Women Worth Watching issue. The women in these pages are truly worth watching. Their stories are inspirational, their achievements extraordinary. As that CEO would attest, these women lead us into the 21st-century global marketplace. These women show us the way. They demonstrate what can be achieved when companies look to gender diversity not as a nice thing to have, but as a strategic business imperative. I am honored to introduce these Women Worth Watching, but I do look forward to the day when these women’s accomplishments are no less extraordinary, but far more commonplace. I fear that day is too far off. While the number of Fortune 500 CEOs has inched higher this year, we’re still building on a small base.

This year, Catalyst released its 10thanniversary Census of Women Corporate Officers and Top Earners in the Fortune 500. While the census revealed some progress in the percentage of women in top business leadership ranks, the rate of growth over the last decade has averaged 0.82 percentage points per year. At that rate, it could take 40 years for women to achieve parity with men in these top positions. The women profiled in these pages aren’t willing to wait. And neither should we. Let’s celebrate these women— their outstanding accomplishments and their proven expertise. Let’s thank them for all they’ve achieved individually and all they make possible collectively. As leaders, as success stories, as mentors to future generations of women in the workplace, these individuals are, indeed, women to watch!

Ilene H. Lang Ilene H. Lang is the president of Catalyst, the leading research and advisory organization working with businesses and the professions to build inclusive environments and expand opportunities for women at work. Visit the Catalyst Web site at www.catalyst.org

Profiles in Diversity Journal

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INNOVATIVE SOLUTIONS FROM DIVERSE PERSPECTIVES

Ecolab is the world’s leading provider of cleaning, food safety and health protection products and services. Working in more than 160 countries, we are proud to partner with many of the most well-respected companies in the world. At Ecolab, diversity is a core value that strengthens our culture and ensures that we grow an industry-leading team which continues to meet our customers’ needs for innovative solutions. We believe diversity of thought, cultures and backgrounds is good for our customers and good for our business.

To learn more, visit www.ecolab.com.

©2006 Ecolab Inc. All rights reserved.


PITNEY BOWES INC. SODEXHO BAUSCH & LOMB INC. UNITED STATES AIR FORCE OWENS CORNING SEAGATE TECHNOLOGY BD UNITED STATES NAVY NATIONAL CITY CORPORATION DARDEN RESTAURANTS / BAHAMA BREEZE AMERICAN RED CROSS HALLIBURTON KEYSPAN CORPORATION SYMANTEC CORPORATION FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION ADT SECURITY SERVICES INC. FORD MOTOR COMPANY ADECCO TENET HEALTHCARE CORPORATION VERIZON BUSINESS METLIFE BANK, N.A. HIGHMARK INC. INTERCONTINENTAL HOTELS GROUP U.S. GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION NEW CENTURY FINANCIAL CORPORATION VANGUARD HARRIS (A PART OF BMO FINANCIAL GROUP) KPMG LLP XEROX CORPORATION CVS/PHARMACY HOUSTON ASTROS BASEBALL CLUB BEST BUY VERIZON WIRELESS DELOITTE & TOUCHE LLP LUCENT TECHNOLOGIES DAIMLERCHRYSLER FINANCIAL SERVICES SPENCER STUART AFLAC EASTMAN KODAK SPRINT NEXTEL CORPORATION LOCKHEED MARTIN AERONAUTICS COMPANY NALCO COMPANY ROYAL DUTCH SHELL SALT RIVER PROJECT (SRP) THE DOW CHEMICAL COMPANY TEXTRON INC. PARKER HANNIFIN CORPORATION CON-WAY INC. AMERICAN AIRLINES SOUTHERN COMPANY BRINKER INTERNATIONAL

Leslie Abi-Karam Carol L. Alesso Carmen C. Allen Maj. Gen. Larita Aragon Sheree Bargabos Karen Berchtold-Hanlon Donna M. Boles R.Adm. Nancy Elizabeth Brown Terri Hamilton Brown Laurie Burns Carmen S. Canino Margaret E. Carriere Coleen Ceriello Janice Chaffin Cassandra M. Chandler Nancy E. Chisholm Susan Cischke Lois Cooper Jennifer Daley, M.D. Terri Dean Donnalee DeMaio Nanette DeTurk Roslyn Neal Dickerson Lurita Doan Patti M. Dodge Carol L. Dow Deirdre C. Drake Candace Duncan Patricia Elizondo Helena B. Foulkes Pam Gardner Julie Gilbert Katherine Greene Kim Griffin-Hunter Elizabeth Hackenson Tracy L. Hackman Sharon Hall Angie Hart Mary Jane Hellyar Chris A. Hill Stephanie C. Hill Deborah Hockman, Ph.D. Susan Hodge Barbara Hoffnagle Julie Fasone Holder Mary L. Howell Pamela Huggins J. Pat Jannausch Debra Hunter Johnson Marsha Johnson Rebeca Johnson

GEORGIA POWER KELLY SERVICES INC. NATIONWIDE HILTON HOTELS CORPORATION UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE WELLPOINT UNITED STATES ARMY APPLIED MATERIALS FIRST HORIZON NATIONAL CORPORATION MEDTRONIC INC. NORTHROP GRUMMAN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY CHUBB GROUP OF INSURANCE COMPANIES WHIRLPOOL CORPORATION ECOLAB INC. NEW YORK LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY VERIZON COMMUNICATIONS SYMBOL TECHNOLOGIES INC. KEYBANK PFIZER INC. LEAR CORPORATION STARBUCKS COFFEE MTV NETWORKS DELL INC. STATE STREET CORPORATION ITT CORPORATION CIT GROUP INC. CONSOLIDATED EDISON COMPANY OF NEW YORK RAYTHEON CDW GOVERNMENT INC.(CDW-G) LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY LOCKHEED MARTIN AERONAUTICS COMPANY THE WORLD BANK EMC CORPORATION CONSTELLATION ENERGY AGILENT TECHNOLOGIES THE BOEING COMPANY CISCO SYSTEMS INC. BANK OF AMERICA DAIMLERCHRYSLER FINANCIAL SERVICES WACHOVIA WASTE MANAGEMENT INC. FIFTH THIRD BANK – WESTERN MICHIGAN STATE FARM LONGS DRUG STORES CORPORATION MGM MIRAGE TEXAS INSTRUMENTS ROHM AND HAAS COMPANY LEADING WOMEN ENTREPRENEURS OF THE WORLD OKLAHOMA NATURAL GAS COMPANY (ONEOK) FREESCALE SEMICONDUCTOR INC. ENCOMPASS FINANCIAL GROUP LLC (ALLSTATE)

Profiles in Diversity Journal

Anne Kaiser Catherine King Gale V. King Madeleine Kleiner Susan M. LaChance Dijuana Lewis Brig. Gen. Anne F. Macdonald Charmaine Mesina Sarah L. Meyerrose Michelle Miller Linda A. Mills Ellen J. Moore Kathryn L. Nelson Susan Nestegard Katherine O'Brien Marilyn O'Connell Kathy Paladino Poppie Parish Sandra Phillips Vickie Piner Wendy Pinero Melisa Quinoy Karen Quintos Alison Quirk Brenda Reichelderfer Christine "Chris" Reilly Frances Resheske Rebecca R. Rhoads Chris Rother Susan Seestrom June R. Shrewsbury Katherine Sierra Irina Simmons E. Follin Smith Darlene J.S. Solomon, Ph.D. Bonnie Soodik Sheila Talton Geri P. Thomas Janet B. Toronski Valarie A. Udeh Stephanie Valdez Michelle VanDyke Susan D. Waring Linda M. Watt Renee West Terri West Anne M. Wilms V. Cheryl Womack Phyllis Worley Jennifer B. Wuamett Cynthia Hardy Young

November/December 2006

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Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006


Profiles in Diversity Journal

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Chris Rother CDW Government Inc. (CDW-G)

Sarah L. Meyerrose First Horizon National Corporation

Roslyn Neal Dickerson InterContinental Hotels Group

Frances Resheske Consolidated Edison Company of New York

Helena B. Foulkes CVS/pharmacy

Nancy E. Chisholm ADT Security Services Inc.

Cynthia Hardy Young Encompass Financial Group LLC (Allstate)

Vickie Piner Lear Corporation

Geri P. Thomas Bank of America

Susan Nestegard Ecolab Inc.


Susan Seestrom Los Alamos National Laboratory

Patti M. Dodge New Century Financial Corporation

Jennifer Daley, M.D. Tenet Healthcare Corporation Carol L. Dow Vanguard

Coleen Ceriello KeySpan Corporation

Barbara Hoffnagle Salt River Project (SRP)

Donnalee DeMaio MetLife Bank, N.A.

Valarie A. Udeh Wachovia

Alison Quirk State Street Corporation Sharon Hall Spencer Stuart

Sheree Bargabos Owens Corning


Tracy L. Hackman DaimlerChrysler Financial Services

Brenda Reichelderfer ITT Corporation

Jennifer B. Wuamett Freescale Semiconductor Inc.

Angie Hart Aflac

Carmen S. Canino American Red Cross

Irina Simmons EMC Corporation

Donna M. Boles BD

Stephanie C. Hill Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company

E. Follin Smith Constellation Energy Ellen J. Moore Chubb Group of Insurance Companies

Terri West Texas Instruments


Linda A. Mills Northrop Grumman Information Technology

Candace Duncan KPMG LLP Leslie Abi-Karam Pitney Bowes Inc.

Elizabeth Hackenson Lucent Technologies

Janice Chaffin Symantec Corporation

Katherine Sierra The World Bank

Karen BerchtoldHanlon Seagate Technology

Marilyn O'Connell Verizon Communications

Melisa Quinoy MTV Networks

Chris A. Hill Sprint Nextel Corporation


Janet B. Toronski DaimlerChrysler Financial Services

Darlene J.S. Solomon, Ph.D. Agilent Technologies

Charmaine Mesina Applied Materials

Michelle VanDyke Fifth Third Bank – Western Michigan

Pam Gardner Houston Astros Baseball Club

Deborah Hockman, Ph.D. Nalco Company

Mary L. Howell Textron Inc.

Christine “Chris” Reilly CIT Group Inc. Julie Gilbert Best Buy

J. Pat Jannausch Con-way Inc.


Terri Dean Verizon Business

Linda M. Watt Longs Drug Stores Corporation

Anne M. Wilms Rohm and Haas Company

V. Cheryl Womack Leading Women Entrepreneurs of the World

Phyllis Worley Oklahoma Natural Gas Company (ONEOK) Catherine King Kelly Services Inc.

Marsha Johnson Southern Company

Michelle Miller Medtronic Inc.

Kathy Paladino Symbol Technologies Inc.

Wendy Pinero Starbucks Coffee


I AM AN ENGINEER. I believe the latest technology is dated. I believe that 50% RH or less means it will be a good hair day. I believe the atmospheric absorption theory can explain why the sky is blue. I believe you shouldn’t wear white after Labor Day because it reflects the sun’s energy during cooler months. I believe if life gives you a lemon, make a citric battery out of it.

ENGINEERS

Whether you’re looking to go wireless with your industrial automation

DIFFERENTLY

using fuel cells, look to Parker—the leader in motion and control solutions.

SEE THE WORLD

system, design the next Joint Strike Fighter ®, or reinvent the automobile And see things in a whole new light. For more information, go to www.parker.com or call 1-800-C-Parker.


Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2006

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W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Leslie Abi-Karam

PITNEY BOWES INC.

“Respect for yourself and a reliance on your values will, almost without fail, lead you to the right conclusion.” Executive Vice President, Pitney Bowes; President, Pitney Bowes Document Messaging Technologies

TITLE:

A

s I continue learning from my mentors, I’m pleased to have an opportunity to share insight with rising stars. Of all the lessons I’ve learned during my career, there are four key principles I have tried to model and pass on to others. TRUST YOUR INSTINCTS AND GO WITH YOUR STRENGTHS.

Inside all of us is a certainty about who we are and what we want to do. I define success as discovering something you like to do, being good at it and finding a fit in an organization that appreciates your talent. It may take some searching, but if you trust your instincts to make the right career choices, you will have the strength to weather the challenges and succeed. TAKE RISKS AND NEVER COMPROMISE YOUR CORE MORAL VALUES.

Every time you step up and show courage, you will not necessarily be rewarded. You must, however, stand up for what you know to be right. Shake off criticism and maintain your optimism. Respect for yourself and a reliance on your values will, almost without fail, lead you to the right conclusion.

BS, Northeastern University; MBA, University of Bridgeport

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

Pitney Bowes engineer

READING: Blue Ocean Strategy, by W. Chan Kim and Renee Mauborgne PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

Leading teams to superior

results FAMILY:

One daughter, a high school senior

INTERESTS:

Travel, tennis, theater

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Cancer research

broaden your skill set. Aim for a job where you have 60 percent of the competency required and can contribute from the start. Be a quick study on the 40 percent of the job that’s new. Stick with it and be persistent—because persistence is a must for any successful career. DON’T GO IT ALONE.

KNOW WHEN TO STRETCH YOURSELF PROFESSIONALLY AND BE PERSISTENT.

Even if you are great at what you are doing and know your business inside and out, you won’t progress if you don’t COMPANY:

Pitney Bowes Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Stamford, CT

www.pb.com

Mailstream software, hardware, services and solutions for business BUSINESS:

RANKING:

No. 1

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

34

You need others around you, a competent team, not only to help get the job done, but also to keep on track. Develop strong networks, and rely on your staff. Take the extra time to coach and develop the people around you, and, over time, you will have created a strong, loyal team that will carry you through the challenging times and share your desire to succeed.

$5.5 billion

34,000

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

In selecting your own mentors, look for coaches who focus on driving success rather than merely preventing failure. Finally, be certain to do your part to mentor the next generation of leaders. It feels great to point out a star when you see one.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Carol L. Alesso

SODEXHO

“At all times rely on honesty and integrity.”

T

hroughout my 18-year career, I have held positions as dietician, general manager, district manager, operations vice president and senior vice president and have always strived to take on greater challenges and responsibility. I learned the value and rewards of entrepreneurship at the age of 11, when I set up a lemonade and hot dog stand at Pepperdine University. I made a tremendous amount of money for an 11-year-old and learned a valuable lesson in running a business. That has motivated me ever since, and I have continued to accept challenges that have afforded me the opportunity to use my entrepreneurial skills. There are four principles that I would offer to individuals as they set out to grow their careers. The first is to be 100 percent straight with everyone all the time. Whether you are dealing with a client or employee, it is important to tell it like it is, no matter what the situation. When the situation is particularly bad, it is important to acknowledge it and provide clear direction on what you as the leader are going to do to make it better. If a mistake is made, own up to it and apologize for it. At all times rely on honesty and integrity. The second principle is to be passionate about what you do. Passion will drive your success, just as the absence of it will lead to stress and failure. If you do not enjoy what you are doing, the best course of action is to find something else.

COMPANY:

Sodexho

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Gaithersburg, MD

www.SodexhoUSA.com

Sodexho is the leading provider of outsourced food and facilities management services in North America. Sodexho serves more than 6,000 corporations, schools, hospitals, health care facilities and college campuses. Additionally, Sodexho is the official food service provider for the U.S. Marine Corps.

BUSINESS:

RANKING:

No. 1 worldwide in food and management

services 2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

$6.3 billion

120,000

TITLE:

Senior Vice President, Operations

BA in business and nutrition, Pepperdine University; MA in nutrition, California State University, Long Beach

EDUCATION:

Selling hot dogs and lemonade at Pepperdine University at age 11; later, waitressing at a local restaurant

FIRST JOB:

Crucial Conversations, Tools for Talk When the Stakes are High, by Kerry Patterson, Joseph Grenny, Ron McMillan and Al Switzler READING:

Have passion about everything you do. Go above and beyond what is expected to take care of your people and the customers you serve.

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

FAMILY:

Husband, Brad; two boys, 18 and 11

INTERESTS:

Travel, skiing, snorkeling and other water

sports FAVORITE CHARITY:

AIDS Project LA and Children’s

Hospital LA

Once you have found your passion, you will be amazed at how successful you will be. The third principle is to develop those around you. I am proud to be able to say that the majority of district managers in my area were promoted from general manager positions, and the majority of general managers from supervisory roles. Nothing is more rewarding than seeing someone else’s career grow. And as you develop the members of your team, you are improving the overall competence and business performance of your operating area. Take advantage of opportunities to mentor others, as well as to be mentored. Finally, in everything you do, make a connection with the people around you. Take the time to connect with those in your immediate work group and others outside of it. Use formal and informal networking opportunities to build contacts with others.

PDJ Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2006

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W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Carmen C. Allen

BAUSCH & LOMB INC.

“Confidence and success arrive when you push through your fear of the unknown.” Vice President, Human Resources, Global Operations and Engineering

TITLE:

O

prah Winfrey often talks about “what she knows for sure.” As an African-American girl growing up in the inner city of St. Louis, I knew for sure that success meant moving outside of my comfort zone and building the confidence to tackle new challenges that seemed out of my reach. How did I do that? By listening and learning from everyone, starting with my very first jobs as a waitress and salesclerk and continuing today as a human resources vice president. Confidence and success arrive when you push through your fear of the unknown. It’s OK to be afraid, but you can’t grow if you don’t stretch and push yourself to take on new challenges. You must force yourself to learn, and, once you conquer the unknown, you move on to the next challenge. It’s a process for life. Define success on your terms. Following in the footsteps of others can lead you to a destination where you don’t want to be. As a child, one of my role models was my mother, who was a nurse. My older sister shared her passion for nursing, and she, too, became a nurse. I assumed that’s what I wanted. However, once my world opened up with books, school activities and meeting new people, I knew there was a world of other possibilities. I could be a nurse, or I could do something that excited me.

COMPANY:

Bausch & Lomb Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Rochester, NY

www.bausch.com

Bausch & Lomb eye health company is dedicated to perfecting vision and enhancing life for consumers around the world. Its products are available in more than 100 countries. BUSINESS:

EMPLOYEES:

EDUCATION: MBA, Simon School, University of Rochester; BS in business administration, University of Missouri, St. Louis

Waitress and salesclerk at Sears, both while

FIRST JOB:

in high school READING:

The Pursuit of Happyness, by Chris Gardner

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: Enjoy the journey. The anticipation of something great happening can be as rewarding as the event itself. Every moment counts. You never know when you are making a memory. FAMILY: John, husband of five years; four stepchildren; eight grandsons INTERESTS: Reading, singing, jazz and gospel music, spending time with family

I’m glad I didn’t let my fear of the unknown stand in the way of creating my own destiny. Design your path on your passion, whatever that might be. You have to feel it inside of you. It’s about intellectually understanding your motivation. Don’t feel too rushed to get to the next level. Enjoy your journey. Savor the learning. By focusing solely on the final goal you miss the valuable lessons along the way. There is nothing wrong with being ambitious, but without a “learning mindset” you can develop an unhealthy reliance on the next promotion to feel successful versus feeling good about your contributions and the value you add right now. As you grow, help your colleagues and friends. Share your gifts and the lessons you’ve learned. Professional success comes not only from individual achievement, but also from the good that rises out of working together for the good of your organization.

Approximately 13,700 worldwide

PDJ 36

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W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Maj. Gen. Larita

Aragon

U N I T E D S TAT E E S A I R F O R C E

“Lead by example.”

E

xpectations set your path in life. For those of us fortunate enough to have someone believe in us, those expectations are set a little sooner than for those who have to chisel out a set of expectations later. I have watched children and airmen achieve amazing things because someone expected them to. To create an environment of high expectations, you have to believe that you can achieve. Believing or expecting is adopting an attitude that enhances success. The basic element in that success is to love what you are doing and to believe that what you are doing is making a difference in the lives of others. Love it or leave it. Broaden your base of experience. Leaders at the top know something about many things. Learn something about every aspect of the business, the macro and the micro. Be able to relate to those who are tied to the core of what you do, and be able to help them relate to the big picture. Lead by example. People believe in leaders they can identify with and trust. Get to know people above you and below you. Seek out others who have opposing views and attempt to understand them. Be ready to support your ideas with fact and conviction. Find a mentor. Then be a mentor to practice and share what you have learned. No one is infallible, so listen and observe with a critical ear and eye. Be courageous in private and public venues. Gloating is not courage. Sometimes it is harder to be quiet than to charge forward. Get involved in your community and in your professional organizations to give back and grow. You grow as you experience; you experience as you attempt; you attempt as you dream. Dreaming is planning, giving forethought to a course of action. Planning is preparing through reading, training and observing those who are already successful and

COMPANY:

United States Air Force

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

Washington, DC

www.af.mil National defense

682,000 including personnel on active duty, U.S.A.F. reserve, Air National Guard and civilians

EMPLOYEES:

Major General; Air National Guard Assistant to the Commander of Air Education Training Command

TITLE:

BS in elementary education, Central State College; master’s in guidance counseling, Central State University; education administrative certification, University of Central Oklahoma

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB:

Waitress, fifth-grade teacher

Eye of the Beholder, by Merline Lovelace; and Brandon Fredrickson on mentoring

READING:

Realize the potential you have. Stretch beyond who you think you are and you will achieve more than you think you can. Socioeconomic status, birth order, race, religion or gender can be overcome by positive expectations and hard work.

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

FAMILY: My husband, J. Greg Aragon Jr., is my best friend, strongest ally and closest confidante. We have been married 25 years and share six children, eight beautiful grandchildren and two more expected this year.

I enjoy people! I read all sorts of books— fiction, nonfiction, self-help and biographies of people I admire. I subscribe to a diverse group of magazines on a variety of issues. I am a “duffer” golfer, but it’s worth it if I get to be outdoors. My greatest interests are my beautiful grandchildren who range in age from 21 years to 8 months.

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY: American Red Cross of Central Oklahoma, the only constitutionally directed agency responsible to support the military; Juliette Lowe Leadership Society for the Girl Scouts; STARBASE for children’s aviation and science education.

practicing behaviors that will make you successful. A sense of satisfaction comes as you grow stronger by helping, doing and dreaming. Women in the military or in any chosen career today can expect to work hard, plan, prepare and meet the same standards as their male counterparts and achieve the success that our mothers and grandmothers only dreamed of. Every success we achieve builds upon another. Success builds success.

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W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Sheree Bargabos

OWENS CORNING

“I have always been more concerned with the challenge than the title.”

I

truly believe that we are capable of much more than we give ourselves and others credit for. As businesswomen, we must find ways to stretch ourselves and step out of our comfort zone to realize our full potential. Throughout my career, I have been fortunate to have many mentors who challenged me and helped me realize my full potential. There are three key principles that I have learned from each of them that continue to steer my life and career today. First, choose to make a difference. Each day, I wake up and choose to make a difference in the lives of my employees by inspiring them to deliver results, have satisfying careers and support their families. Our employees, in turn, make a difference in the lives of our customers. Second, take advantage of the career opportunities that take you out of your comfort zone. I have always been more concerned with the challenge than the title. This has allowed me to gain cross-functional, cross-business and international experience and, as a result, become a well-rounded leader. Third, intentionally form partnerships with key members in the organization. I have found that you can’t just sit around and wait for the CEO to invite you to lunch; you

COMPANY:

Owens Corning

HEADQUARTERS:

Toledo, OH

WEBSITE:

www.owenscorning.com

BUSINESS:

Building materials & composite solutions

INDUSTRY RANKING: EMPLOYEES:

38

Industry leader

20,000

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

TITLE:

President, Roofing and Asphalt Business

MBA, Babson College, Wellesley, NJ; BA in science, McGill University in Montreal, Canada

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

Process engineer, Textile and Industrial

Group READING: Keeping up on what’s going on in the news and market keeps me busy enough. When I get a minute of free time, I love reading a good fiction book! PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

There is greatness in every

person. Golfing, connecting golf with charity, skiing and reading fiction

INTERESTS:

often need to make the first move and put time into building a quality partnership. Similarly, you must strike a balance between not taking things personally and being personally invested. On one hand, business is business; it’s about making money and getting the best return for investors. On the other hand, it’s all about the people. I believe that people are our company’s true competitive advantage, and being personally invested in our people has been key to my success.

PDJ


True strength has many faces.

At DaimlerChrysler Corporation, we work hard to design, engineer and build the best cars and trucks available. And itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all made possible through the dedicated work of every employee. Unity does, indeed, create beautiful things.

Chrysler, Jeep, and Dodge are registered trademarks of DaimlerChrysler Corporation.


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Karen Berchtold-Hanlon S E A G AT E T E C H N O L O G Y

“Speak up. Your opinion matters! ”

I

have been greatly influenced by diverse teachers and colleagues who have pushed me out of my comfort zone, forced me to see issues from different perspectives and demonstrated by personal example what it means to overcome obstacles and persevere. Their lessons shape my professional life to this day: Speak up. Your opinion matters! Early on in my career, I was hesitant to speak up if I disagreed or if I was less senior than others in the room. One of my male bosses noticed this and told me that the whole team is impacted by a person who holds back; and that age, gender or experience do not mean that your opinion is any better or worse than anyone else’s. LESSON TWO

Get out of your comfort zone! When I was asked to work overseas for Seagate, I turned down the opportunity twice because I wasn’t comfortable leaving home. I since have spent seven years living and working in Asia. I now realize that some of my best accomplishments and many of my closest friends came from getting out of my comfort zone. LESSON THREE

Make diversity a part of your core people-management processes, not a separate initiative. At Seagate, we have embedded diversity into our corporate goal-setting process, our performance evaluation process, our employee surveys, our hiring process, our learning and development process, our communication processes and our succession planning process. COMPANY:

Seagate Technology

HEADQUARTERS:

BUSINESS: RANKING:

Scotts Valley, CA

www.seagate.com Hard drive information storage industry Worldwide leader in the hard drive industry

EMPLOYEES:

40

Senior Vice President, Global Human Resources

Master’s in bilingual/bicultural education, Southern Methodist University

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

LESSON ONE

WEBSITE:

TITLE:

55,000

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

Corn detasseling in Iowa

READING: Punished by Rewards and Unconditional Parenting, by Alfie Kohn; Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience, by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi

At work: To cultivate an engaging work environment where teams of diverse people innovate, learn and improve the world around them. At home: To provide a loving, peaceful and interesting environment where my son can explore, enjoy and develop his own unique talents.

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

Traveling/cultures, hiking, biking, swimming, writing, playing with children.

INTERESTS:

LESSON FOUR

Global doesn’t mean “the way we do it in the United States.” After seeing our U.S. “employment at will” policy, a colleague in Thailand told me, “We will never have that policy or language in this country...we will not treat our employees that way.” It made me realize that some U.S. business policies can be counterproductive to creating a team environment. We now engage global teams of employees to work on Seagate policies and programs to ensure that the “U.S. way” does not necessarily end up being the “global way.” LESSON FIVE

Learn from all kinds of people! Those of us who are parents learn as much from our children as they learn from us. At work, I have learned some of my best lessons from colleagues who are not necessarily above me in the traditional organization structure. In today’s world, we need to learn from people of different ages, cultures, gender and skills to keep pace with the future.

PDJ


As the world leader in providing HR solutions, Adecco is committed to diversity. Our goal is to find individuals with the best strengths, ideas and talents in the communities we serve, and to establish and sustain a workforce which values the differences among people. That’s why we created the Adecco Diversity Dimensions Program, which consists of four components: Diversity Education: Adecco believes that ongoing communication and education to all of our constituents is critical to building awareness. Diversity Recruitment: Adecco taps into a wide range of resources to hire the most talented and capable staff available, regardless of gender, race, national origin, language, differing physical abilities, or other factors. Community Outreach: We have developed partnerships with diverse communities to foster mutual support and understanding and to enhance community service and relations. This increases our ability to network in minority communities and attract talented and motivated employees of different backgrounds. Communication: Adecco provides a summary of its diversity initiative on www.adeccousa.com.

Diversity Partnerships: • National Urban League • New York Times • National Business & Disability Council • National Council on Disability Diversity Programs: • Renaissance Program • Career Accelerator • Career Athlete Program Diversity Honors and Awards: • Corporate Diversity Innovation Award by the World Diversity Leadership Council - Prague 2006 • Three time Honoree on AARP’s list of Best Employers for Workers Over 50 • Employer of Choice by the National Business & Disability Council - 2005


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Donna M. Boles

BD

“I knew what I wanted to achieve and was willing to work for it.”

A

successful career for me is not about the amount of money you have made or the title you have achieved. It is when you can look back and say that you have earned a living in a role that you were passionate about, contributed value to and gleaned value from while having fun. The success of my career growth didn’t just happen. I had to work for it. I received my undergraduate degree working full time and attending school at night. I had the same challenge while earning my MBA. However, I knew what I wanted to achieve and was willing to work for it. All along, I was blessed with the coaching, support, insight and encouragement of family, friends and managers. A number of mentor-type relationships exposed me to many different things, culturally as well as professionally. It is because of mentoring that I transitioned from an administrative secretary role to a corporate officer leading the human resources function. It is important to have mentors and coaches in your midst. Don’t wait for one to approach you or to be assigned to you. Align yourself with others you have observed and want to learn from. You would be surprised by how willing people are to help. It is a win-win situation. There is learning at both ends of the relationship

COMPANY:

BD

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Franklin Lakes, NJ

www.bd.com

BD manufactures and sells a broad range of medical supplies, devices, laboratory equipment and diagnostic products.

BUSINESS:

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

42

$5.4 billion

25,000

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

TITLE:

Senior Vice President, Human Resources

BS, HR management/psychology, Upsala; MBA, Pace University, New York, NY EDUCATION:

Supermarket cashier

FIRST JOB: READING:

Team of Rivals, by Doris Kearns Goodwin

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: FAMILY:

Share your blessings.

Husband, Eric Reed, and a son

INTERESTS:

Golf, travel, reading

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Big Brothers Big Sisters

Call upon several mentors or coaches during your career. You could benefit from diversity of experience and knowledge that may not reside in one person. Reach out to those who are aligned with your interests, but don’t underestimate the learning you can reap from exposing yourself to others outside of your typical circle. It is equally important to reach behind as well as forward when it comes to mentoring. Mentoring can be conducted at any stage of life. College students can reach out to high schoolers. Early career professionals can reach out to college students, and so on. There is always someone who could benefit from your experiences. In all, I encourage you to have a full life. Prepare yourself to be the best, share your blessings and make sure you take time off to enjoy your life.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

R.Adm. Nancy

Elizabeth Brown

U N I T E D S TAT E S N AV Y

“Embrace failure and learn from it rather than fear it.”

T

rue leadership cannot be awarded, appointed or assigned; it comes only from having influence, and that can’t be mandated. It must be earned. General Norman Schwarzkopf, the U.S. commander of Operation Desert Storm in 1991, said, “Great leaders never tell people how to do their job. Great leaders tell people what to do and establish a framework within which it must be done. Then they let people on the front lines, who know best, figure out how to get it done.” People are at their happiest and most productive when they’re being challenged. Many of you will find that, as leaders, you’re pushing people to achieve what you know they’re capable of—even if they don’t believe it at the time. To this extent, you’ll be leading from behind. To some of you this may sound Machiavellian; to others it’s common sense. But the latest research does seem to indicate that it’s true. Nobody really appreciates or takes lasting pleasure from that which comes easily. Leadership is also forging a future direction. As leaders, we must establish strategic direction. We must harness change. What I suggest is simply laying out the vision and getting everyone moving in the right direction. You have to know where you are going. And if you are going to be effective, you have to lead by pulling, not pushing, your staff. As such, effective leaders must also have the capacity to motivate and empower others to share their sense of direction.

COMPANY:

United States Navy

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

Washington, DC

www.navy.mil National defense

351,689 on active duty; 131,739 in the reserves; 175,653 civilians EMPLOYEES:

Rear Admiral; Director of Command and Control Systems, North American Aerospace Defense Command Headquarters; Director of Architectures and Integration, U.S. Northern Command Headquarters, Peterson Air Force Base, CO; Commander, Navy Element and Chief Information Officer for both commands

TITLE:

BA, Stephens College; MS, Naval Postgraduate School; MS, Naval War College

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

Substitute teacher

U.S. Navy publications, The Great Influenza and Lead Like an Entrepreneur, and the latest Stephen Coonts novel READING:

To get my missions accomplished, I have to take care of the people who are doing the work.

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

FAMILY:

Husband, three stepsons, two grandchildren

INTERESTS:

Shopping, golf, running, hiking, college football

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Navy Marine Corps Relief and

the USO

Leadership inspires others to do great things, and you inspire it by your own willingness to work hard. Leaders can’t ask anyone to do anything that they are not willing to do themselves. Integrity is a critical component of leadership. If people can see it, they will get it. I really think that people can peer into the heart, and if they don’t see integrity, they are not going to follow. And, as you know, without followers there can be no leadership. My advice to you is never stop anticipating, welcoming and initiating new challenges. Dare to think great things. Dare to take chances. Embrace failure and learn from it rather than fear it. It is the hallmark of effective leadership. Dare to be great. A commitment to lifelong learning will give you the ability to accept, develop and engage fully in those opportunities.

PDJ

Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2006

43


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Terri Hamilton Brown

N AT I O N A L C I T Y C O R P O R AT I O N

“Remember that people will want to help you achieve your goals. It is your job to surround yourself with these people and let them help you succeed.”

M

y experience with mentoring is somewhat different, in that I have not had an “official” mentor. To some degree, I am not disappointed to have missed this experience, if only because it has allowed me to develop an extended network of professional and personal advisors—a model adapted from my experience in the public sector. For a time, I worked with former Cleveland Mayor Michael White, and I learned much from my City Hall tenure. The tradition of the mayor’s “kitchen cabinet,”— a group of unofficial advisers—struck a chord with me. The mayor’s kitchen cabinet was populated with people without personal and professional agendas. They included industry leaders, business people, spiritual guides, educators and friends whom the mayor trusted would “tell it like it is.” When I left the Mayor’s office to run a public agency, I adopted this idea of a kitchen cabinet, though I didn’t know I was doing it at the time. Before I even stepped into my new role, I called upon Jerry Sue Thornton, PhD, president of Cuyahoga Community College, and asked her, as a successful leader of a public entity, what I needed to know, keep my eye on, and champion in my new role. Jerry Sue was open and honest with me, immediately impacting my eventual success. My kitchen cabinet has evolved with my career. Members today—all informal but all vitally important—include people of different ages and experience both inside and outside the company who give advice, share experiences and offer direction as my career and positions of responsibility change.

National City Corporation HEADQUARTERS: Cleveland, OH WEBSITE: www.NationalCity.com BUSINESS: National City is one of the nation’s largest financial holding companies. The company operates through an extensive banking network primarily in Ohio, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri and Pennsylvania, and also serves customers in selected markets nationally. INDUSTRY RANKING: Eighth largest bank in terms of assets EMPLOYEES: 33,000 COMPANY:

44

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

TITLE:

Senior Vice President, Director of Corporate Diversity

Bachelor’s degree in economics from the University of Chicago; master’s degree in city planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB:

Cashier at Roger’s Super Value grocery store

Snake Walkers, an award winning debut novel by J. Everett Prewitt—a native Clevelander!

READING:

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: “Find the good and praise it”— is a quote by Alex Haley that is etched on a plaque in my office. It reminds me every day to value the people around me who are making a difference, and to acknowledge and thank them for their efforts. FAMILY: Husband, Darnell Brown; two children and two dogs INTERESTS: I think of my career and avocation as community building. I am very involved in community development activities and volunteer on numerous civic and social service organizations. Education, economic development, and women’s health issues are most important to me. FAVORITE CHARITY: The

First Tee of Cleveland, a nonprofit dedicated to teaching life skills to youth using the game of golf as a tool.

Today, when others seek my advice on matters such as career development, I share the story of my kitchen cabinet and encourage others to build their own group of trusted advisors. If you would like to do the same, let me offer this advice. Include in your cabinet: • A leader in your field or industry; a person with great knowledge of the subject matter • Another professional much like yourself, reflecting your age, family dynamic, and value set, to discuss the ever-growing importance of managing work-life priorities • Someone of the opposite gender, to offer a unique perspective on issues and ideas • And someone younger, to offer fresh views on landscapes to which you’ve grown accustomed Finally, remember that people will want to help you achieve your goals. It is your job to surround yourself with these people and let them help you succeed.

PDJ


mgmmir a g ed iv er sity.com N e v a d a : B e l l a g i o • M G M G r a n d • M a n d a l a y B a y • T h e M i r a g e • Tr e a s u r e I s l a n d • M o n t e C a r l o • N e w Yo r k - N e w Yo r k • L u x o r • E x c a l i b u r • C i r c u s C i r c u s Railroad Pass • Primm Valley Resorts • Silver Legacy • Circus Circus Reno • Colorado Belle • Edgewater • Gold Strike • Nevada Landing O u t s i d e N e v a d a : B e a u R i v a g e • G o l d S t r i k e - Tu n i c a • G r a n d V i c t o r i a • M G M G r a n d D e t r o i t


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Laurie Burns

D A R D E N R E S TA U R A N T S / B A H A M A B R E E Z E

“Step outside your comfort zone. Try something you’ve never done before.”

I

believe that personal success and happiness start with having a clear sense of your inner values—an understanding of who you are as a person, what you stand for and the values you’ll never compromise. For example, one of my bedrock personal values is integrity—being honest, open and candid; always doing what you say you’ll do; and doing the right thing. My advice is to join a company that shares your values. If your company and co-workers don’t operate with the same basic set of core values that you do, you’ll never be happy, and chances are the relationship will be short-lived. Here are a few other words of advice I would offer:

TITLE:

President, Bahama Breeze

EDUCATION:

BS in finance and MBA, University of

Florida FIRST JOB:

Picked up golf balls at a driving range

Soar With Your Strengths, by Donald Clifton; Resonant Leadership, by Richard Boyatzis and Annie McKee; City of Falling Angels, by John Berendt READING:

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

Live and lead with integrity,

humility and credibility. • Make your career aspirations known to your organization’s leadership and periodically ask how you’re doing on the path to get there. • Know what you don’t know, then do what’s necessary to gain that knowledge, or seek the counsel of those who already have it. • Never be afraid to ask questions or for help when you need it. There’s a far greater risk of failing at a task or project when you don’t have all the knowledge or resources you need. • Seek out periodic feedback on your leadership style; then be open to any suggestions, and be willing to work on your opportunities. • Look for and take advantage of opportunities to broaden Darden Restaurants / Bahama Breeze HEADQUARTERS: Orlando, FL WEBSITE: www.darden.com / www.bahamabreeze.com BUSINESS: Casual dining restaurant RANKING: Largest publicly traded casual dining restaurant company in the world, based on market share and revenues from company-owned restaurants FY 2006 REVENUE: $5.72 billion, Darden; $166.3 million, Bahama Breeze EMPLOYEES: 157,000 at Darden; 4,000 at Bahama Breeze COMPANY:

46

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

FAMILY:

Life partner

INTERESTS:

Travel, biking, food and wine

United Way, United Arts (Central Florida), University of Florida FAVORITE CHARITY:

your career experiences, and be bold in your choices. Step outside your comfort zone. Try something you’ve never done before. • When you have the opportunity to lead a team, create and clearly communicate a compelling vision of the team’s purpose and goals; then focus the team on the right priorities to achieve the vision. • When building a team, first consider the skills and expertise you’ll need. The most successful teams are made up of people with different, yet complementary, skills, ensuring diversity of thought. Recognize and capitalize on the unique role each team member can play beyond his or her functional expertise. Other types of diversity also are important when forming a team that will give you a wide range of perspectives. Show you appreciate people for who they are and what they bring to the table. I’m proud to work for a company that promotes diversity in all its forms, internally and externally. When you feel appreciated for who you are, you feel at home and are more likely to be fully engaged.

PDJ


Innovation has many faces. At Lockheed Martin, that includes everyone. Whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s breakthrough technology for fighter jets, spacecraft that explore the cosmos, or information systems that keep government running smoothly, Lockheed Martin has important work to do. We need the sharpest minds available. And when we find them, we welcome them.

www.lockheedmartin.com


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Carmen S. Canino

AMERICAN RED CROSS

“Every day presents the opportunity to learn something new.”

A

s diverse professional women, we have a fundamental responsibility to identify and provide opportunities for young professionals. These young professionals must have demonstrated the ability and the commitment to become excellent executives. It is a privilege and a responsibility to share career paths, experiences, successes and disappointments that came from accepting opportunities and challenges that made us better managers and stronger people. It is important to know what you do not know. This is a sign of self-confidence and an inquisitive mind. Every day presents the opportunity to learn something new. Strive for excellence. Details make the difference.

Chief Executive Officer, American Red Cross, Puerto Rico Chapter

TITLE:

Master’s in management of human services, Heller School, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: Manager, Puerto Rico Pediatric Cardiovascular Program, University of Puerto Rico Medical School

The World is Flat, by Thomas L. Friedman; The End of Poverty, by Jeffrey Sacks READING:

I believe in trying new things and having the courage and commitment to push forward and make them happen.

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: COMPANY:

American Red Cross

HEADQUARTERS:

Washington, DC

www.redcross.org and www.cruzrojaamericana.org

WEBSITES:

FAMILY:

Three children, two grandchildren

INERESTS:

Cooking, reading and motorcycle riding

FAVORITE CHARITY:

The Red Cross provides disaster relief at home and around the world through a global network of more than 180 national societies. An average of 91 cents of every dollar spent by the Red Cross is invested in humanitarian services and programs. The Red Cross helps thousands of U.S. service members on military duty stay connected to their families. The American Red Cross, which has more than 800 locally supported chapters, is the largest supplier of blood and blood products in the United States.

American Red Cross

BUSINESS:

2005 DISASTERS: VOLUNTEERS:

Nearly 1 million

BLOOD DONORS: EMPLOYEES:

48

72,883—most of them fires

Almost 4 million

35,000

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

Being committed, dependable and responsible will develop your credibility as a professional, an indispensable element for success. Keep an open mind. Be flexible. Setting goals and objectives is crucial, but being willing to listen and adapt to the environment is imperative. There is more than one way to achieve the goals. Set priorities in life, and be willing to sacrifice. Be positive. Always look for the brighter side of things. Be able to laugh at yourself and keep your sense of humor. Do not abuse power; it is a privilege. Become a good communicator; it is the key to success.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Margaret E. Carriere

HALLIBURTON

“Saying ‘yes’ has always opened a lot more doors for me than saying ‘no.’ ”

I

wouldn’t say that I know the secret to success, but I do know that saying “yes” has always opened a lot more doors for me than saying “no.” Growing up in the small woodworking town of Jasper, Ind., I dreamed of working abroad some day. I was interested in languages and studied French and Latin in high school. At 17, I participated in a summer study program that took me to Switzerland and France. Because of my language background, I enrolled in Georgetown’s School of Language and Linguistics in Washington, D.C. Three years after receiving my degree, and with an 18-month-old daughter, I started law school at Southern Methodist University in Dallas. In 1979, armed with a language degree and a juris doctorate, I answered a newspaper ad for an international lawyer position with a company called Otis Engineering, a Halliburton subsidiary, in Carrollton, Texas. I was hired and became Otis’ first female attorney. My long-held dreams of traveling were answered overnight as I was responsible for the Asia Pacific region. In 1986, I was asked to move to London to handle legal work for the Europe/Africa region. In 1994, I did a second stint in London, where for five years I was challenged to merge and

COMPANY: WEBSITE:

Halliburton

www.halliburton.com

HEADQUARTERS: BUSINESS:

Houston, TX

Petroleum and energy

RANKING: Halliburton, founded in 1919, is one of the largest providers of products and services to the petroleum and energy industries. The company serves its customers with a broad range of products and services through its Energy Services Group and KBR. 2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

$20.9 billion

100,000

TITLE:

Senior Vice President and Corporate Secretary

EDUCATION: BBS in language, Georgetown University; JD, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX FIRST JOB: Dorm resident assistant my junior year at Georgetown for a floor of freshman nurses READING: Moving among six or so books on my bedside table

Be positive, look professional and always try to hire people smarter than yourself.

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

Husband, Jim, a semi-retired lawyer; blended family of four children and 10 grandsons.

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

Traveling; reading histories, mysteries and

biographies FAVORITE CHARITY:

National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation

lead the combined Brown & Root and Halliburton law departments of 20-plus lawyers in London; Aberdeen, Scotland; and Stavanger, Norway. Although my career has been spent in an industry traditionally dominated by men, I’ve found it relatively easy to transition between the jobs I’ve held. Today, as senior vice president and corporate secretary, I am the senior woman in the company. I take great pride in knowing that, in 1979, as the first woman lawyer at Otis, I was a true groundbreaker. I’m not one to mull and agonize over things. I tend to make a decision and then make the transitional journey as quickly as possible. I deal with change quite well. My advice to all women would be to always nurture a positive outlook, look at an opportunity from the big point of view and don’t be afraid to take a chance. Even when the president and CEO asks you to join the quarterly golf scramble, say “yes.” Then go knock the cobwebs off your clubs and make the best of it!

PDJ

Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2006

49


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Coleen Ceriello

K E Y S PA N C O R P O R AT I O N

“Be passionate and be present.”

W

e all approach our lives and our work differently. And in today’s diverse workplace, we explore different avenues for pursuing our goals. I’d like to share five guiding principles that have helped me pave a path to success and fulfillment in my own career and my life. I hope they help you do the same.

FIRST: Be passionate and be present. I’m passionate about all I do, and I’m very focused on the task at hand. When I’m meeting with you, I’m not answering a ringing telephone or checking my Blackberry. I’m meeting with you—you have my full attention and my time.

Listen and learn. One of the most important things I continue to learn as I move forward in my career is that I don’t know it all. I will always learn from people around me—peers and individuals who report to me. I listen to them, and, in my leadership role, I provide my employees with the tools, access and visibility they need to bring their unique talents and skills to bear.

SECOND:

COMPANY:

TITLE:

Senior Vice President, Shared Services

BA in economics and business; MBA in corporate finance

EDUCATION:

Management trainee, Brooklyn Union

FIRST JOB:

Gas Co. READING:

The World is Flat, by Thomas L. Friedman

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: Everyone has a talent. Assemble your teams to leverage the talents of others, and enjoy what you do. Passion shows. FAMILY:

Husband, Michael; one daughter, 16; and one

son, 12 INTERESTS:

Running, tennis, gardening and enjoying

my family FAVORITE CHARITY: HeartShare Human Services, Salvation Army and Cabrini Mission Foundation

KeySpan Corporation Take the risks! Too many of us with children and other home responsibilities are afraid to tip our work-life balance. We underestimate our own strengths. Take a careful look at the time and effort you put into your career now—you already may be handling a level of responsibility similar to one you’d take on in a new role. The measured risks I’ve taken throughout my career have rewarded me, without compromising my family’s lifestyle.

THIRD:

HEADQUARTERS:

Brooklyn: Brooklyn, NY;

Long Island: Hicksville, NY; New England: Waltham, MA WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

www.keyspanenergy.com Natural gas distributor and electric generator

offering energy-related products, services, and solutions to homes and businesses. Strategic investments in pipeline transportation, distribution, storage and production. RANKING:

Member of the Standard & Poor's 500

FOURTH: Be a role model. At home and in the office, I try to model behaviors I would encourage others to follow—by being passionate and caring about the needs of those around me; also by caring about, and caring for, myself.

FIFTH: Don’t sweat the small stuff. As women, we think we need to Index; fifth-largest distributor of natural gas in the United do it all perfectly, all the time. We don’t. We need help from others States; largest distributor of natural gas in the Northeast to build on our strengths and fill our weaknesses. We need to set the priorities that count and let less important things slide. 2005 REVENUE: $7.7 billion We also need to reward ourselves for our hard work by pursuing outside interests that fulfill us physically and spiritually. We may EMPLOYEES: More than 9,400 not be able to have it all, but we can come close. And we can certainly enjoy all we have! PDJ

50

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Janice Chaffin

S Y M A N T E C C O R P O R AT I O N

“Success comes from hard work, a series of good choices and a little bit of luck.”

P

eople sometimes ask what it takes to become a vice president or a general manager, as if there is a formula. The truth is there is no formula. Don’t search for the perfect path, just get on one and do your best. Beyond obtaining the education required to start your career, there is no one road to success. Career paths are not always predictable. Success comes from hard work, a series of good choices and a little bit of luck. Here are a few things I’ve learned along the way that have helped me get where I wanted to go. YOUR JOB IS NOT YOUR IDENTITY

What you do for a living cannot be the only way you define yourself. None of us is one-dimensional. Nurture relationships and explore activities with family, friends and community, and make that a part of your identity. Your engagement in activities outside your job will make you a more effective contributor in your job.

Executive Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer

TITLE:

BA, University of California, San Diego; MBA, University of California, Los Angeles

EDUCATION:

Janitor at a doctor’s office

FIRST JOB: READING:

Mayflower, by Nathaniel Philbrick

To live life with no regrets. Before I make any decision, whether it’s related to career, family or how I treat people, I ask myself: “How would I feel about this a year from now? Would I regret taking or not taking this opportunity?” I never want to look back and say, “I wish I would have done things differently.”

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

FAMILY:

Married; two daughters, 14 and 12

INTERESTS:

Windsurfing, skiing, family vacations

FAVORITE CHARITY:

National Charity League

BE COMFORTABLE WITH CHANGE

Like it or not, change is a way of life. Learn to expect it and embrace it. Innovation can be the key to success. The more at ease you are with change, the less anxiety and fear

will paralyze you from taking chances that could lead to wonderful opportunities. ALWAYS FIND ONE THING ABOUT YOURSELF TO DEVELOP AND GROW

COMPANY:

Symantec Corporation

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

Cupertino, CA

www.symantec.com Software

Fortune Blue Ribbon Company for achieving No. 65 on Fastest Growing Companies List, September 2005; No. 792 on the 2005 Fortune 1000 list, April 2005; Fortune’s 2005 America's Most Admired Companies list at No. 2 on the Computer Software list, March 2005; No. 43 on Fortune’s 2005 list of 100 Best Companies to Work for in America, January 2005 RANKING:

FY06 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

$5 billion

Whether you’re 8 or 80, there are new things to learn. Set goals for constant progression. Any goal, whether it’s personal or career related, will keep you aware of your potential and increase your capabilities. SERVE OTHERS

Be in tune with the needs of those around you and respond to them. Good leaders look for ways of improving the world around them. Reach out to others with your own unique set of talents, personality and compassion. Mentor those who are rising behind you. There is no better way to contribute to society. STRIVE FOR EXCELLENCE

No matter what, do your best at school, career and in your areas of interest. Set your goals and work hard to achieve them. Remember that as a leader you are setting the tone for the organization.

15,500 worldwide

PDJ Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2006

51


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Cassandra M. Chandler

F E D E R A L B U R E A U O F I N V E S T I G AT I O N

“Develop a reputation for high standards. Expect and pursue excellence.”

E

very accomplishment begins with a dream built on faith and courage. But first we must be dreamers. What do you want to accomplish? What do you want to change? What do you want for yourself? Our ability to achieve is limited only by our imagination. One of my mentors, Harriet Tubman, was a dreamer. She was born a slave but became a leader in the Underground Railroad. Her life inspires me. She was a God-fearing woman who spoke softly. She encountered numerous obstacles in her quest for freedom, yet she resolutely pursued her dream. I have incorporated Harriet’s life style into 10 steps to success.

Expect and pursue excellence. Harriet led 300 slaves to freedom because of the attention she paid to detail. 10. DEVELOP A REPUTATION FOR HIGH STANDARDS.

Harriet displayed a quiet strength. Her authority was evident in the manner in which she led.

9. SPEAK WITH QUIET DIGNITY.

8. FIGHT THE RIGHT FIGHT. Evaluate your adversary and know your options. Don’t fight everything. It’s not worth the pain nor the negative reputation that will follow you.

Learn what is up and coming. Develop the skills needed to address it, and become the person everyone can depend on.

7. DEVELOP EXPERTISE.

6. MENTOR, NETWORK, MENTOR.

COMPANY:

Federal Bureau of Investigation

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

Seek advice from ethical

Washington, DC

www.FBI.gov Law enforcement

EMPLOYEES: 30,500 in 56 major cities throughout the United States and in more than 50 key cities worldwide, providing coverage for more than 200 countries, territories and islands.

TITLE:

Special Agent in Charge

EDUCATION:

Hostess/cashier

FIRST JOB: READING:

BA in journalism and English; JD

The Heart of Change, by John P. Kotter

The power of one: It just takes one person taking action to change the status quo.

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

Husband, Carl, a retired FBI Special Agent and former Marine; and one son FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

Gardening and landscape design

FAVORITE CHARITY:

The American Red Cross

leaders and stay in touch. As you succeed, mentor others. They will become your eyes and ears when you are not present and your voice when you cannot defend yourself. Once free, Harriet risked her life returning to the South to bring others to freedom. 5. THINK BEFORE YOU SPEAK ABOUT ANYTHING TO ANYONE. 4. CHALLENGE THE STATUS QUO. If something needs to be changed, change it. Let the obstacles, difficulties and frustration strengthen you.

Harriet pursued her dream. Have a vision and develop a strategy to market and pursue your dream. Without a strategy others will use your skills, take your ideas and market them as their own. 3. BE A VISIONARY AND BOLD STRATEGIST.

Have a life outside the job by prioritizing time for yourself and your family. Their support will keep you strong during difficult times.

2. PRIORITIZE FAMILY.

1. SEEK GOD FIRST. Let prayer become a part of your daily ritual. Harriet prayed before every journey. Through faith, you will gain strength, knowing that regardless of what occurs, God will see you through.

PDJ

52

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006


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W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Nancy E. Chisholm

ADT SECURITY SERVICES INC.

“A true leader reaches out to help others achieve success.”

A

s a woman in business, I’ve looked at other leaders I admire and what has really resonated with me is their strong sense of values. Having a good, sound set of values and a strong notion of what’s important to you are crucial in business and in life. Take stock of things that matter most to you, such as integrity, children, family and community; then everything flows from there. With this foundation, you are more likely to have the focus and ability to look outside of yourself and be able to build strong teams of people. BE A CATALYST FOR SUCCESS. A true leader reaches out to help others achieve success. Mentoring relationships enrich both ways. I learn a lot about myself when I’m reaching out and helping others see the possibilities. VALUE DIVERSITY. Now more than ever the stakes are higher for women. In today’s business climate, it is crucial for businesses to attract and retain the best people and to develop a diverse infrastructure to stay competitive. Make the most of your unique talents and attributes, and value the diversity of those around you. SET GOALS. It seems so simple, even cliché, but you’ve got to develop a real plan to get where you want to be. If you

COMPANY:

www.adt.com

ADT is the largest single provider of electronic security services to more than six million commercial, government and residential customers throughout the United States and North America. ADT’s total security solutions include intrusion, fire protection, closed circuit television, access control, critical condition monitoring, electronic article surveillance and integrated systems. World leader in electronic security

2005 REVENUE:

$6.5 billion

7.3 million (5.3 million residential, 2 million commercial)

CUSTOMERS:

SUPPORT VEHICLES IN THE FIELD:

More than 13,500

More than 13,500, including sales, service and response teams

SUPPORT TEAMS IN THE FIELD: EMPLOYEES:

54

Bachelor’s in business administration, Western State College, CO

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: Clerk in a large law firm—which helped me realize I really didn’t want to be a lawyer!

Freakonomics, by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner

READING:

You can accomplish anything if you are willing to put forth the effort and help others achieve their success.

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

FAMILY:

Husband, Andy, and a son, 10

INTERESTS:

Skiing, golf, spending time with family and

friends FAVORITE CHARITY: Women’s shelters; Dumb Friend’s Leagues, a private, nonprofit animal welfare organization in Denver

Boca Raton, FL

BUSINESS:

RANKING:

Vice President, Western Region

ADT Security Services Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

TITLE:

21,000 worldwide

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

don’t, things might slip through your fingers and you’re more apt to lose your focus. NETWORK. Women who aspire to building a successful career need to build supportive networks around them. You have to seek counsel from those you admire and respect, whether they are male or female, in the same type of work or wildly different. EVERYBODY MAKES MISTAKES. Learn from them and move on. I’ve found that when women make mistakes, they can be particularly hard on themselves. Mistakes are usually not as big as you think. EMBRACE CHANGE. No one knows what all the possibilities are for your career, so it’s really important to stay flexible and to embrace new opportunities. There are many ways to get from point A to point B. I’ve learned from personal experience that a change of direction can be a great career booster. Don’t be afraid of a little risk. SET YOURSELF UP FOR SUCCESS. Surround yourself with people who want to see you succeed. The right mentorship and leadership will challenge you to excel. This, combined with your hard work, creates endless possibilities.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Susan Cischke

F O R D M O T O R C O M PA N Y

“I encourage young professionals to be open to taking unexpected twists and turns along the way.”

T

he best advice I’ve ever been given about life or business came from my parents. They were people of strong faith who believed that each of us is on this earth for a reason— and that we can’t always predict what we are destined to become. In my mentoring relationships with promising women and men at Ford, I’ve often offered the same advice, but with a different twist. I don’t believe that anyone should set a clear career path and expect to stick with it for three or four decades. Instead, I encourage young professionals to be open to taking unexpected twists and turns along the way. I challenge them to be brave enough to accept the advice of those who may see something in them that they themselves may not recognize. That’s exactly what happened to me. It was a mentor who first suggested that I tackle my first leadership position, less than 10 years into my job at Chrysler—even as I vehemently argued I was not ready. It was a mentor who recommended me for a high-profile job leading the Chrysler proving grounds, which really was like operating a small city. And it was a mentor who encouraged me to move into the type of environmental and regulatory work that led to my global responsibilities at Ford. As an engineer who was trained to focus on the technical aspects of the business, each of these assignments was daunting at first! Each challenged my skills and confidence and demanded that I reframe my view of myself and my career.

COMPANY:

Ford Motor Company

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Dearborn, MI

www.ford.com

Ford Motor Company manufactures and distributes automobiles in 200 markets across six continents. The company’s core and affiliated automotive brands include Aston Martin, Ford, Jaguar, Land Rover, Lincoln, Mazda, Mercury and Volvo. Its automotiverelated services include Ford Motor Credit Company.

BUSINESS:

RANKING: A global automotive industry leader with 108 plants worldwide EMPLOYEES:

Approximately 300,000

Vice President, Environmental and Safety Engineering

TITLE:

Bachelor's in engineering, Oakland University; master's in mechanical engineering and management, University of Michigan-Dearborn; Tuck Executive Program at Dartmouth College

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB:

Engineer with the Chrysler Institute

The Kite Runner, by Khaled Hosseini; and The World is Flat, by Thomas Friedman READING:

Be adaptable to change; know that others want to be respected and listened to; and be true to your core beliefs because they will guide your life. Find a balance in your life and be able to adjust your priorities accordingly. Maintain a good sense of humor to handle the curve balls life will throw you.

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

FAMILY:

Five nephews, one niece

Golf and travel. I truly enjoy meeting people of different cultures and recently returned from a trip to Russia where I was reminded again that no matter where one is in the world, our similarities as people are greater than our differences.

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY: United Way. I head up the Women's Initiative for the United Way of Southeast Michigan, which is focused on early childhood literacy, a key element to building a better life for our children.

But each gave me the experiences I needed to be more open when the next opportunity came along. Ultimately, this led to my current “dream job” at Ford— helping to create safer cars and a cleaner environment. At Ford, I currently mentor seven high-potential women as part of an innovative group we call the Senior Women’s Initiative. I urge these women to give each opportunity a fair shot—even if it does not fit neatly into their well-defined career plans. To achieve success today, women need to be open to a variety of challenging assignments. We need to seek out and trust in the views that others have of us, along with the views we have of ourselves. As we build experiences, skills and confidence, our careers and lives can take directions we might never have envisioned.

PDJ 56

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006


Thanks to you,

Juan’s family has access to affordable health care. And that’s one huge weight off his shoulders.

Blue Cross of California, a subsidiary of WellPoint, Inc., is proud to be a recipient of the 2006 International Innovation in Diversity Award. At WellPoint, you can be addressing tomorrow’s health care issues today. Significant issues, like improving the lives of the people we serve. In Juan’s case, it was simply the task of finding the right plan for him and his family. But what an impact it made. And what an impact you can make by joining WellPoint today.

Better health care, thanks to you. Visit us online at www.wellpoint.com/careers EOE

®Registered Trademark, WellPoint, Inc. © 2006 WellPoint, Inc. All Rights Reserved


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Lois Cooper

ADECCO

“Spend quality time with family and friends.”

T

here are two points that I would like to share with women

who are rising stars. First, have a great sense of humor. Second, live a fulfilling personal life. Having a great sense of humor makes each day go faster. It also helps when we don’t take ourselves or situations so seriously. There is nothing more sobering than to turn on the news channel after a full day in the office. So many serious things happen in the world during the course of an eight-hour (or 12-hour!) day, that the news puts it all in perspective for us.

TITLE:

Vice President, Human Resources and Diversity

EDUCATION:

A summer job through Nassau County, NY

FIRST JOB: READING:

MBA, Baruch College, New York, NY

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, by Maya

Angelou

Of course, we need to work hard, put all our effort into what we do and pay full attention to the issues that we deal

FAMILY: Married to Joseph for 20 years; daughter, 17, a freshman at Long Island University, NY

Reading, traveling

with during the day. It doesn’t hurt, however, to take a short

INTERESTS:

break during the day to share a smile or laugh with col-

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Toys for Tots

leagues. It really helps us to transition to the next phone call or e-mail with a refreshed attitude! It is equally important to pay as close attention to our personal lives as we do to our work lives. We all have heard

stories of women who put so much into their work that they have no time or energy left for their husbands, children, parents or communities. We don’t want to let life pass us by

COMPANY:

Adecco

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Melville, NY

www.adeccousa.com

Worldwide, full-service supplier of human resources BUSINESS:

650 employees at corporate headquarters; 3,300 full-time employees across the United States; more than 130,000 temporary employees per week throughout the United States; more than 600,000 temporary employees per week worldwide

EMPLOYEES:

58

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

(because we all know how time flies!) and wake up one day not really knowing our family and friends and feeling alone. While work is a critical part of our lives and identities, always remember to “work to live” not “live to work.” Get involved in your church and community organizations. Spend quality time with family and friends. Treasure those special, quiet moments—they may be once-in-a-lifetime opportunities! Read, garden, cook or nurture another activity that you have a passion for. Don’t let work become your only focus—you will actually be less effective that way. Enjoy life!

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Jennifer Daley,

M.D.

T E N E T H E A LT H C A R E C O R P O R AT I O N

“Without your integrity as a person and as a professional, you have nothing.”

I

believe that teamwork, collaboration, mutual respect and support, and constant communication are the keys to successful leadership. You must surround yourself with trustworthy, talented, independent and ethical people who share your vision of the future. Then, develop a strategic plan to meet your goals and focus on executing that plan as a team. To be a successful leader, you must learn how to delegate and trust that the people you have surrounded yourself with will exceed your expectations. Dealing with conflict is a challenging issue, but a successful leader deals with conflict as it arises and understands that conflict is a part of the creative process of change, rather than something to be eliminated, avoided or squelched. Above all, leaders must always maintain their integrity— even at the risk of losing their job. Without your integrity as a person and as a professional, you have nothing. You can always find another job, but, once compromised, your integrity is very hard to regain. I have three main goals every day: Listen, communicate and “look over the next hill.” I spend 70 percent of my time listening to my constituents, whether they are physicians, hospital leaders, patients and their families, employees or

COMPANY:

Tenet Healthcare Corporation

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Dallas, TX

www.tenethealth.com

BUSINESS/RANKING: One of the largest investorowned health care services companies in the United States 2005 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

$9.6 billion

Approximately 68,580

Senior Vice President, Clinical Quality; Chief Medical Officer

TITLE:

BA in human studies, Brown University, Providence, RI; MD, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB:

Drawing blood on the phlebotomy team at a

local hospital

A Team of Rivals, by Doris Kearns Goodwin; the Harry Potter series with my 8-year-old

READING:

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. I hope I leave patients and their families more confident that they will receive high-quality and humane care in hospitals and physicians’ offices. FAMILY:

Five children ages 37, 35, 34, 10 and 8

Spending time with my family, physical fitness, supporting American fine arts and crafts

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY: Preventing domestic violence among women through support of women’s shelters; supporting orphanages in China through Families With Children From China

our suppliers. The balance of my time is spent in communicating our vision of the future for patients, our physician partners and our staff. I take time every day to study and reflect on where the trends in our profession and the health care industry will take us, so I can prepare all my constituents for the rapid pace of change in health care. Take time to nurture yourself physically, emotionally and spiritually. Whether it’s time with family and friends, exercise, or relaxation and reflection, renewing yourself regularly gives to you and brings you the resilience, energy and patience needed to be a great leader.

PDJ Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2006

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W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Terri Dean

VERIZON BUSINESS

“Develop self-confidence and a willingness to take risks by trying new jobs that will enhance your competencies.”

TITLE:

Senior Vice President

EDUCATION:

BA, Chatham College, Pittsburgh, PA

Assistant manager, operator services for Bell of Pennsylvania FIRST JOB:

H

ere are a few of the essential career lessons I have learned (some the hard way), and I share them whenever I am asked to reflect on leadership and professional growth: • Have a career plan that you design and your immediate supervisor actively supports. Trying to move ahead without a documented plan and the endorsement of your immediate supervisor is virtually impossible. • Create and maintain a congenial, yet respectful, relationship with your boss. • Develop self-confidence and a willingness to take risks by trying new jobs that will enhance your competencies. • Foster a rich, deep, and broad network of people at all levels of the business. This is essential for career development and progression. • Build an impeccable reputation whereby you are known for your integrity and for high ethical standards and behavior. • Acquire the ability to inspire, motivate, and lead others to achieve outstanding results, even against all odds.

Verizon Business HEADQUARTERS: New York, NY WEBSITE: www.verizon.com BUSINESS: Verizon Business is one of three operating units of Verizon Communications Inc. The company delivers advanced IP, data, voice and wireless solutions to business and government customers. RANKING: Operates in 75 countries worldwide and across six continents 2006 REVENUE FORECAST: $20+ billion EMPLOYEES: 32,000 COMPANY:

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Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

READING: The Leadership Bible is a constant read because of the myriad leadership lessons I learn and apply in my personal and professional lives every time I read it. I just started reading Pitch Like a Girl: How a woman can be herself and still succeed by Ronna Lichtenberg because the title intrigued me. PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: Check your title at the door. The only thing you can give and still keep is your word. FAMILY: Married 23 years, two daughters. The oldest daughter is a PR professional in New York; the youngest is a rising high school senior in Philadelphia.

Nurturing the development of young professionals through mentoring and leadership projects. Community service projects through my sorority, Alpha Kappa Alpha.

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY: The various missions and ministries supported by Mt. Zion Baptist Church of Germantown.

• Recognize that a willingness to ask for help is a sign of strength, not weakness. • Understand that you are employed to deliver results that drive to the company’s bottom line. • Take stock of what you have been good at and, just as importantly, what area of the business makes you want to get up every day and do your best! Find your passion early and then craft a career plan that will afford you lateral and upward moves until you have reached your goals. • Create a legacy of giving by nurturing and coaching others. Require those you nurture and coach to do for others what you did for them.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Donnalee DeMaio

METLIFE BANK, N.A.

“Having a passion for what you do is what gives you the confidence to take chances.”

I

n January 2006, I earned my black belt in martial arts after four years of intense training. I never imagined that I would end up being a black belt. When I was younger, I tended to be bookish. A product of the ’60s, I was raised to do “little girl” things such as cooking and sewing. But there I was, at 42, watching my son taking lessons and thinking, “I’d really like to do that.” I challenged myself to learn things such as full contact kickboxing and grappling. The experience has been eye-opening and tremendously rewarding. If there’s one thing that life has taught me it’s that you need to step out of your comfort zone to be successful. My parents raised me with a strong work ethic. When I entered college, I was told in no uncertain terms that I was not there to socialize; I was there to develop the skills I needed to get a good job. I chose accounting because I knew I wanted to enter business—but, from the start, this career path forced me out of my comfort zone. Public accounting, at the time, was a male-dominated field, and every day I had to work hard to prove myself because I wasn’t one of the guys. It takes confidence to get out there every day, but if you stay focused you can achieve whatever you want. After 23 years, I worked my way up to a partnership at MetLife. After seven years as a partner, I decided to step out

COMPANY:

MetLife Bank, N.A.

HEADQUARTERS:

Bridgewater, NJ

WEBSITE:

www.metlifebank.com

RANKING:

177 out of 8,800 banks (based on asset size)

2005 ASSETS: EMPLOYEES:

$6.8 billion in total assets

TITLE:

President

EDUCATION:

Summa cum laude, Muhlenberg College,

Allentown, PA FIRST JOB:

Grocery bagger

Get Out of My Life (But First, Could You Drive Me & Cheryl to the Mall?), by Anthony E. Wolf

READING:

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: Never forget who you are and where you’ve come from; then focus on how you can make a difference. FAMILY:

Married, three children

INTERESTS:

Karate, cooking

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Habitat for Humanity

of the zone once again to help MetLife start a new business: MetLife Bank. Three years later, I was named its president. Having a passion for what you do is what gives you the confidence to take chances. No one loves his or her job every day of the week. But when you sit back and think about your career, you need to be passionate about it. Passion shows through. It makes you confident; makes you seek new opportunities. It gives you the spark you need to succeed. Remember, you don’t need to be a brain surgeon to make a difference in life. However, you do need the courage to discover what you’ve got that can make a difference, and then do whatever you can to make that shine through.

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PDJ Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2006

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W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Nanette DeTurk

HIGHMARK INC.

“There is no single path to success.”

T

here is no single path to success. All professionals take a different journey in their career, but I believe that there are standard pillars of success that we can use to guide our professional and personal lives and, therefore, lead our way to success.

EDUCATION: Bachelor’s in accounting, Ohio State University; MBA, Penn State University

ACCOUNTABILITY

FIRST JOB: Summer intern at the recorder’s office in Wood County, OH

Success does not happen on its own, nor does it happen alone. Tap into the realm outside of your comfort zone and always accept accountability. Being willing to take risks and assume responsibility beyond your normal role are integral parts of individual success. BALANCE

Appreciate your job, but also appreciate your life. A healthy work-life balance isn’t just HR “speak.” It’s a reality that leaders today must embrace for their employees and for themselves. From being raised in a funeral home to coping with the death of my husband in 2002, I have a personal appreciation for the fragility of life and a deeper understanding of balance. My work-life balance has created an open understanding with my employees and has helped to open doors in my career.

COMPANY:

Highmark Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Pittsburgh, PA

www.highmark.com

Largest health insurance company in Pennsylvania, based on membership

BUSINESS:

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

62

$9.8 billion

12,000

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

Executive Vice President of Finance and Chief Financial Officer

TITLE:

READING:

A Death in Belmont, by Sebastian Junger

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: Live each day for today. Seize the moment, and remember the importance of family. Find your passion and take risks. FAMILY:

Husband, Steve; and one son

INTERESTS: Ohio State football, reading and spending time at our family’s beach house FAVORITE CHARITY: Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF); Highmark Caring Place, a center for grieving children, adolescents and their families.

COMMUNICATION

The CEO needs different information than the operations manager does. Understanding your audiences and clearly communicating the most important and relevant information to them are fundamental for success. Effective and efficient communication not only fosters a unified understanding but also builds strong relationships and a very high level of teamwork. PASSION

Passion breeds passion. Surround yourself with people who feel the same way that you do about your job and about life. I believe that the most successful leaders are those who have the passion and boundless enthusiasm to inspire departments to follow their lead. Celebrate success, and thank all of those who have helped you to be who you are today—and those who will help you to be the leader of tomorrow.

PDJ


BellSouth has a strong commitment to the communities we serve. We continually reaffirm that commitment and reinforce our connections to the community by embracing diversity and inclusionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; both inside and outside the company.

Connecting to the community with talent, strength and diversity. Through its Office of Diversity, BellSouth supports networking groups that promote mentoring, training, and enhanced opportunity for all employees, regardless of age, race, gender, or sexual orientation. These groups volunteer their time and resources to sponsor a wide range of activities and provide new ways in which BellSouth connects to the people we serve. BellSouth is proud of these efforts. Because, no matter how advanced our technology, we know that the strongest, most lasting connections are made within the community, face to face, person to person.

bellsouth.com Š2006 BellSouth Corporation.


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Roslyn Neal Dickerson

I N T E R C O N T I N E N TA L H O T E L S G R O U P

“I believe success begins with imagination sparked by dreams of who you can be and what you can accomplish.” “

Y

ou can’t be what you can’t see.” I love this quote and think it reflects what it takes to be successful—imagination, creativity and vision. I believe success begins with imagination sparked by dreams of who you can be and what you can accomplish. As we mature, particularly in corporate life, imagination leads to a vision that drives us and becomes the substance of our ambition and competitiveness. For me, it started in the small, racially divided Pennsylvania town where I was raised. As a girl, I observed people close to me who overcame perceived limitations based on race, status and resources to achieve goals far beyond what conventional wisdom would suggest. That motivated me to let myself imagine what I could do, the difference I could make, the places I could go. As a young woman, I began to consider “places I could go” both literally and figuratively. I began to travel the world—for business and leisure. The more exotic the destination, the better. Travel allows me to expand my frame of reference; to form new perspectives on people, places and events; and to extend my horizon for what I can accomplish. I believe that young women today can effectively expand

InterContinental Hotels Group HEADQUARTERS: Windsor, England WEBSITE: www.ichotelsgroup.com BUSINESS: Hotels and resorts RANKING: The world’s largest hotel company by number of rooms (537,000 rooms across 3,600 hotels). More than 120 million guests around the world choose an InterContinental Hotels Group branded hotel as their lodging destination each year. BRANDS: Intercontinental® Hotels & Resorts, Crowne Plaza® Hotels & Resorts, Holiday Inn® Hotels and Resorts, Holiday Inn Express®, Staybridge Suites®, Candlewood Suites® and Hotel IndigoTM, and the world’s largest hotel loyalty program, Priority Club® Rewards EMPLOYEES: 40,000 employees around the world COMPANY:

TITLE:

Senior Vice President and Chief Diversity Officer

EDUCATION:

MBA, Cornell University; BS, Boston

University Summer babysitter

FIRST JOB: READING:

The Lovely Bones, by Alice Sebold

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: Cultivate your imagination and extend your horizon of what you can be, what you can accomplish, the difference you can make. Cultivate this vision into something inspirational that attracts others and compels them to join you on your mission. FAMILY:

Twin 9-year-old boys

INTERESTS:

All sports, gardening, extreme parenting

their vision through travel experiences. Pick a different continent each trip. Go deep into a country, not just to the major cities. Let travel help you grow. While creating experiences through activities such as traveling, it is also important to absorb experiences wherever you are. Talk to people. Find out what motivates them. Learn how they create and channel passion and share in the lives of others. Hear what others say and make personal application. Often, I’ll talk to young women who lament that they haven’t yet found their vision or purpose. To them I say: Keep moving. Keep creating your experiences. First, focus on the tasks at hand and allow your good work to precede you. Second, find opportunities to interact with great people—a neighbor, mentor or someone you meet at the store. Strive to be interested, not just interesting. While you’re doing these things, “it” will find you. Keep in mind, “it” might not be one vision or purpose—“it” could be a series of visions and purposes over your career. Not surprisingly, great people will find you, too. Undoubtedly, you will need many of those great people to help you along the way.

PDJ

64

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006


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Lurita Doan

U . S . G E N E R A L S E R V I C E S A D M I N I S T R AT I O N

“ I never forget that individual, personal initiative is the key to success, regardless of race or gender.” 18th Administrator of the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA), sworn in on May 31, 2006, the first woman to occupy the office. Appointed by President George W. Bush and confirmed by Congress.

TITLE:

W

hy do I do the things I do? The answer always comes back: because I can. While my personal journey has been an ever-changing one—from teaching at a university, to starting and running a successful small business, to serving as the GSA’s first woman administrator—I never forget that individual, personal initiative is the key to success, regardless of race or gender. Today’s African American business women have more social and financial freedoms and more personal ability to lead organizations than ever before. I’ve been incredibly fortunate to have pursued my professional dreams and lead my own company, while also playing a role in making the country a better place to live. I find myself constantly falling back on lessons passed down from three generations of women in my family. We have been a family of entrepreneurs from the time of my greatgrandmother, a free black, who sold pralines in New Orleans in the 1860s. These women raised me to understand that hard

U.S. General Services Administration HEADQUARTERS: Washington, DC WEBSITE: www.gsa.gov BUSINESS: The GSA provides federal employees with workspace, security, equipment and travel services and oversees telecommuting centers, historic buildings, federal child care centers and government policy. Eleven regional offices and 13,000 employees extend GSA services to federal customers nationwide. RANKING: One of three central management agencies in the federal government, the GSA comprises 11 geographic regions that acquire office space, equipment, supplies, telecommunications, and information technology in support of federal agencies throughout the 50 states, U.S. territories and overseas. ANNUAL BUDGET: $16 billion. EMPLOYEES: 13,000 employees in 12 offices COMPANY:

66

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

Bachelor’s degree, cum laude, Vassar College; master’s in Renaissance literature, University of Texas-Knoxville EDUCATION:

At 16, I was the doughnut and coffee counter girl at Tastee Donuts in New Orleans. I poured coffee with gusto and prided myself in making tired, surly people laugh.

FIRST JOB:

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: My dad used to tell me, “Facta, non verba,” Latin for “Deeds, not words.”

Married to Doug for 20 years—the best decision I ever made

FAMILY:

work is critical, but that hard work alone isn’t sufficient. My grandmother ran a business school and owned several rental properties at the turn of the century, around 1908. She taught me about the importance of participating in society, understanding politics and the importance of insisting on equal rights. She operated a successful business at a time when women did not yet have the right to vote. My grandmother, my mentor from an early age, inspired me to mentor others at work and within the community. Mentoring is my opportunity to help others benefit from my hard-won experiences. At a minimum, mentoring allows me to help others avoid making the same mistakes that I made and to share in those personal victories that come from moving a little further up the ladder of success—and it feels really good. I’m a believer in the power of individuals, and especially women, to make a difference, whether they’re selling pralines or more efficient federal contracting.

PDJ


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Patti M. Dodge

N E W C E N T U R Y F I N A N C I A L C O R P O R AT I O N

“Let people know who you are and what you stand for.”

E

arly in my career, I participated in a management training program where we were required to identify our “word in a box.” This one single word was supposed to describe us in a nutshell. Most of my colleagues agonized over choosing their word, but mine came to me in an instant, and I believed it summed me up perfectly. The word was “balance.” It resonated on a number of levels: I am an accountant who loves to balance the books. As a child, the teeter-totter was my favorite piece of playground equipment. And most importantly, as a married mother of two with a pretty demanding job, work-life balance was “top of mind”. I operated for a good part of my career in search of the perfect work-life balance. It always felt like it was right there in front of me, just barely outside my grasp. One more week of long hours and I would be caught up and back in balance. You’ve probably already figured it out: I never really got there. It took some time to realize that, at least for me, there is no such thing as work-life balance. Life is a constant juggle of priorities, with sometimes frenetic activity, and sometimes a lot of nice, quiet downtime. You might describe it as balance if you broaden your definition to allow for the usual instantaneous shifts in priorities that occur for a career woman, wife and mother.

COMPANY:

New Century Financial Corporation

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

Irvine, CA

www.ncen.com

TITLE:

Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer

EDUCATION:

BS in business administration, emphasis in

accounting, University of Southern California Cashier at a fast food restaurant

FIRST JOB: READING:

Good to Great, by Jim Collins; When

Genius Failed, by Roger Lowenstein; and anything by John Grisham PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: FAMILY:

Be positive and be genuine.

Husband and two teenage daughters

INTERESTS:

Golf, traveling and reading

If I were to participate in the same program today, my word in a box would be “genuine.” One thing I have found in my career, that now spans more than 20 years, is that you must always be yourself. Don’t be afraid to say what you think. Let people know who you are and what you stand for. It engenders loyalty, a sense of mission and purpose, and a team orientation that will take you far. And best of all, it’s a lot easier to be yourself than it is to find the perfect balance.

Premier mortgage finance company

EMPLOYEES:

Approximately 7,000

PDJ Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2006

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Carol L. Dow

VA N G U A R D

“Continuously challenge yourself to learn new things.”

A

s I reflect on my career and my personal life, I ask the age-old questions, “What does it mean to be successful?” and “How do you attain success?” I won’t be the first to state that “success” is how you define it. It is a combination of being happy with who you are, what you have achieved and what you have given back to others. Since it means different things to different people, there is obviously no set destination and no clear road map for attaining success. It is personal. As I, like so many others, continue to travel down the path, I will share a few of my thoughts on what I have found to be helpful:

TITLE:

Principal Information Technology

EDUCATION: BS in computer science, summa cum laude, Villanova University FIRST JOB:

Books by Dr. Seuss (I love to hear my daughter read); The Kite Runner, by Khaled Hosseini; Angela’s Ashes, by Frank McCourt; and The World is Flat, by Thomas L. Friedman READING:

PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

• Understand what is important to you and prioritize with that in mind. This includes what you need professionally, intellectually and emotionally. You need to find that right balance and be satisfied with it. You can’t be all things to all people. • Learn your strengths and maximize them. Very often we only focus on improving our weaknesses. An even greater benefit can be obtained by understanding and leveraging your strengths to ensure you are taking on positions and challenges that you can successfully master. COMPANY:

Vanguard

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Valley Forge, PA

www.Vanguard.com

Vanguard is one of the world’s largest investment management companies, serving individual investors, institutions and financial professionals at offices in Valley Forge, PA; Scottsdale, AZ; and Charlotte, NC.

Printing T-shirts

The Golden Rule

Husband and most adored 6-year-old daughter

Skiing, scuba diving, theater, biking, traveling, reading

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

United Way and the Make a Wish

Foundation

• Learn from your mistakes and your successes. Remember that everyone makes mistakes, but the biggest mistake is not to learn from the past. • Take accountability—you will always be recognized. • Follow your instincts. I have always found that if something feels wrong, it probably is. • Continuously challenge yourself to learn new things. It helps to make things exciting and instills a breath of fresh air.

BUSINESS:

EMPLOYEES:

68

More than 11,500

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

• Learn from others—peers, bosses, mentors, employees. • There is no substitute for passion. • Honesty and ethics should never be compromised.

PDJ


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Technology

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Xerox Corporation, Mailstop 205-99E, 800 Phillips Road, Webster, NY 14580, Attn: Corporate Recruiting Drawing on the diversity of a global workforce and offering equal opportunity to achieve success. EOE M/F/D/V © 2006 Xerox Corporation. All rights reserved. XEROX and There’s a new way to look at it and DocuShare are registered trademarks of XEROX CORPORATION in the United States and/or other countries.


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Deirdre C. Drake

H A R R I S ( PA R T O F B M O F I N A N C I A L G R O U P )

“Manage your own career. Corporations may provide the tools, but you must have a plan.”

A

s I look back on my career, I find it readily apparent that mentoring has had an impact on me. Mentoring is important because it is a way to get honest, candid feedback without consequence. I value it from the perspective of someone who mentors others and as someone who has benefited from having a mentor. In many instances, I am a representative sample of an underrepresented group, so the ability to relay my experiences becomes important and valued by others trying to achieve the same goals. It is important for them to know that if I could achieve a certain level of success, they could achieve the same and more. There is nothing more personally fulfilling for me than watching someone I have mentored grow and excel. The personal legacy I want to leave behind is that I made a contribution to the careers and opportunities of as many talented individuals as I possibly could. I provide mentoring on both a formal and informal basis. Formally, there are individuals who ask me to mentor them, and I am happy to do so. Some use the relationship for navigation and career counseling, while others use it for image consultation and personal-effectiveness coaching.

COMPANY:

Harris (part of BMO Financial Group)

Chicago, IL, for Harris; and Toronto, Canada, for parent company BMO Financial Group

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

www.theharris.com Banking and wealth management

RANKING: A division of BMO Financial Group, Harris is a major U.S. Midwest financial services organization with a network of community banks in the Chicago area and wealth management offices across the United States. 2005 REVENUE:

$67.9 billion (BMO Financial

Group U.S.) EMPLOYEES:

Approximately 6,600 (BMO Financial

Group U.S.) 70

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

TITLE:

Senior Vice President, Human Resources

EDUCATION: BS in business administration, Central Michigan University; MBA, St. Joseph’s University FIRST JOB:

Cheerleading coach, before college; HR rep,

after college READING: Right From the Start, by Dan Ciampa and Michael Watkins

When balls drop, they bounce back. When marbles drop, they roll, but you can reach down and pick them back up. When eggs drop, they break and leave a big mess. I think of my priorities as balls, marbles and eggs and address them accordingly.

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

FAMILY:

Single, no children

INTERESTS:

Fitness, bicycling, fine dining

FAVORITE CHARITY: I support several youth related causes such as Big Brothers Big Sisters, Junior Achievement and various college scholarship funds

Informally, I am perpetually aware that others are watching, so role modeling is critical. I try to ensure that my daily behaviors are consistent with the advice I would give formally to any individual under my mentorship. I offer this advice to individuals just entering the workforce: • Use your early tenure as the time to listen, watch and learn. Many of the lessons you will carry with you for the duration of your career come in the first few years, when you are learning and building credibility as a professional. • Learn from good managers, and learn from bad ones. As you go on your career journey, take note of the things that motivated or demoralized, energized or deflated, and compelled or discouraged, and remember them when you become someone’s manager. • Manage your own career. Corporations may provide the tools, but you must have a plan. Think about your career in threeto five-year intervals. Determine the experiences you need to accumulate to best prepare for your end goal, and then manage your career effectively to acquire those experiences.

PDJ


If only you could package this kind of passion...

...actually, you might say we already have.

Inclusion + Insights = Innovation and Growth Buzzwords? Hardly. Diversity and inclusion are central to how we do business, from our ever-expanding portfolio of brands, to our people who market and sell them across the globe. Harnessing our employees' unique perspectives and backgrounds drives our businesses and helps our people grow. Do you want to make the difference? For information on joining PepsiCo, visit www.PepsiCoJobs.com.


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Candace Duncan

KPMG LLP

“The people you have helped don’t forget you.”

R

COMPANY:

KPMG LLP

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

New York, NY

www.us.kpmg.com Audit, tax and advisory firm

The Big Four firm with the strongest growth record over the past decade, KPMG LLP is the U.S. member firm of KPMG International, which has 100,000 professionals in 144 countries.

RANKING:

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

72

Lead Area Managing Partner—Audit, Mid-Atlantic Area

TITLE:

egardless of your industry or title, having a passion for developing people is a key to success. Throughout my 28-year career, my focus on cultivating people by leading, mentoring and team building has been a major factor in the success and development of my career. What drives people depends on their collection of experiences, their generational background and their view of the world. As a leader, I view it as my responsibility to find out what motivates my staff. I learned long ago that trying to fit a round peg in a square hole just doesn’t work. Working successfully with people requires understanding what makes them tick and then meeting them where they are—instead of asking that they meet me where I am. I am a strong believer in mentoring at all levels of an organization. Mentoring relationships allow employees to benefit from the wisdom of more seasoned staff and to discuss personal concerns or issues without negative consequences to their careers. At the same time, for mentors, these relationships bring a fresh perspective and help keep them in touch with different viewpoints. We have a strong mentoring culture at KPMG, and I have found that being a mentor is a learning experience at both ends of the relationship.

$4.7 billion

20,000

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

EDUCATION:

Bachelor’s in accounting, Kansas State

University FIRST JOB:

Lifeguard and swimming instructor

The World is Flat, by Thomas Friedman; The Devil Wears Prada, by Lauren Weisberger; Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking, by Malcolm Gladwell

READING:

The importance of investing time and resources in your people is immeasurable in order to ensure the future success of your organization.

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

FAMILY: Husband, Mike, one brother and one sister, five nieces and nephews INTERESTS:

Sailing; books on tape; spending time with

my family FAVORITE CHARITY:

American Cancer Society Relay

for Life

We all know that two heads are better than one. However, building a team and creating a collaborative environment can be easier said than done. While you work to foster a spirit of teamwork and bring about a better end result for your organization, your ability to bring people together will help you stand out and be noticed for your collaborative skills. You can be a leader, a mentor and a team builder no matter where you work or what your experience level is. When you motivate people and help them to achieve their career goals, you earn the respect of others. The people you have helped don’t forget you. In fact, they often can provide you with new opportunities and open new doors for you. Developing other people has been my proudest professional achievement, and, while I know that I have helped to cultivate a new generation of leaders, I also know that these experiences have enriched my own career and contributed to my success.

PDJ


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Patricia Elizondo

X E R O X C O R P O R AT I O N

“Collaborate and build bridges.”

E

mbrace change. Be flexible. Collaborate and build bridges. Seek knowledge. Demonstrate measurable value. Know what you want. This is the advice that I share with many of the people I mentor. Most of these skills are a natural part of my makeup and rooted in my upbringing. Others, I’ve had to learn and develop along the way.

I grew up in a small two-bedroom house with six children, so life in our household was often chaotic with constantly changing dynamics— just like life in many large corporations today! In today’s world, there is nothing as predictable as change. So, be ready for it, not overwhelmed by it. EMBRACE CHANGE; BE FLEXIBLE.

As the middle child and a natural mediator, I was always building bridges between my siblings. Carrying those skills with me into adulthood has been important. The ability to influence others and build support is critical in moving your key programs forward.

Senior Vice President, Industry and Major Account Operations for Xerox’s North American operations

TITLE:

EDUCATION:

BS, Indiana University; MBA, University of

Notre Dame Customer service rep at Indiana University

FIRST JOB:

Credit Union READING:

The Ultimate Question, by Fred Reichheld

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: Every day is full of opportunities — don’t miss them! Live life with no regrets of challenges and opportunities not pursued. FAMILY:

Husband, John Kitowski, and a son

COLLABORATE AND BUILD BRIDGES.

SEEK KNOWLEDGE. My parents ingrained in me the love of knowledge and learning. Knowledge is what makes you valuable and what gives you substance—the way you think, the ideas you generate, the expertise you demonstrate. The more knowledgeable I am, the more value I bring to my customers, my company and my family.

COMPANY:

Xerox Corporation

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Stamford, CT

www.xerox.com

Consulting and outsourcing services that help companies streamline document-related processes— from accessing critical information, to making the most of their IT assets, to managing their print shop.

BUSINESS:

RANKING:

No. 142 on Fortune 500 list

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

74

$15.7 billion

55,000 worldwide

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

Traveling and golfing with my family, physical fitness, Notre Dame football, Indiana University basketball

INTERESTS:

Growing up, I realized that learning and knowledge for knowledge’s sake was not enough. It was about what you achieved and accomplished with that knowledge—its “measurable value.” This is a key concept that we live with the customers we support at Xerox. We ask ourselves how we can we demonstrate that we bring them measurable value. Through Customer Executive Scorecard Reviews, we lay out metrics that tie what we committed to deliver and what we actually delivered. We call this “Delivering the Promise.”

DEMONSTRATE MEASURABLE VALUE.

Life is full of trade-offs. It’s not that you can’t have it all, but you probably can’t have it all at once. You must have your own personal definition of success. Most of us are going to work for at least 40 years. So, what’s the hurry? When you have a position that you’ve worked for and you’re good at, don’t rush off to your next promotion. Stay awhile, make a difference, and, most important, take the time to smell the roses or, in my case, the freshly cut grass on my favorite golf course.

KNOW WHAT YOU WANT.

PDJ


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Helena B. Foulkes

CVS/PHARMACY

“Do what you love. Live a whole, happy life.”

A

fter starting my career in another field and leaving to go back to business school, I began working in retail for CVS/pharmacy. In my opinion, a career in retail is fantastic because it blends the science of sales data with the art and psychology of understanding shoppers’ needs. At CVS/pharmacy, 80 percent of our customers are women, and we are putting programs in place to make them feel special. Not only do we anticipate what women seek when shopping in a CVS/pharmacy store, but we also understand what a typical day is like for them. As part of my everyday work, I concentrate on how to make CVS/ pharmacy an easy place for women to satisfy not only their family’s needs, but also their own personal needs. I take great pride in helping to take care of these women. I really do empathize with the busy lives they lead. I am one of them. My parents instilled a very strong work ethic in me. I believe that high achievement opens many doors and gives women more options. My mother taught me that women need to be independent, and this has fueled my desire to have a fulfilling career. And my father has always reminded me that we will not wish we had worked an extra day when we are on our deathbed. This advice has led me to embrace

COMPANY:

CVS/pharmacy

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Woonsocket, RI

www.cvs.com

America’s largest retail pharmacy (most number of stores)

BUSINESS:

RANKING:

No. 2 in sales, No. 53 on Fortune 500 list

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

$37 billion

TITLE:

Senior Vice President, Advertising and Marketing

EDUCATION: AB, magna cum laude, and MBA, both from Harvard University

Goldman Sachs, investment banking analyst

FIRST JOB: READING:

Middlesex, by J. Eugenides

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

Do what you love, and live a

whole, happy life. FAMILY:

Bill, husband of 17 years; four children

INTERESTS:

Family sports, running, Pilates and the

beach FAVORITE CHARITY: CVS All Kids Can—focused on children with physical disabilities.

the gift of having a great husband and four children. I am proud of the balance I have achieved in my career and personal life, and I try very hard to leave work at the office when I am with my family. So if I were giving advice to women starting out their careers, I would tell them to find results-oriented positions so that their value to the organization is crystal clear. I would tell them to find mentors inside and out. Careers get a lot more interesting as you rise in an organization, so don’t give up too early. Find a partner in life who is really willing to partner. Do what you love. Live a whole, happy life.

170,000

PDJ Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2006

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Pam Gardner

HOUSTON ASTROS

“You’ll get the same respect you give to others.”

I

TITLE:

FAMILY:

THERE IS ALWAYS A WAY TO ACCOMPLISH YOUR GOAL.

Never say “no!” It may take more time or resources, but there is always a way to say “yes.” Don’t stop before you start. Lay out all the alternatives, and then make a decision based on that information. •

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

BS, University of Wisconsin, Stout

Cashier, Ben Franklin Store

The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald; Freakonomics, by Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner READING:

Embrace new ideas. Listen. Include everyone. Some of the most dynamic ideas may come from someone you least expect.

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

Two 21-year-old children

INTERESTS:

Running, reading, baseball

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Your job is to lead. While you don’t need to have all the answers, you do have to know how to find them. Hire experts in their areas, and then use their knowledge. A great staff makes a great company.

Houston Area Women’s Center

HIRE PEOPLE SMARTER THAN YOURSELF.

OPERATE WITH HONESTY AND INTEGRITY.

Follow the golden rule. You’ll get the same respect you give to others.

LET EVERYONE WIN.

room feeling like they’ve won something. Give a little and it will come back to you down the road. People do business with people. If all parties leave with a good feeling about a deal, they are sure to welcome you in the future. •

SURROUND YOURSELF WITH ALL KINDS OF PEOPLE.

GIVE BACK. Remember where you started. We all have our favorite charity or cause. It’s important to be a part in building our future and our future leaders through mentorship, board participation, and religious or spiritual affiliations.

It’s OK to leave something on the table. The best deals are made when all parties leave the

COMPANY:

Houston Astros Baseball Club

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS: RANKING:

Houston, TX

www.astros.com Professional baseball 2005 National League Champions

EMPLOYEES:

76

President of Business Operations

love what I do! I view each day as a gift. With this gift comes the responsibility to teach, encourage, praise and lead others in a way that allows them to face challenges, contribute and grow. I have had the opportunity to learn from great people throughout my career. I have sought mentors and embraced ideas that I continue to use throughout my work and my life. As I face complex issues, I reflect back on the tenets that have helped me every day.

150

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

Keep your life interesting. My mother used to say, “If we all thought alike, the world would be a very boring place.” Take it all in! Diversity is what makes this a great world.

Last but not least, we all need to find our touchstones for growth and success. Aside from the many business challenges we may face, keep in mind that we still need to maintain a balance in our lives.

PDJ


person ality

Is Nationwide for you? Some people have an inner desire, a compelling force that drives them to take action, deliver on their promises and continually reach beyond what’s expected. It’s this passion for greatness that makes Nationwide associates special. At Nationwide, it’s not about just filling a position. It’s about finding individuals with personality – that special blend of natural talents and innovative ideas. If words like passion, connection, commitment, vision and leadership inspire you, a career at Nationwide could be for you. A number of job opportunities are available now in Columbus. Meet with one of our representatives or apply online at nationwide.com.

Are you ready?

Nationwide is an equal opportunity employer. EOE/M/F/D/V Nationwide and the Nationwide framemark are federally registered service marks of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. On Your Side is a service mark of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. ©2005, Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. All rights reserved.


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Julie Gilbert

BEST BUY

“When you learn to help others, you’ll see you’re also helping yourself. ”

I

’ve learned that people need others to believe in them—at work, at home or with friends. By believing in others, we can inspire them to believe in themselves and become someone they never believed possible. If you treat every day as a journey, you will learn more about yourself and others. When you learn to help others, you’ll see you’re also helping yourself. •

, clearly understand your life’s role and tap your talents to pursue your mission. Hold tight to what you believe is right and to what you believe can come true. Believe in those you work with and for; never work for someone you don’t respect.

BELIEVE DEEPLY IN YOURSELF

BUILD YOUR MISSION AROUND BUSINESS OUTCOMES

. Most good social change has happened as a result of business.

BE ENERGETIC.

Be willing to work hard each day to make your dream come true. Then, mobilize others around your energy and passion. Your only limit is your own energy and commitment to make a difference.

BE YOURSELF AND BE PROUD.

BE STEADFAST.

Uniqueness is your edge. See it as a strategic benefit. Stop trying to fit in.

Stay true to your character, values and beliefs. Recognize that you may be challenged and ridiculed if you try to effect change that parts from the mainstream. Stay strong; once challenges pass, you’ll learn from them. Dream big and assume it will happen— and it will!

COMPANY:

BUSINESS:

EDUCATION: Master’s degree in strategy and marketing and bachelor’s degree in accounting, both with highest distinction, from the University of Minnesota FIRST JOB: Price-marking canned foods with a black grease pen at Don-Ells Grocery Store, a small general store in Draper, SD, a town of less than 100 people. I was 7 years old. READING:

To inspire people to believe in themselves and become someone they never believed possible

FAMILY:

Motivating people, helping people, building businesses, dance, music, skiing, rollerblading, bicycling

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY: Focus Hope in Detroit, MI, cofounded by Eleanor Josaitis to recognize the dignity and beauty of every person and to combine passion and partnership in the community to overcome racism, poverty and injustice.

BE A PARTNER, AND BE A FRIEND.

LEAD.

LAUGH.

HAVE FUN IN EVERYTHING YOU DO!

No. 1 retailer of consumer electronics products and services

RANKING:

EMPLOYEES:

78

$30.8 billion

Approximately 125,000

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

Build a strong, diverse network of people to learn from who are both like you and not like you—nurture those relationships. Constantly look for the unique talents and passion of others and link them to your mission in an energizing way. You may even change the lives of others for the better. Give everyone a role so they have a unique story. Great leaders reach out to others, especially those who struggle.

www.BestBuy.com

2005 REVENUE:

Amazing parents, two brothers, one nephew,

one niece

Minneapolis, MN

Consumer electronics retailing

Eleanor Roosevelt’s biography

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

Best Buy

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

TITLE: Vice President, Women’s Leadership Forum (woLf) and Entrepreneurial Initiatives

Anything is possible with great leadership. Set a vision others can see. Identify and position others to win by empowering them and coaching them to achieve business outcomes. Find humor in everything that happens—even the difficult moments.

PDJ


The most important ingredient in bringing you the future of broadband...

our people. At Verizon, we believe the people creating the broadband future are as important as the technology itself. This is why diversity plays a major role in everything we do. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re continually promoting a workplace that respects the diversity of our employees, customers and suppliers - and we are proud to be ranked the #1 company for diversity by DiversityInc Magazine. By respecting others, we are able to deliver products, services and ideas that create richer experiences for everyone.

Š2006 Verizon. All rights reserved.


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Katherine Greene

VERIZON WIRELESS

“It ’s in the small, everyday actions that success begins and then thrives.”

I

believe that people are capable of achieving goals far beyond what they think possible. The philosophy of success is simple: Set goals, work hard, be honest, do the right thing and work together. Combine these with a commitment to doing your best and you can achieve anything. My passion is the company I work for. It’s what drives me personally and professionally. Commitment to quality and integrity are keys to the success of Verizon Wireless. We lead the wireless industry in providing the best-quality network that delivers the best customer experience. And we back that promise in everything we do. It shows in a record of performance that’s the highest in the industry and has been for some time. And it’s due to the individual and team achievements of every one of our 58,000 employees. I try to remind my employees of this frequently. We are all empowered with the ability to achieve. Focusing on goals with the confidence that you can achieve them delivers an unshakeable determination. I was inspired to believe this at a young age, and I am grateful to have the opportunity to spread this confidence among our employees. Every moment provides an opportunity to make the right decision with the

COMPANY:

Verizon Wireless

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

Basking Ridge, NJ

www.verizonwireless.com Wireless communications

RANKING: Verizon Wireless leads the wireless industry with the best network quality and highest customer satisfaction. The company is the fastest-growing carrier based on net customer additions. 2006 FIRST QUARTER REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

80

$7.6 billion

57,000 nationwide

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

TITLE:

Region President

BA, Rollins College; MA, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: Real estate development project manager for EDC Inc., supporting government development projects

Grant and Sherman: The Friendship That Won the Civil War, by Charles Bracelen Flood

READING:

Fostering the inspiration within people to achieve goals beyond what they imagined possible

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

FAMILY:

Husband, Jeff

Verizon Wireless is my personal and professional passion. I also am active in the Young President’s Organization.

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Children’s Museum of Houston

right motive. It’s in the small, everyday actions that success begins and then thrives. The Gulf Coast team that I lead demonstrated this passion— an unwavering commitment to our company’s customers—in the hurricane tragedies of 2005. I witnessed employees who put their personal tragedies aside to serve customers in the direst of circumstances. Our mission is all about communication, and it becomes the most important job of all when the communication we rely upon is jeopardized in crisis. I have never been more proud than when I observed the sacrifices of our Gulf Coast employees in the name of helping others in need. In the past two years, our customer base has grown by as much as 60 percent in my territory. And our customer loyalty has increased as much as 35 percent. Our industry is a tough one, so these metrics are proof of our employees’ commitment to deliver the best service. It didn’t happen overnight, but it happened due to ongoing faith and achievement. That is really all success is about.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Kim Griffin-Hunter

DELOITTE & TOUCHE LLP

“I highly recommend professional associations as a resource for professional and career development.” Partner and Southeast Industry Leader for Deloitte’s Life Sciences/Healthcare practice

TITLE:

T

he conventional wisdom is that a woman should have mentors and role models who look like her and can relate to her. This is true, but I’ve also thought it was critical to branch out and build relationships with people whose experiences were very different than mine. I’ve been lucky to have had a rich montage of mentors, varying widely in age and background. My mentoring relationships serve different purposes. Some of them are strictly professional in nature. Others enrich me intellectually, culturally or emotionally. I highly recommend building a “Personal Board of Directors”—a collection of mentors, advisors and coaches to fulfill different needs. Earlier in my career, I, like many women, didn’t have a natural way to network with people who had the ability to develop me. Fortunately, Deloitte has a mentoring culture with lots of people who were willing to take me under their wing. From them, I learned how to navigate our organization and get the advice, leadership training and other resources I needed to advance and become partner. A few of them were so committed that they put their reputations on the line to support me. Deloitte also has a Diversity Initiative and a Women’s Initiative to support and develop our talent.

Deloitte & Touche LLP New York, NY WEBSITE: www.deloitte.com/us BUSINESS: Audit, tax, consulting and financial advisory services RANKING: Serves more than one-half of the world’s largest companies, as well as large national enterprises, public institutions, locally important clients, and successful, fast-growing global growth companies. 2005 REVENUE: $7.81 billion EMPLOYEES: 33,000 COMPANY:

HEADQUARTERS:

EDUCATION:

BBA in accounting and MBA, University of

Miami FIRST JOB:

Cashier at Kentucky Fried Chicken

READING: The Power of a Praying Parent, by Stormie Omartian; Bringing up Boys, by James C. Dobson

To live a purpose-driven life. To whom much is given, much is expected.

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: FAMILY:

My husband, Steven, two children, and my

mother INTERESTS: Relaxing and playing with my young sons. (We go to Chuck E. Cheese’s, the pool, swings, basketball, visit friends—you name it; they are in charge!) Also, I’d like to go back to playing the piano and saxophone one day. FAVORITE CHARITY: Greater Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church, United Way, Family Christian Association of America

In addition, I’ve received excellent career development outside of Deloitte. Some of my best mentors have been professionals I met through my long association with the National Association of Black Accountants. I highly recommend professional associations as a resource for professional and career development. I enjoy using what I’ve learned from my mentors to help others. Mentoring is a lot of work, but it can be very fulfilling. Also, it helps me connect with the next generation. I’m one of the younger partners at Deloitte, but that’s not how I’m perceived by our Generation Y professionals. To them, anyone north of 30 is old! Many of the young people I come across in the profession ask for advice on how to acquire it all—career, family, advancement—as soon as possible. They don’t want to wait. I encourage them to pursue their dreams, but I try to keep them grounded at the same time. I’ve had the privilege of coaching and mentoring some very talented people, both inside and outside my organization. It’s very satisfying to develop people with lots of potential and see them move up in their careers.

PDJ

Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2006

81


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Elizabeth Hackenson

LUCENT TECHNOLOGIES

“I make it a point to acknowledge individual contributions.”

M

y mentors and the people I have enjoyed mentoring share a few key characteristics. They tend to be flexible, openminded, and, perhaps most important, they are able to recognize talent and truly appreciate and acknowledge the contributions of others. In my field—information technology—change is a constant, so flexibility is essential. New technologies replace existing ones, and evolving business requirements demand new technologies. As chief information officer, I support every segment of the corporation, and each segment has its specific needs. Understanding those needs requires the ability to listen, to look at things from diverse angles and to be open-minded enough to learn from both the compliments and the criticisms. For that reason I work hard to build a team of smart people who have diverse experiences. I make it a point to acknowledge individual contributions. I believe that by acknowledging talent, a leader can rally people to appreciate each other. That is a big step toward creating a team that leverages the abilities of each member and enables everyone to work just that much smarter. In general, I try to surround myself with people I can learn from. Sometimes that person is a rung or two above me on the corporate ladder, but not always. I look for people who

COMPANY:

Lucent Technologies

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

Murray Hill, NJ

www.lucent.com Telecommunications

EMPLOYEES:

about 30,000 worldwide

TITLE:

Chief Information Officer

EDUCATION:

Data processing, New York State

University Delivering newspapers

FIRST JOB: READING:

The Wall Street Journal

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

Rally great people to do really

great things. FAMILY:

Married, two children

INTERESTS:

Travel, spending time with family and

friends FAVORITE CHARITY:

All of them

have expertise I don’t have; who can teach me no matter where they fit in the corporate hierarchy; and who have the confidence and the personal skills to question me in a way that helps me understand their concern. Not all of my mentors come from inside the company. Sometimes, an outside “sounding board” helps me make better decisions because that person’s input is unbiased by internal issues and comes from a unique perspective. When I think of what has been most rewarding in my 25-year career, I think of the people I’ve touched along the way and those who have touched me. One of the things I am most proud of is the small group of talented, smart—and fun—people I have met over the years who have remained friends and mentors no matter where I have worked. In the end, no one makes it in the corporate world on his or her own. Others contribute to your success. If you ignore that, you just make it that much tougher on yourself—and a lot less fun.

PDJ 82

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006


3ERVING THE WORLD A GREAT TASTE OF LIFE

"RINKER)NTERNATIONALISPROUDTOBEAMONG &ORTUNE®-OST!DMIRED#OMPANIES &ORTUNE®4OP#OMPANIES&OR-INORITIES  #HAIN,EADER®"EST0LACES4O7ORK &ORTUNE®4OP%MPLOYERSFOR7OMEN 

#HECKUSOUTATWWWBRINKERJOBSCOM


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Tracy L. Hackman

DA I M L E R C H RY S L E R F I N A N C I A L S E RV I C E S

“Throughout my career, I have relied upon many people for knowledge, wisdom and insight. ” BUILDING THE FOUNDATION

W

ith a lifelong goal to be a lawyer, I knew that law school was on my academic horizon. Getting to law school would take me through an undergraduate business degree in finance. After eight years of practicing law at Chrysler (pre-Daimler merger), I was nominated to attend an executive MBA program. I learned to appreciate the rigors and challenges of working and going to school full time. Hard work, staying focused and the support of my family were key. This broad academic background enhanced my business acumen and enabled me to take a more pragmatic approach to the practice of law. In-house counsel must be an integral part of the business, and strategies must be aligned accordingly. My advice is to immerse yourself in the business operations and constantly look for innovative solutions. We’re in a very competitive market and staying ahead of the game requires stamina. MENTORING

A strong work ethic, dedication and becoming a student of the business are crucial to success. But you cannot get there alone. Throughout my career, I have relied upon many people for knowledge, wisdom and insight. These mentors have been instrumental in giving me direction and purpose, DaimlerChrysler Financial Services Americas LLC, a company of DaimlerChrysler AG HEADQUARTERS: Farmington Hills, MI COMPANY:

WEBSITE:

www.daimlerchryslerfinancialservices.com/na BUSINESS: Financial services RANKING: One of the leading financial services organizations worldwide. Headquarters for operations in the United States, Canada, Mexico, Puerto Rico, Argentina, Brazil and Venezuela. PORTFOLIO: More than $103 billion with nearly five million contracts. EMPLOYEES: Approximately 5,600 84

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

TITLE:

Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary

BA in finance, Michigan State University; JD, University of Detroit Mercy School of Law; MBA, advanced management program, Michigan State University

EDUCATION:

My first job was in high school working for a local law firm. I have been working in the practice of law my entire career.

FIRST JOB:

READING:

The Kite Runner, by Khaled Hosseini

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

Work hard, stay focused and

strive for excellence. INTERESTS: I spent my summers at our family cottage on Lake Charlevoix in northern Michigan. Consequently, I love the water; swimming, water skiing and boating. FAVORITE CHARITY:

The Susan G. Komen Breast

Cancer Foundation

and I would strongly encourage others in large organizations to actively develop these types of relationships. While I am an advocate of formal mentoring programs, I believe that true mentoring relationships occur naturally and develop over time. LEADERSHIP

New to the role of vice president and general counsel and now a member of the leadership team at DaimlerChrysler Financial Services, I am realizing that what made me successful in the past may not be what makes me successful in the future. In a leadership role you must learn, among many other things, to develop, nurture and coach those around you. That is not as easy as it sounds and requires a focus and dedication that are new to me. Leadership is also about defining what success is, planning how to achieve it and engaging those around you in that process. Most of all, you and your entire team, however it is defined, must have a shared vision and the collective passion to make success a reality.

PDJ


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W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Sharon Hall

SPENCER STUART

“Run your own race, know what you want from the job, and know your risk profile.” Managing Director, Spencer Stuart Atlanta; worldwide board of directors; co-founder and member of the Diversity Practice global practice specialty

TITLE:

T

here are three critical pieces of advice I would offer women who desire to be future corporate leaders: First, run your own race. Do not compete with others or you will be consistently let down. People who are competitive and want to get ahead sometimes compare themselves to others, and there is no advantage in this. You must compete against yourself and determine your own professional time line. Second, know what you want from the job and/or career change and why. Things you might want include stability, compensation, functional experience or life balance. For instance, if you need certain functional experience to round out your resume, do not focus on getting a title or being brought in at a certain level when you are changing jobs. Instead, focus on whether or not the company can give you the functional experience you need. You must be clear about what you are looking for because you cannot always have stability, compensation, functional experience and life balance in one package. If you know what you want and why you want it, it helps you to make the best career choices. Third, get familiar with your own risk profile. What risks are you willing to take for your current job or career change?

COMPANY:

Spencer Stuart

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

Chicago, IL

www.spencerstuart.com The leading privately held, global executive

search firm RANKING:

No. 2 in the industry

$247.3 million (U.S.) and $435.9 million (worldwide)

2005 REVENUE:

EMPLOYEES:

86

1,100 worldwide

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

EDUCATION: BS, magna cum laude, Morris Brown College, Atlanta; MBA, University of Southern California FIRST JOB: Dispatcher at Dog & Suds in Chicago (hot dogs and root beer) READING: The Power of Impossible Thinking, by Jerry Wind, Robert E. Gunther, Colin Crook and Yoram Wind. PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: Know why you are where you are. When there’s an opportunity, you’ll know which ones to raise your hand for because you know why you came. If you are getting what you came for, it doesn’t matter what’s happening around you because you are getting what you need. It helps you to know how long to stay. It helps you know why you should tough it out. And it helps you to know when to move on to other opportunities. FAMILY:

Two sons, 17 and 13.

INTERESTS:

Gourmet cooking, collecting cookbooks

and traveling. FAVORITE CHARITY:

Boys & Girls Clubs of America

Will you relocate? If so, where to and when will you move? Will you take a cut in pay? Under what circumstances? Are you willing to switch industries? If so, to which ones? Each piece of advice that I offer to women has one common thread … each is all centered on you: Run your own race, know what you want from the job, and know your risk profile. One of the most important things we can do is to study our own priorities, our own capabilities and our own desires. As we study the market, the marketplace, the company and the people who will interview us, we should also study ourselves. This is the key to success for women who desire to be corporate leaders.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Angie Hart

AFLAC

“I learned that sometimes it is the little things that count.” Senior Vice President, Community Relations, Travel, Meetings and Event Production

TITLE:

T

he beginning of my Aflac career was as comptroller for the Southern Broadcast Division of the company, which at that time owned seven television stations in addition to the more recognizable voluntary insurance we continue to sell. There were a few key people who took a special interest in mentoring me through my early years at Aflac. These individuals had great character and impressed upon me the importance of developing a vision for my professional career. Their sound advice and decision-making skills played a part in shaping my professional and personal life. From my mentors, I learned that sometimes it is the little things that count. A simple gesture such as a handwritten note of advice can have the biggest impact. As I started mentoring others, I remembered the vision, passion and gestures that were instilled early in my career. As women, we have become more active and independent in our professional growth. We make decisions from the board room and start small businesses from our living rooms. As you climb the ladder of success, chart the course you want to take. Have a vision for your career and set specific goals. Take time and visualize your possible professional and personal objectives, and don’t stop until you achieve them. Have passion about the goals you wish to accomplish. If you want to take a foreign language course or complete your

COMPANY:

Aflac

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS: RANKING:

Columbus, GA

www.aflac.com Insurance No. 151 on Fortune 500 list

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES: CUSTOMERS:

$14.3 billion

Approximately 4,100 More than 335,000 payroll accounts

EDUCATION: Bachelor’s in business administration in accounting from Columbus State University, GA FIRST JOB:

Internal audit with Blue Cross and Blue

Shield READING: A Memoir, by Barbara Bush; Your Best Life Now, by Joel Osteen.

Sometimes it’s the little impressions that make the biggest impact.

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

FAMILY: Married to Pete for 24 years. Two children: one a graduate of Southern Methodist University, and one a junior there. INTERESTS: Traveling, gardening and French hand-sewing (one of my creations was featured in Southern Accents magazine; I also completed a family christening gown that will be passed down through generations). FAVORITE CHARITY:

The United Way

master’s degree, do it. Even if this requires you to move away from your comfort zone, take on the challenge and move forward. It will only make you a better person and potentially more marketable as you play out your vision. Recognition and reward should sit high on the list of kind gestures. Individuals like to know their work is appreciated and that they are progressing in a positive direction. Recognition can be given in the form of a certificate or an appreciation dinner, and rewards can be as simple as a gift card or an employee luncheon. Whatever the method of reward and recognition, just make sure to let the people you mentor know that they are valued for their contributions. Mentors are willing to share knowledge and offer sound advice to help you advance to the next level, and they are essentially important for anyone who desires to succeed personally and professionally. So look around because you just never know where they will come from.

PDJ

Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2006

87


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Mary Jane Hellyar

E A S T M A N KO DA K

“I’m a strong believer that it ’s important to keep opening doors throughout your career.” Senior Vice President, Eastman Kodak Co. and President, Film & Photofinishing Systems Group

TITLE:

I

’ve learned to view each possible job opportunity as an open door to learn more. Often, someone facilitates that opportunity by encouraging you to look at a job change, essentially opening that door for you. I came to Eastman Kodak Company in 1982 as a young chemical engineer. Although the word mentoring was not part of the management jargon of that era, I was fortunate to work with many leaders who helped open doors for me to explore career paths that I had not envisioned for myself. I’m a strong believer that it’s important to keep opening doors throughout your career. It gives you the chance to develop and demonstrate your leadership potential to a range of people. My capabilities caught the attention of managers who knew Kodak would need diverse, insightful leaders to face tough global competition in the coming digital era. Today, I lead two businesses within Kodak, the Display business and Kodak’s Film and Photofinishing Systems Group (FPG). This business remains profitable and strategic to Kodak, even as digital photography swells in popularity. Many consumers, professional photographers and cinematographers continue to rely on photographic and motion picture film for its unmatched image quality. During the years leading up to this promotion, executives saw my potential for general management and compelled me

COMPANY:

Eastman Kodak

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Rochester, NY

www.kodak.com

BUSINESS:

digital imaging and imaging technology

INDUSTRY RANKING: 2005 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

88

#1

$14.3 billion

51,100

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

PhD in chemical engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; BA, in mathematics and chemistry, College of St. Catherine; MS in management of technology, Sloan School, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB:

Development engineer at Polaroid

The DaVinci Code by Dan Brown and The Long Tail: Why the Future of Business Is Selling Less of More by Chris Anderson WHAT I’M READING:

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: Do your best, say thank you, enjoy what you do, because life is a gift to make the most of

Husband and 2 children, a son who is 21 and a daughter, 17

FAMILY:

INTERESTS: Travel,

piano, gardening, spending time with

family FAVORITE CHARITY: Community youth programs, St. Jude Children's Hospital

to stretch myself to meet these new challenges. I faced a steep learning curve both in understanding an unfamiliar business on a global scale and in applying my skill set as a general manager, not a technologist. I quickly learned to trust and draw on the leaders around me to ramp up as quickly as possible. I love the dynamics and complexity of business management and leadership that I encounter every day. I realize I have this position in part because people opened doors for me at key vectors in my career, providing me with opportunities to grow. Because of this, mentoring others is important to me. It is part of my commitment to “pay it forward,” helping others as others have helped me. I try to meet with a wide range of individuals to discuss their careers. Sometimes, it’s a one-time event; other times, it develops into multiple discussions. And for some, I have had the chance to open doors for them.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Chris A. Hill

S P R I N T N E X T E L C O R P O R AT I O N

“I firmly believe that the true test of character is how you react to adversity.”

T

o me, success at any level is only possible if you believe in yourself. As an executive and mother of two daughters, my advice to my children and those I’ve mentored in the field of law or business has largely been the same: DON’T RUN FROM ADVERSITY. Unquestionably, there will be pitfalls and lows in your career and in your life. Use these times as opportunities to see what you’re made of, and rise above the challenge. I firmly believe that the true test of character is how you react to adversity. I have seen more than one eyebrow arch when I tell folks that being diagnosed with cancer was one of the best things that ever happened to me. My priorities, my perspectives and my career were forever changed, but my life seems so much more meaningful as a result of my diagnosis. You’d be amazed where you find those silver linings! DO IT FOR YOU. We’re all motivated by different things. I wanted to be the first person in my family to attend college. Sure, I wanted to please my parents and make them proud. But more importantly, I needed to prove to myself that I could do it; that with my family’s work ethic and my determination, my dream could really happen. I’ve found that success is so much sweeter when you’re satisfied not only with the outcome, but also with yourself.

COMPANY:

Sprint Nextel Corporation

Corporate headquarters, Reston, VA; operational headquarters, Overland Park, KS

HEADQUARTERS:

WEBSITE:

www.sprint.com

BUSINESS:

Wireless communication

RANKING:

No. 59 on Fortune list

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

$44.1 billion

Vice President, Corporate Governance and Ethics; Corporate Secretary

TITLE:

BA, Ohio State University; JD, Ohio State University College of Law

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

Spanish interpreter at a migrant school

Tess of the d'Urbervilles, by Thomas Hardy (with one of my daughters as part of her summer reading assignment)

READING:

To be a positive role model who treats people with respect and kindness, encourages people to believe in themselves, turns adversity into opportunity and inspires people to care to make a difference in this world.

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

FAMILY:

Husband, Greg Kendall, and two daughters, 16

and 14 INTERESTS: Running, reading and most team sports (My younger daughter is a sports enthusiast.) FAVORITE CHARITY:

American Cancer Society’s Relay

for Life

DON’T UNDERESTIMATE YOUR ABILITY TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

Whether you’re paying it forward by a simple act of kindness, standing up for an unpopular position or making a bet-thecompany call at work, recognize that you have tremendous power to make a difference in people’s lives. Don’t get me wrong; this is sometimes easier said than done, as I’ve had to remind myself on more than one occasion—like when I’m feeling guilty about spending too much time at work and not enough time with my family, or vice versa. When I have those self-doubts, and wonder whether what I’m doing is making a difference, I look no further than my daughters and realize that being a positive role model makes an enormous difference in their lives.

60,000

PDJ Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2006

89


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Stephanie C. Hill

L O C K H E E D M A R T I N A E R O N A U T I C S C O M PA N Y

“Establish and articulate a clear vision that inspires, motivates and mobilizes people.” Director, Launching and Ship Systems; Baltimore General Manager

TITLE:

T

hroughout my 18 years at Lockheed Martin, I’ve learned that a holistic approach is the key to a rewarding and fulfilling career and life. I believe there are five leadership tenets critical to corporate success: Develop and exhibit technical competence in your field. Perfecting your craft will be the cornerstone of your career. It is important to gauge the appropriate time to move to the next opportunity so that you don’t skip a step or miss an opportunity. Communicate clearly at all levels. A true leader conveys clear and unambiguous messages. If you are the best at what you do but can’t communicate, it doesn’t matter. It is just as important to advance your innovative ideas and those of your employees to senior managers. Two-way communication is a must. Establish and articulate a clear vision that inspires, motivates and mobilizes people. Corporate leaders must understand where they are going so their team can follow them there. Care about the people in your organization. It is amazing how much trust you can build when people know that you are honest with them and have their best interests in mind. You can practice this right now! Understand the values and priorities of senior managers. Connecting the dots between their objectives and your actions will open the door to success.

COMPANY:

Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Bethesda, MD

www.lockheedmartin.com

No. 1 provider of information technology, systems integration and training to the U.S. Government

RANKING:

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

$37.2 billion

135,000 worldwide

BS in computer science and economics, University of Maryland

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

Teaching math and reading at summer camp

at age 12 READING: The Innocent, by Harlan Coben, and mysteries and other books that allow me to escape and maintain balance PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: A holistic approach to life is key to success in your career and your life. A careful balance of family, career and community leads to fulfillment and serves as an example for those who follow you at work and at home FAMILY:

Happily married for 13+ years, three wonderful

children INTERESTS:

Singing, leading children’s ministry and choir

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Heritage United Church of Christ

From a holistic perspective, understanding the difference between boundaries and limitations is the most important advice I can give. I am clear on my personal boundaries and limitations—they are not the same thing. As women, we face different challenges in the workplace and at home. It is imperative to have a clear understanding of self and balance. It is not necessary to choose between success in business and success at home; however, success at both requires a significant amount of work and careful, constant rebalancing. Understand that the potential tension of the balance between your family, outside interests and your career is natural—don’t let it overtake you. Fine-tune your personal process on all fronts and you will find that the level of fulfillment you gain from “doing it all” energizes you, your family and your team. Being a levelheaded, content and happy person helps you to be a better leader for your organization and your employees, as well as an inspiring example for your family.

PDJ 90

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006


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W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Deborah Hockman, Ph.D. N A L C O C O M PA N Y

“Keep your moral compass ‘on’ at all times.”

I

have mentored, and I have been mentored a lot during my career. Both activities are of value and deepen your knowledge and skills of leadership. The women who are successful today have worked within the power structure of corporations to evolve the organization through policy changes and decision-making. Their work has resulted in globally competitive companies that fully use the talents of women. Those same successful women have taken calculated risks in their careers, pushed the status quo and stepped out of their comfort zone to move the organization to higher performance. The tangible benefits to the organization have been enhanced skills in change management, product and service innovation, and organic growth. Each generation of women entering the corporate world will benefit from the hard work of the prior generation. And each group will bring its own unique brand of experiences and expectations. Enter armed with academic credentials and a love of lifelong learning. Be generous with your time and provide mentoring. Seek out mentors who can assist in your personal and professional growth. Keep your moral compass “on” at all times. There are many decisions that must be made in the absence of law, regulation or ROI calculation. Get help if you are stuck. Sometimes that help is outside your company or outside your industry.

COMPANY:

Nalco Company

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Naperville, IL

www.nalco.com

Nalco is the leading provider of integrated water treatment and process improvement services, chemicals and equipment programs for industrial and institutional applications.

BUSINESS:

No. 1 worldwide in industrial water treatment; No. 566 on Fortune 1000 list

RANKING:

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

92

$3.3 billion

More than 10,000

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

Vice President, Global Safety, Health and Environment and Global Customer Analytical Services

TITLE:

EDUCATION: BS in chemistry, Northeastern Illinois University; PhD in analytical chemistry, Loyola University, Chicago

After graduate school, I taught college

FIRST JOB:

chemistry. READING:

Just finished Jack Welch’s new book,

Winning. PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

What goes around comes

around. Husband, Peter Cihak; a son, 23; and a daughter, 16.

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

Downhill skiing, scuba diving, walking the

dogs FAVORITE CHARITY:

Loyola University of Chicago

Foundation

To all those women who aspire to be corporate leaders and wives and mothers, too, marry the right man. I am a much better corporate leader because of my husband and children. They provide me with a safe haven at home for nurturing, stress relief and fun. Work for companies that share your values. If you find yourself in an untenable situation and are unable to change it from within, then get out. Your time is valuable and there are so many great companies you can work for. Never allow yourself to be trapped. If you find yourself dealing with a change in management or job loss, know that almost everybody in the workplace will encounter this several times in their careers. Don’t let fear in. Find strength in the network you have developed with mentors, family and friends. Know that another opportunity is waiting for you. You just have to go out and find it. And with that career change, you will become more valuable to the next corporation. Your career is an asset that will appreciate over time if you manage it well.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Susan Hodge

R OYA L D U T C H S H E L L

“Leadership is part gift and part acquired skill.”

T

o achieve success in anything, including corporate leadership, you must have a clear sense of yourself and what is important to you. When I have struggled, it was because I veered from my internal compass. When I rebounded, it was because I regained perspective and listened to that still, small voice inside. Here are a few things that I heard: •

Don’t fall prey to the latest trend without understanding the fundamentals behind it: customer value proposition, cost/benefit implications, technical soundness and ethical principles. In recent years we’ve seen examples of fallen industries, companies and individuals that have neglected this principle.

GET THE BASICS RIGHT.

• NEVER STOP LEARNING. Keep the technical skills of your trade sharp and continuously develop your leadership skills. Leadership is part gift and part acquired skill. •

Vice President, Finance and Management Consultancy

TITLE:

BS, Iowa State University; MBA, University of Texas

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: Baby-sitting 40 hours a week during the summer when I was 12. READING: Leadership, by Rudolf Giuliani; and always something by John Maxwell

Serve others and invest your time, talents and treasures in something that will outlive you.

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

FAMILY: Husband, Mike; two great stepchildren; and my nieces and nephews who are a precious part of my life INTERESTS:

Anything outdoors, cooking, gardening and

playing piano FAVORITE CHARITY: Interfaith Ministries of Greater Houston, which brings people of diverse faith traditions together in service

and hold them accountable. If you don’t deal with the problem performance issues, your best employees will be the ones most demoralized.

TREAT YOUR EMPLOYEES WELL

• DON’T TRY TO DO IT ALL YOURSELF—you can’t! Remember, you’re only human. You don’t have to be perfect—no one else is! Things get done through teams of people. Value your employees. When you need resources, ask for them. When you’re faced with a challenge, consult others who have had a similar experience. When you’re facing a down moment, surround yourself with your cheerleaders.

HEADQUARTERS:

BUSINESS:

FIND A WAY OF LIVING YOUR PHILOSOPHY

GIVE BACK. There have no doubt been people who have helped you (or will) along your career path. Return that help. Mentor and coach others—inside and outside of your own organization.

Royal Dutch Shell

COMPANY:

WEBSITE:

Always have people in your life who care enough to cheer you when you’re down and put you on the right path when you veer off course.

The Hague, Netherlands

www.shell.com Global group of energy and petrochemicals

companies RANKING:

No. 3 on Fortune’s Global 500 list

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

$306.7 billion

Approximately 109,000 in more than

within your work. If your work is aligned with your values, you’ll find it satisfying. If it’s not, it will drain your energy. Work for a company whose corporate values align with yours. Part of the purpose of my company is to provide much-needed energy to the world. We are serving the communities in which we do business in a multitude of ways. We do so with a strong set of business principles and values, among which are integrity and respect for people. I feel good about working in an environment where diversity is respected and inclusiveness is a way of working.

140 countries

PDJ Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2006

93


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Barbara Hoffnagle

S A LT R I V E R P R O J E C T ( S R P )

“Acknowledge and learn from your mistakes. Always be on a journey of continuous, lifelong learning.”

A

fter taking time off to raise my children, I decided it was time to get back in the work force at the age of 36. Upon completion of my master’s degree in industrial engineering, I started work as an operations analyst for Salt River Project, a utility that delivers electricity and water to the Phoenix metropolitan area. When I joined SRP, I had no formal career plan and never imagined that nine years later I would be in upper management. As a female executive in a traditionally male-dominated industry, I am often asked how I achieved this success. My response initially was “just lucky, in the right place at the right time.” I quickly realized I needed to review my career, my experiences and take stock of what has contributed to my success—to remind myself and to share with others. Here are just some of the valuable lessons I’ve learned as I made my way to management: • Do what you say. Your employees will look to you for guidance and respect you if your actions mirror your words. • Know your company’s business. My primary responsibility is to oversee and maintain SRP’s support functions, which include supply chain, facilities, machine shop services and

COMPANY:

Salt River Project (SRP)

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Phoenix, AZ

www.srpnet.com

SRP is the largest provider of electricity to the greater Phoenix area, providing electric service to more than 892,000 customers. SRP is the Phoenix metropolitan area’s largest supplier of water, delivering about 1 million acre-feet to agricultural, urban and municipal water users.

BUSINESS/RANKING:

2005 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

94

$2.25 billion

4,500

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

TITLE:

Manager, Operations Support Services

BA in mathematics, College of Mt. St. Vincent, Riverdale, NY; MSE in industrial engineering, Arizona State University

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB:

Personnel assistant for payroll at a savings

and loan

The Heart Aroused: Poetry and the Preservation of the Soul in Corporate America by David Whyte READING:

PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Commit and follow through

Married for 37 years, daughter and son

INTERESTS:

Personal fitness, golf and reading

FAVORITE CHARITY: Fresh Start Women’s Foundation, www.WeHelpWomen.com

fleet management. But I have made it a point to learn all I can about the business of providing electricity and water to hundreds of thousands of customers. This has the added benefit of growing your network and fostering collaboration. • Take the time to know your staff. The more you know about your employees’ personal strengths and challenges, the better prepared you are to lead and develop them. • Be flexible to respond to whatever comes your way, looking for opportunities in every situation. Don’t be too proud to ask for help; instead view it as an opportunity to learn from others. Acknowledge and learn from your mistakes. Always be on a journey of continuous, lifelong learning. Most importantly, give back, whether it’s mentoring another employee, removing barriers or championing a cause for others. I am fortunate to have worked for leaders who believed in me and provided opportunities for me to learn and grow, personally and professionally. In the process, I picked up a lot of wisdom that I now can share with others. I truly enjoy that.

PDJ


National City is committed to diversity.

At National City, we believe in diversity. That’s why we’re committed to a corporate strategy that focuses on workforce diversity, inclusion and investing in the communities we serve. That’s why we target new sources to recruit top talent, host welcome receptions, sponsor special programs for new employees, offer career development programs to benefit women and individuals of color and have an outstanding program to recognize our employees’ accomplishments. We recognize that diversity makes us a stronger, more competitive company. It improves our service, opens our eyes to new possibilities and helps create more opportunities for our employees, our customers and our communities.

NationalCity.com/Diversity ©2006, National City Corporation®


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Julie Fasone Holder

T H E D O W C H E M I C A L C O M PA N Y

“Leadership does not require a senior level title, a large corner office or a six-figure pay check.”

W

BA in business administration, Michigan State University

EDUCATION:

hen I began my career more than 30 years ago, I was keenly aware of the challenges women faced in the work force. As the first female sales rep for Dow’s Building and Construction business, I knew few women I could look up to as mentors, leaders and innovators in my industry. Like law, medicine and many other careers at that time, the engineering and sales professions were dominated by men and diversification was not a top priority. Today, women have a much greater opportunity for achievement as companies have welcomed the potential found within the female work force and have recognized that they are at a competitive disadvantage without it. Being a woman who has experienced a rewarding and successful career, I am compelled to harness the lessons I’ve learned along the way and to share them with future leaders. It is my philosophy that leaders must be visible and accessible role models and coaches and that people development is one of our most important roles. As corporate vice president for human resources and diversity and inclusion, I see this as a key part of my job description today, but it is also some-

COMPANY:

The Dow Chemical Company

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Midland, MI

www.dow.com

Diversified chemical company that offers a broad range of innovative products and services to customers in more than 175 countries, helping them to provide everything from fresh water, food and pharmaceuticals to paints, packaging and personal care products.

BUSINESS:

No. 36 on Fortune 500 list; world’s largest chemical company

RANKING:

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

96

Corporate Vice President, Human Resources, Diversity and Inclusion, and Public Affairs

TITLE:

$46.3 billion

43,000 worldwide

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

FIRST JOB: Field sales representative, STYROFOAM™ brand products, San Francisco, CA READING:

Only in America, by Paul Oreffice

“It is literally true that you can succeed best and quickest by helping others to succeed.” –Napoleon Hill; “Leaders are dealers in hope.” –Myles Martel

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

FAMILY:

Husband, John; and two daughters

Skiing—water and snow, aerobic exercise, my daughters’ activities

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Rod Fasone Memorial Cancer

Research Fund

thing I have always considered to be a very important personal responsibility. In light of this, the most critical pieces of advice I offer to young people are to think, act and work outside the bounds of your job description. I’ve found that the people who are most successful are those who extend their responsibilities beyond what is expected of them. Leadership does not require a senior level title, a large corner office or a six-figure paycheck. Leadership requires helping others, building pride in our organizations, being candid, truthful and trustworthy, showing people we care and, ultimately, doing our best to enable business success. But to be a leader, you must first discover your unique qualities. Our individual talents are what set us apart and solidify our value within a company. They are what gives us the confidence to take initiative, motivate others and gain respect from our colleagues. So to all the future leaders out there, I urge you to discover, embrace and apply the qualities that make you great. I guarantee you will be positioned for a successful and rewarding career. PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Mary L. Howell

TEXTRON INC.

“Be the change you want to see and enjoy the road ahead.”

F

rom my early experiences working for Textron in Washington D.C., and along my path to leadership in the years that have followed, I’ve learned a few things … some more meaningful than others, and some through trial and error and hindsight. As I reflect upon these lessons, I’m struck by how difficult some of them were to learn. First, and perhaps most importantly, LEADERS MUST EMBRACE CHANGE. In my career—and life, for that matter—one thing has remained constant: That one thing is change. Whether we like it or not, the ability to embrace change—to truly accept change—is probably the single most critical attribute for success. I’ve been fortunate to know some exceptional individuals and some great leaders. When I think about the difference between what makes a business or a leader thrive, it so often comes down to an ability to be nimble and to face change head-on. “If you don’t change, you can become extinct.” That’s one of my favorite quotes. It’s from Spencer Johnson’s Who Moved My Cheese, which is a very fitting metaphor for embracing change. When you think about it, change really is the engine that propels growth. LEADERS MUST PLAY TO THEIR STRENGTHS, and to the strengths of their teams. Everyone has a unique combination

COMPANY:

Textron Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Providence, RI

www.textron.com

Multi-industry with aircraft, industrial, and finance businesses

BUSINESS:

INDUSTRY RANKING: 2005 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

#190 on Fortune 500

$10 billion

37,000 in 33 countries

TITLE:

Executive Vice President

EDUCATION:

BS from the University of Massachusetts,

Amherst FIRST JOB: Health Industry Manufacturers Association, Washington, DC WHAT I’M READING:

The World is Flat, by Thomas L.

Friedman PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: Play to your strengths and make the change you want to see. FAMILY:

Husband, John, of 26 years; son, Patrick, 23

INTERESTS:

Snow-skiing, water skiing, gardening

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Children’s Hospital

of professional and personal strengths. Blending these strengths is the challenge, but when done right—when done artfully—the results will come. The growth will happen. Don’t waste too much time force-fitting yourself or your people into roles that don’t make sense or offer an opportunity to unleash potential. Believe me, this is a common leadership mistake that is easy to correct. LEADERS MUST LISTEN. This isn’t necessarily the business climate I entered into—or grew up in—but, like you, it’s the world I’m growing in. There’s a saying at Textron that “dialogue is the oxygen of change.” Indeed, listening is essential in order to realize the change necessary to learn and to thrive. Listening sounds easy, but you would be surprised at how easy it is to NOT listen. At Textron, listening is an actual competency that our leaders are held accountable to build. As aspiring leaders, you have a challenging road in front of you. Be the change you want to see and enjoy the road ahead. Best of luck on your journey. PDJ

PDJ

98

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Pamela Huggins

PA R K E R H A N N I F I N C O R P O R AT I O N

“Never ask anyone to do something that you would not be willing to do yourself.”

A

former boss and mentor has described me as the most tenacious person he has ever known. The truth is, I refuse to succumb to failure. Whether you call that tenacious, determined or downright stubborn, the objective is the same—succeed at whatever it is that you set out to do. My advice is simple: Whether learning something new, solving a complex problem or getting the right job, never give up! Hard work is the foundation for success. To achieve the greatest rewards in your chosen field without some sacrifice would be rare. In today’s high-energy, high-expectations world, success without a major commitment of time and energy is probably impossible. While tenacity and hard work have been at the core of my success, I would like to suggest several other attributes that have served me well and should prove helpful in advancing your career: PLAY FAIR. Always understand the other side of every issue. Show empathy for the opposing view and strive to reach a conclusion that is fair to all parties. Be totally honest in your representations and show integrity by never allowing someone else to settle for a gross inequity. The right answer is the one that is most fair to everyone in direct correlation to the risk each has invested and the reward that will be realized.

COMPANY:

Parker Hannifin Corporation

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Cleveland, OH

www.parker.com

BUSINESS:

World’s leading motion and control company

RANKING:

No. 279 on Fortune 500 list

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

More than $8 billion

More than 55,000 worldwide

TITLE:

Corporate Vice President and Treasurer

Bachelor’s in business administration, Kent State University; MBA, Case Western Reserve University; Certified Public Accountant (CPA); Certified Internal Auditor (CIA)

EDUCATION:

Helping my brother with his paper route

FIRST JOB: READING:

Angels and Demons, by Dan Brown

Create a vision, learn from the best, focus on the mission, accept the risk, embrace opportunity, mentor the future, realize your dream.

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

Husband Russell G. Chester Jr., two stepchildren whom I adore, two grandchildren

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

Golf, travel

FAVORITE CHARITY:

American Heart Association

I have learned that you must perpetually explore new horizons. I was always accepting new challenges that were a stretch beyond any current level of knowledge I then possessed. You cannot reach the top with one year of experience successfully repeated 20 times. Avoiding risks may result in the loss of a critical lesson. LEAD BY EXAMPLE. Never ask anyone to do something that you would not be willing to do yourself. Setting the tone and direction are parts of leadership. I tried to observe those who came before me, and emulated what I thought were their positive characteristics. If I have the good fortune to motivate a change in behavior that enhances an individual’s level of performance, I would consider this the ultimate compliment. Please, never stop learning, never stop growing and never be afraid of a new challenge. Step out with honor, enthusiasm and vigor; and, with a little luck, we will see you at the top! Never give up! TAKE RISKS.

PDJ Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2006

99


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

J. Pat Jannausch

C O N - WAY I N C .

“I believe that leadership is a privilege.”

W

hen I think about leadership, four words come to mind: process, decision, privilege and responsibility. People become leaders through the process of using and developing natural traits and talents. Therefore, it is important to find your true self, understand what you’re good at and what makes you happy, and then put those gifts to work. People become leaders through the process of learning from life experiences and exposure to role models at home, in school, at work and in the community. It’s a selfmanaged process that is continuous. You never stop learning. Every day, you make a decision to use your talents or not, to learn from experience or not, and to follow or not follow a particular example. I recall a poster on the wall at my high school: “Not to decide is to decide.” A successful, rewarding career does not simply evolve nor can others make it happen for you. Proactive choice and decision-making along the way will determine the path your career takes. I believe that leadership is a privilege. When people follow a leader, they are offering trust, dedication and some degree of personal investment in the form of work or another type of commitment. It is a privilege to be given these gifts. They should always be respected and used for the greater good.

COMPANY:

Con-way Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

San Mateo, CA

www.con-way.com Freight trucking and logistics

RANKING: One of the top three freight-trucking companies in North America 2005 REVENUE:

$4.2 billion

TITLE:

Vice President, Training and Culture

EDUCATION: BS in music education K-12 and master’s degree in early childhood education, Rhode Island College FIRST JOB: Music teacher, chorus conductor in a junior-senior high school READING: Branding From the Inside, by Libby Sartain and Mark Schumann; Destination Profit, by Scott Cawood and Rita V. Bailey; Three Weeks With My Brother, by Nicholas Sparks

From my father: “Do a job, great or small, do it well or not at all.” From church: Treat others as I would like to be treated. From Con-way: “Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity.”

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

FAMILY:

Husband, Tom; and two adult sons

INTERESTS:

Reading, church choir, boating, family and

friends FAVORITE CHARITY:

Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer

Foundation

If you seek to be in a leadership position, you must accept the responsibility of making choices that will affect the lives of those who choose to follow you. To effectively fulfill this responsibility, leaders must seek to understand before being understood and never stop being students of their profession, of business or of the world. They must care passionately about what they do as well as for the people with whom and for whom they do it. Leadership is the process of making decisions that will earn you the privilege of having the responsibility to influence other people’s lives.

24,000 at more than 450 service centers in North America and 20 countries.

EMPLOYEES:

PDJ 100

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006


DIVERSITY determines a company’s success. Eastman Kodak Company’s commitment to diversity and inclusion involves our employees, customers, suppliers and communities worldwide. In our global marketplace, Kodak’s innovations reflect the creativity and rich tapestry of our diverse workforce and winning culture.

www.kodak.com/go/careers © Eastman Kodak Company, 2006


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Debra Hunter Johnson

AMERICAN AIRLINES

“Be patient with the younger generations. They have a lot to offer.”

T

o women who aspire to become corporate leaders, I would offer an important tip: Have a flexible mind, particularly on matters related to people. Today’s diverse workplace presents a variety of challenges to leaders. By its very nature, it requires an open mind to understand different perspectives. Just when I think I have my mind sufficiently “open,” a curve ball comes and forces me into new discoveries about how human “disconnects” can affect the workplace. My latest discovery is that age influences how we view the world, and it ushers in a whole new set of challenges for today’s current leaders. For instance, baby boomers grew up with a positive outlook on life. They expected to have a better quality of life than their parents. This generation, to which I belong, grew up believing that if you worked hard, you’d be rewarded. Generation X does not view the world this way. They saw the Challenger tragedy, the stock market crash, the AIDS epidemic. And Generation Y is colored by the events of September 11. These experiences have caused these younger generations to view life with less optimism in many cases. Some saw their parents work hard only to get laid off. Therefore, many want to work to live, not live to work. Immediate gratification and rewards are the order of the day—not years of toil. The big question is how do we motivate them? These differences in the generations are not good or bad, right or

COMPANY:

American Airlines

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS: RANKING:

www.AA.com Passenger airline No. 1

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

102

Fort Worth, TX

$4 billion

83,162

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

TITLE:

Vice President, Global HR Services

BA in English, University of Michigan; JD, Howard University School of Law, Washington, DC

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: Fielding telephone calls at a government human services center READING:

The Art of Friendship, by Sally and Roger

Horchow PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

“To overcome adversity, you

must first transcend it.” FAMILY:

Husband, Lyndon; and a daughter, 12

INTERESTS:

Travel, reading, photography, outdoors

FAVORITE CHARITY: Jack and Jill of America Foundation, which supports leadership in youth, particularly in the African American and Hispanic communities

wrong—simply different. With the traditional baby boomer work ethic, we clearly must meet them halfway to make a connection—and be prepared to listen and learn. I believe the younger generations are the change agents that corporate America needs to ensure future viability and relevance. With their technical skills, ability to multitask and zeal for fulfilling personal lives, they may be the key to future innovation and growth. Be patient with the younger generations. They have a lot to offer. I would also remind future leaders that flexible thinking helps one navigate in an ever-changing world. Those with flexible, nimble minds still can be competitive and vital for decades into their career. With vitamin supplements and plastic surgery helping to sustain youthfulness, age in the workplace will be defined less by physical clues and more by the ability to adapt and work in an ever-changing environment.

PDJ


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Breathe life into your ideas. And ideas into your life.

Creative ideas can change the world. But only if they are born in a supportive atmosphere. A shared atmosphere of respect and enthusiasm, in which people can draw inspiration from each othersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; thinking. Where differences of background and perspective are not only respected, but valued and encouraged. This is the atmosphere we breathe at Seagate. Its richness has helped us to become a leading creator of storage technology. Share it with us. Add to it. Because the richer our diversity, the more we can learn.

www.seagate.com/jobs


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Marsha Johnson

S O U T H E R N C O M PA N Y

“Be comfortable in your own skin.”

I

f 30 years of working have resulted in any wisdom, clarity or vision worthy of passing on, all could be summed up this way: First, “Know the business and constantly seek ways to add value.” Second, and equally important, “Be comfortable in your own skin.” The first piece of advice might seem a bit cliché, but, done well, it demands continual learning and analytical discipline. We must train ourselves to analyze issues and opportunities from the perspectives of multiple stakeholders, both internal and external to the enterprise. In doing so, we learn more about the subject, and we unveil opportunities to bring our skills and talents to bear in achieving desired business results. The organization wins, and our professional reputations are enhanced. Second, and perhaps more challenging, is to be comfortable in your own skin. That one little phrase embodies a wealth of personal growth, encompassing core values, spiritual grounding, and cultural or ethnic anchors. After all, our degree of satisfaction in the work we do and, ultimately, our success at doing it are in direct proportion to the degree to which the work allows us to touch our real passions and

COMPANY:

Southern Company

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Atlanta, GA

www.southerncompany.com

One of the largest producers of electricity in the United States, Southern Company has a generating capacity of more than 40,000 megawatts to serve 4.3 million customers in Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi and the panhandle region of Florida.

BUSINESS:

RANKING:

No. 165 on the Fortune 500 list

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

104

$13.6 billion

Approximately 26,000

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

Senior Vice President of Talent Management and Chief Diversity Officer

TITLE:

EDUCATION: BA in political science, Jacksonville University; Harvard Business School Advanced Management Program FIRST JOB:

Salesperson, May-Cohen department store

YOU: The Owner’s Manual, by Michael Roizen and Mehmet Oz

READING:

One person, one voice, with focus and relentless drive can make a difference

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

Small core family of mother, one sister and one brother, closely knit with one nephew, cousins, and great nephews and nieces

FAMILY:

Visual and performing arts; traveling and learning about others’ cultures

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

YWCA

affirm our sense of self. Functioning successfully as our authentic selves within the confines of corporate culture is possible. It starts with really knowing, liking and valuing ourselves before we are tempted to take the deep dive to think and act like everyone else. Being our authentic selves does not mean we never change. But as we grow and stretch our thoughts and abilities, we hold to the essence of what makes us who we are. Clearly, every organization has its requirements for conformity; and, yes, we do stay out of trouble when we blend in. Unfortunately, we also stay out of mind when the business is looking for innovators; we stay out of touch with our own energy and aspirations; we stay out of tune with opportunities. The good news is that the more we become comfortable in our own skin, the more we are able to leverage our unique qualities. We become to others “real people” in our whole, imperfect, authentic selves, amazingly capable of perseverance and resilience—two essential attributes for success in any arena. PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Rebeca Johnson

B R I N K E R I N T E R N AT I O N A L

“Some of my most rewarding experiences were the most difficult.”

G

rowing up in New Orleans, I developed an appreciation for the sensory experience of sharing a flavorful meal with friends and family. To this day, I enjoy watching people use food and beverage as a catalyst for connecting with one another. During the course of my career, I’ve worked at several great organizations with talented mentors. Today I’m fortunate to hold a job that is every marketer’s dream— developing the marketing agenda and working with a terrific team to build global brands for a well-respected restaurant industry leader. Early on, I learned to take advantage of every professional and personal opportunity to grow. I hope tomorrow’s leaders will appreciate what I’ve found to be the keys to success: •

With experience and encouragement from several role models, I’ve been able to take on some large, challenging assignments—most of which were fraught with risk, as well as the potential for reward. Some of my most rewarding experiences were the most difficult. Having a clear vision, championing the project day in and day out and building a coalition along the way are tremendously rewarding and go a long way toward ensuring a successful outcome.

BE READY FOR CHALLENGING ASSIGNMENTS.

Inevitably, there will be times when you are the only one who does. When paving new

BELIEVE IN YOURSELF.

COMPANY:

Brinker International

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

www.brinker.com Restaurant industry

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

106

Dallas, TX

$3.9 billion

More than 100,000

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

TITLE:

Chief Marketing and Branding Officer

BA in business and communications, Louisiana State University; BS in marketing and finance, Dallas Baptist University; master’s in marketing, Southern Methodist University; graduate of the Advanced Management Program, Harvard Business School

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: Receptionist at WRNO radio station, “The Rock of New Orleans”

Married to the Brand, by William J. McEwen; First, Break All the Rules: What the World's Greatest Managers Do Differently, by Marcus Buckingham and Curt Coffman; The First 90 Days, by Michael Watkins READING:

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

Love, laugh, learn a lot and

leave a legacy. FAMILY:

Married to Harris for 23 years, three children

INTERESTS:

Reading, cooking, sports, travel

FAVORITE CHARITY:

YMCA

pathways or discovering new processes, people may question your ability, become discouraged by the change involved and lose their resolve. Use that energy as fuel to keep going—and ultimately achieve your vision. Once you’ve achieved success, challenge yourself to do it again. Your career is not a 50-yard dash, it’s a marathon. •

I don’t subscribe to the idea of balance. I do believe in defining your principles and values and determining how to stay true to them—especially when they are challenged. Sometimes I’ll work 24/7 to get a big project over the goal line, but there also are times when I click off the BlackBerry to enjoy time with my family.

BALANCE IS EXTINCT.

It’s impossible to achieve perfect work-life balance in day-today life. However, it is possible to balance out your various commitments over time. That said, don’t forget to have a life. You are a whole person. Celebrate it!

PDJ


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W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Anne Kaiser

GEORGIA POWER

“Staying grounded in who you are and what is of real importance to you is what works.”

M

y mother taught me, “You will always be a freshman in life.” She believed that you start over frequently and learn constantly. Her wisdom has served me well in my career. It has given me a strong sense of self and a lot of resiliency. I have worked in eight different industries in 28 years. At each job, I have “started over” and experienced an enormous learning curve. Remembering her words minimized my frustration and allowed me to excel quickly. My mother also was my first and No. 1 mentor. In the business world, a mentor—albeit an overused word—is essential to your survival and success. These purveyors of wisdom come in all shapes and sizes. The key is to find someone who cares enough about you to be brutally honest and who can read the landscape. I have been lucky to have had several throughout my career. The concept of balancing work and home is a sheer myth. There will be times when work will be the predominant focus in your life and times when an ill father will be the sole focus of your attention. Staying grounded in who you are and what is of real importance to you is what works. It is the myth buster. You do not have to hand-stitch the Halloween costume when buying the latest Spiderman outfit is sufficient. It’s more important to have the energy to trick-or-treat with your 5-year-old than to parade your Martha Stewart genes through the neighborhood.

COMPANY:

FIRST JOB:

www.georgiapower.com

BUSINESS:

Electric utility

RANKING:

No. 9 of 136 U.S. utilities

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES: CUSTOMERS:

$6.6 billion

9,015 2.3 million

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

BA in journalism

Sales

Crossing to Safety, by Wallace Earle Stegner; March, by Geraldine Brooks; Leaving the Church, by Barbara Brown Taylor READING:

“Life is a daring adventure or nothing at all.” –Helen Keller

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: FAMILY:

My wonderful husband, Mark, of 18 years

INTERESTS:

Snow skiing, hiking, reading, travel, drawing

Today, you can have it all. The difference, in these times, is that you must define what it means to have it all—not Martha Stewart, Betty Friedan or Good Housekeeping magazine. Over time, I have revised my definition of having it all: I have a rich marriage, a challenging career and friends who I consider family. I have three core beliefs to share to ensure your advancement and personal happiness: •

CRAVE LEARNING. Love to learn and always stay on top of your game. The minute you become complacent, you have lost. Being a freshman is good.

KEEP THE FAITH. As you advance, the challenges are bigger and the shots others take at you become bigger.

ALWAYS MAINTAIN A TRUE SENSE OF POSSIBILITY.

Atlanta, GA

WEBSITE:

Vice President, Sales

EDUCATION:

Georgia Power

HEADQUARTERS:

108

TITLE:

The world’s

wide open to you for whatever you want. You do manage your own destiny. Go forth and do good.

PDJ


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W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Catherine King

K E L LY S E R V I C E S I N C .

“As leaders, we have a unique opportunity to dispel the cynicism that dominates the post-Enron era.”

A

s leaders, we have a unique opportunity to dispel the cynicism that dominates the post-Enron era. Character does exist. It does, in fact, permeate throughout the global business community. Proving our character in the midst of what many believe to be a characterless, commercial world is the responsibility of the chieftains of business today. Unsung heroes who rarely make the newspapers are all around us, often in unexpected positions and without institutional power. Integrity does not sit exclusively in boardrooms. Personally, I have had the privilege of learning the most valuable lessons of business from people who never even knew they were mentors. These leaders led by example, uncompromising and relentless in their pursuit of what was right. They just happened to be in business. Indeed, they could have been found in law, religion or academia. One was Terry Adderley, former chairman of Kelly Services, who for 50 years breathed the life of his mentor,

COMPANY:

Kelly Services Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Troy, MI

www.kellyservices.com

Staffing solutions that include temporary staffing services, staff leasing, outsourcing, vendor on-site and full-time placement in 30 countries and territories. Kelly provides employment to more than 700,000 employees annually in office services, accounting, engineering, information technology, law, science, marketing, light industrial and education.

BUSINESS:

RANKING: Second largest in the United States and fifth largest in the world; Fortune 500 company 2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

110

Senior Vice President and General Manager, United Kingdom and Ireland

TITLE:

EDUCATION:

Executive studies at Harvard Business

School FIRST JOB:

Finance clerk

READING: Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson, the philosophical writings of Niels Bohr, and The Seven Pillars of Wisdom, by T. E. Lawrence PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

“To do good to all and harm to

none.” –On Duties, Cicero FAMILY:

Husband, married 24 years

INTERESTS:

Astronomy, physics, music, philosophy

FAVORITE CHARITY:

American Red Cross

William Russell Kelly, into the DNA of generations of the industry leaders who followed him. Now the wisdom of both resonates throughout the organization in a sort of spiritual patina. Another was businesswoman Sheila Prentice, former vice president for Olsten Staffing Services. After two decades of retirement in Houston, she still can commandeer those of us who worked for her. Twenty years later, we still gather to hear her voice and seek her advice on life. Such is the influence of those who are authentic guides of life. As mentors, we remember that many people are affected by the decisions we make and the things we do—even the small things we do, especially the small things. We are reminded of the wisdom of Mother Teresa, another great mentor for the world, when she said, “We do no great things; only small things with great love.”

$5.3 billion

8,600 full-time employees

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

PDJ


highmark.com

DIVERSITY. IT

ENRICHES US.

STRENGTHENS

US.

DEFINES

US.

At Highmark, we value and celebrate the diversity that makes this world we share a better place. For our employees, our customers, and the suppliers we partner with throughout the many communities we serve.


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Gale V. King

N AT I O N W I D E

“Some of my best learning came from people who cared enough to give me honest feedback.”

I

believe success is possible, but not easy. For me, it’s been about hard work, making the right choices and taking chances. I believe success is dependent on your ability to know your strengths and developmental needs and working to make them better. It’s about never compromising your beliefs, but being adaptable enough to change when change is needed. And most importantly, success is about being able to make a difference—to give back to family, work and the community. I’ve never worried about race or gender, because those are realities—they are who I am. I realized early on that there would be challenges but that I would need to stay focused on what I could control. I can’t control individuals who view me through filters; I can only stay focused on getting the job done. Because I believe doing the right thing ultimately prevails, this has worked for me. For women who aspire to be leaders, I’ll share some things I’ve learned along the way: • Never compromise on getting the job done. • Competence is required, both technical and leadership. • Stand up for what you believe.

TITLE:

Senior Vice President, Human Resources

EDUCATION: Bachelor’s degree in journalism/public relations and a master’s degree in public administration FIRST JOB: Waitress

I’m a big Max Lucado fan. I am reading Cure for the Common Life.

READING:

I believe that you can achieve anything you want to achieve with hard work and a positive attitude. PHILOSOPHY:

INTERESTS: I am interested in organizations that contribute to or protect the elderly and our youth. I also enjoy tennis and reading. FAVORITE CHARITY:

Life Care Alliance

• Be willing to give and accept honest feedback. Some of my best learning came from people who cared enough to give me honest feedback. • Surround yourself with talented people and empower them to do their best work. • Be optimistic and positive—people will respond better to you.

COMPANY:

Nationwide

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Columbus, OH

www.nationwide.com

INDUSTRY RANKING: 2005 ASSETS: EMPLOYEES:

112

#98 on Fortune 100 list

$158 billion Approx. 35,000

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

• Have a network of mentors outside of your place of employment. They provide invaluable perspective. • Be a mentor to others, either formally or informally. There are countless people throughout my career who helped me learn a new skill, welcomed me to a new role, gave me opportunities to work on projects, provided a listening ear, or just believed in me.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Madeleine Kleiner

H I LT O N H O T E L S C O R P O R AT I O N

“To make good decisions, you must be able to manage conflict, not avoid it.”

Executive Vice President, General Counsel

EDUCATION:

BS, Cornell University; JD, Yale Law School

FIRST JOB: Law clerk for the Hon. William P. Gray, U.S. District Court, Central District, CA

M

aking good decisions is critical to being successful in your career. It involves three key components: teamwork, the ability to deal with conflict and trusting your instincts. I often cite an old rabbinical tale on the subject of teamwork. The Lord takes a rabbi to see hell. It is a room filled with people sitting around a large pot of stew. They all are starving. Each holds a spoon that is long enough to reach the pot, but too long to reach the mouth. The Lord then takes the rabbi to see heaven. It is a room that is identical to the first, except that everyone looks happy and well-nourished. The rabbi is puzzled and asks the Lord why everyone is happy in heaven and miserable in hell when everything looks the same. The Lord explains that in heaven, the people have learned to feed each other. Teamwork yields results in all your work relationships— with supervisors, peers and direct reports. A true leader can create an environment where politics have little or no place and where team players are rewarded because of their cooperation and support of others. To make the best decisions, you want open and candid input, many different perspectives, and the knowledge and expertise of the entire group.

COMPANY: WEBSITE:

TITLE:

Hilton Hotels Corporation

www.hiltonworldwide.com.

Hospitality industry with a franchise portfolio that includes Hilton®, Conrad®, Coral by Hilton®, Doubletree®, Embassy Suites Hotels®, Hampton Inn®, Hampton Inn & Suites®, Hilton Garden Inn®, Hilton Grand Vacations™, Homewood Suites by Hilton®, Scandic and The Waldorf-Astoria Collection™ BUSINESS:

Leading global hospitality company, with nearly 2,800 hotels and 485,000 rooms in more than 80 countries

RANKING:

EMPLOYEES:

150,000

READING: I usually have two books going at once. One I’m listening to on the treadmill, and one I read at my leisure. Favorites in the last year: listening to Freakonomics, by Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner, and reading Saturday, by Ian McEwan.

Teamwork is the key to success. Almost anything can be done better when you bring to bear the diverse perspectives and talents of a team.

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

Married 30 years, one son, 24, and one daughter, 21

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

Golf, cooking, wine, crossword puzzles

Public Counsel, a pro bono legal organization that relies largely on volunteer services from lawyers in the private sector FAVORITE CHARITY:

To make good decisions, you must be able to manage conflict, not avoid it. This does not have to be done in an acrimonious way. Conflict resolution leads to better decisions. For instance, if two parts of the company are vying for scarce resources, avoiding the conflict will not result in the most beneficial allocation of those resources. All it will ensure is that whoever has political clout is likely to get the resources. If the conflict is discussed openly, the resolution is more likely to benefit the entire company. Resolving conflicts is not inconsistent with being a team player. If anything, it enables the team to function in a coherent fashion and often leads to a creative, win-win solution. Finally, in making decisions, trust your gut. You will not always have every fact you need to make a decision, and some decisions involve so much ambiguity that you have to make your decision based on unknowns. This is when your intuition is invaluable. Build the best team you can; facilitate conflict resolution; and be confident enough to deal with ambiguity.

PDJ Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2006

113


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Susan M. LaChance

U N I T E D S TAT E S P O S TA L S E R V I C E

“When we understand where others are coming from, it makes leading much easier.”

O

ur success depends on what we learn, what we share and how we grow. Our lives are shaped by people and by experiences. My early lessons were based on the words, actions and expectations of my family. Mom and Dad insisted that each of their five children be polite, respect others, work hard, accept responsibility and never bring shame to the family.

Vice President, Employee Development and Diversity

TITLE:

FIRST JOB:

READING: Roses Are Red, by James Patterson; Effective Succession Planning, by William J. Rothwell PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can and the wisdom to know the difference. Fairness to all, harm to none.

My “postal family” has provided me a great many lessons as well. Over 30 years, I’ve had a variety of experiences and assignments and the pleasure of learning from great people. I’d like to share what I’ve learned. •

Husband, one sister and three brothers, and wonderful nieces and nephews

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

SEEK OUT GOOD MENTORS AND BE A GOOD ROLE MODEL.

WORK HARD AND ACCEPT RESPONSIBILITY.

When you are asked to take on a task, deliver on your promises. If your efforts fall short of expectations, accept responsibility and learn from the disappointments. At all times demonstrate that integrity is a core value for you and expect it from those on your team.

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

LISTEN, LISTEN, LISTEN.

It is very easy to jump in and attempt to solve a problem. It’s more difficult to listen. Listen to understand, listen to diagnose, listen to determine how to best persuade others, and listen to motivate. When we understand where others are coming from, it makes leading much easier.

COMPANY:

114

American Cancer Society

• RESPECT OTHERS FOR THEIR DIFFERENCES. I have been blessed with many wonderful relationships: family, confidantes, close friends and terrific team members. Relationships provide support and love, grant us the great gift of feedback, open our eyes to the value of differences and teach us patience, tolerance and the importance of sharing. •

United States Postal Service HEADQUARTERS: Washington, DC WEBSITE: www.usps.com BUSINESS: World’s leading provider of mailing and delivery services. An independent federal agency that visits more than 144 million homes and businesses every day and serves more than 7.5 million customers daily at more than 37,000 post offices. RANKING: Named one of the 50 Best Companies for Minorities for five straight years by FORTUNE magazine. 2005 REVENUE: $70 billion EMPLOYEES: Approximately 700,000

Travel, cooking, boating and spending time

on the beach

As the oldest child, I was expected to set a good example and give feedback to my siblings, reinforcing the expectations of our parents. As I’ve moved through my career, I’ve realized that everyone needs a good mentor, and we each have a responsibility to reinvest our learning in those who come after us. •

Department store sales clerk

SPREAD ENTHUSIASM.

Did you ever notice the electricity in the air when fans cheer for their team? This is also true about the enthusiasm you show for your work and the efforts of your team. Be passionate about every challenge that is presented to you, and your team will feel the enthusiasm and join in to achieve success. Life is a series of learning opportunities; take advantage of each and every one!

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Dijuana Lewis

WELLPOINT

“I view the development of future leaders as the most important part of my job.” TITLE:

BS in quantitative business analysis, Indiana University; MBA, Wesleyan University, IN

EDUCATION:

M

y leadership style has been greatly influenced by the experiences and lessons I have learned from strong leaders and mentors in my career. As a child of hard-working Midwesterners, I developed a strong work ethic and sense of self at an early age. From my first baby-sitting job at the age of 11 until today, I continue to take on increasingly challenging roles. Navigating these more complex business situations challenges me to rely on my instincts and experiences to stay focused on the tasks at hand. Along the way, I have had the privilege of interacting with leaders who took personal interest in my professional growth, encouraging me to honor my values, sense of teamwork, perseverance, love of learning and respect for individuality. Most importantly, each of them demonstrated the importance of sharing my leadership philosophy with others. Today, in turn, I view the development of future leaders as the most important part of my job. While it’s easy to understand the influence of positive role models, I have found you can learn from negative experiences as well. Early in my career, I saw firsthand the harmful effects poor leaders can have on team morale and business results. I learned from this experience to always be conscious of the impact my attitudes and behaviors have on those around me.

COMPANY:

WellPoint

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

Indianapolis, IN

www.wellpoint.com Health benefits

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

116

President, Northeast Markets

$45 billion

42,000

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

Secretary at a law firm in Louisville, KY

FIRST JOB: READING:

The Da Vinci Code, by Dan Brown

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: All things happen for a reason. Look for joy in your life and embrace the excitement and challenges life brings; acknowledge and learn from failures and celebrate successes. Staying true to yourself is the greatest gift you can give to those around you and the greatest honor you can show those who have helped you grow. FAMILY:

Husband, son and daughter

INTERESTS:

Jogging, tennis, biking, reading and travel

abroad FAVORITE CHARITY:

Juvenile Diabetes Research

Foundation

Support from a strong mentor can help you take on exciting challenges. One of the greatest opportunities of my career came when I relocated my family from the Midwest to the East Coast to lead the Northeast health care management division. My mentor during this time was a guiding force in my ability to manage a formidable personal and professional challenge, helping me to grow tremendously as an individual and as a leader. Working for a company that supports opportunities for women and values diversity in its leadership has contributed greatly to my success. WellPoint also takes great pride in developing its leaders. Participating in the Emerging Leaders Program—a program that provided a full complement of development for high-potential leaders—was instrumental in preparing me for my newest challenge as president of the Northeast region. My best advice is to seek out good mentors, learn from your experiences and commit to nurturing new leaders. Being a good leader is the greatest gift you can give to those around you—and the greatest honor you can show your own mentors. PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Brig.Gen. Anne F. Macdonald U N I T E D S TAT E S A R M Y

“Do the right thing even when no one is looking.”

O

n my first day at West Point in the summer of 1976, I had no idea what to expect. I had no idea those next four years would shape my life as deeply as they have. In some ways, that experience is as fresh in my mind today as it was 30 years ago. Why? Because by the time I left West Point, I had learned some basic truths about leadership that have come to form the core of my leadership philosophy today. •

Brigadier General; Deputy Commanding General, 7th U.S. Infantry Division, Fort Carson, CO

TITLE:

This is basic discipline. In the U.S. Army, we have learned that the success of our organization hinges on the trust and confidence we have in the words and actions of our fellow soldiers. Integrity is the cornerstone of the Army ethos, and it is non-negotiable. DO THE RIGHT THING EVEN WHEN NO ONE IS LOOKING.

Everyone has value. Treating people with dignity and respect also means that you, the leader, must help develop dignity and respect in others. By doing that, you create the trust and confidence.

BS, United States Military Academy; MSSM, University of Southern California; master’s in strategic studies, Air War College, Maxwell Air Force Base

EDUCATION:

Skinning haddock at a Cape Cod fish market

FIRST JOB: READING:

The World is Flat, by Thomas L. Friedman

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: “Watch your thoughts, for they become words. Watch your words, for they become actions. Watch your actions, for they become habits. Watch your habits for they become character. Watch your character, for it becomes your destiny.” –Frank Outlaw FAMILY:

Husband, John

INTERESTS:

International travel, theater and arts, sailing

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Combined Federal Campaign

TREAT PEOPLE WITH DIGNITY AND RESPECT.

This may seem trite, but this leadership characteristic is often overlooked. Whether your work involves physical labor or desk work, you are responsible for the safety and well-being of your team. I am amazed at the number of leaders in all walks of life who don’t know basic safety such as first aid and CPR. Ensuring that safety is part of everything you do is leadership.

Everyone has heard the balance mantra, yet many fail to practice it. Start early to balance work and family and play. If you are “all work,” you get stale, tired, uncreative. You lose depth and texture. When you take a break, you teach your team to maintain balance in their lives. You also show your team that you trust them to carry on without you.

MAINTAIN A POSITIVE ATTITUDE.

BE REAL.

PRACTICE SAFETY IN ALL YOU DO.

COMPANY:

United States Army

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Fort Carson, CO

www.us.army.mil

BUSINESS:

U.S. defense

EMPLOYEES:

MAINTAIN BALANCE IN YOUR LIFE.

Learn to say, “yes, if...” instead of “no, because... .” With a positive attitude, you will get to be known as a can-do person; someone who makes things happen. Training yourself to be the positive person will serve you well all the time—especially in crisis situations.

You are going to come across a lot of different leadership advice throughout your life. Read, listen and take what works for you, but be yourself.

492,000 men and women serving on

active duty

PDJ Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2006

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Charmaine Mesina

A P P L I E D M AT E R I A L S

“Create your opportunities.”

T

here’s a stereotype of Asian women being quiet, studious and reserved. I probably fit the stereotype as far as working really hard and being prepared are concerned; but I definitely speak up and am willing to challenge convention. Growing up in the Philippines and starting out here as a foreign student have given me a somewhat unique perspective. I am a little bit more sensitive to cultural differences and nuances of language—an awareness that I believe is useful in our diverse society, as well as in a global business environment. I value people who are resilient, flexible and open to new ideas and experiences. I also think it’s very important to be involved in and committed to whatever you do. Often in life and at work, you have to be able to jump in and learn about new things and not be afraid because you’re in unfamiliar territory. My group works very collaboratively, operating on the premise that people speak up and their views will be heard and respected. I am proud of my group because we work really hard and do a good job, but we also can celebrate our successes and laugh together. This is really important given the challenges of legal work, where you have to get every single detail right. Being able to laugh helps take the pressure off! It’s also critical to develop relationships in which you can learn about an organization or a situation both formally and

COMPANY:

Applied Materials

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Santa Clara, CA

www.appliedmaterials.com

BUSINESS: World’s leading semiconductor and flatpanel equipment maker RANKING:

No. 317 on the Fortune 500 list

2005 NET SALES:

$6.9 billion

EMPLOYEES: 13,000 in more than 65 locations throughout 13 countries

118

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

Appointed Vice President, Corporate Legal Affairs; Company Ombudsman

TITLE:

EDUCATION: AB in anthropology, Smith College, Northampton, MA; MA in East Asian studies (Japan), Stanford University, CA; JD, Boalt Hall School of Law, University of California at Berkeley FIRST JOB: Doing kitchen work in a school infirmary, working at a student bank, working at a school library

The News From Paraguay, by Lilly Tuck; Arthur and George, by Julian Barnes; All I Did Was Ask: Conversations With Writers, Actors, Musicians and Artists, by Terry Gross READING:

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

Learn from mistakes and be

open to the world FAMILY:

Husband and a son, 16

INTERESTS: Spending time with friends, traveling, walking my dog, reading, attending plays, concerts and movies, yoga FAVORITE CHARITY: Peninsula Humane Society and Silicon Valley Humane Society

informally. Throughout my career, I’ve learned lots of little bits from lots of people, not just one person. My advice would be to have as many different role models as possible so you can take from them whatever characteristics suit your values and personality. I really appreciate the value of a liberal arts education because it helps develop thinking and writing, skills that are useful no matter where you end up. It’s a mistake to think that you have to know what you want to do with your life and your career from the very beginning. I admire people who’ve been focused and have known what they wanted to do from early on; but if you’re not like that, enjoy the journey. Look for ways in which you can figure out what your passions are and how to pursue them. Create your opportunities.

PDJ


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Sarah L. Meyerrose

F I R S T H O R I Z O N N AT I O N A L C O R P O R AT I O N

“Hold ethical behavior as a given in every situation.”

E

ffective corporate leaders paint a clear picture of the company’s future and help employees understand their role in reaching that future. The most important job of any leader is to develop the people around them. I believe that you can learn from every interaction and find continuing inspiration in the energy and ideas of people at all levels in your company. I have been fortunate to have been our company’s first female bank president, first female human resources leader, first female in the executive suite of offices and the first female responsible for the back office of the enterprise— technology, operations, real estate and procurement. These experiences provided valuable insight that may help other women who have the ambition to become corporate leaders: •

LEARN TO DELEGATE.

EMBRACE WORK AND FAMILY RESPONSIBILITIES

It builds future leaders and leverages your ability to make more of an impact through people. By delegating, you develop a network of colleagues and talent that you can tap in the future.

by identifying what’s important to you. Manage your time and priorities to maximize your satisfaction and impact on others professionally, personally and spiritually. And reexamine those priorities often. You are not the same person at 45 that you were at 25. Ignore the stereotypes of gender or position. Sometimes you may need to resolve conflicts using a decisive, assertive and direct style. Sometimes, building teams and being a nurturing leader is more effective. You can learn to be effective in many different ways, and you must find what works best for you and your circumstances.

BE TRUE TO YOURSELF.

First Horizon National Corporation HEADQUARTERS: Memphis, TN WEBSITE: www.fhnc.com BUSINESS: Nationwide financial services corporation RANKING: One of the nation’s top 30 bank holding companies in asset size 2005 ASSETS: $36.6 billion EMPLOYEES: More than 13,000 in nearly every state COMPANY:

Executive Vice President of Operations and Technology

TITLE:

BA in business administration, magna cum laude, Vanderbilt University; executive MBA from Vanderbilt’s Owen School of Management; Chartered Financial Analyst

EDUCATION:

Waitress and soda jerk at a small café in a small town in middle America on Main Street…really!

FIRST JOB:

READING: Now, Discover Your Strengths, by Marcus Buckingham and Donald O. Clifton; Primal Leadership by Daniel P. Goleman, Richard Boyatzis and Annie McKee; Blink, by Malcolm Gladwell; Elizabeth I, CEO, by Alan Axelrod; and whatever Dean Koontz’s latest novel happens to be PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: Helping others develop their fullest potential is the best lasting impact anyone can have. To do this, one must first appreciate people for who they are, not for who you wish they could be.

Married to Mike Meyerrose for 28 years; one 16-year-old daughter, who has made me an official soccer mom.

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

Music, all types of reading and cooking

• Hold ethical behavior as a given in every situation. Never compromise “doing what’s right…every time.” • Appreciate everyone’s contributions and do all in your power to give everyone the opportunity to develop, contribute and succeed. • Do your best in any assignment you accept, and be open to taking a risk on yourself. It may sometimes be uncomfortable, but the payoff is often more opportunity to grow. The first of our company’s core values states that employees come first. FORTUNE, Working Mother and Business Ethics magazines have validated our commitment to this core value by recognizing First Horizon as one of the nation’s best employers. Doing the right thing for employees, customers, vendors, shareholders and communities is key to success. And placing employees first on that list of constituents creates a secret weapon for success that is not easily duplicated.

PDJ

Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2006

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Michelle Miller

MEDTRONIC INC.

“Be thoughtful, but don’t let analysis paralyze your ability to act.”

A

dvancement in corporate America today is based not only on performance and productivity, but also on demonstrated leadership. The most effective leaders develop collaborative relationships, empower others, build individual and organizational commitment, share positive expectations in future actions, and create and manage change. Internal strength and demonstrated character are at the foundation of these skills. In a world of “adapt and adopt,” I would encourage aspiring leaders to first really know and understand their own realities. Define success from your perspective. The definition of success is fluid; it changes with life context, time and maturity. Corporations often focus on job titles, responsibilities and skills as success factors. Give yourself permission to define your idea of success. Make certain that you work toward your goal, not just what you think others expect. Think about the price you are willing to pay for your success. What are your priorities today? What do you really value—lifestyle, autonomy, financial rewards, family time, status, creativity, collegial environment, commitment, or professional and personal integrity? Be authentic, centered and credible with a healthy sense of life balance. We bring our whole selves to work. Be comfortable with who you are. Be strategic and plan well, but not so well that you miss windows of opportunity. Life is a journey, not a destination. Expect the unexpected challenges and explore unanticipated opportunities. Be thoughtful, but don’t let analysis paralyze your ability to act.

COMPANY:

Medtronic Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Suburban Minneapolis, MN

www.medtronic.com

BUSINESS:

The global leader in medical technology

RANKING:

No. 235 on Fortune 500 list

FY2006 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

120

$11.3 billion

34,000

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

Vice President and Senior Counsel of Employment Law, Workplace Relations and Inclusion

TITLE:

FIRST JOB:

Library page

Enlightened Power: How Women Are Transforming the Practice of Leadership, Linda Coughlin, Ellen Wingard and Keith Hollihan, editors; My American Life: From Rage to Entitlement, by Price M. Cobb, MD; In the Company of Cheerful Ladies, by Alexander McCall Smith READING:

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: Do the best you can, where you are, with what you have, taking full advantage of life’s windows of opportunity FAMILY:

Albert, my husband of 34 years; two children

INTERESTS: Family, community service, mentoring, reading, cooking, music

Learn how to recognize what you know, what you don’t know and what you are not likely to learn. Surround yourself with people whose strengths and knowledge complement yours. In the hustle of execution, we cannot lose the wisdom that comes from our intuitive understanding of the environments in which we work. We are educated by experience and should be dedicated to continuous learning. Use your natural candor as a positive tool, not a sword. Clear, direct communication is critical, and implicit messages must be consistent. Have a strong voice; be visible, confident and decisive. Do the best you can, where you are, with what you have. There always will be a time when corporate resources, support or engagement are not optimal. Turn problems into opportunities for innovation and creativity. Finally, have fun. Despite all the advice above, don’t take yourself too seriously. Humor is a great stress reducer and sometimes life really just does not make sense. But then, that’s life!

PDJ


IT’S WONDERFUL TO SHARE DREAMS.

IT’S EVEN BETTER TO OWN THEM. We’re honored to introduce yet another group representing the diverse ownership of hotels within the Hilton Family. These are individuals who share the commitment that, for more than 80 years, has been strengthening a portfolio which now includes many of the most respected names in hospitality. FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO LEARN ABOUT OWNERSHIP OPPORTUNITIES IN THE HILTON FAMILY OF HOTELS, VISIT US AT HILTONFRANCHISE.COM OR CALL 1-877- 448 -2736.

where diversity works


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Linda A. Mills

NORTHROP GRUMMAN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

“Great leaders motivate teams and roll up their sleeves to make things happen.”

A

dvice I often give to those aspiring to a leadership position is to be open and receptive to unique situations, even if the situation results in an unexpected career turn. Success can be achieved by talking to people about their ideas and discussing ways to help implement them. Leaders never s hy away from a complicated assignment. Undertake the challenge, and you will stand out from the crowd and make yourself memorable. I believe that performance counts, and, in the long run, it is performance that matters. With performance comes personal credibility, reputation and trust. Great leaders motivate teams and roll up their sleeves to make things happen. They are engaged with their colleagues and follow up on conversations and action items. Following are my tips that will help open doors to an accomplished future: Take risks. Push yourself to excel at whatever you do, and do it with passion. You never know what you can do if you don’t try. Often the seemingly unachievable or additional project gives you the perfect opportunity to show your strengths, gain visibility, meet new people and learn fresh skills. Don’t be afraid to volunteer or delegate. Build relationships and collaborate. Communicate your

COMPANY:

Northrop Grumman Information

Technology McLean, VA www.northropgrumman.com BUSINESS: Computer support services, defense contractor RANKING: Second largest provider of U.S. Government computer support services; third largest U.S. defense contractor 2005 REVENUE: More than $5 billion EMPLOYEES: More than 18,500 HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

122

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

TITLE:

Vice President, Operations and Processes

EDUCATION: Bachelor’s in mathematics, University of Santa Clara; master’s in computer science, University of Illinois; executive education, Harvard University and University of Virginia

Systems engineer, Bell Labs

FIRST JOB: READING:

Tipping Point, by Malcolm Gladwell

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

Be passionate about what you

do, and do your best. FAMILY:

Husband and two stepdaughters

Traveling to new places and cultures, antiques, decorating and gardening

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY: University foundations with an aim toward increasing women in technical disciplines

interests and the reasons for your interests. Don’t simply focus on the better title. Concentrate on where you can add value. Everyone brings a different perspective and set of experiences to a situation. Use your team and others to help you succeed; and coach and mentor others along the way. Ask for help. It shows good judgment, gains buy-in and helps issues to surface sooner. Most importantly, say “thank you.” Communicate, but don’t forget to listen. Practice expressing yourself both verbally and in writing. Leaders must have the ability to take difficult issues and express them simply so that decisions can be made. Leaders also must grasp and advance the long-term objective. Don’t expect to be right all the time. My first mentor’s advice was, “If you are right most of the time, you have a great batting average.” Everyone makes mistakes. Learn from them. Great leaders adjust and progress. Leadership is about making decisions, dealing with ambiguity and having a vision, even when the final outcome is uncertain. Lastly, leaders surround themselves with people who have the judgment, creativity, urgency, tenacity and vision to make things happen.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Ellen J. Moore

C H U B B G R O U P O F I N S U R A N C E C O M PA N I E S

“Share credit for success across the organization.”

S

uccessful leaders are many things. Their actions are admired; they stand by what they believe in; they keep their promises; and they are real people. Successful leadership comes from building a mutual feeling of trust and confidence with your family, your staff and other constituents. Having the courage to address difficult issues and act on your convictions creates a sense of trust and confidence between you and the people around you. This is no easy task. I would recommend these tips for those who strive to be successful leaders: •

Make sure everyone you lead understands where they contribute and how. A strong connection between individual and team performance and overall organizational goals will help boost your company’s performance and make it a great place to work.

SET A CLEAR COURSE.

COMMIT TO BEING A LIFELONG LEARNER. Learning can come from formal and informal sources, our achievements and our mistakes, our co-workers, business colleagues, and extended family and friends. Be open to feedback that will make you better at your role and in whatever you aspire to be.

BE HUMBLE.

HAVE A PERSONAL COACH. You won’t always see things the way others do. Choose someone without an agenda who is prepared to give you a view through an unfiltered lens.

COMPANY:

EDUCATION:

READING:

The World is Flat, by Thomas L. Friedman

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: Have passion for your work. You must really love what you do to thrive and put the energy into it that your career demands. FAMILY:

Married, two daughters

INTERESTS:

Running, golf, theater

FAVORITE CHARITY:

TRUST YOUR INSTINCTS

YWCA of Greater Toronto

—they have been a large part of your

past success. •

BUILD ALLIANCES

SHOW COMPASSION.

TREASURE YOUR CHILDREN

NURTURE YOUR RELATIONSHIP with your spouse or significant other. This is the relationship that often gets the shortest straw.

Chubb Group of Insurance Companies Warren, NJ

BS in accounting

Accounting clerk for a plastics company

FIRST JOB:

Share credit for success across the organization.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

President and CEO, Chubb Insurance Company of Canada

TITLE:

both inside and outside your company. You will need them often, and they show that you are resourceful and well-connected.

Business can be ruthless. Don’t lose sight of what is really important—the people around you. and make them your No. 1 priority.

“PLAY” WITH YOUR GIRLFRIENDS

(and guy friends). These

connections sustain us.

www.chubb.com

Property and casualty insurance company for individuals and businesses

RANKING: 156th largest U.S. corporation according to FORTUNE Magazine

In my career, I’ve been fortunate to have had the opportunity to lead in many capacities. The personal and professional relationships I’ve developed along the way have made my journey even more enjoyable. PDJ

BUSINESS:

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

124

$14.1 billion

10,800

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

, however you choose

GIVE BACK TO THE COMMUNITY

to define it.


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Kathryn L. Nelson

W H I R L P O O L C O R P O R AT I O N

“Do not be afraid to take chances.”

I

believe honesty and integrity are the most important qualities for professional and personal success. These are the values that drive who I am and that helped to get me where I am today. I pride myself on the fact that my family and friends consider me a “real” person. Do not be afraid to take chances. As a mentor once told me, “If you think the job exactly fits your talents, it probably won’t be challenging enough for you.” Always seek developmental opportunities that enable you to grow and develop professionally. I’ve always found that overcoming obstacles has helped me become a better person and professional. When I was named the first female plant manager of one of Whirlpool’s manufacturing facilities, I knew I was setting the precedent for future female plant managers. While I had management experience, the technical side was more challenging. I worked long, hard hours to gain the knowledge I needed. I worked every job and every shift in the factory, which helped me better understand the day-to-day workings of the factory and better empathize with our employees. I established a high level of credibility among our employees and was a better manager because of it.

COMPANY:

Whirlpool Corporation

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Benton Harbor, MI

www.whirlpoolcorp.com

BUSINESS: World’s leading manufacturer and marketer of major home appliances RANKING: With more than 60 manufacturing and technology research centers around the world, Whirlpool markets Whirlpool, Maytag, KitchenAid, Jenn-Air, Amana, Brastemp, Bauknecht and other major brand names to consumers in nearly every country around the world. 2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

$19 billion

More than 80,000 worldwide

Vice President and General Manager, Consumer and Appliance Care, North American Region

TITLE:

BA in business administration, Jacksonville State University, AL

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

Waitress in a restaurant in a small Southern

town

Talking Back, by Andrea Mitchell; Going Places, by E.D. Hill

READING:

I view dealing with challenges in life like a bike ride; there are three options: keep pedaling, get off, or fall off.

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

FAMILY: Married 21 years to Randy; a daughter, 18, and son, 15 INTERESTS:

Outdoor activities, politics and reading

FAVORITE CHARITY: Local charities that support children and healthy lifestyle causes

I love being a leader. I’ve learned that leadership is not a formula or an equation. You must instill in your team a sense of possibility. A good leader is supportive and empowers people to go beyond what they thought was possible. It is essential to have balance in your life. I balance time for myself, my family, my career and my community. I think of it in terms of credits and debits. You must make the appropriate deposits and withdrawals to keep all areas of your life in balance. Strong family support is crucial. After the birth of our second child, my husband and I decided we didn’t want our children in daycare 10 hours a day. This meant that one of us needed to stay home. My husband gave up his career and earnings to stay at home with our kids. This allowed me much flexibility in my roles and responsibilities. I consider him a huge part of my professional success. Lastly, pursue a career in something you’re passionate about. Don’t worry about money. If you do what you’re passionate about, the money will follow.

PDJ

Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2006

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Susan Nestegard

ECOLAB INC.

“I’ve found that leading with integrity carries me through all situations and lets me sleep at night.” Senior Vice President of Research, Development and Engineering and Chief Technical Officer

TITLE:

W

hen I sit down to write my annual plan, I find that each year I start with the same objectives: • Support and demonstrate a positive, ethical work environment that enhances the performance of the diverse business team. • Provide clear communication on priorities and expectations and provide forums for continuing two-way communications. • Ensure alignment with corporate priorities and build the foundation for future growth.

EDUCATION: BS in chemical engineering, University of Wisconsin; MS in materials science engineering, University of Minnesota FIRST JOB: Age 12: paper girl, baby sitting, door-to-door Amway and flower sales

Always. Alternating fiction with business leadership nonfiction READING:

Strive to see love versus fear, relinquish judging others, and live forgiveness and gratitude.

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

FAMILY:

My focus on leadership today is very much about these objectives, which push me to create an environment where individuals and teams can thrive and deliver results. Although leadership is frequently defined by positions and titles, my personal definition is “authentic self-expression that creates value,” from my favorite leadership book—Leadership From the Inside Out, by Kevin Cashman. Some of my thoughts based on this definition are as follows: LEADERSHIP IS ABOUT CREATING VALUE

Leadership is about critical thinking, creating strategy, driving change, executing results, developing people and getting the job done. This creates value for your company, your shareholders, your associates and your community.

COMPANY:

Ecolab Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Saint Paul, MN

www.ecolab.com

The world leader in premium cleaning, food safety, and health protection products and services for the hospitality, food service, health care and industrial markets

BUSINESS:

RANKING:

No. 1

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

126

$4.5 billion

22,000 employees in 170 countries

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

Husband

INTERESTS:

Hiking, golf, gardening, cooking, art

FAVORITE CHARITY: Portfolio includes science encouragement, women’s advocacy and the arts.

LEADERSHIP IS ABOUT COMMUNICATION

Everyone needs to understand the strategy, the expectations for change, the targeted results and the priorities. The diversity of each organization will require a multitude of communication formats and venues. Leadership styles vary, but leaders must be able to energize and inspire others at all levels in the organization to bring out their personal best. LEADERSHIP HAS TO BE AUTHENTIC

It’s about servant leadership. This means letting people know that you can be trusted. This means walking the talk and doing what you say you’ll do. This means caring more about the organization, your team, and the communities in which you live and work than about your own accolades. I’ve found that leading with integrity carries me through all situations and lets me sleep at night. Looking forward, the advice I give to readers is the advice I give to myself. Focus your energy on giving and making a difference, and the personal rewards will follow. For me, that means mentoring and developing others, giving time and resources to my priorities in the community and being a rainmaker for women. Where will you make a difference?

PDJ


Get more out of your career. Now at Dell. At Dell, we’re committed to bringing together individuals with diverse backgrounds, thinking, leadership and ideas, and arming them with the best tools to ensure their success. We believe this helps drive innovation and makes Dell a more dynamic company. Through career development, mentoring programs, networking groups and productivity tools like the Dell Latitude D610 ® ® with Intel Centrino Mobile Technology, we offer the resources to help every employee achieve their potential. Our goal is to ensure that Dell is a great place to work, grow and aspire. Success real time. Capture it at Dell.

Dell recommends Windows® XP Professional

Evelyn Hernandez uses a Dell Latitude D610 with Intel® Centrino® Mobile Technology

CAREERS AT DELL. CONSIDER THE POSSIBILITIES.

How do you get started? Visit www.dell.com/pdj Dell and the Dell logo are registered trademarks of Dell Inc. ©2006 Dell Inc. Intel, Intel logo, Intel Inside, Intel Inside logo, Centrino and the Centrino logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the United States and other countries. All rights reserved. Dell Inc. cannot be held responsible for errors in typography or photography. Dell is an AA/EO employer. Workforce diversity is an essential part of Dell’s commitment to quality and to the future. We encourage you to apply, whatever your race, gender, color, religion, national origin, age, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, or veteran status.


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Katherine O’Brien

N E W YO R K L I F E I N S U R A N C E C O M PA N Y

“I treat everyone in a way that I hope others will treat me.”

I

was lucky to be raised in a large Irish family with seven children. I was not sure at the time that I was all that lucky, as one can get a bit lost in such a big crowd. In retrospect, it was great preparation for life. My four sisters and two brothers each had completely different personalities, opinions and approaches to life. We shared a common sense of humor, but, other than that, we could not have been more different. My siblings taught me how to get along with a large and diverse group of people and that there is strength in numbers. I learned to appreciate our common views and to accept our differences. The most important thing I gained from a big family was a sense of humor. I also found that common sense and compromise were more important than just about anything else in managing life. I have taken these lessons and skills into my business life, and they have been invaluable in my career development. In business, I am constantly applying the negotiating and diplomacy skills that I developed to survive and thrive in a family of seven children. In corporations, we find all types of personalities. I adjust my behavior accordingly, knowing that each of them brings something special to the table. I make

New York Life Insurance Company

COMPANY:

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

New York, NY

www.newyorklife.com Insurance

No. 1 on the Fortune 500 Industry Data list of largest life/health mutual companies; No. 74 on the Fortune 500 list.

RANKING:

2005 OPERATING REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

$11 billion

Vice President and Chief Diversity Officer

EDUCATION:

BA, Wesleyan University; JD, Brooklyn

Law School FIRST JOB: Salesperson at a sporting goods store while in high school

Suite Francaise, by Irene Nemirovsky; March, by Geraldine Brooks

READING:

Work hard, enjoy life and always try to do the right thing.

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: FAMILY:

Six siblings

INTERESTS:

Fitness, literature, food, friends

FAVORITE CHARITY:

United Way

the situation work, whatever the demands may be. I treat everyone in a way that I hope others will treat me. My siblings taught me that we could accomplish anything we put our minds to, despite our differences. Together we learned that if there was not a way to fix a problem, there probably was a way to work around it. We found that hard work and determination were the keys to getting ahead in the world. This approach to life has guided me in the business world. In a way, it is a simple approach: Set a goal and work with others to accomplish it. There is great strength in a diversity of talent and opinions, so embrace the differences of the people you work with and remember that there also is strength in numbers. When you have accomplished one goal, move on to the next goal and keep moving forward. Finally and most importantly, have fun and keep your sense of humor while you are busy accomplishing all these great things.

8,280 in the United States, 4,900

internationally 128

TITLE:

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

PDJ PHOTO • DARYL-ANN SAUNDERS / DASaunders.com


www.FBIjobs.gov “I’ve always admired my mother. Not only for the person she is, but for the work she does. I’m proud that she is making our country, and the world, a better place. That’s why I followed in her footsteps and also became an FBI Special Agent.”

Become an FBI Special Agent. We are currently seeking Special Agent candidates in the following critical skill areas: Intelligence experience • Computer Science or IT • Engineering • Physical Science • Accounting/Finance • Law • Law Enforcement or other Investigative experience • Military experience • or Foreign Language (Arabic, Chinese - all dialects, Farsi, Hebrew, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Pashto, Punjabi, Russian, Spanish, Urdu, and Vietnamese) • and many other disciplines. To qualify for the position of FBI Special Agent, you must possess a four-year college degree plus three years of professional work experience; be available for assignment anywhere in the FBI’s jurisdiction; be between the ages of 23 and 36; and be in excellent physical condition with the ability to pass a rigorous physical fitness test.

Or join us in one of our Professional Staff positions. Our Professional Staff possess a myriad of specialized experience including the collection

and dissemination of intelligence information as well as analyzing and deciphering communications in order to keep our nation safe. Explore our variety of opportunities from entry level to senior management. • Security Specialist • Auditor • Budget Analyst • Electrical Engineer • Technical Information Specialist • Investigative Specialist • IT Specialist • Automotive Worker • Administrative Specialist • Management and Program Analyst • Logistics Management Specialist • Electronic Technician • and many more. Please visit our Web site for complete details. Positions are added daily. Apply online today at:

www.FBIjobs.gov

You must be a U.S. citizen and consent to a complete background investigation, drug test, and polygraph as a prerequisite for employment. Only those candidates determined to be best qualified will be contacted to proceed in the selection process. The FBI is an equal opportunity employer.


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Marilyn O’Connell

V E R I Z O N C O M M U N I C AT I O N S

“If you are beginning to feel comfortable in your current position, it ’s time to move on.” TITLE:

M

y father had a very specific aspiration for me—to be a musician. One small problem: While my father was naturally talented, I was not. I knew I would never be happy doing something as intense as music without the right aptitude. I needed to find my strong suit; so I did the most logical thing possible: After college, I moved from Kansas to New York City to immerse myself in a place full of options. My first job led me down the path to a marketing career. But that was not the end of my adventures. One of the most important lessons I have learned is to keep yourself open to new opportunities. While we can attempt to plan our career progression, it is important to be open to a new challenge. There are few experiences that build confidence more than taking on a challenge you were not sure you could tackle—and then succeeding. It not only boosts your confidence but also demonstrates to others what you are capable of doing. That, in turn, opens up the door for new, more exciting assignments. If you are beginning to feel comfortable in your current position, it’s time to move on. Maybe it’s my Midwestern roots, but I also believe that you cannot overestimate the value of hard work. That is, digging into a project or problem deep enough to understand

COMPANY:

Verizon Communications

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

New York, NY

www.verizon.com

BUSINESS:

Telecommunications

RANKING:

18 on Fortune 500

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

$75 billion

Senior Vice President

EDUCATION: BS in journalism, University of Kansas; MBA, University of Pepperdine FIRST JOB: Marketing assistant for an insurance trade association (Sounds mundane, but it got me interested in marketing as a profession.)

The Places in Between, by Rory Stewart; Night, by Elie Wiesel READING:

My legacy is the team I have assembled to deploy Verizon’s FiOS TV Service.

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

FAMILY:

Married for nearly 23 years

INTERESTS:

Cooking, wine collecting and travel

FAVORITE CHARITY:

American Cancer Society,

Big Sisters

and learn from it. There is simply no shortcut worth taking when it comes to establishing your knowledge, depth and credibility. Developing leadership skills through managing teams is essential to be successful. To borrow a phrase: “It takes a village” to achieve many of our ambitious and complex goals. Therefore, knowing how to lead a team and be a good team member is critical. The only sure way of knowing, is doing. This is where experience is the best and only real teacher. That being said, observe those who are good at it. In the end, it is not just about you, but also about the people who surround you. I believe that building a strong team and organization is the only real legacy. This includes helping others along the way through mentoring or coaching. None of us got where we are based on sheer will. We had a lot of advice and encouragement along the way. Remember to pass that along.

250,000

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©ROHM AND HAAS COMPANY, 2006

ROHM AND HAAS imagine the possibilities™

www.rohmhaas.com

Simply Stated, Diversity means Differences. We believe that understanding, valuing and managing diversity will result in a healthier, more enriched workforce, maximized profitable growth and sustained competitive advantage. Leading the way since 1909, Rohm and Haas is a global pioneer in the creation and development of innovative technologies and solutions for the specialty materials industry.The company’s technologies are found in a wide range of markets including: Building and Construction, Electronics, Food and Retail, Household and Personal Care, Industrial Process, Packaging, Paper,Transportation and Water.

Our innovative technologies and solutions help to improve life everyday, around the world. Based in Philadelphia, PA, the company generated annual sales of approximately $8 billion in 2005. Visit www.rohmhaas.com for more information. imagine the possibilities™

100 Independence Mall West, Philadelphia, PA 19106


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Kathy Paladino

SYMBOL TECHNOLOGIES INC.

“Taking risks and learning from your mistakes are important elements of growth.”

W

hen I’m asked to share the secrets of my success, almost everyone anticipates a profound response. The truth of the matter, however, is quite simple: I love what I do. After all, it’s no secret that if you love what you do, the rest comes naturally. Make sure that the career path you choose fits your personality and fulfills your life goals and objectives. It’s no different than when we teach our young children not to put a square block into a round hole. That being said, I do recognize that there are people who enjoy what they do but may never reach the level of success that they aspire to achieve. At the same time, the definition of success is very personal; one individual’s definition of success may be very different than another’s. For me, success is an ongoing journey, not a final destination. While it does come naturally, success is not without sacrifice, hard work and even a little luck. A key lesson I learned along the way is never to sacrifice my personal integrity or character. It’s important to be true to yourself always; I’ve found this to be a valuable life lesson in my professional and personal life. Rising through the ranks and achieving professional success require that you have a solid foundation on which to build. My foundation is based on the following:

COMPANY:

Symbol Technologies Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

Holtsville, NY

www.symbol.com Worldwide leader in enterprise mobility

A global company with headquarters in the United States and operations in more than 50 countries, Symbol is a leading provider of mobility solutions that help companies be more effective by giving workers instant access to information and applications, inside or outside of the workplace.

RANKING:

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

132

$1.77 billion

5,200 worldwide

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

TITLE:

Senior Vice President, Worldwide Sales

EDUCATION:

BS in foreign service, Georgetown

University Worked at a farm stand selling fruits and vegetables. First professional job was as a programmer at Aetna Life and Casualty.

FIRST JOB:

Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking, by Malcolm Gladwell; The World Is Flat, by Thomas L. Friedman

READING:

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: FAMILY:

Make a difference.

Husband, Mike, and a son, 10

INTERESTS:

Reading, traveling and weight training

FAVORITE CHARITY: The Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund, which is dedicated to helping military personnel who have been catastrophically disabled in operations in Iraq and Afghanistan.

BUILD GREAT TEAMS. First and foremost, surround yourself with great people who challenge you and make you better each and every day. Trust them to do their jobs, and help them grow.

It’s simple advice you may have gotten from your parents. As my mother often told me, “There’s a reason why we have two ears and only one mouth.”

LISTEN.

LEAD. Provide the leadership and direction that your team needs to succeed. Hold yourself to high standards and never ask your teams to do something you wouldn’t do yourself. TAKE RISKS. Taking risks and learning from your mistakes are important elements of growth. At the same time, be open to new ideas and embrace change.

An Wang, the founder of Wang Labs, once was quoted as saying, “Success is more a function of consistent common sense than it is of genius.” Add the key ingredients of desire, focus, dedication and hard work and you have a “recipe” for success!

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Poppie Parish

KEYBANK

“It is through sharing and communicating both your successes and failures that you empower and enlighten others along the way.”

A

chieving success in the workplace is a journey that does not come without a few pitfalls. Developing as a leader often means undertaking risk. Although you may sometimes stumble, you are always growing and learning from the experience. It is through sharing and communicating both your successes and failures that you empower and enlighten others along the way. To that end, mentoring is very important in helping others to work toward their own growth and self-development. Through coaching, counseling, probing and listening, you create an environment in which individuals can learn and grow from their accomplishments as well as their mistakes. My leadership philosophy is very simple. It involves using all of my abilities, both God-given and learned, in an effort to make a difference in everything that I do and in the people that I touch. I love my work with minority- and women-owned businesses, as well as with our consumers in the low-to-moderate income market segment. I am able to see the impact of my work and am privileged to help people achieve their goals. I am motivated when colleagues, team members, family and friends tell me that I have inspired them to achieve more for themselves. Motivation for me is

COMPANY:

KeyBank

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS: RANKING:

Vice President and Officer of Supplier Diversity, Community Development

TITLE:

Cleveland, OH

www.key.com Financial services 12

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

BA in marketing, Myers College, Cleveland, OH; MA in psychology with an emphasis in diversity management, Cleveland State University

EDUCATION:

Baby-sitting for neighbors and cashier at Bonwit Tellers FIRST JOB:

The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership, by John C. Maxwell

READING:

“We cannot hold a torch to light another’s path without brightening our own.” –Ben Sweetland PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

Partner and husband of 32 years, Alford, three adult sons, and three adorable grandsons

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

After my grandsons, traveling and reading

FAVORITE CHARITY:

The American Red Cross

waking up every day knowing that I have the opportunity to do this all over again! The best career advice I have ever received is to recognize your strengths and believe in yourself. Grow to become an expert in your field, and share your knowledge with others. Because of mentoring, I have been inspired and hopefully have inspired others to learn, develop and share their skills. It is truly one of the most rewarding experiences to hear people say that you have made a difference in their life.

$4.8 billion

21,000

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November/December 2006

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W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Sandra Phillips

PFIZER INC.

“I would not be where I am today were it not for the grace of God and the imparted wisdom and guidance of trusted mentors.” Vice President, Assistant General Counsel and Chief Litigation Counsel

TITLE:

A

great Texas lady once said, “I believe there is a special place in hell for women who do not help other women.” I would modify this to include people of diverse backgrounds. Put simply, I would not be where I am today were it not for the grace of God and the imparted wisdom and guidance of trusted mentors. No person is an island, and success is virtually impossible without the support of those who have been on deserted islands and found their way back to the mainland. As a woman of color, I believe I have a greater responsibility not only to find personal mentors, but also to mentor diverse professionals who are coming down the pike. Like life, careers have different stages, and each stage requires different skills. My career has come full circle. Having started out as an in-house lawyer, then spending almost 12 years in private practice and now returning to inhouse practice, I have had to make major adjustments to my approach. Don’t get me wrong; the things that have stood me in good stead over the course of my career—integrity, commitment to excellence, dedication, humanity, humility, humor and perseverance—continue to sustain me. But understanding the operating environment and successfully navigating it have been absolutely essential to my survival. This knowledge could have come only from the assistance of good mentors. Mentoring can have many different facets within and outside of your organization. During my career, I have experienced five dimensions of mentoring:

COMPANY:

Pfizer Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS: RANKING:

www.Pfizer.com Pharmaceuticals No. 1

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

134

New York, NY

$51.3 billion

More than 100,000

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

JD, University of Texas

Scooping ice cream at Baskin Robbins at

the age of 13

The First Ninety Days, by Michael Watkins; Beach Road by James Patterson and Peter DeJonge READING:

If I can make my mother proud, I will have reached the highest pinnacle of success.

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

FAMILY: Wonderful parents, great siblings and amazing nephews and nieces INTERESTS: Golf, tennis, biking, traveling, watching college basketball and collecting African art FAVORITE CHARITY:

United Way

• The technical advisor is the person who helps you with the technical aspects of your job, such as research and writing and presentation skills. • The champion mentor makes it his or her business to sing your praises to others and help you navigate the maze of your organization’s internal politics. • The navigator or strategic advisor, who often is someone outside your organization, will advise you over the course of your career. • The personal mentor is a friend who knows you perhaps even better than you know yourself. This person can provide a perspective that no one else can. • The en masse or peer-to-peer mentors are those that you encounter at conferences for diverse professionals. The people who embody these roles are key stakeholders in your career and will help you build confidence and strategic vision—essential elements for success. PDJ


Expect more from your career.

You were just following your passion. And millions of people discovered life without the cloud of depression. A promising treatment for colon cancer entered clinical trials. Smokers found new strength to finally quit. Researchers made an important breakthrough to treat macular degeneration. Senior citizens in need received their prescriptions free of charge. You were just following your passion at Pfizer.

You may never set foot in a lab or work

“100 Best Companies to Work For”

hand-in-hand with scientists, but your talent

– Fortune®

can change the world. At Pfizer, everything you do impacts everything we do. Your ideas will help power the next generation of medicines that make life a little easier to live for people everywhere. And at the end of each

“One of the Most Admired Pharmaceutical Companies in America” – Fortune®

“Top 100 Companies for Working Mothers” – Working Mother

“100 Best Places for Latinos to Work”

and every day, you’ll know that you’ve made a

– Hispanic Magazine

difference. This is your career at Pfizer –

“One of the Top-Rated Companies in Corporate Equality”

a career unlike any other.

– Human Rights Campaign

“Top Corporation for Women-Owned Businesses” – Women’s Business Enterprise National Council

Visit www.pfizer.com/careers Pfizer is an Equal Opportunity Employer.


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Vickie Piner

L E A R C O R P O R AT I O N

“Courage is the key.”

F

ear has become one of my best friends. Every time I

encounter a new problem or a new opportunity, my friend fear usually shows up and tags along with me. But the

Vice President, Supplier Diversity and Development

great thing about my friend fear is that she leaves her alter

EDUCATION:

ego, courage, behind. And it is courage that gets me through all opportunities in life, good or bad. It is not easy for a woman to strive or survive in the corporate world. I believe that most women tend to be perfectionists. By wanting to be perfect in all things, we sometimes can set ourselves up for failure. There is only one being who is perfect. It takes courage to be imperfect. It takes courage to work in an environment where, on any given day, the only reflection of who you are is the person you see in the mir-

TITLE:

BS in industrial engineering; MSA in manufacturing management

FIRST JOB: Gift wrapper at Sibley’s Department Store, Rochester, NY

Pathways to Success, by Dale Carnegie; When Black and White Make Green, by Melvin J. Gravely II READING:

Don’t sweat the things you can’t change; change the things that you can; and remember that this is the only life you get. Live it!

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

FAMILY:

Husband, Frank; one stepson, one son

Spending time playing with my 2-year-old and watching all of the miracles he discovers every day.

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

United Way

ror. It takes courage to drop your child off at 6:30 in the morning, pick him up 12 hours later and hope that there is enough time left in the day to ensure that he is happy, whole and strong. It takes courage to sit in meetings with

only your career, but also the opportunities and futures of

your peers and develop strategies and plans that affect not

your co-workers. Courage is the key. The advice that I offer to women or men aspiring to take

COMPANY:

Lear Corporation

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Southfield, MI

www.lear.com

Automotive interior systems and components

BUSINESS:

RANKING:

No. 127 on the Fortune 500 list

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

136

$17.1 billion

115,000

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

leadership roles is to remember that when fear turns into courage, you have just given yourself permission to try, to take chances, to make mistakes. You have just given yourself the confidence to survive and persevere even if everything does not go perfectly. The courage that comes from fear is one of the reasons that great leadership exists. Courage gives you permission to be imperfect.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Wendy Pinero

S TA R B U C K S C O F F E E

“The more we teach, the more our productivity increases and the better our results will be.”

A

chievement stems from having genuine personal interest and

passion for what we do. It is this personal passion that helps us ride through the lows and the not-so-good days. We are blessed to be working women in a country with plenty of opportunities for us to explore. We need to take advantage of that. We should strive to remain approachable and human regardless of level. This is the common denominator among

Vice President, packaged coffee & tea, Consumer Products

TITLE:

EDUCATION: The

University of Texas at Austin, MBA; The University of Puerto Rico, BBA Camp counselor while in college

the colleagues and bosses that I have admired along the way.

FIRST JOB:

These mentors recognized that how we achieve success is

READING: Traveling Light by MaxLucado; Parents Magazine (with 3 kids under 7…handy)

just as important as the success itself. Our career advice list evolves as we accumulate more experience. However, I would offer the following five

FAMILY:

Married since 1993, 3 kids, one dog (Ginger

Marie) INTERESTS:

Exercise, reading, travel, music and

suggestions to others:

theatrical arts

• Expand your personal comfort zone. Speak up, volunteer for projects and responsibilities, even when you think you might not be ready. Chances are, you are indeed ready and you just need to stretch.

FAVORITE CHARITY: Goodwill (far reaching multiple needs), Catholic Relief agencies

• Commit yourself to constant self-improvement and learning. How? Seek feedback frequently and from sources throughout the organization. Our personalities and styles are multifaceted and we morph depending on the situation. COMPANY:

Starbucks Coffee

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Seattle, Washington

www.starbucks.com

BUSINESS:

Food services

338 on Fortune 500. One of the “Ten Most Admired Companies in America” by FORTUNE, 20032005.

RANKING:

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

$6.4 billion

109,000

DATA: Operates in 37 countries; 11,000 retail locations in North America, Latin America, Europe, the Middle East and the Pacific Rim

It’s good to check whether we are being effective; it is important to stay current in our chosen fields. • Hold yourself accountable for the training and development of others, because as we grow, more results are achieved working with others. The more we teach, the more our productivity increases and the better our results will be. More importantly, your team will be motivated to do their best when they know they are growing their own careers. • Preserve relationships and networks as you make career choices. It is, indeed, a “small world.” As your network increases, possibilities for meaningful business connections emerge. • Always choose happiness. This is not in an idealistic or utopian view of the business world. Overall, choose roles that will cultivate your long-term health. Titles, salaries and benefits will come and go, but only you can protect your commitment to yourself. As women, we tend to put the needs of others first, so it’s important to remember to take care of ourselves. PDJ

PDJ

Profiles in Diversity Journal

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W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Melisa Quinoy

MTV NETWORKS

“Always act with integrity and take pride in your work, no matter how small the task.”

I

n many ways, convincing my father to let me go to college was the toughest deal I ever negotiated. I grew up as an only child and the eldest female grandchild in a very traditional Spanish family. Higher education in my family’s eyes was a waste of time and money for a woman. Of course, I had other ideas. I learned early on that you need to fight for what you believe in, and that you can never let yourself be limited by anything but your own determination. I like to think I’ve stayed true to that belief and picked up a few other pieces of wisdom over the course of my career. As a Hispanic woman, the best and most personal advice I can give is never to think of yourself as a minority. I never did! I am a multicultural and multilingual woman; these are the traits that help make me a valuable asset to MTV Networks. The only things you truly have control over are your name and your reputation, and it is these things that will ultimately define you. Therefore, you must be mindful of your actions. Always act with integrity and take pride in your work, no matter how small the task. Treat people with respect. Never ask them to do things you would not ask of yourself. Speak out when you see an injustice. If you neglect to do so, you’ve failed yourself.

COMPANY:

MTV Networks

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

New York, NY

www.viacom.com

MTV Networks, a unit of Viacom, is one of the world’s leading creators of programming and content across all media platforms.

BUSINESS:

DATA: MTV Networks’ linear and digital properties combined reach 479 million homes in 171 countries and territories around the world.

138

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

TITLE:

Executive Vice President, Viacom Brand Solutions

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

BA, Cornell; MBA, Columbia

Economist at the Organization of American

States

The Kite Runner, by Khaled Hosseini; Tinisima, by Elena Poniatowska (I always have two books going at the same time—usually one in Spanish and one in English.) READING:

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: Be true to yourself. Serve as your first and last mentor. Work hard, keep learning, and face challenges head on. And don’t forget to pay it forward. Identify, nurture, and learn from young talent. FAMILY:

Husband, glassblowing artist Robert Alan Stern

INTERESTS: All types of dancing, gourmet cooking, sudoku and crossword puzzles

Never stop learning! We live in an ever-changing world, and the ability to adapt and apply new knowledge is what drives success. Sometimes this means taking risks, but nothing worth having comes without risk. In my career, I have continuously taken risks, and, as a result, I’ve continued to learn, grow and achieve my goals. Never pursue professional success at the expense of personal fulfillment. Keep balance in your life. Don’t lose touch with reality and what makes you, you, independent of titles and responsibilities. Rely on your family and friends to keep you grounded. Life will present you with tough choices now and then. Make those choices from a position of strength, not weakness. Above all, stay true to what we all learned early on: Have fun!

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Karen Quintos

DELL INC.

“The opportunities are what we make them.” TITLE:

A

Vice President of America’s Customer Centers

EDUCATION: BS in business logistics, Pennsylvania State University; master’s in marketing/international business, New York University

s a female executive at a high-profile, global corporation, I believe that women have the responsibility to help each other advance. Although women represent a majority of the work force, and the number of women holding executive positions is growing, we still face many challenges.

FIRST JOB: Multiple roles in marketing, planning, operations and supply chain at Merck & Co.

As I advanced in my career, there were a few key principles that helped me stay focused and provided balance to my life. They still hold true and will set you on the right track for success.

READING: I try to read a fun book and an intellectually stimulating book at the same time. Right now, I’m reading The World is Flat, by Thomas L. Friedman, and My Sister’s Keeper, by Jodi Picoult

PRIORITIZE

Put first things first, whatever that may be for you— family, career or community. The corporate world will consume 24 hours of your day if you allow it. Delegation is key, both at home and at work. DIFFERENTIATE YOURSELF

This is essential. Build your brand. Companies are looking for the best and the brightest. Although women are more educated, experienced and accomplished than ever before, we still need to go the extra mile for recognition. We need to be experts in our field, know the latest trends and key competitors, or take on that extra project that increases our visibility. GET TO KNOW THE RIGHT PEOPLE

Surround yourself with the people in your company who share your values, have passion and will constantly challenge you. This will keep you at the top of your game.

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: A hundred years from now, your bank account or size of your house or car won’t matter. What will matter is how your family and friends remember you and what you’ve given back to society. FAMILY:

Married, three children

INTERESTS: Jogging, travel and cooking. I love throwing great parties! FAVORITE CHARITY: Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA)/Guardian Ad Litem, Meals on Wheels.

NETWORK

Join an industry organization or a local nonprofit organization that will put you in touch with leaders in your field or community. Run for a board position or join a women’s organization. Networking is especially helpful in building a strong support system and getting invaluable advice about both career and family. GIVE BACK

COMPANY:

Dell Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS: RANKING:

Round Rock, TX

www.dell.com Innovative technology and services No. 1

FY 2006 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

$56 billion

69,700

I’ve been fortunate in my life, and I believe it’s my responsibility to give my time, talents and resources to those who are not as fortunate. Through my community outreach, I have served on several nonprofit boards and, more recently, on the advisory board at Penn State’s Smeal School of Business, my alma mater. MANAGE AND ADAPT TO CHANGE

The opportunities are what we make them. You must be able to manage and adapt to change. Remember that your career is a journey that won’t always play out exactly as planned. Whatever your career choice, make sure it’s something that you really enjoy and are passionate about. It’s your career and your life, and you’ll make of it what you want it to be.

PDJ

Profiles in Diversity Journal

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W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Alison Quirk

S TAT E S T R E E T C O R P O R AT I O N

“Understand that learning comes from all angles.”

I

EDUCATION:

’ve taken on a variety of roles—marketing, community affairs and human resources —and each has enhanced my business perspective. The following values have served as my best guides: a commitment to learning and personal and professional growth, a willingness to take risks and an understanding that the definition of work-life balance would differ at various points in my career. There is no one-size-fits-all formula for a successful career, but I do know that the following advice can help you unlock your potential. UNDERSTAND THAT LEARNING COMES FROM ALL ANGLES.

You can seek structured courses to increase your knowledge base, but remember to keep your eyes and ears open always. You can learn as much from jobs that haven’t worked out as you can from the jobs that have. Every day provides new learning opportunities. It’s easy to fall back on what you do well. But to move forward in your career, you need to have a healthy appetite for new opportunities and challenges. If you don’t test yourself, you’ll never know your true potential—and your managers won’t feel comfortable assigning new challenges. STEP OUT OF YOUR COMFORT ZONE.

OBSERVE THE BEHAVIOR OF SUCCESSFUL PEOPLE. Finding your own identity in the workplace is important, but sometimes it helps to learn how successful people found theirs. Different organizations can present different obstacles. Successful people can assist you in crafting a solid roadmap to navigate toward success.

COMPANY:

State Street Corporation

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Boston, MA

www.statestreet.com

Investment servicing, investment management, research and trading

BUSINESS:

Ranked in the top tier of global custodians in major industry surveys

RANKING:

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

140

Executive Vice President and Chief Talent Officer, Global Human Resources

TITLE:

$5.47 billion

More than 21,000 worldwide

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

BA in communications, University of New

Hampshire Very first job: scooping ice cream; first professional job: compensation and benefits analyst

FIRST JOB: READING:

The Rule of Four, by Ian Caldwell and Dustin

Thomason The best part of life is not just surviving but thriving, with passion and compassion, humor and style, and generosity and kindness.

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

Professionally, to be known as an HR person who advanced the overall goals of the business; someone who had very high expectations and was able to contribute to the success of the company. Ultimately, to have employees feel that State Street is a place where they can be engaged and professionally fulfilled. FAMILY:

Husband, one daughter, 15, and one son, 12

INTERESTS: Exercise, gold, reading, skiing, gardening and chasing my kids FAVORITE CHARITY:

Ellis Memorial House, South

Boston, MA

Plans and priorities at work can change on a moment’s notice. Those who are nimble enough to navigate new hurdles are often the people who endure and thrive in the long run.

BE ADAPTABLE AND FLEXIBLE.

It’ll help you manage the demands and allow for clearer concentration, better stamina and improved self-confidence.DON’T EXPECT A

TRY TO DEVOTE TIME EACH DAY TO PHYSICAL FITNESS.

PERFECT WORK-LIFE BALANCE, BUT KEEP AIMING FOR IT.

Professional responsibilities will change throughout your career— and so will your life outside. Striking the right balance will be ever-changing but always worth pursuing. You may not find perfection, but excellence is a great consolation prize. Getting involved with charities and volunteer opportunities at your company helps your community and your organization. And in the process, you’ll do wonders for your own spirit. GIVE BACK.

No matter what your chosen profession, if you feel engaged in your work, open to learning and professionally fulfilled, you'll increase your potential for success.

PDJ


We’re providing women with a workplace that works as well for them as it does for us. Since the launch of our groundbreaking Women’s Initiative in 1993, Deloitte & Touche USA LLP and its subsidiaries have been committed to fostering an environment where the best women choose to be. A place where women can advance, succeed and successfully integrate their personal and professional commitments. And we have the results to show it. We have the highest percentage of women partners, principals and directors among the Big Four professional services providers. And we continue to be recognized as world class for our success in developing women professionals and leaders. We’re also proud to be have been named to Working Mother magazine’s list of 100 Best Companies for Working Mothers for eleven consecutive years. Proof that we are not only making our Women’s Initiative a success, but also the women who work here.

www.deloitte.com/us About Deloitte Deloitte refers to one or more of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu, a Swiss Verein, its member firms and their respective subsidiaries and affiliates. As a Swiss Verein (association), neither Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu nor any of its member firms has any liability for each other’s acts or omissions. Each of the member firms is a separate and independent legal entity operating under the names “Deloitte,” “Deloitte & Touche,” “Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu,” or other related names. Services are provided by the member firms or their subsidiaries or affiliates and not by the Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Verein. Deloitte & Touche USA LLP is the US member firm of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu. In the US, services are provided by the subsidiaries of Deloitte & Touche USA LLP (Deloitte & Touche LLP, Deloitte Consulting LLP, Deloitte Financial Advisory Services LLP, Deloitte Tax LLP and their subsidiaries), and not by Deloitte & Touche USA LLP. Member of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Copyright © 2005 Deloitte Development LLC. All rights reserved.


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Brenda Reichelderfer

I T T C O R P O R AT I O N

“A positive, can-do attitude not only helps overcome obstacles, but it also motivates others to help.” TITLE:

Senior Vice President and Chief Technology

Officer

T

oday’s corporate environment calls for strong, integritydriven leadership from all executives, regardless of their ethnicity or gender. I believe that focusing on the following four factors helps to build a better business climate, thereby increasing the odds of success for all. ATTITUDE

Ability determines what you can do; motivation determines what you will do; but attitude determines how well you will do it. In the classroom, ability and motivation generally are enough; but in business, the social impact you have on others is a key differentiator. A positive, can-do attitude not only helps overcome obstacles, but it also motivates others to help.

BS in electrical engineering, Ohio Northern

EDUCATION:

University FIRST JOB: READING:

Truck-stop waitress while in high school

The World is Flat, by Thomas L. Friedman

Success is: “To laugh often and much; to win the respect of intelligent people and the affection of children; to earn the appreciation of honest critics and endure the betrayal of false friends; to appreciate beauty; to find the best in others; to leave the world a bit better. . .” –Ralph Waldo Emerson

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

FAMILY:

Love them! Both the two- and four-legged

members INTERESTS:

Home building, boating, biking and

gardening

PERSEVERANCE

FAVORITE CHARITY:

To persevere means to persist in or remain constant to a purpose, idea or task in the face of obstacles or discouragement. We all face obstacles; we all get discouraged; we all make mistakes. The key is to learn from everything and move forward. Every one of my mistakes has provided a valuable lesson—as long as I did not dwell on my error. The same is true for troubling work situations. Rather than letting them consume me, I think them through, decide what ITT Corporation White Plains, NY WEBSITE: www.ITT.com BUSINESS: ITT is the world’s premier supplier of pumps, systems and services to move, control and treat water and other fluids. The company is a major supplier of sophisticated military defense systems and provides advanced technical and operational services to a broad range of government agencies. ITT also produces connectors, switches, keypads and cabling used in telecommunications, computing, aerospace and industrial applications, as well as network services. Further, ITT makes industrial components for a number of other markets, including transportation, construction and aerospace. RANKING: No. 291 on the Fortune 500 list 2005 REVENUE: $7.4 billion EMPLOYEES: 41,000 worldwide COMPANY:

HEADQUARTERS:

142

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

Habitat for Humanity and

Covenant House

to do, and do it—even if it means ignoring it. The important thing is to deal with it and move on. Finally, the harder the task, the greater the accomplishment. Don’t use difficulty as an excuse to drop something. Dive in and do—then savor your achievement. FIELD OF VISION

As they say, “You don’t know what you don’t know.” What counts in college is learning how to learn; in life it’s applying that learning skill to the vast array of opportunities that lie before us. A different project, a new job, a change in geography—all of these offer a chance to expand our field of vision. Training doesn’t stop at college. Electrical engineers with four years of schooling may be obsolete in five, unless they keep on learning. BELIEF IN OTHERS

There comes a time when all the attitude, perseverance and vision you have are not enough to solve the problems that land in your lap. But if you have practiced these three things, you will find others who have been drawn to your light. It is those people who will carry you over the line. It has happened to me more times than I deserve.

PDJ


H E AT, P R E S S U R E A N D C O A L C A N W O R K T O G E T H E R TO CREATE SOMETHING OF UNMATCHED STRENGTH. A DIVERSE WORKFORCE CAN DO THE SAME. At SRP, diversity is a value we strongly embrace. Founded over 100 years ago, we have suppor ted an environment where people with different backgrounds, experiences and skills come to define their futures. Today, we’re a leading public utility and we have our employees, like Barb Hoffnagle, to thank for it. A 22-year SRP veteran, Ms. Hoffnagle has made countless contributions to SRP and her community. Her leadership skills recently earned her the honor of being named one of the Women Wor th Watching.™ Congratulations. Your accomplishments make all of us stronger.


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Christine “Chris” Reilly

CIT GROUP INC.

“Be comfortable with new challenges, understand risk and embrace change.”

TITLE:

President, CIT Small Business Lending

BA, cum laude, College of Mount St. Vincent, New York, NY; MBA, recipient of C. W. Nichols Fellowship Award, New York University’s Leonard and Stern School of Business; CPA

EDUCATION:

I

have learned many lessons in life. The four that follow

Lifeguard

have helped me to realize my career goals:

FIRST JOB:

• Develop and cultivate relationships.

John Adams, by David McCullough; Angels and Demons, by Dan Brown; and Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything, by Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner

• Never stop learning. • Be open to change. • Maintain a proper balance in your life. The relationships I have cultivated both professionally

READING:

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: To always see the bright side of things, treat people right and smile

Three teenagers

and personally are what I value most in life. I believe a large

FAMILY:

part of being successful is the ability to know and relate well

INTERESTS:

to those around you. Make the time to focus on developing,

Skiing, golfing, exercising and the beach; reading, playing the piano, listening to music and spending time with family and friends.

cultivating and building your relationships. Regardless of

FAVORITE CHARITY:

your audience—customers, mentors, employees or other con-

The American Red Cross and the Multiple Sclerosis Society

stituents—developing strong relationships is an integral part of effective leadership.

The quest for knowledge and the ability to leave your comfort zone are crucial to success. New opportunities help

COMPANY:

CIT Group Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

New York, NY

www.cit.com

Founded in 1908. A leading global commercial and consumer finance company with $65 billion in managed assets. Provides clients with financing and leasing products and advisory services. Holds leading positions in vendor financing, factoring, equipment and transportation financing, Small Business Administration (SBA) loans and asset-based lending.

BUSINESS:

Fortune 500 company. Member of the S&P 500 Index. No. 1 SBA lender for six consecutive years. No. 1 SBA lender to women-, veteran- and minorityowned businesses.

RANKING:

In approximately 30 industries and nearly 40 countries CUSTOMERS:

EMPLOYEES:

144

More than 6,700

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

you develop and hone the leadership skills that will open the doors to future advancement. Be comfortable with new challenges, understand risk and embrace change. Opportunities that involve unfamiliar territory or adversity are always difficult at first, but ultimately these experiences will build your confidence and teach you to trust your instincts. There’s life outside of the office. Remember to balance your professional and personal life. Without an equal balance, you become less interesting and valuable as a leader and an employee and, ultimately, less satisfied personally. I believe that these lessons have helped me to achieve success in my life and can benefit other women at any stage of their career.

PDJ


Diversity Always worth highlighting

In fact, we consider workforce diversity to be a great natural resource. And we’re in a position to know. Equitable Resources, Inc. (NYSE: EQT) is an integrated energy company with emphasis on Appalachian area natural gas supply, transmission and distribution. Through our business unit segments – Equitable Supply and Equitable Utilities – we recognize the advantage of a diverse workforce embodying widely varied perspectives, life experiences and talents. To learn more about Equitable Resources, visit our website at www.eqt.com. Where talent thrives through equality of opportunity, M/F/D/V.

RE-ENERGIZE YOUR CAREER


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Frances Resheske

C O N S O L I DAT E D E D I S O N C O M PA N Y O F N E W YO R K

“The greatest things that you can earn are the respect and trust of other people.”

I

n sharing advice about mentoring, you will read a great deal about the common threads that make up the fabric of our careers. A few cornerstones I’ve learned along the way are to get a good education, find an opportunity to do an internship early in your career, have a good work ethic, always do your best, treat others with respect and know your company’s business. I grew up believing that one person can make a difference and that, in some way, I could change the world. I still believe that is true. Making a difference begins with how we relate to each other. At the least, we must all treat each other fairly and with respect. Embrace diversity, share ideas and work collaboratively. I can’t stress enough the importance of education as the foundation for all career success. What you learn today will affect the opportunities that you have tomorrow. Continue to grow and learn every step of the way. There is so much to be learned from the experiences of other people. There is also much to be gained through hard work.

COMPANY:

Consolidated Edison Company of New

York Inc. New York, NY www.coned.com BUSINESS: Consolidated Edison provides a wide range of energy-related products and services to its customers through two regulated utility subsidiaries and three competitive energy businesses. RANKING: One of the nation’s largest investor-owned energy companies 2005 REVENUE: $12 billion in annual revenues, $25 billion in assets EMPLOYEES: Approximately 14,500 CUSTOMERS: More than 4.6 million customers in New York City and Westchester, Orange and Rockland counties, as well as sections of northern New Jersey and northeastern Pennsylvania HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

146

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

TITLE:

Senior Vice President, Public Affairs

BA in government and politics, summa cum laude, St. John’s University, New York

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: I began babysitting when I was 11 and moved on to be a supermarket cashier at 16. READING:

Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Bronte

The strength of your convictions, the depth of your compassion and the nature of your actions determine your true place in the world.

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

Being with my family and special people in my life, Pilates, gardening

INTERESTS: FAMILY:

My sister and her family

FAVORITE CHARITY: Queens Theater in the Park, National Dance Institute and several Catholic charities

It also is very important to help other people. Whenever I’m asked to meet with young people, to give advice, or to brainstorm with someone about finding a job, I make the effort to find the time. I advise people to choose careers that they enjoy and where they can make a difference. Community involvement and commitment are important parts of life. It is essential for everyone to give something back to the neighborhoods and institutions where they work and live. If there is one final lesson I can pass along, it is this: Titles and money do not define your value. The greatest things that you can earn are the respect and trust of other people. Bring your personal best to all environments, whether it’s at work or with family and friends.

PDJ


No barriers. Just opportunities. PROFESSIONAL GROWTH TOWARD CAREER GOALS

Bring your leadership, strategic thinking, and commitment to excellence to one of the world’s largest investment management companies. You’ll enjoy a comprehensive total rewards program, long-term career growth, and best-inclass training from Vanguard University, ranked as one of

Training magazine’s “Top 100” programs. YEARS EMPLOYED AT VANGUARD

Current opportunities include: • Marketing Management • Relationship Management

Connect with Vanguard™

• Financial and Strategic Analysis

www.vanguardcareers.com

• Contact Center Management

Vanguard is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

• Investment Management

Named one of Training magazine’s “Top 100” programs, March 2006. Vanguard, Connect with Vanguard, and the ship logo are trademarks of The Vanguard Group, Inc. All other marks are the exclusive property of their respective owners. © 2006 The Vanguard Group, Inc. All rights reserved.


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Rebecca R. Rhoads

R AY T H E O N

“If you’ve been handed a project outside of your comfort zone, consider it a gift.”

I

knew very early in life that, like my dad, I loved math and science. He spent his career in the defense industry, so when I was looking for that all-important first job as an electrical engineer, it seemed like a natural place to start. Some 27 years later, I have undertaken numerous assignments, some more challenging than others. Along the way, I’ve worked with all kinds of different people. Little did I know how much each of those opportunities would prepare me for my current role as chief information officer of a Fortune 100 company. I learned that women leaders need to embody resilience, tenacity and compassion. By resilience, I mean we must not allow professional setbacks or “bruises” to undermine our confidence. Female executives also need to be tenacious about mastering the tough assignments. Those are the very projects that teach you the most. In terms of compassion, we need to nurture the people we meet along the journey. Appreciation and respect for others help build rich networks you can count on, and that can count on you. Another piece of advice that I’d like to share is that it’s OK to be tired and to be frustrated from time to time. Perfection in one’s career, as in life, is illusive. Rarely will your career path be without the occasional valley. Don’t let the hard work that it takes to climb the next hill slow your progress.

COMPANY:

Raytheon

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

Waltham, MA

www.raytheon.com Aerospace and defense

No. 5 aerospace and defense contractor; Fortune 100 company

RANKING:

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

148

TITLE:

Vice President and Chief Information Officer

Bachelor’s and master’s degrees in electrical engineering, California Polytechnic University; master’s degree in the executive management program, University of California at Los Angeles’ Anderson Graduate School of Business Management

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB:

Taco Bell

My “in” box always comes first, then business and IT periodicals, and finally I have a soft spot for fiction—action and mysteries.

READING:

Extract all the learning and experience you can from everything to do. And then, when that great opportunity comes, you’ll be ready and you will be successful.

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

FAMILY:

Husband, a son, 23, and a daughter, 20

INTERESTS:

Water sports, music, travel, gardening

FAVORITE CHARITY:

ALS

If you’ve been handed a project outside of your comfort zone, consider it a gift. Use it to grow your skills. It won’t be easy, but your managers must have thought you were capable; so prove them right and reap the benefits. I’ve never shied away from the tough projects, the ones that nobody else wanted. I would encourage you to embrace those opportunities, too. It’s often while working through the problems that you grow the most professionally. Challenge yourself, respect others in and out of the workplace, and you’ll open doors for opportunities you never imagined.

$21.9 billion

80,000

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

PDJ


A diversity of great technology and solutions starts with a diversity of great people

At Raytheon, an inclusive culture is one of the things we believe gives us a competitive advantage. By recognizing the uniqueness of individuals, empowering employees, and truly valuing their input, our company consistently performs beyond all expectations. It’s a philosophy we’ll always embrace. It’s right for people, and it’s right for business.

We’re proud to feature Raytheon employees in our ads. To join them in a rewarding career, visit

www.rayjobs.com © 2006 Raytheon Company. All rights reserved. Raytheon is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer and welcomes a wide diversity of applicants. U.S. citizenship and security clearance may be required.


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Chris Rother

C DW G OV E R N M E N T I N C . ( C DW- G )

“Confidence and success arrive when you push through your fear of the unknown.”

F

irst, be true to yourself, no matter what. If you haven’t

already done so, take the time to write down the things that are most important to you. Whether it’s family, friends, enjoying your career or making a difference in the world around you—figure out what motivates you. When you know your core values, everything else falls into place. You might think that it becomes easier to make decisions the longer you are in business and the more experience you have. It isn’t true. The decisions get harder. The implications are bigger. With your values centering you, you can avoid the guilt that often comes with having to make diffi-

TITLE:

Group Vice President, Sales, CDW Government Inc.

BS, University of Illinois, Chicago; Kellogg Women’s Leadership Program

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB: READING:

The Tipping Point, by Malcolm Gladwell

To be in a constant state of learning and change. Always to be open to experiencing and trying out new things. What makes me happiest is to see the people in my life and around me succeed. I always want to be the best that I can be, to challenge myself and, more importantly, to give my team and others around me the tools and the autonomy to be the best that they can be.

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

cult decisions. I’ve come to understand that decisions are

FAMILY:

really about giving up one choice for another. That’s OK.

INTERESTS:

It’s also important to be a coach and a leader to the people in your life, from family to friends to colleagues. The key is

Burger King; first job after college: Price

Electronics

Husband, Bill; two children, 11 and 7 Family, gardening, reading

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Children’s Memorial Hospital,

Chicago

to understand the difference between managing and leading. Always try to lead more than you manage. Everyone comes out ahead when you empower people to make decisions.

Pick your battles. Remember those tough decisions? Save your efforts for when it really matters. When you know yourself, you know when to let something go and when it’s time to stand up and fight.

CDW Government Inc. (CDW-G), a wholly owned subsidiary of CDW

COMPANY:

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS: RANKING:

www.cdwg.com Information technology No. 343 on Fortune 500 list (CDW)

2005 REVENUE: E M P L OY E E S :

150

Vernon Hills, IL

Which brings me to my last point: You are only as good as your team. Surround yourself with the best people. They don’t have to be just like you because diversity is good. Time and again I have seen that like attracts like. When you bring the best people together they succeed exponentially—and so do you. A good leader knows how to let her team make her look good.

$6.3 billion (CDW)

4,350 (CDW)

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Susan Seestrom

L O S A L A M O S N AT I O N A L L A B O R AT O R Y

“Leadership is very hard business, and not all aspects are fun.”

L

os Alamos National Laboratory is a unique combination of corporate environment and academic research in the hard sciences. Success as a leader, therefore, entails succeeding in two separate, traditionally male-dominated communities— corporate leadership and science. The most important factor for me has been to establish technical credentials through experience in my chosen area of research—experimental nuclear physics. Without this experience it would be very difficult to maintain the respect and credibility necessary to lead a scientific organization— or to make sound technical decisions as a leader. A key, therefore, to success in a national laboratory is to not make the transition to management too soon. A second very important factor is to have a passion for the work and the people. Leadership is very hard business, and not all aspects are fun. This passion you have for the organization will carry you through the hard times that often come with a hard job. Lastly, I would like to counter the notion that one must choose between career and family. My experience is that not only can one succeed at both, but also that each aspect of one’s life benefits from the other. I can remember very well the constraints imposed in the days when my children were

COMPANY:

Los Alamos National Laboratory

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

Los Alamos, NM

www.lanl.gov

Associate Director for Experimental Physical Sciences

TITLE:

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

BS and PhD in physics

Cook at Frisky’s A&W drive-in restaurant

READING: A Short History of Nearly Everything, by Bill Bryson

Contribute as much as I can with whatever talents I have been given.

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

FAMILY: Fantastic husband, three daughters, two stepdaughters, three granddaughters INTERESTS:

Running, gardening, quilting

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Los Alamos National Laboratory

Foundation

young—leaving work to pick them up and attending school conferences and sporting events. I think that the time spent with family was energizing and allowed me to be more focused and productive while at work. The impact of a strong and capable mother as a role model for daughters (and sons!) cannot be overestimated. I believe that appropriate family-work balance makes for a better work force. It is even more important for women in leadership roles to set the example for their organizations. You can have it all!

Scientific research and development

EMPLOYEES:

8,500

PDJ Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2006

151


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

June R. Shrewsbury

L O C K H E E D M A R T I N A E R O N A U T I C S C O M PA N Y

“It ’s tough to develop and grow if you are never given the chance to take risks and reach beyond your current role.”

S

hortly after I was promoted to vice president, I received a beautiful bouquet of flowers from a friend. The card read, “Is that the glass ceiling I hear shattering?” I realized at that moment that I had made a significant breakthrough that not only would benefit me, but also would open the door for many other women. When I reflect on how I got here, it’s easy to remember the tough assignments and long days stretching into long weeks and long months. However, what stands out is that I was given some amazing opportunities. It’s tough to develop and grow if you are never given the chance to take risks and reach beyond your current role. I feel very fortunate that I had good mentors who had faith in my abilities and trusted that I could get the job done. One mentor took a chance and put me in a leadership role on a very troubled program. While we both knew it would be a stretch, we worked together to identify areas where I would need additional support and made sure those resources were available. The results were very positive. We turned the program around, and I was able to demonstrate that I was ready to take on more responsibility. This was a turning point in my career. My next assignments were on larger and more complex programs, which ultimately led to my current position.

COMPANY:

Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Bethesda, MD

www.lockheedmartin.com

No. 1 provider of information technology, systems integration and training to the U.S. Government RANKING:

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

152

TITLE:

Vice President, F-16 Program

BS, San Diego State University; MBA, University of Maryland University College

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: Building plan approval process office for the county of San Diego READING:

Digital Fortress, by Dan Brown

Everything happens for a reason. Life is about learning, and no matter what happens, it will propel you forward.

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

FAMILY:

Husband, Tom; one daughter, 17

INTERESTS:

Travel, reading and spending time at the

beach. FAVORITE CHARITY: Girls Inc., an organization that helps disadvantaged young women get their life on track.

I’d like to say it was an easy path from one assignment to the next, but that wouldn’t be the entire truth. Along the way, there were many obstacles I had to overcome. When leading military aircraft programs, I encountered biases because I was a woman, and I had not been in the military. However, once people realized that I was competent, that I understood the business and that my motivation was to help the team and the customer succeed, these obstacles ceased to exist. The path I took also required some personal sacrifice. It’s difficult to raise a child and maintain a happy marriage when you work long hours and travel frequently. Having a saint for a spouse helps, but learning to balance my time and be present in the moment, whether at home or at work, has been my strategy for success.

$37.2 billion

135,000 worldwide

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

PDJ


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W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Katherine Sierra

THE WORLD BANK

“Recognize your own passions and talents and build on them.”

I

love The World Bank for its noble vision: “A world free of poverty.” And I love working with extremely talented men and women from nearly every country in the world who aspire to fulfill that vision. To lead in such a large, complex organization brings a unique set of challenges and opportunities. We are all driven to perform at a high level, but women in our organization often find juggling the demands of career and family particularly difficult, especially women from cultures in which assertiveness is not the norm. When asked, therefore, by colleagues how best to pursue a career here, my answers are simple: — personal honesty, integrity, commitment, working with openness and trust, empowering others, respecting differences. But do so in a way that honors your own culture. The diversity of thought and experience you bring is a strength to the organization.

LIVE UP TO THE ORGANIZATION’S MISSION AND VALUES

Recognize your own passions and talents and build on them. Seek feedback to help you become aware of blind spots, especially about how others may perceive you. Build diverse teams that complement you, bringing the right technical skills, different styles or different approaches to problem solving.

TITLE:

Vice President, Sustainable Development

BA in anthropology/Hispanic civilization, University of California at Santa Barbara; master’s in city and regional planning, Harvard University

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: READING:

Selling souvenirs at Universal Studios

The Constant Gardener, by John LeCarré

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

Integrity and honesty above all.

FAMILY: Husband, a commercial mortgage banker originally from Ireland; daughter at university; son a senior in high school INTERESTS: Keeping up with my great kids and husband; spending time at the beach; and reading, reading, reading FAVORITE CHARITY:

Margaret McNamara Memorial

Fund

KNOW YOURSELF.

GET OUT OF YOUR COMFORT ZONE. Take chances and “stretch” yourself in ways you didn’t think possible. I am an

COMPANY:

The World Bank

infrastructure development specialist but was asked to take on corporate assignments, including VP of human resources. It was a tough, but seminal, learning experience for me TAKE CARE OF FRIENDS AND FAMILIES. Many of us travel overseas more than 100 days a year. Figure out when you need to take a position that may not be as operational but allows you to learn and grow while maintaining a healthy work-life balance. I pulled myself out of a high-travel position when my children were young and worked part-time for a few years.

Enjoy your colleagues. Follow my own mentor’s advice: Stay on an even keel. Don’t get too upset when things go wrong; don’t get overly exuberant when things go well. Ours is a business where things can change quickly. The central challenge of leadership is to balance competing forces and trade-offs yet remain grounded in the excellence of the services we provide. In other words, be driven to make a real and lasting difference to the poor of the world. MAINTAIN A GOOD SENSE OF HUMOR.

HEADQUARTERS:

Washington, DC

WEBSITE:

www.worldbank.org

RANKING:

World’s leading development institution

2005 REVENUE:

Lending of almost $24 billion

10,500 in Washington, DC, and 120 offices around the world EMPLOYEES:

154

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Irina Simmons

E M C C O R P O R AT I O N

“Passion for your profession will always energize your career.”

M

y upbringing was one of the biggest influences on my life and career. My family immigrated to the United States from Lebanon with little more than a desire for a different kind of life. So, my parents’ values and sacrifice always instilled the importance of academic excellence, financial independence and pursuing a life that is full of success and opportunity. For that, I am very grateful. While there are still some challenges, there also are tremendous opportunities for women to prove themselves and achieve their goals in business. Over the last 30 years, many amazing, influential women have worked very hard to pave the way for us to break through the glass ceiling and climb the corporate ladder into the corner office. And this will only get better as we continue to offer our influence, encouragement and opportunity to smart, motivated and successful women entering the workplace today. To be successful in business today, you not only need to be confident in your experience and abilities, but, like an athlete, you also must have passion and discipline and be willing to practice and sacrifice. Passion for your profession will always energize your career. Practice and discipline will keep you on the path you have chosen. And, consider what it will take to prove yourself and achieve your goals, as well as what you are willing to sacrifice.

COMPANY:

EMC Corporation

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

Hopkinton, MA

www.emc.com Information management and storage

EMC is the world-leading provider of information management and storage software, hardware, services and solutions. RANKING:

EMPLOYEES:

TITLE:

Senior Vice President and Treasurer

Bachelor’s in economics and French, Tufts University; MBA, Boston University

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

Inventory analyst

To be successful in business today, you not only need to be confident in your experience and abilities, but, like an athlete, you must have passion and discipline and be willing to practice and sacrifice

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

FAMILY:

Married, no children

INTERESTS:

Gardening, boating

While you will have many successes along your career path, you also will face disagreement, disappointment and discouragement. Don’t lose your momentum! As in life, the business world has its ups and downs, but your dedication, discipline and willingness to pick yourself up when you fall will enable you to rebound and learn from any setback. Most importantly, good luck and best wishes! By embracing your experience and pursuing your career with fervor, excitement and determination, you will be poised to succeed as a businesswoman and future corporate leader.

More than 28,000 employees worldwide

PDJ Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2006

155


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

E. Follin Smith

C O N S T E L L AT I O N E N E R G Y

“Trust your instincts.”

Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer and Chief Administrative Officer

TITLE:

I

t may be hard to see, but it exists. Women still face significant barriers to upward mobility, largely because of hidden biases and unspoken assumptions. In spite of growing diversity in the work force, women continue to be underrepresented in management positions. My advice to women: Being a “good guy” won’t help you as much as it will help a guy. Performance must be the driver of your career: • • • • • • •

Become an expert in something; know your stuff. Always follow through on your commitments. Surround yourself with outstanding performers. Take calculated risks. Trust your instincts. Don’t be afraid to ask hard questions. Work hard.

COMPANY:

Constellation Energy

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Baltimore, MD

www.constellation.com

BUSINESS: The nation’s largest competitive supplier of electricity to large commercial and industrial customers and the nation’s largest wholesale power seller. Constellation Energy manages fuels and energy services on behalf of energy-intensive industries and utilities and owns a diversified fleet of more than 100 generating units located throughout the United States, totaling approximately 12,000 megawatts of generating capacity. The company delivers electricity and natural gas through the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (BGE), its regulated utility in Central Maryland. RANKING:

No. 125 on the Fortune 500 list

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

156

$17.1 billion

Approximately 10,000

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

BA from Davidson College, NC; MBA from the University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business in Charlottesville, NC, Shermet Scholar

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB:

Sterilizing instruments in surgery

Author M.F.K. Fisher (I’m on my way to Provence for vacation) READING:

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

You can achieve anything you

set your mind to! FAMILY:

Husband, John Gerdy; daughter, 11, and son, 8

INTERESTS:

Family time, cooking, travel, literature

FAVORITE CHARITY: Music for Everyone, which supports school music programs, founded by husband, John Gerdy

All along the way, but especially once you are in a position of leadership, make it a priority to support other women in their careers. Know who your ten to 15 high-performing female employees are, rotate them, support their development and growth, and provide the necessary career counseling. Keep them on your radar screen and ensure that they are exposed and considered for critical opportunities within your organization. Because leaders tend to choose protégés who are similar to them—in terms of gender, interests and background—females in male-dominated industries are at a particular disadvantage. Those of us who have achieved senior positions need to help create a level playing field for the next generation of women. We should make it a point to support each other. Most importantly, never be self-conscious about being a female executive. We all have unique backgrounds. No two paths to the executive suite are the same. Each of us brings something special to our positions and being a woman is a component of that. Always operate on the strengths and abilities that you have to offer and you will go far. PDJ


It takes a lot of stars to make a Constellation. At Constellation Energy, we’re very proud that our CFO, CAO and Executive Vice President E. Follin Smith has been chosen by Diversity Journal as one of its “Women Worth Watching in 2007.” Here are a few more of the talented leaders who are helping us expand our lead as the #1 national provider of energy and energy services to large commercial and industrial customers, and as the nation’s largest wholesale power seller. We value and support a broad range of experiences and perspectives. By encouraging diverse ideas and opinions, we create and cultivate business ideas that give our company a competitive advantage. Pictured above, left to right, are Wynne Hayes, VP, Business Performance Improvement & IT; Beth Perlman, Chief Information Officer and Sr. VP; Jeannette Mills, Co-Lead, BGE Vision 2020 Project; Maria Korsnick, VP, R.E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant; and Deb Emerson, VP, Constellation Energy Commodities Group, at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture in Baltimore, Maryland.

constellation.com


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

DarleneJ.S. Solomon, Ph.D. AGILENT TECHNOLOGIES

“When you enjoy your work, you’re at your best, and you bring out the best in those around you.”

I

have enjoyed my career and appreciate my excellent education and the chance to work and learn from exceptional people at Agilent and Hewlett-Packard. These are five things that I think of as really important contributors to success: •

ENJOY WHAT YOU DO AND PASSION, COMMITMENT AND SUCCESSFUL CONTRIBUTION USUALLY WILL FOLLOW.

When you enjoy your work, you’re at your best, and you bring out the best in those around you. •

Think about why others may see something differently and the implications and connections across domains.

ALWAYS TRY AND SEE THE BIG PICTURE.

without political or other distractions. There are a lot of smart people in the world, and most can solve the moderately difficult problems. But to solve the really challenging ones requires great people giving their best. That can only happen with the right work environment and culture.

BS in chemistry from Stanford University; PhD in inorganic chemistry from Massachusetts Institute of Technology

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: Hewlett-Packard Laboratories as a member of the technical staff READING: Leading publications on emerging technologies, high-growth markets and global leadership

To contribute to society through the use of technology to improve how people live and work

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

Working together, you can solve the really challenging problems. The days of the lone inventor with the luxury of time are gone. A teaming culture lets you innovate across the value delivery system—R&D with manufacturing, marketing

FAMILY:

Husband, son, 17, and daughter,14

INTERESTS: “Hot” yoga, swimming, working out in the gym, cooking, snorkeling in tropical water FAVORITE CHARITY: American Cancer Society (both my parents have succumbed to cancer)

RESPECT AND VALUE YOUR TEAM AND PARTNERS.

COMPANY: WEBSITE:

Agilent Technologies

www.agilent.com

BUSINESS: The world’s premier measurement company and a technology leader in communications, electronics, life sciences and chemical analysis RANKING: No. 5 on Business Ethics magazine’s “100 Best Corporate Citizens” list; No. 319 on Fortune 500; one of the “Global 100 Most Sustainable Corporations in the World” for a second year in a row. (The list was announced Jan. 27 during the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. Innovest Strategic Value Advisors, an internationally recognized investment research and advisory firm, conducted the research and analysis.) 2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

158

Agilent Chief Technology Officer and Vice President

PROVIDE A CULTURE IN WHICH PEOPLE CAN FOCUS ON WHAT NEEDS TO BE DONE,

TITLE:

$5.1 billion

19,000

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

with support, and so on. So many of the problems that matter today—energy, the environment, food and water safety—are at the intersection of disciplines and require many areas of expertise. Try to invest time in task forces, professional societies, volunteer community work and others. It is often in these extracurricular activities that you find the greatest learning opportunities and the chance to meet people with whom you might not otherwise interact. For me, two great examples were my co-founding the original HP Technical Women’s Conference in 1988 and, more recently, my role as chair of the R&D subcommittee for California’s Blue Ribbon Task Force on Nanotechnology. Both have enabled me to connect with great people in areas of expertise different from my own. I believe in the multiple-mentor model. Each of us has a different set of strengths, and no one has it all. By selecting a set of mentors, each of whom excels in different skills, you can achieve a more powerful and balanced perspective. From there, it is up to you to integrate the picture and come up with a style and approach that reflect the best fit for you.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Bonnie Soodik

T H E B O E I N G C O M PA N Y

“You can be everything that you want to be—don’t settle for less.”

I

t’s always an interesting exercise to pause and reflect on one’s accomplishments and assess what has been learned during the course of a career. When I look back over the last 30 years, I’m surprised by how quickly everything has passed. So the first piece of advice I have for young professional women just starting their careers is to enjoy this time of your life. This is a very exciting time filled with possibilities. What you’ll find, however, is that up until now, much of what you accomplished was based on your individual efforts—your grades, graduating and getting your first job. As you progress through your career, you’ll come to find that it’s what you bring to a team that really matters; how you collaborate with people at all levels of an organization to help achieve success as a group—not as an individual. Have passion for what you do and courage to do the things that you fear. Be bold. Being bold means being yourself and standing up for what you believe in—even if you have to stand alone. Being bold means giving your honest opinion about situations and not saying just what you think the boss or your colleagues want to hear. Communicate your position, which should be well thought out and based on tangible data, with enthusiasm, and be

COMPANY:

The Boeing Company

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS: RANKING:

www.boeing.com Aerospace World’s largest aerospace company

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

160

Chicago, IL

$54.8 billion

153,000

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

Senior Vice President, Officer of Internal Governance

TITLE:

EDUCATION: BA in psychology from George Washington University; MS in administration from California State University; graduate of Advanced Management Institute of Claremont Graduate School, Claremont, CA

Computer programmer

FIRST JOB: READING:

Three Junes, by Julia Glass

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: FAMILY:

Life is an experience; don’t miss it.

Married to Michael Soodik, one son

INTERESTS:

Family, reading, traveling

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Boys and Girls Clubs

ready to defend that position when you are challenged. Being bold also means admitting when you’re wrong. You can’t be perfect, or even right, all the time, and making mistakes is how you learn the most. It also makes you more credible to your team when they know that sometimes you can be wrong, and, more importantly, you know how to accept it, fix it and then move on. The other thing to remember is to never give up on that elusive goal of achieving balance in your life. You can do it. Spend time with family and friends and take time to do the things you love to do. Everybody needs to recharge their batteries from time to time. You can be everything that you want to be—don’t settle for less.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Sheila Talton

CISCO SYSTEMS INC.

“My career is a testament to not waiting around to be noticed.” TITLE:

T

he most significant message I have for anyone aspiring to corporate leadership is to recognize that opportunity is everywhere, but you will have to identify and go after it yourself. I came to this realization harshly. From my perspective as an African-American woman, life seemed all about restrictions and limitations. It took my father to set me straight. He coupled the message that I could do whatever I wanted with the advice that I should never let anyone define my world. This insight spurred me to become one of the few women, let alone African-Americans, in my business school. It also guided my career choices. I chose technology because it was a field with little diversity, and the tech companies couldn’t hire fast enough. I chose finance because I learned that when you control budgets you have influence. I moved to sales and marketing because it put me in greater control of my destiny. I watched the breakup of AT&T in l986, saw the need for networking services in the era of deregulation and started my own business to counsel companies. When that role began to be taken over by the major consulting firms, I joined Cap Gemini Ernst & Young to help set up its critical technology practice. When I saw that the real impact was moving to the

COMPANY:

Cisco Systems Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

San Jose, CA

www.cisco.com

Leading supplier of networking equipment and network management for the Internet

BUSINESS:

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

162

$24.8 billion in net sales

48,296

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

Vice President, Advisory Services

EDUCATION: BS in business, Northern Illinois University; Advanced Management Program, Harvard Business School FIRST JOB: Sales trainee, NCR Corporation, selling hardware and software to government and health care organizations.

Good to Great, by Jim Collins; Harvard Business Review; Ethnic America, by Thomas Sowell, Devil in the White City, by Erik Larson READING:

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: To be fearless about those factors that determine your life.To pass on the benefits of the lessons you’ve learned. To share what you’ve gained to help others create their own opportunities. To support those who are not able to do so for themselves.

Larry Henderson, husband, and one daughter, one stepdaughter, one stepson

FAMILY:

Cooking, entertaining, gardening, sports, putting people together for business and friendship.

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY: After School Technology Center, Lawndale Community Church, Chicago, IL

global corporations, I went to EDS and now to Cisco. Here, I’m in a position where I can fully use my ability to see the next opportunity to help the company as it migrates from a product- to a solutions-focused company. My career is a testament to not waiting around to be noticed. I also hire people who don’t wait for opportunities. Today’s successful companies are challenging the status quo all the time as they seek to maintain market leadership. The people they hire and promote are the ones who know how to do the same for themselves. It’s a misconception to think that a career path is logical, clear or straight. It takes creativity and initiative—and it’s up to you.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Geri P. Thomas

BANK OF AMERICA

“By listening to each other and hearing different points of view, we often find new solutions to familiar challenges.”

L

ooking back on 36 years as wife, mother and executive at Bank of America, I see how important relationships are. I’m pleased with the adults my children have become, and I’m happy that I never sacrificed time with them. They’re my most important legacy. Relationships are equally important at work. When I began my career, I thought all I had to do was deliver results. Fortunately, I had mentors who said it’s about relationships and how you get results, not just the results themselves. Once you get this quarter’s results, it’s on to the next quarter. How are you going to get those results without relationships? I believe that I’m most successful when people who work with me are successful as well, and we are all in the relationship, working together. Building and sustaining relationships can take many forms: taking 30 minutes to speak with a new associate and help make the bank an easier place to navigate and succeed; offering another associate encouragement when the pressure is on; asking the right questions to set an associate on the right path; or helping another achieve their potential. My career at Bank of America has given me the opportunity to represent the bank in the community and to do what’s right for both. Being on the boards of various organizations

COMPANY:

Bank of America

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Senior Vice President and Corporate Diversity Executive

TITLE:

Charlotte, NC

www.bankofamerica.com

BUSINESS:

Financial services

CUSTOMERS:

54 million consumer and small business

relationships 2005 EARNINGS:

$16.465 billion

2005 EMPLOYEES:

177,000

EDUCATION:

BS, human resources, Georgia State

University FIRST JOB: Account representative in Technology and Operations, Citizens & Southern Bank FAVORITE READING:

Just finished Baby Brother’s Blues

by Pearl Cleage PHILOSOPHY:

Realize how important it is to build

relationships FAMILY:

Husband, son and daughter

INTERESTS:

Empowering women

FAVORITE CHARITY:

YWCA

has let me tackle critical questions in the community and be an advocate for people needing help and hope. These service opportunities also have introduced me to people I might never have otherwise engaged, and I’ve developed long-lasting relationships with many of them. My experiences have taught me how corporate America can drive change. The government can’t change people—neither can laws. But when you’re in an organization like Bank of America, where diversity is a dynamic value and embraced each and every day, you can literally see change in the making. In such an environment, each individual brings his or her own perspective to a situation where it is welcomed and valued. By listening to each other and hearing different points of view, we often find new solutions to familiar challenges. Everyone leaves the room with a new approach and a new perspective. And isn’t that what change is all about? Building and sustaining relationships, embracing diversity, seeking solutions, creating change. It’s a formula for success in any organization.

PDJ Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2006

163


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Janet B. Toronski

DA I M L E R C H RY S L E R F I N A N C I A L S E RV I C E S

“Never compromise your integrity or self-respect for anyone or anything.”

I

grew up in a traditional household where my father was an executive and my mother was the perfect housewife and mother. Today, I find myself living a very different life than that of my parents. Despite my conventional upbringing, my parents made me believe that I could do and be whatever I chose. And as I get older, I continue to make choices and reprioritize things in my life. Here is some advice I always try to live by: • Always be honest—with others and especially with yourself. • Determine your strengths. Work is more enjoyable when you use your natural abilities. • Like what you do.

BA in English, Mount Union College; JD, Wayne State University

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: Office assistant at Airco Carbon, a summer job at a local manufacturing plant

The Kite Runner, by Khaled Hosseini

• Remember that things change, so keep an open mind. I started my career as a lawyer and have migrated to the business side of corporate life. I love what I do, but going to law school was the best thing I ever did.

READING:

• Work hard and do your homework. When you advocate a position, have your facts straight and be sure you’ve considered all perspectives, especially those that are different from yours!

FAVORITE CHARITY:

• Surround yourself with people who believe in and encourage you, both at work and in your personal life. Naturally, there always will be people who both support you and work against you. When you have a choice of whom to be around, choose wisely. DaimlerChrysler Financial Services Americas LLC, a company of DaimlerChrysler AG

COMPANY:

HEADQUARTERS:

Farmington Hills, MI

WEBSITE:

www.daimlerchryslerfinancialservices.com/na BUSINESS:

Financial services

One of the leading financial services organizations worldwide and headquarters for operations in the United States, Canada, Mexico, Puerto Rico, Argentina, Brazil and Venezuela

RANKING:

More than $103 billion with nearly five million contracts

PORTFOLIO:

EMPLOYEES:

164

Vice President, Dealer Credit and National Accounts

TITLE:

Approximately 5,600

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: INTERESTS:

Live and let live.

Cooking, art fairs, traveling and music Hospice

• Don’t accept mediocrity in yourself or in others. • Strike a good balance between humility and self-confidence. • Never compromise your integrity or self-respect for anyone or anything. They are qualities that no one can take from you unless you allow it. • Know what’s expected from you in your job and your organization. If it conflicts with what’s really important to you, find another job or another company to work for. • Keep your priorities in perspective. This is a continuing practice, and one that most people never master. But don’t give up trying. • Finally, be a champion for inclusion and diversity. Push for tolerance and acceptance (not accommodation) of different types of people and lifestyles. An organization will thrive when its employees are smart, motivated, work for a common goal and have a real respect for others’ differences. Diversity of people and opinions will foster fresh, exciting ideas and will allow an organization to thrive. Above all, always do the right thing. That’s definitely one thing you’ll never regret.

PDJ


Of one m i n d –

Sovereign Bank Team Members from left to right: Roland Jimenez, Samantha LeManno, Jessica Louis, Sayed Musa, Natalie Bries

Sovereign Bank has become one of the top 20 financial institutions in the country by seeing things from many different points of view, but always with a shared goal: To deliver the highest quality financial products and services in the industry. We continue to exceed our objectives by providing the leadership and the freedom for all in our

– and many unique perspectives.

organization to express their talent and creativity, which builds innovation. As a multi-billion dollar financial services institution, it is the quality of the intellect and the individual that allows us to exceed the industry’s many challenges. Ideas are the currency of success at Sovereign Bank. Your contributions will enhance the future for all of us. To learn more, see us at www.sovereignbank.com We are an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Member FDIC © 2006 Sovereign Bank | Sovereign Bank and its logo are registered trademarks, and America's Neighborhood Bank is a service mark, of Sovereign Bank or its affiliates or subsidiaries in the United States and other countries.


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Valarie A. Udeh

WA C H O V I A

“Self-awareness is critical to moving beyond labels that others will want to give you.”

W

e all want to be personally and professionally successful. But what is success? I believe it is best defined by the individual. Of course, there are indicators that chart our progress—college degrees, promotions, awards and bonuses. But these are only indicators, not true measures. I have found my greatest successes can be measured in the heightened awareness of who I am, living by welldefined values and embracing the lessons of life. My personal and professional accomplishments are intensified by these personal success measures. Any woman, but especially a woman of color, on the corporate path to senior leadership, must be squarely grounded in who she is. Race and gender can feel like both an asset and liability. Self-awareness is critical to moving beyond labels that others will want to give you. I am honored to share what I’ve learned on my personal journey: •

Being powerful is not about position or title. Owning one’s power is showing up every day fully cognizant of what you bring to the table. You will diminish the value you bring to your company if you minimize your ideas, your passion, your commitment or your experience.

Senior Vice President; Director, Brand Management

TITLE:

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB: READING:

Cashier, community swimming pool Junie B. Jones book series with my

daughters PHILOSOPHY: Life is full of lessons. The sooner I learn them, the richer my life becomes. FAMILY:

Husband and two daughters, 7 and 4

INTERESTS: Vintage shopping, studying African American history and culture

OWN YOUR POWER.

Wachovia HEADQUARTERS: Charlotte, NC WEBSITE: www.wachovia.com BUSINESS: Wachovia Corporation is one of the nation’s largest diversified financial services companies, providing 13.4 million household and business relationships with a broad range of banking, asset management, wealth management and corporate and investment banking products and services. RANKING: Fourth-largest bank holding company in the United States based on assets. Third-largest U.S. full-service brokerage firm based on client assets. 2005 ASSETS: $542 billion 2005 AVERAGE DEPOSITS: $323 billion EMPLOYEES: 97,000

ACTIVELY LOOK FOR DAILY LESSONS.

QUESTION EVERYTHING.

CELEBRATE THE UNIQUE POWER OF SISTERHOOD. Embrace and celebrate the unique power of the women who protect you, motivate you, cheer you on, offer a shoulder to lean on, provide a safe place to share and challenge you to remain true to yourself and your values.

COMPANY:

166

BA in journalism, University of South

Carolina

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

We tend to look for great lessons in significant successes or failures. I contend that many of the most profound lessons are found in the day-to-day routine of our lives. You simply have to slow down enough to understand the insight gained from conversations with peers, the group dynamics of a meeting, the service you received as you ordered a cup of coffee or the reassuring rhythm of the train on your daily commute. Women are often plagued with the fear that asking questions will reveal that they are not as knowledgeable as men. Let go of that fear and raise your hand. Ask why, why not, how come and can we do it better. The more you know, the more valued you become.

PDJ


The Case for Apples and Oranges. Sameness has its virtues.

But, in business, difference rules.

Con-way salutes Pat Jannausch, our own â&#x20AC;&#x153;Woman to Watchâ&#x20AC;?.


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Stephanie Valdez

WA S T E M A N A G E M E N T I N C .

“Let people know where they stand so they can move ahead.”

T

he most powerful advice I’d like to share is that within every person resides an inherent ability to succeed mightily, no matter what your roots, background or personal history. Cultivate a belief in yourself with a personal challenge to make the most of your unique talents, whatever they may be. It’s not necessary to be the brightest, the smartest or the quickest wit, nor the best conversationalist or storyteller. In fact, my background doesn’t carry a corporate pedigree. I grew up in a true blue-collar family where everyone worked hard, vacations were local and budgets were often pretty tight. We valued people for what they contributed, not for their style or great promises. So what I bring to business pretty much draws from those roots, and here are some personal, well-tested “rules” I can share: •

Teams are the basic unit of businesses, not individuals. Not everyone is good at the same things, and every person brings something special to the table. Recognize this fact, contribute what you can and encourage others to do the same.

LOOK TO THE TEAM FOR ANSWERS.

That means helping people become better as team players. Be honest equally about good performance and poor. Let people know where they stand so they can move ahead.

Human Resources Vice President, Western

Region EDUCATION: BS in business administration, Colorado State University; MBA, University of Houston FIRST JOB:

Human resources analyst, Shell Oil Co.

The World Is Flat, by Thomas L. Friedman; Tipping Point, by Malcolm Gladwell; Topgrading, by Bradford Smart READING:

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: Make the most of what you have; within every person are attributes of success. FAMILY:

Married

INTERESTS: Running, yoga, reading, sampling cuisine of different cultures FAVORITE CHARITY:

Habitat for Humanity, a truly

hands-on charity

BE A GOOD COACH.

it takes to truly know how an organization works and how to impact change at the right levels.

Waste Management Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS: RANKING:

Houston, TX

www.wm.com Integrated waste services Leads the industry; No.170 on Fortune 500

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

$13.07 billion

About 50,000

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

Develop a passion for your work and how you go about it. Your belief in your work and enthusiasm in doing it are assets. Company leaders know that and reward that kind of behavior.

GROW TO LOVE WHAT YOU DO.

FIND A COMPANY THAT ENCOURAGES YOU TO GROW PERSON-

Business solutions are seldom clear. Learn to understand how processes and people relate throughout the organization. Invest the time

LEARN TO “CONNECT THE DOTS.”

COMPANY:

168

TITLE:

ALLY AND PROFESSIONALLY. This is really important. You need to match yourself with a business that recognizes the worth of every individual and unique value she or he brings to business. That’s what I’ve personally found at Waste Management.

Finally, I’d like to pass along a quote from the tennis great Arthur Ashe about succeeding: “To be great, start where you are, use what you have and do what you can.” That sums up my advice very well.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Michelle VanDyke

FIFTH THIRD BANK—WESTERN MICHIGAN

“Be patient and be persistent.”

W

hen I was 7 or 8 years old, I told my parents that I wanted to own a bank! Fast-forward through my education and my last 20 years of banking, and here I am, president and CEO of Fifth Third Bank—Western Michigan and regional president for an additional three Fifth Third affiliates. I have held a variety of banking positions to get where I am today. My mentors, as well as the mentoring role I actively play, continue to contribute to my success. By definition, a mentor is “a wise and trusted counselor or teacher.” Throughout my career, I have sought out people in positions above me that could guide me—people willing to provide constructive feedback and direction. If you’re seeking a mentor, find one who is willing to identify your weaknesses and help you strengthen your leadership, strategic and tactical skills. Informal mentors are easy to find. You have many around you. Spouses, siblings and friends can fill this role, as well as associates and contacts made through professional associations. What’s most important is that your mentor has an opportunity to observe you and to give you sound feedback and advice. Formal mentors are sometimes harder to find because they must be comfortable that you will perform in a manner that reflects well on them. The best way to develop this kind of relationship is to be visible to these individuals.

COMPANY:

Fifth Third Bank – Western Michigan

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

Grand Rapids, MI

www.53.com Bank

Fifth Third Bancorp is among the top 15 largest bank holding companies in the country and among the 15 largest in market capitalization. RANKING:

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

$665 million

1,916

President and CEO, Fifth Third Bank – Western Michigan; President, Fifth Third Bank – Michigan

TITLE:

EDUCATION:

BA, Calvin College, Grand Rapids, MI

FIRST JOB: At 15, I started working in an ice cream store in Shaker Heights, OH. READING: I love suspense novels—anything by James Patterson, Patricia Cornwell or Sue Grafton. I also enjoy a good Nicholas Sparks love story. PHILOSOPHY: Challenge the process, inspire a shared vision, enable others to act, model the way and encourage the heart. FAMILY:

Husband and four children

INTERESTS:

Spending time with family, reading, traveling

FAVORITE CHARITY: As a family, we strongly support United Way because it touches so many agencies that help families and children. We also give to the Van Andel Institute and Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, both to find cures for diseases that impact the lives of our family and friends.

If you think of mentoring as a process, you will find it easier to see how a variety of people can play different mentoring roles on different subjects and at different times in your career. Look for mentors who have a successful track record, the knowledge or skills that you desire and the willingness to talk and listen. A woman does not need to seek out a female mentor. Mentors of either gender can teach you. Having said that, I do believe that it is very important for all of us in management roles to become mentors for other employees, both men and women. I love my job as bank president and the opportunity it gives me to help others achieve their dreams. I have one additional piece of advice for anyone climbing the career ladder: Be patient and be persistent. Your development and career opportunities are not going to happen overnight. My progression has taken almost 20 years.

PDJ 170

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006


Six days a week, 140 million addresses a day, no one keeps you connected to your customers like the U.S. Postal Service.ÂŽ

Š2005 United States Postal Service. Eagle symbol and logotype are registered trademarks of the United States Postal Service.

usps.com


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Susan D. Waring

S TAT E FA R M

“Have fun at work. Show your sense of humor; laugh out loud and let people see your human side.”

I

grew up as a tomboy competing in football, basketball and baseball with the guys. Early on, I learned about the importance of a team, that each teammate had a responsibility and that someone called the plays. If a team member wasn’t doing their best, the team suffered. Leadership works the same way! Being responsible for my actions, earning respect, leading by example and being a team player are core values that have guided my career. One of my primary and most enjoyable roles is to coach, mentor, and develop our future leaders. When I mentor our talented men and women, I challenge them to be their best and to:

Executive Vice President, Chief Administrative Officer – State Farm Life and Vice President—Health

TITLE:

BA, history, Gettysburg College; MS, counseling psychology, Shippensburg University

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB:

Admission Counselor at a women’s college

Why Should Anyone Be Led By You? by Goffee and Jones READING:

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

Never let someone else’s video

become your reality • Work hard. Be curious, ask questions and learn, and listen to ideas from others as there is always an alternative path. Read, read, read. • Collaborate. It’s about working together and communicating; you cannot accomplish great things alone. • Network. Expand your contacts and become known by people throughout the organization; bubble your brand; try new roles; take a few risks and move out of your comfort zone.

COMPANY:

Bloomington, IL

www.statefarm.com

BUSINESS:

Insurance and financial services

INDUSTRY RANKING: No. 22 on Fortune 500, No. 1 insurer of autos and homes in the United States 2005 REVENUES:

$59.2 billion

79,000 associates and 17,000 agents nationwide and in three Canadian provinces

EMPLOYEES:

172

husband; 2 children; 2 large dogs

INTERESTS: Travel

with family; entertaining; walking

Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation; Children’s Hospital FAVORITE CHARITY:

• Have fun at work. Show your sense of humor; laugh out loud and let people see your human side. • Exercise and stay fit. Schedule three or four days per week to work out and give yourself an opportunity to burn off stress and increase your energy.

State Farm

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

FAMILY:

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

• Do what you say. Your word is your reputation. If you say it, make sure you do it. Be authentic. • Put integrity above all else. As a leader, you are the face of your corporation; communicate honestly and act with integrity: There’s no right way to do the wrong thing. At the end of the day, we live with and are accountable to ourselves. Feeling a sense of accomplishment for a job well done, helping others to grow, and being proud of the legacy we leave behind are priceless!

PDJ


BECOME A STATE FARM AGENT. As a successful State Farm agent, you’ll be your own boss — running your own insurance and financial services business, winning the trust of your customers, and making a name for yourself within the community.

It won’t be easy, but you’ll have the backing of a Fortune 500 ® company. And it could be the most challenging, most rewarding thing you’ve ever done. Visit statefarm.com/careers

GROW. LEAD.

SUCCEED. An Equal Opportunity Employer


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Linda M. Watt

L O N G S D R U G S T O R E S C O R P O R AT I O N

“A leader’s most important role is to be a change agent.”

T

hroughout my life, I have been fortunate to have had full support for my personal and professional goals. My earliest childhood memories include one of my grandmother telling me that I could do anything I wanted to do with my life. Every time I received a promotion in the early years of my retail career, my grandmother would ask, “Are you president yet?” This type of consistent support—coming from a woman born in 1908—helped me form my opinions of myself, strengthened my confidence and drove my accomplishments. Many people have helped me and inspired me in my career. My first retail company allowed me the opportunity to experience all the different disciplines within human resources, providing the foundation on which I operate today. I also was given the experience of a lifetime when I was asked to leave a high-level HR position to operate a $300 million business. The learning curve was steep, but my individual growth and development could not have been achieved any other way. “The glass is always half full” has been my lifelong philosophy. I don’t know how to live my life or lead my teams in any other way. Give me an issue or a situation that needs a solution, and you’ve got my attention!

COMPANY:

Longs Drug Stores Corporation

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

Walnut Creek, CA

www.longs.com and www.rxamerica.com Retail drug store chain

RANKING: One of the most recognized retail drug store chains on the West Coast and in Hawaii, Longs Drugs now operates 498 retail stores including 477 Longs Drugs and the acquired 21 network pharmacies. Longs Drugs provides expert pharmacy services and a wide assortment of merchandise focusing on health, wellness, beauty and convenience. Longs also provides pharmacy benefit management services and Medicare beneficiary prescription drug plans through its wholly owned subsidiary, RxAmerica, LLC. EMPLOYEES:

174

22,000

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

TITLE:

Senior Vice President, Human Resources

EDUCATION: BA in business and education, San Francisco State University FIRST JOB:

Retail clerk

READING: Work-related business and professional journals, John Grisham novels PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: INTERESTS:

The glass is always half full.

Sports, mountain and boating activities,

dogs The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), Guide Dog Foundation, Humane Society (HSUS)

FAVORITE CHARITY:

One common element in every job I’ve held is that I’ve helped people and companies manage change. From individual coaching to complex, large-scale organizational restructuring, dealing with and managing business change are at the heart of what I do. I am dedicated to helping people and companies get to that next level of competence or achieve that next goal. Throughout my career I have learned some very important lessons that I would share with anyone entering the work force: • Keep your eye on the goal and honor the past. Although you may think that everything needs to be changed, remember that the decisions made prior to yours were relevant in a previous time. • Never compromise your personal integrity. It is the most important attribute you have. • A leader’s most important role is to be a change agent. It requires you to use all your leadership skills and allows for personal, professional and organizational growth. • There is no better way to coach your employees or the organization than by how you carry yourself. We are the ultimate models, and we must act accordingly. PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Renee West

MGM MIRAGE

“True success always begins with who you are.”

T

wo small stones sit atop my office desk, each engraved with

a single word. One says, “Imagine.” The other says, “Create.” Those two words have made all the difference for me. I believe that success is limited only by our ability to imagine what we want and to lead ourselves to it. That President and COO, Excalibur Hotel & Casino

ability to imagine, create, lead and succeed is rooted in a

TITLE:

few key characteristics:

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB:

CHARACTER:

Attended University of Nevada, Las Vegas; honorary doctorate in business, Southern Utah University

True success always begins with who you

are. How we deal with the circumstances of life speaks volumes about our character. Crisis does not necessarily

The Ultimate Question: Driving Good Profits & True Growth, by Fred Reichheld

READING:

you need to focus on to become the person you were

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: A true team steps forward together to fire on all cylinders. Leaders must make sure every member of the team knows the common goal.

intended to be?

FAMILY:

make character, but it certainly does reveal it. What do

Training specialist, Caesars Palace

RELATIONSHIP SKILLS:

The ability to work with people

and develop relationships is indispensable to success.

One daughter, two sons, one grandson

INTERESTS:

Cycling, hiking, boating and time with family

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Nevada Cancer Institute, Nevada

Partners

Remember, you are a leader only if you have followers, and that always requires development of relationships. Build enough of the right kinds of relationships with the

SELF-DISCIPLINE:

Success requires individual effort. Individual

right people and you can become a real leader—and a

effort requires self-discipline. Self-discipline requires us to

real success—in any situation.

examine our conversations with ourselves—the ones in which we make excuses for why we, as individuals,

Your desire determines your destiny. Weak

PASSION:

desire brings weak results. By contrast, burning desire

cannot achieve what we want. Those are just excuses, in my

compels you toward greatness.

book. There will always be obstacles—some of them will be real. Self-discipline empowers you to overcome obstacles—

COMPANY:

MGM MIRAGE

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

Las Vegas, NV

www.mgmmirage.com Gaming, hospitality

No. 334 on Fortune 500; third among hotels, casinos and resorts RANKING:

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

$6.5 billion

perceived and otherwise—to achieve your dreams. •

RESPONSIBILITY:

If not you, who? Responsible people never

say, “That is not my job, not my place, not my responsibility.” If they believe in a vision, they are willing to do whatever it takes to achieve it. The ultimate quality of a responsible person is the ability to finish.

70,000

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November/December 2006

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W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Terri West

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS

“Be quiet, listen and ask hard questions.”

W

hen I was 17 and just out of high school, I was thrilled to take a summer job at Texas Instruments. TI paid twice as much as my part-time job at a local movie theater, and it was a great way to make money for my first year of college. As far as I was concerned, this was nothing more than a summer job. As a soon-to-be freshman journalism major, my ultimate goal was to live in Mexico City and work for a newswire service. That first summer at TI, I filed papers, did some light editing and even swept the floor one afternoon. Since this was before the days of desktop publishing, I also spent quite a bit of time manually drawing lines for the company’s technical publications. Yet, more important than the duties I performed was the real-world knowledge I gained by talking with the seasoned staff around me. They were a mix of business managers, office secretaries, graphic artists and technical writers, and each took the time to share insights about the company and the attributes of a truly valuable employee. These people had a huge impact on the type of employee I would become and the ultimate career path I would take. TI hired me back the next summer as a full-time worker. When summer ended, TI put me on “leave of absence” so I could return on holidays and the next summer. Within a few years, I had changed my career goal from moving to Mexico City to someday serving as TI’s primary spokesperson.

COMPANY:

Texas Instruments

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Dallas, TX

www.ti.com

Semiconductor and education and productivity solutions, with manufacturing, design or sales operations in more than 25 countries

BUSINESS:

RANKING:

No. 166 on Fortune 500

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

176

$13.39 billion

34,800

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

TITLE:

Senior Vice President

BA in journalism with minors in political science and Spanish, University of North Texas

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

Summer position at Texas Instruments in

1978 READING: The Informant and Conspiracy of Fools, both by Kurt Eichenwald PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: Forget about money and glory. True career success is being part of a team that does something far greater than it ever thought it could. I hope that I have shown the next generation how to focus on what really matters. FAMILY:

Husband, Mike, a son, 11, and a daughter, 11.

Reading, traveling with family, the kids’ hockey and karate

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

The United Way

Today, more than 25 years later, I am a senior vice president responsible for all of TI’s internal and external communications. I also am a member of the company’s six-person executive management team. Looking back, I can see how the people who “adopted” me very early in my career gave me insight into the value of teamwork and the operations of an international company. Regardless of where you are in your career, there is nothing more important than spending time sharing your insights and learning from others. I work in a company of engineers, yet my education could not be less technical. I routinely remind myself, “Be quiet, listen and ask hard questions.” I learn a lot that way, and, more importantly, it helps me take what I do for a living and increase the technological success of the company.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Anne M. Wilms

R O H M A N D H A A S C O M PA N Y

“I want my actions to benefit others and my life to be my message.”

A

famous teacher once said, “Attend to reality diligently. Say little and do much. Receive all people with kindness.” As women business leaders in male-dominated industries and trailblazers for future leaders, we are challenged every day to deal with the stark realities of working in fast-paced business environments. The reality is that we must be at the top of our game. We must invest time in the preparation process. The essence of true leadership lies in the ability to take action and calculated risks, to harmonize the power of people and not to become paralyzed when challenges appear too big. Taking action can be very difficult, oftentimes risky, and can leave us feeling vulnerable. However, taking action is the only way to move forward. And it is our action that is remembered long after the words are forgotten. We may not always get the results that we desire, but having the courage and confidence to act in the midst of fear and complexity are signs of a true leader.

COMPANY:

Rohm and Haas Company

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Philadelphia, PA

www.rohmhaas.com

Global pioneer in the creation and development of innovative technologies and solutions for the specialty materials industry, including building and construction, electronics, food and retail, household and personal care, industrial process, packaging, paper, transportation and water.

BUSINESS:

RANKING:

No. 286 on Fortune 500 list

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

Approximately $8 billion

Vice President, Chief Information Officer, Director of Human Resources

TITLE:

Executive Management Development Program, University of Chicago Graduate School of Business; Computer Program, Irish Civil Service/Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB:

Irish revenue commissioners programmer

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: Success in career and personal life are dependent on the quality and strength of relationship networks around you. FAMILY:

Husband and daughter

Spending quality time with family and friends, watching and following baseball, and reading

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Red Cross

Whatever the challenge we may face and the corresponding action we may take, we must be careful never to lose sight of the capacity of the human spirit. As leaders, we are often looked to for inspiration, motivation and direction. Our ability to be authentic in treating people with dignity and kindness will impact our overall results and reputation. This, too, is a sign of a true leader. Success in the corporate environment is not solely about position and status. Success also is about the process you take to get there and the people you engage along the journey. Throughout my career, I have learned that there is as much value in the process and the people as there is in the end result. I want my actions to benefit others and my life to be my message.

More than 16,000 globally

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November/December 2006

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V. Cheryl Womack

LEADING WOMEN ENTREPRENEURS OF THE WORLD

“Give yourself permission to celebrate.”

S

o often, accomplished women hide from the spotlight and downplay their victories. It might make the success easier, but it won’t do much to inspire you for future endeavors or to encourage others. Try to accept openly the responsibility and achievement that come with being successful as a woman in business. Realize what a difference you can make in someone’s life when you become a role model. Giving back and sharing in others’ success are almost more exciting than realizing your own success. As a woman in business, whether you own the business or work for a company, think like a business owner and keep an open mind. There will be times when you must make a choice. It does not have to be daunting or frustrating. It can be an invaluable learning experience. There is nothing better than working for a lazy or absent boss to see what it takes to run an operation. Seize that opportunity. Build a support network of peers, friends and mentors whose advice and support you trust. That network will prove to be invaluable to your growth personally and professionally. The only thing you can rely on in business—and life—is change. Embrace it. Learn what works and what doesn’t.

COMPANY:

Leading Women Entrepreneurs

of the World HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

Kansas City, MS

www.leadingwomen.org A nonprofit organization, 501(c)3

More than 300 members from more than 56 countries

EMPLOYEES:

TITLE:

Chair

BA in elementary education, University of Kansas; honorary PhD in life sciences, William Woods

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB: READING:

Telephone solicitor

The World is Flat, by Thomas L. Friedman

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: FAMILY:

The best revenge is a great life.

Married, two sons

INTERESTS: Community work, art, interior design, wine and, most importantly, family. FAVORITE CHARITY:

Leading Women Entrepreneurs of

the World

But continue to move forward. Use your frustration and fear to push you to the next step. The main obstacles for women in business are women themselves. As women, we must create a safe environment in business where we are secure enough to share our accomplishments and learn from and support each other along the way. Through sharing success, women can build meaningful relationships that become more important than just business. Finally, learn to celebrate the small stuff. Too often women wait for a monumental event to celebrate their accomplishments. Life is made up of a multitude of small successes. Give yourself permission to celebrate. Life and its successes are really all about the journey, and, while you are at it, don’t forget those who helped you along the way.

PDJ 178

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Phyllis Worley

O K L A H O M A N AT U R A L G A S C O M PA N Y ( O N E O K )

“The ability to lead is based on the opportunity to learn.”

L

eadership is about serving others. My role is to provide a positive work environment that includes, among many things, caring and supportive leaders. I believe that leaders who take care of their employees will have employees who take care of the company’s customers. Caring for your employees means helping them improve and rewarding them when they perform for the organization. It includes providing clear and consistent direction and meaningful goals. Caring also means listening and being honest—always. Even leaders who have innate people skills need to be taught the “dos and don’ts” of leadership. Organizations are most effective when their leaders understand their roles and the value that comes from treating others with respect and holding them accountable. Leaders also have the challenge of guiding their organizations, employees and customers through change, which increasingly comes at a rapid pace. The ability to lead is based on the opportunity to learn. I have been most fortunate to have had many mentors during my life and career. Some of the mentoring I received was formal. Others who mentored me may never have realized I was learning and watching. Now, I find that one of the most important responsibilities I have is to be a mentor.

Oklahoma Natural Gas Company, a division of ONEOK Inc.

COMPANY:

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Oklahoma City, OK

www.oklahomanaturalgas.com

Natural gas distribution company serving more than 800,000 utility customers in Oklahoma

BUSINESS:

EMPLOYEES:

TITLE:

President

EDUCATION:

Associate’s in business, Northeastern

A&M College FIRST JOB: READING:

Bakery girl at Red Bud Grocery

Growing Slowly Wise, by David Roper

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY: At the end of our lives, what really matters is not your job title, or how much money you made; it is how people felt about you when you were in their presence.

Single. Extended family includes parents, siblings, nieces, nephews, and great nieces and nephews. I love being Aunt Phyl.

FAMILY:

INTERESTS: Big XII College Football (University of Oklahoma Sooners), traveling, being with family and friends, and reading FAVORITE CHARITY: Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation and John 3:16 Mission

As a female leader in my organization, no less or more is expected of me. I have been very fortunate to work for a company that appreciates diversity and hard work. The success I have achieved in my life has come from persistence, a strong work ethic taught to me by my parents, and from God’s blessings in my life. Because I have been given much, much is expected of me in return. My goal each day is to be a person who helps others realize their true potential.

1,171

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W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Jennifer B. Wuamett

FREESCALE SEMICONDUCTOR INC.

“Success results from the choices we make, attitudes we adopt and priorities we set.”

M

any opportunities exist today for women to be successful. Women who leveled the playing field before us faced numerous limitations, including the proverbial glass ceiling. Although external limitations still exist, the biggest challenges we face are often self-imposed, prompted by doubts and fears. Success results from the choices we make, attitudes we adopt and priorities we set. Following are my thoughts on some key factors for overcoming limitations. Confidence is essential. We all have that nagging little voice that sometimes tells us that we aren’t good enough to succeed at x, y, or z, and that it’s only a matter of time before others realize this. Learn to silence that voice and remind yourself of past successes and how good it feels to try new things and succeed at challenging opportunities. One of my favorite books on this topic is Feel the Fear and Do it Anyway, by Susan Jeffers.

BELIEVE IN YOURSELF.

Don’t wait for someone else to create your life map or your career path and your opportunities—only you can do that effectively. Step out of your comfort zone and set reach-out goals to further your growth.

Vice President and Chief Intellectual Property Counsel

TITLE:

JD, Arizona State University; BA, McDaniel

EDUCATION:

College FIRST JOB:

Cashier at Rustler Steak House

The World is Flat, by Thomas Friedman; Leadership by Rudolph Giuliani READING:

To live a purpose-driven life and to create a lasting, positive influence in the lives of those with whom I interact.

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

FAMILY:

Two sons, ages 7 and 16

INTERESTS:

Reading, traveling, learning, boating

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Girl Start

TAKE CHARGE OF YOUR LIFE.

Accept and enhance your natural strengths and talents, and be proud of your femininity. Surround yourself with people who are strong

DEVELOP YOUR OWN STYLE.

Freescale Semiconductor Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Austin, TX WEBSITE: www.freescale.com BUSINESS: Global leader in the design and manufacture of embedded semiconductors for wireless, networking, automotive, consumer and industrial markets RANKING: No. 10 semiconductor company in world (per iSuppli) COMPANY:

2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

180

$5.8 billion

More than 23,000 people in 30 countries

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

in areas where you are not so strong. A great book on the topic of recognizing your key talents is Now, Discover Your Strengths, by Marcus Buckingham and Donald Clifton. FIND YOUR PASSION. I can truly say that I love my work—it energizes me. If you don’t love what you are doing now, then find a way to do what you love, and success will follow naturally.

They are a major key to success. I have been fortunate to have had many wonderful mentors throughout my career. If you don’t have a mentor, then read books about successful people you admire to understand the traits and behaviors that made them successful. Also make the effort to invest time and energy in coaching and mentoring future leaders—it can be life changing for both you and them.

RELISH MENTORS.

EMBRACE CHANGE. The only constant in life is change. We can’t control all the changes that impact our world, but we can control our attitude and reaction. Embracing a positive acceptance of change is a critical factor for growth and success.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 7

Cynthia Hardy Young

E N C O M PA S S F I N A N C I A L G R O U P L L C ( A L L S TAT E )

“Fierce honesty and integrity are the foundation of sustained leadership.” TITLE:

E

President

EDUCATION:

very person can be a leader. From your very first day on the job until the day you retire, you can lead. Leadership has little to do with the title you have or how much money you make. Rather, it’s the way in which you go about doing the very best you can in everything you do. Throughout my professional career, I’ve seen the qualities of leadership displayed by individuals in an array of positions. The common thread shared among all was the pride, enthusiasm and knowledge they brought with them each and every day, as well as their ability to respect the professionalism and contribution of others. The moment they entered the workplace, their positive attitude and willingness to listen, learn and share their expertise were evident. I found myself wanting to talk to those people, to be around them and to learn as much as I could from them. Individuals who possess those qualities are the type of people who are leaders.

JD

FIRST JOB: Attorney, litigation associate at Jones, Day, Reavis & Pogue READING:

Blindness, by Jose Saramago

Investing in the development and mentoring of others yields immeasurable returns.

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

FAMILY:

Husband, Leonard; six siblings

INTERESTS:

Astronomy, gardening, traveling,

table tennis FAVORITE CHARITY:

United Negro College Fund

I will leave you with a few “pearls of wisdom” I’ve picked up over the years: • The best leaders are those who are committed to developing other leaders.

COMPANY:

• Lead by the combination of example, thought and voice.

HEADQUARTERS:

• Fierce honesty and integrity are the foundation of sustained leadership.

Encompass Financial Group LLC, an Allstate Company

WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

Northbrook, IL

www.encompassinsurance.com Insurance

RANKING: Fourth among personal lines insurance carriers targeting independent agencies 2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

$3.32 billion

1,600 countrywide

More personally, I’m reminded that leadership is the result of a number of experiences and influences that have taught me invaluable lessons. I never forget that I am blessed with family and friends who deeply care. And I am proud to know that I stand on the shoulders of people from humble beginnings who had lofty aspirations and expectations. Celebrate the joy of being a woman!

PDJ Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2006

181


Inside cover, 1 Ford Motor Company ford.com 41 3

Adecco adeccousa.com American Airlines AA.com

145

AXA Equitable Life Insurance Company axa-equitable.com

20

Bank of Montreal bmo.com

186

Bank of the West bankofthewest.com

97

Bausch & Lomb bausch.com

105

BD bd.com

63

BellSouth bellsouth.com

183

Best Buy BestBuy.com

91

BlueCross BlueShield of North Carolina bcbsnc.com

53

Boeing Company, The boeing.com

83

Brinker International brinker.com

153

Cisco Systems Inc. cisco.com

157

Constellation Energy constellation.com

167

Con-way Inc. con-way.com

159

CVS/pharmacy cvs.com

39

DaimlerChrysler daimlerchrysler.com

85

DaimlerChrysler Financial Services daimlerchryslerfinancialservices.com/na

55

Darden Restaurants / Bahama Breeze bahamabreeze.com

127

Dell Inc. dell.com

141

Deloitte & Touche LLP deloitte.com/us

18 - 19 Dow Chemical Co., The

dow.com

101

Eastman Kodak kodak.com

22

Ecolab Inc. ecolab.com

129

Federal Bureau of Investigation fbi.gov

Inside cover, 1 Ford Motor Company ford.com 11

Freescale Semiconductor freescale.com

13

Georgia Power georgiapower.com

73

Halliburton halliburton.com

17

Hallmark Cards hallmark.com

111

Highmark Inc highmark.com

121

Hilton Hotels Corporation hiltonworldwide.com

Owens Corning recognizes diversity

positive force

as a for

global opportunity and

growth.

We celebrate our multi-cultural workforce, and their rich contribution to our company and our communities.


ITT Corporation ITT.com

131

Rohm and Haas Company rohmhaas.com

161

IVY Planning ivygroupllc.com

143

Salt River Project (SRP) srpnet.com

123

KeyBank key.com

103

Seagate Technology seagate.com

115

Lear Corporation lear.com

47

Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company lockheedmartin.com

65

186

LSU lsu.edu

165

Sovereign Bank sovereignbank.com

169

MFHA mfha.net

173

State Farm statefarm.com Symantec Corporation symantec.com

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Shell Oil shell.com Sodexho sodexhoUSA.com

45

MGM MIRAGE mgmmirage.com

16

95

National City Corporation NationalCity.com

3rd cover Symbol Technologies symbol.com

77

Nationwide Insurance nationwide.com

187

Unilever unilever.com

New York Life newyorklife.com

171

United States Postal Service usps.com

182

Owens Corning owenscorning.com

147

Vanguard Vanguard.com

32

Parker Hannifin Corporation parker.com

79

Verizon verizon.com

4th cover Waste Management Inc. wm.com

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71

PepsiCo pepsico.com

135

Pfizer Inc. Pfizer.com

109

Pitney Bowes Inc. pb.com

107

Whirlpool Corporation whirlpoolcorp.com

149

Raytheon raytheon.com

69

Xerox Corporation xerox.com

57

WellPoint wellpoint.com


DOROTHY C. SUMMERFIELD UNIT CHIEF, SECURITY DIVISION FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION (FBI) WASHINGTON, D.C.

November has been designated National American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month to recognize the contributions of American Indians to the development and growth of the United States. It is an honor to participate in this celebrated month at the FBI where over 35 federally recognized tribes have been represented by Native American special agent and support employees. As a member of the Muscogee Creek Nation and a descendent of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, I was the first female special agent from those tribal nations and am currently the FBI’s highest ranking. The FBI’s diversity efforts allowed me to achieve this position in history. Our heritage month celebrations at the FBI have included the sharing of our tribal languages through song, dance, and the art of storytelling. We have demonstrated our culture and history through displays of paintings, poetry, beadwork, traditional music, intertribal styles of regalia, and delicious American Indian cuisine. The FBI’s celebrations have shared the rich contributions to American History made by notable American Indians as code talkers, vice-president of the United States, U.S. senator, Olympic gold medalists, FBI special agents, and the first Native American astronaut to fly in outer space. The FBI’s celebrations demonstrate that people from very different backgrounds, cultures, and traditions can come together to build a great country, and bring awareness that diversity can be a source of strength.


KENNETH BEGISHE CLIENT RELATIONSHIP ADMINISTRATOR THE VANGUARD GROUP

People inspire others every day in many ways. But there are only a few individuals that have such a profound effect on others that their legacy withstands the test of time. Chief Manuelito (1818-1893), a principal war chief of the Dine’ (Navajo) people, is one such individual. In the mid-to-late 19th century, the doctrine of Manifest Destiny was alive, and westward expansion of the United States was certain. The Dine’ way of life was being challenged by an inescapable force—change. Chief Manuelito was a symbol of strength for the Dine’ people through this difficult period, and he took his leadership role very seriously. He fought for prosperity for his people and worked to ensure their safety at all times. Adapting to change is a challenge that many of us face professionally and personally on a daily basis, and Chief Manuelito has inspired me to be a leader in the face of change. I believe that we can learn from the example set by Chief Manuelito and be better prepared for success in the future.

PDJ


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Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006


Adecco adeccousa.com Lois Cooper ADT Security Services Inc. adt.com Nancy E. Chisholm Aflac aflac.com Angie Hart Agilent Technologies agilent.com Darlene J.S. Solomon, Ph.D. American Airlines AA.com Debra Hunter Johnson American Red Cross redcross.org Carmen S. Canino Applied Materials appliedmaterials.com Charmaine Mesina Bank of America bankofamerica.com Geri P. Thomas Bausch & Lomb Inc. bausch.com Carmen C. Allen BD bd.com Donna M. Boles Best Buy BestBuy.com Julie Gilbert Boeing Company, The boeing.com Bonnie Soodik Brinker International brinker.com Rebeca Johnson CDW Government Inc. (CDW-G) cdwg.com Chris Rother Chubb Group of Insurance Companies chubb.com Ellen J. Moore Cisco Systems Inc. cisco.com Sheila Talton CIT Group Inc. cit.com Christine “Chris” Reilly Consolidated Edison Company of New York coned.com Frances Resheske Constellation Energy constellation.com E. Follin Smith Con-way Inc. con-way.com J. Pat Jannausch CVS/pharmacy cvs.com Helena B. Foulkes DaimlerChrysler Financial Services daimlerchryslerfinancialservices.com/na Tracy L. Hackman

Janet B. Toronski

Darden Restaurants / Bahama Breeze bahamabreeze.com Laurie Burns Dell Inc. dell.com Karen Quintos Deloitte & Touche LLP deloitte.com/us Kim Griffin-Hunter Dow Chemical Company, The dow.com Julie Fasone Holder Eastman Kodak kodak.com Mary Jane Hellyar Ecolab Inc. ecolab.com Susan Nestegard EMC Corporation emc.com Irina Simmons Encompass Financial Group LLC (Allstate) encompassinsurance.com Cynthia Hardy Young

Federal Bureau of Investigation fbi.gov Cassandra M. Chandler Fifth Third Bank – Western Michigan 53.com Michelle VanDyke First Horizon National Corporation fhnc.com Sarah L. Meyerrose Ford Motor Company ford.com Susan Cischke Freescale Semiconductor Inc. freescale.com Jennifer B. Wuamett Georgia Power georgiapower.com Anne Kaiser Halliburton halliburton.com Margaret E. Carriere Harris (a part of BMO Financial Group) theharris.com Deirdre C. Drake Highmark Inc. highmark.com Nanette DeTurk Hilton Hotels Corporation hiltonworldwide.com Madeleine Kleiner Houston Astros Baseball Club astros.com Pam Gardner InterContinental Hotels Group ichotelsgroup.com Roslyn Neal Dickerson ITT Corporation ITT.com Brenda Reichelderfer Kelly Services Inc. kellyservices.com Catherine King KeyBank key.com Poppie Parish KeySpan Corporation keyspanenergy.com Coleen Ceriello KPMG LLP kpmg.com Candace Duncan Leading Women Entrepreneurs of the World leadingwomen.org V. Cheryl Womack Lear Corporation lear.com Vickie Piner Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company lockheedmartin.com Stephanie C. Hill

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June R. Shrewsbury

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2006

Longs Drug Stores Corporation longs.com Linda M. Watt Los Alamos National Laboratory lanl.gov Susan Seestrom Lucent Technologies lucent.com Elizabeth Hackenson Medtronic Inc. medtronic.com Michelle Miller MetLife Bank, N.A. metlifebank.com Donnalee DeMaio MGM MIRAGE mgmmirage.com Renee West MTV Networks viacom.com Melisa Quinoy Nalco Company nalcom.com Deborah Hockman, Ph.D. National City Corporation NationalCity.com Terri Hamilton Brown Nationwide nationwide.com Gale V. King New Century Financial Corporation ncen.com Patti M. Dodge New York Life Insurance Company newyorklife.com Katherine O'Brien Northrop Grumman Information Technology northropgrumman.com Linda A. Mills Oklahoma Natural Gas Company (ONEOK) oklahomanaturalgas.com Phyllis Worley Owens Corning owenscorning.com Sheree Bargabos Parker Hannifin Corporation parker.com Pamela Huggins Pfizer Inc. Pfizer.com Sandra Phillips Pitney Bowes Inc. pb.com Leslie Abi-Karam Raytheon raytheon.com Rebecca R. Rhoads Rohm and Haas Company rohmhaas.com Anne M. Wilms Royal Dutch Shell shell.com Susan Hodge Salt River Project (SRP) srpnet.com Barbara Hoffnagle Seagate Technology seagate.com Karen Berchtold-Hanlon Sodexho sodexhoUSA.com Carol L. Alesso Southern Company southerncompany.com Marsha Johnson Spencer Stuart spencerstuart.com Sharon Hall Sprint Nextel Corporation sprint.com Chris A. Hill Starbucks Coffee starbucks.com Wendy Pinero State Farm statefarm.com Susan D. Waring State Street Corporation statestreet.com Alison Quirk Symantec Corporation symantec.com Janice Chaffin Symbol Technologies Inc. symbol.com Kathy Paladino Tenet Healthcare Corporation tenethealth.com Jennifer Daley, M.D. Texas Instruments ti.com Terri West Textron Inc. textron.com Mary L. Howell U.S. General Services Administration gsa.gov Lurita Doan United States Air Force af.mil Maj. Gen. Larita Aragon United States Army us.army.mil Brig. Gen. Anne F. Macdonald United States Navy navy.mil R.Adm. Nancy Elizabeth Brown United States Postal Service usps.com Susan M. LaChance Vanguard Vanguard.com Carol L. Dow Verizon Business verizon.com Terri Dean Verizon Communications verizon.com Marilyn O'Connell Verizon Wireless verizon.com Katherine Greene Wachovia wachovia.com Valarie A. Udeh Waste Management Inc. wm.com Stephanie Valdez WellPoint wellpoint.com Dijuana Lewis Whirlpool Corporation whirlpoolcorp.com Kathryn L. Nelson World Bank, The worldbank.org Katherine Sierra Xerox Corporation xerox.com Patricia Elizondo


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Also Featuring: A Preface from Ilene Lang • National American Indian Heritage Month • Catalyst

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Volume 8, Number 6 November / December 2006

25.00 U.S.

PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

Susan Hodge Royal Dutch Shell

Stephanie Valdez Waste Management Inc.

Pamela Huggins Parker Hannifin Corporation

Julie Fasone Holder The Dow Chemical Company

R.Adm. Nancy Elizabeth Brown United States Navy

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Rebeca Johnson Brinker International

Laurie Burns Darden Restaurants / Bahama Breeze

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Terri Hamilton Brown National City Corporation

Patricia Elizondo Xerox Corporation

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Brig. Gen. Anne F. Macdonald United States Army

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Katherine O’Brien New York Life Insurance Company

Susan M. LaChance United States Postal Service Susan D. Waring State Farm

Anne Kaiser Georgia Power

Dijuana Lewis WellPoint

Susan Cischke Ford Motor Company

Sandra Phillips Pfizer Inc.

NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2006 • VOLUME 8 NUMBER 6 www.diversityjournal.com

Rebecca R. Rhoads Raytheon

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Gale V. King Nationwide

$ Sheila Talton Cisco Systems Inc.

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Kathryn L. Nelson Whirlpool Corporation

Cassandra M. Chandler FBI

Karen Quintos Dell Inc.

Bonnie Soodik The Boeing Company

Margaret E. Carriere Halliburton

Mary Jane Hellyar Eastman Kodak

Lois Cooper Adecco

Maj. Gen. Larita Aragon United States Air Force

Katherine Greene Verizon Wireless

Carol L. Alesso Sodexho

Kim Griffin-Hunter Deloitte & Touche LLP

June R. Shrewsbury Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company

Carmen C. Allen Bausch & Lomb Inc. Lurita Doan U.S. General Services Administration

Deirdre C. Drake Harris (BMO Financial group) Nanette DeTurk Highmark Inc.

Poppie Parish KeyBank

Madeleine Kleiner Hilton Hotels Corporation

Renee West MGM MIRAGE

Debra Hunter Johnson American Airlines

Profile for Diversity Journal

Diversity Journal Nov/Dec 2006  

Diversity Journal November/December 2006

Diversity Journal Nov/Dec 2006  

Diversity Journal November/December 2006