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Also Featuring: A Preface from Steve Miller • Catalyst

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Volume 7, Number 6 November / December 2005 Susan E. Sheskey Dell

PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

Judith E. Campbell New York Life

Deborah S. Coleman Ford

Tiffany P. Olson Roche Diagnostics

Carolyn L. Kolesar Sodexho

www.diversityjournal.com

š2EGISTEREDTRADEMARKŠ4RADEMARKOF7HIRLPOOL 53!¼7HIRLPOOL#ORPORATION!LLRIGHTSRESERVEDš2EGISTEREDTRADEMARK4-4RADEMARKTHESHAPEOFTHEMIXERISAREGISTEREDTRADEMARKOF7HIRLPOOL 53!

Michele P. Toth Northrop Grumman Dawn Sweeney AARP

Sheila Lau Verizon

in 2006

Chris Cortez DaimlerChrysler

Sylvia M. Montero Pfizer

4OLEARNMOREABOUT7HIRLPOOL#ORPORATION PLEASEVISITĂœĂœĂœÂ°ĂœÂ…ÂˆĂ€Â?ÂŤÂœÂœÂ?VÂœĂ€ÂŤÂ°Vœ“

Kim E. VanGelder Kodak Rhonda Zygocki Chevron

Maritza G. Montiel Deloitte & Touche

Karen L. Carnahan Cintas

%VERY(OME%VERYWHERE7ITH0RIDE 0ASSION0ERFORMANCE 4HATSOURVISION4HATSOURPROMISE

Leslie R. Sibert Georgia Power

Alice Rosenblatt WellPoint

NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2005 • VOLUME 7 NUMBER 6

4HEONLYTHINGMOREDIVERSETHANOURPRODUCTS!RETHEPEOPLEWHOCREATETHEM

Kathryn Hill Cisco

Launi D. Skinner Starbucks

Valencia I. Adams BellSouth

Margaret G. McGlynn Merck

Kathleen M. Gainey U.S. Army

Debra A. Valentine United Technologies Susan E. Baumgarten Raytheon

Marillyn A. Hewson Lockheed Martin

Karel K. Czanderna Whirlpool

Jacqui D. Vines Cox Communications

Mary Anne Gibbons U.S. Postal Service Maria Coyne KeyBank

Ann E. Rondeau U.S. Navy

Ana M. Mims Starwood Maria R. Morris MetLife

Sandra L. Hanington Harris (BMO)

Marise F. Kumar Whirlpool

Pamela T. Miller Medco

Karen D. Taylor Reliant Energy

Marilyn B. Tavenner HCA


HOW A 63% STIFFER FRAME ADDS UP TO 100% COMFORT.

THE BEST EXPLORER EVER. Introducing the new 2006 Explorer, the most comfortable Explorer ever. Making its chassis more rigid actually helps to give it a softer ride and a quieter interior. The explanation is simple: Less body movement means a ride as smooth and quiet as a luxury car. So get comfortable. Then discover all the other innovations we’ve added at fordvehicles.com/explorer.

circa 750

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Janet Marzett DaimlerChrysler

Ria Marie Carlson Ingram Micro

Evelyn Angelle Halliburton

Laurene Gallo Booz Allen

Anne Erni Lehman Bros.

Katherine Linder Verizon

Mary Atkin A.G. Edwards Catherine S. Brune Allstate

Michele Buck Hershey

Dana Drago The Hartford

Ilene H. Lang Catalyst

Larree M. Renda Safeway

D’Arcy F. Rudnay Comcast

Phyllis G. Morey Lear

Karen Bowman Convergys

Barbara R. Cowden State Farm

Nance K. Dicciani Honeywell

Katherine J. Harless Verizon

Marcia L. Bullard Gannett (USA Weekend)

Kimberly S. Gray Highmark

W

O

M

Karen S. Rohan CIGNA

E

N

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Duy-Loan T. Le Texas Instruments

O

R

Glenda A. Hatchett HCA

Janice D. Stoney Williams Companies Tsion M. Messick Pepco

Denise Kaigler Reebok

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H

W

A

T

C

H

Janice M. Tomlinson Chubb Group

Teresa L. White Aflac

Cathy Lyons Hewlett-Packard

Linda P. Hudson General Dynamics

Paula J. Zusi Liz Claiborne

Lora J. Villarreal ACS

Catherine West Capital One

Tina M. Sivinski EDS

Cathy D. Green Food Lion

Karin Stone National City Bank

Lori L. Bossmann Ace Hardware

Jean Blackwell Cummins

Kathy J. Herbert Albertson's Jean Thomas Cendant

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Debra K. Walker U.S. Air Force


Diversity. It’s what drives us. BELLSOUTH CORPORATION HALLIBURTON A.G. EDWARDS & SONS RAYTHEON CUMMINS ACE HARDWARE CORPORATION CONVERGYS CORPORATION ALLSTATE INSURANCE COMPANY THE HERSHEY COMPANY

who are Leading the Way ...

GANNETT CO., INC. (USA WEEKEND) NEW YORK LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY INGRAM MICRO CINTAS CORPORATION FORD MOTOR COMPANY DAIMLERCHRYSLER CORPORATION STATE FARM INSURANCE COMPANIES KEYBANK WHIRLPOOL CORPORATION HONEYWELL INTERNATIONAL THE HARTFORD FINANCIAL SERVICES GROUP LEHMAN BROTHERS UNITED STATES ARMY

From the cadres of minority designers, engineers, and office staff to the men and women on the

BOOZ ALLEN HAMILTON UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE

factory floor and our network of minority owned dealers, we're dedicated to creating the best cars

HIGHMARK

and trucks possible. In fact, this dedication to work ethic, smarts, and quality is inherent in every

FOOD LION

vehicle we produce. It's what makes us the proud American brands of DaimlerChrysler Corporation.

Valencia I. Adams Evelyn Angelle Mary Atkin Susan E. Baumgarten Jean Blackwell Lori L. Bossmann Karen Bowman

VERIZON LIVESOURCE & PUBLIC HEWLETT-PACKARD DAIMLERCHRYSLER SERVICES NORTH AMERICA MERCK (VACCINES) PEPCO HOLDINGS MEDCO HEALTH SOLUTIONS STARWOOD HOTELS & RESORTS WORLDWIDE

Catherine S. Brune Michele Buck Marcia L. Bullard

PFIZER DELOITTE & TOUCHE USA LEAR CORPORATION

Chris Cortez

Dana Drago Anne Erni Kathleen M. Gainey Laurene Gallo Mary Anne Gibbons

SAFEWAY CIGNA CORPORATION (SPECIALTY COMPANIES) UNITED STATES NAVY WELLPOINT COMCAST CORPORATION DELL GEORGIA POWER ELECTRONIC DATA SYSTEMS CORPORATION STARBUCKS COFFEE NATIONAL CITY CORPORATION THE WILLIAMS COMPANIES AARP SERVICES

Kimberly S. Gray Cathy D. Green

HCA RELIANT ENERGY

BMO FINANCIAL GROUP (HARRIS)

Sandra L. Hanington

CENDANT CORPORATION

VERIZON INFORMATION SERVICES

Katherine J. Harless

CHUBB GROUP OF INSURANCE COMPANIES

HCA ALBERTSON'S LOCKHEED MARTIN (KELLY AVIATION) CISCO SYSTEMS GENERAL DYNAMICS CORPORATION REEBOK INTERNATIONAL SODEXHO HEALTH CARE SERVICES WHIRLPOOL CORPORATION CATALYST VERIZON NETWORK SERVICES GROUP TEXAS INSTRUMENTS

Glenda A. Hatchett Kathy J. Herbert Marillyn A. Hewson Kathryn Hill Linda P. Hudson Denise Kaigler Carolyn L. Kolesar

NORTHROP GRUMMAN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY UNITED TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY AFFILIATED COMPUTER SERVICES COX COMMUNICATIONS UNITED STATES AIR FORCE

Pamela T. Miller Ana Mollinedo Mims Sylvia M. Montero Maritza Gomez Montiel

Larree M. Renda Karen S. Rohan Ann E. Rondeau Alice Rosenblatt D'Arcy Foster Rudnay Susan E. Sheskey Leslie R. Sibert Tina M. Sivinski Launi D. Skinner Karin Stone Janice D. Stoney Dawn Sweeney Marilyn B. Tavenner Karen D. Taylor Jean Thomas Janice M. Tomlinson Michele P. Toth Debra A. Valentine Kim E. VanGelder Lora J. Villarreal Jacqui D. Vines Debra K. Walker Catherine West

AFLAC

Teresa L. White

Ilene H. Lang

LIZ CLAIBORNE CHEVRON CORPORATION

77 Women

Phyllis Golden Morey

CAPITAL ONE FINANCIAL

Marise Fernandes Kumar

Sheila Lau

Tsion M. Messick

Tiffany P. Olson

Karel K. Czanderna Nance K. Dicciani

Margaret G. McGlynn

Maria R. Morris

Barbara R. Cowden Maria Coyne

Janet Marzett

ROCHE DIAGNOSTICS CORPORATION

Karen L. Carnahan Deborah Stewart Coleman

Cathy Lyons

METLIFE

Judith E. Campbell Ria Marie Carlson

Katherine Linder

Paula J. Zusi Rhonda Zygocki

Duy-Loan T. Le

Chrysler, Jeep, and Dodge are registered trademarks of DaimlerChrysler Corporation.

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

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Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2005

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Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005


At WellPoint, we celebrate the diversity of our workforce. We are the leading health benefits company in the nation serving the needs of 28 million members. A FORTUNE 50® company, we are strengthened by the commitment and dedication of our associates. If you’re looking to join a company where you will see your ideas in action - where what you do helps others live better, consider a career with us. Visit our website to search opportunities throughout the United States at:

www.wellpoint.com/careers

What does it take to be named FORTUNE magazine’s Most Admired Healthcare Company six years running? ®

People like you.

Opportunities may be available in the following areas: • Actuarial • Administrative/Clerical • Advertising/Marketing • Claims/Membership/Customer Service • Compliance • Corporate Communications • Finance & Accounting • Human Resources • Information Technology • Legal • Management • Nursing/Case Management • Pharmacy • Provider Network Development • Sales • Training • Underwriting

SM

EOE. SM Service Mark of WellPoint Inc. FORTUNE and FORTUNE 50 are registered trademarks of FORTUNE magazine, a division of Time Inc. ©2004 WellPoint Inc. All rights reserved.


PUBLISHER James R. Rector MANAGING EDITOR Susan Larson

pointofview From the editor of Profiles in Diversity Journal

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Linda Schellentrager ASSOCIATE EDITOR ASSISTANT TO THE PUBLISHER Damian Johnson CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Laurie Fumic WEB MASTER Jason Bice

By the Numbers Those of you on a

REALLY TIGHT SCHEDULE

could skip the bulk

of this issue. Here’s a capsule of the Women Worth Watching messages: Be yourself; work hard; take chances; play nice with others; live fully. A corollary might be—JUST

DO IT.

If you did bypass these profiles, however, you’d be missing the rich LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Commentaries or questions should be addressed to: Profiles in Diversity Journal, P.O. Box 45605, Cleveland, OH 44145-0605. All correspondence should include author’s full name, address, e-mail and phone number. DISPLAY ADVERTISING 30095 Persimmon Drive Westlake, OH 44145 Tel: 440.892.0444 FAX: 440.892.0737 profiles@diversityjournal.com SUBSCRIPTIONS U.S. $49.95 one year / $89.95 two years; in Canada, add $10 per year for postage. Other foreign orders add $15 per year. U.S. funds only. Subscriptions can be ordered at: www.diversityjournal.com or call customer service at 800.573.2867 from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. EST.

SUBMISSIONS Reprints: profiles@diversityjournal.com Editorial: edit@diversityjournal.com Photos & Artwork: art@diversityjournal.com

context of their stories—in many ways similar (ARE YOU

READING

the top

two books in executive suites this year? Is your comfort zone measured by the walls of your office?). Yet their stories are in so many ways unique. In

77 WAYS,

to be exact.

This phenomenal issue,

UNPRECEDENTED

a record number of featured women. The

in our seven years, includes

72 COMPANIES

that have

opened doors to and welcomed these profiled women encompass dozens of industries and a spectrum of sizes and scopes. As Catalyst’s research (see page 12) shows, these organizations have made a MOVE

SMART BUSINESS

in making room for women at the top.

These women are applauded and featured here because they have inspired their colleagues, peers, and mentors with their ACHIEVEMENTS,

INITIATIVE AND

their purpose and drive, as well as devotion to their

teams, their organizations, and their communities. Because these profiles (that is our name, after all) share with you messages in their own words, they

AUTHENTICALLY CHARACTERIZE

these ladies’ diverse styles, personalities, and the ways they capitalized on their particular individual talents. In fact, this is another of the common themes throughout. Their profiles will—we hope—interest and inspire you; they will certainly

Profiles in Diversity Journal® is published bi-monthly by Rector, Inc., Principal Office: P.O. Box 45605, Cleveland, OH 44145-0605. James Rector, Publisher, Rector, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The views expressed in this publication are those of the authors and may or may not represent the views of the publisher. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. Registered in U.S. Patent Office.

REWARD YOU

for the time spent getting acquainted.

Susan Larson Managing Editor

ISSN 15 3 7-2 10 2 Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2005

3


ON THE COVER

14 P R E FAC E BY S TE V E M I LLE R

features / departments 3 10

Point of View Momentum

12 Catalyst 17

D I V E R S I T Y W H O , W H A T, W H E R E , W H E N

THE BOT TOM LINE

Women Worth Watching

142 Spotlight 146 ADvantage 4

EDITOR’S COLUMN

S P E C I A L F E AT U R E

F E AT U R E D O R G A N I Z AT I O N S ADVERT ISER S’ INDE X

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005


Financial Services Education Information and Media Services

Here, your opinion can boost the economy of an entire nation. And the well being of the families who live there. Your work matters immensely to you. You strive to impact the lives of countless individuals around the globe. You should join The McGraw-Hill Companies. Because the work we do matters to millions. Whether you’re assigning a rating with Standard & Poor’s... or developing new media technologies with McGraw-Hill Education, you’ll experience a culturally rich work environment–one that respects and values diversity. You’ll also benefit from our Women’s Initiative for Networking & Success (WINS)–an internal program that builds relationships, cultivates leaders and maximizes goals. With national events, mentoring support and programs to better balance work and home, The McGraw-Hill Companies gives you the resources you need to help build a stronger world. How will you make your mark?

www.mcgraw-hill.com/careers We are an equal opportunity employer.


Women Worth Watching – Profiles & Mentoring Memos 26

Valencia I. Adams

50

BellSouth

27

Evelyn Angelle

Ford

52

Halliburton

28

Mary Atkin

Susan E. Baumgarten

54

Jean Blackwell

56

Lori L. Bossmann

58

Karen Bowman

60

Catherine S. Brune

62

Michele Buck

64

Marcia L. Bullard

66

Judith E. Campbell

68

Ria Marie Carlson

70

71

Ingram Micro

48

Karen L. Carnahan Cintas

Laurene Gallo Booz Allen

New York Life

46

Kathleen M. Gainey U.S. Army

Gannett (USA Weekend)

44

Anne Erni Lehman Brothers

Hershey

42

Dana Drago The Hartford

Allstate

40

Nance K. Dicciani Honeywell

Convergys

38

Karel K. Czanderna Whirlpool

Ace Hardware

36

Maria Coyne KeyBank

Cummins

34

Barbara R. Cowden State Farm

Raytheon

32

Chris Cortez DaimlerChrysler

A.G. Edwards

30

Deborah Stewart Coleman

Mary Anne Gibbons

BMO (Harris)

75 Katherine J. Harless Verizon

76 Glenda A. Hatchett HCA

78 Kathy J. Herbert Albertson’s

79 Marillyn A. Hewson Lockheed Martin (Kelly Aviation)

80 Kathryn Hill Cisco

82 Linda P. Hudson General Dynamics

83 Denise Kaigler Reebok

84 Carolyn L. Kolesar Sodexho

86 Marise Fernandes Kumar Whirlpool

87 Ilene H. Lang

U.S. Postal Service

Catalyst

Kimberly S. Gray

88 Sheila Lau

Highmark

72

74 Sandra L. Hanington

Cathy D. Green Food Lion

Verizon

90 Duy-Loan T. Le Texas Instruments (company index on page 142)

6

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005


Women Worth Watching – Profiles & Mentoring Memos 91

Katherine Linder

108

Verizon

92

Cathy Lyons

Janet Marzett

110

Margaret G. McGlynn

111

Tsion M. Messick

112

Pamela T. Miller

114

Ana Mollinedo Mims

115

Sylvia M. Montero

116

Maritza Gomez Montiel

118

Phyllis Golden Morey

119

Maria R. Morris

120

Tiffany P. Olson

122

Larree M. Renda Safeway

132

Tina M. Sivinski

Launi D. Skinner

Karin Stone

Janice D. Stoney

Dawn Sweeney

123

Marilyn B. Tavenner HCA

124

Lora J. Villarreal ACS

134

Jacqui D. Vines Cox Communications

135

Debra K. Walker U.S. Air Force

136

Catherine West Capital One

138

Teresa L. White Aflac

139

AARP Services

Roche Diagnostics

107

Leslie R. Sibert

Kim E. VanGelder Kodak

Williams Companies

MetLife

106

131

National City Bank

Lear

104

Susan E. Sheskey

Debra A. Valentine United Technologies

Starbucks

Deloitte & Touche

103

130

EDS

Pfizer

102

D’Arcy Foster Rudnay

Michele P. Toth Northrop Grumman IT

Georgia Power

Starwood Hotels & Resorts

100

128

Dell

Medco

99

Alice Rosenblatt

Janice M. Tomlinson Chubb Group

Comcast

Pepco

98

127

WellPoint

Merck

96

Ann E. Rondeau

Jean Thomas Cendant

U.S. Navy

DaimlerChrysler

95

126

CIGNA

Hewlett-Packard

94

Karen S. Rohan

Paula J. Zusi Liz Claiborne

140

Rhonda Zygocki Chevron

Karen D. Taylor Reliant Energy (company index on page 142)

8

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005


We’re providing women with a workplace that works as well for them as it does for us. Since the launch of our groundbreaking Women’s Initiative in 1993, Deloitte & Touche USA LLP and its subsidiaries have been committed to fostering an environment where the best women choose to be. A place where women can advance, succeed and successfully integrate their personal and professional commitments. And we have the results to show it. We have the highest percentage of women partners, principals and directors among the Big Four professional services providers. And we continue to be recognized as world class for our success in developing women professionals and leaders. We’re also proud to be have been named to Working Mother magazine’s list of 100 Best Companies for Working Mothers for eleven consecutive years. Proof that we are not only making our Women’s Initiative a success, but also the women who work here.

www.deloitte.com/us About Deloitte Deloitte refers to one or more of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu, a Swiss Verein, its member firms and their respective subsidiaries and affiliates. As a Swiss Verein (association), neither Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu nor any of its member firms has any liability for each other’s acts or omissions. Each of the member firms is a separate and independent legal entity operating under the names “Deloitte,” “Deloitte & Touche,” “Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu,” or other related names. Services are provided by the member firms or their subsidiaries or affiliates and not by the Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Verein. Deloitte & Touche USA LLP is the US member firm of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu. In the US, services are provided by the subsidiaries of Deloitte & Touche USA LLP (Deloitte & Touche LLP, Deloitte Consulting LLP, Deloitte Financial Advisory Services LLP, Deloitte Tax LLP and their subsidiaries), and not by Deloitte & Touche USA LLP. Member of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Copyright © 2005 Deloitte Development LLC. All rights reserved.


Steve Reinemund (PepsiCo) to Chair NMSDC Steve Reinemund, Chairman and CEO of PepsiCo, has been elected Chairman of the National Minority Supplier Development Council (NMSDC) Board of Directors for a two-year term. The NMSDC mission is to increase procurement and business opportunities for minority businesses. The NMSDC screens and certifies minority business enterprises; manages a national database of more than 15,000 certified minority suppliers, matching them with corporate buyers; offers working capital loans and access to specialized financing; promotes Centers of Excellence to enhance successful business relationships; sponsors training programs and business fairs; and offers many other services and benefits for minority businesses and corporations wishing to work with them. Purchases by NMSDC corporate members from minority businesses in 2004 totaled $87.4 billion.

Jack Campbell Directs Workplace Culture at Verizon Jack Campbell is now Director– Workplace Culture and Communications within Verizon’s Corporate Human Resources unit.

Campbell will be developing and implementing strategies to reinforce Verizon’s position as a premier employer— supporting the continuing development of a performancebased culture; promoting the Verizon Commitment and Values; supporting corporate responsibility and reputation efforts; and managing communications that demonstrate Verizon’s commitment to environmental stewardship, safety, and diversity/inclusion.

Supplier Diversity, managing the firm’s private sector customer requirements—including the Group Purchasing and Integrated Delivery Networks business segments. He also leads various initiatives to create joint ventures and other strategic alliances with diverse suppliers. Robinson was previously with Hospira, the hospital products spinoff from Abbott Laboratories (as Small Business Liaison Officer and Senior Purchasing Agent); with Abbott Laboratories (as Senior Purchasing Agent); and with the Lake County Forest Preserves (as a Buyer). He has a bachelor’s degree (business administration) from Lake Forest College and a master’s degree (general management) from Keller Graduate School of Management.

Campbell began his career in telecommunications at Bell Atlantic, and subsequently served in various assignments in government relations, Verizon Connected Solutions, and Public Affairs, Policy and Communications organizations.

Martha Holmes joined Cardinal Health last fall as Director, Small Business Development, responsible for all government small business subcontracting report management. She is also the small business liaison across Cardinal Health. Holmes was previously at Pharmacia, where she was Director of Supplier Diversity; and at Monsanto, in Global Procurement. She is active in the Chicago Minority Business Development Council and sits on the healthcare committee of the National Minority Business Development Council. Holmes has a BS degree from National-Louis University.

Campbell reports to Magda Yrizarry, vice president, Workplace Culture, Diversity and Compliance.

Robinson and Holmes Strengthen Cardinal Health Diversity Programs Within the last year, two new directors at Cardinal Health are strengthening the company’s efforts for outreach to small businesses as well as minority suppliers. Lamont Robinson has joined Cardinal Health as Director,

PDJ 10

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005


Expect more from your career.

You were just following your passion. And millions of people discovered life without the cloud of depression. A promising treatment for colon cancer entered clinical trials. Smokers found new strength to finally quit. Researchers made an important breakthrough to treat macular degeneration. Senior citizens in need received their prescriptions free of charge. You were just following your passion at Pfizer.

You may never set foot in a lab or work hand-in-hand with scientists, but your talent can change the world. At Pfizer, everything you do impacts everything we do. Your ideas will help power the next generation

“100 Best Companies to Work For” – Fortune,® 2002, 2003, 2005

“One of the Most Admired Pharmaceutical Companies in America” – Fortune,® 2002, 2003, 2005 “Top 100 Companies for Working Mothers”

of medicines that make life a little easier to live for

– Working Mother, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005

people everywhere. And at the end of each and

“100 Best Places for Latinos to Work”

everyday, you’ll know that you’ve made a difference. This is your career at Pfizer - a career unlike any other.

– Hispanic Magazine, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005

“One of the Top-Rated Companies in Corporate Equality” – Human Rights Campaign, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005

“Top Corporation for Women Owned Businesses” – Women’s Business Enterprise National Council, 2004

Visit www.pfizer.com/careers Pfizer is an Equal Opportunity Employer.


The Bottom Line By Catalyst

Catalyst’s groundbreaking research confirms that companies recruiting, retaining, and advancing women will have a competitive advantage in the global marketplace.

B

usiness leaders increasingly request hard data to support the link between gender diversity and corporate financial performance. In response, Catalyst conducted a groundbreaking study demonstrating that such a link does exist. The Bottom Line: Connecting Corporate Performance and Gender Diversity uses publicly available data to explore the connection between gender diversity in top management teams and U.S. corporate financial performance in the second half of the 1990s. This period was chosen because it represents a time of considerable economic growth and for which there exists consistent and reliable gender diversity information. Two measures were used to examine financial performance— Return on Equity (ROE) and Total Return to Shareholders (TRS)1 —in the 353 Fortune 500 companies for which Catalyst has at least four years of data. The financial performance of five industries was also examined.

12

Catalyst found that there is a connection between gender diversity and financial performance. It is important to note that the study explores a link, but does not demonstrate causation. In order to do the latter, all other possible causes of good and poor financial performance would need to be ruled out, which is beyond the scope of the study.

Findings : The findings highlighted below reaffirm Catalyst’s long-standing belief in the business impact of diversity. • The group of companies with the highest representation of women on their top management teams experienced better financial performance than the group of companies with the lowest women’s representation. This finding holds for both financial measures analyzed: ROE, which is 35.1 percent higher, and TRS, which is 34.0 percent higher. • Financial performance also was analyzed by industry; in each of

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

the five industries analyzed2 , the group of companies with the highest women’s representation on their top management teams experienced a higher ROE than the group of companies with the lowest women’s representation. • In four out of the five industries analyzed, the group of companies with the highest women’s representation on their top management teams experienced a higher TRS than the group of companies with the lowest women’s representation. • Catalyst Award-winning companies financially outperformed the 339 other companies in the sample. This finding holds true for both ROE and TRS.

Approach : Catalyst divided the 353 companies into four roughly equal quartiles based on the representation of women in senior management. The top quartile comprises the 88 companies with the highest gender


Average ROE by Gender Diversity Top and Bottom Quartiles—All Industries

TRS by Gender Diversity Top and Bottom Quartiles—All Industries 127.7%

17.7%

Average 109.9%

Average 15.7%

95.3%

13.1%

Top Quartile Bottom Quartile Companies Companies

Note: Difference is significant at the 90% level

Note: Difference is significant at the 99% level

diversity on leadership teams, while the bottom quartile is the 89 companies with the lowest gender diversity. Catalyst then compared the two groups based on overall ROE and TRS. Industry and company differences were controlled to ensure that the findings were not influenced by a few uniquely performing industries or companies. For both ROE and TRS, on average, top-quartile companies financially outperformed bottom-quartile companies. Catalyst also confirmed that the connection holds in the other direction. Again dividing the sample of 353 companies into quartiles—this time by financial performance measures (both ROE and TRS)—Catalyst

Top Quartile Bottom Quartile Companies Companies

analyzed the top-quartile (88 companies) and bottom-quartile (89 companies) financial performers and found that top financial performers have a higher representation of women on their top management teams.

Conclusion : These findings further confirm the business case that Catalyst has put forth for the past 40 years: gender diversity is indeed a characteristic of companies with excellent financial performance, and developing women managers and leveraging that talent by giving them a seat at the decision-making table is smart business.

PDJ

Catalyst is the leading research and advisory organization working to advance women in business, with offices in New York, San Jose, and Toronto. For more information or to download a free copy of: The Bottom Line: Connecting Corporate Performance and Gender Diversity, visit www.catalyst.org. You may also sign up to receive Catalyst’s issue-specific newsletter, Perspective, and monthly email updates at news@catalyst.org. 1 ROE and TRS reflect two critical elements of returns to shareholders: ROE is an accountingbased measure that reflects corporate financial performance; TRS is a value-based measure that reflects changes in stock price. 2 Five industries in Catalyst’s sample have at least 35 companies, permitting separate industry analyses: Consumer Discretionary, Consumer Staples, Financials, Industrials, and Information Technology/ Telecommunication Services.

Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2005

13


T

his is a most important edition

of

Profiles

in

Diversity Journal: it cele-

brates the accomplishments of 77 senior women leaders, and it is the

• the unique and growing heterogeneity of the American population; • the pervasiveness of globalization; and

gateway for understanding PDJ’s • competition in the 21st century ongoing focus on promoting women based upon intellectual property in senior leadership. as opposed to brick and mortar. So many women leaders fea-

By Steven L. Miller

tured at one time—77—the most

The emerging demographics of

ever celebrated in the magazine’s

America are virtually unique in the

history! As you examine their stories,

world as to diversity and complexity.

you will find these leaders come

Much of America’s future preemi-

from all sizes of companies, all disci-

nence and success as a culture will

plines,

industries.

depend on our ability to take advan-

Obviously we are making progress,

tage of the possibilities this diversity

real progress, in gender diversity at

offers for the common good. A good

senior levels.

first step on this journey is success

and

many

But we still have a long way to go in gender parity in leadership; if

Globalization is here for the

you doubt that, just consider how

duration and cannot be sidestepped.

impressed you would be if we fea-

Success for businesses, non-profits,

tured 77 men as leaders—not very, I

and nations will depend on operating

would suggest. The point being that,

well in an all-inclusive worldwide

while we celebrate these leaders and

marketplace for goods, services, and

our progress, we are just beginning

ideas. Learning from our domestic

to make real traction toward gender

diversity opportunities can provide

parity.

us a “leg up” in the world of global-

Why

14

with gender diversity.

is

parity

important?

ization.

A number of business cases can be

And finally, in the intense com-

cited or developed, but for me there

petition of intellectual ideas and

are three overarching reasons:

leadership

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

which

will

be

the


Steven L. Miller business reality for the coming

more senior leaders have become

decades, how can we not bring to

engaged in gender diversity devel-

bear

human

opment this last decade. Today we

resources? As we work to leave no

are getting traction like never before

child behind, we must endeavor as

in moving toward gender parity,

well to leave no citizen behind.

because

Success in gender diversity would be

today’s senior male leaders are

a major step to ensuring a competi-

engaged in making diversified lead-

tive America in the years ahead.

ership a reality.

all

our

nation’s

increasing

numbers

of

Now, how do we get to gender

Now that band of enlightened

parity? As we reflect on these leaders’

standard-bearers will be joined by

stories, we notice the common theme

these honored women leaders who

of mentoring in their narratives.

accept the commitment to extend the

Leaders do not just happen. They are

mentoring and diversity development

nurtured. They are challenged in

that got them where they are today.

constructive environments. In a

The pace of progress toward diversity

word, they are mentored—elevated

parity will depend on successful leaders

and molded by farsighted leaders

who remember their journey, who

who care about the future of the

helped them get there, and why.

enterprise long after they themselves will have left the stage.

Steven L. Miller, retired chairman of the board of directors, president and CEO of Shell Oil Company (1999 to 2002), serves as Honorary Chair of the PDJ Advisory Board.

So today let us celebrate these 77 senior women leaders. Let us read

Mr. Miller currently heads SLM Discovery Ventures, Inc., headquarterd in Houston, TX, which pursues commercial ventures in support of volunteerism, social outreach, and higher education academic achievement. He remains active in both the business and not-for-profit communities, serving on the boards of a number of local and national organizations and institutions: • The United Way of the Texas Gulf Coast

It is a primary responsibility of

and learn from their experiences. Let

the current “generation” of leaders of

us resolve to turn our learnings to

• Points of Light Foundation

an organization to make the right

action

• Reliant Energy

succession happen, and happen

progress. And if we do this, and are

well. Our 77 women leaders in this

successful at gender diversity, we will

issue have had the benefit of men-

be better able to tackle the more diffi-

toring by preceding leaders who

cult diversity challenges of ethnicity,

• The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Board of Visitors

took the time, interest, and risk to

GLBT, and those with special needs

• Rice University’s Board of Trustees

help develop these women’s careers,

and skills. You see, gender diversity

their futures. We honor more women

is just the beginning of the journey!

and

thereby

speed

the

today than in previous years because

PDJ

• University of Illinois Foundation

• Board of Advisors for Rice’s James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy.

Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2005

15


BELLSOUTH CORPORATION HALLIBURTON A.G. EDWARDS & SONS RAYTHEON CUMMINS ACE HARDWARE CORPORATION CONVERGYS CORPORATION ALLSTATE INSURANCE COMPANY THE HERSHEY COMPANY GANNETT CO., INC. (USA WEEKEND) NEW YORK LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY INGRAM MICRO CINTAS CORPORATION FORD MOTOR COMPANY DAIMLERCHRYSLER CORPORATION STATE FARM INSURANCE COMPANIES KEYBANK WHIRLPOOL CORPORATION HONEYWELL INTERNATIONAL THE HARTFORD FINANCIAL SERVICES GROUP LEHMAN BROTHERS UNITED STATES ARMY BOOZ ALLEN HAMILTON UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE HIGHMARK FOOD LION

Valencia I. Adams Evelyn Angelle Mary Atkin Susan E. Baumgarten Jean Blackwell Lori L. Bossmann Karen Bowman

VERIZON LIVESOURCE & PUBLIC HEWLETT-PACKARD DAIMLERCHRYSLER SERVICES NORTH AMERICA MERCK (VACCINES) PEPCO HOLDINGS MEDCO HEALTH SOLUTIONS STARWOOD HOTELS & RESORTS WORLDWIDE

Catherine S. Brune Michele Buck Marcia L. Bullard

PFIZER DELOITTE & TOUCHE USA LEAR CORPORATION

Chris Cortez

Dana Drago Anne Erni Kathleen M. Gainey Laurene Gallo Mary Anne Gibbons

SAFEWAY CIGNA CORPORATION (SPECIALTY COMPANIES) UNITED STATES NAVY WELLPOINT COMCAST CORPORATION DELL GEORGIA POWER ELECTRONIC DATA SYSTEMS CORPORATION STARBUCKS COFFEE NATIONAL CITY CORPORATION THE WILLIAMS COMPANIES AARP SERVICES

Kimberly S. Gray Cathy D. Green

HCA RELIANT ENERGY

BMO FINANCIAL GROUP (HARRIS)

Sandra L. Hanington

CENDANT CORPORATION

VERIZON INFORMATION SERVICES

Katherine J. Harless

CHUBB GROUP OF INSURANCE COMPANIES

HCA ALBERTSON'S LOCKHEED MARTIN (KELLY AVIATION) CISCO SYSTEMS GENERAL DYNAMICS CORPORATION REEBOK INTERNATIONAL SODEXHO HEALTH CARE SERVICES WHIRLPOOL CORPORATION CATALYST VERIZON NETWORK SERVICES GROUP TEXAS INSTRUMENTS

Glenda A. Hatchett Kathy J. Herbert Marillyn A. Hewson Kathryn Hill Linda P. Hudson Denise Kaigler Carolyn L. Kolesar

NORTHROP GRUMMAN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY UNITED TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY AFFILIATED COMPUTER SERVICES COX COMMUNICATIONS UNITED STATES AIR FORCE CAPITAL ONE FINANCIAL

Marise Fernandes Kumar

AFLAC

Ilene H. Lang Sheila Lau

Sylvia M. Montero Maritza Gomez Montiel Phyllis Golden Morey Maria R. Morris

Karel K. Czanderna Nance K. Dicciani

Pamela T. Miller Ana Mollinedo Mims

Tiffany P. Olson

Barbara R. Cowden Maria Coyne

Margaret G. McGlynn Tsion M. Messick

ROCHE DIAGNOSTICS CORPORATION

Karen L. Carnahan Deborah Stewart Coleman

Cathy Lyons Janet Marzett

METLIFE

Judith E. Campbell Ria Marie Carlson

Katherine Linder

LIZ CLAIBORNE CHEVRON CORPORATION

Larree M. Renda Karen S. Rohan Ann E. Rondeau Alice Rosenblatt D'Arcy Foster Rudnay Susan E. Sheskey Leslie R. Sibert Tina M. Sivinski Launi D. Skinner Karin Stone Janice D. Stoney Dawn Sweeney Marilyn B. Tavenner Karen D. Taylor Jean Thomas Janice M. Tomlinson Michele P. Toth Debra A. Valentine Kim E. VanGelder Lora J. Villarreal Jacqui D. Vines Debra K. Walker Catherine West Teresa L. White Paula J. Zusi Rhonda Zygocki

Duy-Loan T. Le

Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2005

17


MEMOS FROM

These leading women worth watching represent achievement

and initiative within their organizations. The ir counse ling

“me mos” to othe r wome n aspiring to le adership— told

in the ir own words— shar e certain principles, value s,

and perspectives: self awareness, learning, perseverance,

fairness. Yet, their profiles reveal them as distinctively

va rie d individuals y ou’ll wa nt to ge t acquainted with.

Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2005

25


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Valencia I. Adams

BELLSOUTH

M

any of the executives I have known who are deemed “accomplished” people in the workplace often attribute at least part of their success to their mentors. This holds true for those both inside and outside of corporate America. There are several individuals to whom I attribute my success as a leader in business and in my community. My mother was my earliest mentor. When I was growing up, she instilled in her children the importance of always doing your best, and that we are no better or no less than anyone else. To this day, I value her counsel and input. As I came up through the corporate ranks in the late ’60s, there were few, if any, women—particularly African-American women—to serve as role models or mentors. I believe the mentoring experience can and should benefit both the mentor and the mentee in many unique ways. A mentor brings the vision and broader business perspectives to the partnership, while the mentee brings current reality and “frontline” business perspectives to the partnership. It is where these two perspectives meet and are explored that learning for the individuals and the organization takes place. Forming a mentoring relationship—whether as mentor or mentee—gives you a chance to see yourself and your career aspirations from another perspective. You can learn from others’ mistakes—without having to repeat them. You can also benefit from someone’s past successes—without re-inventing the wheel! Mentoring someone can give you a chance to revisit skills that you have mastered and pass on a little of what you have learned from others. It may actually change the way you approach your own work. These mentoring relationships best promote diversity of thought and skills when made across disciplines, operating units, race and gender lines, age, and

COMPANY:

BellSouth Corporation

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

Atlanta, GA

www.bellsouth.com Telecommunications

2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

~$28 billion

63,000

CUSTOMERS: DSL: >2 million; long distance: >6 million; access lines: >21 million

26

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE:

Vice President & Chief Diversity Officer

Bachelor of Business Administration: Georgia State University

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB: READING:

Telephone operator at BellSouth

Whatever my book club is reading

PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

It doesn’t matter who gets the credit.

Husband

INTERESTS:

Church choir and boards; reading; traveling

Women’s Resource Center To End Domestic Violence FAVORITE CHARITY:

experience levels. Sharing both professional and personal insights serves to enhance the process since the two areas are often intertwined. Shadowing, networking, and learning are some of the key elements which contribute to a rewarding mentoring experience. One of my first corporate mentors helped me to believe in my abilities, helping me to realize I was sometimes my own biggest obstacle to success. Constructive feedback between the mentor and mentee, though not always easy for some women to do, is very necessary. You want to be able to discuss strengths and weaknesses and share insights on those developmental areas that a peer or boss may be reluctant to discuss. Too often the mentoring process breaks down due to lack of commitment or follow-through by one or both parties. To help avoid this, create a “contract” outlining the goals and objectives of the relationship. Each party must have a willingness to devote the necessary time and energy to assist in the building of the mentor/mentee relationship. Trustworthiness and respect for confidentiality are essential to the experience. The characteristics and style the mentor brings to the process are important elements in enhancing the mentor/mentee partnership. I believe it is critical, especially for women, to reach back and help others along, as well as to not be afraid to seek out those who can help us attain personal goals. Sometimes we don’t have because we don’t ask! PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Evelyn Angelle

HALLIBURTON

I

f anyone were to ask me what is my most prized possession, I would say my college degree. My parents were immigrants from what used to be Yugoslavia. They didn’t expect me to go to college and didn’t have the money to help me. I worked as a lifeguard for years and saved all my money, and I got some scholarships. Still, it was difficult financially, so I finished college in three years instead of four. Because I knew that I’d need to be able to find a job, I chose my major after reading an article that listed accounting as one of the top professions for new graduates. It turned out to be a good match. This industry has a tradition of men in coveralls and hardhats out in the oilfields or on project sites. There aren’t a lot of women executives in business or technical positions, although that’s changing. I’m Halliburton’s first female head of investor relations, and I’m proud of that. But I’m convinced that they offered me the position because, after looking at all the candidates, men and women, they concluded that I was the best person for the job. And that’s the way I want it. I want to be seen as someone who’s made it because of talent and hard work, not because I’m a woman. It’s been a stretch. My previous job was assistant controller, so the financial part of investor relations was easy for me. However, I realized right away I needed to understand the operations—drill bits and pressure pumping and liquefied natural gas. Fortunately, I’m the type of person who loves a challenge, and when I set a goal I usually achieve it.

COMPANY:

Halliburton

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Houston, TX

www.halliburton.com

BUSINESS/RANKING:

World’s second largest energy

services company 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

$20.47 billion

TITLE:

Vice President – Investor Relations

BBA (accounting): Saint Mary’s College, Notre Dame, IN EDUCATION:

Lifeguard and swimming instructor

FIRST JOB: READING:

Triathlons for Women

PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

You reap what you sow.

Husband, and very fine 5-year-old son

INTERESTS:

Horses (I have four); running

I also have great mentors here at Halliburton and a lot of support—both at work and at home. If there is just one piece of advice I’d pass along to other women in business, it’s to be careful how you treat people. It sounds simple, but I’ve found that it’s often the simplest things that hold the greatest truth. I spent the first 15 years of my career at one of the big accounting firms. In public accounting it’s “up or out,” so turnover was a fact of life. It was very likely that some of my coworkers who left the firm might one day be my clients or my neighbors. The world is really very small. It’s important to treat people well that you meet along the way because it’s likely you’ll see them again.

106,000

PDJ Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2005

27


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Mary Atkin

A . G . E D WA R D S

D

eveloping your personal leadership philosophy is the first step to becoming a leader. As for advice to give to others, the best I can offer is to share the leadership principles that I have followed in my own career. I truly believe that success in life is determined not by what happens to us, but by what we make happen. If you aspire to be a leader, you must first establish a reputation as someone who can make things happen. Take on challenging assignments that stretch you beyond your comfort zone, and then deliver results that go above and beyond expectations. Delivering results, however, is only the beginning. The difference between success and failure is often not in “what” you do, but in “how” you do it. When I reflect on my career, I recognize it is how I went about my work that set me apart and paved the way for advancement. Tackle your work with conviction and enthusiasm. Value people and treat them with respect. Show moral courage to “do the right thing,” even if it’s unpopular. Be willing to make the hard call. All of these qualities will help you earn credibility and respect as a leader. Don’t be limited by the boundaries of your job description. Learn more than you need to know to do the job you have today. Understand your company’s business inside and out. Know the issues and challenges facing your organization, and try to look at the world from the perspective of your firm’s top management. Have a vision of what you are trying to accomplish and pursue it with passion. I realized early in my career that I relished the role of being a change agent. The bigger the obstacles, the more energized

C O M PA N Y:

A.G. Edwards & Sons

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

www.agedwards.com Brokerage firm

2005 REVENUE: E M P L OY E E S : CUSTOMERS:

28

St. Louis, MO

$2.6 billion

15,246 3.6 million

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE:

Executive Vice President, Director of Staff Division

EDUCATION: BSBA: University of Minnesota, Carlson School of Management FIRST JOB:

Research assistant for commodity futures

markets READING: I keep both a fiction and a non-fiction bestseller on my nightstand at all times. I’m currently reading The History of Love: A Novel (Krauss) and Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking (Gladwell). PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Life is what you make it.

Two children: daughter (16), son (14)

INTERESTS:

Travel; reading; family activities; community

involvement FAVORITE CHARITY: There are too many worthy charities for me to pick a favorite; I focus my personal efforts toward education and health and human services organizations.

I became. Embrace change—that alone will set you apart. If you believe passionately in what you are trying to accomplish, you will inspire others. Build effective give-and-take relationships. Very few people achieve success without the help and support of others. Surround yourself with talented people and empower them to achieve. Make time to help others to succeed, and don’t be afraid to ask for help when you need it yourself. Seek feedback and accept it un-defensively. Excel at teamwork and be generous about sharing the credit for a job well done. Finally, believe in yourself and be comfortable with who you are. Strive to keep balance in your life. Know your priorities and make time for what’s most important to you. Be grateful for all of life’s gifts. PDJ


Not Everyone at PepsiCo Sees Things the Same Way At PepsiCo, we value unique perspectives. Diversity and inclusion are benchmarks of our business. In the 21st century, high performance begins with the ability to see a different point of view. For more information, visit our Web site: www.pepsijobs.com

#4 on Top 50 Companies for Diversity* #1 for Latinos* #1 for African Americans* #2 for Recruitment and Retention* #4 for Asian Americans* #5 for GLBT Employees* #8 for Supplier Diversity* *DiversityInc Magazine 2005

PepsiCo is dedicated to the policy of equal employment opportunity for all applicants without regard to their race, color, religion, gender, age, disability, national origin, sexual orientation or any other category protected by law.


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Susan E. Baumgarten R AY T H E O N

I

share with women who aspire to be tomorrow’s corporate leaders that great success is not easy—but it’s doable. It’s about competence and hard work. It’s making choices and understanding that no one will give success to you. You have to get the education and the credentials. When you have chosen something to do, you have to commit to being good at it, in places where you can make an impact. Professional challenges and diversity of opportunities in life enable you to be a better leader. For me, it’s about knowing yourself, creating your own career, and excelling at it. As a woman in a male-dominated industry—or any industry for that matter—you have to recognize that you are different. Acting like you’re not is nonsense. You have to be confident, however, that you have something to bring to the game no matter your difference; so make sure you participate and demonstrate your skills and abilities with humility rather than self-aggrandizement. Early on, competence and knowledge are enough, but you have to be even smarter as you move up because workplace and organizational politics are involved. Politics is not necessarily a bad thing; you just have to be aware and develop an ability and agility to work through them. There may be daunting challenges at times, but it all comes back to competence. If you are good at what you do, competence will prevail. You will then find that once you are at a certain level, people will actually defer to you. This respect will not happen

C O M PA N Y:

FIRST JOB:

Dancer with a Los Angeles junior ballet

company London: The Novel (Rutherfurd) and The Cairo Trilogy (Mahfouz). As soon as I finish them, I’ll get to the two most recent Harry Potter books. READING:

PHILOSOPHY: One of the most important aspects for me is thinking that life is bigger than just you, yourself. It’s being more aware of others, putting yourself in their shoes. It makes life more interesting. It allows you to function better in life and business. FAMILY:

Husband; one brother with two sons

INTERESTS: Ancient history; travel; theater; dance; exercise; and I’m intrigued by Shakespeare.

Arts- and dance-related organizations; museums; music centers; these types of programs and their focus on youth. FAVORITE CHARITY:

Waltham, MA

www.raytheon.com

Defense and government electronics, space, technical services; business and special mission aircraft; 4th largest defense contractor BUSINESS/RANKING:

2004 REVENUE: E M P L OY E E S : CUSTOMERS:

$20.2 billion

80,000 worldwide

because you may be the only or one of few women in the room. It will happen because demonstration of your competence will make clear you are there because of your experience, skills, and credentials. I encourage women to always remember that you have something to offer and you are there for a reason.

Primarily the U.S. Department of

Defense 30

EDUCATION: Bachelor’s degree (math/biochemistry); Master’s degree (electrical engineering); MBA (finance/marketing)

Raytheon

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

TITLE: Vice President & Deputy General Manager – Raytheon Technical Services Company LLC

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Jean Blackwell

CUMMINS

M

y grandmother always hoped I would grow up to be a genteel southern lady. What she got instead was a tomboy who loves camping and golf and shudders at the thought of putting on a skirt. But while I may not have followed my grandmother’s guidance on matters of femininity, my family’s advice on dealing with people and determining what is really important was invaluable. My mother, in particular, taught me to be considerate in my dealings with others, yet firm in my convictions. She urged me to put integrity above all else. She encouraged me to appreciate and celebrate differences in people, and to value my own opinion on a par with anyone else’s. My mother’s words of wisdom—coupled with insights gained from my real world experiences— have served me well during the highs and lows of my many and varied careers. One of the most important things I have learned is to “take that leap.” I started my career in the legal profession and then moved to running a state lottery commission and directing a $12 billion state budget. Those first steps away from my legal “safety net” were the toughest—and scariest. I soon discovered that the successes and failures I experienced in each new position made the challenge that much easier the next time. When I was no longer afraid of change, I could embrace it as a way to make a positive difference for my employer and myself. I also realized that I needed to get my priorities straight. As a young professional, my thoughts were

Cummins Inc. H E A D Q U A R T E R S : Columbus, IN W E B S I T E : www.cummins.com B U S I N E S S / R A N K I N G : Manufacturing; #257 – Fortune 500 2 0 0 4 R E V E N U E : $8.44 billion E M P L OY E E S : 28,100 worldwide C U S T O M E R S : 160 countries, 550 company-owned and independent distributors, 5000 dealer locations S U P P L I E R S : 1,500 C O M PA N Y:

32

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE:

CFO & Chief of Staff

EDUCATION: BA (economics): College of William and Mary; JD (cum laude): University of Michigan FIRST JOB:

Partner – Bose McKinney & Evans

The Kite Runner (Hosseini); The World is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-first Century (Friedman); Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (Rowling) READING:

PHILOSOPHY: Helping others be wildly successful is a wonderful thing. FAMILY:

Parents; 3 brothers; sister; 2 dogs: Dixie &

Savannah INTERESTS:

Golf; fly-fishing; travel

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Big Sisters

on getting ahead. Over time I began to understand the importance of focusing on the success of the organization, rather than my personal triumphs. When I put the interest of the whole entity ahead of my own, we both ended up winning. I have learned the importance of being myself and developing my own style. Each of us is unique, and it is important to tap into that inner self to feel fulfilled about what you do and who you are. Finally, I have discovered that the best thing you can do for an organization or company is to surround yourself with people who are more talented than you. You do that by hiring good people and giving them opportunities to grow and succeed in their jobs. Helping others be wildly successful is a wonderful legacy—and one that I hope I can PDJ continue to build for many more years.


A diversity of great technology and solutions starts with a diversity of great people

At Raytheon, an inclusive culture is one of the things we believe gives us a competitive advantage. By recognizing the uniqueness of individuals, empowering employees, and truly valuing their input, our company consistently performs beyond all expectations. It’s a philosophy we’ll always embrace. It’s right for people, and it’s right for business.

We’re proud to feature Raytheon employees in our ads. To join them in a rewarding career, visit

www.rayjobs.com

© 2005 Raytheon Company. All rights reserved. Raytheon is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer and welcomes a wide diversity of applicants. U.S. citizenship and security clearance may be required.


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Lori L. Bossmann A C E H A R D WA R E

I

n mentoring other women who aspire to positions in leadership, I suggest some lessons I have learned along the way that have helped me succeed: LESSON 1.

Be prepared with all the facts. Try not to get caught up using your emotions to gain consensus. If you know that the topic you are presenting is controversial, anticipate questions and be prepared to respond with the facts versus your own personal emotions. Know your own personal strengths and weaknesses and build a team with individuals whose strengths differ from your own. Leverage the diversity around you by being open to different ideas and perspectives. Encourage healthy debate and discussion to produce better results. Try not to take disagreements personally; it’s just part of the decision-making process.

LESSON 2.

Realize that the best idea is only as good as the buy-in you receive from your staff, peers, and superiors. In order to be successful, you must make others own the idea. Also, choose your battles wisely. One thing I learned early in my career from a mentor is that you may be right on a particular topic, but the relationship damage may not be worth the fight. Choose what is really important to you and the company, and focus your efforts there. LESSON 3.

Pursue any opportunity that will expand your knowledge base, even if it’s outside your core competency and comfort zone. Step up and take on the risky, challenging assignments. Also, don’t be afraid to ask for what you want and be prepared to LESSON 4.

Ace Hardware Corporation

C O M PA N Y:

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Oak Brook, IL

www.acehardware.com

B U S I N E S S / R A N K I N G : Retail/wholesale home improvement; largest retailer-owned cooperative 2004 REVENUE: E M P L OY E E S : R E TA I L E R S :

Wholesale sales >$3.2 billion

>5,000 4,700 independent stores on

6 continents 34

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE:

Vice President, Merchandising

EDUCATION:

Bachelor of Science: Northern Illinois

University FIRST JOB:

Staff accountant at KPMG

READING: Good to Great (Collins); Secret Life of Bees (Kidd) for my daughter’s English essay this quarter. PHILOSOPHY:

Treat others with respect and value their

opinions. FAMILY:

Two daughters (13 and 10)

I enjoy watching my daughters play soccer and volleyball. I also enjoy playing volleyball myself; remodeling and redecorating my home; and reading. INTERESTS:

explain professionally why you deserve the opportunity. If you don’t ask, you don’t get! Relationships are important. Actively develop relationships within your company that can help you through key career decisions. Develop relationships through listening to others and gaining their respect, and always make sure you are approachable.

LESSON 5.

LESSON 6. Don’t neglect your personal life. I am personally more productive and creative when I’m spending enough time with my daughters and am involved in their daily lives. I eat dinner with my girls every night I’m in town, and make as many of their soccer and volleyball games as I can. Also, learn your limits and learn how to say “no.”

I’ve been fortunate that Ace has provided me with ample opportunities that keep me engaged and PDJ excited throughout my career.


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Karen Bowman

CONVERGYS

T

he best counsel I can offer to aspiring leaders is:

DO WHAT YOU SAY YOU ARE GOING TO DO. As a leader, you cast a long shadow. Be mindful of the impact your words and actions have on the people that follow you. Never sacrifice your integrity or character. Make realistic commitments and keep them—whether to your family, your colleagues, or yourself.

BE PRESENT. Spend time with the people you lead. My father was a submarine officer and used to walk his ship every day. He taught me you can learn much more about your business and the challenges your people face by routinely getting out of your office.

Appreciate the richness and diversity in each person and value them for the different perspectives and experiences they bring to your business.

PEOPLE ARE LIKE ARTWORK.

Know who you are and what your unique strengths and talents are. Do not try to emulate others or focus too much on your weaknesses. Find opportunities that allow you to make your greatest contribution. PLAY TO YOUR STRENGTHS.

My career path has taken many interesting turns from my initial experiences as a litigator to now leading a business. Take risks in your career and do not be afraid to fail. DIVERSIFY YOUR EXPERIENCE.

VALUE OPPORTUNITIES TO WORK INTERNA-

The future of business is global, and few individuals understand how to operate in a global environment. Seek out opportunities—such as an international assignment or membership on a crossTIONALLY.

Convergys Corporation H E A D Q U A R T E R S : Cincinnati, OH W E B S I T E : www.convergys.com B U S I N E S S / R A N K I N G : #1 provider of outsourced customer service and cable telephony billing in the world, and wireless billing services in the U.S.; #2 global provider of cable billing; 8% of the U.S. outsourced customer care market. 2 0 0 4 R E V E N U E : $2.5 billion E M P L OY E E S : 63,000 C U S T O M E R S : Leading companies in many industries worldwide including communications, financial services, technology, and consumer products C O M PA N Y:

36

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE:

President, Employee Care

EDUCATION: BA (political science, with highest honors): University of Oklahoma; JD: Wake Forest University School of Law FIRST JOB: In high school – lifeguard for a community pool; post-graduate – law clerk for the Honorable Ferdinand F. Fernandez, United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, Los Angeles, CA READING: The World Is Flat (Friedman); Leonardo da Vinci: Flights of the Mind (Nicholl) PHILOSOPHY:

Be the change you wish to see in the

world. (Gandhi) FAMILY:

Married for 16 years; two sons: (12 and 11)

INTERESTS: Spending time with my family and friends; any activities my kids participate in; international travel; outdoor activities (hiking, skiing, mountaineering) FAVORITE CHARITY: I am particularly passionate about charitable organizations that focus on children and literacy.

national work team—that enable you to work with people outside your country of origin. It is a unique and invaluable opportunity to learn and to grow. Find at least some time every day to stop and gain perspective. One of my early mentors took a break for at least 30 minutes at lunchtime every day. I learned that taking time to reflect and gain a fresh perspective enables you to remain calm and see possibilities where others see chaos. TAKE TIME TO REFLECT.

This is the theme of the Global Women’s Network in our company, and I am a true believer in it as a leadership principle.

YOU GET WHAT YOU GIVE.

MAKE TIME TO GIVE BACK to your community and to others. It will enrich you, energize you, and make you a better leader and a better person.

Don’t take yourself or your job too seriously. The quickest way to reduce a very stressful situation is to find the humor in it. Be brave enough to laugh at yourself, and create an environment where others can do the same.

HAVE FUN.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Catherine S. Brune

A L L S TAT E

W

hile I haven’t written it, I suspect my life’s first chapter could be titled, “Unexpected gifts from shrimp, men’s clothing, and other unusual sources.” My grandfathers died young, forcing my grandmothers to earn livings for our families. One started a catering business. The other took over my grandfather’s men’s clothing store. As a result, I cleaned a lot of shrimp and altered a lot of clothes … and boy, can I hem a mean pair of pants! Strong role models showed me you must be able to adapt and learn at every stage of life. Since then, I’ve learned other lessons that have served me well: • Reach out. Use your skills and talents to help others. I look for opportunities to give people hope, because I could have used that same help. It’s easier when people can see what’s possible. • REALLY understand your business. Sit in more than one chair and be accountable—you will learn things a lot differently than if you studied them in a book. • Remember that feedback is a gift. Conversations with the people you work for are important. Without dialogue, even the best results may not speak loudly enough to get you the next job. • Make sure people know you’re interested in new responsibilities. Realize you won’t be successful at everything, but that’s the chance you take to move ahead. Don’t cling to what’s easy or comfortable. • Focus on your customers—in any role you have. As CIO of Allstate, I focus on building technologies and processes that add value for our customers so they walk away feeling, “This is a company that cares about me.”

COMPANY:

Allstate Insurance Company

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Northbrook, IL

www.allstate.com

BUSINESS/RANKING: Insurance; nation’s largest publicly held personal lines insurer; 2nd largest property & casualty insurer 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES: CUSTOMERS:

$33.9 billion

38,000 17 million households

SUPPLIERS: Supplier Diversity Program “to ensure inclusion of the minority- and women-owned businesses in the competitive bidding process “

TITLE:

Senior Vice President & Chief Information Officer

Bachelor of Science (management): University of South Carolina EDUCATION:

First professional job – retail buyer for department store FIRST JOB:

READING:

The World is Flat (Friedman)

PHILOSOPHY: Put your heart and mind into developing people – so they can grow in their careers and their lives. FAMILY:

Husband; son (11) and daughter (9)

Music; golf; and being an ice skating, gymnastics, cross country, football, baseball and basketball Spectator Mom INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY: Junior Achievement. But I also work with any groups that help young women succeed in business and in life.

• Bring your passion for others. Have a risk-taking mentality, but care more about people other than yourself. You’ll have the courage to make difficult decisions. • Think beyond the paycheck. The money’s important, but ask, “Whom did I impact today?” I think about my children—what I contribute helps give them better lives. If you let the job run you, it will. If you don’t have balance in your own life, you can’t have it for your people. Whether cleaning shrimp or managing a billion dollar budget, there’s no way you can be successful without applying yourself and looking for opportunities to learn. You have to start somewhere—but there’s no end to where you can go.

PDJ 38

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005


Get more out of your career. Now at Dell. At Dell, we’re committed to bringing together individuals with diverse backgrounds, thinking, leadership and ideas, and arming them with the best tools to ensure their success. We believe this helps drive innovation and makes Dell a more dynamic company. Through career development, mentoring programs, networking groups and productivity tools like the Dell Latitude X300 with Intel® Centrino™ Mobile Technology, we offer the resources to help every employee achieve their potential. Our goal is to ensure that Dell is a great place to work, grow and aspire. Success real time. Capture it at Dell.

Dell recommends Microsoft® Windows® XP Professional

Jeanne Oliver uses a Dell Latitude X300 with Intel® CentrinoTM Mobile Technology

GET MORE OUT OF YOUR CAREER. GET MORE OUT OF NOW.

How do you get started? Visit www.dell.com/divaa1 or call 1.866.219.2674. Dell and the Dell logo are registered trademarks of Dell Inc. ©2005 Dell Inc. Intel, Intel Inside, the Intel Inside Logo, Intel Centrino and Intel Centrino Logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the United States or other countries. All rights reserved. Dell Inc. cannot be held responsible for errors in typography or photography. Dell is an AA/EO employer. Workforce diversity is an essential part of Dell’s commitment to quality and to the future. We encourage you to apply, whatever your race, gender, color, religion, national origin, age, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, or veteran status.


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Michele Buck

HERSHEY

O

ne of my favorite recruiters calls me a “boot strapper”— someone who pulled herself up by the boot straps. My parents worked for everything they had, and they expected their children to do the same. My mother grew up on a farm with no indoor plumbing, and worked her way through college. My father was the first in his family to finish high school, and joined the military to earn money for a college education. I started working when I was 12, and worked my way through college and graduate school. Earning my MBA was an important milestone. It opened up doors I couldn’t have opened without it. It provided me the opportunity to discover a career that combined my analytic abilities, creativity, and strong interpersonal skills—a career in marketing and brand management. As I worked my way up, I actively sought out a wide variety of assignments to build my skill set. I started marketing high-impulse snacks, then marketed a commodity business, then a high-margin business, and then ran new product development. This wide range of experiences led to my first general manager role wherein I gained valuable knowledge about running a plant; but I learned even more about managing people. The relationships I built with plant employees resulted in the greatest award of my career.

COMPANY:

The Hershey Company

HEADQUARTERS:

Hershey, PA

www.thehersheycompany.com (corporate) www.hersheys.com (consumer) WEBSITE:

BUSINESS/RANKING: Confectionery & snack food products; largest North American manufacturer of chocolate and non-chocolate confectionery products; #3 in the overall snack market 2004 REVENUE:

40

>$4 billion

EMPLOYEES:

~13,000

CUSTOMERS:

>2 million retail outlets in North America

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE:

Senior Vice President, President U.S. Snacks

EDUCATION: Bachelor’s degree: Shippensburg University; MBA: University of North Carolina FIRST JOB: Babysitter at age 12; then worked as a waitress, sales clerk, and bank teller

Always view the glass as half full. This leads to uncovering endless possibilities and finding solutions you wouldn’t have otherwise. PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY:

Husband; daughter (7); son (5)

INTERESTS:

Beach vacations; jogging; kids’ school

activities

When I left, I received a plaque embroidered by the wife of a union employee in a frame made by the shop mechanics, reading: “Our Loss is Their Gain.” Five key philosophies have guided my career. First, “fit is everything.” Work for a company that shares your values and values your strengths, and you will be a star. Second, take personal ownership of managing your career by seeking out the experiences you need to build yourself into a great business person. Third, know yourself well. Recognize your strengths; hire people who complement your skill set. Fourth, start each assignment thinking “how will I make my mark?” Fifth, do what you love—your passion will be contagious. Balancing a full-time job and a full-time family is hard work. Some days will be all about work, others more about family. Every day, make the best decisions you can for that day.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Marcia L. Bullard GANNETT (USA WEEKEND)

I

’m lucky to have started in the business when I did. A lot of doors were opening for women in the mid-1970s. I benefited from that, and had the good fortune to work for a company and for people who were willing to take some chances on me. If you’re looking for “success,” personally or professionally, there is no substitute for hard work and good luck. We can’t control the luck part. But it is necessary—first and always—to pay attention to the current task and to do the very best you can. Be selfaware: understand what your strengths are, and what they are not. Then plunge ahead, and speak up as you go. Speak up to let your managers hear about your accomplishments. Speak up if you see unfairness in promotions or pay. Offer solutions to the problems you see. Stay positive, and be part of the solution. All of us have influence, whether we’re high or low on the food chain. It’s important to use that influence to make the kinds of changes we believe are right. In deciding what I want to influence, I think back to what it was like when I was a young reporter and editor. I remember what it felt like to learn that I wasn’t paid as much as my male colleagues. What it felt like to be too timid to speak up in a story meeting. How exciting it felt to get a promotion, or to get an assignment that was a reach. So, those are the points that I

COMPANY:

Gannett Co., Inc. (USA Weekend)

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

McLean, VA

www.usaweekend.com or www.gannett.com

BUSINESS/RANKING: 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

News media; #283 – Fortune 500

$7.4 billion

52,500

Newspapers: 7.6 million circulation; broadcast: 17.9% of the U.S. market CUSTOMERS:

42

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE:

President & CEO – USA Weekend magazine

BS (journalism): Southern Illinois University; MBA: George Washington University

EDUCATION:

Bussing tables at a cafeteria while in high

FIRST JOB:

school READING:

Lincoln (Donald)

PHILOSOPHY:

Begin at once, and do the best you can.

Husband, a newspaper editor; stepdaughter, a talented actress

FAMILY:

Spending time with my nieces and nephews; gardening; travel INTERESTS:

Our magazine started Make A Difference Day, now the largest day of volunteering in the nation. It’s on the 4th Saturday of every October. Join us! FAVORITE CHARITY:

try to influence now. I have an opportunity to help make sure our staffers are paid fairly, whatever their gender or race, and I have a responsibility to do that. I have the opportunity to ask everyone’s opinion at a meeting. I have the opportunity to encourage managers to take chances by hiring and promoting young and diverse staffers. My hope is that we, as managers and executives, will create more diverse and equitable workplaces that play to everyone’s strengths—and that, as a result, more women will stay in their chosen careers, take on more responsibilities, and move into the very top positions. Yours may not be a perfect workplace now, but change can come. That change will be made most wisely and most quickly by those within it. PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Judith E. Campbell

NEW YORK LIFE

L

ife is an adventure. Mine certainly has been. Twenty-five years ago, I was a single mother with three daughters under 10, and I was starting my first corporate job. It was my first big opportunity to take advantage of newly honed skills, as well as a bit of good luck. Now, all these years later, I can ponder on the things that helped me succeed. Perhaps my hindsight can help others. So here goes. Be curious and intrigued about everything, but mostly about how things work. Don’t be afraid to ask questions that can help you gain a greater understanding of why things are the way they are, and don’t be afraid to challenge existing solutions. At the same time, be interested in the details—not to manage them, but to know all the facts before you begin challenging orthodoxy. After you understand how things work, step back and think broadly about solutions to problems and improvements to the existing business or condition. You and your teams don’t need to have 100% of the answers to everything all the time, because perfection is a dream, but excellence is achievable and sustainable. Think expansively about people, especially how their best talents and skills can be used. Get them involved enough to be as intrigued, as curious, and as enthused as you are. This goes for people at all levels of your organization, not just those in your immediate circle. Encourage their creativity and forgive their minor mistakes, which generally aren’t consequential in the long run. Explain straightforwardly what you’re looking for, and then move on. Thank them for their enthusiasm as well as their achievements.

COMPANY:

New York Life Insurance Company

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

New York, NY

www.newyorklife.com

BUSINESS/RANKING: Insurance (life, annuities, & long-term care insurance; institutional asset management; retirement plan services; securities products & services); #68 – Fortune 500; largest mutual life insurance company in the U.S. 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

$10.4 billion (adjusted operating)

United States – 8,225; Int’l – 4,425

SUPPLIERS: Total procurement ~$500 million (~4% with women- and minority-owned businesses)

TITLE:

Senior Vice President & Chief Information Officer

EDUCATION:

BA (history): Chestnut Hill College – Philadelphia

FIRST JOB:

Freelance newspaper reporter

READING:

The Master: A Novel (Toibin)

PHILOSOPHY:

Do unto others as you would have them

do unto you. FAMILY:

Two daughters and three grandchildren

INTERESTS:

Reading; genealogy

Education. Also, I serve on the Board of Trustees of Drew University in Madison, NJ, and Chestnut Hill College in Philadelphia, PA. FAVORITE CHARITY:

Always follow the Golden Rule. Treat others, talk to others, work with others, and lead others as you would like them to do with you. It isn’t a guaranteed formula for success, but it works out far more often than not. Similarly, help those around you any way you can. Give of your time. This keeps you grounded, so you never start to believe your own press. Broaden yourself. Have interests beyond the workplace. Balance is important, and you will learn things that can help you throughout your life. Become an interesting person. For me, reading fiction is a wonderful doorway to knowledge and a world view, but so is traveling or simply meeting new people. Last but not least, take advantage of good luck. I’ve never had a career plan, but I’ve reached out for things that interested me at opportune moments, and I’ve been fortunate to randomly meet some good people along the way who have helped me. With success then comes the responsibility to help someone else. This makes it all worthwhile.

PDJ 44

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Ria Marie Carlson

INGRAM MICRO

I

had the good fortune of being raised by a strong and intelligent mother. Her advice provided comfort and encouragement during my childhood and, surprisingly, guided me well in my career. My mother was a great mentor, so I’ll share her words of wisdom to help others with their careers. Like yourself…but not too much. Mom did a great job of instilling me with self-confidence, but always brought me back down to earth if I got too cocky. This healthy balance has been valuable in the business world. The key is having the confidence to articulate your ideas with strength and clarity, while having the warmth and humor needed to build relationships. Work hard and get good grades. Mom insisted on glowing report cards. As a kid, I thought her expectations were tough, but today I’m glad her standards were high. Grades continue to be part of everyday life. Report cards have changed since fifth grade, but the outcome is the same. Those who perform get rewarded. Learn to play with others. Work is a team sport. Mom taught me that winning is great, but the way we win is more important. Follow the rules; don’t cheat. Listen to your coach. Treat your teammates well. These words ring true when dealing with colleagues today. My leadership philosophy hasn’t changed much

COMPANY:

Ingram Micro Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Santa Ana, CA

www.ingrammicro.com

BUSINESS/RANKING:

World’s largest technology

distributor; #76 – Fortune 500; (marketing programs, outsourced logistics services, technical support, financial services, and product aggregation & distribution) 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES: CUSTOMERS:

46

$25.5 billion

13,600 165,000 in 100 countries

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE: Corporate Vice President, Strategy & Communications EDUCATION: BA (journalism & political science): University of Southern California FIRST JOB: Counter help at a beachfront snack bar; first professional job – television producer READING: Work-related business, news, and professional journals, as well as Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (Rowling) aloud to my daughters. PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Find the passion.

Husband; two daughters (13 and 9)

INTERESTS:

Family and friends; tennis; bicycling

FAVORITE CHARITY: Southern California-based women’s shelter, education foundation, and foster-care organizations; Junior Achievement

since I was captain of the school softball team: find the great talent, utilize their strengths, improve their weaknesses, motivate them, and get out of their way. You can do anything you set your mind to. As a young girl in the 1960s, my early aspirations were of careers considered off-limits to women of the time— astronaut, President of the United States, professional baseball player—but Mom never smirked. Instead she said, “You can do anything you set your mind to.” That gave me the confidence, perhaps fearlessness, to pursue those things that were outside my comfort zone. We all have our own version of “Mom’s Words” to guide our future. My favorite piece of advice, however, is one I found on my own as an adult: find what makes you happy and stick with it. PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Karen L. Carnahan C I N TA S

T

oday, compared to years past, women aspiring to be corporate executives are in a position of opportunity. In a highly competitive global economy, talent supercedes everything. I know we can all agree that America is in no short supply of talented women. That’s great news for women, America, and corporate enterprise. Throughout my 26-year career at Cintas, I’ve been fortunate to be part of a progressive culture that’s transformed a once small, regional laundry into one of Fortune’s “Most Admired” companies. I’m proud to share some of the valuable lessons learned: • Cherish front-line employees. Regardless of your corporate position, spend time with the people in the field who actually do the work. Make it a priority to ride with service or sales representatives, and roll up your sleeves and work in the plant. Understand what it takes to exceed customers’ expectations.

• Diverse experiences will shape your ability to lead others and make executive decisions later in your career. While both are important, education and wisdom are not the same. Through experience, learn the business, build exceptional levels of trust, and gain the wisdom from successful mentors and leaders. Stay positive and focused, and be a great listener.

COMPANY:

Cintas Corporation

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Cincinnati, OH

www.cintas.com

Corporate identity uniform programs; workplace/safety products & services; industry leader; NASDAQ-100 company; component of S&P 500 Index BUSINESS/RANKING:

FY 2005 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES: CUSTOMERS:

48

$3.1 billion

30,000; 350 locations 700,000

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE:

Vice President & Treasurer BSBA: The Ohio State University

EDUCATION:

Arthur Andersen & Co. (auditor/CPA)

FIRST JOB: READING:

Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking

(Gladwell) PHILOSOPHY:

Connect people who care with causes

that matter. FAMILY:

Married 29 years; two sons

INTERESTS:

Youth sports – ice hockey & football

The Community Foundation of West Chester/Liberty, OH

FAVORITE CHARITY:

• Learn the “big picture” early in your career by volunteering for interdepartmental projects. Go for the tough ones, the unpopular ones, the ones that allow you to see how all the pieces fit together to solve problems. Build a broad network. Later in your career, you’ll draw on those experiences and knowledge. You will know where to get valuable information in order to make informed decisions. • Have a sense of humor; never forget how to laugh. All of us face challenges at work and at home, and the work/life balance is never perfectly level. Take the position that obstacles are meant to be opportunities. Stay positive and enjoy what you do. People will be inspired by your professionalism and enthusiasm. The ability to inspire others will carry you far as a leader.

PDJ


Harris (part of BMO Financial Group) is driven by corporate values that foster a diverse workforce and an equitable, supportive workplace in which all employees are given the opportunity to meet their professional goals. At the very heart of Harris’ ongoing initiative towards a fully inclusive workplace is our unwavering commitment to create a high-performance culture for all employees. This determination energizes our company and allows us to reap the benefits of an engaged and diverse workforce. It’s called leading by example. Please complete your online profile and enter your resume information at www.harrisbank.com while reviewing our career opportunities.


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Deborah Stewart Coleman FORD

W

hen I was young, I thought I’d pursue a career that focused on people. I earned two degrees in psychology, and had dreams of becoming a psychologist. Then, one day, I found myself working as an intern at an auto plant—and I loved it! I began to appreciate that all my training and education in the softer, people-focused fields could be expanded to include exciting work in business. The automotive industry is global, male-dominated, complex, and technical. In this environment, working together creatively and effectively with teams of people to develop solutions for improvement has been an invigorating challenge for me. My background and training in psychology are certainly aligned to today’s work environment— maximizing the contributions of many diverse individuals to deliver significant operating results. One of my primary roles as a leader is as a coach or teacher, with a responsibility to serve as mentor and advocate for other employees. At any given time, there are a number of people whom I’m advising and coaching, mostly through two organizations at Ford that are significant to me—the Ford Employee Resource groups: Women in Manufacturing, and the Ford African Ancestry Network. If I have a mantra, it is this: it is the job of today’s leaders to identify and mentor the leaders of tomorrow, to ensure they have both the formal and informal business acumen necessary to succeed. Business today is more complex, global, and competitive than ever. The current environment in the

COMPANY:

Ford Motor Company

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Dearborn, MI

www.ford.com

BUSINESS/RANKING:

Automobile manufacturing;

#2 (year-end 2004) 2004 REVENUE:

~325,000 globally

EMPLOYEES: CUSTOMERS: SUPPLIERS:

$171.6 billion

2004 total market share 19.3%

Spent >$3 billion with over 500 minority

suppliers

50

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE: Vice President, Global Quality – Ford Motor Co. (previously Group Managing Director & CEO, Ford Motor Co. of Southern Africa)

BA (psychology): Southern Illinois University; MA (psychology): Washington University; MBA (international business): Baker College

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: College Graduate-in-Training program, General Motors READING:

John Grisham’s books

It’s important to center your work life on people – teaching, coaching, educating, and challenging people to think differently to resolve complex issues. PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY:

Two daughters

INTERESTS:

Reading; travel; exercise

FAVORITE CHARITY: Continuing work with HIV/AIDS Awareness since returning to the U.S.

industry is challenging, as it requires results-oriented leadership that centers on effective utilization of the talents and skills of many people. While today’s business leaders certainly need excellent technical knowledge, they also must have development of people as a priority, investing the time necessary to teach, coach, and mentor future leaders. Of course, even though my daughters are both adults, I still have plenty of working-mother guilt syndrome: I am constantly seeking that balance between work, family, and friends. But overall, it’s a great life. I may not be working as a psychologist, but I’m still working with people—encouraging them to be the absolute best in whatever they select to be a part of, to think creatively, and to make a positive difference in their business, team, or organization.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Chris Cortez

DAIM L E R CHRYSLE R

B

eing part of a two-career couple has certainly made for some decision-making and geographic challenges, but I try not to see that as an obstacle. I believe that it’s best to steer your career to areas where you have passion, need learning, can contribute—and which you can align with your homelife priorities.

KNOWLEDGE & STRATEGIES

Keep your ego in check. Ego closes you off from honest information and makes you unapproachable. Ego serves well if you personally have all of the answers needed to improve and grow your division. I don’t believe any one person has all the answers, so I try to keep the doors open; that takes having a style that makes people comfortable coming in to say that a direction we are taking isn’t working or that they don’t have the answer to a problem we need solved. MENTORING

TITLE: Senior Vice President, Global Service & Parts – Chrysler Group EDUCATION: BS (marketing): Western Michigan University; MBA: Wayne State University FIRST JOB:

Management trainee at Chrysler in 1976

When you’re in a mature industry, you still need to be a change agent. It's a constant battle with those who say “that's just always been done that way.” The people who succeed the most are the ones who are able to break through. PHILOSOPHY:

We live on a lake, and boating is my favorite thing to do. I kayak a bit, and on a nice Friday night, four couples go out on what we call the “boat cruise,” sit on a pontoon in the middle of the lake, and eat munchies and drink wine. On a Saturday or Sunday afternoon, you will usually find me floating on an air mattress in the middle of the bay with a good book and a glass of red wine. Any place to do with water is where I am. INTERESTS:

It’s very satisfying to be at a stage where you can give something back to someone coming up behind you, and mentoring is one of the most energizing things you can do. The key to mentoring is to avoid a supervisory role. A mentor is not there to fix the person’s issues. The mentor’s role is to open up the horizon … to let the person see options that they might not see. It’s also a role that requires honesty. Tiptoeing doesn’t help anyone. The mentor can point out weaknesses and suggest outcomes or solutions.

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Children’s Literacy Program

CAREER PATH

I joined the company within sales and marketing, COMPANY:

DaimlerChrysler Corporation

HEADQUARTERS (DUAL):

Stuttgart, Germany &

Auburn Hills, MI WEBSITE:

www.daimlerchrysler.com

Automobile research, design, development, engineering, manufacturing, & marketing; world's fifth largest automaker

BUSINESS/RANKING:

CUSTOMERS/2004 REVENUE:

2.7 million vehicles

sold worldwide

52

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

specifically Mopar Parts Division, where I am now. My career was spent in the controller’s function, a path that moved me all around the company because our finance teams are “embedded” within the operating functions they serve. It was great peeking over the shoulder of every function in a way that you can’t do easily from just one area. I moved back into sales and marketing about eight years ago and have headed our Fleet/Commercial Sales Division and now Global Service and Parts—positions that gave me profit and loss responsibility and a most satisfying challenge.

PDJ


a new way People in every corner of the world are changing the way they work, live, play, and learn. They’re extending the bounds of corporate networks, knowing they are protected wherever they do business—with or without wires. They are bringing school children to the Taj Mahal and Machu Picchu with field trips powered by broadband rather than diesel. And within Cisco, employees are collaborating in new ways with customers, suppliers, and communities across diverse geographies and cultures, thanks to networks that unite voice, video, and data. No matter where you look, these changes have one thing in common. They’re powered by the highly secure, intelligent network we have all built together. The network powered by Cisco. And shared by everyone. Change the way you work at: www.cisco.com/jobs

cisco.com/poweredby ©2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Barbara R. Cowden

S TAT E FA R M

T

hroughout my life I have been fortunate enough to learn from and be inspired by a variety of mentors. As a junior high teacher fresh out of college, I was young, single and completely unsure of myself. A more senior teacher took me under her wing, showed me the ropes, and taught me the subtleties of office politics. Some years later, I joined State Farm as an agent. I was new to the insurance industry and to the corporate world—but, again, a more seasoned veteran took interest in me and offered encouragement, wise counsel, and, sometimes, crucial criticism. Several years ago I became the executive sponsor for State Farm’s Hispanic Employee Resource Group. As I got to know the organization and became familiar with its members, I asked for a volunteer to mentor me and help me better understand the interests of our Hispanic employees, agents, and customers. That relationship continues today and has extended to include mentoring partnerships between many members of our executive leadership and employee resource groups. Currently, I mentor a promising group of men and women from across our company. I consider these relationships an obligation and a privilege of leadership. The people I encounter shape my thinking more than I could ever hope to affect theirs. From them I have learned that mentoring is most successful when approached as a partnership. Switching roles as personal needs dictate is healthy, fulfilling, and enlightening. Reverse mentoring relationships—particularly the partnership with a bright, energetic member of our

COMPANY:

State Farm Insurance Companies

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Bloomington, IL

www.statefarm.com

Insurance; #1 insurer of automobiles in the U.S. since 1942; leading insurer of homes since 1964.

BUSINESS/RANKING:

2004 NET WORTH

$46.3 billion

EMPLOYEES:

69,000 employees; 17,000 agents

CUSTOMERS:

>27 million households & small businesses

SUPPLIERS: 3,700 suppliers across all industries, product lines & services

TITLE:

Executive Vice President

EDUCATION: BS: California Polytechnic University; Master’s degree (business): San Jose State University; Chartered Life Underwriter: The American College FIRST JOB: In high school – worked in the stock room of a retail store; after college – junior high teacher in Santa Clara, CA. READING: For my grandchildren: The Chronicles of Narnia (Lewis); for fun: Finding God in the Land of Narnia (Brunner & Ware); for development: The World is Flat (Friedman) PHILOSOPHY: The environment in which we work affects everything else. Good leaders create a place where we, and the people we work with, want to come and contribute. That’s when the best ideas come and when everyone’s thoughts are valued and appreciated. FAMILY:

Husband; 4 children; 11 grandchildren

INTERESTS:

Gardening; boating; time with family

FAVORITE CHARITY:

United Way; American Diabetes

Association

Hispanic employee group—have allowed me to see the world through different eyes. Her insight and counsel have profoundly affected my leadership style and philosophy. When we sit down together, our differences fall away. Rank doesn’t apply. Nothing is out of bounds. We simply talk. And, in those moments, true exchange takes place. My career has been enriched by the people I have encountered. I am blessed with a collection of relationships that brings me joy, friendship, and support. It is our relationships that heighten performance and make the workplace an engaging place to be. I have learned that relationships make a job into a career, co-workers into a family, and a company into a culture. I’m not sure what happened to that junior high teacher who first took an interest in me. And I’m not sure I remember exactly what we talked about. But what I know for sure is that good leaders are good learners. And none of us can do it alone.

PDJ 54

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Maria Coyne I

KEYBANK

could share hundreds of tips and ‘to dos’ that would help tomorrow’s corporate leaders achieve success in the workplace. But, in my twenty-three year career, there have been four main principles that have guided me in both my professional life and my personal life. In considering the foundation on which to build your success, I offer these suggestions: • HAVE A STRATEGY. It is important to establish parameters for your career path, but be willing to adjust as you go along. Be passionate about what you do and enthusiastic in your approach to work, challenges, and change. Understand where you can make the greatest contribution and stay focused on your goals. • NEVER STOP LEARNING. Continually challenge yourself and seek out new information and fresh thinking. Don’t be afraid to take a few risks. With risk comes change, and that can often mean opportunity. But, always be wise and learn from your mistakes. • ENJOY BALANCE IN YOUR LIFE. Live life with passion—it is a fleeting gift. Make time for your family, for your friends, and for fun. Take care of yourself and take a few minutes each day to just “be.” • ALWAYS CARE. Look to inspire those around you. Look at all the good in the world, and try to give some of it back. Giving your time, talent, and treasures almost always gives you something more

COMPANY:

KeyBank

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Cleveland, OH

www.key.com

BUSINESS:

Bank-based financial services

2004 REVENUE: >$4.4 EMPLOYEES:

56

billion

19,576 full-time-equivalent employees

CUSTOMERS:

2.2 million within Key’s footprint

SUPPLIERS:

8,508

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE:

Executive Vice President, Community Banking University of Notre Dame

EDUCATION:

State Savings & Loan in Euclid, OH

FIRST JOB: READING:

Catherine de Medici: Renaissance Queen

of France (Frieda) PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Give your all to everything you undertake.

Husband, an attorney; two children – a son at

Harvard, and a daughter at Beaumont INTERESTS:

Reading; outdoor activities; opera

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Sociedad Amigos de los Ninos

in Honduras

valuable in return. Make time to volunteer, become a mentor, or sit on the board of your favorite nonprofit organization. I challenge the women who aspire to be our corporate leaders to adopt these ideas into the foundation of their success ‘playbooks’. May you never stop growing and seeking out opportunities to further your development. May you enjoy a balanced and fulfilling life, not forgetting to take time for you. And, may you find reward in caring for all those sharing in your life journey. I wish you great success! PDJ


BellSouth has a strong commitment to the communities we serve. We continually reaffirm that commitment and reinforce our connections to the community by embracing diversity and inclusion— both inside and outside the company.

Connecting to the community with talent, strength and diversity. Through its Office of Diversity, BellSouth supports networking groups that promote mentoring, training, and enhanced opportunity for all employees regardless of age, race, gender, or sexual orientation. These groups volunteer their time and resources to sponsor a wide range of activities and provide new ways in which BellSouth connects to the people we serve. BellSouth is proud of these efforts. Because, no matter how advanced our technology, we know that the strongest, most lasting connections are made within the community, face to face, person to person.

bellsouth.com Š2005 BellSouth Corporation.


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Karel K. Czanderna

WHIRLPOOL

S

uccess means many things to many people, but my definition revolves around tackling interesting challenges, helping people maximize their potential, and having fun—all while delivering results. I firmly believe one of my main responsibilities is to give people opportunities to grow, and to encourage and celebrate with them. Every day I ask myself: “Did I do something today that helped someone grow and develop?” If you think about it, a business doesn’t exist without people, and people are the only appreciating assets. Many people have helped me in my career and given me unimaginable opportunities. I never aspired to a specific title or position, yet with their help I have been fortunate to work in many different functions that have led to general management. For me, the journey has been so interesting—each position has been a learning experience and a chance to make a difference to the business and the people in the organization. The chance to serve customers by providing innovative products and solutions that make their lives easier or better is wonderfully rewarding. I believe we need to “be who we are.” Over the years, I’ve encountered people in the business world who sometimes think that “nice” and “successful” aren’t necessarily a match. But I’ve found that you can be a nice person and still hold people accountable to tough goals. It’s important to be a team player, be fair, and treat people the way you’d want to be treated. You also should make the most of every job— there is something to be learned in every position. Remember that along with your interpersonal skills,

COMPANY:

Whirlpool Corporation

HEADQUARTERS:

Benton Harbor, MI

www.whirlpoolcorp.com & www.kitchenaid.com WEBSITE:

World’s leading manufacturer & marketer of major home appliances INDUSTRY/RANKING:

2004 REVENUE:

$13 billion

EMPLOYEES: 68,000 – with nearly 50 manufacturing & technology research centers worldwide. CUSTOMERS:

58

Consumers in more than 170 countries

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE:

Vice President & General Manager, KitchenAid

Brand EDUCATION: BS (physics): Clarkson University; MS & PhD (materials science & engineering): Cornell University; Executive Education Program: Harvard Business School FIRST JOB: As a teen, I babysat, made and sold candy, and assisted my scientist father with physics experiments. During college, I worked in the chemistry stock room at Clarkson University. READING: Inside Intuit: How the Makers of Quicken Beat Microsoft and Revolutionized an Entire Industry (Taylor, Schroeder & Doerr). I also just read five thrillers while on vacation. PHILOSOPHY:

You can do anything! Learn, grow, deliver,

and give back. FAMILY: Married to my best friend for 20 years. We are concierges for our cat, Millie. INTERESTS: Travel; reading; outdoor activities, especially near mountains or water FAVORITE CHARITY:

Clarkson University

people are looking to see how you, and the teams you lead, perform. It’s results that drive the business. Do what you need to do to deliver results, with high integrity. Just as Rome wasn’t built in a day, neither is a career. You don’t have to do it all … all at the same time. Participate in the things you enjoy outside of work, but know your priorities, and don’t take on more than you can integrate into your working life. I routinely rotate my volunteer activities to maintain the right balance between my family, work, and where I wish to “give back” for all my blessings. Finally, one of my very astute bosses taught me the importance of taking regular vacations—and he made sure to take them by scheduling his weeks off a year in advance. We all need time to refresh in order to do and be our best. For my husband and me, any day on a beach is a good day! PDJ


And then the princess started

Key4Women was created to help make dreams come true for CUSTOMIZED SERVICE ACCESS TO CAPITAL NETWORKING OPPORTUNITIES ONGOING EDUCATION

women business owners everywhere. Big or small, we’re here to help you from day one, or add another chapter to your continuing story. You know, there really is something to be said for that perfect match who helps you get everything you want out of life.

Achieve anything. To learn more about Key4Women, visit www.Key.com/women.

KeyBank is an SBA Preferred Lender.

Member FDIC. ©2005 KeyCorp


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Nance K. Dicciani

HONEYWELL

W

hen you are one of the few females to head a business in a predominantly male chemical industry, it’s not uncommon to be asked about that one person or incident that was crucial to your success. Like many, I had one of those people. It almost sounds cliché, but it was my high school principal. This was back in the time when young women—even those with better-than-average grades and an avid interest in math and science—were either not encouraged or flatly discouraged from thinking of careers in such fields. This teacher did not agree. One day she took me aside and handed me a book entitled, I Dare You! and told me to read it. Her message was simple. I dare you to do what you really want to do, and I dare you to do your best and succeed. • Work hard. • Learn. • Use the talents you were born with and that you have sharpened in school.

President & Chief Executive Officer, Honeywell Specialty Materials TITLE:

BS (chemical engineering): Villanova University; MS (chemical engineering): University of Virginia; PhD (chemical engineering): University of Pennsylvania; MBA: Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: First job ever – bakery sales clerk; first professional job – engineer, Philadelphia Water Department

Churchill: A Biography (Jenkins); Total Recall (Paretsky); Instrument Commercial Manual (Jeppesen)

READING:

• Don’t shrink from risk or adversity. • Tap into your passion for what you do. • Succeed, and have fun. Fortunately, the workplace has come a very long way in pushing out old barriers of gender and race. I believe the forces of economics will continue to demand this. Simply put: competition and the need for top talent is so great that organizations that allow such barriers to remain do so at their own peril.

COMPANY:

Honeywell International.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Morristown, NJ

www.honeywell.com

BUSINESSES:

Specialty materials (the business unit

headed by Dr. Dicciani); aersospace; automation & control solutions; transportation systems; #75 – Fortune 500 2004 REVENUE:

60

$25.6 billion

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

PHILOSOPHY: Never, ever let anyone else put boundaries on what you aspire to or what you can achieve. INTERESTS:

Golf; flying; history; travel

Indeed, there are many business studies now that document that the most successful, innovative companies not only allow diversity, but embrace it by purposely creating diverse work teams. So, when I mentor young women coming up in this business today, I pass on the same message I received. Talent and hard work are still the drivers. Passion for what you do is your fuel. This combination is the best way to achieve success. There will be trade-offs and setbacks throughout a career; but for each of these, there are many more opportunities.

PDJ


FROM YOUR IMAGINATION

TO THE HISTORY BOOKS.

Diverse achievements are the lifeblood of working at Northrop Grumman. So, if you’re craving rigorous, challenging projects that no other company can touch, now you know where to look. Achievement never ends. For current opportunities, please visit our website:

www.careers.northropgrumman.com.

www.careers.northropgrumman.com

Š 2005 Northrop Grumman Corporation. U.S. Citizenship is required for most positions. An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/D/V.


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Dana Drago

THE HARTFORD

“B

e the best you can be—at the job you have today.” I have lived by these words for as long as I can remember. In this fast-paced age, where “to succeed” is synonymous with “being on the fast-track,” many women derail because they are focusing on their next job—on where they want to be—instead of delivering on their current objectives. Once you have successfully delivered in your current role, you are in a better position, and better prepared, to move ahead. “Be the best you can be” has the potential of sounding like trite advice—easily given and maybe easily forgotten. But here are five points that have helped me on my journey to be my best: • ALWAYS ASK FOR FEEDBACK on what you could do better. Contrary to popular belief, people in the workplace are more apt to share positive feedback than constructive criticism. Unless you identify your weaknesses, as well as your strengths, you will never achieve your full potential. Unfortunately, people are hesitant to share negative impressions—the “buts” about a person, I call them. “That was a great presentation,” someone may tell you, leaving off the “but it went on too long.” You may disagree with the feedback, but you have to acknowledge and address the perception that people may have. Make sure you ask for, and learn, the “buts” about yourself. • BE WILLING TO TAKE RISKS. Don’t look at risk as having a negative connotation; rather, see it as a possibility. The successes I am most proud of resulted from taking a variety of jobs that might have been considered a risk because they were only lateral, or not the “right,” career moves. However, these

COMPANY:

The Hartford Financial Services Group, Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Hartford, CT

www.thehartford.com

BUSINESS/RANKING: #88

– Fortune 100

2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

62

Investments; insurance;

$22.7 billion

30,000 worldwide

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE: Executive Vice President, Property & Casualty Field Sales & Service Operations

BA (business administration): University of

EDUCATION:

Mississippi FIRST JOB:

Loan officer

Leadership the Eleanor Roosevelt Way (Gerber). A role model for today's leader—strong yet caring; open to others’ perspectives; stands up to criticism with elegance; overcomes much adversity; humanitarian. READING:

PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Nothing happens by just thinking about it.

Husband and three children

INTERESTS:

Time with family; running

American Heart Association— heart disease is the number 1 killer of men and women.

FAVORITE CHARITY:

changes enhanced my skill set, broadened my perspective, and opened more opportunities. So, go ahead, be risky. • BE OBJECTIVE. Don’t be so emotionally connected to “your” initiative that you refuse to see the opposing view. You will have more success, and garner more respect, when your arguments are fact-based and not emotionally driven. • TAKE CARE OF YOUR TEAM. As much as you’ve been affected by those who’ve mentored you, you must also mentor those who follow. Guide them, give them the support they need, and above all else, listen to them. Don’t be afraid to be their coach. And don’t be afraid to help them to recognize their own “buts.” • HAVE BALANCE IN YOUR LIFE. You know the old saying, “If you want something done, give it to a busy person?” That’s because they’ve learned to balance their priorities. In order to have balance in your life, you must focus only on those things you can control. I actually got better at my job when I had my three children because I spent time more productively. And I make time for myself—I exercise, read, and pray—to clear my mind and get a fresh perspective. Remember, a career should be a long-distance marathon, not a race to the finish.

PDJ


CHEVRON is a registered trademark of Chevron Corporation. The CHEVRON HALLMARK is a trademark of Chevron Corporation.Š 2005 Chevron Corporation. All rights reserved.

A workforce as global as the world itself. At Chevron, we strive to create a diverse workforce, fostering a steady flow of ingenuity. In over 180 countries around the globe, we run our business in a way that respects the unique cultures and communities in which we work. Because the best global approach is a local one. To learn more, visit us at chevron.com.


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Anne Erni

LEHMAN BROTHERS

T

hroughout my life, I have been inspired by mentors whom I have sought for advice and guidance. Even historical figures have inspired me—people like President Jefferson, who once wrote “I am a great believer in luck, and I find the harder I work the more I have of it.” Indeed, it’s the combination of hard work, determination, and luck that contributes to workplace success. As a woman, though, I have learned that my success also relies on another factor: an understanding of the unique qualities that differentiate my leadership style as a woman. I believe we need to develop our own brand of women’s leadership, rather than simply follow male models of success. In my 17 years on Wall Street, successful leaders have often been described in masculine terms: dominant, aggressive, and competitive. Speaking with younger women, I hear success described differently. They want balance in their work and their lives outside of work. They want continued growth, challenging work, emotional balance, and a great boss. These aspirations represent some of the values that women are infusing into the Wall Street culture. Not that it’s easy. As a mom who works outside the home, I’m often torn between my own expectations of what it means to be a good mom and a good leader at work. For the last five years I’ve been working a flexible work schedule, even for some years as a sales person on the trading floor, and I find myself

COMPANY:

Lehman Brothers

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

New York, NY

www.lehman.com

BUSINESS/RANKING:

#94 – Fortune 500; ranked in

FT Global 500 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

$11.6 billion

19,600 (NY, London, Tokyo & 21 countries)

Corporations; governments and municipalities; institutional clients; and high net worth individuals worldwide. CUSTOMERS:

SUPPLIERS: Supplier Diversity Initiative; dedicated full-time supplier diversity manager

64

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE:

Managing Director & Chief Diversity Officer

EDUCATION: BA: The Johns Hopkins University; MA (international relations and economics): Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Advanced International Studies FIRST JOB: Babysitting; working at a local pharmacy; selling cookware door-to-door READING: The Kite Runner (Hosseini) and The Other Boleyn Girl (Gregory) PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Appreciation is the key to happiness.

Husband; daughter (14) and son (7)

INTERESTS:

Cooking; skiing; family time; adventures

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Prep for Prep in New York City

challenged by the stereotypes that some people hold about whether flexibility lends itself to true corporate commitment. But I try to hold firm to what I believe, and know in my heart that I can excel on both fronts. I remember my first job, where my boss told me “Anne, you know you are successful when not everyone likes you.” I thought long and hard on this one. It seemed counter-intuitive as I worked diligently to build consensus on projects I was leading. Ultimately, I realized that I was driven by different motivations than my boss, and yes, I could be successful by building consensus in my own way. Throughout the years I have grown to define success on my own terms. I have joined a chorus of women who represent a new type of leader for Wall Street: a leader who values flexibility, inclusion, consensus, and bringing our full selves to the workplace. I have learned to not try to fit someone else’s mold, but to shape my own.

PDJ


Diverse talents. One goal. Putting people first. At HCA, the decisions our business professionals make affect much more than the bottom line. They save lives. That’s why we are committed to providing them with the technology and resources to stay on the leading edge of healthcare. At HCA, our business is caring. We care about delivering premier healthcare and empowering today’s diverse and talented minds to make it happen. Explore HCA opportunities. Join us, and discover the real meaning of putting people first.

Executive * IT * Financial/Accounting * Health Information Management * HR * Legal

w w w. h c a h e a l t h c a re . c o m BETTERING THE HUMAN CONDITION.

EOE


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Kathleen M. Gainey U.S. ARMY

M

y advice to young women of today is: Mission First, People Always. Do what is right, legally and morally. Treat everyone with respect and dignity. Instill teamwork and values. The mission must get done, but if you take care of people they will do the right thing the first time. Do what’s right, even when no one is looking; then you never have to worry about what you have said or done. Teamwork and values are essential. Look for team players and reward teamwork, not back-stabbing. Expect people to be technically competent but not expert in everything. We all make mistakes; underwrite all honest mistakes, but learn from them. Give credit to those who do the work and publicly recognize them. Ensure everyone has the opportunity to be all they can be. Set people up for success: set the standard, train them, and give them leader’s intent. Train people on what “right” looks like, and enforce it. Mentor them to excel, and counsel those who fall below the standard. Utilize diversity: every person brings a special talent to the table—identify it and leverage it. Ensure people understand how they play a critical role in the success or failure of your organization. Take initiative—you know what to do. Communicate up and down the chain. Listen to what your subordinates tell you, and share it with superiors. Show subordinates you value them by sharing information with them. Get to know people—their dreams and concerns. Once they trust you, they’ll share

COMPANY:

United States Army / Multinational

Forces – Iraq HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

The Pentagon, Washington, DC

www.army.mil or www.iraq.centcom.mil

BUSINESS/RANKING: 2004 BUDGET:

National defense

93.9 billion

484,000 active duty; 331,000 guard; 197,000 reserve; 290,000 civilian EMPLOYEES:

66

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE: Brigadier General: Deputy Chief of Staff, Resources & Sustainment EDUCATION: BA (special education): Old Dominion University; MBA: Babson College FIRST JOB: Platoon Leader, Medium Truck Company, Mannheim, Germany READING: National Security Strategy of the United States; and One Small Step Can Change Your Life: The Kaizen Way (Maurer)

Each job is like a Lego block: you gain skills and knowledge to help with the next job even though you do not know what it will be—all serve as the foundation of success. PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY:

Husband; very supportive family and friends

INTERESTS:

Hiking; antiquing; cross-country skiing

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Special Olympics

concerns and problems with you. Email does not equal communication. Get out from behind the computer: find out what is going on, assess morale, and check motivation levels. Power down to and train subordinates. This way they grow, and you are free to assess and strategize for the future. Mentorship and performance feedback are critical. Put performance feedback in writing and state strengths, areas to work on, and road ahead. Do the best you can do in every job, even those you think are not career enhancing. Don’t be a “yes” person. Disagreement does not mean disrespect. If you do not know something, admit it and seek out the answer. Accentuate the positive and minimize the negative. If you don’t love what you do, find another job. PDJ


We Welcome the World! The rich cultural mix of the communities we serve is constantly changing. We have always responded positively to these neighborhood shifts. Our diversity programs ensure opportunities for people from every background to work together and pursue their potential. The Safeway community of employees, customers and vendors represents a true global spectrum. And as the world keeps changing, so will we. Our doors, as always, remain wide open.

For more information visit www.safeway.com


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Laurene Gallo

BOOZ ALLEN

A

s the eldest of three children, I learned early on that I could lead. When we were young, that meant I could order my brothers around. When I—and they— realized they could gang up on me, I learned the value of leading through persuasion. And when I was older still, my parents taught me that leading meant more than getting people to do what you wanted—it meant making good decisions, being responsible for your actions, and setting good examples. These leadership qualities have served me well throughout my career. I joined Booz Allen Hamilton as a consultant after two years as an intelligence analyst at the National Security Agency. I’ve been very fortunate in my career, but I’ve learned that opportunities are part luck and part what you make of them. At times I’ve been in the right place at the right time—but those are precisely the times that I had to dive in, take on additional responsibilities, and make good decisions. Along the way I learned that knowing the business is important, but not nearly as important as cultivating relationships. One of the hardest things I’ve had to do as a leader was to move on and hand over a business that I’d nurtured from the ground up. But the person I passed it on to did things with it that never crossed my mind—he took it to a new and different level. That taught me a valuable lesson: grooming the next generation and infusing teams and projects with new blood are extremely important. They, in turn, are forced to groom their next generation. It’s what keeps a 90+-year-old firm like Booz Allen thriving.

COMPANY:

Booz Allen Hamilton

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

McLean, VA

www.boozallen.com

BUSINESS/RANKING: Global management consulting; #1 technology consulting firm, #4 strategy consulting firm (Consulting Magazine) 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

$3.3 billion

>16,000 employees on 6 continents

Major international corporations and government clients

CUSTOMERS:

68

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE:

Vice President

BS (journalism): University of Maryland; MA (national security policy): George Washington University EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB:

Intelligence analyst at the National Security

Agency READING:

Brilliance of the Moon (Hearn)

Look for the positive, plan for the challenges, and celebrate the unexpected. PHILOSOPHY:

Beautiful stepdaughter (15); a large and wonderful family – mom and dad, two brothers, in-laws, a slew of nieces and nephews; and one large red dog. FAMILY:

INTERESTS: Hanging with family and friends; traveling with my daughter; reading science fiction; watching cooking shows and failing miserably at emulating their recipes. FAVORITE CHARITY:

American Red Cross; Children's

Hospital

I’ve learned too that, while consensus and collaboration are important, making the most of your firm’s diversity means embracing dissenting opinions—not quieting them. Diversity isn’t about making everyone think alike; it’s about celebrating differences and seeing things in different ways. More ideas and different ideas almost always lead to better ideas. Being a leader doesn’t mean that you have to have the official mandate. It means that you actively participate in making something happen. You don’t have to be the one seen holding the flag—the key is removing yourself from the equation and keeping the focus on what you want to have happen and how to make sure it does.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Mary Anne Gibbons U . S . P O S TA L S E R V I C E

I

was fortunate from the start to have parents—both immigrants and neither of whom had an opportunity even to attend high school—who expected that I as well as my four brothers needed to excel academically, work hard, care about others, stay healthy, tackle life with resilience, and not be afraid to change course. I’ve changed course more than once, beginning with a plan to teach in elementary school, discovering in college that I enjoyed managing and teaching older students more, working in higher education for four years, and finally moving on to pursue a law degree. In the legal profession, I started out as a litigator and eventually moved into management. I pursued each new direction based on what I most enjoyed doing. Along the way, I’ve learned a few important lessons. First, integrity in legal analysis and interactions with people is critical for an attorney. There is also no substitute for excellent legal analysis and writing. Nevertheless, we must always remember that there is the law, and then there are the people who create the legal issues. Success depends on understanding and working effectively with both. Success as a manager also depends on knowing when to delegate and when to be involved personally in a decision. Know your own limits in terms of time, knowledge and influence. Finally, developing a strong, committed, knowledgeable staff is one of the most important things a manager can do—successful staff need challenging work and high expectations,

COMPANY:

United States Postal Service

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Washington, DC

www.usps.gov

BUSINESS/RANKING: Mail and package delivery services and products; #6 – Best Companies for Minorities (Fortune, 2004) 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

~$69 billion

~700,000 career

CUSTOMERS: >7 million daily (~38,000 post offices; 142 million homes, businesses and PO boxes) SUPPLIERS:

70

~25,000

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE:

Senior Vice President & General Counsel

EDUCATION: BA (psychology, education); MA (education); JD FIRST JOB:

Full-time summer babysitter for two children

at age 13. READING: Devil in the White City (Larson); The Majesty of the Law (O’Connor) PHILOSOPHY: Assume the best about people. Be fair with those you interact with. Tackle the issues and resolve them quickly.

Married to an engineer; daughter (6) and son (3); four brothers, one sister, 14 nieces and nephews, and very large extended family. FAMILY:

Family time; travel; baseball; reading; more exercise one day soon.

INTERESTS:

Christian Community Group Homes (serves low-income senior citizens). FAVORITE CHARITY:

information and training, honest performance feedback, recognition, and a supportive, cooperative work environment. Personally, remember that opportunity does not always knock at the most convenient time. I was just returning to work after adopting an infant when I was asked to be the General Counsel of the second largest employer in the United States, and my husband and I adopted a second small child a few years later. Knowing my limits, having a supportive boss—and the Postmaster General is absolutely the best in terms of family/work balance—using my time efficiently, keeping a good home/work balance, and having a terrific staff (and husband) have been crucial to my success. PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Kimberly S. Gray

HIGHMARK

A

lthough each woman seeking to advance her career needs to know her personal environment (her goals, desires, talents, strengths, frustrations, challenges, and fears), there are a few “truths” that have worked for me that might also work for other women seeking to progress as leaders in the corporate world. • Think proactively, visualize the larger picture, and envision the end result. Don’t wait for problems to appear before seeking a solution, but rather anticipate what you might do to forestall a problem. More than just embracing change, create change when it will support your corporate mission.

• Don’t fear risks, but be willing to be the decision maker and to accept accountability for your actions. Gather all the needed facts; analyze those facts, risks, and benefits; and choose the path. If you take a risk and you fail, you’ll still be learning. If you take a risk and succeed, you and your company will both win. • Maintain positive relationships with co-workers by treating them with courtesy, dignity and respect. Treat them as you wish to be treated—and then some. Go the extra mile to help others achieve their goals, and allow others to help you. Allowing others to help us is sometimes difficult because, as business women, we tend to feel as though we must be superhuman. But by allowing others to help, you ultimately empower them. • Hire good people, and then trust them to do their jobs. My staff members thrive enthusiastically and creatively when I allow them to bring their unique COMPANY:

Highmark Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Pittsburgh, PA

www.highmark.com

Health insurance and employee benefits (licensee of Blue Cross Blue Shield)

BUSINESS/RANKING:

2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

10,403

CUSTOMERS: SUPPLIERS:

$9.1 billion

24.5 million

TITLE:

Chief Privacy Officer

BA (summa cum laude): Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania; JD: The Dickinson School of Law

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB:

Community hospital records clerk

Case Histories (Atkinson); Golf Rules Plain & Simple (Russell)

READING:

PHILOSOPHY: Decide each morning that you’re going to have a good day, and then live it. FAMILY:

Single

Foreign languages and cultures; travel; wine; music; sports INTERESTS:

No one in particular, but give to where the greatest needs are.

FAVORITE CHARITY:

perspectives to the table, and the corporation and I both benefit from their diverse views. I believe in allowing them appropriate autonomy, knowing they will come to me when they need advice or a helpful ear. When staff members perform well, reward them. While we likely all work for personal satisfaction, we also like to be appreciated by others. Don’t be shy about giving compliments, and don’t forget to say “thank you.” • Suggesting we need balance in our lives might sound trite, but life has taught me that as women in business we sometimes try so hard that we work ourselves to death. We shouldn’t equate overwork with success, and we should recognize that there are “real” deadlines and constraints and there are self-imposed deadlines and constraints. Learn to know the difference, and allow for some flexibility with those that are self-imposed.

PDJ

116 minority- and female-owned businesses Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2005

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W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Cathy D. Green

FOOD LION

M

ost people would describe me as genuine, spirited, and enthusiastic. Helping others achieve their potential is paramount to me, and I make a concerted effort to connect with and make a difference in people’s lives and careers. One of the most rewarding things for me as a leader is the ability to unleash the best in people. I define leadership as the ability to explore possibilities and turn them into reality with velocity. There are four very critical components of this: creating fellowship; inspiring others; executing with excellence; and coaching and developing people. That ability to coach is core to who I am. Having great mentors, taking risks, and gaining cross-functional experience have all contributed to my success:

Chief Operating Officer

Bachelor’s degrees (management; marketing): University of Maine; completed coursework in Strategic Retail Management: College of William and Mary

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: At age 14, I started my own lawn mowing business: “Clippings by Cathy” READING:

Winning (Welch)

• Role models and leaders with varying styles provide an opportunity to assimilate the best qualities of each and apply them into your own unique style of leading.

PHILOSOPHY: Strike a harmonious balance between home and work. I give my utmost to both. I know my ultimate legacy lies with my children and the impact I have on them.

• To succeed, you cannot be afraid to take risks. Failure is not an option. With risk comes growth and learning.

FAMILY:

• Finally, cross-functional experience provides opportunities to learn about different parts of the organization and understand how they interrelate and function. Being successful in today’s world is not without its challenges. Probably the most difficult challenge for both men and women is to maintain work/life balance. We struggle with time away from home and spending quality time with our families. It’s critical to recognize the importance of finding balance.

Food Lion, LLC (subsidiary: Delhaize America)

COMPANY:

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Salisbury, NC

www.foodlion.com

BUSINESS/RANKING: Retail grocery chain; Delhaize America #10 in U.S. grocery sales (Supermarket News) 2004 REVENUE:

CUSTOMERS: SUPPLIERS:

$15.8 billion (Delhaize America)

~70,000 (Food Lion)

EMPLOYEES:

72

TITLE:

~10 million/week (Food Lion)

~7,400 (Food Lion)

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

Husband; two daughters

INTERESTS: Spending time with my two girls; reading; photography; golf FAVORITE CHARITY:

Living Hope Adoption Agency

A second challenge for women is recognizing that we don’t have to do everything on our own. We need to leverage our resources, be open to information and learning —and again, not be afraid to take risks. We also need to integrate our personal experiences into our organization’s strategy. For example, the retail supermarket industry is changing. Seventy-two percent of our customers are women, and more and more of our gender are assuming leadership roles. Imagine the possibilities! My advice is to be willing to learn something new every day, be overt in seeking out role models, and reach out to others unselfishly. Don’t underestimate the value of creating relationships with customers, peers, and people with whom you work closely. Never be afraid to try something new. It’s important that people make a mark and put their name on something they’ve created. Finally, be comfortable with who you are; and even as a professional, never forget to have fun.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Sandra L. Hanington HARRIS (BMO)

I

have found that the mentoring relationships that I have with others are colored by the approach that I’ve taken with my own career. It’s a bit of a cliché, but I really do thrive on challenge—I made many of my life’s choices based on maximizing the degree of difficulty. This included spending a year as an exchange student in South Africa in the late ’70s; taking engineering at the University of Waterloo (in Canada); doing my MBA part-time while working and starting my family; and taking individual career opportunities—including my current role which involved uprooting my husband and children from Toronto and moving to the Chicago area. When mentoring others, I look for individuals who have the aptitude for career progression, but who also have a great attitude. I often talk to employees throughout the organization about their career aspirations, potential career paths, and areas of interest within the organization—whether in my group or beyond. Although everyone I spend time with is different, of course, my overall advice is consistent: Find a path that challenges you, but also look for opportunities to make a significant contribution to the organization. From that combination you can get dynamic results, including personal growth, recognition, and satisfaction. I’m often asked about how I maintain a balance between my family and my work. For me, this involves the ability to focus 100% on my family when I’m at home, and 100% on my work when I’m at the

COMPANY:

BMO Financial Group (Harris)

HEADQUARTERS:

www.harrisbank.com

BUSINESS/RANKING: Financial services: banking, lending, investing/management 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

$61.2 billion

~7,000

CUSTOMERS: >1.5 million personal, business, corporate & institutional clients

74

EDUCATION: Bachelor of Applied Science (licensed professional engineer): University of Waterloo; MBA: University of Toronto.

Working and living on a uranium mine/mill in N. Ontario as a student engineer. FIRST JOB:

I read a lot and always have several books on the go, currently: Gilead (Robinson), Blink (Gladwell), and The Memory of Running (McLarty). READING:

PHILOSOPHY: Live life to your absolute best ability – aspire to greatness, whatever that means for you, but also make sure you enjoy the journey.

For stress management, I try to stay physically active. I really enjoy running and ran a marathon a few years ago. INTERESTS:

FAMILY:

Husband; daughter (10); two sons (12 and 14)

Toronto, Canada (BMO) /

Chicago, IL (Harris) WEBSITE:

TITLE: Executive Vice President, Marketing & Customer Strategies – Harris (part of BMO Financial Group)

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

office. I try not to bring the office home with me. I have also learned the importance of creating and using a support network—be it a spouse/significant other, a nanny, or a friend. Above all, the most important element is that I have to love what I do. The good news is that—because of the bank’s culture, people, and strategy—I do.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Katherine J. Harless VERIZON

M

y father always said, “Kathy, just tell me what you’re going to do and then do it.” His words and actions demonstrated commitment and accountability. I expect that from myself—and everyone who works with me. That’s the power my dad had as a mentor. He and my mother insisted I go to college, which I might not have done on my own. As a finance major, I was often the only woman in class, preparing me well for the male-dominated telecommunications business. I turned down offers from Big 8 accounting firms to move home to San Angelo, TX, to get married. When I joined GTE there, I encountered my most influential professional mentor. Because my boss believed employees needed broad perspective, he reassigned us to new positions every 18 months. That helped me develop skills and insights for my own career, and shaped my philosophy for selecting and developing people. I also learned to embrace change, to get quickly up to speed on new areas of the business, and to produce results. I moved functionally, physically, and organizationally in field and headquarters finance assignments, and then stretched with assignments in consumer and enterprise sales and process re-engineering. When I left my native Texas for headquarters in Connecticut, I viewed it as “getting my corporate ticket punched.” It was the best move I ever made, because of the people there who mentored me and influenced my career. That background—plus a reputation for directness, tenacity and meeting commitments—led me to three assignments running vastly different businesses: our

COMPANY:

Verizon

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

New York, NY

www.verizon.com

BUSINESS/RANKING:

Telecommunications;

#14 – Fortune 50 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

7,400

CUSTOMERS: SUPPLIERS:

$3.6 billion

1.1 million yellow pages advertisers

TITLE:

President – Verizon Information Services

EDUCATION:

BA (accounting): University of Texas

at Austin FIRST JOB: Secretary to the finance director at the San Angelo (TX) Independent School District

Today, my “in” box, which is

WHAT I’M READING:

generally overflowing! PHILOSOPHY: Personal integrity—in other words, “say what you’re going to do, and then do it!” FAMILY:

Husband; three sons; three grandsons

INTERESTS:

Fishing (bass or catfish)

FAVORITE CHARITY:

University of Texas Foundation

Texas/New Mexico telephone operations (regulated, unionized and structured); GTE Airfone (small and entrepreneurial); and Verizon Information Services (nationwide, competitive print and Internet advertising business going through transformation). Throughout my career, I’ve learned some important lessons: • Honor those who paved your path. Although you may change everything, remember that most of their decisions were right for the time. • Like your job and respect your boss; if you don’t, move on. • Manage by fact; anecdotes shouldn’t be the basis for decisions that affect your company, customers—or employees. • Being a change agent is the top leadership task. It requires facts, follow-through, and helping people see what’s in it for them. • And, most important, my daddy’s motto: “Say what you’re going to do, and do it.”

4,500

PDJ Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2005

75


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Glenda A. Hatchett

HCA

W

inston Churchill once said, “The price of greatness is responsibility.” For me, personal responsibility has always translated to professional success. As women, we must strive to preserve ourselves, our essence, even as we navigate the sometimes rough waters of the business world. There are ten personal commandments that have served me well over the years as I climbed the corporate ladder; but more importantly, they strengthened me as a woman and a citizen of the world. • Be clear about who you are. Embrace yourself, to whom you belong, and what your values are.

TITLE:

Judge; Board of Directors, HCA

BA: Mount Holyoke College; JD: Emory University School of Law EDUCATION:

• Nothing is important enough to lie about. Speak truth to power. Your integrity and reputation are invaluable—carefully guard them. • Be consistent. Say what you mean. People may not agree with me, but they never have to guess about my position. I do not change positions with the wind, and I do not change to be politically expedient. I have passed on offers because they were not consistent with my values. • You can’t lead where you are not willing to go. Simply put, be decisive and lead by example. • Get a life and keep it. This is immensely important. Love, live, and laugh. I cannot stress enough the importance of balance and wholeness. • It is not about just you. Find people to mentor and nurture, and in the process, you will grow enormously. COMPANY:

HCA, Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Nashville, TN

www.hcahealthcare.com

BUSINESS/RANKING: 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES: CUSTOMERS:

Healthcare; #80 (fortune.com)

$23.5 billion

~190,000 1.6 million patients

SUPPLIERS/CONTRACTORS: >1,100 members (>$100 million with minority- and women-owned businesses)

76

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

Clerk to the Hon. Horace T. Ward, U.S. Federal District Court, Southern District, Georgia FIRST JOB:

READING:

Cracking the Millionaire Code (Allen and

Hansen) From those to whom much is given, much shall be required. PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY:

Two sons

INTERESTS: CHARITY:

Family advocacy

CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates)

• Mentoring relationships must be reciprocal. What have you done for your mentors? You must give to get. • Love it or leave it. If you cannot find joy and satisfaction in your work, find a new path—period. • Value all people. Look for the best in everyone even in the darkest times. And last… • Try not to date turkeys, and whatever you do, do not marry one. A spouse who is insecure and does not believe in your dreams is a distraction, to say the least. As you journey through your career, you will learn that the professional is often personal. I hope these personal commandments will inspire you as you climb.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Kathy J. Herbert

ALBERTSON’S

M

y career has been an incredible journey that has taken me through a series of twists and turns—from a cashier to a store manager, from the supermarket to the corporate office, from Chicago to Boise. I have enjoyed every job I’ve been asked to do … and have appreciated the opportunities to advance my career and achieve my goals. But, above all, I relish the fact that I have constantly been in a position to learn. Lifelong learning is my passion. I believe that there are many qualities of great leaders, but none as important as having an insatiable appetite for continuing to learn. My message to the next generation of leaders is to always stay current with best practices, new studies, and research related to your profession. It’s critical to understand the trends, challenges, and issues that shape your industry … and it’s imperative to be knowledgeable about every aspect of your company so that you are able to help influence decisions and drive results. Leaders in human resources and finance should understand merchandising and marketing; leaders in information technology should know about operations. Effective leaders always see the world without boundaries, reach out for new information, ask probing questions, resist the status quo, and insist on a better way. I have been proud that I am a product of both “street smarts” and “book smarts.” While I earned an advanced degree, I spent hours throwing freight, writing labor schedules, and sorting produce. The combination of what I learned both at school and on

COMPANY:

Albertson’s Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Boise, ID

www.albertsons.com

BUSINESS/RANKING:

Food and drug retailer;

~2,500 stores in 37 states; #35 – Fortune 500 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

78

$40 billion

240,000

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE:

Executive Vice President, Human Resources

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

MBA: Lake Forest School of Management

Babysitting

Saturday (McEwan) and Confronting Reality (Bossidy and Charan)

READING:

PHILOSOPHY: God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference. FAMILY:

Married

INTERESTS:

Interior decorating; horses; cross-country

skiing FAVORITE CHARITY:

United Way

the job is invaluable to me today. I am better equipped to make smarter decisions because of my broad perspective of people and business. Additionally, much of my learning comes from other great leaders—people who invested their time showing me the ropes, sharing their experiences, and letting me learn from my own mistakes. As a tribute to them, I constantly look for opportunities to coach and mentor new leaders … giving back to others who will make a difference. One of my favorite quotes is from Abigail Adams: “Learning is not attained by chance. It must be sought for with ardor and attended to with diligence.” Her words are from 1780 … but they still strike a chord with me today. Learning is a privilege, and great leaders never lose sight of that. My hope for tomorrow’s leaders is that they enjoy a passion for learning that will take them to even greater heights.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Marillyn A. Hewson

LOCKHEED MARTIN

I

’ve always believed that success depends largely on managing your own professional growth, being willing to take risks, and staying open to new ideas. My dad died when I was nine, leaving my mother with five young children. Self-reliance and taking responsibility were traits I had to learn very early in life. I’ve learned through the years that successful performance hinges on our ability to integrate what we’ve learned and apply the relevant skills and knowledge to any situation; hence, the more experiences and challenges we have, the better we become. My philosophy has always been to perform on today’s job and go for the learning experience; then opportunities for growth and development will follow—even if it means moving to another geographic location or out of your comfort zone, which is much more difficult. It’s beneficial to have several informal mentors throughout your career. A good way to gain insight from someone you admire and respect, without asking them to commit to a full-time mentoring role, is to seek out occasional input on difficult projects or issues you may be working. For example, approach a senior member of your organization with, “I have an issue that I would like to discuss with you. I’m thinking of doing XYZ, and would like to know what you think, to see if I’m on the right track.” Just remember, it’s important that you have a solution to the problem pre-defined, so you won’t appear to be asking your mentor to solve the problem for you.

COMPANY:

Lockheed Martin

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Bethesda, MD

www.lockheedmartin.com

BUSINESS/RANKING: Aerospace & defense; #1 U.S. Department of Defense contractor 2004 REVENUE:

$35.5 billion

135,000

EMPLOYEES:

Growth markets in defense, homeland security, and systems/government information technology

CUSTOMERS:

SUPPLIERS:

Leading technology firms worldwide

TITLE:

President – Kelly Aviation Center, L.P. (Lockheed

Martin) BS (commerce and business administration), MA (economics): University of Alabama; Columbia Business School Executive Development Program

EDUCATION:

Economist, Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor FIRST JOB:

Blink (Gladwell): a book on trusting your “gut feeling” in decision-making and how to sharpen your rapid cognition skills.

READING:

PHILOSOPHY: Perform at your best on today’s job, go for the experience, and the opportunities will follow. FAMILY:

Husband; two boys (16 and 13)

INTERESTS:

Family time; golf; travel; reading

FAVORITE CHARITY: The Women’s Legacy (focused on early childhood care/education, preventing child abuse/ neglect, and helping women achieve economic security)

No matter what your skills and experience, another key attribute to success is the ability to work well with all levels of people. You may be the smartest person in the room, but if you can’t get along with others, you will not succeed. Bottom line is, do your best and don’t set limits on what you think you can do. Be flexible. Be willing to seek out new projects. Learn something new, and step out of your comfort zone. And one of the best things you can do for yourself is to learn to forgive yourself for not knowing all the answers when you’re knee-deep in new territory. PDJ Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2005

79


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Kathryn Hill

CISCO

I

’m very fortunate to have had a great career, good luck, and great co-workers. Management coaches tell you that, for a successful career, you must: work hard and smart; be persistent and resilient; and work to make an impact. After more than 25 years of professional work, I believe a few additional pieces of advice served me well. A key success factor for me has been an ability to see myself with clear vision. Self-awareness is something that I learned when my first manager told me I was about to be fired due to a bad attitude. I was completely surprised by his assessment, and desperately wanted to keep the job. So I did some soul searching, realized he was right, and made the necessary changes. Self-awareness has proven to be a foundational element of my work life. I’ve worked for several great companies and great leaders. The most rewarding experience I had was working for a leader who believed in my capabilities and was willing to give me honest and insightful feedback on my performance. I was given an opportunity to take on a new challenge when I became a general manager. I applied myself to the job, using my experience, skill, and dedication to achieve success. But the most successful aspects of the job were the personal changes that I made based on the feedback of my manager. Being in a senior position with significant responsibility is a great learning ground. You make decisions that have impact, and you deal with problems daily. Having a manager who is willing to provide honest and frequent feedback, in a supportive manner, has

COMPANY:

Cisco Systems, Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

San Jose, CA

www.cisco.com

BUSINESS/RANKING: 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

80

Networking

$22 billion

35,000 (worldwide)

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE:

SVP/GM, Ethernet & Wireless Technology Group

EDUCATION:

BS (math): Rochester Institute of

Technology McDonald’s; 1st professional job – software engineer programming railroad equipment for automated train control. FIRST JOB:

READING: Several books including fiction, poetry, and business; several newspapers daily via the Internet. PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Do the right thing.

Single

INTERESTS: Travel to all parts of the world and keeping current with world news. FAVORITE CHARITY:

No one favorite—there are many

doing great work.

made it possible for me to learn, adjust, and ultimately succeed. I’ve also had my share of difficult situations, partly due to my own level of maturity or to differences in management styles. One manager I worked for was highly successful and very smart, but his style differed significantly from mine. I struggled to succeed in the environment for some time, but eventually assessed the situation as a misfit and moved on. Many styles are successful, but not every style can be made to work for you. Clearly assess your skills, work with a team compatible with your management style, and be willing to change when things aren’t working. Applying these ideas, in addition to working hard and smart, has given me a very rewarding career. PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Linda P. Hudson

G E N E R A L DY N A M I C S

T

hroughout my career, I have developed a personal philosophy of what it means to be a leader. As a woman in a male-dominated field, I have come to believe that leadership traits are gender neutral, and that the required attributes evolve as circumstances and organizations change. Leadership is a concept difficult to define, but you know it when you see it. From my experience, an effective leader must inspire people, establish a sense of direction, create change, and anticipate customer needs while effectively balancing her personal and professional lives. In addition to these responsibilities, a leader helps find the right lens and the right perspective. It is the leader’s job to find the next right answer and make the tough decisions to get there. But above all, leaders are passionate and committed to what they do. Leadership doesn’t just happen while you are at work; it’s a 24/7 state of being. Over the years, I’ve had the opportunity to meet several great leaders. While the list of attributes they share is long, four critical traits stand out above the rest: • HONESTY – Nothing is more important than personal integrity and ethical behavior. I’m not talking just about what is legal, I’m talking about what is right. You never get a second chance to be trusted and respected. • PASSION – Be passionate about everything you do. You should play as hard as you work, and you should have fun at both. In my experience, the most successful business people have incredibly

COMPANY:

General Dynamics Corporation

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Falls Church, VA

www.generaldynamics.com

BUSINESS/RANKING:

4th largest U.S. defense

contractor REVENUE:

$19.2 billion

EMPLOYEES:

82

70,800

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE: President – General Dynamics Armament & Technical Products EDUCATION: BS (systems engineering; with honors): University of Florida FIRST JOB:

Research and development engineer, Harris

Corporation READING: The World is Flat (Friedman) and Freakonomics (Levitt and Dubner) PHILOSOPHY: The challenge is that we all must be everyday leaders inspiring everyday creativity, leading by example, and taking the time to win the hearts and minds of those who work for us. FAMILY:

daughter; son-in-law; granddaughters (6 and 1)

INTERESTS: Yoga; International Women’s Forum; adventure travel; reading; gourmet cooking FAVORITE CHARITY:

The United Way; YMCA

interesting personal lives. They are often well traveled, well read, have exciting hobbies and interests, and are generous with their time and money. • EXCELLENCE – Hold yourself and your people accountable to a high standard of performance. Lead by example, and never ask your employees to work harder than you are willing to work yourself. • FLEXIBILITY – Be flexible, open minded, and cooperative … no matter what! Embrace change and uncertainty. Continue to brutally reassess everything, be proactive, and act quickly to adapt to the changing marketplace. These four traits are critical components of my leadership philosophy; they continue to prove valuable and relevant. As you develop into the leaders of tomorrow, I encourage you to consider how these traits relate to you and your vision of leadership. PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Denise Kaigler

REEBOK

I

am often asked how I rose through the ranks at Reebok, one of the country’s most well known corporate success stories. My career path from an entry-level PR job to my current executive-level position was fueled by my need to make a difference, and do it with integrity, intellect and insight. My work ethic has never been compromised. From my first day, I have arrived to work energized, committed to doing my best, and ready for anything. I was willing to do the task no one else wanted to do. I ran when others walked. I smiled when others whined. I saw opportunities to learn when others saw obstacles. And I was, and am, never willing to sacrifice my integrity. Ever. Here are three pieces of career advice I’d like to share: • DON’T BE AFRAID TO MOVE OUTSIDE your comfort zone and learn something new. Embrace such opportunity with enthusiasm. Although I have always held some type of communications position, I have never held the same type of job longer than 18 months. I am constantly reinventing myself, or accepting new challenges to reinvent the ways in which the job’s functions are performed.

• STAY FOCUSED on delivering quality results. A gallant effort without results doesn’t move the needle, for the company or for me. A solid effort with strong and positive results is something that will benefit the company and my career. • HAVE FUN and keep it all in perspective. As much as I love my job, I am committed to maintaining a vibrant and healthy attitude and lifestyle. A caring COMPANY:

Reebok International Ltd.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Canton, MA

www.reebok.com

BUSINESS/RANKING:

Footwear/apparel/equipment;

#3 in international sales 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

$3.8 billion

~9,000 (worldwide)

TITLE:

Senior Vice President & Chief Communications

Officer EDUCATION:

McDonald’s in Laurel, MD

FIRST JOB: READING:

BA: Emerson College

The Big Bad Wolf (Patterson)

Set goals. Dream. And when you achieve those goals and dreams, do it again and keep setting them. PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY:

Husband (19 years); daughter (13) and son (10)

Reading; traveling; movies; being with family and friends

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Sportsmen’s Tennis Club

circle of family, friends, colleagues, and mentors combined with a healthy sense of humor serve as my life’s foundation. As a black woman, I have faced many career challenges. However, I have never used gender or race as an excuse to fail. I view both as a beacon of light. In most situations, I stand out. Over the years, I’ve learned to use those situations to have my voice heard and my ideas seen. That has been of great benefit to me as I have traveled the path to my executive suite.

PDJ

Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2005

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W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Carolyn L. Kolesar

SODEXHO

M

y parents were missionaries, and I spent most of my youth living in Congo/Zaire, Africa. That experience taught me many valuable lessons including the importance of self initiative, risk taking, and hard work. One could say that I developed my passion for the food business at the age of 7, working kitchen duty in the boarding school I attended. I continued working kitchen duty to put myself through college, and afterward began my professional career in the food and facilities management business. My experience has taken me through all levels within the business and both sides of six acquisitions. I’ve had a wonderful and exciting career and had the opportunity to work with, learn from, and mentor many individuals who now have very successful careers. There are three areas of advice that I would offer to individuals as they set about growing their careers. • BE A LEADER. In everything that I’ve done, both personally and professionally, I’ve set a goal and gone after it. Don’t wait for someone else to direct you or tell you what to do—just do it. When you have a new idea or process, try it. Of course, equally important to leadership are patience and persistence. There may be times when you will have an idea that is so far ahead of its time that others may not be ready to accept and act on it. With patience and persistence you will prevail. • TAKE RISKS! Taking a risk involves acting when you may not necessarily have all of the facts on

COMPANY:

Sodexho

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Gaithersburg, MD

www.SodexhoUSA.com

BUSINESS/RANKING: Leading provider of outsourced food and facilities management services in North America. 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

$5 billion

110,000

CUSTOMERS: >6,000 corporations, schools, health care facilities, college campuses; U.S. Marine Corps

84

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE: Executive Vice President – Sodexho Health Care Services EDUCATION: BS (food, nutrition & institutional administration): Oklahoma State University FIRST JOB: At the age of 7 – kitchen duty in boarding school; management – unit manager at Oklahoma State University READING:

Good to Great (Collins)

PHILOSOPHY: Connect with everyone that you come in contact with, at all levels from an hourly employee to the CEO, and do something that will bring value to them as a person. FAMILY:

Married; two children

INTERESTS:

Gardening

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Crystal Cathedral; the Sodexho

Foundation

possible outcomes. But if you wait to act until you have all the information, it may be too late. It is equally important that when you do take a risk you hold yourself accountable for the outcome, whatever it may be. Mistakes are an inherent part of risk taking, but the learning that comes from those mistakes is invaluable. Learn from your mistakes and move on, being careful not to make the same mistake twice. • MAKE A CONNECTION with the people around you in everything you do. From the lowest level employee to the most senior executive, know that you have value to offer that person. Be real and open with the people you work with, and the rewards will pay off tenfold.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Marise Fernandes Kumar WHIRLPOOL

P

utting the consumer first has been the underlying theme of my career. I’m fascinated by what drives the consumer proposition and all that is required to sustain it. As a business and marketing professional, I’ve gained experience in each job that has prepared me for the next challenge. One of my early roles was in a market research organization, where I gained great insight into what it takes to generate consumer passion for a product. All too often, we stop at what is possible to achieve rather than going that extra mile to delight the consumer. My strong consumer lens has enabled me to launch and revitalize consumer businesses across different markets and countries. I have worked in foods, cosmetics, and appliances—throughout Asia and the United States. Today I guide the customer loyalty plans for Whirlpool globally. The misconception that you have to be toughminded to excel in the harsh world of business is gradually being replaced with the notion that work can be a rewarding extension of your life. These days, you can be most effective by bringing “yourself” to work. Business is about relationships and empowering people to do their best work. I gain the most as a professional and a person by challenging people and helping them to unlock their hidden talents. By creating emotional connections with people, I try to promote a culture where trust and mutual respect are achieved and teamwork flourishes. Work/life balance has been a challenge because I’ve always worked long hours and often traveled for weeks at a time; but my family is important and always

COMPANY:

Whirlpool Corporation

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Benton Harbor, MI

www.whirlpoolcorp.com

BUSINESS/RANKING: Manufacturer and marketer of major home appliances; # 1 worldwide 2004 REVENUE:

$13 billion

EMPLOYEES: 68,000; 50 manufacturing & technology research centers worldwide CUSTOMERS:

86

Consumers in more than 170 countries

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE: Vice President, Global Customer Loyalty, NAR Business Strategy & Core Competencies

BA (economics): Elphinstone College, Mumbai, India; MBA: Indian Institute of Management, Calcutta EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: First full-time job – management trainee at HMM in India (now GlaxoSmithKline) READING: I like a mix of business periodicals and light reading to keep a balance between business and fun. So I read everything from The Economist to romantic comedies, like Something Borrowed (Giffin). PHILOSOPHY: Sometimes in life you have to “go slow to go fast.” You can tackle any situation or problem if you aim high and think through your approach. I call this approach “solving world hunger...one mouth at a time.” FAMILY:

Married 21 years; two sons (16 and 8)

INTERESTS: Tennis; cooking and entertaining – there are always lots of friends and family at my house.

I tend to support charities connected with women and children, and those where I personally know someone who is passionately involved with the work. FAVORITE CHARITY:

comes first. When I was offered the opportunity to launch the Whirlpool brand in India, my husband and I discussed our life priorities and decided that having a second child was more important than career opportunities. Whirlpool had the confidence in me to structure a plan that benefited my family as well as my career. A supportive family is essential. My mother and mother-in-law took turns taking care of our children while my husband and I were at work. In addition, my husband encouraged me to take a foreign assignment as a way to further my career, despite the fact that we were apart for three years! When I began my career, it was important to me to be well regarded as a business professional. Today, I strive to be a well-rounded person with a passion for activities outside of work. As my tennis partner recently remarked, my definition of success today would probably include perfecting my overhead smash! PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Ilene H. Lang I

C ATA LY S T

never had a plan for my life. In the mid-1960s, even an honors graduate of Radcliffe had few options. Classified ads were still segregated by gender: “Help wanted–men” and “Help wanted–women.” After six years working in the emerging computer industry, I entered the MBA program at Harvard. We were 34 women in a class of 800; “solid” representation according to Fortune magazine. Many of my professors and classmates wondered if I was attending business school in order to better understand my husband. Thirty years ago, there was no such thing as a career ladder if you were a woman. You just had to make the most of every opportunity you found, wherever you found it … or it found you. In the volatile high-tech industry, change was the constant. I loved the challenge to think outside the box and act boldly to achieve a new vision. In the early ’90s, my global product development team at Lotus figured out how to simultaneously deliver new products in 16 languages, including Japanese and Chinese—capturing over $100 million in incremental revenue by beating our competition to non-Englishspeaking markets. Just as my early bosses had taken chances on me, I trusted talented people who were different, and they responded with outstanding performance. It doesn’t have to be harder than that. Approaching a new situation, I look for 50% of the job that I can do with my hands tied behind my back and 50% that is totally new. Thus, I leverage my knowledge, skills, and experience—half in my comfort zone and half beyond it, alternating ease with

COMPANY:

Catalyst

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

New York, NY

www.catalyst.org

BUSINESS/RANKING: Nonprofit; ranked #1 among U.S. nonprofits focused on women’s issues (American Institute of Philanthropy) 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES: CUSTOMERS:

$9 million (revenue and support)

70

TITLE:

President

BA (history & literature): Radcliffe College; MBA: Harvard Business School

EDUCATION:

Assistant children's librarian at Watertown, MA Free Public Library

FIRST JOB:

READING:

Reading Lolita in Tehran (Nafisi)

PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Never lie.

Husband; daughters (28 and 25); son (22)

INTERESTS:

Travel; dance; food

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Catalyst

exhilaration. I assume every member of the team can do his or her job better than I can. Then the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. Relationship-building is the key to business success in today’s global economy. Your network is not a database of contacts gleaned from collecting business cards at networking events; your network is your reputation for integrity, reliability, leadership, and fairness. It’s how people think of you when a difficult problem or great opportunity surfaces—and what compels them to seek you out. I have been very lucky: my parents gave me the gift of a great education which in turn opened doors for me. I always worked hard and tried to make my own good luck. But I owe every opportunity and break to those who encouraged, helped, and believed in me along the way. My advice: Honor your sponsors, and pass it on.

334 member companies

PDJ Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2005

87


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

SheilaLau

VERIZON

W

hen I was a young girl I never dreamed I would be a lawyer, work for a major corporation, and hold a position others aspire to have. But I have no illusions: these accomplishments are not mine alone. I’ve had help from many mentors along the way. My mother was my first mentor. From the day I was born, she provided me with support and assurance that I had the necessary skills to excel in all endeavors. Whether it was instilling the importance of education or shuttling me back and forth from dancing, swimming or music lessons, she made sure that I had distinctive opportunities. Now I find myself in a position of responsibility as a mentor of other women. I consistently emphasize five key points in my mentoring groups: • First, DEVELOP STRONG LEADERSHIP SKILLS; you can learn new technical skills while climbing the corporate ladder, but leadership skills are a constant imperative for success.

• Second, GAIN CROSS-FUNCTIONAL EXPERIENCE, especially when you work in a large corporation. As I moved to jobs with increasing responsibility, I acquired a broad range of experience (marketing, sales, regulatory, call centers and field operations), which gave me an understanding of how teams must work together. • Third, TAKE RISKS. I relocated four times for a new job opportunity. • Fourth, NEVER COMPROMISE YOUR INTEGRITY. The success you achieve will be meaningless if it’s built on a shaky foundation. COMPANY:

Verizon

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

New York, NY

www.verizon.com

BUSINESS/RANKING:

Telecommunications;

#14 – Fortune 50 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

88

$3.6 billion

1,561 (Texas Region)

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

Region President, Texas – Verizon Network Services Group TITLE:

BA (criminology): University of California at Berkeley; MBA: University of Hawaii; JD: Hastings College of the Law EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB:

Sales clerk, H.C. Capwells

Empress Orchid (Min); Angels & Demons (Brown); The Wall Street Journal READING:

PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Leave behind more than you took in life.

Daughter; son; fiancé

INTERESTS:

Travel; golf; reading; shopping; decorating

American Heart Association; Susan G. Komen Foundation; United Way

FAVORITE CHARITY:

• Finally, DO NOT SACRIFICE YOUR FAMILY. When you’re lying on your deathbed, are you going to recall memories of the XYZ merger, or your son’s first steps? My nature is to continuously strive for improvement. I am my own chief competitor, and I never allow myself to become completely satisfied with my latest accomplishment. This is what pushed me to pursue both a law degree and MBA. This pioneering spirit has inspired me to take on new roles and to accept increasingly difficult responsibilities. At Verizon, I am leading a team in deploying fiber optics, a project that will change the entire telecommunications network. My fantasy job is not as CEO of a major corporation. I want to help women build their self-esteem, encourage their pursuit of academics, and develop life skills necessary for true independence. In so doing, I can share those precious and intangible gifts so graciously given to me.

PDJ


The most important ingredient in bringing you the future of broadband...

respects the diversity of our employees, suppliers and customers. By doing this, we’re able to deliver products, services and ideas that create richer, deeper, broader experiences for everyone.

verizon.com © 2005 Verizon. All Rights Reserved.

§

This is why diversity plays a major role in everything we do. We’re continually promoting an inclusive workplace that

Job :

At Verizon, we believe the people creating the broadband future are as important as the broadband technology itself.

A B C D E F G` C M Y K 60261.001 Burrell Advt. Cust :

our people.


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Duy-Loan T.Le

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS

I

n 2002, I celebrated my 20-year wedding anniversary, had my 20-year anniversary with Texas Instruments (TI), had a 40th birthday, became the first female elected Senior Fellow at TI, and was recognized as National Technologist of the Year. When one of my colleagues asked me which of these milestones was most important, I told her it was the day I drove my oldest son to school on his first day in the fifth grade! I strongly believe a harmonious work/life balance is key to success. While my job, speaking engagements, and community service often take me away from my home, I always hold family as my top priority, and it provides the foundation for my life. I am the seventh child in a family of six daughters and three sons. I grew up in a country where often only sons receive higher education, but my father dreamed big and told me when I was six years old that I would be an engineer. In 1975, I left Vietnam with my family of nine women and children to seek refuge in America. My mother, with the help of my older sisters, started a new life in America without her husband and eldest son. When we arrived, we had only $80 to support our entire family. I learned a great deal from my mother’s courage, witnessed my sisters’ hard work, and was blessed with the opportunities of this land we call America. Four years after coming to America, and determined to honor my father who was stuck behind in Vietnam, I graduated high school as valedictorian at

COMPANY:

Texas Instruments

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Dallas, TX

www.ti.com

BUSINESS/RANKING: Digital signal processor & analog technologies: semiconductors; sensors & controls; education & productivity solutions; #166 – Fortune 500 2004 REVENUE:

$12.6 billion

34,800 w/manufacturing, design or sales operations in >25 countries EMPLOYEES:

90

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE:

Senior Fellow

EDUCATION: BS (electrical engineering – magna cum laude): University of Texas at Austin; MBA: University of Houston

Dynamic-random-access-memory design engineer with Texas Instruments at age 19

FIRST JOB:

READING: A Vietnamese love novel; also Ronnie & Nancy: Their Path to the White House (Colacello) PHILOSOPHY: Luck and hard work are a powerful combination … but hard work first, then luck. True success is measured less by what a person accomplishes and more by what she or he enables others to achieve. To know where you are going, you must first remember where you come from. FAMILY:

Husband; sons (12 and 8)

INTERESTS: Deep sea fishing; poker; painting; reading; classical music. FAVORITE CHARITY:

Sunflower Mission; Mona

Foundation

the age of 16, teaching myself English at night after the rest of my family had gone to bed. Three years later, I graduated magna cum laude with a BSEE from the University of Texas and married. I began my career at TI in 1982. While working full time during the day, I attended the University of Houston at night and obtained my MBA in May 1989. By this time, my father had escaped from Vietnam by crossing the Thailand-Vietnam border on foot and could proudly attend the graduation ceremony. The best advice I can give to young professionals is to work hard, stay focused on what’s important to YOU, and care enough to help others. Each one of us has the ability to improve our own situations, control our destiny, and create opportunities for others along the way … but we can only accomplish this when we apply not only our minds, but also our hearts. PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Katherine Linder

VERIZON

M

y first mentor in the business world broke the glass ceiling in the early 1970s to become the first female executive at New York Telephone. She was a team player, a great listener, and a person of action with remarkable communication and management skills. These characteristics have shaped my leadership style and guided me in balancing work, family, and community involvement. My parents were my earliest cheerleaders, instilling in me the importance of education and the belief that I could do anything. I pursued a liberal arts education in college with an emphasis on communications. This path broadened my view of the world and prepared me for a more abundant life. Key to my business philosophy is developing people to grow the skills they need to advance the business and their own careers. As leader of a business unit competing in an evolving industry, my role is to transform my organization by preparing our team to excel in a new and demanding environment. I stress personal accountability, teamwork, and innovation, and foster an environment where everyone feels included and motivated to contribute. That vision extends across an organization of over 7,000 people who handle over four million transactions a day. Early in my career, I realized you could have it all, just not all at the same time. So I had to be ferocious in setting priorities. I focused on my dual commitments of family and growing job responsibilities. As

COMPANY:

Verizon

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

New York, NY

www.verizon.com

BUSINESS/RANKING: Telecommunications; Verizon LiveSource & Public is the nation’s premiere provider of public pay phone services, retail directory assistance, and operator services. 2004 LS & P REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

$1 billion

7,400

CUSTOMERS: >280,000 payphones; >42.5 million Verizon subscribers + Cingular, Alltel, others SUPPLIERS:

Volt Delta; TellMe Networks

TITLE:

President – Verizon LiveSource & Public Randolph-Macon Woman’s College

EDUCATION:

Shareowner correspondent for AT&T

FIRST JOB: READING:

Blue Ocean Strategy (Kim & Mauborgne)

“Leadership and learning are indispensable to each other.” – JFK

PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Husband; adult children

INTERESTS:

Mentoring; theater; travel; gardening

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Big Brothers/Big Sisters

my family matured, I was able to broaden my reach and became a mentor in the Women’s Association of Verizon Employees and the Big Brothers/Big Sisters of New York City. As a member of the education committee of the Brooklyn Academy of Music, I’ve helped develop cooperative programs to help enrich the lives of children in challenged communities. Throughout my life, I’ve been fortunate to have terrific role models and mentors. With that great privilege comes the great responsibility to share what I’ve learned to enhance the lives of others. Helping young people realize their potential through mentoring is an extremely rewarding experience. I offer the following insights as a guide to success: Maintain a high energy level in all that you do; pursue a job, along with community service, that puts a smile on your face; and remember that the most worthwhile endeavors are not achieved individually, but by working cooperatively as part of a team.

PDJ

Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2005

91


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Cathy Lyons

H E W L E T T- PA C K A R D

F

or women who aspire to a career in management, my advice is to never stop learning. As soon as you stop learning, you do a disservice to your employees, who expect you to stay on top of your game. The world is changing too fast for people to sit back and say they know everything. A former supervisor offered some great advice that I would advocate for women in management. You’ll always do the right thing if you prioritize your approach to work using the following criteria: 1) put the business first, which means the customer comes first; 2) put your employees next; and 3) put yourself last. I define my leadership style as being open and positive. I like to establish relationships and build a community among people who share a passion for their work. I strive to approach relationships—with customers and with employees—with humanity and high integrity. Whether or not they realize it, women in management serve as role models for other women. When I first became a manager at HP, I was surprised by the number of women who saw me as a role model. I thought “How can I be your role model when I don’t understand your needs?” Because I grew up with four brothers, I am used to a male environment and didn’t recognize the challenges a male-dominated industry posed for many women. Even though I’m female, I had to educate myself on women’s issues and learn how personal and professional growth can impact a woman’s ability to succeed. Developing an understanding and awareness of women’s issues also made me more sensitive to all types of diversity and helped

COMPANY:

Hewlett-Packard

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Palo Alto, CA

www.hp.com

BUSINESS/RANKING: #1 consumer IT company; #2 enterprise IT company 2004 REVENUE:

$79.9 billion

151,000 employees in 178 countries

EMPLOYEES:

Consumers; small & medium businesses; enterprise & public sector; health & education markets

CUSTOMERS:

SUPPLIERS:

92

Global supplier network

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE:

Executive Vice President & Chief Marketing

Officer EDUCATION: BS (business administration and marketing): University of Colorado FIRST JOB: Lifeguard. I started competitive swimming at an early age; lifeguarding seemed like a logical job at that time.

Two Old Women (Wallis). This is a story about two old women left behind by an Alaskan tribe whose people were starving – it tells how these women overcome numerous challenges to survive. READING:

PHILOSOPHY: Pretty upbeat – Life becomes what you want to make of it. FAMILY:

Husband; two sons (15 and 11).

INTERESTS: One of my favorite things to do is walking and hiking in the mountains, woods and foothills – it’s something I can do by myself or with friends and family. FAVORITE CHARITY:

Idaho Food Bank; Idaho Youth Ranch

me to appreciate the contributions from many types of people. Fortunately for women these days, more businesses are joining companies like HP in supporting career advancement while providing the flexibility to help us balance the demands of our personal and professional lives. As a woman in management, I’ve learned that life throws us tough challenges. The mark of a great leader is how you face adversity. Setting aside your personal feelings to first do what’s right for the business and the customer, then what’s right for your employees, and lastly, what’s right for you—that’s the true test of leadership.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Janet Marzett

DAIM L E R CHRYSLE R S E R V I C E S

G

rowing up in a single-parent family with two older sisters provided me rare challenges and experiences. My sisters and I had chores that encompassed interior and exterior home repairs and general up-keep. The responsibility of these chores taught me the value of a strong work ethic, the importance of having self confidence, and the power of being independent. I have always believed in the power to create positive change. Some people choose to spend their time focusing on their mistakes or how they got where they are. I believe it is much more productive to understand where you've been, then move on to focusing your efforts on how to create a positive future. More than 25 years ago, I chose to work for a company offering both opportunities and long-term job satisfaction. I was committed to contributing my best and constantly striving to make a difference. It is critical to know yourself—to understand your strengths and opportunities, so you know where to focus your development. While I worked on becoming successful in current positions, I would prepare for the next job by expanding my knowledge about the job and skill requirements. My ultimate goal was to become the first female African-American zone manager. I shared my vision and goals with others who could impart their knowledge to help me achieve this goal. I assessed my strengths and opportunities, and encouraged others to provide open and honest feedback. Five years ago I achieved my goal, but it did not come without sacrifice, challenge, and dedication. Each increasingly responsible position has built my confidence, expanded my knowledge, and developed skills that have contributed to my success. My family

COMPANY:

DaimlerChrysler Services North America

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Farmington Hills, MI

www.daimlerchryslerservices.com/na

BUSINESS/RANKING: DaimlerChrysler Services NA (an arm of DaimlerChrysler Services AG, Berlin), provides brand-specific financing for automotive and commercial vehicle dealer inventories and their retail consumers; 3rd largest captive financial services provider 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

94

Global portfolio of $139 billion

>11,000 people in 40 countries

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE: Vice President, Human Resources & Administrative Services EDUCATION: BA (business marketing): University of Texas FIRST JOB: Dallas Handbags – responsible for sewing the interior lining in handbags READING: You’re the Greatest: How Validated Employees Can Impact Your Bottom Line (Maguire) PHILOSOPHY: Don’t limit your mentors to people who walk, talk, and look like you. FAMILY: Husband; daughter and son INTERESTS: Jogging; cooking FAVORITE CHARITY: Educating consumers about their finances and how to maintain good credit health (i.e., Money Smart Week in Detroit and Chicago)

and I have relocated seven times, accepting new challenges and opportunities and proving it is possible to have a family and a career. I know I have not achieved success without the encouragement and support of family, friends, and co-workers—success is never achieved alone. Having knowledge of the business has given me the courage and confidence to go places no one like me has ever been. My satisfaction is knowing I have not compromised my values to achieve this. My advice to women seeking to advance their careers is to have a plan of action. Stay committed to the plan, but more important, execute the plan. Reflect on your failures, but revel in your successes to build confidence. Take control of your career, and don’t wait to be tapped on the shoulder. Moving out of your comfort zone is when you will experience exponential growth. Lead by example and reach out to others, sharing your knowledge, experiences, mistakes and successes. Careers don’t just happen, and you must be committed to “stay the course.” Let’s continue to support each other because PDJ there is plenty of room at the top.


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Margaret G. McGlynn MERCK

I

have been passionate about pharmaceuticals since a very young age, as my father owned a community pharmacy and taught me how medications can have profound effects on individual lives. I learned the importance of taking care of people and doing your best at everything you do. I intended to follow in my father’s footsteps, but took advantage of an internship opportunity at Merck during my combined pharmacy/ MBA program. I was enthralled with what I saw happening at Merck—employees were absolutely committed to Merck’s mission of “medicine is for the people” and to developing breakthrough therapies that could impact millions of lives. I joined Merck because it gave me the best opportunity to help the most people. I’ve never focused on moving ahead here, but rather on doing my best in every job and striving to help achieve Merck’s mission. I’ve been open to taking on new opportunities, and after a fairly traditional early career in sales and marketing, have taken roles in various Merck business areas: managed care; pharmacy benefit management; global marketing; the U.S. hospital and specialty business; and now the global vaccine business. I look forward to leveraging all of my prior experience to successfully bring to market several important vaccines in the next few years, and to assure they have the positive impact on people’s lives they are capable of delivering. My approach to leading an organization to success is to have a diverse team of talented, committed

COMPANY:

Merck & Co., Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Whitehouse Station, NJ

www.merck.com

BUSINESS/RANKING: Pharmaceutical products and services: #3 – Fortune 500; #6 – Fortune Global 500 2004 REVENUE:

62,600 worldwide

EMPLOYEES: CUSTOMERS: SUPPLIERS:

$22.9 billion

13,000

6,196 (U.S.); 10,876 (global)

TITLE:

President – Merck Vaccines

EDUCATION: BS (pharmacy), MBA (marketing): State University of New York at Buffalo

Clerk in father’s pharmacy (Hempling’s

FIRST JOB:

Pharmacy) READING:

The World is Flat (Friedman)

Always do your best at everything you do, and use the gifts you were given to add value to society.

PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY:

Married; two children

INTERESTS:

Reading; photography; tennis; sailing; skiing

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Cradle Beach Camp

individuals who bring different perspectives to the table, and to coach them to help each individual and the organization perform to their fullest potential. I set a high standard for myself and others, and always strive to do the right things in the right way. I also try to be a role model on balance and flexibility. I’ve always believed that if you set the right priorities and always deliver, you earn the flexibility you need to achieve balance. In terms of my own balancing act, I try to follow the approach taught by Stephen Covey: “Define the important roles you play in life and establish goals and priorities for each one. Then … have the discipline and courage to stick to these priorities.” I intend to succeed in every role I play by working hard and focusing on helping people. PDJ Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2005

95


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Tsion M. Messick

PEPCO

F

resh from college, I started as a junior engineer at Atlantic City Electric Company, a 100-year-old utility in a highly regulated industry. Little did I know then, that this was the quiet before the storm—utility deregulation, industry restructuring, and a series of mergers and acquisitions were all just over the horizon for me, my company, and the industry at large. Reflecting back, I was fortunate to be in the midst of these changes and to be able to take advantage of the underlying opportunities they offered. I believe three key factors—along with a bit of luck—helped me meet these challenges and achieve a personally fulfilling career: • Individual beliefs and values • Good networks and mentors • Willingness to embrace risks and challenges Being grounded in your values and beliefs is a source of strength and personal definition. Early on, my parents taught me to be focused and committed to what I do (always give it 100% and more!). After all, success starts with your own self-assessment, self-satisfaction, and sense of achievement. I have always been fully committed to doing my best at the job at hand. If you enjoy what you do and you believe it is worthwhile, the commitment and dedication to the task become almost second nature. INDIVIDUAL BELIEFS AND VALUES.

ESTABLISH NETWORKS AND WELCOME MENTORS.

Build a network early on, and continue to grow and nurture these personal relationships. These contacts

TITLE:

Vice President, Transmission

BS (electrical engineering); MS (power engineering); Executive Program: University of Michigan Business School EDUCATION:

Junior engineer, Atlantic City Electric

FIRST JOB: READING:

Benjamin Franklin (Isaacson)

PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Have a purpose in life.

Husband

INTERESTS:

Exploring the world; painting

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Catholic Charities; Sunday

Breakfast Mission

are invaluable. Carefully listen to and observe people in your company to learn from their successes and failures. Also, be sure to include leaders with great attitudes in your network. Seek their advice, work hard to win their confidence, and encourage them to take risks on you such as giving you a shot at a challenging new role. This is how I made my first step into management! You make no progress if you are afraid to take risks. Embrace change— constantly look for ways to improve while ignoring temporary hurdles and setbacks. Stay focused. Take charge: do not be bashful or afraid to make mistakes. Mistakes are another source of learning! Look at the positive side and try to move on—look back to learn from your mistakes, but not to regret any decisions. After all, every step is part of the journey. EMBRACE RISKS AND CHALLENGES.

COMPANY:

Pepco Holdings, Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Washington, DC

www.pepcoholdings.com

BUSINESS/RANKING: 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES: CUSTOMERS:

96

Electric utility holding company

$7 billion

5,000 1.8 million

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

PDJ


Starwood Hotels & Resorts salutes this year’s

Women Worth Watching We recognize and appreciate the diversity of people, ideas and cultures. Through diverse viewpoints, we deliver unprecedented business results.

starwoodhotels.com


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Pamela T. Miller

MEDCO

G

rowing up the youngest of four children, I was raised by two loving parents who set high expectations and standards. We were challenged to attain high levels of academic achievement, to volunteer our time to worthy community causes and projects, and to be spiritually centered. Strong family values, integrity, fairness, and respect for all kinds of people and diverse perspectives were instilled in us. We were taught that the only limitations we had were the ones we imposed on ourselves. This strong foundation has served me very well in my career and life in general. A love of constant learning—whether it is formal or informal, through preparation and broad experience with all kinds of people and situations—has afforded me the confidence and comfort to navigate otherwise devastating professional and social situations. I believe that the most talented and accomplished people are those who have not only mastered their craft, but have enhanced the practice of their craft and their profession by creating something new, different, and valuable that others emulate. I also believe that the most accomplished people are

COMPANY:

Medco Health Solutions

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Franklin Lakes, NJ

www.medco.com

Pharmacy benefit manager; S&P 500; #48 – Fortune 500 BUSINESS/RANKING:

2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

>$35 billion

~13,000 nationwide (~2,000 pharmacists)

BlueCross/BlueShield plans; managed care organizations; insurance carriers; third-party benefit administrators; employers; government agencies CUSTOMERS:

Develop & utilize small and socially/ economically disadvantaged contractors

SUPPLIERS:

98

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE:

Vice President, Market Strategy & Development

BS (natural science): Saint Peter’s College; MPA (health policy, planning and administration): New York University EDUCATION:

Retail sales person, junior department store

FIRST JOB: READING:

The Purpose-Driven Life (Warren)

PHILOSOPHY: As Mary McLeod Bethune said, “Lift as you climb.” FAMILY:

Married; two children (18 and 10)

Family; travel; community projects; reading; swimming; antiques and art INTERESTS:

endlessly curious about all kinds of things; that they are never “satisfied” with their performance; that they are selfenergizing; and that they share their abilities, knowledge, and experiences generously with others. Successful people invariably view failure as a learning experience—not as a position in life. The greatest fear is not in failure but in not trying at all. I believe that it is important to seek new challenges that stretch your intellect, skills, and comfort zone. Sometimes that means stepping out of a clear path for one less certain, more risky, and yet with greater promise. Being able to recognize hidden opportunity is a great asset. Finally, I believe in being surrounded by colleagues and friends who motivate and challenge, who are honest with you about your shortcomings, and with whom you can freely “test” your ideas and dreams. PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Ana Mollinedo Mims S TA R W O O D H O T E L S

I

believe that to truly be successful at anything in life—personal or business, as a man or a woman— you must be true to what you believe in and what you stand for spiritually, morally, and ethically. Know yourself: who you are and who you are not; know what you are good at and what you need to get better at. People will respect you for both. Knowing who you are will allow you to build great teams and alliances that complement your strengths and weaknesses. I have learned things along the way that I would offer as advice to women who aspire to be future corporate leaders: • Be passionate. Love what you do or find something you love doing.

Vice President, Diversity, Internal Communications & Community Affairs TITLE:

MBA: Nova Southeastern University

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

Cashier at K-Mart

• You don’t have to act like a man or sound like a man to succeed—that’s a myth. Be comfortable with who you are, and focus on the strengths that come from being a woman.

READING: Beyond Jabez (Wilkinson); Come Thirsty (Lucado); What to Expect When You’re Expecting (Eisenberg et al.)

• Actively seek out mentors both within and external to your organization.

To be a good steward of the gifts and talents God has given me; a good steward of the opportunities my parents sacrificed for me to have, and to give back by teaching others to reach their potential. PHILOSOPHY:

• Network in and out of your industry. Also be willing to build networks across cultural and racial lines— there is more power in unity and more diversity of thought and learning. • Develop the ability to communicate clearly and directly what you want in terms of your career goals, and set reasonable timelines for achieving those goals. • Not all organizations are great places for women to work or advance, so be willing to show your boss and the organization what they can do to help you

COMPANY:

Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

White Plains, NY

www.starwoodhotels.com

BUSINESS/RANKING: EMPLOYEES:

>80 countries)

Leading hotel and leisure company

120,000 (at 750 properties in

FAMILY:

Husband; a baby on the way; and our Shih-Tzu dog

INTERESTS:

Running; hiking; writing; traveling; riding our

Harley

be successful. Acting like they know does not always mean they really do. • Clearly communicate your desire and openness for feedback from the person you report to and your colleagues; actively seek it out on a periodic basis. Be willing to provide feedback to others as appropriate. • Learn to delegate. We often feel as women we have to do it all. We don’t. That’s what teams are all about— learn to build them and guide them. • Learn to laugh and have fun. Don’t take yourself and your environment so seriously that you can’t laugh and have fun. PDJ Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2005

99


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Sylvia M. Montero

PFIZER

S

ometimes you have no idea what is out there until you see it with your own eyes. I grew up in New York City, the daughter of two proud and traditional Latinos. My parents ingrained in me the basic belief that getting a good education was the key to a better life. I worked hard in school because I wanted to go to college. As college approached, I applied only to city schools because the thought of going to a private school was just too foreign to me. But my high school mentor had other ideas, and told me to apply to Barnard College. I remember going to campus for an interview and being absolutely overwhelmed by what I saw. It was a new world—a world so different from my own but somehow one that I wanted to be a part of, and I was fortunate enough to be given a full scholarship. The decision to go was easy. Barnard did more than just give me an incredible education; it also exposed me to people from backgrounds very different from my own. Another view of the world opened up. I believe that the biggest negative of growing up as a minority is the impact it can have on your self-esteem. You begin to think that the people who discriminate against you may just be right, maybe you really can’t compete outside your own circle. But being able to learn alongside these amazing, sophisticated women showed me just how big the world really is and how much was available to me if I wanted it. My own strength and courage to go for what I wanted grew, and I was

COMPANY:

Pfizer Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

New York, NY

www.pfizer.com

BUSINESS/RANKING: 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES: CUSTOMERS:

100

Pharmaceuticals, healthcare (#1)

$52.2 billion

TITLE:

Senior Vice President, Human Resources

EDUCATION: Bachelor’s: Barnard College; Master’s: Queen’s College–CUNY FIRST JOB:

Teacher, New York City Public School

System READING: The Five Equations That Changed The World (Guillen); Wisdom of Crowds (Surowiecki); Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (Rowling) PHILOSOPHY: An excellent education is the best legacy we can leave our children.

Son; daughter-in-law; two perfect grandchildren; parents; siblings; partner FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

Family; wilderness treks; reading

FAVORITE CHARITY: The Cruz & Eligia Montero Scholarship Fund/Barnard (in honor of parents)

no longer satisfied settling for what was handed to me. If I hadn’t seen what was out there for me with my own eyes, my dreams might have been more limited. Sometimes you have no idea what is out there for you unless you see it with your own eyes. So look for what you want to see. Remain open to the world you have yet to discover. Believe that you belong anywhere you want to be, no matter where you once were.

15,000 colleagues worldwide in >150 countries

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

PDJ


Why have we invested $500 million on employees’ college degrees? At UTC, we pay all costs – tuition, academic fees and books – and provide paid time away from work for any employee who pursues an education at an accredited college or university. Any degree. No limits. Recipients of a bachelor’s, master’s or doctorate in the U.S. also receive $10,000 worth of UTC stock. To date, over 16,000 degrees have been awarded and 13,500 employees are currently enrolled worldwide. What’s in it for us? Lots – including smarter, more productive employees better prepared to take on new challenges. Smart investment. Great dividends. A note of appreciation to UTC Chairman and CEO George David from Richard Baumann, one of over 16,000 graduates of the Employee Scholar Program. To learn more about it and to view additional letters, please visit www.utc.com/careers/esp

this is momentum CARRIER

HAMILTON SUNDSTRAND

OTIS

PRATT & WHITNEY

SIKORSKY

UTC FIRE & SECURITY

UTC POWER

NYSE: UTX

www.utc.com


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Maritza Gomez Montiel DELOITTE & TOUCHE

I

had an exceptional mentor early in my career. This was in the late 1970s, a different era in the accounting profession. Back then, developing talent was not a high priority. It was largely up to the individual to figure out what to do to advance his or her career. I was very lucky to have had access to a partner who took an interest in developing me. I was one of the first women professionals to work in our Miami office. The practice had no history of developing women—much less Hispanic women— so I was an unknown quantity. Fortunately, my mentor saw a lot of potential in me and provided the training and guidance I needed to become a good auditor. He helped me understand how to manage relationships with clients and associates; saw to it that I got assignments that offered breadth and visibility; and helped prepare me for partner candidacy. His guidance and encouragement helped give me the confidence to stretch and take on new challenges. Most importantly, he taught me to believe in myself. Through his and others’ examples, I’ve learned a lot about being an effective coach and mentor. I consider it a privilege to guide talented people who go on to grow our business, lead teams, and in turn mentor others. I take particular pride in having successfully mentored and coached some colleagues whose potential was not initially recognized by others. We have so many bright, talented, and ambitious people at Deloitte. We strongly promote mentoring as a way for experienced colleagues to share their knowledge to help others be successful.

COMPANY:

Deloitte & Touche USA, LLP

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

New York, NY

www.Deloitte.com/us

BUSINESS/RANKING:

Audit, tax, consulting &

financial advisory services 2005 FY REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

102

$6.87 billion

30,000

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE:

Regional Managing Partner, Southeast BBA (accounting): University of Miami

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

Selling Christmas trees at the age of nine

The Five Dysfunctions of a Team (Lencioni); The World is Flat (Friedman) READING:

You can get what you want if you help others get what they want. Also: Never give up on your dreams! PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY:

Husband; daughter

INTERESTS:

Golf; motorcycling

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Goodwill Industries

It’s deeply satisfying for me to see the positive impact mentoring has on people—both in their performance for our organization and how they feel about themselves and their abilities. People like to work in an environment where they have strong relationships and feel connected and valued. I believe mentoring and coaching are integral to creating that type of environment. I’ve stayed at Deloitte for 30 years largely because of the bonds I’ve developed here.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

PhyllisGoldenMorey

LEAR

I

grew up as one of seven children raised by a single mother after our father died. Educated in a public school environment, I was selected with several other students to be placed on an accelerated academic track. The quest for academic excellence in my early development was the first of many opportunities I had to “reach for the stars,” and it instilled within me a passion to succeed. Later in life, my focus was to excel in whatever professional roles I obtained with an eye toward achieving the ultimate (higher) position I could attain with each employer. My first position as an Assistant U.S. Attorney honed my litigation skills to proficiency. Although I enjoyed this role, I pursued other legal positions to broaden my experience, to enhance my ability to evaluate legal matters, and to use those analytical skills to resolve wide-ranging business issues. In working for a governmental agency, a national law firm, and three corporations in different industries, I experienced a very diverse set of business situations and complex legal issues. Most importantly, I learned how to successfully resolve various business crises in an innovative and organized manner. The best advice I can offer aspiring professionals is to first focus on your personal growth: seek opportunities to hone your skills in your area of expertise and cultivate your leadership abilities; develop your aptitude for the business environment in which you are working; and volunteer to take on challenges outside your comfort zone to expand your knowledge and skills. As you conquer new frontiers or responsi-

COMPANY:

Lear Corporation

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Southfield, MI

www.lear.com

BUSINESS/RANKING:

Integrated automotive interiors;

#127 – Fortune 500 2004 REVENUE:

$17 billion

EMPLOYEES:

110,000

CUSTOMERS:

Automakers worldwide

SUPPLIERS:

>2,000 globally

TITLE:

Vice President & Chief Litigation Counsel

EDUCATION: Bachelor’s degree: Memphis State University; JD: University of Tennessee, College of Law

Assistant U.S. Attorney – prosecuted bank robberies, forgeries, and environmental crimes

FIRST JOB:

READING:

The Purpose-Driven Life (Warren)

Enjoy each day to its fullest; and strive to do your best at work, at home, and at play.

PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY:

Husband; three daughters (29, 15 and 12)

INTERESTS: Rollerblading; skiing; leisure time with family and friends FAVORITE CHARITY:

Programs that help girls/women

in crises

bilities, you will broaden your expertise and strengthen your business acumen in areas that you may never have imagined. Secondly, to help enhance your professional development, seek a mentor (within or outside your company) whom you admire as a role model and trust to give you honest, constructive suggestions in business matters. Third, adopt a “value-add” philosophy in all aspects of your job responsibilities. Ask whether you are adding value with each project you undertake, and demonstrate leadership by motivating those on your team to contribute in some unique way to achieving the overall objective. At the end of the day, you must hold yourself accountable to achieve the company’s objectives in an efficient, comprehensive, and effective manner. Set high standards for yourself and meet them! PDJ Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2005

103


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Maria R. Morris

METLIFE

T

he two people who had the earliest and largest influence on me were my parents, who were also my biggest role models. My father is a licensed public accountant who worked long and hard when my siblings and I were growing up. My mother, who is an absolutely amazing woman, left her ten-year career to raise five children. If nothing else, my parents taught me how to lead and work hard. They’ve been a tremendous influence on me during my more than twenty-year career. After college, I was fortunate to be able to enroll in one of MetLife’s career development programs—an outstanding opportunity for me to learn and grow professionally. I was able to rotate through various areas within MetLife’s national accounts and group insurance businesses. On top of this, I’ve had great mentors. I was fortunate to be able to benefit and learn from their broad business knowledge. Today, I want to be able to do for others what was done for me, so mentoring others is something that I really take to heart. I truly believe that we learn from everyone, but what you need to do is look for the thought leaders in an organization. Also, identify people who really know their business; share what you know; and never underestimate the value of networking. And while mentors are great, everyone needs to be an active manager of his or her own career. Sometimes, people will tap you on the shoulder with that next, great offer; but sometimes you need to be proactive and get out of your comfort zone. That may

COMPANY:

MetLife

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

New York, NY

www.metlife.com

BUSINESS/RANKING:

Insurance; #37– Fortune 500;

#1 U.S. life insurer 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

104

$39.2 billion

57,813

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE:

Senior Vice President, Institutional Business

BA (psychology; business – magna cum laude): Franklin and Marshall College EDUCATION:

The Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Leadership Fable (Lencioni) READING:

PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Live every day fully.

Husband

INTERESTS:

Gardening; singing

FAVORITE CHARITY:

All Stars Project

not necessarily mean finding a new job—just taking on some new responsibilities. Finally, to be successful, I’ve found that you need people with diverse perspectives. There have been a number of businesses that I inherited at MetLife where we really needed to take a step back and think through a problem or challenge. It’s important to have talented people around you that you can pull together to take a fresh look at the business. You need to find out what’s going well, and what things need to change; then prioritize tasks to move the business forward. After all, the lessons you learn today just may help you tackle the challenges of tomorrow. PDJ


©2005 Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, New York, NY 10166 L0508E2Z6 (exp1207) MLIC-LD PEANUTS ©UFS, Inc.

The more varied your inspiration, the better your results.

THE PERFECT MIX. At MetLife, workforce diversity is not a new idea. In fact, it has been part of our culture for all of our 137 years. MetLife is dedicated to providing every associate with career advancement opportunities, by offering a variety of programs designed to help them reach their career goals. We proudly offer a comprehensive set of benefits for all individuals and families. Our wide range of innovative programs, policies and services are designed specifically to address our associates’ particular needs and provide them with the support, tools and expert advice to help them be more effective at work and in life. At MetLife, we believe that workforce diversity is good for business. If you would like to find out more about a career at MetLife, call 1- 800 MetLife or visit metlife.com/careers


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Tiffany P. Olson

ROCHE DIAGNOSTICS

I

always knew I wanted to work in healthcare—I loved the idea of making a living in a field dedicated to helping people—but I was also interested in science and business. So after graduating from the University of Minnesota, I was fortunate to land a job as a pharmaceutical representative, combining my three interests—healthcare, science, and business. I knew next to nothing about sales or the pharma industry, however, so I did what most graduates do: I learned on the job. That experience set the stage for my career in two important ways: first, I stayed in healthcare, moving from sales to consulting to management; and second, I’ve never begun a new job knowing exactly how to do it! As a result, I’m constantly challenged and always learning. The key for me has been to listen—especially as a leader—and to work with talented subject matter experts who can fill the gaps. These experiences have shaped my philosophy as a mentor and a leader. Take risks. Don’t be afraid to step outside your comfort zone. And get to know your strengths and weaknesses so you can fall back on what you do best and ask for help where you need it. I’ve found that with each new level of job responsibility, the more critical it is for me to maintain a strong internal network and a network outside the company as well. It is important to rely on people

COMPANY:

Roche Diagnostics Corporation

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Indianapolis, IN

www.roche-diagnostics.us

BUSINESS/RANKING:

Medical diagnostics;

#1 diagnostics company in the U.S. 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES: CUSTOMERS:

$1.9 billion (U.S.)

3,500 U.S. Medical, research and academic

institutions; pharmacies; retail; people with diabetes

106

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE:

President & CEO – Roche Diagnostics

BS (business): University of Minnesota; Master’s: St. Thomas University

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: In junior high – I swept the floors and washed towels for a hair salon; right after college – a pharmaceuticals sales rep. READING: Just finished Light on Snow (Shreve); but also love just about anything by Janet Evanovich. PHILOSOPHY: Step outside your comfort zone – don’t be afraid to take risks. FAMILY:

Husband; daughter (10) and son (9)

INTERESTS: Family; skiing; travel; reading. If I weren’t at work on Monday morning … I’d be traveling somewhere with my family. FAVORITE CHARITY:

United Way; the Humane Society

who will give me the straight story—the good and the bad—rather than what they think I want to hear. Throughout my life, I’ve had many wonderful mentors, but one in particular stands out. Early in my career, a colleague and I began co-mentoring each other, and we continued to talk after leaving the company. To this day, I depend on my friend’s feedback and insights on everything from business strategy to work-life balance. I still struggle with that age-old dilemma prevalent among so many professional women I know: how to create and maintain balance in life. I’ve learned that if I don’t manage my own time, it’s no longer mine. I’ve had to fight my tendency to let the scale tip too far into work and away from family. I’m a wife and a mother as well as a CEO, and I depend on those first two roles to help me keep my sanity, humility, and sense of humor! PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Larree M. Renda

S A F E WAY

A

fter a long struggle with cancer, my father passed away when I was 16. His passing changed my life. I had hoped to go to medical school; instead I took a job at a local Safeway store to support myself. From this difficult personal experience I learned some important lessons that guide me to this day. I came to understand that everything happens for a reason. You make the best with the hand you are dealt. My father taught me the value of hard work and commitment, two things that formed the foundation of who I would become as a wife, mother, and executive. Over time, I built on that foundation and forged my own expanded set of guiding philosophies—drawn from a mix of experience and common sense picked up along the way. For example, an extension of my father’s work ethic is my eagerness to take on the unpopular or tough tasks. During my early retail days, nobody wanted to run the frozen food department in my store. It was cold, physical work, but I volunteered to take on the job in the dead of a frigid Iowa winter. The experience showed my boss that I wouldn’t shrink from tough assignments. Five years ago, the company added labor relations to my already long list of responsibilities. We needed to restructure our labor contracts, a seemingly gargantuan feat. Yet I embraced the challenge. It was an important company initiative, and one of those rare opportunities to test my skills at the highest level. I have some bruises to show for it, but the progress we made was critical to our future and to our ability to remain competitive in a new, challenging retail environment.

Safeway Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Pleasanton, CA WEBSITE: www.Safeway.com BUSINESS/RANKING: #3 food and drug retailer 2004 REVENUE: $35.8 billion EMPLOYEES: 188,160 CUSTOMERS: People in Western, Southwestern, Rocky Mountain, and Mid-Atlantic regions of the U.S. & W. Canada. SUPPLIERS: Extensive list includes many minorityand women-owned businesses COMPANY:

TITLE: Executive Vice President – Retail Operations, Human Resources, Public Affairs, Labor & Government, Reengineering & Communications FIRST JOB:

Bagger at Safeway

The Leadership Moment: Nine True Stories of Triumph and Disaster and Their Lessons for Us All (Useem)

READING:

Everything happens for a reason. Approach adversity with optimism and make the most of it. PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY:

Husband; three children (18, 17 and 14)

INTERESTS: Spending time with family; yoga; sports; community involvement.

Safeway Foundation; Easter Seals; Muscular Dystrophy Association; Prostate Cancer Foundation FAVORITE CHARITY:

Otherwise, I’ve always been a lifelong learner. I read a lot. I have always looked for opportunities to build my knowledge base by learning from different sources. I surround myself with the best people who can teach me as much as I can teach them. Finally, in his own way, my dad instructed me to exceed expectations at even the most mundane task. By extension, I’ve learned to seize opportunities to create better, smarter ways of doing things. Executives can increase their upward mobility by being creative and devising growth opportunities for their company. A great executive not only gets the job done, but also uses their skills as an innovator to go beyond the expectation. Some people call it “raising the bar.” My father would call it “stepping up to the plate and then knocking it out of the ballpark.”

PDJ Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2005

107


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Karen S. Rohan

CIGNA

A

lways an avid recreational runner and marathoner, I was on the treadmill recently, with fellow runners on either side. We were training hard and goading each other to go farther and faster when suddenly, they both stopped and declared that they’d had enough. In between strides and with a chiding smile, I asked how far they’d gone and the response was 6.5 miles. I challenged them to go farther. They replied that 6 miles was the target—and the furthest they’d ever gone. “Get back on that machine and make it to 7,” was my reply! They did, and we laughed, enjoying the competitive camaraderie. The treadmill is really just a metaphor for life. Early on, I came to appreciate that it takes discipline, mental strength, and support to focus and maintain your energies on achieving the desired results. Throughout my career, I’ve been the very fortunate recipient of great coaching and mentoring from colleagues and friends. I’ve been surrounded by people on whom I could lean for sound and encouraging advice. These people—my personal network— can be counted on to constantly challenge my capacities in an honest and productive manner. The educational choices I made early on facilitated a career in finance. After graduating from Boston College, I went into public accounting, earned my CPA, and went on for my MBA. Then I moved into management roles with diverse and increasing responsibilities. Wise coaching and challenges from

COMPANY:

CIGNA Corporation

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Philadelphia, PA

www.cigna.com

BUSINESS/RANKING:

Employee benefits services;

#122 – Fortune 500 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

$18.1 million

27,000

CUSTOMERS/MEMBERSHIP: 9 million U.S. health care plans; 15.4 million behavioral care, EAPs, work/life; 10.7 million dental; 12.3 million group life, accident and disability; + expatriates + international.

108

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE:

President, CIGNA Specialty Companies

BS: Boston College; MBA: Boston University; Certified Public Accountant EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB:

Ernst & Young, public accounting

READING: Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done (Bossidy) PHILOSOPHY:

It’s your attitude that determines success

or failure. FAMILY:

Husband

INTERESTS:

Running; reading; the beach; results-based

leadership FAVORITE CHARITY:

March of Dimes

my most trusted mentors helped me realize that being flexible to opportunities which veered from my original path, while sometimes scary, not only helps build skills, but also allows you to discover interests and abilities you might not have otherwise considered. As my career has evolved, I’ve found that it’s even more gratifying to be on the giving end of a mentoring relationship. Guiding and inspiring others to set and stretch goals and achieve them carry meaningful rewards. My involvement serves as a catalyst and sounding board along the way, but their true success comes from within. Demonstrating strong leadership means working hard to uncover the best solutions and most optimal paths for pursuing those outcomes. Challenges and struggles are a reality and also an opportunity. Our reactions will be the differentiator that sets truly successful leaders apart from the rest. PDJ


Diversity...It’s About Business

IT’S ABOUT... ...creating opportunities for all people to work together, share ideas and achieve their goals ...reflecting our community in our workforce ...ensuring a favorable relationship between our company and the communities we serve ...furthering our commitment to meet the needs of our customers.

WE BELIEVE DIVERSITY IS STRATEGIC TO OUR BUSINESS PERFORMANCE.

Pepco Holdings, Inc. (PHI) is one of the largest energy-delivery companies in the Mid-Atlantic region. Through its utility subsidiaries, PHI delivers regulated electricity and gas service to more than 1.8 million customers in Delaware, the District of Columbia, Maryland, New Jersey and Virginia.


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Ann E. Rondeau

U . S . N AV Y

P

eople matter. No matter the mission, requirement, operation, or project—when it comes to any group, military unit, or corporate endeavor, each person matters. This belief is fundamental to the principles of leadership, management and operation of the United States military in general, and to the Navy in particular. We have a strong and abiding commitment to the growth and development of the people in the Navy who represent the broad diversity and rich fabric of this great country. The military is virtually the only organization that must promote from within; we don’t hire our executive leadership from outside the organization. We recruit the very people who will eventually be our services’ managers and leaders. This fact creates a sense of pride and ownership, and makes the deep and dedicated development of individuals and teams enormously central to all that we do. We are focused on the human performance and success of sailors and all service members. We encourage lifelong learning and respect, and leverage the fact that each individual learns and processes information differently. Our aim is to make every sailor the best he or she can be, and to prepare every individual for the opportunity to succeed by instilling a sense of self-motivation. We do this with academic skills enhancement courses, personal mentoring, standards testing, performance evaluations, and formal training and opportunities for education. We also realize and appreciate how very important our families are to the overall well-being of the group and organization. Our sailors and their families matter, and that makes us successful.

COMPANY:

United States Navy

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

www.navy.mil

EMPLOYEES:

110

Washington, DC

~361,000 (+reserve & civilian)

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE:

Vice Admiral – Director, Navy Staff

MA (political science): Georgetown University; Honorary EdD (public service): Carthage College; EdD (in process): Northern Illinois University EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB:

Ensign, United States Navy

Professional reading – always! Over the summer I re-read Faulkner, and Alain Locke’s works about the Harlem Renaissance. READING:

PHILOSOPHY:

We have a purpose above ourselves.

Reading (avidly); learning; sports; family; contributing; music; friendships INTERESTS:

All organizations must have a similar belief in and commitment to the potential of their people. We, as executives and leaders, must have a sincere respect for the physical, moral, emotional, intellectual, and mental growth and development of our people. As executives we must lead by example, inspire, motivate, and guide our teams so that they succeed on their own. This investment in building human capacity pays off in increased corporate capabilities. By nature an optimist, I believe that there is an opportunity in every circumstance; that individuals should be treated with respect and dignity; that honor and integrity are essential to a life of excellence; that living a life of critical-self examination has enormous rewards toward wisdom; that accountability and ethical conduct are liberating; that delivering on a promise or commitment is a part of character—and that people matter.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Alice Rosenblatt

WELLPOINT

T

he best decision I made for my career was to leave graduate school, where I was studying for a PhD in mathematics for teaching at the college level. Soon after making this decision, I first heard about the actuarial profession, and immediately set out to get a position. I passed all 10 exams required to become a Fellow of the Society of Actuaries the first time, while working, within four-and-a-half years (average was about eight). The professional knowledge and analytic tools I acquired along the way have opened many doors for me. I am hesitant to admit this, but almost all my job changes have been opportunities presented to me by recruiters, not self-directed plans, and I have relocated several times for my career. The most important characteristics of the companies I have worked for have been integrity and meritocracy. I have been able to use my analytic skills and attention to detail to lead WellPoint’s integration efforts. Our success at integrating acquisitions has been due to creating a team structure that fits each particular case, aligning incentives, having detailed plans, making quick decisions, setting up monitoring of results, and having the support of executive management. I have had many mentors along the way and have learned from them what “to do” as well as what “not to do.” Actuaries are often stereotyped as “geeks” with no communication skills. But early in my career I learned the importance of communication, and have been valued as someone who “tells it like it is” and discusses difficult topics that people try to avoid. One of my hardest struggles was with a diagnosis of breast cancer five years ago. I worked all through

COMPANY:

WellPoint, Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Indianapolis, IN

www.wellpoint.com

BUSINESS/RANKING: 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

Health benefits; 1st

$20.8 billion

37,000

Executive Vice President of Integration Planning & Implementation, and Chief Actuary

TITLE:

BS (math): City College of NY; MA (math): City University of NY EDUCATION:

Actuary in Mutual of New York’s rotational training program FIRST JOB:

I usually have two books going: one I read at night – currently The Broker (Grisham); another I listen to on CD while I drive – currently Animals in Translation (Grandin and Johnson). READING:

Work hard and communicate your expectations clearly. Do not settle for mediocrity on your staff – aim to recruit and retain the best and help them succeed. PHILOSOPHY:

Husband; two dogs (Dalmatian and golden retriever); two birds (cockatoo and parrot) FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

Reading; golf; fitness

FAVORITE CHARITY:

WeSpark (a cancer support center)

chemotherapy and radiation treatments, and my job became the place where I acted like everything in my life was normal. I wore a wig and makeup to hide the fact that I didn’t have hair or eyebrows, put a smiling face on, and “became” the normal person I was dressed and made-up to be. I now make myself available to help other women who are going through this, and serve on the board of a local cancer support center. Recently, I have relied on some basic philosophical principles. One is: “Any decision is better than no decision.” Another is: “If you always do what you’ve always done, you’ll always be what you’ve always been.”

PDJ

Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2005

111


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

D’Arcy Foster Rudnay COMCAST

T

here are three key pieces of advice that I think will benefit every woman starting her career: she must recognize her self-worth; work hard at everything she embarks upon; and not underestimate the importance of networking. My parents instilled a great sense of self-worth in my sister and me at a very young age. My father was always surrounded by very strong women in his life, and was adamant that his daughters never let themselves be treated as second-class citizens. As a result, I always tried not to succumb to perceived career limitations, and never allowed myself to be put down or disrespected. As I entered the working world, I approached every project with enthusiasm and as an opportunity to learn. I knew that I would have to work extra hard to prove myself, consider no project beneath me, and complete every project to the best of my ability. Instead of competing directly with others, I concentrated on differentiating myself and my performance by reading and learning everything I could about the industries and fields my work touched. I always looked beyond the immediate task at hand, keeping the bigger picture in mind. Throughout my career I made it a point to surround myself with really smart people, both men and women, recognizing that hard work alone is not enough to become truly successful. I was fortunate very early on to have several men and women who took an interest in me and helped me understand what it would take to achieve in a professional envi-

COMPANY:

Comcast Corporation

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Philadelphia, PA

www.comcast.com

Nation’s leading provider of cable, entertainment and communications products and services BUSINESS/RANKING:

2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

$20.3 billion

74,000

CUSTOMERS: 21.5 million – cable; 7.7 million – high-speed Internet; 1.2 million – phone

112

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE:

Vice President, Corporate Communications BA: Trinity College; MS: University of

EDUCATION:

Pennsylvania Admission counselor at Trinity College

FIRST JOB: READING:

No Clues Left Behind (beach book for the

summer) PHILOSOPHY:

Always treat people as I would want to

be treated. FAMILY:

Husband; two wonderful daughters

INTERESTS:

My family; travel; reading; skiing; work

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Steppingstone Foundation

ronment. I went to a college for women, and there was a very strong network of women helping open doors and advance young women in their careers. That network was very instrumental in my early career, and since that time I have made it a point to help and guide younger women with whom I come in contact. I learned along the way that it is important not only to produce great work, but also to recognize and cultivate young talent. Last, I encourage every woman aspiring to the seniormost levels in her profession to obtain a graduate degree. At 40, while raising two young children, I went back to school to pursue a graduate degree and fulfill my desire to learn and better myself. This required an enormous amount of work, sacrifice, and commitment, and is one of my proudest accomplishments. PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Susan E. Sheskey

DELL

I

t may sound trite, but I believe that, for the most part, you can accomplish anything you set your mind to. Fortunately, most businesses today are meritocracies, so they’re constantly identifying the very best people to lead the organization and deliver results. But you can’t simply “be” good and expect success to just happen. First, you need to really know your business— because if you don’t, there will always be people around who do, and they’ll figure out pretty quickly if you’re not up to speed. Then you need to invest in yourself, taking every opportunity to grow, take on new challenges, and leave your comfort zone. Focusing on things you’re already good at is tempting, but a mistake. If you’re not certain where you need development, seek out and build mentoring relationships to gain insights, new perspectives, and guidance. Additionally, mentors in leadership positions can be powerful advocates for you. A quality I always look for in others is the ability to assess trends, to discern, to take prudent risks—to be forward thinking and not just reactive. I get my energy from being around very bright people. They challenge me, keep me on my toes, and make it a joy to go to work. So I think it’s hugely important to seek out and surround yourself with the best people you can to supplement your own areas of expertise. It's then critical to check your ego at the door. All team members, including leaders, need to be able to ask questions to gain an understanding of the issues and work together toward an optimal solution. Modeling and encouraging intellectual curiosity aren’t always easy, but will take you and your team much further than appearing to have all the answers. One danger is to see problems as a burden, rather than as challenges offering a chance to demonstrate

COMPANY:

Dell Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Round Rock, TX

www.dell.com

BUSINESS/RANKING:

Diversified global technology

provider (#1) 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

114

$49.2 billion

61,400

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE:

Vice President & Chief Information Officer

EDUCATION:

BA: Miami University (Ohio)

Lifeguard at YWCA for $1 per hour; church pianist and children’s choir director while in high school. FIRST JOB:

READING:

The World Is Flat (Friedman)

PHILOSOPHY: Don’t be afraid to take tough assignments. Be resilient – you learn more from your less successful efforts. Invest in yourself. FAMILY:

Husband; son (college freshman)

INTERESTS: Golf; exercise; reading; music and playing piano; spending time with family and friends FAVORITE CHARITY:

Capital Area Food Bank of Texas

what you can do. I think it’s critical that you have fun at whatever you do and feel a passion for it. While some days your enthusiasm for going to the office may be lower than usual, if those days become the rule rather than the exception, it might be time to look for something new. To me, happiness is a component of success— so if you’re miserable I don’t think you can call yourself a success regardless of your achievements. As I look back on my own career, I’m less certain than ever that there is any magic path to success. No matter how much you plan and strategize, your life and career are very mutable, and the unexpected can—and will—happen. The real key is to be out in front of change, to see it coming, and embrace it. Control your career and use unexpected opportunities for growth. But remember: it’s important to grow not only professionally, but also in how we give back to others and to the community. For me, that’s as important a measure of success as any other. PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Leslie R. Sibert

GEORGIA POWER

B

eing different or standing out in a crowd can sometimes be a good thing. That’s been the lesson I’ve learned in my career at Georgia Power. When I began in Distribution, there were a limited number of supervisory positions. Basically, you had to “do your time.” It was frustrating until I realized I needed to differentiate myself from everyone else to be more marketable. At the time, I was only one of two or three females in that entire organization, but I didn’t want that to be the reason I stood out. So, I deliberately pushed myself to gain other skills to make myself more marketable. While my peers accepted me for my own merits and skills, management was much more protective. I just wanted to be treated like everyone else, and having supporters along the way certainly helped. It’s a huge confidence boost when someone believes in you. Once someone is willing to take a chance on you, you have to seize the opportunity to demonstrate what you can do. For that reason, I believe it’s so important to have a mentor. Don’t wait for someone to find you; seek out someone, male or female, who has the values and leadership style that you admire and respect. Having guidance definitely helps. It would have been nice early on to have someone say, “If you aspire to do this, you need to get experience in these areas of the business.” Maybe there are now women, looking at me and others who blazed a trail before me, who are encouraged that there is an opportunity for women in this company to succeed.

COMPANY:

Georgia Power

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Atlanta, GA

www.southernco.com/gapower

BUSINESS/RANKING:

Electric utility; #9 of 136 U.S.

utilities 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

$5.4 billion

8,800

CUSTOMERS: >2

million

Spent $158 million (13.5%) with minorityand female-owned companies in 2005

SUPPLIERS:

TITLE:

Vice President – Transmission

Bachelor of Electrical Engineering: Georgia Tech; Professional Management Development Program: Harvard University. EDUCATION:

Co-op student in Distribution at Georgia

FIRST JOB:

Power READING:

Personal History (Graham)

Life is to be lived, so don't spend your whole life planning it. PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY:

Husband; daughter (9); son (4)

INTERESTS:

Interior decorating; traveling; scuba diving

FAVORITE CHARITY:

YWCA

You have to be willing to create your own path as well. You can get into jobs and get comfortable, but taking a chance on something unfamiliar can challenge you. You learn to do new things and can carry those experiences on to other challenges. Every move I’ve made has given me experience for my next position. You also have to remember that getting what you want is not easy. You have to make a choice about what’s important to you. Decide what “having it all” means for you, and realize you might not be able to do that. Above all, love what you do. Have fun. If you do, you’ll be driven by it and produce results. You’ve got to enjoy what you do or it’s not going to be worth the sacrifices you may have to make. PDJ Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2005

115


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Tina M. Sivinski

EDS

W

omen need to remember the importance of work/life balance. There was a time—and it now seems long, long, ago—when many people in corporate America worked nine-to-five jobs. But somewhere along the way, that pleasant scenario changed: the pace picked up; competition intensified. In my own career, I’ve observed these changes from the oil patch to the technology sector. And yes, I’ll admit it, I thrived on the adrenaline rush of the “stress for success” mindset. Eating lunch from a styrofoam container at my desk. Taking calls on the way home. Feeding, bathing, and putting my two children to bed, only to log back on and keep working for as long as it took to get everything—or most everything—ready for the next day. Many women have shared the same story. It’s a story that comes with a price. The workaholic flourishes because we’ve created a perfect environment for such individuals: fast food ... fast internet ... fast-track education. My question: when we are done rushing, where will we be? Think, for example, of the “V” word—vacation. Mention that word and, suddenly, all of the most important events in your career line up for your first day off. Or, consider the “D” word—for dentist or doctor. How many of us have had to reschedule those necessary appointments five or six times, or do business in the dentist’s chair? Know anyone who’s had to bring a sick child to work and hide them under the desk? When was the last time someone in your company

TITLE:

Executive Vice President, Human Resources

BS (magna cum laude): Springfield College (Massachusetts)

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: Placing temporary personnel in high technology companies READING: In Praise of Slowness (Honore); In My Own Words (Mother Teresa); The Art of War (Tzu)

When you move on in life, people do not need to remember your name – only that things got better, even if they don’t really know how. PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY:

Two sons with a passion for life

INTERESTS: International cultures; medical research; travel; community service FAVORITE CHARITY:

Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer

Foundation

told you not to worry about going away on vacation or taking time out for that much-needed appointment? COMPANY: EDS (Electronic Data Systems) Corporation We as leaders need to be role models. If executives HEADQUARTERS: Plano, TX like us start taking vacations—instead of postponing or WEBSITE: www.eds.com canceling them—it gives others the opportunity to assume BUSINESS/RANKING: Information technology servicresponsibilities we thought only we could handle. When es; #2 we get away from the office, we give others a chance to 2004 REVENUE: $20.7 billion prove themselves. And that creates a deeper bench, and a EMPLOYEES: 118,000 natural succession plan—which are no small rewards. CUSTOMERS: 9,000 We need to restore the work/life balance, but it’s going to take all of us working in concert. SUPPLIERS: 25,000

PDJ

116

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005


ne t. th e pe op le ... ex ce pt m ay be se pa ra te sh ou ld no th in g be lie ve w e US TA , At th e The USTA is proud to be an equal-opportunity employer that values diversity on and off the court. We believe when people are given a chance, regardless of color or ethnicity, everybody wins. To learn more about our commitment to diversity and career opportunities, visit USTA.com.


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Launi D. Skinner

S TA R B U C K S

I

have been very fortunate throughout my career to work for companies that have believed in the possibilities of their employees. What these companies had in common was that they created environments that encouraged and supported professional and personal development. You were allowed to try new things, fail, learn, and succeed. Most importantly, though, within each of these companies were a few select people who believed in me, encouraged me, and quite honestly, gave me a chance. I try to do the same. In examining the behaviors of the leaders who helped me, I use three concepts to guide how I lead, and I always share these concepts as expectations of people I work with:

TITLE:

Senior Vice President – Store Development CGA; Diploma Business Administration

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

Retail clerk

Beyond Success: The 15 Secrets of Leadership… John Wooden’s Pyramid (Biro) – second time reading

INSPIRE PARTNERS (EMPLOYEES) TO EXCEED

READING:

their personal best. I always encourage each person to compete only with themselves. If each day she tries to be better than the day before, then she has been successful.

PHILOSOPHY:

At the end of the day, this is what it is all about—people. People always come first. Be truthful, be genuine, and be direct.

FAMILY:

Be the best you can be.

Husband; daughter (3)

INTERESTS:

Horses; cooking; traveling; golf

DEVELOP FUTURE LEADERS.

Any charity that promotes children’s safety, health, or inspiration.

FAVORITE CHARITY:

MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN EVERY PERSON’S DAY.

Every interaction is an opportunity regardless of its seeming importance. You never know when a kind word or encouragement will be a life long memory for someone else. Make it a positive memory.

Starbucks Coffee

COMPANY:

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Seattle, WA

www.starbucks.com

BUSINESS/RANKING: Retailer, roaster & brand of specialty coffee; 3rd – Fortune’s “America’s Most Admired Companies” 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES: CUSTOMERS:

$5.3 billion

>90,000 serving at >10,000 retail locations ~34 million people in 36 countries each

week SUPPLIERS:

Dedicated supplier program that supports

diversity.

118

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

I believe that what truly makes a great leader is the ability to be genuine in whatever you are doing. I am fortunate in that I love what I do, so my values and my behaviors are consistent whether I am at home or at work. I often advise women to focus less on the next position they want and more on loving the position they currently have. Staying focused and truly engaged in what you are doing will prepare you for the next position. As long as I love what I do, and believe that I am making a difference in a position that keeps the possibilities open, then the title doesn’t really matter. The most important advice I can give (but the most challenging) is: keep focused on the relationships you build. Have the courage to keep your family and friends as priorities. As I reflect upon my life, really it is not the numbers I remember, is the people, the relationships.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Karin Stone

N AT I O N A L C I T Y B A N K

I

t all begins with your core values. Without that foundation, you’re bound to find yourself in trouble. I learned this lesson from one of my first mentors, who counseled me to truly define my core beliefs and values. She said I’d need to because I was going to “see things that would make my hair stand on end”— so I would need to know when to stand firm. And, when to walk away. Today, as my career moves forward and I find myself in the role of mentor, I share these secrets to success: If you don’t deliver results, the rest of the lessons don’t matter. Obviously, early in your career, individual performance is critical. As you progress to positions of greater authority, you still have to deliver, but you need to figure out how to do it through others. 1. PERFORMANCE COUNTS.

They take time to establish, but the effort you expend will pay off. Clearly, your boss and your employees are important relationships. But don’t forget your colleagues and your peers. Their trust and respect is very difficult to rebuild if you lose it. Conversely, these people will be your sounding board, will help you navigate company politics, and might be your boss (or employee) someday. Also, remember to get to know the administrative assistants: they know what’s really happening in the company and can help (or not) facilitate interaction with their bosses. 2. RELATIONSHIPS AND RESPECT COUNT.

COMPANY:

National City Corporation

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Cleveland, OH

www.NationalCity.com

BUSINESS/RANKING:

Financial holding company:

commercial & retail banking; mortgage financing & servicing; consumer finance; asset management; 9th largest bank – assets (American Banker) EMPLOYEES: CUSTOMERS:

36,000 Extensive banking network primarily in

TITLE: Senior Vice President, Director of Corporate Marketing

BA (mathematics and accounting): Gustavus Adolphus College; MBA: University of Minnesota EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: Mutual fund accountant at IDS Financial Services (now Ameriprise) READING:

The Last Word on Power (Goss)

PHILOSOPHY: Focus on doing the right things and building relationships. The rest will fall into place. FAMILY:

Single

INTERESTS:

Bicycling; travel; baseball

FAVORITE CHARITY: The ones in which I am active: my college, Gustavus; Cleveland Institute of Music; and Community Partnership for Arts and Culture

This lesson is specific to women: THE FILTER USED TO JUDGE YOU IS NARROWER than the one used to judge your male colleagues. You need to speak up, but not talk too much. Your communication must be confident, assertive and passionate, but not aggressive. You need to know all the answers, but don’t ask others the hard questions if you think they don’t know the answers. Yes, this still happening in 2005. It’s not intentional. You can’t change it. But you do need to understand it, get over it, and then focus on lessons 1 and 2. This last lesson remains the most important—because it takes you right back to the first two. Performance counts. Relationships count. 3.

As you go out into the world, remember to focus on doing the right things and building relationships. The rest will fall into place. And don’t forget to have a life along the way.

Midwest and select markets nationally

PDJ Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2005

119


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Janice D. Stoney

WILLIAMS

M

y 102-year-old-mother has been a major influence in shaping my life goals. As a widowed working mom at a time when few mothers worked outside the home, she was a secretary, accomplished seamstress, home manager, and wonderful mother. I saw her as very stylish, competent, and self sufficient, associating her accomplishments with the fact that she was a professional.. I grew up believing that education, hard work, and perseverance pay off. I still believe in “the American Dream.” Additionally, over a lifetime I have become convinced of the importance of faith to a complete life. During my career, I was dedicated to balancing personal and professional responsibilities; however, as I look back, I am convinced that the ‘superwoman’ model doesn’t exist and never did. At any given time there are priorities and resulting sacrifices. Today, I see women and men making informed, deliberate choices about family and careers. Consequently, I believe they will experience rewarding lives with fewer regrets. As a practical matter, a short list of attractive attributes for career women might include: • Physical fitness and a high energy level

TITLE:

Board of Directors – The Williams Companies

EDUCATION: Executive Program: Williams College; Bell Advanced Management Program: University of Illinois; accounting and finance management: Columbia University; and US West’s Japan Study Mission FIRST JOB: Service representative – Northwestern Bell Telephone Company READING:

1776 (McCullough)

PHILOSOPHY: Priorities of God, family, and community. Look for the joy in life and the positive attributes in human beings. FAMILY:

Husband; one son; three granddaughters

INTERESTS:

Faith; fitness; family; friends

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Omaha Community Foundation

• Ethical conduct • Self discipline and organization • Insatiable curiosity with an attitude of lifelong learning • Philosophy of learning 200% more from mistakes than successes, exercising discipline of self examination, and utilizing opportunities for improvement • Genuine regard for others, their needs and aspirations

COMPANY:

The Williams Companies

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Tulsa, OK

www.williams.com

BUSINESS/RANKING: Find, produce, gather, process & transport natural gas; #165 – Fortune 500 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

120

$12.4 billion

3,600

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

• Ability to develop vision and inspiration with others. I heard the CEO of a major Japanese corporation describe his most important role as “the inspiration of the human heart.” I thought it one of the most profound expressions of a corporate leader I have ever heard. Decades ago, the Civil Rights Act, Equal Pay Act, and others were the result of extraordinary efforts and necessary chapters in the progress for women. My personal encouragement to women today is to not forget “the cause” and those who forged that groundwork, but to build on it, and move on—not make it our focus. The good news is that there are very few roads not traveled today. We have earned the right and proved that our competencies provide value in all aspects of life, business, and community. Now we need to pursue our dreams— as well as inspire our daughters, sons, and grandchildren.

PDJ


We couldn’t be your voice in Washington without being a neighbor in your community.

AARP. Creating change in our community. From community service programs to consumer protection and nursing home reform, AARP is working hard to create positive social change where it’s needed most — in every community. At AARP we are involved in the daily lives of more Americans in more ways than you can imagine. We provide them with information, promote independence and protect their health and financial security. We also encourage them to work and volunteer. Our goal is to improve the lives of Americans over 50 by making them healthier, happier and better informed.

Call us at 1- 888 -OUR-AARP or visit our website at www.aarp.org.


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Dawn Sweeney

AARP SERVICES

M

y advice for anyone striving for a leadership role is to trust your instincts, behave with unwavering integrity, and leverage your listening skills. We all know that we can’t lead effectively if no one will follow! People want to believe in their leaders and they want their mission to be clear and good. Good. That’s the test I give to any new venture—will this do good? Will this make our world a better place? I have had some marvelous opportunities in my life to add to the greater good. As VP of market development for the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, I helped launch Touchstone Energy®, an initiative that set the national standard through which energy cooperatives provide quality service to consumers, many in rural America. It made the world better for millions of people. As President of AARP Services, I’m focused on improving the quality of life for everyone as they age. That’s a terrific mission and a great reason to get to the office every day. The work we do now will be helping people for a long time to come. Doing good is what I believe in. And I firmly believe that our core values shouldn’t fade into the background when we sit in the corner office. If anything, who we are should be under more scrutiny when we lead—and it is. People want to believe in their leaders, and they can’t believe in someone they don’t know and trust. Connect with people, listen to them, learn from them. And return the favor by being accessible and open with those around you. Making connections is a

COMPANY:

AARP Services, Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Washington, DC

www.aarp.org

2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES: CUSTOMERS:

$375 million

125 35 million members (AARP)

PROVIDERS: United Health; The Hartford; New York Life; MetLife; The Home Depot; Travelocity; Bank One/ Chase; Foremost; Delta Dental; others.

122

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE:

President, AARP Services

EDUCATION: BA (government): Colby College; MBA (marketing): The George Washington University

Educational coordinator, Milk Industry

FIRST JOB:

Foundation READING:

Blue Ocean Strategy (Kim & Mauborgne)

It’s not what happens to us but what we choose to do about what happens that makes the difference in how our lives turn out. PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY:

Husband; son

INTERESTS:

Hiking; spending time with friends & family;

volunteering FAVORITE CHARITY:

National Down Syndrome Society

lifetime project and will enrich your days. I’ve learned some amazing lessons from my son, my assistant, our Board members, and from AARP members I meet on planes or in hotel lobbies. Along with things we should always do, there’s the flip side. Don’t compromise yourself for a win—ever. Don’t agree to a course that you doubt. Don’t ever hurt a colleague to make a point. Don’t shrug off a mistake. Don’t stop being yourself. Our careers should be an active part of our lives. It shouldn’t be “either/or” with our lives and our jobs. Trust yourself to be yourself in all aspects of your day, from the breakfast table to the boardroom. Trust yourself—and that inner voice that guides you.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Marilyn B. Tavenner

HCA

T

here are many ways to advance a career. Some say make a plan and work the plan. Others say it’s mostly luck—being in the right place at the right time. I believe it’s both. Especially for women, the road upward is not a straight path. Sometimes we take a circuitous route, leaving the workplace to have children and delaying career advancement. At other times, we’d like to go for the executive suite, but are not sure how to get there. Even with the progress women have made, there’s still a gap in the speed and frequency at which women advance to top jobs. How do we change that? Consider these suggestions: • There is no substitute for preparation. If you have the credentials and aspire to a higher level, look around. Who is in the job you want? What training and education does he or she have? Do you understand finance and how the business works? There’s an axiom that “a manager is a manager,” implying managerial skills are portable. Whenever possible, get experience to supplement education so you will be ready when the big opportunity comes.

• Women are team builders. We can be tough, but we tend to balance toughness with compassion. Use those inherent qualities to leave your mark. Never forget or abandon those who supported you along your journey. Call on associates for advice, and give counsel when asked. • Accept assignments out of your comfort zone. Taking risks and learning from failure are important elements of growth.

COMPANY:

HCA, Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

BUSINESS/RANKING:

EMPLOYEES: CUSTOMERS:

#80 – Fortune 500

$23.5 billion

~190,000 1.6 million patients

>1,100 suppliers and contractors (>$100 million with minority- /women-owned businesses)

SUPPLIERS:

President – Outpatient Services Group

BS (nursing): Medical College of Virginia; Master’s (Health Administration): Medical College of Virginia

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB:

Lifeguard and swim coach.

Conspiracy of Fools (Eichenwald); Angels & Demons (Brown) READING:

PHILOSOPHY: Keep an open door and an open mind. Be approachable – you will learn much more about yourself and your organization. FAMILY:

Husband; three children

INTERESTS:

Scuba diving; traveling; NASCAR; football

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Juvenile Diabetes Research

Foundation; YWCA

• It may seem obvious, but do what your boss asks. You might be surprised at how often this is ignored or rationalized: “He (she) didn’t really mean for me to do that.” “Maybe I misunderstood.” “That’s crazy.” Take that stance at your own peril. • Experience “otherness.” It’s human to gravitate toward those who look and think like us, but we lose opportunities for creativity, growth, and enrichment if we surround ourselves with mirror images.

Nashville, TN

www.hcahealthcare.com

2004 REVENUE:

TITLE:

• Sell, sell, sell! We’re all sales people. In business, everyone must do more with less while keeping customers happy. Show your peers and supervisors that you add value to the product or service … and do it cheerfully. • Keep your sense of humor. Be serious about serious matters, but laugh at every opportunity—particularly at yourself. It humanizes you with coworkers, and can help you get through the day!

PDJ

Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2005

123


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Karen D. Taylor

RELIANT ENERGY

T

he most effective lessons I have learned on leadership are those that came about by more fully understanding who I am and what I bring to the table. By better understanding myself, I can operate out of my strengths and more effectively influence those around me. I have also learned humility in discovering areas where I need to improve. In counseling aspiring leaders, I have drawn upon these lessons from my personal journey:

TITLE:

Senior Vice President, Human Resources

EDUCATION: Master’s (professional accountancy): Louisiana Tech University; Certified Professional Accountant FIRST JOB:

BE AWARE OF WHAT YOU KNOW AND, MORE IMPORTANTLY, WHAT YOU DON’T KNOW. I

believe that self-awareness is a significantly underrated leadership competency, perhaps because it is uncomfortable for leaders to admit their areas of weakness. However, had I not recognized an area where I was not particularly strong, my career would have taken quite a different turn. I am a CPA with a master’s degree in accounting. Early in my career, recognizing that I was not a strong technical accountant, I gravitated to roles that allowed me to effectively call upon my accounting background but were not traditional accounting positions. This opened an entirely different set of opportunities for me to explore, in spite of the fact that “on paper” I was still an accountant.

Packing peaches at a peach orchard during

high school. READING: I jot down books that catch my attention – through references, mention on the radio, etc. My favorite business book is Working with Emotional Intelligence (Goleman). For pure pleasure, I also enjoy a variety of fiction, especially authors with colorful characters. PHILOSOPHY:

Don’t take yourself too seriously

I owe much of my success to my supportive husband and my mother, a leadership role model herself. Also, a son and twin daughters – all in high school. FAMILY:

Major League Baseball fan; reading; jogging with my dog; water sports; children’s activities INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY: Humane Society; Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals

BE AUTHENTIC—AS A PERSON AND AS A

There is a huge body of knowledge on leadership as well as role models and mentors for instruction and guidance. While these are invaluable sources of information and thought-provoking ideas, the lessons learned from them must nevertheless fit the individual. I have seen many people—particularly women—try on attributes, behaviors, and styles that don’t fit, as if attempting to wear clothes belonging to LEADER.

Reliant Energy, Inc. Houston, TX WEBSITE: www.reliant.com BUSINESS/RANKING: One of the largest independent power producers U.S. (>19,000 MW) 2004 REVENUE: $8.7 billion EMPLOYEES: 3,767 CUSTOMERS: ~1.9 million (from residences to large commercial & institutional customers) SUPPLIERS: Supplier Diversity Initiative active COMPANY:

HEADQUARTERS:

124

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

someone else. The lack of authenticity is apparent, so they are not believable, and ultimately are not as effective. BE GENEROUS IN A NUMBER OF DIMENSIONS.

Be generous with responsibility and accountability: give people the tools they need to succeed, allow them to fail, and help them learn from both. Be generous with information: explain why and how decisions are made, and encourage two-way information flow. Be generous with recognition: recognize good work and give credit to others, while accepting blame yourself—and do both publicly. Finally, be generous with yourself: allow employees to have access to you and, above all, listen actively to them. Leadership is a privilege, not a right. It is a 24/7 responsibility. Simply put, once you are a leader, you are never not a leader, regardless of where you are. Leaders have multiple opportunities to influence others, directly and indirectly, in all areas of life. I hope my influence as a leader will be positive and lasting. I can think of no better legacy. BE CAREFUL WHAT YOU WISH FOR.

PDJ


Diversity drives human achievement.

Providing access to affordable prescription care for millions of Americans.

www.medco.com Medco is a registered trademark of Medco Health Solutions, Inc. Š 2005 Medco Health Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Jean Thomas

C E N DA N T

I

have been fortunate to work with a variety of companies over the past 25 years. Some of the most important lessons I learned throughout my career were gained very early on and have served me well over the years. Three lessons that have been particularly useful are: doing what you love, taking unexpected career turns, and working with non-profit organizations.

I earned my undergraduate degree in foods and nutrition because I was fascinated by food as a science and as an art. I discovered that food as an art form was my true interest because it allowed me to create new products and find creative ways to market them. This influenced my job seeking from the very start. Instead of pursuing research, I pursued marketing. This taught me that finding work in the right aspect of what you love is critical. It makes all the difference as to whether you have a job or a career.

DO WHAT YOU LOVE.

I spent a good part of my senior year in college sending letters to a variety of food companies looking for marketing positions. Many didn’t respond or, if so, sent polite declines. A few indicated that I would benefit from a more business- versus science-oriented background. However, one responder said I should contact a national public relations agency that specialized in food. I didn’t know much about public relations, but I sent the agency a letter and interviewed for the position over the phone. I got an entry-level position at that agency based on the call. TAKE THE UNEXPECTED CAREER TURNS.

COMPANY:

TITLE: Senior Vice President of Marketing, Hospitality Services Division EDUCATION: BS (foods and nutrition): Oregon State University; Master’s degree (marketing): UCLA Graduate School of Management

Assistant account executive (Harshe-Rotman & Druck public relations)

FIRST JOB:

Daily– New York Times; The Wall Street Journal; USA TODAY; monthly book club – fiction/nonfiction

READING:

PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Keep learning.

Husband; father; twin sister; younger brother

INTERESTS:

Cooking; travel; community/volunteer activities

Jersey Battered Women’s Service (serves victims/families of domestic violence) FAVORITE CHARITY:

Though I didn’t have any formal public relations training, it turned out to be a terrific first step in my career. I learned to write, develop business plans, think creatively, sell my ideas, and speak confidently in front of groups. I did go back and get my master’s degree five years after college, but it was that first unexpected step that started my career.

Cendant Corporation GET INVOLVED IN NOT-FOR-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

New York City

www.cendant.com

BUSINESS/RANKING:

Provider of travel & residential

real estate services; #107 – Fortune 500 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

126

~$20 billion

~85,000

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

Motivating people who don’t work for you is completely different from managing direct reports. I became a much stronger manager and leader through my not-for-profit experiences. I learned to be a better listener, clearer communicator, and more inspiring motivator. These skills also proved to be invaluable in today’s matrix organizations where one frequently works with others without a direct reporting relationship. PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

JaniceM.Tomlinson

CHUBB GROUP

I

began my life as the youngest of 11 children on a farm in rural Kansas. My parents believed that education was very important for both their sons and their daughters—this was progressive thinking for the times. They also fostered in me a sense of determination and a feeling that I could do anything I wanted to do with my life through education. I attended a women’s college in Kansas, where my advisor further reinforced what my parents had taught me. By the time I began working in my first full-time job, I never doubted my ability to accomplish what I had set out to do. Since my first corporate job in 1972, I have continued to pay close attention to lessons learned along the way—after all, education is a lifelong process. By applying these accumulated do’s and don’ts to my personal and professional life, I have been able to build a successful career and a fulfilling life: LIVE BY YOUR VALUES AND BEHAVE WITH

Good business relationships are built on trust. That’s why it’s important to choose a company whose values resonate with your own. If you find the right fit, you’ll feel comfortable in your work environment and proud of the way in which you’ve achieved success.

INTEGRITY AT ALL TIMES.

A person who is balanced has the advantage of being able to focus on what’s important in their life and their work. If your life is too focused in one direction, you may lose that ability. Look beyond your work and be an active participant in your family life and your community. SEEK BALANCE IN YOUR LIFE.

COMPANY:

Chubb Group of Insurance Companies

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Warren, NJ

www.chubb.com

Property & casualty insurance for individuals and businesses BUSINESS:

2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

$13.2 billion

11,800

TITLE: Executive Vice President, International Field Operations

BA: Marymount College of Kansas

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

Underwriting trainee

PHILOSOPHY:

Love what you do!

Husband; son (23); mother and many brothers, sisters, nieces, nephews, etc. FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

Golf; reading; needlepoint

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Women in Insurance Cancer

Crusade

PRODUCE RESULTS. Businesses count on people who can contribute to the bottom line. The best way to accomplish this is to hone your technical skills and know the business. This will earn you a reputation as someone that people can go to for critical information, strong advice, and stellar results. GIVE BACK TO THE COMMUNITY. No one—man or woman—gets anywhere without the help and support of others. If the community has helped your business to profit, then find opportunities to volunteer and serve that community. If you were fortunate to have a mentor who guided you down the right path, return the favor by serving as a mentor for someone else.

Most of all, never forget as you are struggling your way to the top—as well as when you finally reach your destination—that there are always new lessons to be learned. I’m sure that there is much more in store for me in the years ahead. PDJ Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2005

127


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Michele P. Toth

NORTHROP GRUMMAN IT

I

believe that the foundation of a fulfilling career is rooted in a commitment to learning, an appreciation for a diverse workforce, and actively engaging in mentoring. An individual should be encouraged to stretch his or her intellectual limits and broaden horizons by seeking out new business roles and challenges. My career within Northrop Grumman has included a variety of roles that enabled me to leave my comfort zone. The most difficult time came when Northrop Grumman acquired Litton Industries. I was asked to strategically lead a large part of the integration project and combine six former businesses into one new division. This challenged my ability to balance my commitment to the company with my compassion toward the workers whose lives would be affected by the reorganization. The process taught me the value of managerial support and the significance of a cohesive team. For a successful and fulfilling career, I offer the following thoughts/suggestions:

Vice President, Human Resources & Administration – Northrop Grumman Information Technology TITLE:

EDUCATION: Bachelor’s (psychology): University of Maryland; Master’s (statistics & industrial psychology): University of Baltimore – Harvard General Mgmt. Program FIRST JOB: Materials internship within Northrop Grumman Corporation READING: Celebrating the Joy of Living Fully (Yamada); Rocco (Trigiani) PHILOSOPHY:

MIX IT UP, AND LEAVE YOUR COMFORT ZONE.

The minute your job gets comfortable, find something to challenge yourself. Facilitate an open communication policy with your staff and create a forum where everyone can exchange ideas. Create a stimulating work environment. Take on small and large projects outside of the daily routine.

FAMILY:

Honesty

Significant other

INTERESTS: Meeting people; the arts; the symphony; theater; architecture; sports; travel. Most importantly, I love to live and want to see the world. FAVORITE CHARITY:

American Cancer Society

BE A FORMAL AND INFORMAL MENTOR.

Mentoring should be a personal and professional commitment. Build relationships with colleagues of different backgounds and all levels. Positive and constructive feedback, extra support during challenging assignments, and shared knowledge and skills will help them excel. I continue to have both formal and informal mentors, and counsel several colleagues; in return, I learn from them. COMPANY: Northrop Grumman Information Technology (unit of Northrop Grumman Corporation) HEADQUARTERS:

IT unit: McLean, VA (corporate:

Los Angeles, CA) WEBSITE:

www.it.northropgrumman.com/itsolutions

BUSINESS/RANKING: Computer support services; U.S. defense contractor; 2nd largest provider of U.S. government computer support services; 3rd largest U.S. defense contractor. 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

128

>$5 billion (corporate $29.9 billion)

>23,000 (corporate >125,000)

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

FOSTER AN INCLUSIVE WORKING ENVIRONMENT.

People should not feel judged because of what they look like or where they came from. A professional environment should be a place where people come to learn and give back to customers or a cause. It takes the sum of all workers to make a company prosper and for employees to achieve their individual goals. YOU CAN LEARN A LOT ABOUT YOURSELF FROM OTHERS. I received this advice from my father, the greatest

mentor I ever had. He taught me early on about diversity, and encouraged me to surround myself with people from other cultures and backgrounds who offer new insights and intellectual challenge. I think women aspiring to the executive level should, above all, treat their careers as an education. My numberone goal has always been to learn, not to attain a specific title. I know firsthand the importance of challenging myself and constantly increasing my knowledge base while staying true to my values and convictions. At the end of the day I must go home, look myself in the mirror, and be proud of the person I see. PDJ


Food for thought At Food Lion, we have bags of fresh foods that exemplify the diversity of our customers, products, associates and communities we serve.

DIVERSITY & INCLUSION

DIVERSIDAD & INCLUSIÓN

Our DIVERSITY of skills,

Nuestra DIVERSIDAD de

knowledge, abilities,

habilidades, conocimientos,

and life experiences

capacidades,

are leveraged through creating an INCLUSIVE environment.

y las experiencias de la vida son influenciadas a través de crear de un ambiente INCLUSIVO.

DIVERSITY & INCLUSION, It’s all part of our commitment to be an active partner in the communities we serve.


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Debra A. Valentine

UNITED TECHNOLOGIES

A

s in much of life, not everything comes naturally, and much comes from hard work and astute observation. I’d like to share six lessons from my experience: First, care passionately about what you do. Absent this passion, you will never truly excel—because doing well takes hard work and long hours, and you need that caring and commitment to sustain you. Ultimately, that passion nourishes the vision that every leader needs to motivate the hearts and minds of others. Second, find inspiring role models. They may be male or female, but they must have the brilliance and drive and integrity that spur you to emulate them and, by osmosis, to continually improve yourself. While we may learn most profoundly from our own failures, we can learn much (and less painfully) from the experience of others. Third, mentor and develop others. Good leaders exist because they have learned to surround themselves with great people. You will be infinitely rewarded for encouraging the talents of others who will support you through life. And because we can never lead without others willing to come along, always acknowledge the contributions of others. Appreciation of others’ talents is a powerful and underutilized motivator critical to any team’s success. Fourth, learn to communicate in a way that persuades others and that enables others to buy in to your vision or idea. Your best ideas will get nowhere if others are not willing to embrace them with confidence.

COMPANY:

United Technologies Corporation

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Hartford, CT

www.utc.com

BUSINESS/RANKING:

#39 – Fortune 500 (U.S.),

#120 – Fortune Global 500 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

130

$37 billion

210,000 worldwide

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE: Vice President, Secretary & Associate General Counsel EDUCATION: Princeton University; Yale Law School; Fulbright Scholar

First ever – camp counselor; first professional job – clerk to Judge Arlin M. Adams, U.S. Court of Appeals, Third Circuit

FIRST JOB:

Alexander Hamilton (Chernow); John Adams (McCullough); always reading Tolstoy’s War and Peace READING:

An unexamined life is not worth living; but once you’ve learned what really matters, pursue those goals and values with all your heart. PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY:

Wonderful parents and great friends

INTERESTS:

Hiking; opera; theater; travel

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Local arts and educational

organizations

Fifth, pursue learning voraciously; be open to new ideas and change. We often learn most—and most intensely—when confronted with a dramatic career change or unexpected development. Moreover, the global marketplace will continue to evolve more and more rapidly, placing a premium on flexibility, creativity, and open-mindedness. Sixth, maintain your personal and professional integrity. Your reputation is your most important asset and one you cannot afford to lose. The tone of a corporation is set at the top, but you will never get to the top if you compromise your core values.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Kim E. VanGelder

KO DA K

I

’ve been at Eastman Kodak all of my working life, having started out as a programmer. As CIO twentyone years later, I still feel fortunate to work for a great company with great people dedicated to delivering results and driving change. An environment of give and take in terms of feedback, help, and support makes all the difference. I want to look back and know that I have helped others along the way, just as they’ve helped me. I’ve experienced many mentoring relationships over the years, some formal and some informal. Because I’ve held a variety of positions, I’ve had the opportunity to interact with and observe a diverse group of individuals. This has been invaluable in learning what does and doesn’t work. I’ve learned that direct and ongoing feedback is the most effective. The feedback I’ve learned the most from is the feedback that is completely unsolicited. Such feedback is priceless—jewels that typically don’t happen in a formal mentoring relationship. Often in mentoring relationships, the focus is on how the individual can gain a higher position, rather than how to excel in his or her current role. I’ve learned that the latter is more valuable in the long run. The first step to success is to stand out in your current role and to build your base of experience. This sets the stage for new opportunities so that you are prepared to take on roles of greater responsibility

COMPANY:

Eastman Kodak Company

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Rochester, NY

www.kodak.com

BUSINESS/RANKING: Traditional and digital imaging and information products and systems for consumers, businesses, communications professionals, and cinematographers as well as medical and dental practices; # 1– Fortune 500 (scientific, photo, control equipment) 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

$13.5 billion

54,000

TITLE:

Chief Information Officer & Vice President BS (mathematics): Rochester Institute of

EDUCATION:

Technology Programmer for Eastman Kodak

FIRST JOB: READING:

The World is Flat (Friedman)

PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Maintain perspective.

Husband; two children

INTERESTS:

Reading; running; traveling; scuba diving

FAVORITE CHARITY:

United Way

when they become available. In my own career at Kodak, I accepted a variety of information technology roles across the company; this allowed me to build a strong foundation and to learn from a wide range of people. The process prepared me to fill the role of CIO when the opportunity came my way. It’s clear that corporations are more willing to do their part. More and more, there is a willingness on the part of companies to ensure that the selection process for their executive teams results in the kind of diversity that represents the markets in which they conduct business. This is great news for women. For those who are willing to learn from others, excel in their current jobs, and prepare and ready themselves for the positions to which they aspire— the sky is the limit. PDJ Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2005

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W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Lora J. Villarreal

ACS

M

y grandfather taught me most everything I have ever needed to know about achieving success—in a word: values. He used to say “you can lose all your money and you can still rebuild your life—but if you lose your values, you can never regain them, because people will never trust you again.” The values of respect, integrity and honesty have helped me succeed in business and in life. Until I was 13, my grandfather and grandmother raised my sister and me; those early years with my grandparents had the biggest impact on helping shape my values and my perspective on life. We lived in the barrio of East Los Angeles, and although we never had much money, somehow there was always enough to eat and more than enough love to go around. I watched my grandparents work as a team to provide for us, and for each other, through good and bad times. Through it all, they both maintained a positive, can-do spirit. That can-do spirit has carried me through some tough times in my own life. As a single mother of two, with only a high school diploma to my name, I struggled to make ends meet. Ever the optimist, and a persistent one, I managed to get a job in human resources at Southern California Edison. Frank Quevedo, a senior employee, took me under his wing, gave me projects to help me grow, and encouraged me to pursue my dreams with a college education. Having someone in my professional life believe in me, especially early in my career, has made all the difference. Ultimately, I ended up with three degrees, and I married again. Just as Mr. Quevedo’s mentoring helped me professionally, I gained personal and

ACS (Affiliated Computer Services), Inc.

COMPANY:

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Dallas, TX

www.acs-inc.com

BUSINESS/RANKING: REVENUE:

$5 billion (FY 2005) ~55,000 worldwide

EMPLOYEES: CUSTOMERS: SUPPLIERS:

132

#460 – Fortune 500

Fortune 500 corporations

Include: Spherion, Office Depot, IBM

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE:

Chief People Person & SVP

EDUCATION: BS: Bellevue University; MS: Central Michigan University; PhD: California Coast University FIRST JOB:

Sears Roebuck as a sales rep when I was 15

I am an avid reader – anything, from periodicals to mysteries to romance. Reading is an opportunity to escape the chaos of the corporate world and take a deep breath, if only for a moment. READING:

Always treat others as you expect to be treated – with respect and dignity. I hope to leave as a legacy the values of my roots – a great respect for my Hispanic heritage, and an ethical upbringing, not only in my life, but in the lives of my children as well. PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY: Daughter, granddaughter and grandson in Atlanta; son in Chicago

Spectator sports – hockey, football, soccer; movies; running; jogging; and taking the time to cook a wonderful meal! INTERESTS:

The loss of my mother-in-law to Alzheimer's disease brought understanding and desire to assist with the search for help and a cure of this disease. FAVORITE CHARITY:

professional strength from my husband, Larry. When I began to pursue my own career, this former Air Force officer shared in the parenting and home duties, and served as my own personal cheerleader. My professional success has much to do with the balance I have been able to achieve, thanks to my husband. I believe in giving back. Because I have been blessed with nurturing people in my life, I work to offer that same kind of support to those around me. My job at ACS allows me to give back to our employees in many ways, and to help ACS give back to the community. My position also gives me the privilege of serving as a role model, living out the values that my grandfather taught me.

PDJ


Working together. Combining resources and knowledge. Providing value, selection and helpful, friendly service. Striving for excellence and staying true to our customers.

Like any good team, Ace understands that each member brings different strengths, unique experiences and diverse talents to the mix.

Combining these qualities enhances the performance of the team, allowing Ace to deliver world-class service as the most helpful hardware company. Anywhere...

www.acehardware.com


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Jacqui D. Vines

C O X C O M M U N I C AT I O N S

W

hen I was a little girl, my Great Aunt Hattie used

to sing me an old gospel hymn—We Shall Overcome. As challenges arose in my life, I found myself relying more and more on those immortal words. That hymn became my “siren song,” guiding me through difficult times and helping me stay the course when it would have been easier to give up. I encourage you to find your “siren song.” Whether it’s a song, or a phrase or a proverb that your grandmother used to say, find something that you can draw strength from, something that can be your inner guide. You also need to have a formal plan for your career development. The simple act of writing down your goals and monitoring your progress will tend to keep you focused on your ultimate objective. The process helps you to see beyond the moment and

TITLE:

Vice President & General Manager (Cox – Baton

Rouge) BS (business administration & management): University of the Redlands, CA

EDUCATION:

develops your ability to see the big picture—which is FIRST JOB:

Junior park counselor

the ultimate goal of any leader. As with any business, the success of the bottom line is always important, but how that success is achieved is just as important. It takes passion, determination, and the ability to stand for what is right to

Broken Open: How Difficult Times Can Help Us Grow (Lesser); Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (Rowling); Jesus, CEO: Using Ancient Wisdom for Visionary Leadership (Jones) READING:

From those to whom much is given, much is required. PHILOSOPHY:

make that success worthwhile. It is also imperative that you find someone that

FAMILY:

Two small children

you admire and get to know them. Watch how they interact with people, listen to their advice, and learn from their experiences. A mentor can be an invaluable tool as you progress through life.

INTERESTS:

Reading; traveling; golfing

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Organizations that work to prevent

domestic violence.

I didn’t know when I started my journey just where I COMPANY:

Cox Communications, Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Atlanta, GA

www.cox.com & www.cox.com/batonrouge

BUSINESS/RANKING: 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES: CUSTOMERS:

134

Telecommunications; #3

$5.8 billion

20,000 6.7 million

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

would end up, but I did know that I had the power and the ability to make that journey a success. If you remember nothing of this, remember only my “siren song:” You shall overcome; You’ll walk hand-in-hand; You’re not afraid; and, You’re not alone.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Debra K. Walker

U.S. AIR FORCE

I

t is hard to specifically identify the exact critical factors for success in the workplace. All workplaces are different and one must have the ability to understand the culture and the keys to success in each particular business. I firmly believe most women need to find what works for them—there is no magic formula as many hope for! My general guidelines for success are to set achievable goals, improve your interpersonal skills, and conduct yourself with the highest level of integrity and professionalism. You must identify realistic, achievable goals and expand them as you achieve your short terms goals. When you run a marathon the first time, you start by running shorter distances and, with success, you run farther and farther. You should manage your career the same way. Know what it takes to be that successful runner and be sure you don’t just “check the squares;” you have to do the work. You must excel in your current position, volunteer to perform special projects outside of your current position, and be willing to consider jobs that were not in your planned career path. Bottom line: knowledge, ability, and hard work generate the respect of your staff and your leaders, resulting in that next promotion. Good interpersonal skills are absolutely crucial to achieving senior level positions. There are many highly capable people in the workplace who don’t work well with others or are not comfortable with leading. You must find the right balance between being too tough versus too benevolent. The first will de-motivate employees, and the latter will prevent getting desired

COMPANY:

United States Air Force

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Washington, DC

www.af.mil

BUSINESS/RANKING: EMPLOYEES:

civilians)

National defense

620,000 (active duty, AF reserve, and

TITLE: Deputy Director of Resources, Deputy Chief of Staff for Installations & Logistics

BS (business) and Master’s in Public Affairs: Georgia College & State University; Princeton Public Fellow; Harvard executive programs

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB:

Babysitting and tobacco farming

Predictable Surprises: The Disasters You Should Have Seen Coming and How to Prevent Them (Bazerman and Watkins) READING:

Keep smiling, learn as much as you can, credit others for your success, and don’t change who you are regardless of your position. PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY: Married to my best friend, for 28 years; two wonderful, successful daughters (26 and 23) INTERESTS:

Golf; tennis; shopping; spending time

with family FAVORITE CHARITY:

American Red Cross

results; both are career ending. Treat people with dignity regardless of the situation. Do not lose your temper, use foul language, or share an employee’s shortcomings with subordinates. Bottom line: hold employees accountable, but do it with respect. Don’t become “one of the boys or girls.” I’m not saying you can’t have fun, but keep your work life separate from your personal life. Managers live in a fishbowl. Everything you do in the workplace, and even to some extent in your personal life, is watched and judged by others—managers, employees, and customers. Bottom line: hold yourself to the highest standard, dress professionally, and always follow the company ethics PDJ and rules. Good Luck! Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2005

135


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Catherine West

C A P I TA L O N E

E

ach of us can think of someone who has had a significant impact on our lives. I was fortunate to grow up in a family filled with role models and mentors. My mother, in particular, has always encouraged my dreams and challenged me to succeed. She taught me that life is too short to work in a job that you are not passionate about, and she fed my insatiable curiosity to learn and grow by teaching me to embrace new experiences. She instilled in me a sense of humility and compassion for others and taught me that caring, sharing, and helping others succeed is a uniquely rewarding experience. Today, at 72, she is CEO of my father’s printing business and one of the greatest mentors I have ever had. I have never taken for granted the impact that my mother has had on my life and my career, and I have always welcomed the opportunity to share what I’ve learned with others as a mentor. One of the most gratifying elements of my work life at Capital One is being part of a corporate culture that mirrors the supportive environment that I was lucky enough to enjoy growing up. Each day, I have the opportunity not only to work alongside a team of very talented individuals, but I also have the privilege to mentor, helping to encourage new ideas and diverse paths for growth. For me, mentoring is more about helping another individual reach their personal potential than it is about the gratification of getting that next promotion or a new title. Not that women aren’t—or shouldn’t be—concerned about advancing their careers, but I

COMPANY:

Capital One Financial

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

McLean, VA

www.capitalone.com

Financial services; 6th largest credit card issuer in the U.S.

BUSINESS/RANKING:

2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES: CUSTOMERS:

136

$10.8 billion (managed)

14,481 48.6 million

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

President of U.S. Card & Director of Capital One Financial TITLE:

BA: Lynchburg College; Executive education: Harvard Business School

EDUCATION:

Working in a Maryland crab house

FIRST JOB: READING:

Being Perfect (Quindlen)

PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Listen more than you speak.

Son (8); and our family dog – Rocky

INTERESTS:

Spending time with my son; sailing

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Foster Care; charities associated

with at-risk children

believe that those “measures of success” are often a natural result of the growth and confidence gained through the developmental process. I have also learned that listening is a big part of leadership. You can often learn much more from someone whose perspective differs from your own. Surrounding yourself with people who challenge you to think differently can help you clarify your goals and succeed in ways that you might never have envisioned. Leadership and success mean accepting the challenge— remaining true to yourself, being open to new opportunities, taking risks, and stretching beyond your boundaries (which, we have to remember, are sometimes self imposed).

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Teresa L. White

AFLAC

I

grew up believing there was nothing I couldn’t achieve. That same belief carried me through college and into corporate America. I also believe that having a mentor—someone who is willing to share knowledge and offer sound advice to help you advance to the next level—is vitally important for anyone who desires to succeed professionally. My first mentor was my mother, who raised my sister and me without much assistance. We were latchkey kids and had many reasons not to succeed. Success is a choice and sometimes a sacrifice. I am so blessed to have had a mother and family who provided me with insight and focus. I firmly believe that, as you start to climb up the corporate ladder, you must have a vision for your life and specific goals for your career. Sometimes it is easy to put other people’s goals and dreams ahead of your own. But at some point, you must visualize how you want your career to unfold. If your objective is to become CEO, chart the course and determine what is necessary to reach your goal. Approach life and work with passion. Take on at least one new challenge each day. Maybe it’s time to finish that MBA. Whatever it is, get out of your comfort zone and pursue it fervently. My current role is a great example of taking on a challenge. Before I was promoted, I managed the client services side of our business, focusing on meeting policyholders’ needs. In the last year, I’ve had to completely change my thought process into making decisions that impact the company’s bottom line. The transition was not simple, but overcoming fear of the unknown while reaching new heights of personal and professional growth was worth the challenge.

COMPANY:

Aflac

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

Columbus, GA

www.aflac.com

BUSINESS/RANKING: 2004 REVENUE:

Insurance; #158 – Fortune 500

$13.3 billion

EMPLOYEES:

~4,000

CUSTOMERS:

>334,000 payroll accounts

138

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE: Senior Vice President, Director of Sales Support & Administration

BBA: University of Texas at Arlington; MS (management): Troy University

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: First job ever – in a fast food restaurant; first professional job during college – inventory management at Mercedes-Freightliner; first job after college – member services consultant at Alaskan Federal Credit Union.

I'm re-reading Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done (Bossidy and Charan) and introducing it to my team via a book club. I'm also personally reading Positioning: The Battle for your Mind (Ries and Trout). READING:

PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Life is more about giving than taking.

Married for 17 years; son (15) and daughter (10)

INTERESTS: I love reading a good book and taking vacations with family and friends. I also enjoy playing volleyball and following football (I'm a Dallas Cowboys fan).

The Aflac Cancer Center & Blood Disorders Service at Children’s Healthcare – Atlanta; NeighborWorks Columbus. FAVORITE CHARITY:

Professional and individual growth require a certain amount of risk, but you must stay the course and believe in your abilities. See the value in what you do every day. Ask yourself, “Am I getting joy out of what I’m doing?” Finally, make time in every work day to transition from your home life to the office and then from the office to home again. A healthy work/life balance maintains both professional and personal well-being. Succeeding at whatever you set out to do can be a challenge; but the goals you set can be achieved when you surround yourself with a solid support network of family and friends.. Don’t be afraid to take risks, see challenges as growth opportunities, weigh your options, choose wisely, learn from your mistakes, and embrace change. Remember, life is more about giving than taking.

PDJ


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Paula J. Zusi

LIZ CLAIBORNE

I

recall my father buying me my first sewing machine when I was 8 years old and teaching me how to sew. From that point on, I would lock myself in my room for hours, sewing clothes for my Barbie dolls. A fashion industry career was surely in the making! I landed my first job as a designer for a small clothing company in the early ’80s; it was a fabulous experience, as the company was so small I had to wear many hats and gained exposure to finance, sales, and manufacturing. I took a big risk at the age of 24, moving sight unseen to Hong Kong. I traveled extensively throughout Asia and visited many garment factories. Looking back, I think the move to Hong Kong was probably the single most formative event in my career. I have had incredible opportunities, a wonderfully supportive family, and a few fantastic mentors who helped me achieve the level of success I have today. I always remember those that helped me along the way, and take time to mentor others. I spend time with our interns, as well as young people within the organization, to guide and counsel them on their career paths. I had a tough time after my son was born, as he was diagnosed with autistic spectrum disorder at the age of two. The company was extremely supportive while I explored treatment options, special diets, and took him to a myriad of doctors. To this day, our CEO, Paul Charron, regularly asks me how my son is doing—which tells you a bit about the culture in our

COMPANY:

Liz Claiborne Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

New York, NY

www.lizclaiborneinc.com

BUSINESS/RANKING:

Fashion apparel & accessories;

#407 – Fortune 500 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

$4.6 billion

TITLE:

Corporate Vice President, Global Manufacturing &

Sourcing BS (apparel design): University of Delaware

EDUCATION:

Designer – Mark Stuart Sportswear

FIRST JOB: READING:

The Heart of Change: Real-Life Stories of

How People Change Their Organizations (Kotter & Cohen); The Toyota Way: 14 Management Principles (Liker) PHILOSOPHY:

Count your blessings and not your

problems. Life is a journey – enjoy the ride! FAMILY:

Husband; daughter (8) and son (6)

INTERESTS:

Spending time with my family; travel;

skiing; boating. FAVORITE CHARITY:

St. Jude’s Hospital (children’s cancer)

organization. Liz Claiborne is an incredible company to work for, really understands women’s issues, and supports work/life balance. My advice to others would be this: Life is too short and can throw you a curve ball in a moment’s notice. Be sure you are happy in what you are doing, be open to all options, and don’t be afraid to take calculated risks … as you may never reap the rewards if you don’t!

14,000 worldwide

PDJ Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2005

139


W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G 2 0 0 6

Rhonda Zygocki

CHEVRON

D

ecember 1980, at minus 20°C, supervising oil rigs in Alberta, Canada—that’s where I started. It would have been impossible for me to predict that 25 years later I would be writing this from the executive suite of the same company—Chevron. It has been an incredible journey for me intellectually, professionally, and personally, and has taught me valuable lessons about success in business and life. As you start your own journey, recognize that your education is your entry ticket, not your destiny. I’ve learned that, while strong grades can get you a job, strong performance gets you a career. In the years since I started in the field, I have never practiced civil engineering. Be open to all possibilities, because your potential is far greater than you can imagine. However, turning your potential into performance is the key. No matter what role you have in a company, at any level, understand the value proposition and which results and behaviors get rewarded. Set goals that exceed what is expected of you. Acquire deep job knowledge, act with integrity, take risks, be decisive and forthright, and deliver impactful results. Never lose sight that your objective is to create profits or shareholder value. A track record of producing impactful results can lead to advancement, bringing with it both opportunities and challenges. Be prepared

COMPANY:

Chevron Corporation

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

San Ramon, CA

www.chevron.com

BUSINESS/RANKING: Oil & natural gas industry (exploration & production; refining, marketing & transportation); chemicals manufacturing & sales; and power generation; 2nd largest energy company in the U.S. 2004 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

$150.9 billion

>47,000 employees worldwide

CUSTOMERS: U.S. government and foreign host governments; communities; private companies; individual consumers SUPPLIERS: Halliburton; Schlumberger; MWBE suppliers; small business owners; individual leaseholders

140

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

TITLE:

Vice President, Health Environment & Safety

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB: FAMILY:

BS (civil engineering)

Petroleum engineer

Husband of 22 years

INTERESTS:

Snowboarding; sailing

Those dedicated to support for battered women and children

FAVORITE CHARITY:

to make tough choices and trade-offs. Most importantly, make your decisions based on your life’s goals, not just your career interests. The higher you advance in leadership, the higher the expectations. Setting vision; building teams; instilling confidence; drawing out the potential and, ultimately, performance of others—these are just a few of the skills you will need, skills you did not likely learn in engineering school. Be prepared to learn. A successful career brings with it a commitment to continuous learning. When your learning stops, so likely will your advancement. When you reach the executive ranks, there will essentially be only one major question to answer: have you earned credibility with your superiors, peers, and employees? The sum of your experiences, performance, actions, and interactions will form the opinions of those looking to you for leadership. That’s why it’s so important to make every action, interaction, and decision along the way count. When I visit our oil rig operations today, my early experiences are now an essential part of my credibility. In the end, business success means little if it comes at the expense of a successful life. Above all else, find the balance that’s right for you, set your own path, and enjoy your life’s journey.

PDJ


Organizations Opening Doors for these Women Worth Watching Page 122 34 132 138 28 78 38 26 74 68 136 87 126 140 127 108 48 80 112 36 134 32 52 94 114 102 131 116 72 50 42 82 115 27

142

AARP Services aarp.org Dawn Sweeney Ace Hardware Corporation acehardware.com Lori L. Bossmann Affiliated Computer Services (ACS) acs-inc.com Lora J. Villarreal Aflac aflac.com Teresa L. White A.G. Edwards & Sons agedwards.com Mary Atkin Albertson’s albertsons.com Kathy J. Herbert Allstate Insurance Company allstate.com Catherine S. Brune BellSouth Corporation bellsouth.com Valencia I. Adams BMO Financial Group (Harris) harrisbank.com Sandra L. Hanington Booz Allen Hamilton boozallen.com Laurene Gallo Capital One Financial capitalone.com Catherine West Catalyst catalyst.org Ilene H. Lang Cendant Corporation cendant.com Jean Thomas Chevron Corporation chevron.com Rhonda Zygocki Chubb Group of Insurance Companies chubb.com Janice M. Tomlinson CIGNA Corporation cigna.com Karen S. Rohan Cintas Corporation cintas.com Karen L. Carnahan Cisco Systems cisco.com Kathryn Hill Comcast Corporation comcast.com D’Arcy Foster Rudnay Convergys Corporation convergys.com Karen Bowman Cox Communications cox.com Jacqui D. Vines Cummins cummins.com Jean Blackwell DaimlerChrysler Corporation daimlerchrysler.com Chris Cortez DaimlerChrysler Services North America daimlerchryslerservices.com/na Janet Marzett Dell dell.com Susan E. Sheskey Deloitte & Touche USA deloitte.com/us Maritza Gomez Montiel Eastman Kodak Company kodak.com Kim E. VanGelder Electronic Data Systems Corporation eds.com Tina M. Sivinski Food Lion foodlion.com Cathy D. Green Ford Motor Company ford.com Deborah Stewart Coleman Gannett Company (USAWeekend) gannett.com or usaweekend.com Marcia L. Bullard General Dynamics Corporation generaldynamics.com Linda P. Hudson Georgia Power southernco.com/gapower Leslie R. Sibert Halliburton halliburton.com Evelyn Angelle

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005


62 76 123 40 92 71 60 46 56 103 64 139 79 98 95 104 119 44 128 96 100 30 83 124 106 107 84 118 99 54 90 135 66 110 70 130 75 91 88 111 58 86 120

The Hartford Financial Services Group thehartford.com Dana Drago HCA hcahealthcare.com Glenda A. Hatchett HCA hcahealthcare.com Marilyn B. Tavenner The Hershey Company hersheys.com Michele Buck Hewlett-Packard hp.com Cathy Lyons Highmark highmark.com Kimberly S. Gray Honeywell International honeywell.com Nance K. Dicciani Ingram Micro ingrammicro.com Ria Marie Carlson KeyBank key.com Maria Coyne Lear Corporation lear.com Phyllis Golden Morey Lehman Brothers lehmanbrothers.com Anne Erni Liz Claiborne lizclaiborneinc.com Paula J. Zusi Lockheed Martin (Kelly Aviation Center) lockheedmartin.com Marillyn A. Hewson Medco Health Solutions medco.com Pamela T. Miller Merck & Co. (Merck Vaccines) merck.com Margaret G.McGlynn MetLife metlife.com Maria R. Morris National City Corporation nationalcity.com Karin Stone New York Life Insurance Company newyorklife.com Judith E. Campbell Northrop Grumman Information Technology it.northropgrumman.com/itsolutions Michele P. Toth Pepco Holdings (Transmissions) pepcoholdings.com Tsion M. Messick Pfizer pfizer.com Sylvia M. Montero Raytheon raytheon.com Susan E. Baumgarten Reebok International reebok.com Denise Kaigler Reliant Energy reliant.com Karen D. Taylor Roche Diagnostics Corporation roche-diagnostics.us Tiffany P. Olson Safeway safeway.com Larree M. Renda Sodexho Health Care Services sodexhousa.com Carolyn L. Kolesar Starbucks Coffee starbucks.com Launi D. Skinner Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide starwoodhotels.com Ana Mollinedo Mims State Farm Insurance Companies statefarm.com Barbara R. Cowden Texas Instruments ti.com Duy-Loan T. Le United States Air Force af.mil Debra K. Walker United States Army army.mil Kathleen M. Gainey United States Navy navy.mil Ann E. Rondeau United States Postal Service usps.gov Mary Anne Gibbons United Technologies Corporation utc.com Debra A. Valentine Verizon Information Services verizon.com Katherine J. Harless Verizon LiveSource & Public verizon.com Katherine Linder Verizon Network Services Group verizon.com Sheila Lau Wellpoint wellpoint.com Alice Rosenblatt Whirlpool Corporation whirlpoolcorp.com Karel K. Czanderna Whirlpool Corporation whirlpoolcorp.com Marise Fernandes Kumar The Williams Companies williams.com Janice D. Stoney add WWW to all internet addresses

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November/December 2005

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The 2006 Profiles in Diversity Journal





    

 

      

3rd Annual International Innovation in Diversity Awards will honor ten organizations and institutions that have developed innovative solutions offering measurable outcomes in the area of workforce diversity and inclusion.

Entry deadline: April 21, 2006

Full information is available at

www.diversityjournal.com or call Jim Rector at 800-573-2867. 2005 Winners: SODEXHO • FORD MOTOR COMPANY • DAIMLERCHRYSLER GEORGIA POWER • ENTERGY • CREDIT SUISSE • PEPSICO GM • SHELL INTERNATIONAL • NEW YORK LIFE INSURANCE 144

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005


Gena Mendoza-Telck Fort Worth, TX

When you can’t come to the Post Office,™ let the Post Office come to you. Just go to usps.com where you can print labels, pay for postage, and your carrier will pick up your packages for you. To learn more, visit usps.com/clicknship. It’s just one more way the U.S. Postal Service® is working for you.

©2005 United States Postal Service. Eagle symbol and logotype are registered trademarks of the United States Postal Service.

usps.com


AARP Services, Inc. www.aarp.org

page 121

Ace Hardware Corporation www.acehardware.com Albertson’s Inc. www.albertsons.com Allstate Insurance Company www.allstate.com

77 141

Pfizer Inc. www.pfizer.com

Food Lion, LLC www.foodlion.com

129

Raytheon www.raytheon.com

33

Cover 2

Reliant Energy, Inc. www.reliant.com

45

Ford Motor Company www.ford.com

page 11

Georgia Power www.southernco.com/gapower

16

Roche Diagnostics Corporation 113 www.roche-diagnostics.us

BellSouth Corporation www.bellsouth.com

57

Halliburton www.halliburton.com

73

Safeway Inc. www.safeway.com

67

BMO Financial Group www.harrisbank.com

49

HCA Inc. www.hcahealthcare.com

65

Sodexho www.sodexhousa.com

37

The Boeing Company www.boeing.com

7

Starbucks Coffee www.starbucks.com

47

Cardinal Health, Inc. www.cardinal.com

43

Cendant Corporation www.cendant.com

137

Chevron Corporation www.chevron.com

63

Cintas Corporation www.cintas.com

69

Cisco Systems, Inc. www.cisco.com

53

Comcast Corporation www.comcast.com

93

Convergys Corporation www.convergys.com

147

Cox Communications, Inc. www.cox.com

81

DaimlerChrysler Corporation www.daimlerchrysler.com

24

Dell Inc. www.dell.com

39

Deloitte & Touche USA LLP www.deloitte.com

146

133

Eastman Kodak Company page 41 www.kodak.com

9

Highmark Inc. www.highmark.com KeyBank www.key.com Lear Corporation www.lear.com The McGraw-Hill Companies www.mcgraw-hill.com Medco Health Solutions www.medco.com

148 59

State Farm Insurance Companies 55 www.statefarm.com 5 Unilever www.unileverusa.com United States Postal Service www.usps.gov

MetLife www.metlife.com

105 United Technologies Corp. www.utc.com

101

35 Verizon www.verizon.com

Northrop Grumman Corporation 61 www.northropgrumman.com

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2005

145

United States Tennis Association 117 www.usta.com

New York Life Insurance Company 31 www.newyorklife.com

PepsiCo, Inc. www.pepsico.com

85

125 51

Pepco Holdings, Inc. www.pepco.com

97

144

Merck & Co., Inc. www.merck.com

National City Corporation www.nationalcity.com

Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc. www.starwoodhotels.com

Waste Management, Inc. www.wm.com WellPoint www.wellpoint.com

89 Cover 3 2

109 Whirlpool Corporation Back Cover www.whirlpool.com 29


WEBSITE RESOURCE COMING

Profiles in Diversity Journal, long a dedicated supporter of women in leadership, will be launching a new resource for women navigating their careers in the shifting trends of the global economy. PDJ’s new website, www.WomenWorthWatching.com,

will share its virtual library of mentoring counsel offered by these annually honored women leaders with women all over the world. The website will be particularly useful for: Women entrepreneurs—for motivation, guidance and training. Business educators, or internship directors—as case studies of accomplishment in the face of challenges. Career counselors and coaches of women/ minorities aspiring to leadership positions in their fields—for encouragement and guiding principles. And women themselves seeking self-awareness, motivation, critiquing and improvement. The Women Worth Watching website, currently in development, is an outreach program of WomenWorthWatching™.

Profiles in Diversity Journal

November/December 2005

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highmark.com

DIVERSITY. IT

ENRICHES US.

STRENGTHENS

US.

DEFINES

US.

At Highmark, we value and celebrate the diversity that makes this world we share a better place. For our employees, our customers, and the suppliers we partner with throughout the many communities we serve.

Profile for Diversity Journal

Diversity Journal - Nov/Dec 2005  

Diversity Journal - Nov/Dec 2005