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Volume 6, Number 6 • November/December 2004

JUDY F. MARKS LOCKHEED MARTIN DOROTHY KIM STARBUCKS

SHARON ALLEN DELOITTE

LOUISE FRANCESCONI RAYTHEON

LaVERNE H. COUNCIL DELL

SUE BRUSH STARWOOD HOTELS & RESORTS

PUNAM MATHUR MGM MIRAGE

ROSE M. PATTEN BMO FINANCIAL GROUP

Women Worth Watching

W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

JERRI DeVARD VERIZON

Plus stories from: The United States Postal Service • Shell Inter national • Catalyst


PATRICIA A. WOERTZ CHEVRON TEXACO

LOUISE GOESER FORD

NANCY RAE DAIMLERCHRYSLER

SUZANNE F. MEDVIDOVICH U.S. POSTAL SERVICE

JANET CRENSHAW SMITH IVY PLANNING GROUP

LYNN M. CADDELL WASTE MANAGEMENT

SHEILA KEARNEY DAVIDSON NEW YORK LIFE

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MARSHA J. EVANS AMERICAN RED CROSS

MARY KAY SCHNEIDER NATIONAL CITY BANK

LINDA DILLMAN WAL-MART

MARIE F. SMITH AARP

KIM HARRIS JONES DAIMLERCHRYSLER

ANN OKA SODEXHO

FRAN KEETH SHELL CHEMICALS JANIE TSAO LINKSYS/CISCO

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thetruthabouttrucks.com ALL TRUCKS ARE NOT CREATED EQUAL. Ford F-150 is built with a monstrous, integrated front-support structure. This design contributes to overall structural stiffness and helped F-150 earn the government’s 5-Star front driver and passenger crash test rating. Now look at Chevy Silverado. Once the fenders are removed, no integrated front structure at all. What kind of support do you want from your truck? See the difference. Decide for yourself.

NOBODY BUILDS A STRONGER TRUCK THAN THE FORD F-15O.* THAT’S THE TRUTH ABOUT TRUCKS.

FORD F-15O

CHEV Y SILVERADO

*Based on best-in-class frame strength, towing and payload, when properly equipped.

2005 F-150

Learn more at: thetruthabouttrucks.com


THE FRAME.

*When properly equipped. **Based on best-in-class frame strength, towing and payload.


It has the highest payload capacity of any truck in its class.* None higher, thanks to a frame that’s hydroformed and fully boxed. It’s beefed up to the point of being twice as strong as its proven predecessor, with through-rail crossmembers welded on both sides of the frame – not just the inner edge. Its rigidity reduces chassis flex and helps deliver handling of a caliber you might not expect in a pickup truck. Why did we insist on giving this truck the strongest backbone out there? Because we’re building the strongest pickup.** So you can haul more. Tow more. Benefit from a better ride. And that’s just for starters. Call 1-800-301-7430 or go to fordvehicles.com and find out how this truck earns the right to be the Ford F-150.

THE 2005 F-150


WHAT MAKES THIS TRUCK STRONGER AND MORE CAPABLE THAN EVER BEFORE?


At WellPoint, we celebrate the diversity of our workforce. We are the leading health benefits company in the nation serving the needs of 28 million members. A FORTUNE 50® company, we are strengthened by the commitment and dedication of our associates. If you’re looking to join a company where you will see your ideas in action - where what you do helps others live better, consider a career with us. Visit our website to search opportunities throughout the United States at:

www.wellpoint.com/careers

What does it take to be named FORTUNE magazine’s Most Admired Healthcare Company six years running? ®

People like you.

Opportunities may be available in the following areas: • Actuarial • Administrative/Clerical • Advertising/Marketing • Claims/Membership/Customer Service • Compliance • Corporate Communications • Finance & Accounting • Human Resources • Information Technology • Legal • Management • Nursing/Case Management • Pharmacy • Provider Network Development • Sales • Training • Underwriting

SM

EOE. SM Service Mark of WellPoint Inc. FORTUNE and FORTUNE 50 are registered trademarks of FORTUNE magazine, a division of Time Inc. ©2004 WellPoint Inc. All rights reserved.


PUBLISHER James R. Rector MANAGING EDITOR Susan Larson CREATIVE DIRECTOR Linda Schellentrager CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Laurie Fumic LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Commentaries or questions should be addressed to: Profiles in Diversity Journal, P.O. Box 45605, Cleveland, OH 44145-0605. All correspondence should include author’s full name, address, e-mail and phone number. DISPLAY ADVERTISING 30095 Persimmon Drive Westlake, OH 44145 Tel: 440.892.0444 FAX: 440.892.0737 profiles@diversityjournal.com SUBSCRIPTIONS U.S. $49.95 one year / $89.95 two years; in Canada, add $10 per year for postage. Other foreign orders add $15 per year. U.S. funds only. Subscriptions can be ordered at: www.diversityjournal.com or call customer service at 800.573.2867 from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. EST.

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Profiles in Diversity Journal® is published bi-monthly by Rector, Inc., Principal Office: P.O. Box 45605, Cleveland, OH 44145-0605. James Rector, Publisher, Rector, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The views expressed in this publication are those of the authors and may or may not represent the views of the publisher. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. Registered in U.S. Patent Office.

ISSN 1537-2102

pointofview From the editor of Profiles in Diversity Journal

Many women since Eve have aspired to positions of significance and exhibited the initiative to achieve their dreams. Those who succeeded, who accomplished, who rose to the top, usually did so by learning about themselves and their world and capitalizing on their own individual talents. They pursued new ways of thinking, accepted challenges, made choices and sacrifices; sometimes even made mistakes (whether on their own or ill-advised). And though some might argue that today’s world—not quite a paradise—is more complex, certain issues and factors are perhaps not that different. The woman who aspires to a leadership role in business today still requires inquisitiveness, vision, and tenacity in pursuit of her goals, as well as a recognition of the importance of balancing diverse relationships to best utilize professional and personal resources. These women are worth watching and are featured here because they represent diversity within their spheres of influence. Nominated by their colleagues, peers, and mentors for their initiative and achievements, these are women of purpose and drive. They lead by their vigorous attention to a vision, as well as devotion to their teams, their organizations, and their communities. These women represent a range of industries, gifts, paths, experiences, and styles. Their profiles reveal diverse person-alities and their optimization of their own distinctiveness. Yet there are common threads to their guidance for others: They know who they are, where they’re headed, what they want to accomplish. They lead lives characterized by eagerness to learn, strength derived from links to past and people; creative problem solving; ‘gumption and go.’ They are certainly heart-strong if perhaps sometimes head-strong. They express a strong sense of self: self-awareness, self-motivation, self-discipline, as well as self-critiquing and self-improvement. These are their portraits. To celebrate the upcoming seventh year for Profiles in Diversity Journal, this third-annual Women of Initiative issue is taking a different approach. More “girl talk” than curricula vitae, this is the kind of information shared by a mentor counseling someone who aspires to become tomorrow's corporate leader. The profiles reveal dreams formulated, fought for and fulfilled; guiding principles; lessons learned; paths taken and their milestones; hurdles and triumphs. These are profiles of real people with real stories to tell—in their own words. Their stories may have been edited by PDJ for space considerations, but we have assiduously tried to maintain the integrity of the messages of women worth watching.

Susan Larson Susan Larson

Managing Editor Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

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Table of Contents

VOLUME 6, NUMBER 6 • NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2004

17

Cover Story Women Worth Watching – special focus profiles

Features

10 92 100 4

Shell Makes a Difference for Women United States Postal Service / The Women's Program – 30 Years Tackle Resistance Head-On: Avoid common mistakes when implementing diversity efforts. by Catalyst

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004


I am an avid genealogist.

I have traced my family’s ancestry back to 1823. And I am part of a cardiovascular research team working on a drugcoated stent program to enhance the lives of heart patients.

My name is Sandra Burke. I’ve been an Abbott employee for 16 years.

You are passionate about what you do—an inspiration to those around you. You want to make a difference in your world. You want the freedom to think, to dream, to see your ideas realized. And you look forward to meeting new and exciting challenges every day. At Abbott Laboratories, you will find an environment that inspires a level of achievement seldom found in today’s workplace. An environment that recognizes and rewards individual contributions and discoveries. An environment where you can work alongside the foremost authorities in your chosen field. Experience the inspiration that comes from having small-company freedom with big-company resources.

www.abbott.com


Table of Contents

VOLUME 6, NUMBER 6 • NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2004

Women Worth Watching Profiles

26 Sharon Allen 27 Theresa Alvillar-Speake 28 Judy Anderson 29 Maura C. Breen 30 Sue Brush 31 Lynn M. Caddell 32 LaVerne H. Council 34 Sheila Kearney Davidson 35 Rebecca C. Davis 36 Jerri DeVard 38 Linda Dillman 40 Veronica Dillon 42 Marsha J. Evans 43 Eileen Farinacci 44 Lorry M. Fenner 46 April Foley 47 Louise Francesconi 48 Edie Fraser 49 Louise Goeser 50 Carolyn Handlon 52 Karen M. Hardwick 54 Keiko Harvey 56 Jacquelyn Hayes-Byrd 57 Marsha S. Henderson 6

Deloitte U.S. Dept. of Energy Georgia Power Verizon Starwood Hotels & Resorts Waste Management Dell New York Life AFLAC Verizon Wal-Mart Kaplan American Red Cross Bausch & Lomb U.S. Air Force Export/Import Bank Raytheon Diversity Best Practices Ford Marriott Hogan & Hartson Verizon U.S. Dept. of Commerce KeyBank

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004


Table of Contents

VOLUME 6, NUMBER 6 • NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2004

Women Worth Watching Profiles

58 60 61 62 64 65 66 68 70 71 72 74 76 77 78 80 82 83 84 86 88 89 90

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Karen Jennings

SBC Communications

Kim Harris Jones

DaimlerChrysler

Fran Keeth

Shell Chemicals

Dorothy Kim

Starbucks

Carol Kline

AOL

Melendy Ewing Lovett

Texas Instruments

Joanne M. Maguire

Lockheed Martin

Judy F. Marks

Lockheed Martin

Punam Mathur

MGM Mirage

Suzanne F. Medvidovich

U.S. Postal Service

Ann Oka

Sodexho

Rose M. Patten

BMO Financial Group

Nancy Rae

DaimlerChrysler

Andra Rush

Rush Trucking

Joyce Russell

Adecco

Mary Kay Schneider

National City Bank

Molly D. Shepard

The Leader's Edge

Janet Crenshaw Smith

Ivy Planning Group

Marie F. Smith

AARP

Sandra L. Thompson

FDIC

Janie Tsao

Linksys/Cisco

Claire Watts

Wal-Mart

Patricia A. Woertz

ChevronTexaco

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004


Different perspectives. Diverse minds create solutions. At Deloitte & Touche USA LLP, diversity isn’t just a philosophy – it’s how we do things. It’s incorporating ideas from our people with different backgrounds, experiences, and skills. It’s giving our clients a 360º perspective on complex business issues they face, from assurance and tax to financial advisory and consulting. Our teamwork invariably produces the best results and helps us build strong, enduring relationships with our clients – who appreciate our multidisciplinary, multidimensional approach to their business issues. To learn more about Deloitte & Touche USA LLP, visit us at www.deloitte.com/us.

www.deloitte.com/us About Deloitte Deloitte, one of the nation’s leading professional services firms, provides audit, tax, consulting, and financial advisory services through nearly 30,000 people in more than 80 U.S. cities. Known as an employer of choice for innovative human resources programs, the firm is dedicated to helping its clients and its people excel. “Deloitte” refers to the associated partnerships of Deloitte & Touche USA LLP (Deloitte & Touche LLP and Deloitte Consulting LLP) and subsidiaries. Deloitte is the U.S. member firm of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu. For more information, please visit Deloitte’s Web site at www.deloitte.com/us. Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu is an organization of member firms devoted to excellence in providing professional services and advice. We are focused on client service through a global strategy executed locally in nearly 150 countries. With access to the deep intellectual capital of 120,000 people worldwide, our member firms, including their affiliates, deliver services in four professional areas: audit, tax, consulting, and financial advisory services. Our member firms serve more than one-half of the world’s largest companies, as well as large national enterprises, public institutions, locally important clients, and successful, fast-growing global growth companies. Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu is a Swiss Verein (association), and, as such, neither Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu nor any of its member firms has any liability for each other’s acts or omissions. Each of the member firms is a separate and independent legal entity operating under the names “Deloitte,” “Deloitte & Touche,” “Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu,” or other, related names. The services described herein are provided by the member firms and not by the Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Verein. For regulatory and other reasons, certain member firms do not provide services in all four professional areas listed above. Member of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Copyright © 2004 Deloitte Development LLC. All rights reserved.


Leslie Mays, Head of Global Diversity and Inclusiveness at Shell International, describes award-winning strategies for embedding D&I throughout its organization worldwide.

Shell has received recognition and several prestigious awards for its work on diversity and inclusiveness around the world. Two recently received by the company —the Catalyst Award in the U.S., and the Opportunity Now Award in the U.K.—were awarded for Shell’s innovative, effective, and measurable efforts to advance women in the workplace. This significant achievement is even more impressive since Shell is operating in what is generally viewed as a heavily male-dominated industry. PDJ talked with Leslie Mays, Head of Global Diversity and Inclusiveness at Shell International, to learn about Shell’s strategy and process for an enhanced work environment. Above, left: At Shell’s D&I Regional Conference in Buenos Aires, leaders and change agents use table discussions, exercises, and learning modules to develop action plans for creating a more inclusive work environment. Above, right: Participants at Shell’s D&I Week in Asia/Pacific region overview highlights and stories representing the conference theme, Inclusiveness starts with I.

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Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004


Q. What were senior

leaders hoping to achieve when they launched the Shell Group’s diversity strategy? A. In September, 1997, the Committee of Managing Directors committed to diversity management as a strategic change process that is critical for competing successfully in a global market. Their aspiration was to integrate diversity principles into every aspect of Shell’s operation and culture, much in the same way as health, safety, and environmental considerations have been embedded into day-to-day practices and behaviors. The effective implementation of diversity, they believed, would lead to attraction and retention of top talent, enhanced decision making, increased creativity and productivity, stronger customer/market focus, and enhanced social performance and corporate image.

Q. Shell operates in over 140 countries and employs more than 110,000 people; how can you implement diversity consistently across so many different cultures and regions? A. We took an approach that provided global guidance while relying on local implementation. We knew that a broad, strong framework was needed to clearly define expectations at a global level, yet it had to be flexible enough to allow discretion for implementation at business and

local levels. As a result Shell’s global diversity and inclusiveness standard (policy) was developed and put in place (see sidebar list). The standard, which takes into account local laws, sets a high level of expectation from every Shell company around the world. It includes statements of commitment to diversity and inclusiveness, actions that each business must formally assure are in place, and a framework to guide action. The businesses own and drive the process, taking into account local regulations, culture, and local issues. To our knowledge, no other company has a similar standard or policy. Ours is not just a value statement; it is an enforceable commitment that is assured annually.

Q. We don’t hear many stories about multinationals implementing global diversity. What model did you follow? What challenges did you face? A. When we started this work in 1997, we looked to identify other best practices on global diversity processes and there was little to no information on the experience of other companies on the scale we were contemplating. We created our own roadmap, which forced us to really think about our approach and the desired outcomes. There were many challenges along the way; one of the very first was the perception that diversity was a “U.S.” thing. Another was the term diversity— which has no meaningful translation in some languages. Engaging the hearts of people, not just the minds, was (and still is) a major challenge. And of course, a

common challenge that Shell and many other companies continue to face is staying the course and making progress in the face of other business priorities that have changed over the course of our work. Today we have to balance D&I action against priorities like true globalization of all of our businesses and functions, offshoring jobs to other regions of the world, and standardizing and streamlining business operations.

Q. Tell us about your diversity roadmap. What are some key milestones? A. From its inception, diversity management has been owned and led by senior Group and business leaders. It is a powerful model focused on systemic change and a belief that change must occur simultaneously at three levels: personal, interpersonal, and organizational. Shell’s process has been mapped against four stages of work: awareness, ‘hardwiring’, ownership, and leading edge (see diagram). The first stage of work occurred from 1997-1999 with the establishment of a case for action, a vision for the future, and the creation and communication of aspirational targets to measure progress. Stage two (2000-2003) focused on building an organizational infrastructure to achieve our vision. A diversity council, chaired by the company chairman, was formed to provide direction and monitor progress. Dedicated specialist resources were put in place in the corporate center and in the businesses to support implementation. Education and coaching was provided to enroll, prepare, and

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

11


establish expectations with the top 2000 leaders. A global standard and assurance process were established, and diversity and inclusiveness principles were ‘hardwired’ into existing people and business management processes. Employee networks began to emerge in various countries around the world. Stage three, our current position, focuses on reinforcement of accountability, integration, and mainstreaming. Efforts are underway to strengthen leadership accountability for results at the Group, business, and country levels, and for integration and mainstreaming of D&I into core people and business processes— leading to behavioral change consistent with Shell’s stated core values of honesty, integrity, and respect for people.

Q. We notice that you initially labeled your strategy as “diversity management”; now you refer to it as “diversity and inclusiveness management.” Is this just a change in terminology or is there more to it? A. Inclusiveness brings a deeper dimension to this topic. It goes straight to the heart of what we are trying to do—changing the culture and behavior, not just the demographics. People understand the concept of being included or excluded. It is something they can easily relate to. In fact, “Inclusiveness starts with I” was the theme of this year’s series of learning events under the banner of D&I Week at several Shell locations in Asia/Pacific. I sincerely believe that we need to focus on diversity as well as on inclusiveness. They are interconnected, mutually

12

dependent, and they both must exist in balance.

Q. Why do you think that Shell’s approach is sufficiently robust to survive the continuous business challenges of increased globalization, off shoring, and outsourcing, not to mention changes in leadership? A. Three conditions, in my view, must be present for this change process to survive long-term, all of which are embodied in our work: A high level of commitment and accountability from the entire senior executive team, not just the CEO; A compelling vision and business case—diversity and inclusiveness must be viewed as strategic and critical for the business, not just the morally right thing to do; The hardwiring of D&I principles into key people and business processes and systems—the more integrated, the more they become part of the culture and day-to-day operations and mindset.

Q. Shell women in the U.S. and the U.K. must feel proud and optimistic about Shell’s progress in this area. How are women in other countries reacting to the news, and what are you doing to make similar progress in countries outside the U.S.?

about progress made. However, this is not the case for women of color (ethnically and/or culturally diverse women), for whom progress has been limited and disappointing. Steps are now being taken to raise the awareness and visibility of this critical issue and engage leaders in accelerating progress. We have a two-pronged D&I strategy for the advancement of women across our businesses and regions. One is to examine and address any unintended biases or obstacles in organizational systems and processes. The second is to enable women to build networks and support systems and engage in self-development activities. To do this, we have embedded D&I in critical human resource processes, such as talent management, attraction, and recruitment; leadership development; and other processes across all global businesses and functions. We have also included measures and objectives in the personal performance contracts of the top 1500 leaders. We currently have 13 women’s networks across the world, eleven of which are outside of the U.S. in countries such as Australia, Germany, the Netherlands, Malaysia, Nigeria, Singapore, Thailand, and the U.K. “Fit-forpurpose” career development programs for women are offered in a number of countries including the U.K., Netherlands, U.S.; Malaysia, and Singapore. Formal and informal mentoring programs and learning circles have emerged as the norm in a number of these countries as well.

Q. We don’t hear much information on the implementation of diversity in Africa, Asia/Pacific, Latin A. Many women in the U.S. and U.K. are indeed very optimistic America, and the Middle

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004


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East. Can you share some stories? A. One of the most rewarding parts of my role has been to personally experience the evolution of diversity in these regions. A few years ago, the concept of “diversity management” in this area was novel and vague. Now, we have champions, role models, and best practices emerging across businesses in every region of the world. In 2003 and 2004 we coordinated a series of regional D&I conferences in Bangkok, Buenos Aires, Houston, Nairobi, and The Hague. The objective was to provide leaders and change agents an opportunity to learn behaviors, necessary steps, and plans to create a more inclusive environment for enhanced business performance. Each conference featured internal best practices from the region, speakers, learning modules (for example one on micro-inequities), and exercises to develop personal action plans. In Asia/Pacific region, D&I Week, an annual communication campaign, has been extremely successful in engaging staff through simultaneous events in numerous locations featuring senior leader speakers, presentations, posters, quizzes, games, and food—shared in a fun atmosphere. Business leaders in Latin America region searching for an effective way to explain diversity concepts to staff created a program which integrated customer focus and D&I. They developed and led a series of learning modules with impressive results—an increase of several points in their customer satisfaction rating, and a better understanding of D&I amongst internal customers.

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Q. There has been quite a bit of debate on whether or not the diversity office should be a formal part of human resources. What are your views? A. Diversity is often mistaken for just another human resource project or program focused on acquiring and advancing diverse talent, when in effect it is much more. If viewed as a competitive strategy to win customers and employees, achieve better business results, and enhance corporate social responsibility, D&I should be positioned outside HR. In this way, the diversity office can partner with and influence strategies in planning, HR, businesses development, marketing, social responsibility, sustainable development, procurement, and corporate communications. It is only through such a comprehensive approach that companies can fully reap the benefits that diversity has to offer.

Q. If you had to do it over again, would you do anything differently? A. Perhaps to introduce targets, which incidentally are very much a part of how we operate our business, at a slightly later stage. While the targets provide critical success measures, we learned that, if introduced too early, targets become the outward objective in many people’s minds, that the ‘numbers’ are all that we are after, when in fact a key goal of this work is to change the culture and processes so that increased representation at all levels is a natural occurrence. Also, we would have done more work on engaging Anglo-

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

Dutch men up front. Resistance always occurs in change processes, but there may have been ways to manage this differently to gain their commitment and support earlier in the process. The advancement of people of color would have been an area deserving earlier attention. It is a difficult area, one that is not generally understood in most regions outside of the U.S. As we look back at our achievements, we do notice limited progress in this area, perhaps due to lack of focus and priority.

Q. On a personal side, implementing a change management process like diversity and inclusiveness globally must be both exhilarating and exhausting. How do you keep your energy level and positive outlook in the midst of hard work and periodic setbacks? A. Watching the “light bulbs go on” for key business leaders who have a sincere interest in making this work is invigorating; seeing the pride and confidence of empowered employees as they take charge of their lives when previously they felt like victims of a system they did not understand; external and internal recognition that something has shifted in our culture and that we are doing things differently; and drawing on the support of an incredibly dedicated and knowledgeable group of people—the diversity team. All of these things have been a source of strength and helped me sustain the momentum needed to reach our diversity aspirations. PDJ


Women Worth Watching

PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

IN 2005

DELOITTE U.S. DEPT. OF ENERGY

SHARON ALLEN THERESA ALVILLAR-SPEAKE

GEORGIA POWER

JUDY ANDERSON

VERIZON

MAURA C. BREEN

STARWOOD HOTELS & RESORTS WASTE MANAGEMENT DELL NEW YORK LIFE AFLAC VERIZON WAL-MART KAPLAN AMERICAN RED CROSS

SUE BRUSH LYNN M. CADDELL LaVERNE H. COUNCIL SHEILA KEARNEY DAVIDSON REBECCA C. DAVIS JERRI DeVARD LINDA DILLMAN VERONICA DILLON MARSHA J. EVANS

BAUSCH & LOMB

EILEEN FARINACCI

U.S. AIR FORCE

LORRY M. FENNER

EXPORT/IMPORT BANK RAYTHEON DIVERSITY BEST PRACTICES FORD MARRIOTT HOGAN & HARTSON VERIZON U.S. DEPT. OF COMMERCE KEYBANK SBC COMMUNICATIONS DAIMLERCHRYSLER SHELL CHEMICALS STARBUCKS AOL TEXAS INSTRUMENTS

APRIL FOLEY LOUISE FRANCESCONI EDIE FRASER LOUISE GOESER CAROLYN HANDLON KAREN M. HARDWICK KEIKO HARVEY JACQUELYN HAYES-BYRD MARSHA S. HENDERSON KAREN JENNINGS KIM HARRIS JONES FRAN KEETH DOROTHY KIM CAROL KLINE MELENDY EWING LOVETT

LOCKHEED MARTIN

JOANNE M. MAGUIRE

LOCKHEED MARTIN

JUDY F. MARKS

MGM MIRAGE U.S. POSTAL SERVICE SODEXHO BMO FINANCIAL GROUP DAIMLERCHRYSLER RUSH TRUCKING ADECCO NATIONAL CITY BANK THE LEADER’S EDGE IVY PLANNING GROUP AARP FDIC LINKSYS/CISCO WAL-MART CHEVRON TEXACO

PUNAM MATHUR SUZANNE F. MEDVIDOVICH ANN OKA ROSE M. PATTEN NANCY RAE ANDRA RUSH JOYCE RUSSELL MARY KAY SCHNEIDER MOLLY D. SHEPARD JANET CRENSHAW SMITH MARIE F. SMITH SANDRA L. THOMPSON JANIE TSAO CLAIRE WATTS PATRICIA A. WOERTZ

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

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Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004


Women Worth Watching

PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

IN 2005

DELOITTE U.S. DEPT. OF ENERGY

SHARON ALLEN THERESA ALVILLAR-SPEAKE

GEORGIA POWER

JUDY ANDERSON

VERIZON

MAURA C. BREEN

STARWOOD HOTELS & RESORTS WASTE MANAGEMENT DELL NEW YORK LIFE AFLAC VERIZON WAL-MART KAPLAN AMERICAN RED CROSS

SUE BRUSH LYNN M. CADDELL LaVERNE H. COUNCIL SHEILA KEARNEY DAVIDSON REBECCA C. DAVIS JERRI DeVARD LINDA DILLMAN VERONICA DILLON MARSHA J. EVANS

BAUSCH & LOMB

EILEEN FARINACCI

U.S. AIR FORCE

LORRY M. FENNER

EXPORT/IMPORT BANK RAYTHEON DIVERSITY BEST PRACTICES FORD MARRIOTT HOGAN & HARTSON VERIZON U.S. DEPT. OF COMMERCE KEYBANK SBC COMMUNICATIONS DAIMLERCHRYSLER SHELL CHEMICALS STARBUCKS AOL TEXAS INSTRUMENTS

APRIL FOLEY LOUISE FRANCESCONI EDIE FRASER LOUISE GOESER CAROLYN HANDLON KAREN M. HARDWICK KEIKO HARVEY JACQUELYN HAYES-BYRD MARSHA S. HENDERSON KAREN JENNINGS KIM HARRIS JONES FRAN KEETH DOROTHY KIM CAROL KLINE MELENDY EWING LOVETT

LOCKHEED MARTIN

JOANNE M. MAGUIRE

LOCKHEED MARTIN

JUDY F. MARKS

MGM MIRAGE U.S. POSTAL SERVICE SODEXHO BMO FINANCIAL GROUP DAIMLERCHRYSLER RUSH TRUCKING ADECCO NATIONAL CITY BANK THE LEADER’S EDGE IVY PLANNING GROUP AARP FDIC LINKSYS/CISCO WAL-MART CHEVRON TEXACO

PUNAM MATHUR SUZANNE F. MEDVIDOVICH ANN OKA ROSE M. PATTEN NANCY RAE ANDRA RUSH JOYCE RUSSELL MARY KAY SCHNEIDER MOLLY D. SHEPARD JANET CRENSHAW SMITH MARIE F. SMITH SANDRA L. THOMPSON JANIE TSAO CLAIRE WATTS PATRICIA A. WOERTZ

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

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Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004


Diversity. It’s what drives us.

47 Women who areLeading the Way ...

From the cadres of minority designers, engineers, and office staff to the men and women on the factory floor and our network of minority owned dealers, we're dedicated to creating the best cars and trucks possible. In fact, this dedication to work ethic, smarts, and quality is inherent in every vehicle we produce. It's what makes us the proud American brands of DaimlerChrysler Corporation.

Chrysler, Jeep, and Dodge are registered trademarks of DaimlerChrysler Corporation.

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

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JACQUELYN HAYES-BYRD U.S. DEPT. OF COMMERCE

JUDY ANDERSON GEORGIA POWER

VERONICA DILLON KAPLAN

ANDRA RUSH RUSH TRUCKING

JOYCE RUSSELL ADECCO

MOLLY D. SHEPARD THE LEADER’S EDGE

KAREN JENNINGS SBC COMMUNICATIONS

CLAIRE WATTS WAL-MART

MAURA C. BREEN VERIZON EDIE FRASER DIVERSITY BEST PRACTICES

REBECCA C. DAVIS AFLAC

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JACQUELYN HAYES-BYRD U.S. DEPT. OF COMMERCE

JUDY ANDERSON GEORGIA POWER

VERONICA DILLON KAPLAN

ANDRA RUSH RUSH TRUCKING

JOYCE RUSSELL ADECCO

MOLLY D. SHEPARD THE LEADER’S EDGE

KAREN JENNINGS SBC COMMUNICATIONS

CLAIRE WATTS WAL-MART

MAURA C. BREEN VERIZON EDIE FRASER DIVERSITY BEST PRACTICES

REBECCA C. DAVIS AFLAC

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EILEEN FARINACCI BAUSCH & LOMB MELENDY EWING LOVETT TEXAS INSTRUMENTS

APRIL FOLEY EXPORT/IMPORT BANK

CAROLYN HANDLON MARRIOTT

LORRY M. FENNER U.S. AIR FORCE KEIKO HARVEY VERIZON

SANDRA L. THOMPSON FDIC

THERESA ALVILLAR-SPEAKE U.S. DEPT. OF ENERGY

CAROL KLINE AOL JOANNE M. MAGUIRE LOCKHEED MARTIN

MARSHA S. HENDERSON KEYBANK KAREN M. HARDWICK HOGAN & HARTSON

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EILEEN FARINACCI BAUSCH & LOMB MELENDY EWING LOVETT TEXAS INSTRUMENTS

APRIL FOLEY EXPORT/IMPORT BANK

CAROLYN HANDLON MARRIOTT

LORRY M. FENNER U.S. AIR FORCE KEIKO HARVEY VERIZON

SANDRA L. THOMPSON FDIC

THERESA ALVILLAR-SPEAKE U.S. DEPT. OF ENERGY

CAROL KLINE AOL JOANNE M. MAGUIRE LOCKHEED MARTIN

MARSHA S. HENDERSON KEYBANK KAREN M. HARDWICK HOGAN & HARTSON

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Diversity. It’s what drives us.

47 Women who areLeading the Way ...

From the cadres of minority designers, engineers, and office staff to the men and women on the factory floor and our network of minority owned dealers, we're dedicated to creating the best cars and trucks possible. In fact, this dedication to work ethic, smarts, and quality is inherent in every vehicle we produce. It's what makes us the proud American brands of DaimlerChrysler Corporation.

Chrysler, Jeep, and Dodge are registered trademarks of DaimlerChrysler Corporation.

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

19


Women Worth Watching PROFILES OF

These women worth watching represent diversity and initiative within their organizations. They have in common an attitude of personal challenge and purposeful achievement in their rise to leadership; yet their stories, told in their own words, reveal them as distinctively varied individuals . . .

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

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W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Sharon Allen I

f I were to counsel women who aspire to become tomorrow’s corporate leaders, I’d offer a few suggestions:

• First, find your strengths and focus on them. Understand where you can make your greatest contribution. • At the same time, don’t be afraid to step outside of your comfort zone. You have emerging strengths; it’s there you might discover your greatest learning and growth. • Recognize the power of mentoring— have a mentor and be one. Your job is not only to elevate yourself but also those around you.

COMPANY: WEBSITE: TITLE: AGE:

Deloitte & Touche USA LLP

www.deloitte.com

Chairman of the Board 53

BS (accounting), Honorary PhD, University of Idaho

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB:

Staff accountant with this firm (first

full-time job) Whatever I can on effective governance and global commerce and affairs. Also about Norfolk Terriers—we have two new pups. WHAT I’M READING:

Philosophy is a big word. But I can tell you I’m powerfully oriented toward treating people fairly and with dignity.

PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY: My husband Rich, my mother, his mother, and each of us has three sisters with wonderful families INTERESTS:

Gardening, wine, and kitchen

remodels

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Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

• Last, it’s very important for women to build affiliations outside their usual circles… and not just for networking. It helps broaden your perspective and elevate your vision. On the national front, for example, I serve as a director on the Foundation for the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award and as member of the Women’s Leadership Board at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard. This helps me contribute and keeps me close to evolving standards. Community ties are equally important. In my case, this includes working with the United Way of Greater Los Angeles, the YMCA of Metropolitan Los Angeles, and the Independent Colleges of Southern California. Such affiliations contribute to your growth and your relevancy.


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Theresa Alvillar-Speake

I

have always believed that one must be prepared for whatever position one is seeking, whether that position is determined by competition or appointment. The preparation may be actual technical knowledge—such as a certificate or degree—or understanding of the culture and environment in which one will be located. Several times in my career development, I encountered challenges in both areas. Early on in my career, I realized that in order to advance I would need a college degree. I was working for an organization that placed a high value on education, so I went on to college (while working full time, raising three children as a single parent, and being involved in the community). I moved up in the organization from Administrative Assistant to Director of the Office. Later on in that same career, I ended up without a job because the organization closed its doors. I took that opportunity to

start my own (non-profit) business because I knew that the services we had been providing were in great demand and the government was providing funding to organizations to perform those services. That business was very successful for sixteen years. I had taken what might have been an obstacle and changed it into an opportunity. Another example of overcoming obstacles was when I was working as a Deputy Director and my boss, the Director, left his job. I decided to seek appointment to his position although he was recommending his Chief Deputy, a white male, for the position. I set up a grassroots campaign, lobbied the Governor, and was successful in getting the position. Again, I did not let the fact that I had competition stop me from pursuing my goal. I had prepared myself and I believed in myself; I knew the industry and people being serviced, and I sought and received their support. I could have remained ‘safely’ in my position as Deputy Director, but I was ambitious and wanted to advance in my career. In line with my philosophy of life, when life gave me lemons, I made lemonade.

ORGANIZATION: WEBSITE:

U.S. Department of Energy

www.energy.gov

Director, Office of Economic Impact & Diversity

TITLE:

AGE:

64 MBA

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

Secretary

WHAT I'M READING: Leadership on the Line by Ronald Heifetz and Marty Linsky

When life gives you lemons … make lemonade.

PHILOSOPHY:

Mother, grandmother, and greatgrandmother

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

Reading, gardening, and snow skiing

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

27


Ford Motor Company W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5 COMPANY:

Judy Anderson

WEBSITE:

Georgia Power

www.southernco.com/gapower

Senior Vice President of Charitable Giving; CEO & President, Georgia Power Foundation, Inc.; President, Southern Company Charitable Foundation, Inc.; executive sponsor for Georgia Power’s leadership development

TITLE:

AGE:

56

EDUCATION: BS, Troy State University; JD and LLM, Atlanta Law School; Harvard: Advanced Management Program

Financial services manager, American Hospital Supply Corp.

FIRST JOB:

Why I Wake Early by Mary Oliver and Falling Angels by Tracy Chevalier

WHAT I'M READING:

Live life to the fullest each and every day. There are no dress rehearsals. Find your true passion and give it all you have to give.

PHILOSOPHY:

INTERESTS:

A

s you advance in your career, you’re often asked about the secret of success. The most important things for me have been determination, perseverance, and a bit of good luck. Life has taught me the importance of being in touch with who you are. That means knowing your strengths, your weaknesses and your own innate ability to decide what’s best for you. It means being flexible and adaptable when life’s journey takes an unexpected turn. It means making choices that engage your heart and mind. Don’t make a choice of any kind just because it ranks high on someone else’s scale of achievement or even because it seems to be simply the logical thing to do at that moment on your path. It’s important to maintain a positive attitude. I believe in enjoying the job you’re in. You have the power to make it fun, meaningful, and challenging. A positive, can-do attitude is everything. Sometimes, how you deal with the events in your life is more important than what has happened to you. That’s something I learned

28

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

Theater, music, growing orchids

from my mom. We have a lot more control in our careers and in our lives than we give ourselves credit for. Some might call it idealistic, but I believe our goal in life should be to make the world a better place for those who come after us. That message becomes even more relevant as we take on leadership roles, because I believe good leadership is not about title and position. It’s about creating an environment where others can achieve their potential, where people can make a significant difference. Leadership is not about what you do, but about what those people you are trying to inspire accomplish when their hopes, dreams, skills, and talents are unleashed. It is also important to realize that we all need to rely on others. And in turn, we need to be there for others. Those of us who have gained experience and a measure of success have an obligation to share what we have learned by being a friend or mentor to others.


Ford Motor Company W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Maura C. Breen A

s a woman, it’s important to be comfortable with who you are. You should be willing to accept coaching, but you have to speak up if something doesn’t COMPANY: Verizon make sense. You Communications should also be willing WEBSITE: www22.verizon.com to take risks, go outside your comfort TITLE: Senior Vice President, zone. You're capable Support Services of doing and accomAGE: 48 plishing more than you think. But make EDUCATION: Graduate of sure you have a Skidmore College in Saratoga healthy balance in Springs, N.Y. (also: executive development programs at Rutgers your life and a University and Harvard) perspective on what’s important. FIRST JOB: Clerk in the probate Having a mentor is court rewarding for both WHAT I'M READING: My Life the mentee and the by Bill Clinton mentor. Sharing experiences and PHILOSOPHY: Be passionate mistakes takes some about what you do professionally of the stress out of sitand personally—it is more fun and uations and doubles the end result is always better. Take the joy of sharing in accountability for your life and the the successes. I’ve had decisions you make; your career and your personal happiness are several mentors what you make of them. throughout my career and have the pleasure FAMILY: Husband Jay and son of mentoring others Ryan now. I learn a lot INTERESTS: Politics, sports, from my mentees, reading and I really enjoy mentoring; it reenergizes me. Success in corporate strong leadership skills, passion, and a strong America needs to start with being competent at sense of accountability for what they do. what you do. An individual must also possess

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

29


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5 COMPANY: Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc.

Sue Brush

WEBSITE:

www.starwoodhotels.com Senior Vice President, Westin Hotels & Resorts

TITLE:

MBA, University of Puget Sound/Seattle

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: Receptionist/bookkeeper for a radio/TV commercial production company WHAT I'M READING: Our Lady of the Forest by David Guterson

Priorities should be to God, self, family, and profession

PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY: Happily married to Ken, and proud mom of 22-year-old son Kevin INTERESTS: Travel, reading, walking in scenic parks

M

y advice is simple: prepare yourself; set goals; be true to yourself; let your passion show; turn adversity into opportunity; and don’t take yourself too seriously. There’s no excuse for lack of preparation, whether it’s getting the education you need for the career you desire or preparing for a big presentation. Take the time up front to plan, and allow plenty of time to adjust and refine. You can’t be creative when you’re under lastminute stress. Advance preparation reduces stress and gives you confidence. Part of preparation is setting realistic goals for yourself. Aim high and you’ll be surprised by what you can accomplish. Celebrate your successes and raise the bar for even greater achievement. When you fail, give yourself 24 hours of mourning and then pull yourself together and get started again. Being true to yourself is all about values. Values may be spiritual, personal, or professional. Know who you are, let others know, and never compromise your values. Being your best self brings you peace and

30

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

enhances your relationships with others. Success is based on passion. Choose your career based on what you love—what truly excites and challenges you. Ask yourself every day if this is the job you really want. If not, start immediately looking for one that truly inspires you. No one forces us to continue in a job that doesn’t fuel our passion. Turn adversity into opportunity. When I got breast cancer in 2003, a colleague and fellow survivor told me that the breast cancer journey could be one of the best things that ever happened to me, and she was right. I learned that I could survive a life-threatening disease and that my support system was much richer than I ever imagined. That experience has enhanced all areas of my life and given me boundless hope and enthusiasm for the future. I’m amazed how serious young people are today. They seem so focused on getting ahead that they forget to have fun. Live each day to the fullest, and make sure you laugh out loud at least once every day. And be brave enough to laugh at yourself.


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Lynn M. Caddell T

o succeed in today’s demanding business world, surround yourself with diverse individuals with more talent than you. Do not fall into the trap of thinking less talented individuals will make you look better simply by comparison. A strong team will reflect well on each of the individuals as well as the leader who pulled them together. Look for this talent throughout the organization. Be open to individuals from other departments or several layers down in your organization. The right individual with outstanding leadership skills can overcome any deficiency in experience on a particular subject—go for the leadership talent first, and then subject matter expertise. In addition, continually build your pool of available talent. Actively participate in recruiting, Waste Management, Inc.

COMPANY: WEBSITE: TITLE:

www.wastemanagement.com

Senior Vice President & Chief Information

Officer AGE:

50

EDUCATION:

BA (history); MS (systems

engineering) FIRST JOB:

Industrial engineer with IBM

WHAT I'M READING:

Breakthrough by Bill

Davidson To maximize your contribution, keep your priorities straight and know what you can change or influence and what you can't. Put your efforts where they count.

PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY: Husband, Doug; three sons: Drew, 21; Grant, 17; Kyle, 11 INTERESTS: Reading, and any activities (baseball, basketball, swimming, etc.) that my children participate in

mentor, and take an active interest in the human resource activities in your organization. If you see a need, volunteer your organization to be the test group for a new process, or procedure. College recruiting can also be an excellent source of future talent. Internships are a valuable tool in identifying top graduating talent. If you see deficiencies in the education the graduates are receiving, work with a select number of universities to help define the future direction of their curricula. This will ensure not only that you and your organization will have access to the best and brightest our universities have to offer, but also that these students will have the tools necessary to succeed. After building a strong team, make sure you truly understand the business. Don’t focus only on your area of responsibility. Recognize what is driving the business. Understand how your group supports the overall goals and objectives and identify ways to improve your contribution to the organization’s success. A strong business-oriented team will ensure success for your organization as well as yourself in today’s demanding business climate.

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

31


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

LaVerne Council T

here are five key themes that have run through my career and the careers of those women I know who are happy in executive positions. I would advise all women looking to advance in a corporation to focus on them: 1. Think big. This goes not only for setting high goals for your career, but for how you go about solving business problems. Too many people get accustomed to existing industry, process, or departmental constructs and do not push themselves to be imaginative and think past them. They undermine themselves. There is great demand in corporations for those who can imagine a better tomorrow and execute a plan to realize that vision. 2. Speak in facts. Yes, everyone does need to get comfortable with making decisions and moving forward when the ideal amount of information is not available. However, it pays to become skillful at uncovering facts quickly. Don’t get caught up in the whirlwinds of heated conjecture—take a quick step back to get your facts in order. Assembling a reasonable level of information doesn’t take as long as you may Dell, Inc.

COMPANY: WEBSITE: TITLE: AGE:

www.dell.com

Global I/T Vice President 42 MBA, Illinois State University

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

Systems Analyst

WHAT I'M READING: PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

The Purpose-Driven Life

Create more joy

Husband Bennie; son Troy, 6

INTERESTS:

Reading, cooking, wine, community

involvement

32

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

imagine it will; I cannot overstate the benefits of having compelling business cases filled with fact-based options. 3. Keep your support systems healthy. There is no question about it: you will have highs and lows in your career—it’s a journey. The successful women I know regularly make time to maintain the support systems that help make them who they are. You define your own support systems; they may center around faith or relationships with family, mentors, colleagues, or friends. By investing in them now, you’ll be able to count on them to see you quickly through any rough times ahead. 4. Have fun and give back. This is not just “nice to have.” In my book, it’s a must. Learning how to create fun and community within corporate teams pays huge dividends. Think back to the times you have most enjoyed your job—I bet it is due in large part to the leadership caring enough to emphasize fun and community. Everybody wants to have a sense of belonging at work, and you have the power to create that! It starts with setting goals in this area just as you would in any other important area of your work and personal life. 5. No regrets. First, become a highly competent decision maker—in circumstances when you have consensus up front and when you do not. Then don’t be afraid to change direction if needed. There is often more risk in delaying an important decision than in making a marginal one. You do not want regrets or fear to constrain making a decision because these are not only useless feelings, they have a tendency to stifle that all-important creativity!


Alicia Tutt Falls Church, Virginia

When you can’t come to the Post Office,™ let the Post Office come to you. Just go to usps.com where you can print labels, pay for postage, and your carrier will pick up your packages for you. To learn more, visit usps.com/clicknship. It’s just one more way the U.S. Postal Service® is working for you.

©2004 United States Postal Service. Eagle symbol is a registered trademark of the United States Postal Service.

usps.com


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

SheilaKearneyDavidson irst, draw on your insecurities to project an air of confidence. Fastidious preparation dispels the jitters about a particular presentation or project. Anticipate questions and have others critique your thinking before a big meeting. Stop apologizing for your opinions—just make sure that they are well researched and based in fact. Get rid of verbal cues of self-doubt like, “I could be wrong about this, but….” Take the floor and hold it when it should be your turn to speak. Don’t get shouted down when you worked hard to get to the table. However, don’t let go of the insecurity that drives you to be thoroughly prepared. An air of confidence is essential, but cockiness leads to a lack of discipline that is fatal. Second, push yourself outside your zone of comfort. Earlier in my career, I was resisting an opportunity to make a lateral move to manage the insurance law group within the legal department. A mentor urged me to do it, counseling that the first word in the General Counsel title is “general.” Later, when I was asked to leave the legal department to head the compliance department, I was again dragging my feet, protesting that I was trained to practice law and that I should therefore practice law. Once again, I got wise advice to make the move since I would learn all of the operational skills necessary to run a department—better preparing me to run the legal department. Recently, I was asked to take on responsibility for human resources, corporate communications, governmental affairs, facilities and governance. I leapt at the chance because experience has taught me that you have to stretch to advance and grow.

CDASAUNDERS.COM

F

New York Life Insurance Company

COMPANY: WEBSITE: TITLE: AGE:

www.newyorklife.com

Senior Vice President & General Counsel 42

BA (cum laude), Fairfield University; JD, George Washington University Law School

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB:

Walking neighbor’s dog for $5 a week

WHAT I'M READING: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (aloud to my boys) PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Follow the golden rule.

Husband, Tony; two sons: Andrew, 6, and

Patrick, 3 INTERESTS: Homework, soccer games, birthday parties; thinking about travel and reading

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Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Rebecca C. Davis W

omen seeking to become tomorrow’s corporate leaders must work today to improve their listening and communications skills. These skills, representing a “communications capability,” are developed by combining careful listening with good oral communication and writing skills. First, really listen. You must be able to understand what people are truly saying (or possibly not saying). For example, I recently was asked to correct a service date for an employee who was retiring. Although the man presented factual reasons why the date needed to be changed, as well as how the mistake had occurred, I realized what he needed was more than a date correction. What I heard was the emotional reason: it was a matter of pride that

AFLAC, Inc.

COMPANY: WEBSITE:

www.aflac.com

Executive Vice President; Chief Administrative Officer; Director of Corporate Communications

TITLE:

AGE:

54

Bachelor's degree (business administration), Columbus State University

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB:

AFLAC Claims Department

WHAT I'M READING:

Night Fall by Nelson DeMille

Always try to look on the bright side. We’re all going to make mistakes at some point, so learn from your mistakes and don’t dwell on them. Treat people with the same respect you want to be treated with.

PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY:

Married; a daughter

INTERESTS:

Cooking, reading, and collecting

he be recognized for the time he had been with the company. Practice good listening with customers, too; it shows care about their needs and is the first step to making sure your employees and company meet those needs. Second, learn how to communicate your ideas. A good leader communicates clearly the vision and values of the company through words as well as actions. Communicate your commitment, and let each employee on your team know how important his or her role is to the success of your organization. Create a work environment that respects and appreciates every employee and you’ll develop stronger products, gain new customers, and strengthen long-term relationships. Also encourage employees to communicate their ideas. They can help find ways to either serve the customer better or save the company money. Listen to the problems your employees face in executing the vision and make necessary adjustments. Successful leaders make sure that they hear diverse viewpoints. Good communication throughout the ranks fosters a unified understanding of corporate goals and a very high level of teamwork.

cookbooks

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

35


Ford Motor Company W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Jerri DeVard Y

ou should seek advice and counsel from anyone that you deem to be a success. Don’t be afraid to ask for guidance. Mentoring doesn’t have to be a formal program with scheduled meeting times or outlined action items. Any situation can be a mentoring situation if you’re willing to ask for advice and counsel. You have to be clear about what you want and you need to approach someone you think can help. Just say, “I need your help, your advice or your guidance.” When you face a challenge, don’t spend a lot of time worrying about the problem. Rather, place your energies into developing a plan for overcoming it. Then take action. To be successful in corporate America, you

Verizon Communications

COMPANY: WEBSITE:

www22.verizon.com

Senior Vice President, Brand Management & Marketing Communications

TITLE:

AGE:

46

BA (economics), Spelman College; MBA (marketing), Clark Atlanta University

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB:

Retail salesperson for The Limited

Stores An advance copy of Malcolm Gladwell's new book, Blink

WHAT I'M READING:

You owe it to yourself to build a life that you'll enjoy. I think the formula is fairly simple: enjoy your family, take time for yourself, and remember to celebrate everything, not just the big things. In our family we take time to celebrate everything.

PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY: My husband of 21 years, Gregg; two children: Brooke, 15, and Alexander, 12 INTERESTS:

36

Reading, fitness, and family vacations

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

first have to be very good at what you do. Think, talk, and act like a leader, and have the strength and conviction of your ideas. You then can be fearless. Women can celebrate the fact that we’re now more appreciated as working mothers. I’m fortunate to be at a company that recognizes the dimensions of who I am—mother, businesswoman, and wife—and how these layers contribute to the company’s success. It doesn't mean I don’t struggle with balance. I do. But the joy is in having both—work and family.


Š2004 Verizon. All rights reserved.

Many views. One vision. Diversity has become a pervasive force in every aspect of our business, from the products we deliver, to the suppliers we select, to the talent we hire. Many ideas, many approaches and many minds broaden our vision, making us open, adaptable and better able to make progress every day for our customers, our clients and our employees.

verizon.com/careers Make progress every day


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Linda Dillman I

’ve been in IT for a long time, and came into it as an entry-level manager. I worked my way up, kept my head down, and took the tough assignments, always looking for opportunities to grow. More often than not, management would tap me before even I felt I was ready. Too often we restrict ourselves, but that can limit our work. You have to be able to make changes and take the assignments no one else wants. That’s where you get the best experience, and where you learn a lot about yourself. Success comes from building relationships with people—not political maneuvering, but genuine relationships that will carry you through difficult times. I think men and women share on the job, but women do it differently. It’s important for me to have people with whom I’m able to share, like Susan Chambers on our executive committee; we just get together to talk. People who are successful hopefully like their work, but they also have to know when they are out of balance. Whenever I was way out of balance in my life, I struggled; I had to learn to schedule and prioritize personally and professionally, and be able to mentally leave work. Although it sometimes takes a long time to shut down, it’s healthier and makes us better at what we do when we’re able to turn it off outside the office. I have a strong circle of family and friends, and a little condo on a lake about three hours’ drive away. No one there knows who I am, and I can just escape for a few days. I’ve also learned that if I schedule time to go home, I am forced to leave the office. And if I take my laptop home without the power cord, I can only do about two hours’ work in the evening. The best part of any job, dealing with a team of any size—it’s like watching a

thousand kids grow up. To see them do things that help our business is just a blast. What would I do differently? My feeling is if I did something different, I wouldn’t be where I am today. My advice to women is • Learn as much about the business as you can. • Take one step at a time. • If you do your absolute best, you can get noticed. People who think they have to finesse and politic their way to promotion will not be successful over the long term.

WEBSITE:

Executive VP & Chief Information Officer

TITLE: AGE:

www.walmart.com

48

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

University of Indianapolis

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

File clerk at a bank (while in high

school) WHAT I'M READING:

The Fred Factor by Mark

Sanborn Take the tough assignments and step out of your comfort level; it will help you grow to levels you never imagined!

PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY:

Single

INTERESTS:

38

Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.

COMPANY:

Travel & jet skis


What’s inside Dell?

Thurmond B. Woodard, Vice President of Global Diversity and Chief Ethics Officer, stays connected to customers, suppliers and his team using the performance and mobility of his Dell Latitude™ Notebook with the Mobile Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor-M.

Dell Global Diversity Thurmond B. Woodard, Vice President of Global Diversity, Chief Ethics Officer and one of corporate America’s leading diversity experts. He helps drive Dell’s vision of barrier-free opportunity by: creating a winning culture, building direct customer and supplier relationships in the global marketplace, and equipping the community for the digital world. What’s the result? Dell is the computing technology supplier of choice for customers around the world. So, what’s inside Dell? People like Thurmond who deliver superior quality, efficiency and value in all they do. To find out more about Dell Global Diversity, call us at 1-888-741-1633 or visit www.dell.com/diversity.

Direct relationships. Easy as

To find out more about Dell Global Diversity, call us at 1-888-741-1633 or visit www.dell.com/diversity. Dell, Inc. cannot be held responsible for errors in typography or photography. Dell is an AA/EO employer. Intel, Intel Inside, the Intel Inside Logo and Pentium are trademarks or registered trademarks of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the United States or other countries. Dell and the Dell logo are registered trademarks of Dell, Inc. ©2004 Dell, Inc. All Rights Reserved.


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Veronica Dillon M

ore than a decade ago, I worked for a publishing company as an in-house lawyer, advising primarily the schools division and direct marketing groups. The really ‘plum’ job in the department was the publishing counsel position; this lawyer negotiated with the bestselling authors, got to read advance copies of all the books, and went to the fancy book parties in the executive suite. The rest of us chugged along at the day-to-day business of the company—the publishing and information writing contracts, counseling on human services groups. By taking on this new assignresources issues, and negotiating leases. ment, I expanded my skill set. Since then, I At one point, we were starting a new have incorporated this strategy in many of my division focusing on developing scientific career decisions. software and online books. The publishing A few suggestions: Don’t be afraid to lawyer had no interest in practicing the new try new things. Volunteer for new or unpopular ‘computer law’. It did not have the cachet of the assignments; you will learn another skill and copyright lawyers’ bar or the esteemed and meet business colleagues who may be valuable sexy libel lawyers’ bar, and included none of to your growth. Ask questions; seek advice; and the internal political listen and be willconnections in the ing to learn from company. My boss COMPANY: Kaplan, Inc. others. Don’t be asked if I would WEBSITE: www.kaplan.com afraid to speak up, handle the work. make mistakes, and Always up for a new TITLE: Vice Chairman & Chief Administrative Officer have your own challenge, I agreed. AGE: 55 style. Every idea What I learned from you contribute that experience has EDUCATION: BA, St. John’s University; JD, does not have to be helped me move Fordham Law School brilliant or new. forward in my life FIRST JOB: Teacher at elementary school in East There is no straight in many subsequent Harlem path. Be reliable. situations. I learned Never sacrifice that it pays to WHAT I'M READING: Two novels by Mario Vargas your character or volunteer for unpopLlosa: The Real Life of Alejandro Mata and Death in integrity. Don’t take ular assignments. the Andes things personally. I began a new PHILOSOPHY: Focus on the positives and learn Grow thick skin. channel of learning— something valuable from everyone you meet. Some days are like technology. I met the boot camp—hang senior executives in FAMILY: One of six children; husband: Kevin; in, you’ll recover. another division of children: Katherine and Michael, both in college INTERESTS:

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Travel, theater, and reading

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

MarshaJ. Evans L

ife and work are an adventure, and that makes every stride—and every stumble—along the way an opportunity. On my career path, I have learned that roadblocks and detours provide the chance to revisit the map and plot a better route. I joined the U.S. Navy right out of college. My friends thought I had lost my mind. Opposition to the war in Vietnam was at its height, and opportunities for women in the military were restricted by convention and by law. Yet the Navy offered adventure, and that was what I wanted. It’s also what I got. Serving in this traditionally male bastion was not always easy, but it was always interesting. I learned that for every person who might be an obstacle, there was a person who was willing to serve as a mentor. One helped me discover a deceptively simple strategy that has guided me ever since: working hard works every time. Hard work pleases your supporters and, better yet, tends to silence your critics. Keep

ORGANIZATION: WEBSITE: TITLE: AGE:

American Red Cross

www.redcross.org

President & Chief Executive Officer 57

BA, Occidental College Los Angeles; MA, Tufts University; additional studies at the National War College and the Naval War College

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: Babysitting during high school; lifeguard at a community pool during college WHAT I’M READING: PHILOSOPHY:

Built to Last

Work hard and the opportunities will

come your way. FAMILY:

Husband Jerry, retired Navy jet pilot

INTERESTS:

42

Skiing, golf, and reading

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

putting one foot in front of the other and you are bound to progress forward. When I found myself filling positions that had always been held by men, I realized it was impossible to do the job exactly as it had been done before. The traditional top-down military way wasn’t comfortable or practical, so I worked on developing my own leadership style and honing my own strengths and talents. A sense of adventure, hard work, and personal leadership have been my ticket to an exciting life and career. Daunting challenges—such as leading the committee recommending changes to end sexual harassment and expand opportunities for women in the Navy and Marine Corps—became wonderful opportunities to effect much-needed change. Confidence instilled by these experiences was just what I needed to take on my current and most rewarding post. Two years of organizational effort updating how we get help to people paid off last fall when four successive hurricanes struck Florida: the Red Cross was able to shelter nearly 425,000 people and serve more than 11 million meals. The privilege of playing a role in the largest humanitarian response to a natural disaster in U.S. history was the adventure of a lifetime.


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5 COMPANY:

Eileen Farinacci

WEBSITE:

Bausch & Lomb

www.bausch.com

Vice President & General Manager, Canada and Latin America Region

TITLE:

AGE:

46

BS (pharmacy), University of Puerto Rico; MBA, University of Phoenix

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: At 15, I taught piano to children in a music academy in an underprivileged area. Between notes and chords, I had to find the wisdom to give advice on situations I had never experienced or even imagined. I cherish those memories.

One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez WHAT I'M READING:

“Courage is resistance to fear, mastery of fear—not absence of fear.”(Mark Twain) This philosophy will always lead to a richer life.

PHILOSOPHY:

F

or women aspiring to corporate leadership, I believe there are three keys to success: choose to work in a company that believes diversity provides a competitive advantage; understand yourself and your talents; learn to work well within a team. A company’s commitment to and encouragement of diversity increases exponentially your odds of success. When you research a company, visit, or interview, look carefully for visible commitment to diversity. This strongly influenced my decision to join Bausch & Lomb. When the company first approached me, I went to the interview only out of curiosity. I was impressed to learn that there was already a woman on the pharmaceuticals management team, heading sales. Later, during an interview with senior executives, the president and COO not only spoke about the company's commitment to diversity, he arranged for two female corporate officers to take me to lunch to discuss the opportunity. Later I met the woman who headed one of the largest business units. It was then that I knew the company put into practice its commitment to diversity and that I could be successful here. By developing a good insight into your

FAMILY: Husband of 25 years, Frank; four children: Christian, 16; Brenda, 15; Frank, 14; Louis, 13 INTERESTS: Latin American literature and history; classical music (play piano); playing tennis

unique strengths and capabilities, you can better articulate what you bring to the table and find the best fit for your skills. This not only helps achieve success, it makes for a more satisfying work experience. Offer your skills as a product, with defined features and benefits differentiating you from others. Because business is ever dynamic, continue developing new skills and refining ones you have by actively seeking learning opportunities and being open to ‘teachable moments’. In business today, teamwork is critical and our success often depends on how well we work with staff, a boss and her or his staff, or a project team to achieve common goals. Bring your uniqueness to the team and encourage others to do so, too. Explore the inventory of strengths and put them to work for the team. Work with and learn from exceptional people so that together your team can deliver exceptional results which, at the end of the day, will determine your success.

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

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W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Lorry M. Fenner L

ooking back, I recognize some things that helped me progress as a leader that I would counsel others to try. First, find good and diverse mentors who are not just successful, but who also share your values and interests. Then network, and mentor others as you yourself progress. Share information rather than hoard it; knowledge is more powerful when shared. Whenever presenting a problem to your bosses, always also present a solution that considers their broader responsibility as well as potential opposing arguments; address

ORGANIZATION: WEBSITE:

United States Air Force

www.af.mil

Colonel, Chief, Intelligence Force Development Division; Directorate of Intelligence, Surveillance & Reconnaissance; Deputy Chief of Staff of Air & Space Operations TITLE:

AGE:

47

EDUCATION: BA (cum laude, secondary ed.), Arizona State U.; MA and PhD, U. of Michigan; MS, National War College/National Defense U. FIRST JOB: As teen: babysitting, pet sitting, lawn mowing, movie theater concession girl; after college graduation: teaching

Besides a lot of work-related material, newspapers, and education or history journals, I tend to read several books at once— currently Alice Sebold’s The Lovely Bones and Patricia Cornwell’s Blow Fly. WHAT I'M READING:

It’s not enough to “do no harm”; we have to try to make things better. Anything, even if it’s good, can be better. PHILOSOPHY:

I have a large family of very dear relatives and friends around the world; and my dog, Scout.

FAMILY:

Reading, travel, sports/fitness, popular culture (movies, TV, plays, literature), education, political and social issues

INTERESTS:

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Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

these issues. Avoid the trap of either/or solutions where someone loses; try to find a creative third way, where more people can win, and enlist support. Be honest and maintain your integrity. Smile and treat people with respect. Support and thank your people often when they are right, and coach them when they’re not. Nominate deserving people for rewards/awards. When you’re angry, take a deep breath; and save that flaming e-mail till after you’ve had a chance to review and edit it again. Don’t be limited by others’ prejudice or discrimination, or worse, sexual extortion. Think about your threshold before you get there, and draw lines. Decide whether it is a ‘teaching moment’ or if there’s no chance for that; speak out constructively and respectfully, and document every incident. Insist on being treated in ways that you have earned and being paid for your skills and experience; likewise, stand up for others when you witness unfairness. Always take responsibility for your decisions and actions. Move issues from endless discussion to some constructive action, identifying who’s responsible and when it needs to be done. Be a decisive leader, but don’t be afraid to admit when you’re wrong or change your mind with new information. Readily ask for advice from above and input from below. When making career decisions, try to choose opportunities that open options, and remember that you’re usually not qualified for a position until you get it. Finally, never be afraid to ask to be supported for special opportunities—the worst someone can say is “no.”


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

April Foley L

esson #1: Friends come and go; enemies accumulate. One of the most important assets to have in business is good working relationships. The more positive the relationships you have with your peers, the more effective you can be. I once read an article about what Fortune 500 CEOs have in common. It was not intelligence, education at the best schools, or affability. The common success factor for top CEOs was that they had developed a broad network of people who respected them and said they would be willing to work with them again. So pay attention to your relationships. If you make a mistake or get into a strained relationship situation, fix it, just as you would any other business issue—quickly and sensitively. Lesson #2: Listen to what people say; they always reveal themselves. Being effective in business is about persuasion, getting people to feel comfortable about moving in a certain direction. It’s about motivating them. It’s about working with and through others to get results. You cannot be effective unless you understand where others are coming from—their motivations; how they win; their problems or objections to what you are suggesting. You can’t show someone how something is in their best interest unless you take the time to find out what their best interest is…or is not. Lesson #3: Embrace change. The adage, “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it,” is misguided. It implies that you should wait for a problem to surface before you change anything. My experience is that once a problem develops, fixing it can be a long and painful process, one in which there’s lots of downside for all involved. The most successful organizations have a positive predisposition to change: new ideas are welcomed and rewarded; people are always looking for ways to enhance programs, products, and policies; small and large changes are constantly being made in

46

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

every function and activity. Only in this way can an excellent organization remain at the cutting edge of excellence. Lesson #4: Catch people doing something right. Appreciation is a powerful motivator. It is also an underutilized motivator. Many of us assume that money is the biggest driver for people in business. I personally feel that recognition is a far stronger motivator. People work hard to do a good job. You’ll get far greater performance from them if you make an effort to frequently recognize the value of their contributions, large and small. COMPANY: WEBSITE: TITLE: AGE:

Export-Import Bank of the United States

www.exim.gov

First Vice President & Vice Chairman 57

BA, Smith College; MBA, Harvard Business School

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB:

Camp counselor at a summer camp

Tournament of Shadows, an excellent history of Central Asia by Karl Meyer

WHAT I'M READING:

PHILOSOPHY:

Give of yourself to the fullest; in that

will you receive. FAMILY: Widowed; three children: Catherine, 26, a reporter for a Gannett newspaper; Giff, 24, an analyst at Goldman Sachs; James, 19, a college sophomore INTERESTS: International travel; cooking; supporting the excellent work of non-profit organizations; history


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Louise Francesconi T

here are as many different styles of leadership as there are leaders. Leadership is not about organizational power. It’s about influence and personal qualities and how your vision motivates the minds and hearts of those you lead. It’s about helping others focus on achieving not only the right business goals but also the right personal goals. A leader must see the future in a way that is different from others, seeing possibilities where others see confusion. But the leader’s vision must be so compelling that others can be inspired to overcome concerns, insecurities, and reasons not to change and be propelled collectively into that future. To lead others, you must be able to communicate this vision clearly. A consistent message and a clearly stated vision, repeated often, will give people confidence and trust in where you take the organization. Help people to see your vision through their own eyes; when the vision working collaboratively can create ideas that transforms from “the leader’s” to “ours” the real generate far greater results than the efforts of a teamwork and feelsingle individual. ing of shared accomWe will remain COMPANY: Raytheon Missile Systems plishment can begin. viable and grow to WEBSITE: www.raytheon.com Personal integrity is meet the challenges an important part of ahead only if we TITLE: President leadership that is continue to engage lasting. A charismatic and attract the best AGE: 51 person may motivate and brightest as EDUCATION: BA (economics), Scripps College; MBA, others to follow for judged by what UCLA a time, but true leadthey bring to ership is the ability the table in terms FIRST JOB: Babysitting to inspire others to of thinking and WHAT I'M READING: All bestsellers carry a vision teaming skills, forward. perspective and PHILOSOPHY: Focus on what’s important—keep I have come to problem solving, balance in your life. appreciate that being and performance FAMILY: Husband, two sons, two grandchildren inclusive is an excellence that engine of innovagenerates results. INTERESTS: Cooking, family tion: diverse teams

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

47


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Edie Fraser

COMPANY: Diversity Best Practices; Business Women's Network WEBSITE: www.diversitybestpractices.com / www.bwni.com

President & CEO

TITLE: AGE:

61 (old in age but vibrant in spirit!)

BA (with honors) and graduate studies in political science

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: U.S. Peace Corps staff for five years; Desk Officer for Africa

Confidence by Kanter; Clearing the Hurdles by Brush, et al.; In Defense of Globalization by Bhagwati; Contagious Success by Annunzio; Spanish language guide; six newspapers a day WHAT I'M READING:

Do the best you can (be on the cutting edge) and give back to others (do your givin’ while you're livin).

PHILOSOPHY:

I

have learned so very much from many, and I am grateful for all the lessons. Never stop learning; get training and acquire new skills. Read, think, and generate ideas to apply and teach others. Learn something new each day. Be passionate about what you are doing. Try always to stay positive despite the setbacks we all have. Think success, not failure. Surround yourself with a can-do, go-get-them attitude. Be strong and resilient. Be the best you can be. Be creative and innovative. Don’t be afraid to be different. Leaders are not afraid to be unique and to push hard for what they believe, to take issues ahead of our time. Take Action. Goals are nothing without action. Be customer-driven; work hard; go the extra mile on everything. Never give up (only change course when it does not seem to work, but work hard for it anyway). Deal, build partnerships, and communicate. Give back with mentoring and support. Work with those you like and admire. Network and realize that we are only as good as our many friends, supporters, and buddies (women mentorships or “fentors” are so very special).

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Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

FAMILY: Dedicated to husband, Joe, and my dad who is 95+, and others INTERESTS:

Friendships; cooking and entertaining;

reading

Say “thank you” daily, write notes of appreciation, or call and express gratitude. Give hugs and love. Be grateful for family and friends, and find the time to celebrate them and give to them. Sharing with my personal and business friends is special to me. Be helpful. Give of your time—and if you can, your money—for philanthropy, for politics. I am so proud to have worked with the Peace Corps and Poverty Program early in my career, and I cherish the non-profit boards. Support diversity advancement. Women and minorities comprise the backbone of the economy—the market, the workforce, and the entrepreneurial talent base of the new America. Embrace change. Women and people of color will account for about 70% of all new workers by 2008, only three short years away!


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Louise Goeser I

knew from an early age that business is my life’s passion. I was fascinated by my father’s metal forging company, and spent many Saturdays tagging along to his office, where I colored his sales charts. I’ve learned much about business and management since those days spent with my crayons on his office floor. The best advice for how to succeed hasn’t come from personal development and management training seminars, but from my family, friends, and colleagues. Some common sense rules continue to guide my career and my life. First, do what you love, and love what you do. Each of us needs to discover what makes us want to get up in the morning. For me, this is management: I enjoy the challenge of melding a group of people together and moving them in a direction that is good for the business, as well as for their personal development. Is there one thing that you love so much you would do it for

COMPANY: WEBSITE: TITLE:

Ford Motor Company

www.ford.com

President & Chief Executive Officer, Ford of

Mexico EDUCATION:

Bachelor's degree (mathematics) Pennsylvania State University; MBA, University of Pittsburgh

FIRST JOB:

Sales clerk at a department store

WHAT I'M READING:

The Rose Without a Thorn

by Jean Plaidy PHILOSOPHY:

Life is a gift; treasure it.

FAMILY: Married; four stepdaughters, four grandchildren

Learning new things; outdoor activities; arts and theater; reading; time with family and friends; travel

INTERESTS:

free? Then do it, and find a way to get paid for it. Don’t live for the weekends and settle for a job you hate. Embrace work as part of a full life. Get a broad base of experience, as early as possible. Following college graduation, I accepted a job that allowed me to rotate through several organizations and assignments. That experience taught me a great deal about my new company, revealed skills and interests I didn’t know I had, and laid the foundation for many future assignments. Identify the path to success within your company. Businesses tend to have one or two major operations that are viewed as critical or produce company leaders. Ask your managers and colleagues which functions have the most career development potential, and actively seek those assignments. Don’t allow yourself to be pulled in too many directions. A mentor once advised me to focus a bulk of my time on one or two projects that would generate tangible results. Identify what your business needs, and find a way to move the needle. And finally, don’t forget there is life outside the office. I love my job, but I also love my family, kayaking, and riding horses. If I dedicate my entire life to my career, not only will I miss out on these things, I’ll be a less satisfied and valuable leader and employee. Remember that results are more important than face time—and have the courage to gently remind managers, employees, and colleagues when they forget. Though I am energized and fulfilled by my job, what matters in the end are the people I love. Though my jobs have been demanding, I was there whenever it was important to my family. I don’t regret it, and my career hasn’t suffered for it.

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

49


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Carolyn Handlon

COMPANY: WEBSITE: TITLE: AGE:

Marriott International, Inc.

www.marriott.com

Executive Vice President & Global Treasurer 47

BA (economics), Virginia Tech; MBA, Indiana University

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: Commercial loan officer for Continental Bank (post-graduate school)

Harvard Business Review; The Classic Touch: Lessons in Leadership from Homer to Hemingway by John Clemens and Douglas Mayer; Architectural Digest WHAT I’M READING:

You need to do what makes you happy in life. If you can enrich your life by giving to others, it can truly make a difference.

PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY:

Husband, Jim

INTERESTS: Outdoor sports, especially golfing and boating; cooking.

M

y best counsel for overcoming obstacles is to always try to be a contributor, striving for excellence and always running the extra mile. Positive thinking, collaboration, and teamwork are all important. I have been fortunate to have many mentors over the course of my career. There are three significant things I’ve learned from each of them, and I continually apply these principles to my career. First, deliver what you promise. Set high standards for yourself and then deliver. Earn an unshakable reputation for excellence, integrity, and responsiveness. Second, play to win. Develop strategies that can leapfrog you ahead of the competition. Again, it’s about setting high standards and goals that can help differentiate you and create the foundation for professional and corporate success.

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Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

Finally, master the art of successful risk taking. For example, the hospitality industry is incredibly fast-moving; to continue to lead our industry, my company has to consistently anticipate our customers’ needs and exceed their expectations. Success comes from being proactive, not reactive. That means that you need to be innovative, flexible, focused, and ultimately, accountable. As a leader, I also take my role as a mentor very seriously. I firmly believe the pursuit of our business objectives must be balanced against the needs of our associates. We must all make it our responsibility to provide the support and guidance others need to grow and reach their full potential. This is how we can achieve the ultimate success.


A DIVERSITY OF GREAT TECHNOLOGY AND SOLUTIONS STARTS WITH A DIVERSITY OF GREAT PEOPLE.

At Raytheon, an inclusive culture is one of the things we believe gives us a competitive advantage. By recognizing the uniqueness of individuals, empowering employees, and truly valuing their input, our company consistently performs beyond all expectations. It’s a philosophy we’ll always embrace. It’s right for people, and it’s right for business. To learn more about opportunities with Raytheon, visit www.rayjobs.com

We’re proud to feature Raytheon employees in our ads. To join them in a rewarding career, visit

www.rayjobs.com © 2004 Raytheon Company. All rights reserved. Raytheon is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer and welcomes a wide diversity of applicants. U.S. citizenship and security clearance may be required.


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Karen M. Hardwick S

ome lessons we learn by observing those who succeed; others we learn the hard way. Here are some lessons that have served me well. Keep your spiritual house in order. In my experience, to excel one must tap daily into the power of the divine. Include whatever nourishes your spirit, whether that is yoga, prayer, running, reading sacred texts, meditation, etc. Do things that make you laugh, that help keep your professional life in perspective; it’s an important part of who you are, but it’s not all of who you are. And stay in touch with those who love you whether you succeed or fail. Operate from a position of strength: leverage your unique gifts and passions. As a new graduate in systems engineering, I realized that I had capitalized on my analytical abilities, but that I wanted to exploit my talent for oral and written advocacy. So I passed up lucrative consulting opportunities to attend Harvard Law School. I endured three more years on a

COMPANY: WEBSITE: TITLE: AGE:

Hogan & Hartson L.L.P

www.hhlaw.com

Partner 41

EDUCATION:

BSE, University of Virginia; JD, Harvard

Law School FIRST JOB: Intern at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

The Art of Possibility by Zander & Zander; His Excellency: George Washington by Ellis; and The Bondwoman's Narrative by Crafts/Gates WHAT I'M READING:

PHILOSOPHY:

I seek to serve God and my neighbors

in all that I do. FAMILY:

Single

INTERESTS: Travel, photography, reading, Pilates, music, conversational French

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Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

student’s budget, but I was much happier. Master your craft— learn from the best. While researching law firms for summer jobs, I found that many of the finest trial lawyers practiced at Hogan & Hartson. I landed a summer position there, earning an offer to return as an associate. When I returned after graduation, I made sure that management knew I wanted to become a great trial lawyer and was prepared to hustle to achieve that goal. As a result, I learned from the very best how to write briefs, take depositions, examine witnesses, and persuade juries. I never miss opportunities to hone my craft. Cultivate fertile ground in which to grow. Build a support network of peers and mentors who can help you develop a vision for your career, encourage you when you’re down, answer ‘dumb’ questions, and give you fresh perspective on challenges. Know the key people in your business unit and make sure they know you and what you do well. Seek their counsel on opportunities to advance your career. Keep in touch with colleagues from your college, industry conferences, and the like. These relationships will allow you to grow and evolve. Take charge of your own professional development. Think of yourself as the CEO of your career. Remember, no one has a greater stake in your success than you. Take responsibility for your successes and failures, and for creating new opportunities to grow. If you find yourself in an environment that does not support you—move on. When you fail (and you will), get up, learn from your mistake, and get back in the game. If you’ve never failed, you’ve never taken a risk. And if you never take a risk, you aren’t stretching yourself and will have to be satisfied with something less than your best.


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Keiko Harvey A

nything worth achieving takes planning and commitment. Successful leaders understand that creating the right plan and moving quickly to implement action is important. They also recognize the importance of assembling a team with diverse backgrounds, ideas, and skill sets; such a team generates a more innovative and often more creative outcome. Differences provide strength, and your strength helps, ultimately, to build the corporation's success. Mentoring can be both formal and informal. It's up to the individuals involved in the process to decide what kind of mentoring relationship works Verizon Communications

COMPANY: WEBSITE:

www22.verizon.com

Senior Vice President, Fiber to the Premises TITLE:

AGE:

56 Rutgers University, School of

EDUCATION:

Engineering FIRST JOB:

Sales representative at a souvenir gift

shop I've just finished Patricia Cornwell's Trace, and have picked up Janet Evanovich's Metro Girl WHAT I'M READING:

Work should be fun. If you're not having fun, you're doing the wrong work. Also, life is all about learning; if you're not learning something every day, you're not really living.

PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY: Husband Gerald; two children: Ted, 26, and Emma, 21 INTERESTS:

54

Travel, interior decorating

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

best for them. Personally, I’ve had many mentors, including many of my bosses. And I’ve mentored numerous people both formally and informally. Getting advice is helpful, but the key is to listen and then decide what to do with that advice. You’re responsible for your own success; so, you have to stretch yourself. Learn something new every day. Communicate, communicate, communicate—both inside and outside of your function. Listen and observe before making decisions. Take on projects that challenge you.


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Jacquelyn Hayes-Byrd M

y suggestions for women who want to achieve positions of leadership: Know the mission. Throughout my career in the military, and in private and public sectors as do those not-so-glamorous jobs yourself. Your an appointee, there were many obstacles that I staff needs to understand that you will not ask had to deal with and overcome. I have found it them to accomplish anything that you would extremely important to first always learn everynot do yourself. If there is a short deadline and thing about my programs and organizations. the envelopes have to be licked, get in there That ensured that I had a clear understanding and do it too. of the existing Take the high mission, or helped road when making me to develop a misORGANIZATION: U.S. Department of Commerce, hard staff decisions. Commercial Service sion. I created clear Very early in my objectives and goals WEBSITE: www.commerce.gov career in the ’80s, that would deterwhen Africanmine the direction TITLE: Executive Director, Global Diversity Initiative American female for my staff as well Program military officers as myself, while recAGE: 43 were still not as ognizing that there common in leadermay be times that I EDUCATION: Master's Degree in Public Administration ship positions as would have to reFIRST JOB: At 17, to help my family send me to they are today, evaluate those goals college, I earned money cleaning the houses vacated there were many and objectives based by military families that had transferred to other bases, times that I would on changes in the preparing the houses for the next family to move in. have loved to put organizational the blame squarely environment. WHAT I'M READING: Race for Success by George Fraser on the shoulders of Surround yourself PHILOSOPHY: Always leave your environment better whoever appeared with a great staff. In than when you found it. to be the responsiorder to find success, ble party. I found one of the most FAMILY: Married 11 years to my great husband, that it is always important things that David; a wonderful three-and-a-half-year old nephew, Landon important to look at you must always do the big picture and is surround yourself INTERESTS: Home improvement, decorating, quickly assess the with very smart, crecollecting antiques, and cooking problem to avoid ative, and hard-workjumping to conclusions. Remember that things ing people. Be willing to incorporate their great are not always what they seem. By looking at ideas into the plan that has been strategically the facts (and sometimes behind the facts), you developed for the mission. Always find out have a better chance of making fair and clear what motivates your staff and be willing to decisions which can ultimately have a major reward them for their efforts. impact on an employee’s life. Roll up your sleeves. You cannot be afraid to

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W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Marsha S. Henderson W

hen I started in banking, I invested a lot of time in building a network. I got involved in things, whether it was organizing the employee picnic or leading the company’s United Way campaign. Joining associations and community groups put me in places where I could meet business professionals. Two things happened: I became known out in the community; and I got to know the decision-makers, the influential people who were out there getting things done. I enjoyed networking, but it also laid a foundation for my future success, paying off tenfold in contacts for my career advancement and business relationships. Today I have people across the country I can call for advice. I also remember networking is a two-way street, so I always make time for people I have known who call me seeking some counsel. My career was definitely aided by many trailblazing women in business and banking before me, but I was always alert to opportunity. When I left my first employer after 18 years, it was because management still saw me as I was when I started, rather than what I had become. I wanted to go to a company that would continue to invest in me and, likewise, I could invest in them. I also chose at one point to move from staff to sales, which has more risk but also more reward and recognition for your accomplishments. When I changed positions, I was concerned whether my expertise would go with me, but it was a freeing experience. You find that you truly carry with you certain skills, and you also discover skills you didn’t even know you had until you put them to work in a different setting. Think of yourself as a corporation, with skills and assets that you have to sell in the marketplace. Don’t settle. Never underestimate yourself even if management does. Just because one company doesn’t see you as an executive doesn’t mean you are not one.

Find the place that values you and take a chance. Picture yourself in the job you really want, not the job you’re in. Paying attention to how executives around me managed, made decisions, and interacted with others helped me model that behavior. People at decision-making levels must be able to visualize you in a leadership role. I’ve always subscribed to a famous quote by Wilma Vaught, who retired from the Air Force as a brigadier general well before women were in these kinds of roles: “I wasn’t sure what I wanted to be when I grew up, but I knew that I wanted to be in charge.” COMPANY: WEBSITE: TITLE: AGE:

KeyBank, N.A.

www.keybank.com

President, Western District 56

BA, State University of New York at Buffalo; MBA, Canisius College

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: During college, I worked in retail stores but went into banking as my first ‘real’ job.

I just re-read Under the Tuscan Sun as a preview to a trip to Italy.

WHAT I'M READING:

The person who succeeds in life is willing to apply herself to the work at hand, do more than her share, treat others fairly, listen well, and learn from mistakes.

PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY: My husband is a great partner in life, plus I share in two wonderful grown children, John and Renee, and three grandchildren. INTERESTS:

I enjoy gardening for relaxation and golf

for frustration.

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

57


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Karen Jennings M

y advice to women who want to succeed in the corporate world is to go to work for a company that recognizes the value that women bring to the business world and that is dedicated to the promotion of women. Look for a company that knows that gender equity helps create a better business environment— one that makes the company an employer of choice, a preferred business partner, and an important contributor to the communities they serve. As your career develops, take advantage of the programs that may be available to support your advancement. These could include online career path tools, mentoring through employeeinitiated organizations, leadership development programs, and tuition reimbursement for skills enhancement. Finally, be objective of your own strengths and weaknesses. Be flexible and take advantage of opportunities. Demonstrate self-discipline and a strong work ethic. Have a positive, can-do attitude; add value to everything you do.

COMPANY: WEBSITE:

www.sbc.com

Senior Vice President, HR & Communications

TITLE: AGE:

SBC Communications

54 BSE, University of Arkansas

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: Initial management development program at Southwestern Bell Telephone Company WHAT I'M READING:

The Lion's Game by Nelson

DeMille PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Husband Bob, son Zach, stepson Bob Jr.

INTERESTS:

58

Golden Rule

Golf, reading, cats

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

Trust your gut instincts on tough decisions. Treat people right. Be true to yourself, but aware and respectful of the value systems and styles of the people with whom you interact.


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Kim Harris Jones COMPANY: WEBSITE: TITLE: AGE:

DaimlerChrysler Corporation

www.daimlerchrysler.com

Vice President, Product Finance 44

BBA (accounting) & MBA (finance), University of Michigan; executive programs at Columbia University and INSEAD (Fontainebleau, France)

EDUCATION:

M

y strategy on every assignment has been to become the expert as quickly as possible. It’s important to stay focused on your own career and not that of others. Don’t think of your competition as only other women/ minorities— you’ll limit yourself. If your career isn’t going as you had hoped, look inward first to see if you’re doing the things necessary for advancement. Reality is that sometimes as a woman you have to go more than the extra mile. You don’t have to be overly aggressive in order to be successful, but you do have to be assertive. Treat people the way you want to be treated. In the workplace you must recognize that you won’t be successful solely on your own; mentors (both men and women) are very important. Likewise, serve as a mentor to others. You will also find that you are only as good as the team working for/with you. Don’t be afraid to surround yourself with smart people (even those smarter than you) because you will learn from them and they will only strengthen your team. Relative to your life outside of work, strive to maintain a good balance between work and personal life, recognizing the real importance of family. In line with my philosophy of “you can have it all, but don’t have to do it all,” though I am a perfectionist I wouldn’t win a Good Housekeeping award either at home or in the

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Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

FIRST JOB: Staff accountant/auditor for Deloitte & Touche (great learning experience) WHAT I'M READING: Our Separate Ways: Black & White Women and the Struggle for Professional Identity by Ella Bell and Stella Nkomo

You can have it all, but you don’t have to do it all—which means that you don’t have to try to be a superwoman. Seek perfection in the really important aspects of life and don’t sweat the small things.

PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY: Married for 20 years to Jeffrey; two children: Jeffrey, 13, and Justin, 9 INTERESTS: Spending time with the family and friends, traveling, reading, and volunteer work

office, and that doesn’t bother me. My husband and I believe in full employment and I don’t feel guilty for paying someone else to do housecleaning, laundry, and other household tasks so I can have enough time and energy for the really important things like attending my kids’ school programs, sporting events, and other weekend activities. Finally, though family and the job are important, don’t forget to take time for yourself—we all need some private/personal time. I plan an annual visit with a friend to a health spa; it works wonders for my mental health and physical well-being.


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Fran Keeth T

o be one of tomorrow’s corporate leaders, I believe you must have integrity, respect for people, a desire to constantly learn, and a natural curiosity about the world. You must not be afraid to step outside your comfort zone. It also helps if you’re action-oriented and decisive. A successful leader is someone who can take a dream and turn it into a vision, and communicate that vision in such a way that people not only understand it, but believe in it and are motivated to accomplish it. A successful leader is one who is wise enough to create an

COMPANY:

Shell Chemical LP, Shell Chemicals

Limited WEBSITE:

www.shellchemicals.com

CEO & President of Shell Chemical LP; Executive Vice President of Shell Chemicals Limited

TITLE:

AGE:

58

EDUCATION:

BBA, MBA, JD: University of

Houston, TX FIRST JOB: Soda fountain waitress at drugstore on weekends and summers while in high school

I am an avid reader of fiction to relax, especially courtroom dramas and mysteries. Favorite authors: Jonathan Kellerman, Susan Isaac, Sandra Brown, Richard North Patterson, James Patterson, Agatha Christie, David Baldwin

WHAT I'M READING:

This is tough; catchy sound bites don’t capture the depth and breadth of a philosophy. For me it comes down to a journey of learning and growing; of knowing myself and liking me anyway; of being comfortable with who I was, who I am, and who I am becoming.

PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY:

Husband of 34 years and one grown son

INTERESTS: Reading, skiing, piano, wine, and quiet evenings with my family

inclusive and diverse environment where people can get on with their work, yet who is humble enough to step to the side and cheer the team on to success. I’m a big believer in diversity. I want to create an environment where you could bring your whole self to work. No one should have to worry about trying to fit into the organization—that is a waste of time and energy that people could be using to do their jobs. When we talk about diversity in the United States, we usually think of more women and minorities in the workplace; but we need a more global perspective in our definition of diversity to include all cultures. For instance, our company is developing a talent pipeline to better utilize the strengths of all our employees around the world, fostering a culture where everyone is a leader. This means that everyone knows what his or her job is within each organization. This also means that we expect employees to know what he or she has the power to do, and then decide to do it. Finally, I think in order to become one of tomorrow’s corporate leaders, you need to remember to have some fun along the way! Enjoy what you do and the people with whom you work. This will give you the enthusiasm and the energy to keep going when others give up. It will also inspire the people you are leading.

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

61


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Dorothy Kim

Starbucks

COMPANY: WEBSITE:

www.starbucks.com

Executive Vice President, Supply Chain & Coffee Operations

TITLE:

AGE:

42 MBA, University of Washington

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

Analyst, Boeing Company

WHAT I'M READING:

Too Busy Not to Pray by

Bill Hybels PHILOSOPHY:

Know where you are going; know

your purpose. FAMILY:

Single mother, large extended family

INTERESTS:

T

here are five basic ideas I focus on in my life, which have allowed me to grow personally and professionally. They have helped me to make decisions consistent with my values and the values of my employers over the years. I offer these ideas as a starting point for tomorrow’s corporate leaders to help guide their careers. Be true to who and what you are. As tempting as it may be sometimes, don’t try to be someone else—it doesn’t work in the long run. Take the high road and rise above the noise. It’s the best thing you can do for yourself personally, as well as for the organization. Surround yourself with outstanding leaders who have great attitudes, and empower them to do what they do best. Not only can you help them rise to new heights they may never have imagined themselves reaching, but you will learn many new things from them as well. Lead from your heart. Speak from your heart

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Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

Family & friends

and make connections with people from the heart—let them know you care about them. This is true in business and your personal life. Connecting with someone over a cup of coffee can be a very rewarding experience for both parties. Take as many people as you can with you through your life journey. Love what you do; share it with others. There are so many different people in the world, and you can benefit from their experiences and learn from the examples of their lives. Take them on your journey and they will take you on theirs. Two of our corporate Guiding Principles are: providing a great work environment by treating each other with respect and dignity; and embracing diversity as an essential component in the way we do business. Not only are these principles exceptional guidance for making business decisions, they are also two great principles to follow in everyday life.


Without differences, there are no unique perspectives. Without unique perspectives, there is no innovation.

At Lockheed Martin, diversity isn’t just trendy corporate-speak. It’s one of the driving forces behind our success. Every one of the men and women working here brings their own special perspective to our business challenges. The result? A creative environment where unique thought is encouraged. Which enables us to produce innovative solutions for our customers. We believe our differences make us stronger. And bring out the best in us, so that we can achieve great things together. Lockheed Martin. One company. One team. Where diversity contributes to mission success.

www.lockheedmartin.com


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Carol Kline I

have never thought of myself in the context of a woman or a minority in the workplace, and I believe that translates into making it an even playing field. I would tell anyone that it is essential that you work seamlessly across the organization or business, at every level. By doing so, you cannot help but get noticed. I have also made a conscious decision to take really measurable jobs, so that it is clear that I have made a difference in an organization. Some people say “If you can't measure it, you can’t manage it.” While I happen to agree with that from a management perspective, the truth is that from a career perspective it is difficult to succeed no matter who you are if you cannot point to where you were in the past, what you are doing in the present, and where you are going in the future. Some of the greatest lessons I have learned have come at the time of adversity; I feel that you always come out stronger on the other side once you have faced it. While a lot of people try to avoid it, I will welcome it and face the challenge at hand. In saying all of that, I am smart enough to know that you do not have to be the smartest on the team. I have always felt that smart leaders surround themselves with great people that are aligned around them to deliver. I love a great team, and that is the secret to success.

COMPANY: WEBSITE:

www.aol.com

Chief Information Officer

TITLE: AGE:

AOL

40

Bachelor of Science (marketing and management), Ohio Northern University; MBA, Case Western Reserve University

EDUCATION:

Product manager in the wholesale division, Ohio Bell FIRST JOB:

WHAT I'M READING:

Dr. Seuss books with my

children It's about the journey, not the destination. If you forget about the journey, you will lose sight of the destination.

PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY: Husband, Rich; two daughters: Taylor and Mackenzie (8 and 7) INTERESTS: Time with family; traveling; Cleveland Browns; Cleveland Indians; mountain biking and the outdoors

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Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Melendy Ewing Lovett COMPANY: WEBSITE:

Texas Instruments Inc.

www.ti.com

Senior Vice President, President Education & Productivity Solutions

TITLE:

AGE:

46

MS (accounting), University of Texas at Dallas; BBA (management & information systems) Texas A&M University

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: Republic Bank, implementing systems for commercial customers

O

ver my career, I have picked up a few attitudes and practices essential to my professional and personal success. Though strength comes in self-discovery, I wish I had known these when I first started out, and I am honored to share them. Knowing myself. I spend time planning and acting on personal development that works for me. I encourage self-awareness, recognizing one’s strengths and weaknesses, and finding ways to grow professionally that are effective— some of us learn by going to classes, but most of us learn more through real-life relationships and experiences. Self-competition. I think self-competition is healthy, and I compete against my own goals and best effort, rather than competition with others. I also enjoy helping others achieve their professional goals through self-competition, and championing and celebrating their successes. Focus. I discipline myself and prioritize time to achieve the highest-impact results. This focus sets boundaries for a successful career and life. There is always more work to be done, and it takes self-discipline to realize true priorities and live accordingly. This never gets easy! Confidence. Setting and achieving hard-toreach but reasonable goals has helped build

WHAT I'M READING: For work: Profit from the Core and Beyond the Core by Chris Zook; with my daughter: The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd

Each of us has unique, God-given talents; we are happiest when we are using them to their full potential. And, live life based on what really matters—don't sweat the small stuff.

PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY:

Husband Jim; daughter Alexa (14)

INTERESTS: Family, reading, exercise, travel, scuba diving, snow skiing, my daughter's equestrian sports

my confidence to take on new challenges. I encourage women to take on tough, messy challenges, achieve against ambitious goals, and build a track record of results. Learn to deliver big and celebrate bigger! Toughness. I have become comfortable accepting risk and planning to win rather than trying not to lose. An attitude of ‘change=opportunity’ has been very helpful. I accept responsibility for my own destiny and expect to work hard to achieve. I don’t expect things to always go my way. Faith. My relationship with God is a source of strength for me and I enjoy giving back with an attitude of gratitude.

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

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W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

JoanneM.Maguire I

always have been passionate about what I do—the important work my company performs or clarifying examples. for our nation; the amazing solutions we Find a mentor; delve into how that person provide to tough challenges; and, most of all, performs, manages, and delivers results. the terrific people with whom I work. If you Besides mentors, also surround yourself with don’t feel that same kind of passion, career networks. Demonstrate confidence, but also be guidance is not going to make a great difference. your own toughest critic by strictly Be inquisitive, advancing yourself by monitoring your performance against personal absorbing every bit of knowledge you can. goals. Clearly define your career desires and Learning is important from every source—the make them known media, professional to those who journals, books, and help steer your those around you. COMPANY: Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company path. Accept blame Plus, never be afraid when it is due, of asking dumb WEBSITE: www.lockheedmartin.com and acknowledge questions! Lifelong your mistakes— education translates TITLE: Vice President & Deputy this builds your into better problem AGE: 50 credibility. solving, deeper Finally, concensubject knowledge, EDUCATION: BS (electrical engineering), Michigan trate on your ‘emoand proficiency; it State University; MS, (systems engineering), UCLA tional intelligence’. can pave the way to FIRST JOB: TRW Defense Systems (technical staff: Technical and intelhigher-skilled, bettermissile system analyst) lectual skills are paying positions. only part of the Communication WHAT I’M READING: The Lexus and the Olive Tree: equation for sucalso is essential. Understanding Globalization by Thomas Friedman cess. People who Over the years, I’ve PHILOSOPHY: When you follow your passions and can understand, learned that the give fully of yourself, you reap rewards far greater than communicate, and keenest insights are you might predict. empathize with colthose born in free leagues will go farand open dialogue FAMILY: A family of 12 siblings taught me the value of self-reliance and give-and-take; I’m trying to pass these ther in their careers with diverse stakelessons on to my son (7) and daughter (4) than those unable holders—from the or unwilling to do most senior cusINTERESTS: Sports, all types of music, Web-surfing so. Bring these tomer to the newest skills with you to hire on the factory all interactions. The floor. In such an growing perception in business is that someenvironment, more often than not, everyone one’s abilities to understand and manage emosucceeds. Speak up and bring your different tions improves their performance, their collabpoints of view to meetings, conversations, oration with colleagues, and their interaction and correspondence. Use your experience, with customers. education, and skills to contribute alternatives

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Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Judy F. Marks I

n considering “what advice could serve as a chart and compass for navigating a channel toward a successful career as a corporate leader?” I reflect on the journey that started long ago and the continuing journey ahead. The query brings me back to a moment when I wrote in my high school yearbook: “Some people set their sights higher than others.” You have the duty to teach continually and mentor those who need to chalfollow your footsteps. lenge yourself, COMPANY: Lockheed Martin You must be willing to seek out menwork hard and tors, be a menWEBSITE: www.lockheedmartin.com encourage your team tor, tap your TITLE: President, Distribution Technologies to find creative strengths, answers even when understand AGE: 41 convention says there your weakare none. Realize there nesses, and EDUCATION: Bachelor’s degree (electrical are no short cuts, and engineering), Lehigh University believe in your execute decisions with convictions. FIRST JOB: Systems engineer at IBM Corporation unparalleled business It’s vital to ethics. be passionate WHAT I'M READING: How Full is Your Bucket? Be diligent about about what Positive Strategies for Work and Life by Tom Rath and Donald O. Clifton eliminating private you’re doing. prejudices, keeping Infuse enthusiPHILOSOPHY: Do your best. No one can ask more, your emotions in balasm in all you and you won’t be satisfied with less. ance, and being a role do, as well as model for positive among those FAMILY: Husband and 13-year-old daughter change. When I think you work with INTERESTS: Golf, reading of the importance of and lead. taking time to mentor Encourage a and be a role model, continuous I keep my daughter’s quest for knowlfuture in my mind’s eye—along with a edge and customer satisfaction. professional duty to participate in industry Leadership encompasses responsibility, organizations, and a social responsibility to be action, service, and intuition—guided by involved in my community. With my husband’s common sense, and grounded by facts. It’s not fantastic support and encouragement, we’re bluster, inaction, or excuses. able to provide our daughter a paradigm of I wouldn’t be where I am today if people normalcy through example that says achieving had not taken risks with me. So, as you move your goals can be done regardless of gender. along a path toward greater responsibility, you

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Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004


Promoting healthy workplaces. Starting with our own.

Most people at Excellus BlueCross BlueShield focus on the wellness of our customers. But some of us direct our attention to the core principles of a healthy company. Open opportunity and inclusive programs. We know that diversity in our offices means more understanding and compassion in the communities we serve. Learn more about our diversity program by contacting Marie Philippe at diversity@excellus.com.

Vi t a l . Va l u a b l e . E v e r y d a y .

A nonprofit independent licensee of the BlueCross BlueShield Association

SM


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Punam Mathur M

y late father reminded me as a youngster that I had power to do anything, but that my power ended at the tip of my nose. It’s an extremely empowering notion. If you are pleased with the outcomes of your actions, continue the actions. If the outcomes are not as you desire, don’t lament them and don’t become de-motivated! Just change your actions and create different results. Too frequently when faced with obstacles, we waste energy and time attempting to change the outcome—the way people react, the corporate landscape, perceptions of others. You can't. By using your own infinite power, do things differently until you generate the result you seek. Daring to succeed, by definition, also means daring to fail. If we are challenging ourselves— choosing paths less traveled, stretching to the ‘skinny branches’ (all the types of ‘risky’ behaviors that yield career success)—we will, inevitably, fall down once in a while.

MGM Mirage

COMPANY: WEBSITE:

www.mgmmirage.com

Senior Vice President of Corporate Diversity & Community Affairs TITLE:

AGE:

43

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

Special Education-pending

Age 13: car wash

WHAT I'M READING: PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Life—it is what you make it.

3 adopted children: ages 15, 6, and 5

INTERESTS:

70

The Life of Pi by Yann Martel

Family time, outdoor activities

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

Successful professionals seem to be set apart from the rest by their amplitude and gusto, as evidenced by their impressive successes and their stunning defeats. Therefore, be bold, because boldness creates success! And, when you occasionally falter, learn from it and move on.


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Suzanne F. Medvidovich ORGANIZATION: WEBSITE: TITLE: AGE:

U.S. Postal Service

www.usps.gov

Senior Vice President, Human Resources 58

Master’s degree (management), University of Mary, Bismarck ND

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB:

Dishwasher for Sisters of Mercy

Convent

The Fred Factor by Mark Sanborn; Leading at the Edge by Dennis N.T. Perkins

WHAT I'M READING:

W

hat advice would I offer women aspiring to leadership positions? I attribute my success to three things: willingness to accept every challenge presented to me, several caring mentors who have helped me throughout my career, and an organization that values diversity and offers unlimited opportunities to anyone willing to take advantage of them. I have always trusted myself, done the best job I could possibly do, and been very flexible. I believe that accessibility leads to opportunity. It certainly has for me. I started as a letter carrier in New Cumberland, PA. When I was offered a chance to fill in for my supervisor, who went on a detail to another position, I took it. This experience piqued my interest in management, and I applied for and was named postmaster of a small town, Marysville, PA. That opportunity in turn led to increasingly higher level positions. I am now one of three senior women officers on the Postal Service Executive Committee serving as advisors to the Postmaster General. I am also a strong advocate for developing leadership skills among an organization’s future leaders. I believe the business achievements we have made were possible because of our organization's top-down commitment to succession planning, starting with the officers and

Do your best, never waste your time, trust in yourself, and always trust in God.

PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY: Widowed when my children were 14, 11, and 10, I have, with the help of God, successfully raised my two daughters and a son. I now have a granddaughter and a grandson who, in my opinion, are perfect. INTERESTS: Church; decorating; going to Disney World (>50 visits to date); and talking with my children

executives. Find an organization like mine that is diverse, that values employees, that offers them the tools they need to prepare themselves for advancement, and then promotes them based solely on their ability! For example, we recruit in colleges and universities, provide multi-level developmental opportunities for employees, and offer a corporate succession planning process that is open and fair. Naturally, if you do all this, you will get a diverse pool of the best people. As a manager yourself, you must allow your team to be successful. You have to make sure they understand the direction the organization wants to take, set clear expectations, and then stay out of their way. But you also must be a good sounding board and support them in every way you can.

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

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W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Ann Oka I

grew up with two brothers, and was fortunate to have been raised to believe that I could do anything that they could do. This came in handy as my first job out of college was as a supervisor of a group of 55 men working in a vegetable oil refinery. It never occurred to me that there were those who thought a woman could not do the job. That naiveté helped me to settle in and do the job I was hired to do, eventually earning the respect of those doubters. Of course, life experience has since taught me that the doubters do exist out there; but I have consciously decided to practice ‘deliberate naiveté’ so that I do not create artificial barriers for myself. I love a good challenge, and a good day is one in which I learn something. I believe that this has helped me to create my own success. I do not consider title and salary to be the key symbols of success. This has allowed me to

Sodexho

COMPANY: WEBSITE: TITLE: AGE:

www.sodexho.com

Senior Vice President, Supply Management 45

EDUCATION:

BS (chemical engineering), UC Berkeley;

MBA, UC Irvine FIRST JOB: First job ever: appetizer, salad & dessert cook in a French restaurant; first professional job: supervisor of a vegetable oil refinery in San Francisco WHAT I'M READING: My favorite book is Atlas Shrugged, but on a daily basis I do well to keep up with the news!

Enjoy the journey; each step has its own unique beauty.

PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY:

Husband and 12-year-old son

INTERESTS:

72

My family, travel, golf, and cooking

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

take lateral moves to expand the breadth of my knowledge and experience. Early on, I recognized the career limitations of remaining on the technical path of engineering and operations. I moved out of my comfort zone into a position in finance, and pursued my MBA to further develop the business skills that I would need to grow in my career. Pursuing these challenges has meant taking on some risk. I have relocated four times, and most recently changed companies after almost twenty years. These are the choices that I have elected to make as opportunities have arisen. I believe it is very important for individuals to recognize the many choices that they have, and to own the choices that they make. We choose which limitations to accept, and which to push through. My advice to women seeking to grow their careers is based on what has worked for me: keep all options open, always seek a challenge, choose wisely, but don’t be afraid to err. But most of all, remember that we all live in the today, and we better be enjoying that!


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Rose M. Patten I

believe women need to be prepared to readily talk about their skills and experiences when opportunities arise. I don’t mean to suggest that they should spend all their time tooting their own horn, but sometimes it is not enough to work hard and just expect contributions to be recognized automatically. At a minimum, you should be ready during your performance discussions, for example, to be able to cite those occasions where your ideas made a difference, when your participation caused progress and brought about beneficial change, or your leadership moved your team or the company forward. If you find yourself in a disappointing career situation, avoid quick reactions, think carefully, and assess the longerterm implications. Above all, the best advice I would give is be true to yourself, be courageous, and stay focused on your goal. Throughout my career, I have made great use of the following advice: • Always choose the toughest task; • Listen and learn at all times; • Think of the four C’s: be curious, calm, COMPANY: BMO Financial Group compassionate, and WEBSITE: www.bmo.com courageous; • Above all, share what you TITLE: Senior Executive Vice-President & Head, know and be helpful to Office of Strategic Management others. EDUCATION:

Memorial University

Wisdom is knowing what to do, skill is knowing how, and virtue is doing it.

PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY:

Husband, Tom

INTERESTS: Gardening; community involvement; training five birds and two dogs

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Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004


AT CISCO SYSTEMS,® ONE OF OUR PRIMARY BUSINESS OBJECTIVES IS TO ENSURE WE HAVE AN INCLUSIVE WORKFORCE AND A DIVERSE GROUP OF SUPPLIERS.

Employees from different cultures and geographies, viewpoints, experiences, values and styles of interacting help Cisco better understand the needs of our customers, create innovative products, foster healthier communities, and promote customer success. We encourage our employees to develop their full potential and share their expertise, and they help Cisco change the way we work, live, play, and learn.

© 2004 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco, Cisco Systems, and the Cisco Systems logo are registered trademarks of Cisco Systems, Inc. and/or its affiliates in the United States and certain other countries.


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Nancy Rae

Daimler Chrysler Corporation

COMPANY: WEBSITE: TITLE:

www.daimlerchrysler.com

Senior Vice President,Human Resources

MA (industrial relations), Central Michigan University; BS (business administration in management), Eastern Michigan University

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB:

Warren Truck Plant: interviewer qualifier

WHAT I'M READING: Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap and Others Don’t by Jim Collins

Always keep your word—if you say that you’re going to do something, do it.

PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY: Family keeps you whole; always find quality time INTERESTS:

T

oday’s challenges—including globalization, technology, profitability through growth, capacity for change, and strategic talent management—make for a business climate significantly different than it was even a decade ago. But these circumstances also create opportunities for those aspiring to significant positions of leadership. Major corporations that want to be successful in the global marketplace are waging a fierce battle for people with global leadership capabilities, so they now seek to attract and retain the best talent regardless of gender. Women (as well as men) hoping to advance within any major corporation will need far more than functional knowledge or technical expertise. Today’s professionals aspiring to be tomorrow’s corporate leaders must understand the business environment in general and their industry in particular. They must learn to think strategically. They must be able to quickly

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Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

Golf and travel

adapt to change, and develop the capabilities to lead change and drive value creation within their organizations. They must appreciate and practice behaviors that inspire and motivate a globally diverse workforce, knowing how to empower people and challenge them to top performance. Now more than ever, exclusion is not an option. Human capital remains the one true measure of differentiation between companies. Traditional barriers to the advancement of women are fading fast as companies strive to enhance their organizations by developing individual competencies as well as the depth of their workforce, beyond diversity of race and gender, to include nationality, language, and cultural differences. Winning in the global marketplace will require leaders to optimize the potential and performance of each and every employee in the workplace.


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Andra Rush T

o be a leader—whether in corporate America or in your community or family—you must have a dream. From that, you create a vision and a belief of success in achieving your dream. Then you must set goals, believe that you can achieve them, and then act on them or “get in the game.” I have found that the power of crystallizing your vision to a measurable goal or fixed date is amazing: I have achieved many goals I set in business in half of the time I thought I would. You must be able to go beyond your comfort zone and beyond the status quo, always realizing you are on the edge of success or rejection, and that it is OK if rejection occurs.

COMPANY: Rush Trucking Corporation; Dakkota Integrated Systems, LLC; Global Rush, LLC WEBSITE:

www.rushtrucking.com

CEO, Rush Trucking; President: Dakkota Integrated Systems; Chairman of the Board: Global Rush

TITLE:

AGE:

44

EDUCATION: BS, U of Michigan; graduate & management classes: U of Michigan, Dartmouth, Kellogg U FIRST JOB:

A paper route

Good to Great, Native Wisdom Teachings, and The Purpose-Driven Life

WHAT I'M READING:

I believe in living a spiritual life; as a Christian, I believe in respecting others, finding the good in people, and following the Golden Rule. Also, live while you’re alive.

PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY: Three sons: Zackary, Cheyne, Chance. Mom and Dad are supportive; three sisters INTERESTS: Kids, golf, hiking, travel, skiing, boating, reading, working out, movies

Don’t let others steal your dreams. In my heritage, we have dream catchers—artistic webbed circles made of wood, sinew, and feathers that you place in your home. The purpose of the web is to catch bad dreams or thoughts that may be floating in a spiritual sense, and the center of the dream catcher is open, to allow good dreams and thoughts to pass through. In the American culture, there are a lot of dream stealers who point out flaws instead of attributes in something or someone. I challenge people to find the attributes and the possibilities. As a leader, don’t be afraid to ask for help. Seek guidance from many sources; engage people outside of your industry in discussions on business issues. Participate in non-profit organizations and volunteer to those without role models. Make the leaders of your customers’ organizations part of your team: ask their perceptions and pulse on the business. Such relationships have been a differentiator in major decisions I have made. Take time for diversity in your life—work, health, family, friends, hobbies, and spiritual time. I am learning to accept not always having an “A” performance, to live life, not work. Appreciate your gifts and blessings, and find chances to have joy and laughter.

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

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W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Joyce Russell

COMPANY: WEBSITE:

Adecco USA

www.adeccousa.com

TITLE:

Chief Operating Officer

AGE:

44

EDUCATION:

Bachelor of Arts from Baylor University

FIRST JOB: During high school: selling tomatoes at a roadside stand; after college: recruiter at a staffing company WHAT I'M READING:

Leadership by Rudolph

Giuliani PHILOSOPHY: Every day, look for the positive in each and every person and situation.

O

f all the leadership qualities outlined in book after book, passion—defined (among other things) as “boundless enthusiasm”—ranks right at the top of my list. At Adecco, I and the people I have the honor of working with have boundless enthusiasm and passion for serving our clients and associates, the employees we place at client companies. Growing up in Florida, where my dad was a citrus grower, I learned valuable lessons from my parents that still guide me. My dad taught me that how you make people feel is even more important than what you do and say. My mother taught me the importance of patience, respect, and finding value in all people. I learned about sales by selling at the farm’s roadside stand. I learned about leading people from watching my dad: he treats every person with dignity and respect. My favorite book is Bringing out the Best in People; that book and my own experiences have formulated my five essential guidelines to leading any team or organization: • Hire the best people—everything begins and ends with people. Hiring the best people is the first step in building and leading a world-class organization. • Give them the best products and training. Investing in people creates

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Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

FAMILY:

Two great teenage sons and a wonderful

husband INTERESTS:

Snow skiing, gardening, antiquing

three positive outcomes—getting results today, developing the next generation of leaders, and leaving a valuable legacy. As the saying goes, “…teach a man to fish, and you feed him for a lifetime.” Leadership is about inspiring others, helping them to reach their full potential. • Give them the best support. You show people you care by spending time with them, by being present, and role modeling the behavior you expect. The saying rings true, “What you do speaks so loudly, I can’t hear what you say.” • Hold them accountable; it’s one thing to have a plan, and quite another to execute it. Managing performance is a very important job as a leader. • Reward the doers. Everyone who works for you wants to feel important. Good leaders always recognize and reward success, which not only gives people a sense of accomplishment, but also lets them know they belong to an organization that cares about them.


“I am

making a difference.”

“I am

“I am taking care

improving your life.”

of you. And people you care about .” People define our success. Diverse perspectives and talents allow us to provide

I am

innovative food and

Sodexho facilities management

services that improve the quality of daily life for the millions of people we

“I am ensuring

serve in the U.S. every day.

your safety.”

“I am a step ahead.” mit

us i on

t e d t o Di

s i t y and I

ncl

ve r

Com

Food Services, Facilities Management, Vending, Catering, Office Refreshment Services, Environmental Services, Landscaping & Grounds Management, Conferencing, Plant Operations & Management

sodexhoUSA.com • 1-800-SODEXHO ©Sodexho Member of Sodexho Alliance®

Sodexho embraces diversity and inclusion.


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Mary Kay Schneider I •

n counseling women who aspire to positions of leadership, I can only share what has worked for me, which boils down to several key points: Lead with your strengths and involve yourself in work that you truly care about. Trying new things helps you clarify your strengths and interests. Remember that if you don’t ask, you don’t get—kind of the reverse of “ask and you shall receive.” Tell people what you want, whether it’s their business (if they are a prospective customer) or it’s a raise or a particular position (if they are your boss or someone who can influence your boss). Set goals for yourself and measure your progress. Be willing to modify your plan in the face of new information or circumstances. Surround yourself with positive, upbeat

• National City Corporation

COMPANY: WEBSITE:

www.nationalcity.com

Executive Vice President, Small Business Banking

TITLE:

AGE:

41

BA, Kent State University; MBA, Case Western Reserve University

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB:

Working as a waitress at Bob’s Big Boy

WHAT I'M READING:

Re-imagine! by Tom Peters

I agree with Zig Ziglar who says that "you can get everything you want in life if you will just help enough other people get what they want."

PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY:

Two daughters: ages 6 and 11

INTERESTS:

Music, singing, working-out, skiing,

reading

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Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

people and inspire yourself by reading inspirational material. When faced with an obstacle, think creatively to find a way over or around it. Think through all of your possible alternatives. Don’t limit your thinking to “this is the way we’ve always done it.” Seek constructive feedback for improvement. If you want to work on a particular skill, ask people to help you and give you feedback. A number of years ago, I decided that I needed to be more comfortable speaking in front of a large audience. I prepared in advance for a presentation, I paid particular attention to my body language and tone of voice, and I asked my boss to critique me. On another occasion, I asked one of my employees for feedback. Then, I acted on that feedback. Be thankful and show appreciation to those who work for you and with you. Celebrate their successes and encourage them when they face difficulties. Learn to delegate w o r k t o o t h e r s . It frees you up to take some of your boss’s work, which will challenge and develop you, and the work you delegate (and check up on!) will develop your employees.


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Molly D. Shepard I

t seems to me that too few women move from middle management positions to senior levels in corporate America, and many who do successfully enter the executive ranks do not stay. These realities suggest my advice for women who aspire to corporate leadership. I think women need to adopt the styles, skills and savvy of corporate America— developing an understanding of problem issues, and taking action to make adjustments in their approach to their work and careers. This requires awareness of the people and politics around them: learning what qualities are valued, who is making the decisions, and the most effective way to get things accomplished. Only after you understand your corporate culture can you determine where you fit in. From my personal experience, the key areas most problematic for senior level women include: communicating effectively; building networking relationships; promoting their own accomplishments; being politically savvy; getting the most out of mentoring; maintaining a work/life balance; and developing impact and presence. One way to improve in these areas is through community outreach. For instance, I serve on the boards of our region’s public TV/radio and other organizations; I am also active with the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce and various charities. When you develop an appreciation of your working environment, and carefully assess your strengths and weaknesses, you can begin to overcome hurdles and be more successful. As women in management we have the opportunity to bring to the top of the house distinctive expertise, perspectives, and more collaborative and inclusive management styles that can make a real change in the corporate cultural landscape.

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Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

COMPANY: WEBSITE: TITLE: AGE:

The Leader’s Edge

www.the-leaders-edge.com

Founder, President & CEO 57

BA, Wheaton College; MS (psychological services & counseling), University of Pennsylvania

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: Director of Admissions, Institute for Paralegal Training (first paralegal training program in the United States) WHAT I'M READING: The Things They Carried by Tim O'Brien, and Confidence by Rosabeth Moss Kanter (I always have two books going)

With change comes the opportunity to grow, so we need to embrace change rather than run away from it.

PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY: Widowed in May after 24 years of partnership in life, love and work. I have three children: Ashley and Kurt, who are lawyers; and Robert, a senior at The Haverford School INTERESTS: I am most interested in the lives of my children. When I am not running my company, I love to read and travel.


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Janet CrenshawSmith M

y advice for women regarding overcoming obstacles to advancement is that most obstacles simply are not. Life’s biggest barriers represent an opportunity to demonstrate what’s possible. Success begins with a strong belief that you will succeed. That belief may be grounded in faith, spirit, or someone else who believes in you so much that you believe too. You can then visualize your success—actually see it—very clearly. Even when you encounter a roadblock, you don’t give up because the goal is still in view. I encourage women who wish to be corporate leaders to live rich, balanced lives. Experiencing life as a daughter, wife, and mother has prepared me to follow, partner, and lead— all key skills in business.

Ivy Planning Group, LLC

COMPANY: WEBSITE: TITLE: AGE:

www.ivygroupllc.com

President 43

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

BA, Harvard College

Marketing rep, IBM Corporation

WHAT I'M READING: The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd; and Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done by Larry Bossidy, et al.

Faith drives results. Believing is seeing. Decide how you can make a difference; then go do that.

PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY: Married 20 years to Gary A. Smith; three sons: Gary II, 17; Alex, 15; Bradley, 14. INTERESTS: Anything teenager-related: high school football, college applications, surviving having three teenagers!

Invest time in building strong relationships with diverse groups of people. While strong technical skills are important, particularly early in your career, ‘who you know’ matters as much, perhaps more, as you advance. Take the time experiencing a full life to know what makes you happy. Create a plan that enables you to do work that you love. I love the work that I do; so even though I sometimes fret over my travel schedule, it’s OK because I adore the work. Find that for yourself.

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

83


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Marie F. Smith ORGANIZATION: WEBSITE: TITLE: AGE:

AARP

www.aarp.org

National President 65

BA (biology, pre-med), Fisk University; Graduate Certificate (public affairs), Stanford University

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB:

Social Security Administration

Maya Angelou’s Hallelujah! The Welcome Table: A Lifetime of Memories

WHAT I’M READING:

PHILOSOPHY:

You can do anything!

FAMILY: Widow; three stepchildren; five grandchildren INTERESTS:

I

t’s all about hard work, stick-to-ittiveness, and determination. I was fortunate to have a mentor, as I began my career path, who insisted upon fully completed staff work. No detail was too small to consider. I have rewritten a single report a dozen times until I felt it was right, only to have missed details pointed out. Instead of throwing up my hands, I would take a deep breath, tear up the old report, and start fresh. I was also willing to follow the next opportunity. I applied for, then accepted, promotions frequently. I moved from the East Coast to the West Coast, then up the West Coast, then down the West Coast. Every new position was an opportunity to learn more and demonstrate that

84

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

Writing

I could do the job effectively and efficiently. If I did not have all of the skills I felt necessary to carry out the duties of my job, I would research and study to add to my knowledge about particular areas of interest within the job. During my 25 years with Social Security, I took over 25 management and supervisory courses. There were few new management approaches that I had not studied and had available to use to enhance my participation in the work place. Later, as the owner/operator of a small business, I sometimes worked 12 or more hours per day, doing everything from planting trees to filling out tax forms for quarterly returns. I had to be willing to do any and all jobs to make it work.


Š2004 ChevronTexaco Corporation. ChevronTexaco is a trademark of ChevronTexaco Corporation.

Bring the world together, and you help develop a better one. In a global marketplace, a rich tapestry of ideas, skills and perspectives is a key competitive advantage. At ChevronTexaco, we support diversity initiatives around the world, fostering growth and opportunity for everyone. To find out more, visit us at chevrontexaco.com.


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

SandraL.Thompson I

t is not realistic to expect a career without problems. Problems and obstacles are invaluable opportunities that allow you to grow, act creatively, and gain insight into difficult situations. I find that how you think is more important than what you are thinking about. If you think negative and fearful thoughts, you are putting up internal roadblocks which do not allow you to engage at the highest level. Your approach to a problem will generally determine the outcome. You can tell a lot about someone’s character by assessing their approach in dealing with difficult situations because you have an opportunity to see critical thinking and problem-solving skills at work in less-than-ideal circumstances. It’s easy to make the right decisions when things are going well; however, when the situation is not ideal, it’s a whole different ballgame. The personal obstacle that is most prevalent today is the reluctance to change. I consider myself a risk taker: I am not afraid to fail, and I am not afraid to change. In fact, the one constant throughout my career has been change. I’ve applied for jobs and assignments that were not in my area of expertise because I think it is important to step out of my comfort zone to increase my knowledge and area of responsibility. I am comfortable with unknown situations because my faith allows me to live a life where I trust God for outcomes. That is truly liberating, and it allows me to adapt to almost any situation, political climate, or business culture. In almost every situation, I count my blessings and try to have an attitude of thankfulness. A frequent workplace obstacle can be interactions with others. I believe that for disagreements at work, every battle is not a war, and you don’t have to win every argument. Some things are just not that important. Even in

86

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

the most dire situation, there is a greater good that will ultimately prevail. Exercising patience is critical. Some fires burn themselves out over time, and some battles you don’t need to fight; however, there are some things that are deal breakers. The key is knowing when and where you really need to be engaged and trying not to expend unnecessary energy when a situation is not that important. Even when you have disagreements, valuing the opinion of others is important. Every person should be treated with dignity and respect, and their different perspectives should be respected. You don’t have to be disagreeable to disagree; delivery is critical. ORGANIZATION:

Federal Deposit Insurance

Corporation (FDIC) WEBSITE:

www.fdic.gov

Deputy Director, Division of Supervision & Consumer Protection

TITLE:

AGE:

44 BBA (finance), Howard University

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: Computer programmer, Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company WHAT I'M READING:

The Purpose-Driven Life

by Rick Warren To treat everyone with dignity and respect; to be thankful and appreciative for all things.

PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY: Two sons: Jarrett, 19, college sophomore; and Aaron, 14, high school freshman INTERESTS:

Reading, traveling, watching old movies


Committed to Success The culture of National City is one in which respect, inclusion and performance excellence prevail in all we do for our customers, our communities, our shareholders and our employees. By providing jobs, products, services, community investments and civic leadership, National City builds pathways to success‌one person, one relationship at a time.

F o r i n f o r m a t i o n a b o u t o p p o r t u n i t i e s a t N a t i o n a l C i t y, v i s i t u s a t N a t i o n a l C i t y. c o m .

National City Corporation and its subsidiaries and member banks are Equal Opportunity Employers. National City Corporation and its subsidiaries and member banks do not sponsor trainees for work authorization. National City Corporation requires candidates to submit a pre-employment drug screening. Member FDIC, Š 2004, National City Corporation


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5 COMPANY:

Janie Tsao

WEBSITE:

Linksys, a Division of Cisco Systems, Inc.

www.linksys.com

Senior Vice President, Worldwide Sales & Business Development

TITLE:

AGE:

51

EDUCATION:

BA, Tamkang University, Taiwan

FIRST JOB: Trainee in information technology at Sears Roebuck

I tend to read the trade journals and business magazines that keep me updated on the business and technology trends.

WHAT I'M READING:

Sometimes making decisions is not always comfortable, yet those times can be the biggest growth areas; just choose thoughtfully, and move forward.

PHILOSOPHY:

M

y first professional job resulted from a conversation I had with friends at a New Year’s Eve celebration. I was having difficulty understanding them because they were speaking a language I didn’t understand …the language of IT acronyms. The next thing I knew, I was committed to be part of the IT industry. I found out that Sears had openings within their MIS department, I applied, and that started my career in the field of technology. My work in the MIS department for more than eight years was the foundation of my business acumen. It taught me to think logically, adapt to change, problem solve at a moment’s notice, prioritize, and multitask. As for what advice I would give to women embarking on their careers, although I do not recollect any major incidents that contributed to my success, the biggest underlying factor was my confidence level that has developed throughout the years, growing as my responsibilities and goals have grown. I have put myself into positions where making decisions is not always comfortable; yet those times have been the biggest growth areas for me. I just made a choice based on all possible consequences, and drove forward. My husband and I built our company one account at a time, one challenge at a time, getting one issue resolved at a time, and

88

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

FAMILY: Husband and business partner, Victor; two grown sons: Michael and Steven INTERESTS: In my rare spare time, I enjoy traveling around the world and visit places with historical points of interest

solving one major crisis at a time—always making an overall decision that was best for the company. In our experience, success is really built upon a quality team: hiring highly skilled people, employees with a lot of passion and potential. We grow the team as we grow the business. As employees grow in their career, their responsibilities and accountabilities also grow, because people make better decisions when they feel ownership. I try to pass along the gift of confidence to women, encouraging them to wear as many hats as possible, taking on new challenges and risks while learning the business as a whole. Putting yourself into situations where you have to make a decision based on the information you have helps to build the confidence to make successively more difficult or complex decisions much easier. I am still thrilled to drive myself to the next level, and with pride I watch women drive themselves to the next level in their careers.


Ford Motor Company W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Claire Watts I

’ve spent 23 years in merchandising with department, specialty, and discount stores, progressing from buying to merchandise management to Executive VP. In my seven years at Wal-Mart I’ve seen advancement based on my idea, I’ve gotten a lot from being asked to talents and ability, no matter who you are. sit in on a store planning meeting or work in a Leaders don’t get paid just to have visions, warehouse during the day. but also to execute them. For instance, Since life is short, I also try to work hard and to improve the ‘now-ness’ of our fashion work smart—to sort priorities and ask “does assortment and branding, my job is to see and this make a differarticulate the vision ence to this compain order to lead the COMPANY: Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. ny, this division, team through execuWEBSITE: www.walmart.com and my personal tion. We need to life?” Maintaining build the relationTITLE: Executive Vice President, Merchandising relationships is parship of win-win with ticularly important. merchants and posiAGE: 44 I still have as mention for acceptance, EDUCATION: BS (business), University of Cincinnati tor one of the peoto look five years out ple who hired me and show what the FIRST JOB: Assistant buyer with May Department 23 years ago. I also impact will be on stores have a four-yearbusiness, and at end WHAT I'M READING: Re-imagine! by Tom Peters; old daughter who of each year we look Heart of a Leader by Ken Blanchard teaches me how to see whether we to be an editor met our goals or not. PHILOSOPHY: Since life is short, work hard and of priorities, to be Learning and work smart—sort priorities and ask "does this make incredibly organgrowing are also a difference to this company, this division, and my personal life?" ized. I’m home for important for leaderdinner at 6:30 every ship. We need to try FAMILY: Husband, Jeff; daughter, Lauren night. new things and get Over the years, away from tunnel INTERESTS: Gardening, antiques the rewards of vision. When Wal-Mart leadership change. called, I didn’t shop Early on, the thrill is knowing you can drive a here and wasn’t sure I was interested, but I said business: it’s absolutely exhilarating to come in to myself, “get on that plane and at least have every morning and see sales results. My second a conversation.” I came back saying “I want to stage was being excited about bringing beautiwork for Wal-Mart.” Here, I can learn from all ful products to people. As you get later into kinds of people in logistics, real estate, marketyour career, it’s the people themselves: I try to ing, and international operations. To look at our help other people to find success, to help them business through their eyes has made me a establish career paths. much better executive. Although not originally

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

89


W O M E N O F I N I T I AT I V E 2 0 0 5

Patricia A. Woertz T

he best advice I can give women who want to be successful in business is to focus on the success part and not so much on the woman part. Don’t define who you are or where you want to make your mark according to gender. I never have. Instead, I would ask: do you have skills, experience, intelligence, passion, commitment, integrity and deeply held values? These are the marks of a true leader, male or female. One quality that’s absolutely essential for leadership today (in business or in life) is integrity, which we think of as meaning honesty and reliability. But in the dictionary you’ll find the first meaning of integrity is ‘wholeness’: nothing missing, nothing left out. And I think that’s the richer, more valuable definition for leaders. It means that, to lead with integrity, we must be whole human beings, bring our whole selves to the role. I would also say that international experience—whether by background or career path—is increasingly important for leaders. The future of business is global: that’s where the markets, the customers, the suppliers, and the partners are. Because there are still relatively few people who bring such experience, if you are the person who steps forward to take an international opportunity, you will be arming yourself with an incredible advantage. Work in another country gives you tremendous confidence when, despite language and cultural differences, you are still able to get the work done. The challenge is greater, and so too is the satisfaction when you work through issues to success. As the workforce becomes increasingly diverse and multinational, successful leaders will be those who can truly respect people’s differences, value their distinct contributions, and inspire them to greater collaboration. You have an advantage if you don’t have a desire to win exclusively on your own terms. Too much

ego can get in the way, making you afraid to lose. You will always be more successful when you seek consensus; help your partners and colleagues find ways to create more together than any of you can envision alone. My career path has taken some unlikely twists and turns out of my background in finance. I was always willing to say: “I’ll try that!” when new opportunities appeared, and that’s something I encourage others to do. Step up and grab the risky, the challenging, the unexpected opportunities. Be prepared for change—thrive in it! And be eager for experiences that will lead you outside your comfort zone. That’s what gives you breadth of experience and positions you for leadership. COMPANY: WEBSITE: TITLE:

www.chevrontexaco.com

Executive Vice President

EDUCATION: Bachelor’s degree, Pennsylvania State University; Graduate, Columbia University’s International Executive Development Program FIRST JOB:

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

Auditor

WHAT I'M READING:

Alexander Hamilton,

by Ron Chernow Be, know, do: be yourself and work from your values; know your business and continually learn more; do it! Be biased for action.

PHILOSOPHY:

FAMILY:

Three children

INTERESTS:

90

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THE UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE WOMEN’S PROGRAM

Delivering Diversity for over 30 years In September the United States Postal Service celebrated the 30th anniversary of its Women’s Program—a

program

dedicated

to

providing

employment

and

developmental

opportunities to women. Today the Postal Service employs more than 270,000 women—women whose dedication and commitment have helped build a robust U.S. Postal Service. Since the program’s inception, the number of women employed by the Postal Service has continued to grow, as have the opportunities. In 2004, 32 percent of all Postal Service mid-level manager positions, and 27 percent of executive positions, were held by women. The Women’s Program traces its roots to March 1959, when Postmaster General Arthur E. Summerfield appointed Cecil M. Harden as the Post Office Department’s First Special Assistant for Women’s Affairs. With her appointment, Post Offices were encouraged to employ women, who until then, had been employed in limited numbers, primarily in smaller towns, where qualified men were not available.

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implementation of the Postal Service Women’s By 1964, the Post Office Department had a Program as a principal management objective “positive action plan” in effect to support Title 7 of of the highest priority. the Civil Rights Act, which prohibited discriminaThe United States Postal Service Women’s tion based on sex, race, color, religion and national Program was born. As the program made its mark, origin. Women were encouraged to apply for women began to move up the career ladder, and higher-level positions throughout the organizain June 1979, Nancy L. George became the Postal tion, and Postal headquarters began maintaining Service’s first woman officer and distributing lists of eligiwhen she was appointed ble female employees in USPS National Women’s Program Assistant Postmaster General each region. of the Employee Relations After the United States In 1974, the United States Postal department. Postal Service was created Service employed 8,600 women as But the change within the from the Post Office regular letter carriers and drivers. organization was best Department in 1971, women Today, the company employs more described by the highest were increasingly promoted than 58,000 female city letter ranked woman in the history to managerial positions, of the Postal Service, Deputy opening the door to the carriers. Postmaster General Jackie establishment of the Postal Strange, in a Dec. 8, 1986 Service Women’s Action In 1974, women represented interview with Federal Times: Committee. In March 1973, 19.2 percent of the USPS workforce. Women recognized then that the committee held its first Today, 270,899 female employees we were trying to change the meeting. Its goal was to represent 38.2 percent of the total system, and I was willing to establish career ladders for postal workforce. be a part of it. I helped change upward mobility among it . . . I devoted my energy more women in the Postal Service. In 1984, women represented in a positive way than spendSoon after, an appeal was 3.9 percent of postal executives. ing my time feeling like I made to Postmaster General Today, 27.3 percent of executives was discriminated against. E.T. Klassen to appoint a are female. Instead I used my energy Women’s Program Manager, trying to serve as a role model and the rest was history. for the younger women. On Sept. 6, 1974, Postmaster General Though we are only in the dawn of the Klassen proclaimed in a letter to Regional 21st century, the Postal Service has sent out Postmasters General and USPS headquarters a clear message that it plans to be a diversity department heads that, trendsetter—one that will lead the way with The demand for greater productivity and action. To accomplish this, the organization will economy within the U.S. Postal Service continue to rely on the legacy of the Women’s requires us to obtain maximum utilization Program, as well as other special-emphasis of our manpower resources. One of the areas programs. where we can more effectively accomplish this Performance management and succession planis in the development of women employees ning programs are providing more advancement within the Postal Service to their greatest opportunities for women and minorities. And, the potential. Therefore, I am announcing the

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Postal Service recently revamped its Corporate Succession Planning process, adding a new selfnomination feature that ensures its accessibility to all employees. The change has increased participation and leveled the playing field for both women and men. In today’s Postal Service, women hold key managerial positions. Many more still have been identified as future postal leaders. Currently, seven USPS officer positions are held by women: • Suzanne Medvidovich, Senior Vice President, Human Resources; • Anita Bizzotto, Chief Marketing Officer and Senior Vice President; • Mary Ann Gibbons, Vice President and General Counsel; • Jo Ann Feindt, Vice President, Area Operations, Great Lakes Area; • Linda Kingsley, Vice President, Strategic Planning; • Donna Peak, Vice President, Finance, Controller; and • Francia Smith, Vice President and Consumer Advocate. Medvidovich*, Bizzotto and Gibbons also serve on the executive committee of the Postal Service—a decision-making body whose members are senior advisors to the Postmaster General. For three decades, the Women’s Program has been reaching its goal, building career ladders for women. And while initiatives including the Associate Supervisor, Advanced Leadership and Career Management programs are paving the way for women at all levels in their Postal career, the Management Intern program is opening doors to successful Postal careers for women outside the Postal Service. Opportunity for career advancement for women has never been greater than in today’s Postal Service. PDJ *Medvidovich is featured in the Women Worth Watching profiles; also see her commentary on the strategies and effectivenss of the Women’s Program in the sidebar.

Commentary by Suzanne Medvidovich, Senior Vice President, Human Resources: While a story about a career filled with obstacles to advancement might make for more interesting reading, it simply hasn’t happened in my case. To the contrary, I have found the Postal Service to be an organization filled with opportunities. I believe the Postal Service is unique in the way we train and develop future leaders. We use a combination of classroom training, college courses, and, most importantly, details to other positions, where employees can develop their skills “on the job.” Our strategy is to have a succession pool of managers ready and willing to fill future vacancies. That offers employees throughout the organization a great deal of opportunity, as it did me. We prepare managers from entry level all the way up the ladder to executive positions. And it works. Several of our senior officers, including the Postmaster General, started their postal careers as letter carriers, mail handlers or window clerks. That level of commitment to developing employees has gone a long way in creating a highly motivated workforce. The proof is in our turnover rate-a very low 5%. We have a robust pay- for-performance program and are a recognized leader in diversity, ranking sixth among Fortune 500 companies. In the past few years the Human Resources Department has proven to be a vital part of the strategic focus of the Postal Service. We have increased training and development programs, creating two intern programs to recruit internal and external candidates to fill difficult positions; started two executive development programs; and begun an orientation program for newly appointed executives. My department also worked very closely with Information Technology to create a robust e-learning program that utilizes our postal intranet, Blue, one of the largest intranets in the world. As for practical concerns about the working environment at the Postal Service, from my involvement in the Anthrax crisis, I am extremely happy to report that Postal employees feel safer today than they did prior to September 11th. The safety performance has shown a 36% decrease in accidents in the past 3 years. I attribute this to the joint efforts of labor, management and OSHA to create positive safety programs. Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

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Postal Policy

Women Honored

National Women’s Program Policy Statement

Women on Stamps

The Postal Service is committed to promoting career opportunities and advancement for women in the workforce. The National Women’s Program (NWP) is a vital and integral part of this commitment. The program does not seek preferential treatment for women, but does seek to ensure that all postal career opportunities are made available to all employees, including women. The NWP is also a part of the Postal Service’s Affirmative Employment Program. Postal management established the women’s program in 1974 to ensure fairness for women in every aspect of employment, including but not limited to hiring, retention, training, career development, and promotions. The NWP is not merely a program developed to enhance the individual experiences of women, but rather it enhances how we do business as an all-inclusive workforce. Monitoring the overall postal workforce demographics to address any under-representation of women is part of this program. Advocacy and education will help achieve equality for women in the workplace. The NWP will collect, conduct, and analyze research on issues affecting women in the workplace. It will be a resource offering information and business solutions to common workplace issues and professional development. It will provide networking opportunities, educational programs, and visibility for the women in our workforce, which will enable them to realize their goals and aspirations for personal and professional development. The NWP seeks to ensure that managers at all levels will not only respect and be sensitive to the concerns of female employees, but also that they will examine and remove any barriers to equal employment opportunity for women. Together we can ensure that we are providing opportunities and promoting fairness for women in hiring, retention, training, career development, and promotions.

Sending a powerful message requires a powerful tool. And the mail is one of the most powerful—and easily accessible—communication tools available today. A single postage stamp is the only investment you need. Since the first postage stamps were issued more than 150 years ago, just about every one of them has also carried a message about our shared heritage, our diverse culture and the people and events that have helped build a great nation. Women have had a strong and lasting impact on American history. The Postal Service is proud to honor their influence and achievements through our stamp program. They are artists, abolitionists, national leaders and physicians. They are war heroes, pioneers, authors and performers. They are American painter and printmaker Mary Cassatt, a home-grown and world-renowned Impressionist; Harriet Tubman, who personally led over 300 individuals from slavery to freedom; Patsy Cline, whose plaintive voice personifies the sound of country music; and Eleanor Roosevelt, the vocal and progressive First Lady, who became a champion for social reform and human rights. For more than a century, since 1893, when a woman first appeared on a United States postage stamp, the Postal Service has proudly honored women and their achievements. We will continue to tell their story, and the story of America, through our stamp program. The United States Postal Service has bound the nation together through its personal and business communications for more than two centuries. We have continually evolved to serve a growing nation more efficiently and effectively—without operational subsidies. And we continue that process today, as we transform ourselves to meet the challenges of the 21st century.

John E. Potter, Postmaster General, CEO United States Postal Service www.usps.com 96

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004


Will your organization make the list?

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Diversity Journal Profiles in in Profiles

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TOP COMPANIES for

INNOVATION in Diversity

2nd Annual International Innovation in Diversity Awards May/June 2005 For application and information visit www.diversityjournal.com or call 1.800.573.2867.


2005 International Innovation in Diversity Awards The annual Profiles in Diversity Journal International Innovation in Diversity Awards honor corporations, organizations, and institutions around the world that have developed innovative solutions offering measurable outcomes in the area of workforce diversity and inclusion. Our objective is to encourage and increase the number of businesses and institutions implementing innovative programs, projects, or practices that will help to improve workforce diversity/inclusion excellence. Ten organizations will be selected as honorees. In defining innovation, we use Webster’s definition as “effecting a change in the established order; the creating of something new.” Innovations can be in the form of new ideas, methods, services, or processes that improve the quality of life or enhance productivity within an organization. These awards will recognize innovations within the organization that have been launched within the past two years, and have had an influence and delivered a positive outcome on diversity management, staff recruitment, and/or toward inclusiveness and improved equity in the workplace. Any one idea or project qualifies so long as the ensuing results are already making a greater impact on diversity management and/or business and institutional diversity/inclusion excellence than anything prior. Selection criteria include: • Ease of implementation • Effectiveness in improving diversity awareness/management, staff recruitment, employee retention and/or inclusiveness and improved equity in the workplace • Evidence of commitment and involvement from senior management and employees • Genuine measurable outcomes (tangible and/or intangible) due solely, or primarily, to that innovation.

How to Enter Nominations are made in the form of a case study of no more than 1,500 words, plus photos and/or background documentation. For more nomination details, an overview of participation benefits, judging criteria, and application forms, please contact info@diversityjournal.com as soon as possible.

The deadline for submitting the nominating application and supporting material is April 18, 2005.


Tackle Res Avoid common mistakes when impleme

F

or organizational change to occur, the behavior of both businesses and individuals must adapt. However, change is often difficult for organizations and the people who work in them, and resistance is an expected part of any change process. In order to increase diversity and create inclusive work environments that benefit all employees, managers must understand, anticipate, and address employee resistance at every stage of the process.

Why Do Employees Resist Diversity Efforts? Employees resist diversity efforts for a number of reasons. For example, if the organization’s definition

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of diversity is not broad and inclusive, some employees may feel excluded or left out of the change process. Furthermore, employees who are often not made to feel included in the process, such as white men, may feel blamed for inequities in their organizations and react with defensiveness.1 Employees who feel excluded may also believe that their own concerns and issues are not being addressed by organizational efforts. On the other hand, employees who are specifically included in diversity efforts—such as women or people of color— may express resistance because they do not want to be singled out or perceived as having succeeded purely as a result of change efforts.

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

Finally, employees are also cynical and reluctant to get involved with new diversity efforts when past change efforts have not been successful.

How Is This Resistance Expressed? Resistance may take on many different forms, depending on the stage of a diversity initiative. In some organizations, the most marked struggle can come at the introduction of the change effort, when employees don’t understand what changes will be made and why. Alternatively, employees may be curious about what is happening and thus remain neutral in the early stages. Their resistance, how-


istance Head-On nting diversity efforts. by Catalyst

ever, may become more pronounced in the implementation phase, when more concrete changes directly affect their day-today experiences. Perceptions Without clear communication, individuals create their own perceptions of the “true nature” of the initiative’s goals and rationale as well as the methods by which these goals will be achieved. Employee perceptions of diversity efforts may include the: • Belief that unearned benefits or advantages will be given to a specific group, such as parents, white women, or people of color

• Perception that one has to be part of a specific group in order to be promoted • Equating the goal of the diversity effort with tokenism • View that diversity and inclusion efforts separate employees by emphasizing groups over individuals • Perception that the development of some employees necessarily impedes the advancement of others. • Sense of being singled out or punished • Sense of being dominated by “political correctness”

Behaviors Resistance may be passive or active. Some examples of resistant employee behaviors include: • Propagating rumors about why certain promotions, or development opportunities, are given— perhaps openly insinuating preferential treatment • Charging that ill-considered promotions are made for the sake of making quotas • Ignoring or giving very low priority to program implementation and policy compliance related to a diversity initiative (e.g., ensuring a diverse slate of candidates when recruiting,

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TA C K L E R E S I S TA N C E H E A D - O N attending a mandatory professional development session on managing diversity effectively) • Making dismissive jokes regarding inclusion efforts (e.g., disrespectful nicknames for employee resource groups and networks) • Taking legal recourse because an individual believes his/her retention and advancement has been adversely impacted by diversity programs or policies • Believing or communicating that the team-building process is time consuming, arduous, or doomed to fail.

What Can Companies Do to Address Resistance? There are a host of strategies that organizations can employ to minimize, manage, and address employee resistance. Strategies cluster in three key areas: communication, program and processes, and education. Communication Of all the tools available to manage resistance, clear and frequent communication may be the most critical. • Articulate a vision. Resistance to workplace diversity initiatives is most dramatic when diversity programs or policies are implemented independently of efforts to put forth a new vision of the culture—the beliefs, values, and behaviors that define the organization. The vision establishes how the organization will benefit from the change and what the change will look like at the individual level.

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• Communicate the business case. Articulate a clear business case that makes sense for your organization, and communicate it extensively through leadership speeches, broadcasts/ videos, town hall meetings, newsletters, and regular memos. Make it as specific as possible. • Establish a broad umbrella for diversity. Adopt as broad a definition of diversity as makes sense for your organization. Be sure to communicate that white men are an important employee group. Other factors to consider that go beyond the typical racial/ethnic and gender groups include parental status, education, physical abilities, age, sexual orientation, work status, and functional expertise. • Demonstrate the support of top management; ensure that top managers model desirable behaviors. Create opportunities for employees in top management to discuss their support and demonstrate their understanding of diversity and/or women’s initiatives. • Keep in touch with specific employee concerns. Allow employees to react openly to workplace issues through various means, such as focus groups, workshops, and computer bulletin boards. Providing a forum for resistance can be a powerful way to dispel it. Also, communicate any adjustments you make in response to employee feedback. • Communicate rationale for promotions, and highlight successes. Use highly visible promotions as opportunities to draw

Profiles in Diversity Journal November/December 2004

attention to individuals’ achievements as well as the organization’s management development and advancement processes. • Demonstrate fairness. Track and communicate proportional promotion rates and/or development opportunities to counter perceptions of unfair advantage. Fight myths with facts. Programs & Processes • Tie individual diversity efforts to business objectives. Initiatives related to diversity should be dealt with as key business strategies and not as “side-line” programs. Monitoring progress should be treated as part of the regular goal-setting and review processes. • Create accountability. To illustrate the importance of diversity to the organization, tie managers’ compensation to performance objectives related to recruiting, developing, and advancing a diverse group of employees. It is advisable to wait for two to three years after introducing a diversity initiative to tie results to manager performance, so that managers will have some time to understand the business case for diversity and what is expected of them. • Leverage existing internal institutions. Tap into existing channels (i.e., employee networks, councils, taskforces) to brainstorm company-specific issues relating to resistance and possible solutions. • Create ongoing forums for discussion on diversity and inclusion at various levels. Peers can provide the most persuasive


• Strengthen management competency. Help strengthen senior management’s facilitation and intervention skills for addressing verbal resistance to inclusion. Hire coaches to help leaders hone their skills in addressing employees who raise concerns about potential bias as a result of inclusion efforts. In addition, strengthen senior management’s team building and conflict resolution skills.

arguments in favor of supporting diversity, and champions at different levels can showcase “role model” behaviors. • Ensure that programs are inclusive. For instance, offer formal and informal mentoring programs to white men as well as white women and people of color. Track participation in programs by demographic group. Ensure that employee resource groups and corporate networks are open to employees from groups outside of the defined identity groups. Education Integration It is critical that diversity education be broadened beyond the standard diversity training sessions. Integrating the precepts of diversity into core business and management practices will lead to the most profound changes and will best leverage the competitive advantage your business seeks in creating a more inclusive work environment.

• Integrate the business case and vision for diversity and inclusion in all management development education. As the business case for diversity is further integrated into all facets of management practices, effectively managing workforce diversity will be seen as a core management skill. • Create diversity leadership competencies and teach behaviors. Treat diversity as a core leadership competency against which you can develop, assess, and promote the next generation of leaders. • Provide executives with greater exposure to diverse communities. Require executives to participate as members or leaders in outside community organizations (e.g., associations, nonprofit boards) in which they are exposed to communities outside their own demographic and socio-economic backgrounds.

Organizations have a responsibility to address resistance to diversity efforts. Surfacing resistance and its causes is the first step in moving through the change process successfully. Employers must be able to recognize how and why resistance is expressed. More effective implementation of change efforts helps minimize resistance to the process. Employers must therefore avoid common mistakes when implementing diversity efforts and tackle resistance head-on. PDJ 1

Lee Gardenswartz and Anita Rowe, “Dealing with Resistance to Diversity,” Mosaics (April 2004): p.3,6.

With offices in New York, San Jose, and Toronto, Catalyst is the leading research and advisory organization working with businesses and the professions to build inclusive environments and expand opportunities for women at work. For more information about Catalyst’s research, products, and services focusing on tackling resistance, visit our newly designed website at www.catalystwomen.org. You may also sign up to receive Catalyst’s issue-specific newsletter, Perspective, and monthly email updates at news@catalystwomen.org.

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The Drive for Diversity and Inclusion starts right here.

A

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s a proud sponsor of NASCAR’s “Drive for Diversity” initiative, Waste Management is racing toward the same goals as you are. From Bill Lester behind the wheel of his Number 22 Waste Management Toyota Tundra to our constant efforts to recruit and support a diverse workforce, we are truly committed to speeding past today’s conventions of diversity and inclusion. Waste Management salutes the many other workplaces that are on the same track as we are. By working together, we already find ourselves on the road to a more diverse, inclusive tomorrow. From everyday collection to environmental protection, Think Green. Think Waste Management. ®

NASCAR® is a registered trademark of the National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing, Inc. ©2004 Waste Management, Inc.

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Profile for Diversity Journal

Diversity Journal - Nov/Dec 2004  

Diversity Journal - Nov/Dec 2004