Pawnee Steam Program A 2023

Page 1

FRIDAY-SUNDAY, MAY 5-7, 2023 Steam Park Grounds in Historic Pawnee, OK Gates Open At 8am • $10/Day - 12 & Under Free FRIDAY IS SCHOOL DAY (Free Admission To School Groups With Their Teacher) OKLAHOMA STEAM THRESHING & GAS ENGINE ASSOCIATION A LIVING HIST ORY EVENT Limited Activities On Sunday New Members And Exhibitors Welcome OklahomaThreshers.org • 918.762.2108 Rumely Products Collectors RUMELY EXPO 31st Annual Oklahoma Steam and Gas Engine Show Welcomes You To The

About the OST & GEA

2023 OFFICERS:

President: Robert Marrs

Vice President: Brady Kelley

Secretary: Carrie Keiffer

Treasurer: Pam Marrs

DIRECTORS:

Jimmy Bryson

Mike Cartwright

Les Currie

Wes Kinsler

Eldon Leighty

Marneth Hoisington

Kyle Reeves

Dale Wolff

Mike Waggoner

Alternate: Will Ratliff

OST & GEA is an all volunteer organization. No officer or director is compensated for their service.

Meetings

All meetings are held in the Headquarters Building at Steam Engine Park, located at 409 E. Beck Drive in Pawnee. We have seven meetings throughout the year, on the second Sunday of January, February, March, April, June, August, and October. The Board of Directors meet at 10:00AM, Thresher’s Diner is at noon, and the General Membership Meeting is at 12:30PM. Board Meetings are open to any member that wants to attend.

1909 Victor IV Talking Machine

Owner: Wes Kinsler

Featuring a mahogany cabinet with turned corner columns, a brass-belled horn and a 2-spring motor, the Victor IV was the most expensive talking machine with a 10” turntable Victor offered. The Victor IV sold for $50 in 1909. The Victor IV was made from 1904 to 1925.

I purchased this machine from a collector in Mississippi because I wanted a mahogany cased Victor. It is in unrestored condition.

1928 Thirty Caterpillar

Owner: Scott & Kathy Kuhns

Bought it from original owners in Pretty Prairie, KS in 1968. This tractor pulled the road grader to maintain the local dirt roads in southern Reno county Kansas.

1927 Huber 20-40 Super Four

Owner: Steve Dunn

Huber Manufacturing Company began in 1854, building agricultural implements. In 1885 they started making steam traction engines (now commonly called steam tractors). Starting in 1898 they built an early gasoline tractor using a Van Duzen engine but it was not a success. They returned to the gasoline tractor in 1911, building the large 30-60 “prairie” tractor. Smaller farmers tractors called Lite Fours came along in 1916. My 20-40 Super Four was made in 1927 but did not sell until 1928. Later versions of this tractor were rated to 32-45 after the Nebraska test results. Huber survived in one form or another until 2002.

1923 Mack Model AB Truck

Owner: Steve Dunn

Originally these trucks were made with open C cabs and solid rubber tires. Later trucks were available with enclosed all weather cabs and pneumatic tires. My truck is a 2 1/2 ton rated capacity with a C cab and solid tires. This truck was originally purchased by the Joplin Supply Company of Joplin, MO in May 1923. A photo of this truck still hangs on the wall of the general manager’s office. **This truck was also used as a prop in the movie “Killers of the Flower Moon, filmed in Pawhuska, OK in 2021.

Watch Fobs

Owner: Brian “Odie” Oldenburg

PAGE 2 - OKLAHOMA STEAM THRESHING & GAS ENGINE SHOW 2023

Become a Member

We invite you to come be part of the fun and help us enjoy our hobby. You don’t have to have equipment to join us; just the interest and enthusiasm. There are lots of areas of our organization that have a place for you to share in the fun!

COST

Individual/Family memberships are $25 per year. Membership to OST & GEA entitles you to free admission to our show every year. You will also receive our newsletter “The Flywheel” which is mailed out 6 times per year.

There are several ways you can join us: You may become a member by scanning the QR code below and print and fill out the membership application form and mail it to us with a check or USPS money order for $25 to: OST & GEA • P.O. Box 472 • Pawnee, OK 74058-0472

You can also join us by attending one of our General Membership Meetings, held in the Headquarters Building at Steam Engine Park, located at 409 E. Beck Drive in Pawnee.

And you may also join us in Pawnee at our annual show, which is always the first Friday, Saturday and Sunday in May.

Scan the QR Code to get the Membership Form!

OKLAHOMA STEAM THRESHING & GAS ENGINE SHOW 2023 - PAGE 3
1925 Keck Gonnerman 19HP Steam Traction Engine Owner: Jeff Detwiler This steam engine was produced in Mt. Vernon, Indiana and spent its early years as the power source for threshing machines and sawmills on local farms all over Southern Indiana. It made its way to Oklahoma when OST & GEA former President Ivan Burns purchased the engine and made it a part of his collection until his passing in the late 1990's. Jeff purchased the engine at his estate auction in 1999, and thus began his collecting adventure. The Keck Gonnerman Steam Engine was the featured steam engine at the OST & GEA show in 2008. The engine also appears regularly at the Major County Threshing Bee in Fairview, Oklahoma and the Kansas & Oklahoma Steam and Gas Engine Show in Winfield, KS. Welcome to the 56th Annual Pawnee Steam and Gas Engine Show!
PAGE 4 - OKLAHOMA STEAM THRESHING & GAS ENGINE SHOW 2023 WO ODLAND AUTOMOTIVE DIXIE CHOPPER • NAPA 701 Nor th Main Fair f ax, OK 74 637 Open Mon-Fri 7:30 AM - 6:0 0 PM, Sat . 8:0 0 AM - 5:0 0 PM. 918-642-3407 AUT O PART S & AUT O SERVICE woodlandaut omotive@outlook.com Veteran Owned YOUR SUMMER AUTOMOTIVE TRAVEL HEADQUARTERS NAPA OIL HANKOOK DYNAPRO TIRES NAPA FILTERS Welcome to the 56th Annual Pawnee Steam and Gas Engine Show! 5320 E. 6th, Stillwater, OK www.stillwatersteel.com MON-FRI 8am-5pm 405-377-5550 tillwater teel & Welding upply PAYNECOUNTy’ssourceforsteel,Fabrication&Welding •Full Fabrication Welding Services •Steel, Stainless Steel & Aluminum in full lengths or cut cut to size •Sand Blasting, PAinting & Powder Coating S S S Come see our Full Showroom of WElding Supplies Welcome to the 56th Annual Pawnee Steam and Gas Engine Show! OKLAHOMA’S Choice WEEKLY Your Premiere Weekly Consumer Resource For Individuals And Business Gary Goldberg • Sales Director • 918-645-5621 Anesa K. Chastain Jones • Graphic Manager • 918-285-1314 The Oklahoma’s Choice Weekly is proud to publish the 2023 Oklahoma Steam Threshing & Gas Engine Association Steam & Gas Engine Show Program! Please visit the advertisers in this publication and enjoy the 2023 Oklahoma Steam Threshing & Gas Engine Association Steam & Gas Engine Show! Scan the QR Code to take our Survey!

Corn Mill

Owner: Oklahoma Steam Threshers and Gas Engine Association

It is a 1912 Williams grain Mill powered by a 6 hp 1930’s Fairbanks-Morse gas engine. The granite stones are upright, with one stationary stone and one that rotates. The gap between the stones can be changed to allow for a fine or coarse flour to be made. We grind yellow corn for sale, and have ground blue corn for the Pawnee Nation.

1919 Model TT

Owner: Robert Marrs

This Ford 1 ton truck was built in 1919. It is currently in factory original condition. Model TT’s did not come from the factory with a cab or a bed until 1924. As you see it now is how you received it and drove it home… with a box over the gas tank. The owner then built their own cab and bed.

Economy 1 3/4 HP Engine

Owner: Jon & Zoe Herzig

This is a hit and miss style engine., equipped with a WICO EK magneto, used to power feed grinders, well pumps, augers and almost anything that required a small engine to run. This story tells of the fun and comradery the hobby brings to those involved. We purchased this engine from an auction in Reeder North Dakota, at the time we did not have any way to haul it, we were on the way back from California in our car. We called my brother-in-law Chuck in Minneapolis and asked him if we purchased stuff from the auction could he bring a trailer to pick the stuff up, he agreed. The auction started and we made our first purchase and called Chuck. The temp was in the 90’s that Saturday. Chuck drove through the night, by Sunday morning there was snow flurries and it had dropped below 32 degrees as we loaded up the engines on the back of his truck and our car on the trailer. I started driving at some point we hit construction and we needed to make a lane change, suddenly it felt as if we had a flat tire on the rear of the truck. We pulled over into the ditch, jumped out and to our amazement all tires looked great. We pulled off the hub cap of the tire we thought was making the noise and was shocked to see all but one of the lug nuts broken off and the lug nut holes destroyed. Luckily, we had a spare car along to drive into town, what could possibly go wrong? did I mention Sunday in North Dakota they have what is called “Blue Law” meaning Businesses are not open, however our luck had not run out. We noticed someone working on their personal vehicle at a service station, we discussed our dilemma with him, he grabbed a coffee can off the shelf full of lug studs of various styles, rummaged through and thought he could make them work! He grabbed his tow truck, drove to pick up Chucks truck, fixed the lug studs and off we went. What a great trip we will never forget.

OKLAHOMA
- PAGE 5
STEAM THRESHING & GAS ENGINE SHOW 2023
MEMBER FDIC
We’re a local bank that ’s more than a centur y strong. Family is the reason. It ’s impo rtant to have people in your corner who suppor t you, care about your su ccess , and want to see you grow. That ’s what families do. That ’s what we do

28-90 Minneapolis

Steam Engine

Owner: Brady Kelley

1917 28-90 Minneapolis. This engine was featured at the original show in Wakomis and it the last of the original engines that was at the start of the Pawnee show. “Big” Floyd Kelley bought it from Art Kosted when the show got moved to Pawnee. Art Kostead bought it off the original owners in the Guthrie area. The engine is still mostly original with just the the piping, coal bunker, water tanks and safety features being replaced.

Shingle Mill

Owners: Robert Marrs & Steve Dunn

This Chase shingle mill was built in 1900. Shingle mills were used at that time to cut tapered roofing shingles and non-tapered fruit box sides. This shingle mill can cut both tapered and non-tapered. It is an automatic mill.

1923 Rumely Oilpull

Model G 20-40

Owner: Dale & Cindy Wolff

John Deere D

Owner: Kayla Kelley

1937 John Deere model D. Was converted to propane early in life and set up with a generator and lights so it could plow ground around the clock. Was purchased from a collection that came out of western Kansas.

Caterpillar Model 44

Leaning Wheel Grader

Built October 1935

Owner: Scott & Kathy Kuhns

This was built specifically designed for the Caterpillar Thirty tractor. We purchased this grader from Chady Atteberry. This grader hitched up to the Caterpillar Thirty will smooth out the plowing area.

Souvenir Shirts, Caps & Bags Are Available in Registration & Shingle Shack!

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1923 Rumely oilpull model G 20-40 bought new and farmed around Fairview Okla.

1948 John Deere A

Owner: Roland & Angie Bengston

When Grandpa sold the farm in the late 80’s he sold it lock stock and barrel, equipment and all. I have tried to track down one of his tractors for years. I was told that one of them was sold to a guy up around Jennings and that the other one ended up being sold for scrap. A few days ago I saw an add on marketplace for some old John Deeres for sale and as I scrolled through the pictures I saw one old sad looking tractor that made my heart skip a beat or two. I tried to convince myself that this was not the tractor that I was told went for scrap, that this was not one of the tractors I had written off as never seeing again. I am proud to say that after over 30 years I now own one of Grandpa’s tractors. No doubt she is in sad shape and it will take untold hours and no telling how much of my hard earned money, but the Good Lord willing I WILL see that this tractor runs again. As it turns out this was less than 20 miles from my house all this time and thank God that the young man that was selling off some of his father’s collection was raised right and has a good heart that is in the right place. It was obvious that I was beside myself with joy and instead of trying to take advantage of the situation and asking for a king’s ransom, he all but gave it to me. Thank you is not enough to that young man and to his dad for saving this old Deere. The last photo is Grandpa with all the grandkids around this tractor.

C1915 Ottawa 5 Hp Engine 1937 Case Model C

Owner: Wes Kinsler

I purchased this engine in 2018 from Jerry Swanson. Jerry is a sign painter and graphic artist who made a lot of the signs and artwork used during the annual Oklahoma Steam and Gas Engine Show, produced by OST&GEA. Jerry also created the fictional character of Beuford Snardbarker, still used for the free bean dinner given to exhibitors and volunteers the evening b y was started by the Warner Brothers and originally made barbed wire and patent woven fence. In the early 1900’s, the Warners diversified into other farm-related equipment and in 1912 started making engines after a deal to make engines for another firm fell thru. Ottawa ceased business operations in the early 1950’s. This engine is rated 5 horsepower at 450 rpm. Ignition is of the low-tension type using moving contacts inside the cylinder, known as an igniter. A 6-volt battery and induction coil in series with these contacts produces the spark.

Owner: Steve Dunn

The Case model C is the smaller brother to the popular L model. They were made in several configurations from 1929 to 1940. It is a small lightweight, handy tractor around the farm and a little over 28,000 were produced. A previous owner alleged that my model C had come from the Miller Brothers of the 101 Ranch. I use this unrestored tractor to bind wheat for the show, using an international harvester 7’ binder.

1903 Edison Standard Model A

Owner: Wes Kinsler

The Edison Standard was one of the most popular models in Edison’s line of phonographs.

The Standard was introduced in 1898 and went thru several model revisions before it was withdrawn in 1913 after having been revised to the Model F. It was attractively priced, and sold for around $20 when new. Although Edison offered a less expensive machine, known as the GEM, the Standard was a much more practical and popular machine, and is the most common of the antique Edison phonographs found today.

The Standard here was retroactively called the Model A after the Model B was introduced in 1905. It is housed in what is known as the “new style” cabinet, introduced in 1901, finished in green oak. The Standard remains popular with collectors and enthusiasts for its robust design and is often the first cylinder phonograph to be acquired by collectors.

Rayo Center Draft Kerosene Lamp Owner: Wes Kinsler

The Rayo name was a trademark owned by Standard Oil. The Rayo lamps were made by Bradley & Hubbard in Meriden Connecticut and are no different than a standard B&H center draft lamp. Bradley & Hubbard started as a brass rolling mill in the 1840’s. In the 1850’s they began making clocks and in the 1870’s they began making lamps. Most of the Rayo lamps were made in the 1920’s and 1930’s. Center draft lamps give off more light than the ordinary flat wick lamp which we are all familiar with. They also used much more kerosene. An often repeated legend goes that Standard Oil would gave away a Rayo lamp with the purchase of 7 gallons of kerosene. Whether this story is true or not, it does speak to the thirst for fuel one of these lamps has.

1927 Caterpillar Model Twenty

Owner: Steve Dunn

The merger of the C.L. Best Tractor Co. and the Holt Manufacturing Co. in 1925 created the new Caterpillar Tractor Company. A number of the earlier crawler tractors constituted to be sold under the Caterpillar name. In 1927 the Twenty was designed from the ground up as the first completely new Caterpillar. My tractor has a two digit serial number indicating it was made in November or December 1927. Twenties were made from November 1927 to September 1931. They were then re-rated as a Twenty Five in 1931, and then re-rated again in 1932 as a Twenty Eight until 1935.

1931 International M Engine

Owner: Wes Kinsler

1924 Emerson 71666 Fan

Owner: Wes Kinsler

Ruggedly made from cast iron, steel and brass, this oscillating table fan was made in 1924. The fan has 6 blades. Most fans had four blades. The extra blades were added not to move air, but were paired with a slower turning motor to make the fan move air more quietly than a fourbladed fan. Emerson called these 6-bladed fans “residence fans” and marketed the smaller 12” version you see here to homes, hospitals and hotels, while larger 16” versions were aimed at theaters and churches. I completely restored this fan in 2017. It was in very rough condition and was missing several parts. It now runs today as good as it did in 1924. With a few drops of oil every year, it should easily make it another 100 years. This is one of those products where they don’t make ‘em like they used to!

1947 Farmall Cub

Owner: Wes Kinsler

I was looking for a riding mower when a friend who did not know I was looking for a riding mower, but did know that I like International Tractors, called me with news that his neighbor was selling this little Farmall Cub. I thought the Cub looked like a small version of my Farmall 100. He started it up and I did not hesitate and bought it on the spot. This Cub was made in August 1947, only a few months after the Cub was introduced in May 1947. It was made as a smaller version of the Farmall A and used the same CultiVision concept with an offset operator’s position. The inline four-cylinder engine is 60 cubic inches and produces 10 horsepower at 1800 rpm. With so few horses, it is important to know them all bay name!! The belly-mounted mower is a Pennington H-600B triple blade made in the late 1950’s. It uses three 20” blades and makes a 59” cut. It handles normal lawn mowing chores with ease and is even capable of handling light field work, such as mowing and weeding around the edge of a wheat field.

OKLAHOMA STEAM THRESHING & GAS ENGINE SHOW 2023 - PAGE 7

CARRIE'S BBQ: SMOKED BRISKET, SMOKED SAUSAGE, SMOKED BOLOGNA, NACHOS

ROASTED CORN ROASTED CORN

CARRIE'S BBQ: SMOKED BRISKET, SMOKED SAUSAGE, SMOKED BOLOGNA, NACHOS

GODOFREDO'S PIZZERIA: PIZZA, SANDWICHES, DRINKS

GODOFREDO'S PIZZERIA: PIZZA, SANDWICHES, DRINKS

WILD GOOSE CONCESSIONS: WILD GOOSE CONCESSIONS: CORNDOGS, CHEESE ON A STICK, FUNNEL CAKES CORNDOGS, CHEESE ON A STICK, FUNNEL CAKES

PAWNEE FIRE DEPARTMENT: HAMBURGERS AND HOTDOGS

PAWNEE FIRE DEPARTMENT: HAMBURGERS AND HOTDOGS

KINGDOM CONCESSIONS: KETTLE KORN & PORK SKINS

BILLY JACKS ROOT BEER BILLY JACKS ROOT BEER

AMISH ICE-CREAM AMISH ICE-CREAM

ROASTED PEANUTS ROASTED PEANUTS

COTTON CANDY & POPCORN COTTON CANDY & POPCORN

FOOD DRIFT WOOD

KINGDOM CONCESSIONS: KETTLE KORN & PORK SKINS

*During Show Hours* Ground trains, pedestrians permits) and mobility device area No motorized vehicles Steam or Gas Tractors be PAVILLION SONIC TRACTOR PARADE STAGING

ARTS AND CRAFTS VENDORS

SAWMILL AND SHINGLE MILL

EQUIPMENT ENTRANCE PARTY COVE Parade Steam Feature Lawn & Garden Gas Tractors Vehicles

BAKER FAN

HORSE POWER TESTING

PRONY BRAKE

ROCK CRUSHER

HAY Parade Line Up 1 2 3 4 5

THRESHING

GAS

TRACTORS

BLACKSMITH

ANTIQUE CARS AND TRUCKS

FOOD East Fair Outer Limits

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4 5
S EN
FEATURE AREA TRACTOR PLOWING
1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 5 5 6 6 77 8 8 9 9 10 10 11 11 SPECTATO
M O R R I S R O A D
TWISTED LIME: STREET TACOS TWISTED LIME: STREET TACOS PRESS & HAND BAILING

SWAP MEET

VENDORS

LOADING DOCK NORTH FIELD TRAIN STOP OFFICIAL SHOW MERCH PRIMITIVE CAMPING CAMPING WITH HOOKUPS TICKET GATE PHOTO OP 1 2 6 7 10 11 9 8 VENDORS TRADING POST RUMELY EXHIBIT CORNMEAL GRINDING POWER HOUSE MACHINE SHOP GAS ENGINE POWER HOUSE DOMESTIC EXHIBIT
BLACKSMITH GAS ENGINES STEAM NGINES LAWN & GARDEN
ENGINES MAIN STAGE BLEACHERS OR PARKING EXHIBITOR PARKING BECK DRIVE MEMORIAL ROAD Camp Rumely Camp David N S E W West Fair Grid Iron SPECTATOR PARKING Hours* s, golf carts (with s only in gas engine s, Lawn & Garden, yond this point Parade TRACTOR GAMES STAGING
SWAP MEET GAS
MAIN PAVILLION CANDY SHOP

1928 Chrysler-Plymouth Model Q

1928 Chrysler-Plymouth Model

Peacock 12-in Loom

Owner: Barb Fulton

This Peacock Loom was made by The Handcrafters in Waupun, Wisconsin. In the late '60s and early '70s these looms were offered for $11.50. I rescued her (complete) for half price at an antique store in Rootstown, Ohio, for $50.

1938 John Deere Model B Tractor

When Walter P. Chrysler took over control of the troubled Maxwell-Chalmers car company in the early 1920s, he inherited the Maxwell automobile as part of the package. The company's facilities were used to help create and launch the six-cylinder Chrysler automobile in 1924. In 1926, the Maxwell was reworked and rebadged as the four -cylinder Chrysler '52' model. In 1928, the '52' was redesigned to create the Chrysler -Plymouth Model Q. After the introduction of the Plymouth Model U in 1929, the 'Chrysler' portion of the name was dropped.

Owner: Lita Kelley

1928 Chrysler-Plymouth Model Q

When Walter P. Chrysler took over control of the troubled Maxwell-Chalmers inherited the Maxwell automobile as part of the package. The company's launch the six-cylinder Chrysler automobile in 1924. In 1926, the Maxwell four -cylinder Chrysler '52' model. In 1928, the '52' was redesigned to create ter the introduction of the Plymouth Model U in 1929, the 'Chrysler' portion

In the catalog this loom is advertised as "Simple. Sturdy. Weaves any material. Used in schools and homes."

The loom has two top heddles and she weaves from back to front. The treadles at the feet are operated by the pin at the very top, which moves front to back to lift the harnesses/shafts, which form the shed. The shed provides a path so the shuttle can move crosswise to form fabric. Because these looms are on the small side, these days we call them 'table looms'.

Plymouth, launched in 1928, was intended for the 'low -priced' market segment that was dominated by Ford and Chevrolet. They were originally sold exclusively through Chrysler dealerships, serving as a low -cost alternative to the upscale Chrysler brand. The logo was the rear view of the ship Mayflower which landed at Plymouth Rock in Plymouth, Massachusetts. Chrysler ’s car company was barely four years old, and as the story goes, his friend Henry Ford warned him to stay out of the category, telling him, “Walter, you ll go broke.”

Plymouth, launched in 1928, was intended for the 'low -priced' market Chevrolet. They were originally sold exclusively through Chrysler dealerships, the upscale Chrysler brand. The logo was the rear view of the ship Mayflower Plymouth, Massachusetts. Chrysler ’s car company was barely four years Henry Ford warned him to stay out of the category, telling him, “Walter,

The Chrysler-Plymouth Model Q was powered by an inline, four -cylinder engine displacing 170.3 cubic -inches and delivering 45 horsepower at 2,800 RPM. It used solid valve lifters, three main bearings, and a Carter carburetor. The engine was backed by a three -speed sliding gear transmission with spur gears and a single plate, dry clutch. Hydraulic brakes on all wheels provided the stopping power. Wood spoke wheels were standard and wire wheels were optional.

When Walter P. Chrysler took over control of the troubled MaxwellChalmers car company in the early 1920s, he inherited the Maxwell automobile as part of the package. The company's facilities were used to help create and launch the six-cylinder Chrysler automobile in 1924. In 1926, the Maxwell was reworked and rebadged as the four-cylinder Chrysler '52' model. In 1928, the '52' was redesigned to create the Chrysler-Plymouth Model Q. After the introduction of the Plymouth Model U in 1929, the 'Chrysler' portion of the name was dropped. Plymouth, launched in 1928, was intended for the 'low-priced' market segment that was dominated by Ford and Chevrolet. They were originally sold exclusively through Chrysler dealerships, serving as a low-cost alternative to the upscale Chrysler brand. The logo was the rear view of the ship Mayflower which landed at Plymouth Rock in Plymouth, Massachusetts. Chrysler’s car company was barely four years old, and as the story goes, his friend Henry Ford warned him to stay out of the category, telling him, “Walter, you’ll go broke.”

The Chrysler-Plymouth Model Q was powered by an inline, four -cylinder and delivering 45 horsepower at 2,800 RPM. It used solid valve lifters, tor. The engine was backed by a three -speed sliding gear transmission clutch. Hydraulic brakes on all wheels provided the stopping power. Wood wheels were optional.

Body styles included a roadster (with or without a rumble seat), deluxe coupe, two - or four -door sedan, standard coupe, and a tourer. Prices ranged from $670 to $725. Many mechanical and body parts were shared with the six -cylinder DeSoto and for the first few years, both DeSoto and Plymouth shared the same production facilities.

Walter

Flour, Seed, & Feed Sack Quilt

Body styles included a roadster (with or without a rumble seat), deluxe coupe, and a tourer. Prices ranged from $670 to $725. Many mechanical -cylinder DeSoto and for the first few years, both DeSoto and Plymouth

Madison Square Garden on July 7th of 1928 to introduce the Model Q. Amelia Earhart drove the first car as it entered the arena.

The Chrysler-Plymouth Model Q was powered by an inline, four-cylinder engine displacing 170.3 cubic-inches and delivering 45 horsepower at 2,800 RPM. It used solid valve lifters, three main bearings, and a Carter carburetor. The engine was backed by a three-speed sliding gear transmission with spur gears and a single plate, dry clutch. Hydraulic brakes on all wheels provided the stopping power. Wood spoke wheels were standard and wire wheels were optional.

Nearly 60,000 examples of the Model Q were built in its inaugural year.

1929 Rumely 30-50 Model Y

Owner: Dale & Cindy Wolff

I got it from Buster Hatchet of Beard Tx. In 1985. It took two of us two days to find all the parts. It was scattered over 40 acres. And been under water several times.

Gifted by Anonymous Donor to OST&GEA in 2022

Thanks to a generous gift of fabric sacks dating back to early 1900s, we have the opportunity to make a quilt.

Walter P. Chrysler chose Madison Square Garden on July 7th of 1928 to drove the first car as it entered the arena.

Nearly 60,000 examples of the Model Q were built in its inaugural year.

This quilt will be made using vintage sewing machines from as early as they were made to 1973.

While we will be using these vintage machines throughout the day, the formal demonstrations will be between 11:00A and 1:00P

1928 Thirty Caterpillar

Owner: Scott & Kathy Kuhns

Bought this from the original owners

Replica Of 1928 John Deere D Made From Riding Mower

Owner: Gordon Hada

Body styles included a roadster (with or without a rumble seat), deluxe coupe, two- or four-door sedan, standard coupe, and a tourer. Prices ranged from $670 to $725. Many mechanical and body parts were shared with the six-cylinder DeSoto and for the first few years, both DeSoto and Plymouth shared the same production facilities. Walter P. Chrysler chose Madison Square Garden on July 7th of 1928 to introduce the Model Q. Amelia Earhart drove the first car as it entered the arena.

Nearly 60,000 examples of the Model Q were built in its inaugural year.

1918 Edison Amberola 30

Owner: Wes Kinsler

Edison introduced his response to the Victor company’s Victrola in 1909 and called it the Amberola. The first Amberola models were premium machines and sold for $200. It would be several years before Edison would introduce an Amberola phonograph priced below $50. In 1915 Edison introduced the Amberola 30, named after its initial sales price of $30. This was not the first $30 Amberola to be made, but it was the most successful, and production lasted from 1915 to 1927. Edison would stop making cylinder records in 1929. It plays 4-minute celluloid cylinders only and features a diamond stylus. The single-spring motor will play 3 records on one winding.

PAGE 10 - OKLAHOMA STEAM THRESHING & GAS ENGINE SHOW 2023
1938 John Deere Model B tractor. Bought brand new by my father-inlaw, Floyd Kelley. He bought it from Kelley Equipment, Pawnee, OK which was owned by his dad, Warren Kelley. On the back is a lister planter. P. Chrysler chose

Model 65 Case

Steam Engine

Owned by Dalen, Dale & Cindy Wolff

Tony Benda from Cashion Okla. showed for years in Okla. and Kansas. Dalen helped him sense he was 4 years old. After Tony Died we Bought at his Estate sale 2012.

Truck

Owner: Brady Kelley

1950 GMC 350. This truck equipped with a 248 inline 6 backed by a 4 speed transmission and a vacuum 2 speed rear axle. It also has vacuum assist brakes and had a flat bed with pto driven hydraulic lift. It now lives out its days transporting antique tractors and equipment and being dressed up for a Christmas float for Santa Clause.

Rumely Oil Pull

Model W 20-30

Owner: Jon & Amanda Ferris

Love to use it as intended to belt up to equipment and plow.

1957 John Deere 820

Owner: Robyn Kelley Moncrief

It was bought in Web City in the mid 90’s. Given to Robyn by her grandpa, Floyd Kelley

2 Bottom “Tumblebug” Minneapolis Moline Plow Owner: Scott & Kathy Kuhns

1915 ALLEN Motor Company Car

Owner: Jon & Zoe Herzig

The Allen was an American automobile, built in Fostoria, Ohio between 1913 and 1921. The company used 3.1-litre side-valve Sommers fourcylinder engines and acquired that company in 1915. This car features touring coachwork. My wife's late stepfather Allen collected cars for many years. He came across this car The ALLEN he had to have it. He was very proud to own a car that shared his name ALLEN. He took it to car shows as an unrestored original. Over 20 years ago Al let us take the car to McGrath MN to the White Pine show, we had a blast with it and dreamed of owning the car someday. The car was willed to his grandson Eric, we gave up on owing it. After Al's passing, we helped clean the estate prepping items to be moved and readied for an estate sale. Eric started making preparations to move the ALLEN, it had been sitting in the shed waiting for him for over 20 years. My wife Zoe was helping her mom Marlene clean out the house. Eric stopped by that day with some questions about the car. Zoe called me to see if I had the answers. I mentioned to her let Eric know if he ever wanted to sell the car, please let us know, I was being hopeful that we could someday own it. Three days later he called, and we struck a deal, we own the ALLEN! Part of the deal was if I could get it running before I moved it off the property, he wanted a ride and a photo taken in the car in the same spot on the property that his grandfather had a photo taken with the car many years prior. I was pretty excited to get the car running. I arranged to have my brother-in-law Chuck meet on the property that Saturday morning. We drained the old gas, cleaned the points, installed a new 6V battery, checked for spark and fuel. No fuel! The vacuum style fuel pump system was clearly not working, this system gave Al many years of frustration. We decided to bypass the entire fuel system, we spotted an old tank from a gas stove, some tubing, and clamps found in the garage were used to connect it to the carburetor. We then added fuel to the tank and hung it from the windshield. I jumped into the car, to give it a try. Chuck had a can of starting fluid in hand to help it out and it started. Chuck and I were amazed at how well it was running so we drove it out for a quick spin around the property, for the first time in over 20 years it was moving again. The following weekend was set for Eric's family to ride in the car. That weekend was great! Eric, his family, Zoe's cousins and Marlene arrived, they were all ready for rides in The ALLEN. I gave rides, after several hours of circling around the property we managed to remember to take photos before loading up the car.

OKLAHOMA STEAM THRESHING & GAS ENGINE SHOW 2023 - PAGE 11
This plow is designed to be able to plow back and forth in the field as opposed to circling the field, by flipping the plow shears for the opposite direction.
PAGE 12 - OKLAHOMA STEAM THRESHING & GAS ENGINE SHOW 2023 521 4th Street • PAWNEE, OK 918-762-3983 Join Us For Happy Hour! ank You F Making Our Sonic Your Sonic ! 405 Six th St reet Pawnee, OK 918-762-2750 For All Your Paint And Lumber Needs. Welcome to the Pawnee Steam and Gas Engine Show! Furniture * Appliances * Service We Service What We Sell! Cole & Ciera Collins - Owners 614 Harrison Street • Pawnee, OK 74058 918-762-3174 spearsfurniture@sbcglobal.net

1940 Singer 29K70

‘Patcher’ or Shoe Cobbler’s Machine

Owner: Wes Kinsler

Not many sewing machines have the visual appeal that the Singer Model 29-series machine has. With a large rocking “walking beam” and a 360-degree rotating walking presser foot, the 29K70 is a machine built for specialty work. The 29K70 also reminds us of another era with its nickname, “patcher”, when shoes and boots were often repaired rather than replaced.

The 29K70 is designed for tight spaces and maneuverability when working on shoes, boots, and clogs. Although also suitable for other general leather sewing, the large walking beam gives many the false impression that the machine has the power to sew thru heavy leather. The 360-degree walking foot allows the operator to sew a circle without ever turning the work.

1871 Singer New Family Sewing Machine

Owner: Wes Kinsler

Since making his first machine in 1851, Isaac Singer made several unsuccessful attempts at making a sewing machine suitable for home use. Most of the other machines Singer made were for industrial use and could weigh up to 150 pounds. They say the third time is the charm, and the Improved Family was the third model Singer made for home use. Introduced in 1863, the New Family became very popular and even copied by other companies. Later on, the name was changed to the Model 12 as Singer switched from names to numbers. Singer model numbers are generally in order of introduction starting with the Model 1 in 1851. The New Family/12 was discontinued in 1902.

The New Family you see here was made in 1871 and is in its original cabinet. This cabinet is a few steps above the lowest-cost option for this model, having both a drawer and a wooden cover, popularly known as a “coffin top”. This machine was previously in Western Pennsylvania. The machine still works as well as it did when new, a remarkable feat for something that is over 150 years old!!!

Singer 71-1 Buttonhole

Sewing Machine

Owner: Wes Kinsler

Everyone is familiar with Singer as a maker of sewing machines used by Mom, or Grandma at home, or the tailor or seamstress down the street. Less well known are the industrial machines Singer made for use in factories for the mass-production of ready made clothes.

The Singer 71-1 shown and demonstrated here is an industrial machine that forms the reinforcing stitches around the hole for a button. For this stitch, the whip stitch is used. The machine is also designed to cut the hole itself, though on this particular machine these parts have been removed. The machine is operated by two foot pedals, one to raise the cloth clamp for positioning the fabric, and one to start the cycle. Once the cycle is started, it takes about 6 seconds to sew a ¾” buttonhole. The machine then automatically stops when the stitch is completed.

History Of My Popcorn Trucks

Owner: Mike Cartwright

1991 was the first year of my popcorn truck I had at Pawnee. In 1989I bought a 1918 Model T Truck. It was not in to bad of condition. It had been in a barn that had a fire (see picture 01). I got it home and started working on it. My wife said it would be nice to make a popcorn truck out of it and sell popcorn and cotton candy at Pawnee so we did (see pictures 02 , 03 & 04 ). A couple of years later a man wanted to buy it and put the old bed back on it so I keep the popcorn box and made it into a wagon (see pictures 05 & 06 ). That worked out well for awhile but I still liked the idea of a truck. I started on my next popcorn truck ( see pictures 07, 08 & 09 ) and still have it at Pawnee. When my wife died in 2015 I just did not want to quit selling popcorn and cotton candy. I hope to keep selling for years to come.

OKLAHOMA STEAM THRESHING & GAS ENGINE SHOW 2023 - PAGE 13

Horse Power measured?

torque T is in pound-foot units, rotational speed N rpm is required in horsepower.

How is Horse Power measured?

Horse Power measured by the Prony Brake?

When torque T is in pound-foot units, rotational speed N rpm and power is required in horsepower.

constant 5,252 by 1,000 to get 5.25 feet. or 63 inches. 63 inches away from the shaft center of the Prony allows easy calculation of torque; therefore, the scale foot pounds of torque. Much more simple!

Gaspard de Prony (above) invented the 1821 to measure the performance of and engines.

How is Horse Power measured by the Prony Brake?

Divide the constant 5,252 by 1,000 to get 5.25 feet. or 63 inches. The scale is 63 inches away from the shaft center of the Prony Brake. This allows easy calculation of torque; therefore, the scale is reading foot pounds of torque. Much more simple!

Gaspard de Prony (above) invented the "brake" in 1821 to measure the performance of machines and engines.

PAGE 14 - OKLAHOMA STEAM THRESHING & GAS ENGINE SHOW 2023
Kenneth Kelley’s 110 on Prony Brake with Amos Rixman, 1988 Kenneth Kelley’s 110 on Prony Brake with Amos Rixman, 1988

Rumely Products Collectors RUMELY EXPO 31st Annual H FRIDAY-SUND

MAY 5-7, 2023

BY OKLAHOMA STEAM THRESHING & Steam Park Grounds in Historic Pawnee, OK Gates Open @ 8:00am • $10/Day - 12 & Under Free Friday is School Day

(Free admission to school groups accompanied

The Rumely Products Collectors is an organization which was incorporated in 1993 to preserve the heritage of the Advance Rumely company, and affiliated organizations which came under the Rumely umbrella. The Rumely company was founded in 1853 by Meinrad Rumely, an immigrant from Germany, who later set up his business in LaPor te, Indiana. The Rumely company developed the OilPull tractor, whose success was due to the Secor -Higgins carburetor, which burned kerosene efficiently. The Rumely company acquired the Advance Thresher Company of Bat tle Creek, Michigan, the Gaar -Scot t Company of Richmond, Indiana, the Nor thwest Thresher Company of Stillwater, Minnesota, and the Aultman & Taylor Company of Mansfield, Ohio, before being bought by the Allis Chalmers Company in 1931, mostly for its worldwide dealer network.

We are proud to have the Oklahoma Steam Threshing and Gas Engine Association of Pawnee, Oklahoma host our 31st Annual Expo, especially since this show ’s featuring of the Rumely line in 1990 sparked the interest among a group of early collectors to form the Rumely Products Collectors organization!

Our board members include:

Keith Kuhlengel of Palmyra, PA (President)

Jim Greif of Prairieburg, IA (Vice President)

Mike Travis of Corning, IA (Treasurer)

Aaron Schmidt of Cleveland, WI (Secretar y)

Brian Oldenburg (Odie) of Munger, MI

Reese Groshong of Columbia, MO

John Langenbach of Marine St. Croix, MN

Ron Graves of Har t ford Cit y, IN

Adam Floyd of Westville, IN

OKLAHOMA STEAM THRESHING & GAS ENGINE SHOW 2023 - PAGE 15
HOSTED Come by the RPC booth at the Expo, and meet the RPC board and your fellow collectors!
If you are not a member, a family membership is only $20 a year!
PAGE 16 - OKLAHOMA STEAM THRESHING & GAS ENGINE SHOW 2023 www.lakesideautorvandoutdoors.com 918-358-8070 Auto rvs Portable Buildings utilit y trailers POwersports Steam On To
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