Page 1

ThE YEAR ThAT WAS...

1996

WhAT WAS GOING ON IN ThIS YEAR?... SEE pAGE 18

FOOD FOR T! ThOUGIAh L! FOOD SpEC ISSUE 07 jUNE 2010

LIvE/LEARN/ ASpIRE/AChIEvE p16 hOME FROM hOME FOR ThE GROWING ARMY OF GARDENERS

p28 p33

EGGS!

ThINGS TO DO WITh SAUCES

FOR LOADS MORE GREAT CAREERS INFO vISIT: WWW.WAY2GOMAGAZINE.CO.UK

pLAYTIME REvIEWS


WITh ThANKS TO OUR SpONSORS...

WWW.WAY2GOMAGAZINE.CO.UK


Nanotechnology

explore the world of nanomaterials... The interest in nanomater ials and nanotechnology was started by Richard Feynman [a famous pa rticle physicist and lectur er] in 1959, who gave a talk entitled ‘plenty of room at the bottom’. Ultimately, nanomaterial is about making mater s ials with atomic precis ion, allowing incredibl control of their propertie e s and enabling a whole range of applications. Such atomic control can already be achieved in the scientific laboratory and control at the ten s of nanometer scale is commonly found in the electronics industry.

NanoMaterials Inspiring Commercial

04

Success

There are fewer and few er young people going into science, however it is as important as ev er to keep their interest in subjects that shape our lives and are essen tial in helping to combat the challenges of today and the future. To ass ist this, NanoCentral® has developed the It’s small world educational a programme for school students. Schools, groups and individuals seeking to learn more about how nanomaterials is revolu tionizing modern mater ials science should vie our website www.nanoce w ntral.eu and also conta ct Dr Steve Devine for more infomation, includ ing a teachers handou t. tel: 01740 625 729 email: steve.devine@na nocentral.eu web: www.nanocentral.e u

WWW.NANOCENTRAL.EU


WWW.WAY2GOMAGAZINE.CO.UK

n EDUCATION n CAREERS n LIFESTYLE

05


INTRODUCTION

WELCOME TO ISSUE 07: W2G for this issue looks to give you all the information you need to know about the food you eat. What would be the first thing you would think of if someone mentioned allotments? A pastime for Senior Citizens in flat caps, or you may not even have heard of an allotment. Well it is time for a re-think – as we all become more conscious of what we eat and how many food miles it takes to bring it to your table - the allotment is fast becoming the domain of the younger person, with influence of the TV chefs having a major effect. Here at W2G we have also embraced the culture, with features editor John and designers Dave and Rich all taking up the challenge of allotment holding, the office now gets regular deliveries of fresh vegetables and free range eggs. Katy Bennett our latest team member swaps the classroom for the business world when she spends time with the head of marketing at a major fashion retailer. Along with all our regular Playtime features, The Year that was 1996 and information on further education, apprenticeships and employment. If you would like to get in touch, to give your opinion on any subject we have covered or anything you think we should be covering the address as always is production@distinctivepublishing.co.uk it would be great to hear from you. All of us at W2G hope you enjoy the read in between the revision and preparation for the upcoming exam season.

Distinctive Publishing Ltd, 8th oor, Aidan House, Sunderland Road, Gateshead NE8 3HU

T: 0191 4788346

John Dean & Francis Griss

FEATURE EDITOR

deangriss@btinternet.com Pete Thompson

pRODUCTION MANAGER pete.thompson@distinctivepublishing.co.uk Ewan Waterhouse

bUSINESS DEvELOpMENT MANAGER ewan.waterhouse@distinctivepublishing.co.uk

hOME FROM hOME

pAGE 16 pAGE 28

EGGS!

ThINGS TO DO WITh SAUCES

pAGE 33


LIvE/LEARN/ASpIRE/AChIEvE

CONTENTS W2G MAGAZINE 07

pLAYTIME pAGE 08

6. pLAYTIME 12. ThE OIL AND GAS SECTOR STIL hAS A bRIGhT OpITO 14. YOUR RESULTS, CERTIFICATES AND MYSqA - SqA 16. hOME FROM hOME FOR ThE GROWING ARMY 18. ThE YEAR ThAT WAS...1996 20. GET OUT AND AbOUT - NExUS 22. STEpS YOUNG AppRENTICES REACh REGIONAL’S STEpS 26.INSpIRING FUTURE ENTREpRENEURS - A4E 28. EGGS! 29. FUN FOOD FACTS 30. FOOD MILES 32. SpUDS 33. ThINGS TO DO WITh SAUCES 35. ShILDON YOUNG pEOpLE AWARDS 2009 CONNExIONS 36. A DAY IN ThE LIFE - MAERSK 38. FLYING hIGh! - NEbp 40. AppRENTICEShIpS IN ENGINERING - ROLLS ROYCE 42. RObOTS RETURN TO INSpIRE FUTURE ENGINEERS ONE NORTh EAST 44. ENTERpRISE IN NEWCASTLE - RTC NORTh 48. SCIENCE AND MAThS - NWDA 52. KATY MEETS... 54. AIMhIGhER LANCAShIRE ASSOCIATE - AIMhIGhER 56. DISCOvER YOUR pOTENTIAL ON A pLACEMENT ChEMICALS NW 58. NUTRITION FACTS


pLAYTIME WhIp IT

MOvIES

...

Drew Barrymore’s directorial debut is a little gem. It could have been called Juno on Skates, such are the comparisons, but that is not necessarily a bad thing. Sure, Bliss Cavendar is almost identical to Juno MacGuff (and not just because Ellen Page plays them both), it follows a similar ‘finding oneself’ story arc, there are eccentric yet lovable parents and it prides itself on the unique dialogue flowing throughout; however Whip It has something up its sleeve to give it its own recognisable edge – roller-derby. Fun doesn’t come any thicker, faster or sillier than roller-derbying. Barrymore understands this and appropriately places the underground sport front and centre. Beneath the action is a coming-of-age tale that wears its heart on its sleeve and bears all. Despite being slightly predictable and clichéd, real life roller-derby competitor Shauna Cross’ screenplay (adapted from her own book) makes up for it with razor-sharp dialogue (“I can grow the balls”) and genuinely intriguing characters. Not to mention the comedy littered throughout; never laugh-out-loud moments but you’ll be chuckling from start to finish. The romance subplot could have been left out though, it doesn’t hold your interest like the other story elements and feels slightly unnecessary. Undeniably cute once again, Ellen Page stamps her A-list spot with another splendid, oddly appealing performance. Page’s serious acting chops are matched by her superb comic timing as she proves that she is one of the finest young actors coming through today. The huge supporting cast is letdown by no-one; Kristen Wiig the pick of the bunch, her deadpan humour is hilarious and she is surely another actress we will see more of in the future. A special mention to Marcia Gay Harden and Daniel Stern as well, they play Bliss’ old folks with warmth and likability, never allowing them to become the typical misunderstanding parents you often find in these movies.

IF YOU LIKED THIS I RECOMMEND YOU SEE: n Bend it like Beckam n Million Dollar Baby n Blue Crush

A laugh-a-minute affair with a bigger than average heart. Throw in a terrific little indie soundtrack and you have yourself a must-see movie.

3

RATING ★★★★★

08

“FUN DOESN’T COME ANY ThICKER, FASTER OR SILLIER ThAN ROLLER-DERbYING”


pLAYTIME

“NOT ONLY A GOOD KIDS FILM, bUT A GREAT COMEDY IN GENERAL”

DvD’S...

CLOUDY WITh A ChANCE OF MEATbALLS Consider me shocked that Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs is not only a good kids film, but a great comedy in general. It works as a kids film because it remains lighthearted throughout, while also conveying some worthwhile messages about sticking with your dreams and passions—but it also works as a great comedy for adults with subtly mature humor, and a perfectly chosen cast. And somehow, along with everything else the film has going for it, Cloudy also manages to be a brilliant parody of the disaster film genre. Lord and Miller use the sparse plot of the original Cloudy book as a guide for the film’s second and third acts, but the initial setup and characters are entirely their own creation. The film centers on a young scientist named Flint Lockwood (Bill Hader) who has been trying to help the community of his small island town, Swallow Falls, with his inventions ever since he was a child. Mostly, his inventions cause more problems than they solve (one has to wonder what made him think “rat birds” were a good idea, though they serve for some great recurring jokes), until one day his machine that turns water into food ends up making food rain from the sky. This is a boon for Swallow Falls, which was a former sardine town until the world realized that sardines are “totally gross”. The egomaniacal Mayor Shelbourne (Bruce Campbell) sees the business potential in being a town that rains food, and ends up changing the town’s name to Chewandswallow and rebranding it as a tourist attraction. As you can probably guess, things don’t work out so well when the food mutates and ends up attacking the town. Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs is the third feature CG film to come out of Sony Pictures Animation. Their previous features felt incredibly safe, whereas Cloudy takes chances and is all the better for it.

5

RATING ★★★★★

IF YOU LIKED THIS I RECOMMEND YOU TRY: n Up n Madagascar n Toy Story 3

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pLAYTIME

. . . C I S U M DIANA vICKERS

- SONGS FROM ThE TAINTED ChERRY TREE Diana Vickers’ debut album Songs From The Tainted Cherry Tree is the result of over a year’s worth of work for Diana with an amazing array of co-writers and producers. The list of collaborators is as impressive as it is surprising, with Ellie Goulding, Lightspeed Champion, Nerina Pallot, Starsmith, Guy Sigsworth and Cathy Dennis all helping to give the record its mature shape. But it’s Diana herself who keeps it box-fresh youthful. Ellie Goulding’s co-write “Remake Me and You” meanwhile, is the strangest cut on the record – a jittery stop-start electro boogie that lodges itself straight in the head. The lead single is Cathy Dennis and Eg White’s “Once”, which from the original demo has been re-arranged to Diana’s bespoke measurements and builds to a gob-stopping crescendo in the first minute. Her debut single ‘Once’ opens the album, an electropop masterpiece. It works well as a debut, smashing her back on the scene after a very long hiatus from the music industry (she took a break to take the lead role in the west end production of ‘The Rise And Fall Of Little Voice’, to rave reviews I must add!) and the accompanying video shows Diana for the superstar she is.

4

RATING ★★★★★

IF YOU LIKED THIS I RECOMMEND LISTEN TOO: n Goldfrapp n Kate Nash n Cheryl Cole

10

“ThE LIST OF COLLAbORATORS IS AS IMpRESSIvE AS IT IS SURpRISING”


pLAYTIME

GAMES...

COOKING MAMA 3 Like the title implies, Cooking Mama 3 continues the Mama series with a return to the kitchen. The game introduces new dishes, ranging from simple lollipops to complex chili con carne, and with those new recipes come new steps that retain the silly, lighthearted theme from previous titles; you rush to peel boiled tomatoes before your hand is burned, or quickly lift drying squid to keep a cat from grabbing them. But the overall premise is just as simple as always: Follow the recipe to gain points that determine your dish’s final score. The better you complete the recipe’s steps, the better your dish will be. Earlier games made it nearly impossible to come back from a mistake, but Cooking Mama 3 lowers the aggravation level by easing up on the difficulty. For example when sifting flour it’s a little too easy to flip the sifter up into the air on accident. While in previous games that would make you fail immediately, now you can blow into the DS’ microphone to clear the air of flour and start sifting again without tarnishing your score. A new part of Cooking Mama 3 is the shopping game, where Mama gives you a list of items to find at the grocery store. You then maneuver a character around the store to collect the items, while dodging other shoppers. Its general good fun for the whole family!

4

RATING ★★★★★

IF YOU LIKED THIS I RECOMMEND YOU TRY: n Cooking Mama 2 Worlds Kitchen n Big Mams’s Cooking n Imagine: Fashion Designer New York

“ITS GENERAL GOOD FUN FOR ThE WhOLE FAMILY!”

11


S A G D N A L ThE OI S A h L L I T S R SECTO K O O L T U O T h A bRIG ThERE ha s been an urban myth sur rounding the oil and g as indust ry for a while n ow with many reports c laiming t he sector is in steady decline.

12

WWW.OpITO.COM


However, this couldn’t be further from the truth as the oil and gas sector still has a bright outlook on the horizon with the experts predicting a healthy and prosperous future.

“The separate energy sectors can also work together to share common ideas as they all face the same sort of barriers and must meet similar technical requirements.

Major oil companies are also now investing significant sums of money into the renewable energy sector so there’s a new wave of opportunity waiting to be unlocked.

“That’s why it’s not surprising to learn companies are increasingly willing to diversify across different sectors.

Renewable specialists are building on the progress of their counterparts in the oil world, transferring skills and knowledge as wind and tidal power starts to gain more recognition. It’s a sector predicted to take off making it an ideal career choice for youngsters gearing up to enter the job market. It also offers extensive opportunities for travel and further development. Recent graduate Jack Golding is benefitting from the partnership approach between the oil, gas and renewable industries. The 24-year-old has just completed a 12 week internship with OPITO - The Oil & Gas Academy in their Norwich base which has given him a greater understanding of both sectors. Jack, who completed a Masters in Mechanical Engineering at Bristol University, was tasked with researching the growth of the energy sector in the East of England – a project he found extremely rewarding. “It’s been a great learning experience for me and I’m grateful to everyone at the Academy for giving me such a worthwhile opportunity,” said Jack. “There’s no doubt working here has given me a greater understanding of the oil and gas industry.” So just what did Jack find out following his three month study of the energy industry? “My findings clearly show there is huge potential for the energy industry to grow and prosper in the East of England,” said Jack.

“Perhaps one way forward to help further development could be to form a regional apprenticeship scheme or university sponsorship programmes supported by the main energy sectors. “This would secure a talented future workforce and ensure all the different energy sectors like oil, wind and wave continue to grow. “The energy sector could arguably be a defining industry for generations of future workers.” Jack is now about to start his professional career and will join an international energy company in September which will present him with extensive opportunities and challenges in a sector that makes a difference. Liz Davis-Smith, regional manager for OPITO – The Oil & Gas Academy, has been delighted with Jack’s contribution. She said: “Jack has been an inspiration to work with, providing a valuable regional perspective for the Academy on a complex project. “His ability to engage with industry stakeholders and partners from Norfolk and Suffolk County Councils has been impressive and his analytical abilities have come in very useful. “It’s pleasing that his intern experience has motivated his decision to accept a graduate level job in the energy industry – a success story for the Academy and an indication of our ability to influence the industry’s future workforce.”

“jACK hAS bE EN AN INSpIR ATION TO WORK WITh, p ROvIDING A v ALUAbLE REGIONAL pE RSpECTIvE FO R ThE ACADEMY ON A COMpLEx pR OjECT. “hIS AbILITY TO ENGAGE W ITh INDUSTRY STA KEhOLDERS A ND pARTNERS FR OM NORFOLK AND SUFFOLK COU NTY COUNCILS hAS bEEN IMp RESSIvE AND hIS ANALYTICAL A bILITIES hAv E COME IN vE

RY USEFUL.”

WWW.OpITO.COM

13


Your results, certificates and MySQA

As the exam diet draws to an end for another year, students in Schools across Scotland will be eagerly anticipating their results and some may already be starting to study their new subjects.

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WWW.sqa.ORG UK


READY bE STARTING TO STUDY ThEIR NEW SUbjECTS? All candidates will receive their results by post on Thursday 5 August 2010. But if you register for MySQA, you can receive your results the day before, on Wednesday 4 August, by text or e-mail. It takes the anxiety out of waiting for the post. And of course if you’re on holiday or away from home you can access your results without having to ask someone else to open the envelope for you. You will still receive your paper certificate through the post on Thursday 5 August. To allow us to update your results, online access to MySQA will be unavailable between Friday 23 July and Monday 9 August. Registration is simple. You’ll need your Scottish Candidate Number (SCN) and a unique e-mail address. Once you’ve confirmed we have your correct home address, we will send a letter to that address with your activation code, which you use to access your account online. You must register before Thursday 15 July and activate your account by Friday 23 July. You can then choose to have your results sent to you by text as well as by e-mail. Texts and e-mails will be sent out on Wednesday 4th August. If you registered for MySQA last year, then there’s no need to re-register. You will receive your results again as you chose last year, unless you go onto the site and change your preferences. You should check the address details we hold for you though.

s time t l u s e R t a t r Suppo hing is u think somet

yo results, or if ly. If there derstand your ge immediate lle co If you don’t un or ol ho sc ur yo it out. sing contact act us to sort wrong or mis they will cont m le ob pr a is sday 5 ble from Thur ce line availa vi ad e out the on ab ph a tele is for advice SQA also run u can ring th Yo . st will be r gu be Au m turday 7 lephone nu August to Sa cate – the te ifi rt ce ur . yo te layout of ur certifica content and sued with yo the leaflet is or included in your school e person in th – em st ion sy at an appeals ovide inform SQA operates exams can pr A SQ r at fo th e ol or college is responsibl e by the scho college who ad m be ly peals can on . about this. Ap for the exam entered you

More than R

MySQA is no

t just about

esults

getting your registration results early stay with yo - the benefits u. MySQA of of access to al fe rs you secure l your SQA re and unique sults – so yo u can log on results whene and look at ver and whe your rever suits yo u. Our newly la unched SQA website incl offering advi udes a useful ce and guidan learners sect ce from stud ion the a Progre y guides, info ssion Routes for parents an Guide design d the career pa ed to identif th or job you y routes tow want to do by ards and qualifica selecting from tions pathway the training s available. and accurate It aims to pr information ovide detaile about relatio d nships and pa qualifications thways betw , jobs and ca ee n To find out ho re er s. w to activate your accoun www.mysqa.in t by logging on fo and visit w to ww.sqa.org.u k/learners

SAvE 25% ON pAST pApERS!\ Everyone who registers for MySqA will receive a 25% discount of all past papers from bright Red publishing. The discount is valid until 30 june - visit www.mysqa.info for more detail and terms and conditions

WWW.SqA.ORG UK

15


hOME FROM hOME FOR ThE GROWING ARMY OF GARDENERS

WAY WE REGARD E Th IN ON TI LU vO RE A EN SE vE RECENT YEARS hA SELvES ChALLENGED EM Th D UN FO vE hA TS KE AR RM pE OUR FOOD. SU D MANY pEOpLE hAvE AN E UC OD pR C NI GA OR RE MO E TO pROvID EY CAN ThEMSELvES. Th AS Ch MU AS G IN OW GR TO ED TURN IvING ThE ChANGES. DR IS T hA W ES IN AM Ex AN DE hN jO

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WWW.NSALG.ORG.UK


There was a time when allotments were the domain of retired men, all flat caps and pipe-smoking in the shed. However, the allotment is undergoing a remarkable renaissance which has seen it develop from a largely traditional pastime to one that increasingly involves families and young children. The reasons are complex; people turn to allotments for different reasons. Some people, for instance, want to know that they have worked towards the food they eat and to know where it comes from. They also want to know what, if any, chemicals have been used on it. For others, the attraction comes because they realise that gardening is a very healthy pastime: it is estimated that 15 minutes of digging burns off 150 calories. And for others, there is a good financial reason: some estimates suggest that a good allotment can save the leaseholder up to £1,500 a year in shopping bills. Whatever their motivations, allotments are no modern fad. Like most things, it’s not a new idea and allotments were first mentioned in the late 1500s. Common land that had long been used by the poor began to be enclosed, leaving people without land on which to grow their own food. Allotments were created as compensation. During the First World War allotments were created to help deal with food shortages, which happened against during the Second World War when even public parks became food plots, people inspired by the slogan Dig for Victory which saw allotments contribute 1.3 million tons of vegetables from 1.4 million plots.

What is notable is the increasing number of families becoming involved, the parents inspired by a desire to teach their children about homegrown produce rather than relying purely on supermarkets. Clio said: “If you look round the site where my allotment is you can see the mix. There are retired men but also families with young children and couples in their twenties. I think for parents, one of the appeals is being able to teach their children where food comes from. They can also give their children an area of their own to work. “It’s a cheap way of having fun with young children and teaching them more about where their food comes from. Not to mention all the wildlife they may encounter - recently, the children on the allotment near me were fascinated by a slow worm I discovered hiding under a bit of carpet. “And with the horror story of globally mass-produced, intensive food systems I think many people are motivated by a desire to be closer to natural systems - wanting to take control of where their food comes from and produce it without the use of chemicals. Peas eaten straight from the pod that you’ve grown yourself not only taste absolutely amazing they are at their freshest and most nutritious.” That view is reflected by John Monkhouse, secretary of the Smithfield Road allotments, tucked away in a side road close to Darlington town centre in North East England. Looking round the plots with their lovingly-worked earth and vegetables, including his onions, carrots and leeks, he said: “I have an allotment because I want to know where my food comes from. And by growing my own veg, I am helping to reduce the carbon footprint.”

Another peak of popularity came in the 1970s and this time the driver was television, specifically the comedy sitcom The Good Life when many people realised they would rather be the self-sufficient Tom and Barbara than Margot and Jerry, whose food all came from stores. Now allotments are enjoying another peak. These days there are 300,000 allotments in the UK, each year producing a staggering 215,000 tons of fresh produce. And in many areas waiting lists are large and lengthening all the time. Nationally, it is estimated that 100,000 people are have their names down. Donna McDaid, Assistant National Secretary, of the National Society of Allotment and Leisure Gardeners, said: “If you go back to the eighties and nineties, allotments were not as popular and sites were neglected and became derelict but allotments are very popular again. “I think one of the reasons they are so popular is that it is a lifestyle choice for people. That has been helped by TV chefs championing the idea of growing your own produce. People like Hugh FearnleyWhittingstall and Jamie Oliver have been champions for the idea and now people of all ages and cultures are getting involved in allotments. It is a real mixture.

The Soil Assoc ation runs orga nic farm visits all over th e UK as well a s a series of courses and advice for youn g people on foraging an d growing their own food. More informati on is available at www. soilassociation .org The National S ociety for Allotm ent and Leisure Garden ers can be rea ched via www.nsalg.org .uk

“The stereotypical image of the older gentlemen has changed although they are still involved and thank goodness they are because they are a valuable source of information and it is down to them that the allotment has survived and is still here today.” Clio Turton, press office manager for the Bristol-based national Soil Association, believes that there is a very fundamental reason for the popularity of allotments. She said: “For a lot of people it is a desire to get back to the earth. The rise in popularity of allotments can be attributed to the sense of wellbeing and relaxation working on an allotment can create - I personally find a morning pottering about on my allotment extremely therapeutic.”

WWW.NSALG.ORG.UK

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T

. . . S A W T A h T R A E Y hE jAN 23

The first version of the Java programming language is released

FEb 10

Chess computer ‘’Deep Blue’’ defeats world chess champion Garry Kasparov for the first time

MAR 13

The Dunblane massacre. A gunman kills 16 children, their teacher and himself at a primary school in Dunblane, Stirling. The killer who wounded 13 other children and another teacher is confirmed as a 43 year old former scout leader Thomas Hamilton

ApR 16

France Telecom introduces its Wanadoo Internet Service

MAY 11

Eric Cantona scores the winning goal in the FA Cup Final against Liverpool for Manchester United who were confirmed Premier League champions six days earlier, becoming the first team in England to win the double twice

jUN 19

The government selects the Greenwich Peninsula site on the banks of the River Thames as the location for the Millennium Dome exhibition, which is set to open for the year 2000.

jUL 5

Dolly the sheep, the first mammal to have been successfully cloned from an adult cell, is born at the Roslin Institute in Scotland

AUG 28

The Prince and Princess of Wales complete their divorce proceedings. The Princess of Wales loses her status of Royal Highness and assumes the title Diana, Princess of Wales.

SEp 29

Super Mario 64 game for Nintendo 64 is released for the first time

OCT 13

Racing driver Damon Hill wins the Japanese Grand Prix clinching the Drivers’ World Championship.

NOv 5

Bill Clinton wins his second term as President of the United States when he defeats Republican candidate Bob Dole

DEC 20

Steve Jobs’ company NeXT is bought by Apple Computer, the company co-founded by Jobs.

TOp 10 GAMES... Super Mario 64 Resident Evil Tomb Raider Quake Duke Nukem 3D Crash Bandicoot Mario Kart 64 NiGHTS into Dreams r: Red Alert Command & Conque Diablo

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TOp 10 MOvIES... Independence Day Twister Mission Impossible Jerry Maguire Trainspotting Ransom 101 Dalmations The Rock The Nutty Professor The Birdcage

1996 I’LL TELL YOU WHAT I WANT WHAT I REALLY, REALLY WANT! ZIGGA-ZIGGGG-ARRRRRRR!

TOp 10 SONGS... Killing Me Softly - Fugees Wannabe - Spice Girls Spaceman - Babylon Zoo Say You’ll Be There - Spice Girls Return Of The Mack - Mark Morrison Ooh Aah... Just a Little Bit - Gina G Three Lions - Baddiel and Skinner and The Lightning Seeds Children - Robert Miles 2 Become 1 - Spice Girls Don’t Look Back In Anger - Oasis


NORTHEAST

6


get out and ring p s is h t out b a Nexus can help you get out and about this spring – from giving you ideas for things to do that you can get to by public transport to providing you with information on how to get there, and how to save money on fares. The all new nexus.org.uk is the place to go to for timetable, route and ticket information. And if you’re looking for ideas of places to go and things to do – check out the Explore Tyne and Wear section. It gives you details of loads of places in Tyne and Wear you can get to easily by public transport – from beaches and castles to cinemas and shopping – as well as events. And for each place or event, we tell you the nearest Metro station and best buses to get there. Here’s some information that’ll help you save some money on bus and Metro fares – and the right one for you will depend on how old you are.

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www.nexus.org.uk


IF YOU’RE UNDER 16 – GET A CAT! You can travel all day on all public transport in Tyne and Wear for just £1 if you have an U16 Child All-day Ticket (U16 CAT). The single child fare is 50p, so use the U16 CAT as a return ticket – or make several journeys with it and save loads of money! So, if you travel to school and back by bus or Metro, buy a ticket in the morning and you’ll be able to use it on your way home too. Or if you go back to your friend’s house after school before you go home, or perhaps pop to the shops, your £1 CAT will still get you there. And the CAT can be even better value at weekends and in school holidays, when you have more time to get out and about – use it to meet up with friends or visit your Gran, go shopping or to the cinema, get your hair cut or have a day at the seaside. You’ll need to show your Under 16 Card to be able to buy the U16 single fare or U16 CAT. Under 16 Cards are free, so if you haven’t got one, get an application form from any Nexus TravelShop or at nexus. org.uk. So all you need to do is buy a CAT at the start of your day, keep it safe, and wherever the day takes you, as long as you’re in Tyne and Wear, you won’t have to worry about having enough money for fares. We also sell season tickets for travel to school - School Passes. Further details of all tickets available to children and young people going to school are on nexus.org.uk.

WhAT IF I’M OvER 16? There are a wide range of tickets which can be used on Metro, Shields Ferry, bus and local rail services or on a combination of them all. The ticket section will help you work out which is the best one for you to buy, depending on which type of transport you’re using and how often you’re travelling. There are special season tickets if you just use one type of transport (eg the 16 -18 Metro Student Card if you just use Metro or the Teen Travelticket if you use more than one type/all types of public transport). All the information and links you’ll need are there – or pick up a Student Ticket leaflet from a Nexus TravelShop.

WWW.NExUS.ORG.UK

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G N U O Y S p E T S h C A E R S E C I AppRENT S ’ L A N O I G E R

ShORTLISTED S ER N R A LE x SI E Th F E Up FOUR O L AND LAURA EL STEpS LEARNERS MAD W b M O W x LI A S. IE R T CATEGO UNDER TWO DIFFEREN S FOR ThE YOUNG ST LI A N FI L A N IO EG R S TED A TE hALLETT KA D N A FENNY WERE ShORTLIS ER N R O D IE ph AR AWARD. SO AR AWARD. YE E AppRENTICE OF ThE YE Th F O ER N R A LE G R ThE YOUN WERE ShORTLISTED FO Four STEPS into Health and Social Care Young Apprentices were shortlisted to attend the CLASS Awards on Friday 23rd April 2010, hosted by Kate Thornton. The Celebrating Learning and Skills Success (Class) Awards have taken the place of the Celebration of Learning and Skills Awards (CoLaS) for the North East and are the region’s biggest showcase of learning excellence. Awards were given for categories such as; regional Young Learner of the Year, Life Time Achiever and Best New Business. This year the regional finalist for the National Young Apprentice of the year will also take part in the CLASS Awards. The winner of this category will then move onto the National Final in London.

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WWW.SKILLSACADEMYFORhEALTh.ORG.UK


REGIONAL FINALISTS: YOUNG AppRENTICE OF ThE YEAR Alix is completing her Young Apprenticeship Diploma Hybrid and the Level 2 Society Health and Development Diploma. Alix has developed into a mature and confident young woman during the two year programme. In July 2009 Alix was a runner up for the STEPS Student of the year award at the STEPS Annual Awards Evening. This reflects the hard work, dedication and achievements Alix has realised whilst on the programme. The STEPS Young Apprentice Programme has helped Alix to decide on pursuing a career within the health care sector as a psychologist. Alix plans to stay on in 6th form next year to complete the Level 3 Society Health and Development Diploma. Laura is about to complete the second year of her Young Apprenticeship in Health and Social Care. Laura has maintained an outstanding attendance record over the two year programme and has completed an additional 10 days of placement in her over time. In July 2009 STEPS held their annual Awards Evening, during which every student received an award reflecting their performance on the programme to date. Laura was one of only five students, out of a cohort of 59, to be awarded the Outstanding Performance Award, which is the highest award possible. This is a reflection of the wholly positive impression she has made with all of the STEPS team since she joined the programme. Laura has developed her confidence and self esteem during STEPS Activities and now plans to go onto complete a level three qualification in Health and Social Care. Laura would like to pursue a career in the Health Care sector in either Nursing or Midwifery. Charlotte Ellis, Laura’s STEPS Young Apprentice Coordinator had this to say:

“LAURA IS AN OUTSTANDING STUDENT – ShE IS ALWAYS WILLING TO hELp OThERS AND hER MATURE AND pOSITIvE AppROACh TO EvERY SITUATION hAS ENSURED ExCELLENT FEEDbACK FROM EvERY EMpLOYER, WhILST DEMONSTRATING COMMITMENT bY COMpLETING ExTRA pLACEMENTS IN hER SpARE TIME – ShE IS AN ASSET TO ThE STEpS YOUNG AppRENTICEShIp pROGRAMME.”

WWW.SKILLSACADEMYFORhEALTh.ORG.UK

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Regional Young Learner of the Year

and Society Health and Sophie is about to complete the Young Apprenticeship Diploma Hybrid it a challenge to catch up to Development Diploma. After joining the programme late Sophie found tion to overcome all the rest of the group. However she has shown great commitment and dedica in completing all of the barriers and is now ‘ahead of the group’ at school in her coursework and e and willing to grasp new elements of the Young Apprenticeship programme. She is always positiv a massive impact on her ways of learning. Sophie’s learning throughout the programme has had life. Sophie has also changed enthusiasm and confidence. It has raised her aspirations and goals in essing, however now she is her career choice. Initially Sophie wanted to pursue a career in hairdr interested in working within mental health.

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www.SKILLSACADEMYFORHEALTH.ORG.UK


Kate is completing her Young Apprenticeship in Health and Social Care. Kate has developed into an exceptional student who is always keen to be involved and will participate in whatever is asked of her to the best of her ability. She is bright and enthusiastic and always has a positive attitude. During Kate’s first year on her course she questioned whether this programme was the right one for her. After completing several work experience placements she then realised that she could make a positive difference to the lives of others in this line of work and she has grown in confidence, skills and knowledge ever since, which has had a beneficial impact on her school work. Kate’s most recent placement has been in a local nursery where, not only has she provided excellent support to the teachers and children there, but she also acted as a ‘buddy’ with another work experience student who has learning difficulties. Kate shows maturity and consideration in overcoming any barriers between them and the two students have been working well together. Kate has now decided to stay on at 6th Form in school to study the Society Health and Development Diploma at level 3 then go onto a career working with people who have learning disabilities.

ards so for aw e es th r fo ts an ic pl ap of ds re nd There were hu onal finals gi re e th to it e ak m to es tic en pr these four Young Ap r teachers, ei th of l al t en em ev hi ac us do en em has been a tr team are extremely S Ep ST d an s nt re pa , rs ne rt pa er employ rk, commitment wo rd ha ’ es tic en pr Ap g un Yo e th pleased that d. and enthusiasm has been recognise

WWW.SKILLSACADEMYFORhEALTh.ORG.UK

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E R U T U F G N I R I p S N I ENTREpRENEURS ShIp (TvEbp) IS TEES vALLEY EDUCATION bUSINESS pARTNER OLS AND COLLEGES ONE OF 8 NORTh EAST EbpS ThAT hELp SChO pEOpLE. UNCOvER ThE ENTERpRISE SKILLS IN YOUNG

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ENTERPRISE IS ONE OF THE KEY PRIORITIES OF ‘LEADING THE WAY’ – THE REGIONAL ECONOMIC STRATEGY 2006- 2016. AS A REGION WE NEED TO RAISE THE NUMBER OF BUSINESS START UPS AND TO ACHIEVE THIS WE NEED MORE YOUNG PEOPLE TO GO INTO SELF EMPLOYMENT IN THE FUTURE. AMANDA OLVANHILL – TVEBP MANAGER FEELS THAT... “Young people in our region are naturally enterprising, they are able to come up with some fantastic ideas but sometimes they just need a little help and encouragement to develop their entrepreneurial attitudes and apply their enterprise skills.” TVEBP deliver enterprise programmes in primary schools, secondary schools and colleges. Students are encouraged to work in teams (non friendship groups) and undertake challenges that develop their economic and business understanding, enterprise capability; team work, creative thinking, problem solving, adaptability, influencing others and financial management. Regardless of whether the young people are designing and producing a new chocolate bar in ‘Cheeky Charlie’s Chocolate Extravaganza’ or designing and producing a new car in ‘Car Wars’ they are provided with an opportunity to apply their enterprise skills. Amanda says, “We highlight the importance of these skills to any career, but we always actively promote self-employment as a realistic career option for young people. Our work with older students tends to become specifically focussed around self-employment.” TVEBP are also a key partner in a new exciting venture that will be developed on Stockton’s High Street. Supreme Property Services are refurbishing a high street unit that will become the new Stockton Incubator Centre (SIC). The three storey building will comprise of two upper levels of office space and a ground floor of dedicated ‘retail pods’. The new venue will officially open in summer 2010.

TVEBP and A4e will be a key partner in SIC, encouraging a culture of youth entrepreneurship and ensuring that local schools and colleges can benefit from this fantastic high street venue that will hopefully encourage some of today’s students to be the entrepreneurs of the future. The centre will offer business guidance, assistance with the formulation of business plans, financial guidance, workshops and up to the minute retail training on EPOS till systems. TVEBP has secured at least one of the eighteen retail pods for Stockton schools to enable the schools to sell and promote goods and services (from their own onsite business/es) through a Stockton Schools’ Cooperative. Because of the importance of SIC to the young people of Stockton, TVEBP are getting them involved at the earliest possible opportunity and therefore TVEBP will be running a competition for KS3 students to influence the ‘look and feel’ of the new building in the summer term. In addition to helping shape the design of the building, the winning school will get a package of free business support services and free sales and marketing for their business/es for 12 months.

ontact: c o f n i e r o For m e.co.uk 4 a @ l l i h n a v l ao 54750 Tel. 01642 7

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FUN FOOD FACTS California’s Frank Epperson invented the Ice pop in 1905 when he was 11-years-old. Capsaicin, which makes hot peppers “hot” to the human mouth, is best neutralized by casein, the main protein found in milk. China’s Beijing Duck Restaurant can seat 9,000 people at one time. Chocolate contains phenyl ethylamine (PEA), a natural substance that is reputed to stimulate the same reaction in the body as falling in love. World wide, consumers spend more than $7 billion a year on chocolate. Haggis, the national dish of Scotland: take the heart, liver, lungs, and small intestine of a calf or sheep, boil them in the stomach of the animal, season with salt, pepper and onions, add suet and oatmeal. Enjoy! In an authentic Chinese meal, the last course is soup because it allows the roast duck entree to “swim” toward digestion. Large doses of coffee can be lethal. Ten grams, or 100 cups over 4 hours, can kill the average human. Laws forbidding the sale of sodas on Sunday prompted William Garwood to invent the ice cream sundae in Evanston, IL, in 1875. Mayonnaise is said to be the invention of the French chef of the Duke de Richelieu in 1756. While the Duke was defeating the

British at Port Mahon, his chef was creating a victory feast that included a sauce made of cream and eggs. When the chef realized that there was no cream in the kitchen, he improvised, substituting olive oil for the cream. A new culinary masterpiece was born, and the chef named it “Mayonnaise” in honor of the Duke’s victory. McDonalds and Burger King sugar-coat their fries so they will turn golden-brown. Crisps were invented in Saratoga Springs in 1853 by chef George Crum. They were a mocking response to a patron who complained that his French fries were too thick. Rice is the staple food of more than one-half of the world’s population. Saffron, made from the dried stamens of cultivated crocus flowers, is the most expensive cooking spice. Swiss Steak, Chop Suey, Russian Dressing, and a Hamburger all originated in the US. The color of a chile is no indication of its spiciness, but size usually is - the smaller the pepper, the hotter it is. The first ring donuts were produced in 1847 by a 15 year old baker’s apprentice, Hanson Gregory, who knocked the soggy center out of a fried doughnut.

The FDA allows an average of 30 or more insect fragments and one or more rodent hairs per 100 grams of peanut butter. The fungus called truffles can cost £500 to £3,000 per pound. They are sniffed out by female pigs, which detect a compound that is in the saliva of male pigs as well. The same chemical is found in the sweat of human males. The sandwich is named for the Fourth Earl of Sandwich (1718-92), for whom sandwiches were made so that he could stay at the gambling table without interruptions. The vintage date on a bottle of wine indicates the year the grapes were picked, not the year of bottling. The world’s deadliest mushroom is the Amanita phalloides, the death cap. The five different poisons contained by the mushroom cause diarrhea and vomiting within 6 to 12 hours of ingestion. This is followed by damage to the liver, kidneys, and central nervous system - and, in the majority of cases, coma and death. When Swiss cheese ferments, a bacterial action generates gas. As the gas is liberated, it bubbles through the cheese leaving holes. Cheese-makers call them “eyes.”

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FOOD MILES

LE

Op pE OF S ER Mb NU NG SI EA CR IN R FO N ER NC A CO It was in the latter stages of the 20th Century that a new phrase entered the English language - food miles. It reflected the growing anxiety for many people about the distance their food travelled before it arrives in their local shops.a business grow.” Behind the movement was the growing concern about the damage caused to the environment by carbon dioxide and the contribution being made by transporting food - for instance, it is estimated that half the vegetables and more than 90 per cent of the fruit eaten in the UK is imported from abroad. One of the main ways of transporting food is by air but environmentalists have identified aircraft as a major cause of global warming, giving off more carbon dioxide (CO2) than any other form of transport. One figure suggests that although airfreighted produce accounts for less than one per cent of total UK food miles, it is responsible for 11 per cent of the total CO2 emissions from UK food transport. The other major issue is what happens to food when it arrives. Figures vary but it is estimated that about thirty per cent of goods on our roads is food, carried by trucks which cause pollution and congestion. Indeed, food transport is responsible for 25 per cent of the kilometres clocked up by HGVs. The term coined to describe all this travel - ‘food miles’ - is credited to Dr Tim Lang, professor of food policy at London’s City University, in the 1990s. It may be a small phrase but it is a big and complicated debate. Take Africa, for instance: it is estimated that the £200m-a-year trade in fresh fruit and vegetable trade from Africa supports one million people living on the Continent. Take that away and communities and industries would suffer so any decision has to be carefully considered. And the solution is not just about tackling food miles on a global scale because a lot of

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the problem lies with the way people shop in the UK. Figures suggest that with most people shopping at supermarkets, cars are responsible for 20 per cent of the UK’s CO2 emissions from food transport. One solution often suggested is sourcing more fruit and vegetables at home, with those advocating such an approach arguing that locally grown and organic food can be kept chilled for months. However, even that approach uses energy. Indeed, a UK Government report suggested that it would be more energy-efficient to import tomatoes from Spain by lorry than to grow them in heated greenhouses in the UK. Lettuce grown out of season in the UK also compared unfavourably with Spanish salad when carbon emissions were taken into account. One company that is taking the issue seriously is Asda, which has taken steps to reduce its carbon dioxide emissions, including reducing the distance its food travels. The supermarket chain recently announced that it had removed more than 80,000 tonnes of CO2 out of its operations since 2007, despite opening 36 stores and serving an additional 2.5m customers each week. One of the ways it has done that is using double-decked trailers and improving planning to reduce the number of journeys required to deliver food, helping the company to record a seven per cent reduction in CO2 in just two years. Paul Kelly, Asda’s External Affairs and Corporate Responsibility Director, said: “Saving money and cutting waste has

always been at the heart of our business and that also puts sustainability centre stage. Compared to 2005, our stores are significantly more energy efficient, and despite our colleagues now delivering 400m more cases each year, our trucks are driving 19m fewer miles.” For many people, the simple answer is to buy local. Clio Turton, press office manager for the national Soil Association, said: “We have always advocated that people buy local food and the more local the better. If they buy local they are benefiting their local community and supporting the local rural economy. In addition to that, they get fresher produce.”


E

CAMpAIGN CALLS FOR S E I R E S R U N N I D O O F R E TT bE At the heart of the food debate is a concern for the health of the nation’s children with the Soil Association pointing out that 22.8 per cent of children who start school are already overweight or obese. To address that statistic, the Association is campaigning for the Government to improve nursery food, a wish underlined by a survey of 1,000 parents conducted by Mumsnet for the Better Nursery Food Now campaign. The campaign, run by The Soil Association and funded by organic baby food manufacturer Organix, calls for the introduction of mandatory standards to ensure high quality food is served in all nurseries. According to the Better Nursery Food Now survey of parents with children at nursery, 89 per cent wanted to see legally enforceable rules for the nutritional standards of food in nurseries. The findings included: ■

82 per cent wanted foods like chips, sweets and chocolate, which are banned

or restricted in primary and secondary schools, also banned in nurseries. ■

95 per cent wanted to ban additives that are linked to behavioural problems or other health issues in nursery food.

94 per cent wanted to see compulsory nutrition and cookery training for nursery staff preparing and serving food.

Nine out of ten parents wanted Government funding available to help nurseries improve food provision.

The survey found that only 34 per cent of parents were happy with the food at their nursery, citing children being given junk food, too many convenience foods and not enough fruit and vegetables. Pamela Brunton, Soil Association policy manager, said: “The younger the child, the more vulnerable their health is to the effects of poor quality nutrition. The Government’s own research shows that a quarter of our opportunities to prevent obesity occur when a child is at nursery. It is vital that the Government put regulation for nursery food at

the top of their agenda, to ensure that every child gets the start in life that they deserve.” In response, the Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF) announced that it had asked the School Food Trust to review the rules for nursery food. The Trust was responsible for driving improvements to school lunches, an issue highlighted in a campaign led by TV chef Jamie Oliver who wanted more nutritional menus.

ATTACK OF ThE NASTIES They are the enemy of gardeners, private and commercial, alike. The pests that can devastate a crop whether it be in a farmer’s field or an allotment vegetable patch. Way2Go has compiled a top ten: 1 Colorado Beetle: perhaps the one that sparks the most fear among farmers and there are military-style measures in place should it ever venture onto UK shores. Native to North America, the insect has spread across the planet, devastating potato crops and has turned up on odd occasions in the UK down the decades, although no breeding colony has been discovered since 1977. Farmers and Government agencies are on stand-by should a beetle be sighted and farmers are urged to report incidents the moment they happen. 2 Asparagus beetle: can strip a plant of foliage in one go then remain in the soil over winter before emerging to do the same next year.

3 Cabbage moth caterpillar: can strip the leaves off a plant in a single night. 4 Gooseberry sawfly: perfectly capable of eating every leaf on currant and gooseberry bushes within days. 5 Potato eelworm: minute worm-like creatures that attack potato roots. Even if you get rid of them, it is advised that you do not grow potatoes on the same site for eight years. 6 Slugs and snails: plenty of gardeners hate the very sight of snails and slugs as well - although both creatures have plenty of supporters who argue that it’s a case of live and let live and that problems should be tackled without recourse to chemicals. Or you could put out some cat food and hope that your friendly neighbourhood hedgehog comes round to feast on the snails and slugs!

plant juices, smothering leaves in order to so. 8 Greenfly and blackfly: types of aphid that descend on plants and kill them off as they feed. 9 Celery fly: a tiny fly that lays eggs which destroys all affected leaves. 10 Wasps: love to burrow into apples and other fruit. But, as with some other socalled pests, there are two sides to the story because wasps are brilliant at keeping down the insect nasties. The situation with wasps underlines the dilemma at the heart of pest control. Some gardeners will throw chemicals at the creepy crawlies but the growing number of organic gardening supporters reach instead for the soapy water and other more environmentally-friendly methods.

7 Aphids: soft-bodied insects that feed on

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SHILDON YOUNG PEOPLE AWARDS 2009

RYAN MERRYWEATHER WITH CONNEXIONS PERSONAL ADVISER: JUNE ELLISON AND PERFORMANCE MANAGER: GLYNIS HOLMES AT THE AWARDS CEREMONY

The Shildon Children & Young People’s Action Network (SCYPAN) held its Young People Award 2009 event to reward the efforts of young people in Shildon. This event was to highlight and reward the exceptional achievements of the young people in Shildon who made a contribution to their society. There were eight awards presented on the night, one of which was a Connexions Special Award.

He had his ups and downs but he remained focused throughout 2009 despite the disappointment of losing his place on a training course. With the support of Connexions he was able to find a training route that suited him and allowed him to develop his obvious ability in joinery. He managed to successfully reach the conclusion of his level 2 training and did exceptionally well to gain an employed apprenticeship.

This award went to Ryan Merryweather; he was nominated by his Connexions Personal Adviser : Tony Roe who is based at the Bishop Auckland Connexions Centre. Tony feels that Ryan thoroughly deserves the award for all of his hard work and determination he has shown over the past two years. Ryan left school with few qualifications and didn’t take up any education, employment and training for several months.

Ryan also received excellent support from the staff of Bishop Auckland College and his employer Lee Ramsey of Ramsey’s Joinery & Property Maintenance. Ryan who became a father in March 2009 has fully turned his life around, and deserved to be recognised for his achievements

STEPPING UP MOVING ON Young school leavers in County Durham have successfully participated in the SUMO [Stepping Up Moving On] project based at Durham Community Business College in Ushaw Moor. These young people had all undergone a period of being out of education employment or training and the programme was designed to help bridge the gap back into learning. The young people, aged 16-18, took part in a wide range of activities including construction taster courses, job search skills, interview techniques, compiling a CV to search for opportunities first aid sessions, confidence building and an anti racism workshop. To match the hard work with a little fun they also visited the Odeon cinema at the Metro Centre, the ‘Centre for Life’ in Newcastle and the ‘Baltic Art Gallery’ in Gateshead. As a result of the SUMO programme the participants progressed into employment, college courses and e2e [entry to employment]. SUMO was the result of really positive partnership work between: ■ Durham and Chester-le-Street Connexions Centre ■ New College Durham

PICTURED PRIOR TO THEIR PRESENTATION AT NEW COLLEGE DURHAM ARE: JONATHAN CARR, MARK MESSER, CHRIS ADAMS, CATHERINE ROWNTREE, CHELSEA HANDLEY, MARK TODD AND SHANE BOWES.

■ The Northern Learning Trust ■ Durham Community Business College All contributed time and personnel to deliver the course 2 days per week over 10 weeks.

www.help4teens.co.uk

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A DAY IN ThE LIFE Maersk trainees spend three years at college gaining their HND’s or Foundation Degree, along side the academic life they enjoy practical experience with worldwide travel. Here we have two Deck Officers sharing their experiences of both academic and sea life;

ROSS MCbURNIE, WARSAh NAUTICAL COLLEGE FIRST FEW DAYS OF COLLEGE:

FIRST FEW DAYS AT SEA:

My first few days of college at Warsash maritime academy were mainly based around trying to settle in to a new routine, meeting new people and getting acquainted with my new surroundings. The college itself used the first week to introduce us cadets to the new environment as well as completing the necessary paperwork, handing out timetables for our first phase and making the colleges expectations of us clear. The college also produced a series of daily lectures by guest speakers from the maritime industry which were designed to inform us about our future careers from a variety of perspectives. I found these lectures to be a good way of learning more about the path we had all chosen with the merchant navy. At the end of the week, as Maersk cadets we were flown up to Newcastle to participate in a two day company induction which was proved to be good fun and a good way of meeting fellow cadets from the company as well as gain more of an insight into the values of the company and what we all have to come over the coming years!

Boarding my first ship, the ‘Maersk Bentonville’ in Busan, South Korea was a very exciting time. When myself and a fellow cadet arrived at the dockside with the agent, seeing the ship for the first time was a great experience, she was massive! It was very exciting to think that I would soon be part of her crew for four months. Once onboard I was shown to my cabin by the third officer and given a few minutes to settle in before going up and meeting the captain and completing the necessary paperwork. My next job quickly followed as I was called by the chief officer to the aft mooring station to help recover the mooring lines as we left port. This busy few hours set the trend for the next few days as we had a busy schedule which meant I was either called to a mooring station to assist the officer or called up to the bridge to assist the captain. Although I had busy few days I really enjoyed them and it confirmed to me I had chosen the right career path.

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WWW.SEACAREERS.CO.UK


KENNY MCGEE – SOUTh TYNESIDE COLLEGE SEA phASE DAY ONE - ThE AIRpORT I am surprisingly relaxed. I am relaxed about the long flight ahead, although I’ve never had a problem with flying previously; I am also relaxed about the next few months on board the Maersk Brownsville. The challenges that I’ll face, I don’t even know if I get sea sick! My mind wonders, dreaming of the possible situations I may face. I board my flight, destination Los Angeles, for everyone on that plane except me, my destination was the future. My future!

SEA phASE DAY TWO - ThE vESSEL Before I knew it, I was stood at the bottom of the gangway, completely unprepared for the butterflies in my stomach! The 3rd Officer comes up to collect us, two new cadets, and this vessels first cadet! The 3rd Officer shows us around the accommodation block, “In here you’ll find the library” “Over here you’ll find the officers day room” “This is the laundry; the steward can show you how to use the machines!” Was it all a blur? We were walking and talking at normal pace, but it seemed so fast. My cabin! My home! It’s so spacious. Clean and tidy, I unpack, it’s still clean and tidy and I’m informed that on a Sunday the Captain and Chief Officer do the cabin inspections, noted. I take a look at my watch, 1157hrs local time, I head down to B deck, to the officers saloon for lunch. My first meal on ship, and greeted by a smell of food that was pleasing to the nose I ate my lunch, which was just as pleasing to the stomach.

The 3rd Engineer sits down and introduces himself. We talk about life at sea and before he heads back to work, he shows me around the galley a little more and gives me some tips. It was at this moment in time that I became aware of the sense of camaraderie that engulfs an environment such as this. I am still in awe.

SEA phASE DAY FOUR - WE ARE SAILING I awake for my next watch. Back on the bridge; 12 noon. More plotting points and more looking at very expensive pieces of equipment and I ask more and more questions trying to understand them. We receive a call over the radio, San Francisco Pilots. Pilot will board on arrival. We arrive into Oakland after passing the Golden Gate Bridge and Alcatraz. The sun is setting. I go with the 2nd Officer to Stations. We’re at the Forecastle. After we moor up and get on the berth we head for dinner. I then head to my cabin and get my head down. A 6 hour cargo watch entails from midnight.

DAY SEvEN TO ThE ThIRD WEEK IN.

crossing the pacific, where for the first 10 days we encountered next to no traffic. Then we came close to China, fishing vessel after fishing vessel, coaster after coaster, and plenty of large container ships too. On bridge at night it is just a spectacle of lights. I grab my light rule. The light rule is a large ruler that has a sliding piece on it. It slides along and helps you identify lights. I look through the binoculars focusing on various lights and trying to identify them. Also throughout the crossing I have been into a Water Ballast Tank, Checked the Fire Extinguishers with the 3rd Officer, learnt about the different Buoys and Buoyage regions, had Christmas onboard, had Christmas dinner onboard, sent and received dozens of emails with friends and family back home. Right now the Maersk Brownsville is sat just outside of Xingang, at anchor. There is a lot of fog, the port is closed. We are informed berthing will be at 2100hrs. It’ll be a long night.

For more information on Maersk’s Officer Training Scheme and how to apply please visit www.seacareers.co.uk

The weather is still incredible. Force 10 Winds, Sea Swell higher than I ever imagined. I made a joke in Oakland that I wanted to experience bad weather so I could find out if I get seasick. After being at sea until the 26th December, we arrive in Dalian, China. I reflect on the past 11 days. 11 Days

WWW.SEACAREERS.CO.UK

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FLYING hIGh!!!

SEATON bURN COMMUNITY COLLE GE AND NORTh TYNESIDE Ebp

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WWW.NORThTYNESIDE.GOv.UK


Students from Seaton Burn were given the chance to go behind the scenes to see who really runs the show when it comes to flight safety, signals and operations on board the Boeing 737 at Newcastle College’s Aviation Academy.

Debbie took them through emergency medical scenarios, using the PA system, post flight checks as well as tackling some of the paperwork that must be filled in and signed before departure and arrival.

Debbie Hutchinson of Virgin Atlantic took the day out to work with students studying for their Cabin Crew Certificate. Carrying out a wide variety of activities inside the aircraft, students experienced first-hand what life would be like as cabin crew and had a taste of some of the toughest situations that they may face on the job.

“Thanks to Graeme Bell at Newcastle College, we have managed to really bring learning to life for the girls from Seaton Burn. We had a fantastic day and they should be really proud of themselves. They worked amazingly hard and show true promise for a career in aviation.” Debbie Hutchinson.

“WORKING CLOSELY WITH EMPLOYERS REALLY ADDS VALUE AND STRENGTH TO THE COURSES WE OFFER. IT PREPARES OUR STUDENTS FOR THE REAL WORLD OF WORK AND ADDS EXCITEMENT AND ENERGY“ - ALISON SHAW, HEADTEACHER

WWW.NORTHTYNESIDE.GOV.UK

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Apprenticeships

We would like to invite applications to join our Apprenticeship programme starting in September 2010. This is an exciting opportunity for the Engineers of tomorrow and is ideally suited to school leaver’s who have achieved or expect to achieve GCSE Grades of ‘C’ or higher in Mathematics, Science and English and who are less than 19 years of age on 6th September 2010.

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www.rrnetc.co.uk


S IN ENGINEERING

Rolls-Royce North East Training Centre Is a major force in engineering training, achieving the highest Natioinal vocational and Academic standards WhAT YOU GET

AppLY TO:

First year training in our own cenre to NVA Level 2 Further Educational qualifications Keys Skills up to Level 2 Excellent employment opportunities within the Engineering sector n NVQ Level 3 in your specialist field n Fully certified apprenticeships

Rolls-Royce Newcastle, Scotswood Road, Newcastle upon Tyne NE15 6LL Contact Marian Morgan Telephone 0191 2565385 Fax 0191 256376 Email apprenticeships@michellbearings.co.uk

n n n n

We are an equal opportunities company, strongly committed to its promotion

WWW.RRNETC.CO.UK

North East Training Centre

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RObOTS RETURN TO INSpIRE FUTURE ENGINEERS

Inspiring young people is once again the aim of the North East Engineering Show as it makes a welcome return to the region this summer. Asimo

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Rubot

WWW.bOOMNORThEAST.CO.UK


Rebranded as ‘boom!’ the event will see thousands of future engineers descend on what is the engineering equivalent of the Greatest Show on Earth.

Last years show

Starchaser’s Skybolt Sounding Rocket. The event, which is aimed at students age 1117 and remains free for North East schools, is sponsored by One North East and combines an exciting fast-moving theatre style performance and interactive exhibition. The show takes place at the Metro Radio Arena in Newcastle from Tuesday 13 July until Friday 16 July 2010 It will feature Honda’s ASIMO, the world’s most advanced humanoid robot with other highlights including RuBOT the amazing Rubik’s Cube solving robot, Starchaser’s Skybolt Sounding Rocket which stands at nearly 12 metres, RAF flight technology and a coffee powered car. North East based Universities and Companies including SubSea North East, North East Process Industry Cluster, Nissan, Siemens and Tanfield Group will be showcasing their new technology and engineering innovation. The event will be presented by Robert Llewellyn of Scrap Heap Challenge and Red Dwarf fame. This year, schools have already registered over 4000 young people to attend the event. Schools still wishing to bring a class or year group to ‘boom!’ are urged to book via the event website www.boomnortheast.co.uk

One North East manufacturing and productivity manager, Dr Colin Herron, said: “The North East Engineering Show was a huge success in the region last year bringing inspiration to thousands of young people and I am delighted to have the opportunity to host it again. “Engineering is an exciting, fast-moving career touching a variety of sectors and we want teachers to sign up now to help guide enthusiastic pupils thinking about a future in engineering.” ASIMO is the culmination of more than two decades of humanoid robotics research and development. The latest version of ASIMO made its UK debut in the region in 2008 and returns for the third time to inspire the North East’s next generation of engineers. The Skybolt Sounding Rocket has been designed to flight test a Starchaser rocket engine and is designed to be reusable, a trait that is almost unique compared to other existing sounding rockets.

the engineering profession continues to attract pupils from our schools. “This show goes a long way to demonstrate to pupils how subjects such as maths, science and design and technology can be used in the future and why engineering is so important to our economy and an attractive career option.” The show provides a fantastic opportunity for young people to find out about the diverse range of rewarding career options available in engineering with representation from employers in key regional sectors including renewable energy, subsea engineering, zero emission vehicles, low carbon technologies, ICT/digital, process industry/chemical engineering and construction/civil engineering. Schools interested in booking to attend the event should visit www.boomnortheast.co.uk or call 0191 240 7008.

Jarrow School was one of the schools attending last year’s event. Director of Engineering Barry McGregor said: “Engineers are a vital part of our lives and we need to ensure that

WWW.bOOMNORThEAST.CO.UK

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NEW ENTERpRISE I Thanks to the European Commission and Newcastle City Council over a thousand young people across the city of Newcastle will benefit from enterprise focused investment in their future.

As part of the new £3.5 million Newcastle Enterprise Package over 1,000 young people from schools and youth groups across the city will access FREE programmes aimed at increasing their business skills and knowledge of enterprise. Helping young people to move into a position where they would seriously consider self employment the programmes delivered by RTC North will offer a wide Pick and Mix range of enterprise activity. Delivered in schools or working with youth groups, sessions will be offered as interactive lessons, half day workshops or full day activity programmes. Available sessions include:

n n n n n n n n n n

Creative thinking and problem solving Idea generation Introduction to business/social enterprise Decision making Entrepreneur case studies and mentoring support Business planning Financial awareness Marketing awareness VVirtual business simulation experience Signposting to regional support and other providers of enterprise education

Working closely with RTC North as part of the Enterprise Package programme Walker Technology College will kick off a series of enterprise activities for young people and CPD opportunities for staff from November 09. With Year 10 students currently working on an enterprise project culminating in Enterprise Week Joanne Lulham from Walker college said:

“AT WALKER TEChNOLOGY COLLEGE, WE GREATLY AppRECIATE ThE SUppORT pROvIDED bY RTC, ThE STAFF hAvE bEEN FANTASTIC. RTC hAvE CREATED RESOURCES WhICh ARE RELEvANT AND AppROpRIATE TO ThE STUDENTS NEEDS. RTC’S INvOLvEMENT WILL GREATLY ENhANCE ThE DELIvERY OF ThE CURRICULUM AND ThUS FURThER ThE STUDENTS LEvEL OF UNDERSTANDING.” *FREE depending on eligible post code

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E IN NEWCASTLE ! To compliment the enterprise activities delivered to young people in Newcastle, FREE CPD training for staff is also available. Targeting key influencers of enterprise across the city, idea generation and business simulation sessions will be offered to youth workers, teachers, volunteers and advisers working with young people. With training already delivered to Connexions advisers and KeyFund facilitators across Newcastle Janine Marshall from RTC North commented:

“WE ARE CURRENTLY ENTERING A REALLY ExCITING pERIOD OF ENTERpRISE LEARNING FOR YOUNG pEOpLE IN OUR REGION. bY WORKING WITh KEY INFLUENCERS AND ADvISERS OF ThESE GROUpS WE WILL ENSURE ThAT ENTERpRISE LEARNING WILL bECOME EMbEDDED AND SUSTAINAbLE. WE ARE pLANNING TO REACh OvER ONE ThOUSAND YOUNG pEOpLE ACROSS NEWCASTLE AND RECOGNISE ThE “TRAIN ThE TRAINERS” WORKShOpS ARE CRUCIAL TO ThE SUCCESS OF ThIS INITIATIvE.” The two part training programme for staff aims to increase knowledge of entrepreneurship by offering a one day business simulation workshop complemented by a suite of three half day thematic workshops. The Business simulation process is a valuable element of the support package offering participants the opportunity to run their own virtual business. Supported by business planning, sourcing finance and marketing sessions Influencers will be better placed to help young people develop their skills for running a venture.

CONTACT US NOW FOR FURThER INFORMATION:

T: 0191 5164400 E: enquiries@rtcnorth.co.uk W: www.rtcnorth-education.org.uk RTC North is a trusted delivery partner of business support, innovation and enterprise programmes on behalf of regional development agencies, the European Commission, local authorities and central government.

WWW.RTCNORTh-EDUCATION.ORG.UK

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NORTHWEST


s h at M and Science – see where they can take you!

n ca u yo s er re ca ng ti ci ex e th of e m Discover so l Science, ve -le A ng yi ud st by t es w th or N e th do in . Technology, Engineering and Maths Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths are the cornerstones of a productive nation and can affect everything we do in our daily lives. They form the basis for many careers and industries and can be fascinating in their own right. The future of the region’s productivity lies heavily on young people choosing to stick with these exciting subjects, which are often referred to as STEM subjects. STEM subjects have the ability to improve the quality of people’s everyday lives and find solutions to global challenges, such as sustainable economic development.

Choose Science Science can allow you to discover how ideas contribute to technological change – affecting industry, business and the environment Science is far more diverse than the traditional Chemistry, Physics and Biology subjects

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Choose Technology Technology gives you the skills to understand of economic, industrial and environmental issues within industry and business Technology opens the door for careers in engineering – automotive, forensic, aerospace environmental… the list is truly endless

Choose Maths Maths is important for all members of a modern society, for its use in the workplace, business and finance Maths is the basic tool for understanding economics

Maths is essential for participation in the knowledge economy Maths gives you the ability to work on problems and in contexts beyond the school gates

Choose ICT ICT skills let you understand and apply skills purposefully in learning, everyday life and employment ICT presents numerous career opportunities that are fast-moving, full of variety, interesting and rewarding

www.futuremorph.org


Interested? Visit www.FutureMorph.org to view just how exciting and rewarding studying technology, engineering or maths beyond the age of 16 can be. It isn’t just a one track road to becoming a scientist or engineer – the skills and knowledge you gain are valuable in almost any career and will make you very employable.

STEM Careers in the Northwest Energy & Environmental Technologies “Think Green” is the new hot topic on everyone’s lips – from homes to business, travel, transport and leisure, the future is definitely one that will be led by environmentally friendly and eco-conscious firms. It is for this very reason that careers in the energy and environmental technologies sector are growing at a phenomenal rate – the range of jobs available in these industries is huge, especially in England’s Northwest, which is taking the lead on climate change, energy and wider sustainable development…. In a sector that nationally employs over 530,000 people there is no doubt that there is a career that would suit you. Over the next 10 years the sector needs to recruit over 14,000 people within the UK to replace those that are retiring or moving onto jobs in other industries, so there are plenty of opportunities at all levels. The main categories of employment are management, scientific, technical and craft, commercial and sales, and administrative/clerical. Demand is high for skilled engineers and technicians, scientists, operatives and customer care staff in particular and for flexibility and adaptability necessary across all occupations in an ever-changing working environment.

Where do I start? As with many industries there are a number of ways to get into the top jobs. The most important factor is to ensure you have good grades – especially in maths, science and technology. Taking these subjects at A-Level or equivalent will stand you in good stead of working your way up the ladder. Apprenticeships are a great opportunity to achieve a nationally recognised qualification, gain work experience and develop transferable skills - all while getting paid! Apprenticeships are available at several levels, including a National Vocational Qualification (NVQ) or Scottish Vocational Qualification (SVQ). This includes key or core skills, employment rights and responsibilities and in some cases a Technical Certificate. By the end of the programme, the mix of training undertaken ensures that you are both competent to do the job you have been training for, and you have the essential underpinning knowledge and transferable skills.

Advanced Manufacturing Manufacturing is a crucial sector in the North West economy. Here are some key facts about four of the main manufacturing industries chemicals, aerospace, automotive and technical textiles: They employ around 400,000 people in the region - about 12% of the workforce. There are over 20, 000 businesses across the four industries in the Northwest. The industries are together worth almost £15 bn to the region’s economy.

All of these facts mean there are fantastic, exciting opportunities for you to start your career in manufacturing in the Northwest. Make sure you visit the Skills NW careers event in February, the biggest skills and careers event happening in the region, to get a real taste of different future career options in manufacturing.

Chemicals Chemicals are absolutely vital to our daily lives – they end up being used in loads of products and services we purchase every day. There may be many stages between the processing of a chemical and the final consumer, but it is estimated that each UK household either directly or indirectly spends around £30 per week on chemicals. The North West is the largest regional centre for chemical manufacture in the UK and the sector employs 51,000 highly skilled people. Chemicals is also one of the North West’s largest exporter and 60% of the world’s top 50 chemical manufacturers are based in the region, including major companies in: • Petrochemicals • Pharmaceuticals • Cleaning agents, soap and detergents • Performance and speciality chemicals • Agrochemicals • Polymers and plastics • Coatings • Advanced flexible materials. These are just some of the well-known names located in the Northwest: AstraZeneca, Ineos Group, Unilever, Shell UK, Innospec, Solvay, Brunner Mond, Innovia Films, GrowHow and Johnson Matthey. The North West region has a strong science and engineering base with 15,000 graduates each year in science, technology, and engineering and maths subjects. Universities in Manchester, Liverpool & Central Lancashire have major strengths with respect to chemical related research and a track record in innovation and Lancaster University complements a specialises in environmental chemistry. You can start your career in chemicals through a wide range of routes - from apprenticeship schemes through to graduate and recruitment. There is demand for people with diplomas, NVQs and degrees and there are also opportunities to study whilst working and move from NVQs through to foundations degrees and onwards…

Learn more about the industry and careers in chemicals at www.cogent-careers.com and www.chemicalsnorthwest.org.uk.

www.scienceandmaths.net

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TEChNICAL TExTILES

AEROSpACE

The Advanced Flexible Materials sector is also known as Technical textiles. In technical textiles, the performance and physical properties are more important than other features, such as colour, style, handle and price.

Aerospace is one of the UK’s most highly-advanced and successful industries, with a turnover of £20 bn a year.

Firms in this industry produce textiles, materials, fabrics and composites and cater for a wide range of high performance end-use markets including

• Construction • Civil engineering • Industrial applications • Automotive & aerospace • Medical applications • Technical and high performance garments. There are about 450 companies in technical textiles in the Northwest, employing 22,000 people. This is the largest technical textile cluster in Europe. The sector supplies materials to a large number of businesses in other sectors so it is a really important sector in the region.

ExAMpLES OF MATERIALS USED IN TEChNICAL TExTILES ARE: • Composite materials are used in F1 cars, top-end sports cars and aircraft. • Protective clothing materials are used in military and police uniforms and bullet proof products. • Automotive fabrics are used in sound insulation, seat fabrics and airbags. • Industrial fabrics are used in camouflage and beltings for the print and aluminium industries. • Medical fabrics are used to make bandages and replacement joints.

It is possible to get into technical textiles through apprenticeships, further education NVQs and degree courses.

Find out more about career opportunities at www.skillfast-uk.org/justthejob/ and www.nwtexnet.co.uk

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The Northwest aerospace industry is the largest in the UK, accounts for almost one third of total UK turnover, employs over 60, 000 people and is recognised as a global centre of excellence. In total, more than 100 major aircraft types have their roots in the region. The major aerospace companies all have a presence in the region – BAE Systems, Rolls-Royce and Airbus. There are great opportunities in aerospace design and engineering. The industry is at the forefront of efforts to tackle the climate change impacts of transport and we are beginning to see revolutionary changes to aircraft design. Aerospace engineers design and develop products such as:

• Airliners • Helicopters • Fighter jets • Satellites • Space vehicles engineers. They also work on components that make up aircraft such as landing gear, engines and electrical/electronic systems also require highly specialised skills. Specialist opportunities include careers in:

• Aerodynamics • Propulsion • Manufacturing Management • Materials & structures. • Avionics • Systems Iwntegration Get more information on careers in aerospace at www.semta.org.uk/careers__qualifications.aspx and www.aerospace.co.uk.

WWW.AppRENTICEShIpS.ORG.UK


AUTOMOTIvE

DIGITAL & CREATIvE INDUSTRIES

The automotive industry is very important to our economy. Nationally, it employs 200,000 people in over 3,000 companies. The Northwest is the second most significant region for the industry in the UK. In 2007 we produced over 220,000 cars and over 20,000 trucks and buses.

As the ‘wow-factor’ goes, a career in the Digital & Creative Industries won’t disappoint. England’s Northwest is internationally recognised as a hub of creative talent, with an incredible amount to offer those who wish to pursue a career in this exciting industry.

Some key facts about the Northwest automotive industry • Worth over £9 bn per year • Employs over 40,000 people in 500 companies. • The auto industry in the Northwest specialises in making commercial vehicles – particularly buses and trucks. • To respond to climate change the government has set big targets to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from vehicles by 60% by 2050. Already, average new car emissions have dropped by 12 per cent in nine years, thanks to investment in technologies like hybrids, biofuel cars, low-emission diesels and improvements in fuel economy. • Northwest companies are pushing ahead with systems to improve the environmental impact of vehicles. For example, Torotrak in Leyland have developed new transmission systems to cut vehicle’s fuel consumption. • They are also involved in the development of new systems for energy storage which will be used in the 2009 F1 season. • The need to continue environmental improvements will create more opportunities for engineering careers in the region. The industry is looking for young people who have the right technical and personal skills and are keen to meet the challenges of new technology. In the manufacturing sector, traditional engineering skills are influenced more and more by advances in robotics and computers but also personal leadership skills. Companies need engineers with electronics, systems and software skills. These are the roles in demand by the industry:

• Design engineers • Electronic engineers • Production engineers • Technicians • Maintenance • Tool-making • Prototyping You can get more information on careers in automotive at www.semta.org.uk and www.nwautoalliance.com

There are no hard or fast rules when it comes to training, however the right personality and tons of enthusiasm can get you a head start. It is a very competitive environment and to get ahead you have to be willing to work hard with 100% commitment - Whether you want to work behind-the-scenes, in front-of-camera or in the expanding world of digital or interactive platforms, there’s a lot that you can do to improve your chances of success. In terms of creative buzz, few careers provide the same job satisfaction as those in the media and if you’ve got what it takes, the rewards can be great. If you don’t know where to start, don’t worry, you’re not alone! Many people who now have a dream job were once in your position. A bit of timely research might just give you the kick-start you need. For training, advice and all the latest recruitment news visit www.skillset.org - Skillset is the UK’s Audio Visual Industries Sector Skills Council, covering areas such as broadcast, film, video, interactive media and photo imaging – they can help with the different jobs that are available and the career routes open to you.

WWW.NWDA.CO.UK

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Hi Katy here, My first assignment for the W2G team was a meeting with Sarah Holmes, PR and Marketing Manager wth Jules B, the fashion house. Although I was unsure what my first venture into the world of business would be, early impressions of Sarah, was a friendly person, who I found to be helpful, informative and very down to earth. Sarah described the day to day running of the business, introducing me to members of her team, the products and the website - the lastest being ‘Toy Watches’ for which there is currently a high demand. The Jules B shops have been in operation for 25 years and the website was launched in 2007. Sarah joined the business in January 2009 and since then the online team has grown from six people and now has a strong workforce of over 30. I was shown the Photography Studio which I found very interesting. Here clothing and other items are photographed, the images then manipulated to the standard required for the web, then adding the description before inserting on line. What was interested to learn was that Jules B are looking at using live models in the future to promote the goods on line more effectively. At present Jules B send out on average 1500 orders per month. Pro-actively, on a regular basis Jules B circulate a Newsletter to people currently on their database, also targeting special events such as the Royal Ascot race meeting and other social events. Sarah introduced me to Julian himself, and although he visits fashion houses in places like Italy, buying in designer clothes from various credited designers, he also designs his own brand in shirts, scarfs and ties. As you can imagine, fashion comes in and goes out very quickly, to cater for this ‘Jules B online operates from a large building with underground storage space where they keep current and past-season stock. Everything is listed online and you can buy sale items all year round as well as the brand new collections. Overall as a business, they work hard to keep one step ahead of the competition. The average age group that tend to buy from Jules B is 30, although the variety of designs, designers and styles lend themselves to virtually any. Initially Sarah wrote descriptions for products on line after gaining good qualifications with a view to going in a completely different direction. With hard work and a passion for her product she gained recognition and has progressed to her current position of PR and Marketing Manager. Sarah showed me what is needed to be an effective team leader, promoting a good, organised, well balanced, comfortable, friendly Company with a future. For my first insight into life after the classroom, Sarah and Jules B provided nothing but positives. I am now looking forward to what my next task will be! At the end of my time with Sarah, she gave me the answers to the W2G 20 questions, have a read, it would be good to know what you think and remember if you would like your school or college to be featured in W2G, email me at production@distinctivepublishing.co.uk See you next time

Katy

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q3.) WhAT IS ThE MOST IMpORTANT ThING YOU LOOK FOR IN A NEW RECRUIT?

I want to see lots of relevant work experience on their CV, proven hard-work ethic, bags of enthusiasm, real passion for fashion and a positive attitude. There will be lots of obstacles on your way to the top and you need to be able to handle pressure – always with a smile on your face !

q4.) IF YOU COULD EMpLOY ANYbODY FROM ThE WORLD OF bUSINESS WhO WOULD IT bE AND WhY?

KATY MEETS.... SARAh hOLMES pR AND MARKETING MANAGER, jULES b Name: Sarah Holmes Job Title: PR and Marketing Manager

I would love Natalie Massenet who founded www. net-a-porter.co.uk to come and be my boss for the day. I could pick her brains about how to run the most successful fashion website in the world.

q5.) AS A bUSINESS pERSON, DESCRIbE YOUR ThREE MAIN qUALITIES? Self-motivated, organised and I listen to all advice available. But then make my own mind up!

Lives: Newcastle

q2.) WhAT ADvICE WOULD YOU GIvE TO ANYbODY WANTING TO GET INvOLvED IN ThE INDUSTRY?

Work experience, work experience, work experience.! If you want to work in fashion but you’re not sure in what capacity, the best way is to get as much experience in as many different areas as you can. Work in fashion stores, write for local magazines, assist on fashion shows – anything to build up a CV that stands out. Thousands of students graduate with fashion related degrees so your education is only half of what employers are looking for.! We want to see enthusiasm and a dedication to gaining work experience just as much as top marks.

Vogue magazine. I would be happy just having one article published - then I could leave and come back to Newcastle which is where I am happiest.

q15.) IF YOU WON ThE LOTTERY WOULD YOU RETIRE?

q7.) WhAT hAS bEEN YOUR MOST SATISFYING MOMENT IN bUSINESS?

q16.) DO YOU MAKE TIME FOR LUNCh EvERY DAY?

Can I have two? Worrying and being impatient.

A big handbag full of magazines, articles I’ve ripped out of magazines for inspiration, notebooks for writing down ideas, contacts book, phone and my diary.

I did a Screen Writing degree and for extra credits I wrote for our University magazine – film reviews etc. I have always been very interested in fashion so I also began to write fashion pages too. From that I was able to produce a portfolio to apply for work placement positions on magazines and newspapers in London. By the time I completed my degree I knew I wanted to follow a career in fashion rather than film.

q14.) IF YOU COULD ChOOSE TO WORK FOR ANY COMpANY IN ThE WORLD, WhICh WOULD IT bE AND WhY?

I wouldn’t retire exactly. But I would definitely start writing full-time. It would be amazing to do what you truly love without having to worry about paying bills.

q8.) WhAT DO YOU ALWAYS CARRY WITh YOU TO WORK?

q1.) WhAT bROUGhT YOU TO ThE FAShION INDUSTRY?

I always had part-time bar and restaurant jobs through six-form and university. I can’t remember what I got paid – not much! My first proper job began as a placement at The Times newspaper and I started on only £50 per week. How did I how survive in London on £50 per week? More bar-work.

q6.) AND YOUR WORST qUALITY?

When I was able to take on our first work placement student full-time. The Creative Department has gone from 4 members of staff to around 15 in less than a year. I’m very proud of what we’ve achieved.

Company: Jules B

q13.) WhAT WAS YOUR FIRST jOb AND ThE AMOUNT IN YOUR FIRST pAY pACKET?

q9.) WOULD YOU SAY YOU LIvE FOR WORK OR WORK TO LIvE? I think I have a good 50/50 balance.

q10.) WhO IS ThE MOST FAMOUS pERSON YOU hAvE EvER MET – WhAT WERE ThEY LIKE?

Through work it was probably Jade Jagger. I freelanced as Fashion Assistant on a photo-shoot in Ibiza and we spent 3 days with her and her family. She was very cool and totally down-toearth.

q11.) WhO IN YOUR vIEW IS ThE FAShION INDUSTRY ROLE MODEL AND WhY? Natalie Massenet for changing the way we shop forever. In my opinion she started the whole online fashion revolution. Before net-a-porter nobody would spend hundreds of pounds on a designer handbag over the internet.

q12.) WhAT IS YOUR bIGGEST AChIEvEMENT? Opening my own fashion boutique

WWW.jULESb.CO.UK

Definitely. We all leave our desks and eat in the kitchen. No work talk! I think it’s important to take a proper break so you’re ready to get back in work mode refreshed and with a clear head.

q17.) WhAT IS A NORMAL DAY FOR YOU?

I oversee the Creative Department that is responsible for getting all the new stock online. I’m also responsible for the PR and marketing for the website. I start at 9.30am checking emails, setting tasks for the day, making sure all the new stock is getting photographed and put online, speaking to brands about images we can use for marketing purposes, brain-storming with the team about marketing ideas, research into other websites selling the same brands as we do – staying one step ahead is crucial to continuing success.

q18.) IF YOU COULD WORK IN A COMpLETELY DIFFERENT FIELD, WhAT WOULD IT bE? I would love to do something in interiors. Doing up the houses of the rich and famous. That would be my dream job in a different field.

q19.) IF YOU COULD TURN ThE CLOCK bACK, WhAT WOULD YOU hAvE ChANGED AbOUT YOUR bUSINESS CAREER? I would have learnt French at some point. That could have opened many more opportunities in a career in fashion.

q20.) WhAT hObbIES DO YOU hAvE? Running, socialising and I still love film with a passion - I try and go to the cinema at least once a week.

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Aimhigher Lancashire Associate Scheme

What is the Aimhigher Associate Scheme? The Associate Scheme is a mentoring programme for learners in years 9-13 that aims to encourage progression into higher education.

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www.aimhigher.ac.uk/lancashire


hOW IS ThE ASSOCIATE SChEME DIFFERENT FROM OThER MENTORING pROGRAMMES? The mentors are undergraduates from four universities in Lancashire who know exactly what it’s like to study at university. The four universities involved in the scheme are: • Lancaster University • University of Cumbria • University of Central Lancashire • Edge Hill University

WhAT YOUR MENTOR WILL hELp YOU WITh: • Where to find information about courses at college and university • How hard will you have to work? • Should you study at home or go away to university? • What flexible ways of studying are available so that I can work as well as study?

1:1 SESSION

• Student support

This is when your Associate will get to know you and develop a work plan with you. During these sessions you may do an activity or you could just have a discussion about an issue that is relevant to you and your studies.

• Making a UCAS application

GROUp SESSION

hOW ThE ASSOCIATE SChEME WORKS:

During these sessions you will work with a group learners from your school/college and a number of Associates. You could take part in a group discussion or an interactive activity.

• Making friends and socialising at university • Student finances

Once your Aimhigher Coordinator has asked you if you want to become involved in the scheme, you will be asked to fill out a profile form that captures some information about you, what you are studying at school/college and what your hobbies are. Then, you are matched with an Associate who has similar interests and/or is studying similar subjects as you. You will be introduced to your Associate and they will arrange mentoring sessions with you during school/college time. The sessions will always be held at your school/college apart from if you are invited to the university for a group campus visit. There will be three different kinds of sessions:

E-ExChANGES You will also get an opportunity to communicate with your Associate over the internet using a secure e-mentoring website. You will get your own login and will be able to access lots of e-learning resources as well as message your Associate with any questions that might arise as you find out more about your future plans and study options.

WhAT WILL I GET OUT OF IT? Encouragement and support in making decisions about your future An opportunity to find out from a student in HE what it’s really like at university

INCREASED SELF ESTEEM AND CONFIDENCE A chance to improve your communication skills both orally, in group situations and also your written communication Help with action planning from students who have already made successful transitions from school to university

D?

hOW DO I GET INvOLvE

ordinator if the Ask your Aimhigher Co nning in your school/ Associate Scheme is ru you can get involved college and if it is, how 10-2011. in the academic year 20

55


otential p your er v Disco on a placement

h quality, ig h s e d vi ro p e m m ra g INI) pro The Year IN Industry (Y ar before ye p a g ir e th in ts n e d paid placements for stu article, is th In . e rs u o c e re g e d y or during their Universit student’s t n e m e c la p e n o w o h ears Chemicals Northwest h mpany o c l a ic m e h c t s e w h rt o daN smart thinking has save nergy bills. e in s d n u o p f o s d n a s u tho

56

www.etrust.org.uk


As part of a year long placement with chemical company, INEOS ChlorVinyls, nineteen-year-old Claire Dillon from Chorlton, Manchester evaluated options for reducing costs on a number of cooling tower systems by identifying options for: combining cooling tower units; isolating pumping capacity no longer required and reducing pump impeller sizes to reduce power consumption. Claire, who was once told by her chemistry teacher that a career in Chemical Engineering would be too difficult for a woman, personally re-designed the system to reduce its energy usage by more than 25%, saving the company more than £27,000 in energy bills. As part of a wide range of projects Claire also re-designed a critical safety fire deluge system. Given that some assets had recently been closed, this project required Claire to revaluate the new cooling water requirements and also to consider the safety implications of reducing the number of operational pumps. Aspects of Claire’s final proposals are now to be implemented at INEOS ChlorVinyls’ Runcorn site. Claire’s bosses were so impressed with her work that they are sponsoring her through her Chemical Engineering degree at Leeds University. Claire said: “As a female I was always dissuaded from following a career in Chemical Engineering so to be able to get the experience of working at INEOS ChlorVinyls before going to University was amazing. “More than 17 of us were interviewed for this placement and I was lucky enough to be selected. “My placement was a fantastic learning experience. I was given the chance to work independently on a number of projects that a process engineer would be expected to do. “I thoroughly enjoyed my year with INEOS ChlorVinyls and it was really rewarding to know my recommendations were being accepted by the company.” “This experience has made me even more determined to become a chemical engineer and I am looking forward to completing my degree.”

INEOS ChlorVinyls supports schemes such as the Year IN Industry and has previously employed students that have gone through the YINI programme and similar initiatives. The work completed by Claire was designed by INEOS ChlorVinyls managers to expose her to the kind of work she would expect to complete post graduation as a process engineer with the company. The projects were selected so that the process engineering requirement would be compatible with her current state of knowledge, as a pre-university student, but were still designed to stretch her. Nigel Browning, a Senior Process Engineer at INEOS ChlorVinyls, said: “Claire was proactive in seeking out the relevant people that could help her and showed real enthusiasm and courage in approaching people at all levels in the organisation. “One of the key benefits that Claire brought to the Company was her questioning approach, which was free from the preconceptions that can develop after years of working in the same place. “Her drive and enthusiasm was infectious, which certainly helped in getting the best out of others. “Giving youngsters the chance to experience engineering before University is important in that it helps them to understand, and put into context, the practical implications of the theory they will learn later. “British industry needs good quality students to study and practice engineering and a YINI is an ideal way of doing this.” Claire’s YINI placement was organised through EDT (North). The EDT is a registered education charity that helps talented young people achieve their full potential through careers in engineering, science and technology. For more information about EDT or the YINI programme, visit www.yini.org.uk or www.etrust.org.uk

?

now k u o y Did INEOS ChlorVinyls is one of the major chlor-alkali producers in Europe, a global leader in chlorine derivatives and Europe’s largest PVC manufacturer. The chlor-alkali cellroom at the INEOS Runcorn site is the second largest single unit in Europe. INEOS ChlorVinyls is the largest chlorinated paraffins producer in the world and Europe’s leading polyvinyl chloride (PVC) manufacturer.

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57


! acts F Nutrition Carbohydrate

Calcium strong. Foods that have a lot of Calcium keeps our bones and teeth urt, spinach
and sardines yogh , calcium include: Cheese, milk is what you should eat! Sweets are a treat - but healthy food s should not be eaten a lot food ry suga and t swee Remember that . because they are bad for our teeth healthy include: Fruit, milk, Foods that can help keep our teeth se chee yoghurt, vegetables and It is important to brush your tooth decay

ent teeth at least twice a day to help prev

Protein ir and maintenance of the body. It Protein is required for growth, repa and other tissue in the body. is also needed to build our muscles in, it keeps our bodies working Every cell in the body contains prote tion and gives us energy. infec from properly and helps protect us them: Meat, fish, dairy products Foods that have a lot of protein in cereals (wheat, rice and oats), urt), yogh and se (milk, eggs, chee s and lentils). bread, pasta and pulses (peas, bean

ce of energy, we need energy Carbohydrate is a very important sour t of the energy in our diet should for growth and physical activity. Mos which there are several types of come from carbohydrate foods, of . fibre ry dieta including starch and them: Cereals, grains, Foods with a lot of carbohydrate in pulses, vegetables and fruit

seeds,

Balance of Good Health our bodies to work properly. A Food gives us nutrients, which help give us all the nutrients we need. mixture of food has to be eaten to rent foods including plenty of Enjoy your food, eat a variety of diffe s rich in starch and fibre. food of ty fruit and vegetables and plen sugary foods too often. Drink Don’t eat too much fat and don’t eat plenty of water every day

Give Me 5! Try to eat five portions of fruit and

vegetables every day.

protein and fat. They are high in Fruit and vegetables are very low in and minerals. ins carbohydrate, dietary fibre, vitam ins and minerals which keep us Fruit and vegetables provide vitam fibre and help keep the digestive of ce sour t grea a healthy. They are against disease and prevent us ct system healthy and they may prote from getting ill.

58


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