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Community Consolidated School District 15

PARENT/STUDENT

HANDBOOK 2019-20

Producing world-class learners by building a connected learning community. John G. Conyers Learning Academy • Central Road School • Frank C. Whiteley School • Gray M. Sanborn School Hunting Ridge School • Jane Addams School • Kimball Hill School • Lake Louise School Lincoln School • Marion Jordan School • Pleasant Hill School • Stuart R. Paddock School Thomas Jefferson School • Virginia Lake School • Willow Bend School • Winston Campus Elementary Carl Sandburg Junior High • Plum Grove Junior High • Walter R. Sundling Junior High • Winston Campus Junior High


Community Consolidated School District 15 580 North 1st Bank Drive Palatine, Illinois 60067 (847) 963-3000 Scott B. Thompson, Ed.D., Superintendent of Schools

OFFICIAL SCHOOL CALENDAR 2019-2020

(Approved by the Board of Education 12/13/2017, Revised on 12/12/2018) 2019 Monday, August 12, 2019

Teacher Institute Day—No Student Attendance

Tuesday, August 13, 2019

Teacher Institute Day—No Student Attendance

Wednesday, August 14, 2019

Opening Day of School (Grades 1-8)

Thursday, August 15, 2019

Kindergarten and Early Childhood Classes Begin

Monday, September 2, 2019

Labor Day—Holiday—No School

Monday, October 14, 2019

Columbus Day—Holiday—No School

Monday and Tuesday, November 25-26, 2019

Parent/Teacher Conference Days—No Student Attendance

Wednesday, November 27, 2019

Student Nonattendance Day—Staff follow their individual working calendar

Thursday and Friday, November 28-29, 2019

Thanksgiving Recess—No School

Monday, December 23, 2019— Friday, January 3, 2020

Winter Break—No School

2020 Monday, January 6, 2020

Teacher Plan Day—No Student Attendance

Tuesday, January 7, 2020

Schools Reopen

Monday, January 20, 2020

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Birthday Observance—Holiday—No School

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

Teacher Institute Day—No Student Attendance

Monday, February 17, 2020

Presidents’ Day—Holiday—No School

Monday–Friday, March 23-27, 2020

Spring Break—No School

Monday, March 30, 2020

Teacher Plan Day—No Student Attendance

Tuesday, March 31, 2020

Schools Reopen

Friday, April 10, 2020

Student Nonattendance Day/Staff Nonattendance Day

Thursday, May 7, 2020

Teacher Institute Day—No Student Attendance

Friday, May 8, 2020

Teacher Plan Day—No Student Attendance

Monday, May 25, 2020

Memorial Day—Holiday—No School

Tuesday, June 2, 2020*

School Term Ends

(*Subject to change in April. The school year will be shortened by any remaining unused emergency days. The school year will end on Tuesday, May 26, should the District not use any snow days.)

I:\Group Staff\COM\Calendars\Official School Calendar Public\2019-20\2019-20 School Calendar Eng Rev 12-12-2018.docx

© 2019 Community Consolidated School District 15


TABLE OF CONTENTS Preface ............................................................................... 1 From the Desk of Dr. Heinz.................................................. 2 CHAPTER 1 WELCOME TO SCHOOL DISTRICT 15..................................... 3 • The Board of Education.......................................................3 • Administrative Staff.............................................................3 • 2019-20 Board of Education Meeting Schedule..................4 • Addressing the Board..........................................................4 • FOIA (Freedom of Information Act).....................................4 • Joseph M. Kiszka Educational Service Center......................5 • 2019-20 Building Locations..................................................6 CHAPTER 2 DAY-TO-DAY INFORMATION................................................. 8 • Enrollment Procedures........................................................8 • Change of Address, Telephone Number, or Name...............8 • Transfers..............................................................................8 • Arrival Procedures...............................................................9 • Animals on School Grounds.................................................9 • Bicycles, Skateboards, Skates, and Scooters........................9 • School Supply Lists...............................................................9 • Backpacks/Book Bags..........................................................9 • Bringing Items to School......................................................9 • Articles Not Permitted in School .......................................10 • Cell Phones........................................................................10 • Lost and Found..................................................................10 • Telephone/Messages.........................................................10 • Student Attendance...........................................................11 • Home/School Communication..........................................13 • Campus Parent..................................................................13 • Permission Slips.................................................................13 • CCSD15 Directory Information/Photo Release..................13 • C.A.R.E. Before- and After-School Program.......................14 CHAPTER 3 STUDENT FEES................................................................... 16 • Textbook Rental/Material/Technology Fees......................16 • Transportation Fees...........................................................16 • Other Fees.........................................................................17 • Fee Waiver ........................................................................17 • Student Accident Insurance...............................................17 CHAPTER 4 DISTRICTWIDE CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION............... 18 • General Overview..............................................................18 • Title I..................................................................................18 • Elementary Curriculum Overview......................................18 • Resources..........................................................................19 • Recess ...............................................................................19 • Homework Guidelines.......................................................19

• • • • • •

Physical Education.............................................................20 Junior High Curriculum Overview......................................20 Homework.........................................................................23 Physical Education.............................................................24 Junior High Lockers............................................................24 Academic Requirements....................................................25

CHAPTER 5 DISTRICTWIDE INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY................... 27 • Internet..............................................................................27 • 1:1 Student to Chromebook Initiative...............................27 CHAPTER 6 CLUBS & SPORTS............................................................... 28 • Intramural & Club Sports...................................................28 • Interscholastic Sports........................................................28 CHAPTER 7 MISCELLANEOUS............................................................... 31 • Instrument Rental..............................................................31 • Field Trips...........................................................................31 • Gifts and Parties.................................................................31 CHAPTER 8 STUDENT SUPPORT PROGRAMS........................................ 32 • Early Entrance to Kindergarten and First Grade, and Accelerated Placement......................................................32 • Academically Talented and Gifted Students......................32 • Reading Interventions........................................................32 • Special Education Programs and Disability Services..........32 • Section 504 Services..........................................................34 • English Learners.................................................................34 • Spanish Dual Language (Two-Way)....................................35 CHAPTER 9 DISTRICTWIDE STANDARDIZED TESTING............................ 36 CHAPTER 10 STUDENT BREAKFAST AND LUNCH PROGRAM................... 38 • General Overview..............................................................38 • Lunch.................................................................................38 • Breakfast............................................................................38 • CEP School Buildings..........................................................38 • Á la carte............................................................................39 • Menus................................................................................39 • Allergies.............................................................................39 • Food Sharing......................................................................39 • Payment.............................................................................39 • Unpaid Meal Charges Procedures.....................................39 • Balances Owed..................................................................39


• Refunds..............................................................................40 • Free and Reduced-Price Meal Services..............................40 • Home for Lunch.................................................................40 CHAPTER 11 TRANSPORTATION............................................................. 41 • General Overview..............................................................41 • Paid Transportation...........................................................41 • Bus Rules and Safety Guidelines........................................41 • Versatrans My Stop™ GPS Parent Portal Program.............42 • Transportation Frequently Asked Questions.....................42 CHAPTER 12 HEALTH SERVICES.............................................................. 45 • General Overview..............................................................45 • Guidelines to Determine When to Send Your Child to School ...........................................................................45 • Medication Policy .............................................................46 • Medication Administration................................................46 • Required Health Examinations and Immunization Recording...........................................................................46 • Guidelines Applicable to Medical and Religious Immunization Exemptions.................................................48 • Activity Restrictions...........................................................48 • Concussion and Head Injuries...........................................48 • Communicable Disease Management...............................49 • Vision and Hearing Screenings..........................................49 • Food Allergies....................................................................50 • Asthma..............................................................................50 • Diabetes.............................................................................50 • Wellness Policy..................................................................50 • Student Birthdays..............................................................50 • Snacks Within the School Day...........................................50 • Individualized Health Planning..........................................51 • Privacy and Confidentiality................................................51 • Contact Us.........................................................................51 CHAPTER 13 SAFETY.............................................................................. 52 • Emergency School Closings...............................................52 • Parent/Visitor Procedures.................................................52 • Saftety/Emergencies..........................................................54 • Accidents...........................................................................56 • Caring, Safe, and Orderly Learning Environment...............56 • Keeping Our Students Safe................................................56 • School Threats Taken Seriously..........................................56 • Bullying/Safety Tip Line.....................................................57 • Student Appearance Policy ...............................................57 • Junior High School Resource Officers................................58 • Canine Searches.................................................................58 • Sex Offender Registration Act............................................58 • Erin’s Law...........................................................................58 • Suicide and Depression Awareness...................................59

CHAPTER 14 MISCELLANEOUS............................................................... 60 • Care of School Property.....................................................60 • Use of School Building.......................................................60 • Pesticide Application Procedures......................................60 • Availability of Asbestos Management Plan........................60 CHAPTER 15 BOARD OF EDUCATION POLICY.......................................... 61 • Student Equal Educational Opportunities.........................61 • Student and Family Privacy Rights.....................................62 • Sexual Harassment and Grievance Procedure...................63 • Student Records................................................................64 • Homeless Students............................................................67 • Student Behavior...............................................................67 • Search and Seizure.............................................................72 • Out-of-School Suspension Procedures..............................73 • Gangs and Gang-Related Activities....................................74 • Bus Conduct.......................................................................75 • Title IX Compliance............................................................75 • Harassment/Bullying.........................................................75 • Bullying Prevention and Response Plan.............................76 • Parent Rights.....................................................................79 • Accommodating Individuals With Disabilities...................79 CHAPTER 16 OTHER PROGRAMS............................................................ 80 • Northwest Suburban Council of PTA/PTSA........................80 • The one-five Foundation...................................................80 • Palatine Assisting Through Hope (PATH) Community Clothing Closet...................................................................81 • Partners for Our Communities (POC)................................81


PREFACE The information in this handbook will acquaint you with District 15 and answer some of the questions you may have. This handbook is only a summary of Board of Education policies governing the District. The complete School District 15 Board of Education Policy Manual is available for public review at the District office and on the District 15 website. Although this handbook addresses general questions about the District as a whole, some programs and procedures may differ from school to school. The differences are due to the size and location of the building, the grades housed in the building, the facilities available, and the programs conducted in the school. Principals will let you know about any changes that pertain to their buildings. State and federal laws require school districts to notify parents and students about certain rights, responsibilities, and procedures. You will find that information in this handbook. This handbook may be amended during the year without notice to parents. This handbook is not meant to take the place of personal communication between the home and the school. Please feel free to call your child’s school if you have any questions on programs or procedures.

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FROM THE DESK OF DR. HEINZ

O

n behalf of the Board of Education, I welcome you to the 2019-20 school year. If you are new to our schools, it is a pleasure to have you as part of what I know you will find to be a wonderfully diverse and child-centered District. For those of you returning, welcome back. I know I speak for our entire staff when I say we look forward to continuing to develop a strong home/school partnerships. New or returning, I am filled with anticipation for a new year of learning and growth for our students.

Laurie Heinz, Ed.D. Superintendent of Schools

District 15 educates over 12,000 students in 20 schools from early childhood through eighth grade. While each school has its own unique characteristics, there are many policies and procedures that help anchor us as a District. The 2019-20 Student-Parent Handbook was designed to serve as a comprehensive reference guide for all things District 15. You will find nuts and bolts information on communication, safety, academics, and behavior to name just a few. Please take time to review the handbook and bookmark it on your favorites list for easy future reference.

As the second largest elementary District in Illinois, District 15 is well regarded within the educational community. During my transition meetings, I was able to confirm that it has earned its reputation through our curricular as well as extracurricular offerings, focus on ensuring all students receive what they need to grow as learners, access to support services, talented staff, and collaborative partnerships that help enhance our desire to do what is best for our students. In addition to our handbook, the District 15 website and mobile app are additional ways to stay connected and access information. They are both designed for ease of use on your mobile device, so you can find the information you want most about your school and District. My commitment to you is to listen and learn from staff and families in order to advocate for the needs of all students. An active and engaged community is the foundation of a strong school system. Each of you plays an important role in what makes District 15 a great place for students to learn and grow. That said, please know my door is always open. I want to hear what’s working and where we have room to improve. Continuous improvement is what we are striving for in District 15 so keep ideas, concerns, and compliments coming. As the new Superintendent and an educator at heart, I am happy to take an active role in ensuring we continue to grow and exceed your expectations as a school system. On behalf of the Board of Education and administration, it is my sincere pleasure to welcome you to the 2019-20 school year. I look forward to coming back to District 15 as we continue to focus on the academic and social-emotional growth of every child every day. Your partner in education, Laurie Heinz, Ed.D. Superintendent heinzl@ccsd15.net

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CHAPTER 1

WELCOME TO SCHOOL DISTRICT 15 District 15—the second largest elementary system in Illinois with more than 12,000 students— has fifteen K-6 schools, four junior high schools, and one alternative school. Serving students from all or parts of seven municipalities, the District’s boundaries encompass a diverse population of approximately 35 square miles, with a population of 119,054 (2010) residents who speak more than 70 languages or dialects. District 15 is committed to providing educational opportunities that will prepare children for the challenges of a rapidly changing world—a solid foundation in the basics and the development of independent learners and problem solvers. The District also recognizes the essential role technology plays in helping children reach their potential and giving them the necessary tools to be successful. The mission of Community Consolidated School District 15 is: To produce world-class learners by building a connected learning community (see back inside cover). The Mission, VIsion, and Values are established by the Board of Education to provide a framework for providing the children of our community with the highest possible quality of education. Informed parents play an important role in ensuring a sound educational program for their children. Parents are encouraged to become active and involved by visiting our schools, talking with administrators and teachers, volunteering in the schools, and attending Board of Education meetings. Your involvement is essential to building the “connected learning community” that is our District mission. This handbook provides general information about policies and procedures established by the Board of Education. You will receive additional information from the individual schools your children attend. If you need additional information, please feel free to speak to the principal of your local school or contact the Joseph M. Kiszka Educational Service Center at 847-963-3000.

THE BOARD OF EDUCATION Members of the Board of Education are: • • • • • • •

Lisa Szczupaj, President Frank J. Annerino, Vice President Anthony Wang, Secretary Samantha Ader Wenda Hunt Zubair Khan Michael Smolka

Board of Education members serve four-year terms. Board elections are held the first Tuesday in April of oddnumbered years.

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF • • • • • • • •

Laurie Heinz, Ed.D., Superintendent of Schools Claire Kowalczyk, Ed.D., Deputy Superintendent of Schools Michael Adamczyk, SFO, Chief School Business Official Susan Gehring, Assistant Superintendent for Student Services Lisa Nuss, Assistant Superintendent for Human Resources Meg Schnoor, Ed.D., Assistant Superintendent for Teaching and Learning Thomas Edgar, Ph.D., Assistant Superintendent for District Improvement and Data Morgan Delack, Chief Communication Officer 3


2019-20 BOARD OF EDUCATION MEETING SCHEDULE All meetings begin at 7 p.m. and are held at: • Walter R. Sundling Junior High School, 1100 N. Smith Street, Palatine • Meetings are open to the public. • See the District website under Board of Education for agendas, minutes, Board Briefs, meeting videos, and other information. 2019 • • • • •

August 14, 2019 September 11, 2019 October 9, 2019 November 13, 2019 December 11, 2019

2020 • • • • • •

January 8, 2020 February 12, 2020 March 11, 2020 April 8, 2020 May 13, 2020 June 10, 2020

ADDRESSING THE BOARD At each meeting, members of the public and District employees may comment on or ask questions of the Board on agenda and non-agenda items, subject to reasonable constraints. A form requesting a brief outline of the topic to be discussed is available at the registration table. Comments are limited to five minutes. The Board welcomes written comments. The Board rarely acts immediately on issues brought before it for the first time. Even with more familiar issues, the Board takes action only after its members thoroughly examine all aspects of the matter.

FOIA (FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT) In compliance with State Law (5 ILCS 140/4), each school district is required to post specific information regarding the school district as part of FOIA (Freedom of Information Act) requirements on its website. If the information you are seeking is not found on the District website (www.ccsd15.net), you may request copies of existing documents using the Request for Examination and/or Copies of Public Records Pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act form. This form is provided for your convenience to help expedite the search process—its use is not required, however, all requests must be made in writing. The form is available at the School District 15 Joseph M. Kiszka Educational Service Center, 580 N. 1st Bank Dr., Palatine, or it can be downloaded from the website, www.ccsd15.net/FOIA. When a written request for information is received, the District must comply within five working days. Under certain circumstances, the response time may be extended for up to five additional working days. If this happens, you will be notified by letter at the end of the first five days specifying the reason for the delay. The fundamental right guaranteed by the Act is the right of inspection. While you may obtain copies of records requests, you are not required to purchase copies of records in order to gain access to them. When copies are requested, a public body may charge fees reasonably calculated to reimburse it for the actual cost of reproducing and certifying public records. FOIA requests can be sent to FOIA@ccsd15.net. Questions concerning requests may be directed to Min Goodwin, Senior Executive Assistant, at goodwinm@ccsd15.net; or June Becker, Board of Education Recording Secretary, at beckerj@ccsd15.net. Additional information about Freedom of Information Act Requests can be found on the District’s website, www.ccsd15.net/FOIA.

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JOSEPH M. KISZKA EDUCATIONAL SERVICE CENTER Joseph M. Kiszka Educational Service Center 580 N. 1st Bank Drive, Palatine, IL 60067-8110 www.ccsd15.net Public Office Hours: 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Monday-Friday Phone Number: 847-963-3000 Fax Number: 847-963-3200

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS

ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES

Laurie Heinz, Ed.D. 847-963-3205, heinzl@ccsd15.net

Lisa Nuss 847-963-3013, nussl@ccsd15.net

DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS

Director of Human Resources _____________ 847-963-3020, _______@ccsd15.net

Claire Kowalczyk, Ed.D. 847-963-3202, kowalczc@ccsd15.net Manager of Technology Services Dave Kuechenberg 847-963-3230, kuechend@ccsd15.net

CHIEF COMMUNICATION OFFICER

Morgan Delack 847-963-3204, delackm@ccsd15.net

CHIEF SCHOOL BUSINESS OFFICIAL

Michael Adamczyk, SFO 847-963-3032, adamczm1@ccsd15.net Director of Fiscal Services/ Assistant Chief School Business Official Corey Bultemeier 847-963-3033, bultemec@ccsd15.net Director of School Nutrition Services Kristin Voigts 847-963-3929, voigtsk@ccsd15.net Director of Transportation Tom Bramley 847-963-3905, bramleyt@ccsd15.net

Assistant Director of Human Resources Erin Stein 847-963-3020, steine@ccsd15.net

ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF TEACHING AND LEARNING

Meg Schnoor, Ed.D. 847-963-3101, schnoorm@ccsd15.net Executive Director of Second Language Programs Renee Urbanski 847-963-3136, urbanskr@ccsd15.net Assistant Director of Second Language Programs Rocio Fisher 847-963-3000, fisherr@ccsd15.net Two-Way Dual Language Coordinator Angelica Brifcani 847-963-3110, brifcana@ccsd15.net District Literacy Coordinator Colleen Mullins 847-963-3122, mullinsc@ccsd15.net

ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF DISTRICT IMPROVEMENT AND DATA

Thomas Edgar, Ph.D. 847-963-3106, edgart@ccsd15.net

Assistant Director of Research and Systems / School Psychologist Coordinator Laura Swanlund, Ph.D. 847-963-3147, swanlunl@ccsd15.net Director of SIS Implementation and Principal Support Jason Klein, Ph.D. 847-963-3000, kleinj@ccsd15.net Manager of Data Services Tim Woomert 847-963-3055, woomertt@ccsd15.net

ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF STUDENT SERVICES

Susan Gehring 847-963-3149, gehrings@ccsd15.net Director of Student Services Alicia Corrigan 847-963-3152, corrigaa@ccsd15.net Assistant Director of Special Education Ann Cygnar 847-963-3153, cygnara@ccsd15.net

Manager of Environmental Services Craig Phillips 847-963-3950, phillipc@ccsd15.net

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COMMUNITY CONSOLIDATED SCHOOL DISTRICT 15

2019-20 BUILDING LOCATIONS

1 Jane Addams School

10 Gray M. Sanborn School

20 Walter R. Sundling Junior High School

2 John G. Conyers Learning Academy

11 Carl Sandburg Junior High School

21 Thomas Jefferson School

3 Central Road School

12 Winston Campus Junior High

22 Maintenance/Warehouse Facility

4 Marion Jordan School

14 Virginia Lake School

30 Joseph M. Kiszka Educational Service Center

5 Kimball Hill School

15 Winston Campus Elementary

1020 E. Sayles Drive Palatine, IL 60074-7274 Phone: (847) 963-5000 Fax: (847) 963-5006 www.ccsd15.net/JA 2800 Central Road Rolling Meadows, IL 60008-2535 Phone: (847) 963-3400 Fax: (847) 963-3406 www.ccsd15.net/CLA 3800 Central Road Rolling Meadows, IL 60008-2554 Phone: (847) 963-5100 Fax: (847) 963-5106 www.ccsd15.net/CR 100 N. Harrison Avenue Palatine, IL 60067-0913 Phone: (847) 963-5500 Fax: (847) 963-5506 www.ccsd15.net/MJ 2905 Meadow Drive Rolling Meadows, IL 60008-1801 Phone: (847) 963-5200 Fax: (847) 963-5206 www.ccsd15.net/KH

6 Stuart R. Paddock School

225 W. Washington Street Palatine, IL 60067-6147 Phone: (847) 963-5800 Fax: (847) 963-5806 www.ccsd15.net/SRP

7 Pleasant Hill School

434 W. Illinois Avenue Palatine, IL 60067-6745 Phone: (847) 963-5900 Fax: (847) 963-5906 www.ccsd15.net/PH

101 N. Oak Street Palatine, IL 60067-5246 Phone: (847) 963-7000 Fax: (847) 963-7006 www.ccsd15.net/GMS

2600 Martin Lane Rolling Meadows, IL 60008-2722 Phone: (847) 963-7800 Fax: (847) 963-7806 www.ccsd15.net/CS 120 N. Babcock Drive Palatine, IL 60074-5599 Phone: (847) 963-7400 Fax: (847) 963-7508 www.ccsd15.net/WCJH 925 N. Glenn Drive Palatine, IL 60074-7189 Phone: (847) 963-7100 Fax: (847) 963-7106 www.ccsd15.net/VL 900 E. Palatine Road Palatine, IL 60074-5552 Phone: (847) 963-7500 Fax: (847) 963-7406 www.ccsd15.net/WCE

16 Hunting Ridge School

1105 W. Illinois Avenue Palatine, IL 60067-6628 Phone: (847) 963-5300 Fax: (847) 963-5306 www.ccsd15.net/HR

17 Lake Louise School

500 N. Jonathan Drive Palatine, IL 60074-4114 Phone: (847) 963-5600 Fax: (847) 963-5606 www.ccsd15.net/LL

8 Plum Grove Junior High School

18 Lincoln School

9 Frank C. Whiteley School

19 Willow Bend School

2600 Plum Grove Road Rolling Meadows, IL 60008-2042 Phone: (847) 963-7600 Fax: (847) 963-7606 www.ccsd15.net/PG 4335 Haman Avenue Hoffman Estates, IL 60192-1306 Phone: (847) 963-7200 Fax: (847) 963-7206 www.ccsd15.net/FCW

1021 N. Ridgewood Lane Palatine, IL 60067-3448 Phone: (847) 963-5700 Fax: (847) 963-5706 www.ccsd15.net/LS

1100 N. Smith Street Palatine, IL 60067-2606 Phone: (847) 963-3700 Fax: (847) 963-3706 www.ccsd15.net/WRS

3805 Winston Drive Hoffman Estates, IL 60192-1851 Phone: (847) 963-5400 Fax: (847) 963-5406 www.ccsd15.net/TJ 1001 Rohlwing Road Rolling Meadows, IL 60008-1029 Phone: (847) 963-3950 Fax: (847) 963-3995

580 North 1st Bank Drive Palatine, IL 60067-8110 Phone: (847) 963-3000 Fax: (847) 963-3200 (Superintendent) Fax: (847) 963-3119 (Instruction) Fax: (847) 963-3145 (Student Services) Fax: (847) 963-3061 (Business) Fax: (847) 963-3162 (Personnel) Fax: (847) 963-3315 (C.A.R.E.)

20 School Nutrition Services

1100 N. Smith Street Palatine, IL 60067-2606 Phone: (847) 963-3928 Fax: (847) 963-3925

20 Transportation

1100 N. Smith Street Palatine, IL 60067-2606 Phone: (847) 963-3900 Fax: (847) 963-3906, 3907

40 William Tremelling Technology Center

110 N. Harrison Avenue Palatine, IL 60067-4846 Phone: (847) 963-3230 Fax: (847) 963-3235

4700 Barker Avenue Rolling Meadows, IL 60008-3202 Phone: (847) 963-7300 Fax: (847) 963-7306 www.ccsd15.net/WB

Building Locations 19-20.indd 05/2019

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COMMUNITY CONSOLIDATED SCHOOL DISTRICT 15

2019-20 BUILDING LOCATIONS

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Jane Addams School John G. Conyers Learning Academy Central Road School Marion Jordan School Kimball Hill School Stuart R. Paddock School Pleasant Hill School Plum Grove Junior High School Frank C. Whiteley School

10 11 12 14 15 16 17 18 19

Gray M. Sanborn School Carl Sandburg Junior High School Winston Campus Junior High Virginia Lake School Winston Campus Elementary Hunting Ridge School Lake Louise School Lincoln School Willow Bend School

20 Walter R. Sundling Junior High School School Nutrition Services Transportation 21 Thomas Jefferson School 22 Maintenance/Warehouse Facility 30 Joseph M. Kiszka Educational Service Center 40 Wm. Tremelling Technology Center 7


CHAPTER 2

DAY-TO-DAY INFORMATION ENROLLMENT PROCEDURES Parents new to the community may call the Joseph M. Kiszka Educational Service Center at 847-963-3000 for information about where their child will attend school. Kindergarten students must be five years old on or before September 1, 2019. Any family needing to register should complete online registration at www.ccsd15.net/registration, then submit necessary paperwork (proof of residency, birth certificate, and health forms) during regular school office hours. If you need assistance completing online registration, please visit your school during office hours. The following information is required to enroll your child in District 15: 1. Birth certificate (original with seal) or other government document verifying date of birth; 2. Physician’s telephone number and address, if known; 3. Two local emergency contact names and phone numbers; 4. Two proofs of residency (i.e., copies of driver’s license, lease, or utility bills); 5. Any pertinent health information including health, dental, and eye exams at regular intervals (see Required Health Examinations and Immunization Recording). (A physical examination is valid so long as it was conducted within the prior 365 days of school entry, i.e., for Kindergarten students—on or after August 15, 2018; for students in Grades 1-8—on or after August 14, 2018); 6. A student transfer form from the previous school attended (if applicable); and 7. Your child (only if needed to screen for English language proficiency). In the event that a family is unable to provide any needed documentation because of a temporary living situation, please contact Julie O’Hara, 847-963-3210, oharaj@ccsd15.net, or Min Goodwin, 847-963-3209, goodwinm@ccsd15.net, in the Superintendent’s Office. If you believe you’re eligible for McKinney-Vento services, please contact Alicia Corrigan, Director of Student Services, 847-963-3152, corrigaa@ccsd15.net.

CHANGE OF ADDRESS, TELEPHONE NUMBER, OR NAME It is very important that parents promptly provide written notification of any change of address, home, work, or cell phone numbers, name, emergency information, or any other information that might be pertinent to school records. NOTE: Parents reporting address changes will also be asked to provide two forms of identification that show both the parent/guardian name and the new address.

TRANSFERS Parents are asked to call the school office at least one week in advance of a move outside the school’s attendance area. This will allow the school and parents adequate time to complete the necessary forms to ensure a timely transfer of school records. The following information will be requested from you before you move: • Date of move • New address • New school child will attend (if known) Pro-rated book rental refunds will be mailed to your new address.

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ARRIVAL PROCEDURES Students who walk or ride by private vehicle should not arrive at school until five minutes before school begins. Children generally go outside for recess, so they should be appropriately dressed for active outdoor play. Exceptions are made only when a child brings a doctor’s note excusing him/her from outdoor recess. Staff members provide playground supervision at all times during recess. All exterior doors except the main entrance of the building will be locked at all times. Late arrivals must use the front entrance in order to maintain building security. All visitors to the school must report directly to the main office and produce an identification card, such as a driver’s license or state ID card, in exchange for a visitor’s badge, each time you visit one of our schools. This procedure is in place for the safety of students and staff.

ANIMALS ON SCHOOL GROUNDS No animals are allowed on school grounds during times when children are present unless pre-authorized by the Principal of the school. (Trained dog guides or service animals in use by a person with a disability are allowed on school grounds.)

BICYCLES, SKATEBOARDS, SKATES, AND SCOOTERS Students in Grades 3 through 6 may ride their bikes to school. All bikes must be walked on school property. Bikes must be locked in the bike rack using one lock per bike. The school is unable to assume any responsibility for loss or damage to bikes brought to school. Bicycle helmets are strongly recommended. Skateboards, scooters, roller skates, Heely’s (shoes with wheels in them), and in-line skates are prohibited on school property during school hours.

SCHOOL SUPPLY LISTS The school supply lists for our schools are posted on the District 15 website at www.ccsd15.net | Our Schools. From each school’s page, the school supply list is located under “Our School | School Supply Lists”.

BACKPACKS/BOOK BAGS Students are not permitted to carry backpacks and book bags from class to class during the school day. All backpacks and book bags must be placed in students’ lockers during the day. Purses or handbags may be carried during the school day; however, such items must not be larger than 8½” x 11”.

BRINGING ITEMS TO SCHOOL Children should never bring valuable or treasured items to school. This includes toys and all electronic devices, as well as prized possessions such as jewelry, souvenirs, coin collections, card collections, and large sums of money. Additionally, students should not buy, sell, or trade any items at school or on the bus. The school is unable to secure children’s personal possessions and cannot be responsible for lost or damaged personal property. Similarly, the school is not liable for accidental damage that may occur to personal items it may be necessary for children to bring to school (eye glasses, hearing aids, dental devices, etc.). Parents are urged to label clothing, lunch boxes, boots, coats, backpacks, and other items with name tags or indelible ink. The school maintains a lost and found box which students and parents may check for lost items.

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ARTICLES NOT PERMITTED IN SCHOOL Articles that interfere in any way with school procedures, disrupt the educational process, or are hazards to the safety of others are not allowed at school. Such items include, but are not limited to: • • • • • • •

Cigarettes, e-cigarettes, vaping devices, and/or other tobacco products Drugs, including over-the-counter drugs and look-alike drugs (see section on Medication Policy) Alcohol Weapons or look-alike items (firearms, knives, etc.) Lighters or matches Laser pointers Aerosol cans

Possession of these items is prohibited at school and may result in detention, suspension, or expulsion. A student who uses, possesses, distributes, purchases, or sells an explosive, firearm, or any other object that can reasonably be considered a weapon can be expelled in accordance with Board of Education Policy 7:190 Student Behavior. If a student brings a firearm or weapon to school, the criminal justice or juvenile delinquency system will be notified. MP3 players, iPods, e-readers, and/or other electronic devices may not be used in school. On arrival at school, they must be turned off and placed in the student’s hallway locker immediately and remain there throughout the school day and during after-school activities. Items used during the school day without staff permission may be confiscated and held until a parent/guardian can pick them up.

CELL PHONES Student possession and/or use of cell phones and other electronic devices while at school is governed by Board of Education Policy 7:190 Student Behavior, which reads as follows: The school administration is authorized to discipline students for gross disobedience or misconduct including, but not limited to: • Using or possessing an electronic paging device. Using a cellular telephone, video recording device, personal digital assistant (PDA), or other electronic device in any manner that disrupts the educational environment or violates the rights of others, including using the device to take photographs in locker rooms or bathrooms, cheat, or otherwise violate student conduct rules. Prohibited conduct specifically includes, without limitation, creating, sending, sharing, viewing, receiving, or possessing an indecent visual depiction of oneself or another person through the use of a computer, electronic communication device, or cellular telephone. • Unless otherwise banned under this policy or by the Building Principal, all electronic devices must be kept powered off and out of sight during the regular school day unless: (a) the supervising teacher grants permission; (b) use of the device is provided in a student’s individualized education program (IEP); or (c) it is used during the student’s lunch period, or (d) it is needed in an emergency that threatens the safety of students, staff, or other individuals.

LOST AND FOUND Parents are urged to mark all personal belongings with their child(ren)’s name in permanent marker or with a name tag. Each school maintains a lost and found area where children or parents may claim lost articles such as clothing or school materials.

TELEPHONE/MESSAGES All classrooms are equipped with telephones. If class is in session or if the teacher is out of the room, a message can be left in the teacher’s voice mailbox. The teacher will return the call as soon as possible. Messages to students will be delivered to them by the end of the school day. Parents are requested not to call unless it is urgent. Students may use the classroom phone with permission from the teacher or office staff. Emergencies should always be directed to the school office.

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STUDENT ATTENDANCE State law requires that all student absences be verified. Parents are required to call the school when a student will be absent. All schools have voice mail with an absence voice mailbox for parents to report absences. When a child is absent and the parent(s) have not called to report the absence, the school will attempt to verify the child’s safety by contacting parents using the contact numbers parents have provided to the school. Please be sure that your child’s school has all current phone numbers on record. If your child is absent, and you do not call, and you cannot be reached, your child will be marked truant. Students occasionally may be absent from school for valid reasons: for example, illness, death in the immediate family, family emergency, observance of a religious holiday, situations beyond the control of the student, or circumstances that cause parents reasonable concern for the safety or health of the student. Students who are absent for these reasons will be given an opportunity to make up missed school work. Taking students out of school for vacations is discouraged and is considered an unexcused absence. Students are not allowed to leave the school grounds during the school day except for those elementary children who go home for lunch. At times, it may be necessary for your child to be excused early from school for medical or dental appointments, family emergencies, etc. Such requests should be directed to the office. Regular, on-time attendance is very important. Children who are absent unnecessarily miss vital classroom instruction time. Repeated absences may have a negative effect on a student’s progress, work habits, and attitude. The Illinois State Board of Education dictates what constitutes a full day of school versus a half day of school, as well as tardies and truancies. District 15 follows the standard shown below: • Any student who is late for school 30 minutes or less will be marked tardy unless the school bus is late in arriving. (We understand that school buses sometimes run late due to unforeseeable circumstances, and in these instances students will not be marked tardy.) • Any student who leaves 30 minutes or less before the end of the school day will be marked with an early pick-up. • Any student who is in attendance for more than 150 class-time minutes (the lunch/recess hour does not count) but less than 300 class-time minutes will be marked absent for a half day. • Any student who is in attendance for fewer than 150 class-time minutes (excluding the lunch/recess hour) will be marked absent for the full day. In the event of a persistent student attendance problem, District staff shall assess reasons for the absences and develop appropriate diagnostic procedures. These procedures may include, but are not limited to, counseling for the student and the student’s parent/guardian, health evaluations by the school nurse, and clinical evaluations by local and/or state agencies. Support services that may be offered to a student with an attendance problem include: parent-teacher conferences, counseling, case study evaluations, alternative educational programs, alternative school placements, and community agencies. When medically certified, homebound instruction may be provided for students with ongoing medical circumstances that impact attendance. Our first concern when a child is absent is to verify the child’s safety. For that reason, it is very important that the school office knows the whereabouts of your child(ren) when they are absent or will be late arriving at school. When your child is absent or late, it is your responsibility to call the school absence line or the school office to notify the staff of your child’s absence. Please state your child’s full name, the teacher’s name, the date of the absence, and the reason for the absence. Please do not leave this information on your child’s teacher’s voice mail or e-mail. Substitute teachers do not have access to teachers’ voice-mail or e-mail. If your child’s whereabouts are unknown, every effort will be made to reach you using the phone numbers you have provided. Please make sure that your child’s school office has all current phone numbers on record. If you have not notified the school with the reason of an absence and the school office has exhausted all attempts to reach you, your child will be marked truant for that school day and any other school day that your child is unaccounted for.

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TRUANCY A “truant” is a child subject to compulsory school attendance and who is absent without valid cause from such attendance for a school day or portion thereof. Disciplinary action may be taken against any student guilty of being absent without a recognized excuse. State law and Board of Education Policy 7:70 Attendance and Truancy will be used with chronic and habitual truants. Valid cause for absence—A child may be absent from school because of illness, observance of a religious holiday, death in the immediate family, family emergency, situations beyond the student’s control as determined by the Superintendent or designee, or such other circumstances that cause reasonable concern to the parent/guardian for the student’s safety or health. It is District practice to request a doctor’s note if a student is chronically absent due to medical issue. Chronic or habitual truant—A “chronic or habitual truant” is a child who is subject to compulsory school attendance and who is absent without valid cause from such attendance for 5 percent or more of the previous 180 regular attendance days. Truant minor—A truant minor is a child to whom supportive services, such as prevention, diagnostic, intervention and remedial services, alternative programs, and other school and community resources have been provided but have failed to result in the cessation of chronic truancy, or have been offered and refused. VACATIONS Taking students out of school for vacations is strongly discouraged and is considered an unexcused absence. If a student is to be absent because of a family vacation, parents should notify the school office in writing at least one week before the planned absence. TARDIES Students are expected to arrive on time for school because late arrivals cause unnecessary disruption in the classroom and result in lost instruction time. Late arrivals must get a pass from the school office to ensure that the student is not marked absent for the day and to enable us to notify School Nutrition Services if a hot lunch is needed. We closely monitor students who are frequently absent or tardy. If truancy or tardiness becomes a problem, parents will be contacted to resolve the issue and/or disciplinary actions will take place. MISSED HOMEWORK When students are absent for acceptable reasons, make-up work will be allowed. Students are responsible for obtaining and completing missing assignments or parents may contact their child’s teacher directly regarding homework assignments. After returning to school, students will have one day to make up homework for each day absent. Teachers are not required to provide homework assignments prior to the child leaving for vacation or in advance of an absence. LEAVING DURING THE SCHOOL DAY Students are not permitted to leave school grounds on their own at any time during the school day. When a student needs to be excused during the school day for an appointment, parents should state in writing the reason for early dismissal, date and time the student is to be picked up, and by whom the student will be picked up (parent or other designated person). The note should be brought to the office at the beginning of the school day. Students must report to the office prior to leaving, and the parent or designee must come into the school office to sign the child out. Students will only be released to parents or the designee, either of which will be asked for identification when picking up the child. Students returning to school must report to the office, sign in, and get a pass to return to class. Students who are ill and in the nurse’s office will not be allowed to walk home. A parent or other designee must come to the school and sign the student out.

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HOME/SCHOOL COMMUNICATION Ongoing parent/teacher communication is important for each child’s educational success. Parents who have questions or concerns are encouraged to contact teachers, the school office, or school administrators. All teachers have phones equipped with voice mail in their classrooms, so parents can leave messages. The best time to call is before or after school or during your child’s lunch period. Calls made to teachers during instruction time will go directly to voice mail. Parents may also e-mail teachers using the teacher’s last name (up to seven letters) and first initial followed by @ccsd15.net. Early in the school year, a parent orientation is scheduled to give parents an opportunity to meet their child’s teacher and learn about subject matter to be covered in the school year. Elementary parent/teacher conferences are scheduled for November 25 and 26, 2019. Please try to avoid scheduling vacations during this time so you can meet with your child’s teacher on one of these designated conference days. In the event that you will be unable to attend November 25 or 26, your child’s teacher will contact you for a phone conference. Additional conferences with individual teachers may be scheduled at parents’ request. During the school year, each building hosts an open house to showcase students’ work. Parents and students are invited to visit classrooms together.

CAMPUS PARENT District 15 provides parents with access to a secure, online, web-based parent portal through Infinite Campus, its student information system. Parents must confirm their desire to view their child’s information online in order to access the Campus Parent portal. Once they do, the portal will allow them to view their child’s attendance history, junior high schedule, registration and transportation information, report cards, and junior high mid-term progress reports. Also, if a child’s teacher chooses to use the grade book and/or homework modules available through Infinite Campus, parents will be able to access this information through Campus Parent. Access is granted after the registration process. For assistance with Campus Parent, please contact your school office.

PERMISSION SLIPS Written permission from parents is required for: • Field trips • Participation in intramural sports • Emergency release to a specific person other than a parent • Bussed students who walk or ride a bike home • Early dismissal from school • Children going home with another student after school or for lunch

CCSD15 DIRECTORY INFORMATION/PHOTO RELEASE Community Consolidated School District 15 wants to honor family privacy while meeting its obligation to share education-related information with the community. The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and the Illinois School Student Records Act (ISSRA), which govern the confidentiality of student record information, allow school districts to publicly disclose students’ “directory information” without parental consent as long as the district annually notifies parents of the categories of information that have been designated as “directory information” and allows them the chance to opt out. CCSD15 has designated the following as “directory information”: • student’s name; • address; • grade level; • birthdate and place; 13


• parents’ names; • mailing addresses; • electronic mail addresses; • telephone numbers; • photographs/video/digital images used for information or news-related purposes (whether by a media outlet or by the school) of a student participating in school or school-sponsored activities, organizations and athletics; • academic awards, degrees, and honors; • information in relation to school-sponsored activities, organizations, and athletics; or • period of attendance in the school. If you do NOT want CCSD15 to release this directory information about your student, you must make a request in writing and send it to your school principal within 30 days of the first day of school each year or within 30 days of the date of enrollment. A letter submitted for the previous year will not carry over. What happens if you write the directory information opt-out letter? CCSD15 and its schools will not release your students’ directory information in any publications that could reach beyond the school or to any outside organization. In your letter, please specify your desire to also opt out of yearbook, directory, and/or program information. This means your child’s photo will not appear on any electronic or printed media hosted by the district. What happens if you do not write the letter? CCSD15 and its schools may responsibly release your student’s directory information in publications and to outside organizations to promote non-commercial, education-related news, achievements and activities. This means appropriately using your child’s name and/or photo/image on the school district’s websites (including District-sponsored social media) and in newsletters, school directories and athletic/event programs. Without seeking parent/guardian consent, schools could allow, for example, the one-five Foundation to use video from your student’s class to highlight a program; local newspapers to run a yearbook photo or picture of your student’s class engaged in a learning activity; or a local non-profit to publicize your student’s name for participating in a school fundraiser that benefited the organization. The District is not responsible for photos and videos taken by parents or the media at events that are open to the public. More information about your rights under FERPA is available online at www.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco/ ferpa/index.html.

C.A.R.E. BEFORE- AND AFTER-SCHOOL PROGRAM C.A.R.E. is a Park District run program, housed in District 15 schools, which offers before- and after-school care for children whose parents require extended childcare. C.A.R.E. is a financially self-supporting program and is not supported by taxes or school district funds. Enrollment is limited. This park district program is one of many childcare options offered in the community. Families register for this park district program at either the Palatine or Rolling Meadows Park District. The park districts process registrations and payments. All registrations, drops, schedule changes, refunds, and additional fees are billed through the registering park district. The program is structured to be relaxed and recreational to counterbalance the educational activities during the school day. We offer quality childcare with a variety of structured and non-structured activities including: arts, crafts, sports, active games, outdoor play, and games they can play with their peers, such as card or board games. Children are also given time to work on homework. WHO CAN PARTICIPATE? The C.A.R.E. program is available in all of the District’s elementary schools for children Kindergarten through 6th grade. Children must attend the participating elementary school in order to register for the C.A.R.E. program at that school. 14


KINDERGARTEN OPTIONS For children enrolled in a Morning Kindergarten class: • Children who attend a Morning Kindergarten class can sign up for the Morning Kindergarten Extended-Day Program. Childcare is provided offsite from the time the Morning Kindergarten class is dismissed until the AfterSchool C.A.R.E. session starts (3-6 p.m.). • Transportation is provided to and from the Morning Kindergarten Extended-Day Program location by School District 15 transportation at no additional charge. • The Morning Kindergarten Extended-Day Program is only offered Full-Time, Monday–Friday. • The Morning Kindergarten Extended-Day Program is recreation based and therefore does not have a curriculum; however, our Kindergarten C.A.R.E. staff do incorporate activities that reinforce both math and literacy skills. For children enrolled in an Afternoon Kindergarten class: • Children who attend an Afternoon Kindergarten class can sign up for either Part-Time or Full-Time After-School C.A.R.E. • There is no Before-School C.A.R.E. option available for children who attend an Afternoon Kindergarten class. For children in a Full-Day Kindergarten class: • Children who qualify for Full-Day Kindergarten (where available) can sign up for any of the Before-School C.A.R.E. and After-School C.A.R.E. sessions. WHO TO CONTACT • For schools located in Palatine and Hoffman Estates, please contact: Palatine Park District Donna Orr, C.A.R.E. Registrar 847-496-6240 dorr@palatineparks.org • For schools located in Rolling Meadows, please contact: Rolling Meadows Park District Andrea Wilford, Recreation Supervisor 847-818-3200, x225 awilford@rmparks.org For more information, please visit www.ccsd15care.net.

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CHAPTER 3

STUDENT FEES TEXTBOOK RENTAL/MATERIAL/TECHNOLOGY FEES School District 15 charges a book rental, material, and technology fee to help defray costs. If you are new to the District, fees are payable at the time of enrollment. During the summer, parents can log into Infinite Campus to pay student fees. Students who enroll late may pay the fees in the school office when they register. Book/material/technology fees for the 2019-20 school year are: • Kindergarten—$60 • Grades 1-6—$120 • Grades 7-8—$135 Payments may be made by cash, check, or credit card. • Cash payments should be made by the parent in the office of the child’s attendance school, where a payment receipt will be issued. • Check payments should be made payable to “CCSD15,” and can be mailed to your child’s school or the District Office at the address below, noting the student’s name, amount paid, and parent’s name in the payment envelope. Returned check fee charge is $25 per check. CCSD15 580 N. 1st Bank Drive Palatine, IL 60067-8110 • Credit card payments may be submitted online via RevTrak, ccsd15.revtrak.net. You will need your Campus Parent portal email address and a valid credit card number. If you need assistance with your Campus Parent portal email address, please call your child’s school for assistance. Parents who do not have Internet access may come to the District 15 office at 580 N. 1st Bank Drive, Palatine, to process their credit card payments. Because all books under this rental plan are the property of the Board of Education, the cost for replacement of lost or damaged books is the responsibility of the student/parent. Please visit Student Fees for more information.

TRANSPORTATION FEES District 15 students who live 1½ or more miles from the school they will attend are entitled to bus transportation at no charge. Bus transportation is available to other students on a paid basis to the extent that transportation services are available, except that no stops will be made less than one-half mile from a school building, and are approved on a case-by-case basis by Transportation Services. Transportation fees for pay riders for the 2019-20 school year are:

On or before October 1, 2019*

After October 1, 2019

One child................................ $370..................................... $420 Two children........................... $470..................................... $520 Three or more children.......... $520..................................... $570 *Families new to the District after the beginning of the school year will pay a pro-rated amount based on the date of registration. Payments may be made by cash, check, or credit card, or can be paid online using RevTrak, D15’s Web Store, at ccsd15.revtrak.net. Payment in full, or proof of purchase (Web Store receipt) must accompany a completed Application for Paid Transportation on or before October 1, 2019, to avoid a service charge. Returned check fee charge is $25 per check. Unless you are new to the District or are leaving the District, the annual transportation fee cannot be pro-rated, waived, or refunded. The Application for Paid Transportation is available at all schools or on the District website at www.ccsd15.net/PaidTransportation. Questions should be directed to Transportation Services at 847-963-3900. 16


OTHER FEES Other fees collected from students include $12 for any additional PE clothes and graduation gown rental (Grade 8). (A one-time PE clothing fee is included in the annual book/material/technology fee. Students pay $12 for any additional PE clothes.) Other student fees are optional. They include interscholastic sports ($85/sport/year or $175 maximum/student/year, nonrefundable), instrument rental (Grades 5-8), and/or regular bus fees for students living less than 1½ miles from school. There is no charge for the activity bus.

FEE WAIVER Students eligible for the free or reduced-price lunch program qualify for the fee waiver, as do students whose parent(s)/guardian(s) are on active military duty or deployment. Fees will be waived at the time of approval of the free or reduced-price lunch application. No additional application is required. If the student does not qualify for free or reduced-price lunch, the parent may submit an Application for Fee Waiver, available on the website. A detailed explanation of family circumstances and documentation is required. Factors that are considered include: illness in the family; unusual expenses resulting from circumstances such as fire, flood, or storm damage; seasonal employment; or other emergency situations. Students eligible under the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act will have fees waived. Please contact Alicia Corrigan at 847-963-3152 or corrigaa@ccsd15.net if you have questions about or believe that your family may qualify for services under the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act.

STUDENT ACCIDENT INSURANCE School District 15 has purchased a student accident insurance program that covers your child for injuries incurred during school hours and while participating in all school-sponsored and supervised activities, including sports.

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CHAPTER 4

DISTRICTWIDE CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION GENERAL OVERVIEW The curriculum in School District 15 is continually evaluated to ensure maximum effectiveness. The Curriculum Advisory Council, consisting of teachers and administrators, researches programs for study and recommends materials which enhance student learning. Parents have a right to review instructional materials used by their child(ren)’s classroom teachers. Elementary school classes are self-contained, and junior high school classes are departmentalized. Language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies are taught at all grade levels. In addition, the subject areas listed below are taught at the grade levels indicated: Subject Area Environmental Education Foreign Language Human Growth and Development* Music Visual Arts Instrumental Music (Woods, Brass, Percussion, Strings) Comprehensive Health Career Education Practical Arts and/or Tech Prep Consumer Education Computer Literacy Physical Education

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*Human Growth and Development is taught as a separate unit within the Comprehensive Health curriculum. Content and activities are carefully selected for grade-level appropriateness. Parent involvement is essential for the success of this curriculum. Parents may view materials that will be used for instruction and have the option to withdraw their children from this unit of instruction by sending a written request to the principal. When instruction in recognizing and avoiding sexual abuse is included in any class, parents will receive notice at least five days before such instruction begins and may choose to have their child(ren) withdraw from participation.

TITLE I The District shall maintain programs, activities, and procedures for the involvement of parents/guardians of students receiving Title I services. An annual meeting of a Title I Advisory Committee shall be held to assess and plan the future directions of the Title I program.

ELEMENTARY CURRICULUM OVERVIEW Our elementary schools offer a variety of educational opportunities and support programs for all students. Curriculum is aligned to the Illinois Learning Standards (incorporating the Common Core Standards). The instructional program includes the following subject areas: • Language arts (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) • Mathematics • Science 18


• Social Studies • Music—Students in Full-Day Kindergarten through Grade 6 receive two 30-minute music classes each week. HalfDay Kindergarten students have music instruction for one 30-minute period per week. • Health • Physical Education—Two 30-minute physical education classes per week are scheduled for students in Grades 1-6. • Art—Students in Full-Day Kindergarten through Grade 6 participate in one 60-minute art class every week.

RESOURCES The following resources are available in support of or in addition to the instructional programs listed above: • Learning Resource Center (library) • Technology • Video Studio • Band/Orchestra—Fifth and sixth-grade students may join band or orchestra. Lessons are provided weekly during the school day. Rehearsals are held before school. • Chorus—Chorus is a school-sponsored club that may be available for students in Grades 5 and 6. • Intramurals—Fifth- and sixth-grade students are eligible to participate in intramurals. Signature forms needed to participate in intramurals are available through the intramural program coordinator or PE teacher at your child’s school. Students are supported, as appropriate, by: • Student Services Team • School Social Worker • School Psychologist • School Nurse

RECESS Students generally go outside for recess every day, so they should be dressed appropriately. Exceptions are made only when a child brings a doctor’s note excusing him/her from outdoor recess. Staff members provide playground supervision at all times. Children who misbehave may be placed in “time out” or sent to the office to talk with an administrator. Indoor recess is determined based on the following guidelines: • If the temperature outside, together with the wind chill, is below 0°F, all students will remain inside for the entire lunch hour. • If the temperature outside, together with the wind chill, is between 0°–10°F, the preferred procedure is a rotation of 20 minutes for lunch, a 20-minute outdoor recess, and a 20-minute indoor recess. However, at the principal’s discretion, the students may be kept inside for the entire lunch hour. • If the temperature outside, together with the wind chill, is above 10°F, students will have regular outdoor recess. Other considerations include the condition of the playground and the presence of precipitation. For indoor recess, students are supervised in their classrooms.

HOMEWORK GUIDELINES Homework extends and reinforces classroom learning, provides skills practice, and helps students prepare and review for lessons and tests. It is also a way to help parents stay informed about what their child is learning, and it helps children develop good discipline and responsibility. 19


We encourage families to consider the importance of setting aside a specific time and place for children to do their homework. Parents should check their child’s understanding of assignments and review directions together if necessary. If there is a special problem, contact the child’s teacher. The following guidelines for suggested amounts of time to be spent on homework may be helpful: Grade Level Kindergarten First and Second Grade Third Grade Fourth Grade Fifth and Sixth Grade

Minutes per day 10 20 30 30-40 45-60

Reading for pleasure at home is important. Children should set aside daily time for recreational reading in addition to homework time. You may wish to establish a family reading time.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION All students participate in physical education classes. A child may be excused from some or all physical activities when the appropriate documentation is provided to the school: • A request from a parent/guardian to excuse a child from physical education will be honored for up to three days. • For periods longer than three days, an excuse from a physician stating the reason and length of time the child is to be excused from class and exact notification when they can return to activity is required. Alternative activities and/or units of instruction will be provided for pupils whose physical or emotional condition prevents their participation in the physical education courses as determined by a person licensed under the Medical Practice Act. In order to participate in physical education classes, elementary students need to wear safe, appropriate attire such as: • Tied or fastened athletic shoes (not boots, sandals, platform shoes, leather-soled shoes, or shoes with wheels), and • Clothing that does not interfere with the student’s ability to run and move freely.

JUNIOR HIGH CURRICULUM OVERVIEW Our junior high schools offer a variety of educational opportunities and support programs for all students. Curriculum is aligned to the Illinois Learning Standards (incorporating the Common Core Standards). The instructional program includes the following subject areas: LANGUAGE ARTS (READING, WRITING, LISTENING, AND SPEAKING) Students in both grades will participate in a double period of language arts each day (a reading class and a writing class). The curriculum balances the teaching and learning of reading strategies, writing processes, listening, and speaking skills. HISTORY • Seventh Grade—The social studies curriculum centers on United States history: the Constitution through the Civil War period. • Eighth Grade—The social studies curriculum centers on United States history: Civil War to the present time. SCIENCE • Seventh Grade—Students engage in the study of the life sciences, including cell structure, ecology, biological studies, genetics, and health. 20


• Eighth Grade—Students engage in the study of the chemical and physical sciences, including chemical interactions, forces, motion, atomic structure, and health. SEVENTH-GRADE MATHEMATICS • 7th Grade Math—This course aligns to the 7th Grade Common Core State Standards with a focus on problem solving and application. Integers and rational numbers, proportional relationships and percent problems, equivalent expressions, equations and inequalities, sampling, probability, and basic geometry concepts are covered. • 7th Grade Accelerated Math—This course is a compacted curriculum of both 7th and 8th Grade Common Core State Standards which includes: number systems, rational number operations, ratios, proportionality, percentages, expressions, solving linear equations, inequalities, exponents and scientific notation, graphing proportional and non-proportional relationships, angles and angle relationships, circumference and area of circles, volume of cylinders, spheres, and cones, and the Pythagorean Theorem • 7th Algebra 1—This advanced 7th Grade algebra course introduces the fundamental principles of algebra. Course topics include linear equations, graphs and inequalities, systems of equations, exponents and scientific notation, simplifying and factoring polynomials, quadratic equations and functions, rational expressions, and introductory radical operations. For seventh-grade students who took Algebra 1 in sixth grade, these courses are also available: • Advanced Topics of Algebra 1 (see course description below) • Honors Plane & Solid Geometry (see course description below) EIGHTH-GRADE MATHEMATICS • 8th Grade Math—This course aligns to the 8th Grade Common Core State Standards with a focus on problem solving and application. Topics include the real number system, linear equations, modeling relationships using functions, bivariate data, identifying and solving systems of linear equations, transformations, solving problems including congruence, similarity, the Pythagorean Theorem, surface area, and volume. • 8th Grade Algebra 1—This advanced course introduces students to the fundamental principles of algebra. Algebraic symbolism, simplifying expressions, solutions to equations, the graphic representations associated with variables, and statistical variability are among the course topics. Additional points of emphasis include graphical representations, connection to related functions, and algebraic processes applied to word problems. Common Core State Standards provide the foundation for the course. • Advanced Topics of Algebra 1—This advanced course is designed to focus on problem solving, word problems and higher-order thinking. It incorporates previously learned concepts from 7th Grade Algebra and delves deeper into the material and application process. • Honors Plane & Solid Geometry—This advanced course is a comprehensive study of plane and solid geometry including constructions, formulas for measurement and formal proofs. It is based on the theorems and axioms that relate points, lines, planes, and solids. Topics are covered in great depth, especially area and volume of solids. Additional emphasis is placed on the integration of algebraic techniques in solving geometric problems. • Accelerated Algebra 2—This highly accelerated high school course is designed for students who have an excellent knowledge of algebra and geometry. M328 Accelerated Algebra 2 is provided at a high school location. The course briefly reviews concepts presented in earlier course work and then rigorously expands and applies them to other areas of mathematics. In addition, selected topics from pre-calculus are studied. Ideas presented in this course involve advanced techniques of graphing and solving equations and inequalities and prepares students to take Trigonometry/Calculus A. This course requires a graphing calculator. ENRICHMENT OFFERINGS The Junior High Enrichment Program consists of courses in fine arts, practical arts, technology, and foreign languages. The Enrichment Program is designed to provide students with an exposure to some courses in the above areas. • French or Spanish I and II—French and Spanish classes are offered based upon minimum enrollment. Students will learn about the countries and the people who speak these languages. They will learn by listening, speaking, 21


reading, and writing activities in the new language, and will learn to communicate in the target language by learning to count, greet people, and talk about daily activities. They will discover cultural similarities and differences, and will realize how much the French and Spanish civilizations have contributed to life in the United States. • Spanish for Native Speakers (SNS)—SNS is offered based upon enrollment. This class is for students who have an advanced oral level of Spanish. Students will discuss literary works, current events, and acquire advanced literary skills. • 7th Grade Band—Offered as a seventh-grade enrichment class to all students who have successfully completed intermediate band. Students are invited to continue their band experience on traditional band instruments. Band meets every school day as an enrichment class. Students are also required to attend one small-group lesson per week on a rotating schedule. Through the study of different time periods and styles, students will understand music as a form of communication which will expand their ability to listen, analyze, and discuss concepts. Through daily learning, the band prepares and performs at concerts and events during and outside the school day. • 8th Grade Band—Offered as an eighth-grade enrichment class to all students who have successfully completed seventh-grade band. Students are invited to continue their band experience on traditional band instruments. Band meets every school day as an enrichment class. Students are also required to attend one small-group lesson per week on a rotating schedule. Through the study of different time periods and styles, eighth-grade students will develop a relatively more advanced understanding of music as a form of communication which will expand their ability to listen, analyze, and discuss concepts. Through daily learning, the band prepares and performs at concerts and events during and outside the school day. Eighth-grade students will also have the opportunity to make connections with their appropriate High School band program, teachers, and students. • 7th Grade Orchestra—Offered as a seventh-grade enrichment class to all students who have successfully completed intermediate orchestra. Through the instrumental performance experience, students will prepare a variety of genres and styles of music that make connections to their lives. Through the study of different time periods and styles, students will understand music as a form of communication which will expand their ability to listen, analyze, and discuss concepts. The seventh grade orchestra meets every day throughout the school year. Students are also required to attend one small-group lesson per week on a rotating schedule. The seventhgrade orchestra performs at various events throughout the school year. Students are offered the opportunity to participate in various festivals and competitions. • 8th Grade Orchestra—Offered as an eighth-grade enrichment class to all students who have successfully completed seventh-grade orchestra. Through the instrumental performance experience, students will prepare a progressively more advanced variety of genres and styles of music that make connections to their lives. Through the course, eighth-grade students will develop a relatively more advanced understanding of music as a form of communication which will expand their ability to listen, analyze, and discuss concepts. The eighth-grade orchestra meets every day throughout the school year. Students are also required to attend one small-group lesson per week on a rotating schedule. The eighth-grade orchestra performs at various events throughout the school year. Throughout the year, students are offered the opportunity to participate in various festivals and competitions. Eighth grade students will also have the opportunity to make connections with their appropriate high school orchestra program, teachers, and students. • 7th Grade Music—The goal of this course is to give students a lifelong appreciation and understanding of the arts. To achieve this goal, students will review the basics of music notation, learn the elements of music, and explore music history. Student musicians will create, perform, and respond to music. This is achieved through authentic instruction using guitar, keyboards, voice, and music technology. Students will make connections to music through a variety of musical styles and genres • 8th Grade Music—This semester-long music course is unique to eighth graders. The focus is music technology or how music is used in and created for everyday life. Web-based applications, similar to Garage Band, on Chromebooks and/or iPads are used for a variety of project-based learning experiences. These projects are constantly evolving as new applications are created. Some project examples are: creating new music, remixing existing music, producing radio commercials, and even generating a soundtrack for a short film. In addition, students may have the opportunity to form their own rock band to compose and perform an original song. Through these projects and others, students gain a deeper knowledge and appreciation of the music they hear 22


every day, as well as skills that can be used in future projects and presentations in high school, college, and the workplace. • 7th Grade Art—The seventh-grade semester long art course is designed to meet the Illinois state standards. The curriculum focuses on the study of art through the use and understanding of the Elements of Art including, shape, form, space, texture, value and color. The program encourages students to develop cultural and historical awareness through the visual arts. Students are exposed to a variety of art materials, methods and production opportunities. Students focus on problem solving, self-directed learning, peer collaboration and managing materials as they purposefully design, produce and present their own expressive works of art. • 8th Grade Art—The eighth-grade art curriculum continues to encourage creativity and a heightened awareness of the world. Students will apply their knowledge of the elements (line, color, shape, form, texture, value) and principles (rhythm, balance, unity, variety, pattern, emphasis, and movement) to create original works of art. Cultures are investigated and universal themes are explored to inspire personal responses that will be reflected in their own artwork. Students learn to problem solve, direct self, and manage materials. This curriculum is designed to meet state standards through experiences in art criticism, philosophical/aesthetic issues, and historical and cultural inquiries, as well as production in a variety of media. • Design & Modeling—Design and Modeling (DM) provides students opportunities to apply the design process to creatively solve problems. Students are introduced to a unit problem in the first activity and are asked to make connections to the problem throughout the lessons in the unit. Students learn and utilize methods for communicating design ideas through sketches, solid models, and mathematical models. Students will understand how models can be simulated to represent an authentic situation and generate data for further analysis and observations. Students work in teams to identify design requirements, research the topic, and engage stakeholders. Teams design products (i.e., design a toy or game for a child with cerebral palsy), fabricate using a 3D printer and test it, and make necessary modifications to optimize the design solution. Students will also learn how to use industry standard 3D modeling software to create a virtual image and 3D print of their designs that they can take home. Student Population: 7th grade students. • Automation & Robotics—Automation and Robotics teaches students critical thinking and problem solving skills through a series of hands-on design challenges. Students will learn mechanical systems and how they can be adapted to change speed, torque, and type of motion. Students will use this information to design, construct, and program autonomous robots that meet the criteria and constraints of a design challenge. They will learn and apply basic coding skills using RobotC programming software and construct their robots using VEX robotic kits. Student Population: On-level 8th grade students. • Medical Detectives—In the Medical Detectives (MD) unit, students play the role of a real-life medical detective as they solve medical mysteries through hands-on projects and labs, investigate how to measure and interpret vital signs, and learn how the systems of the human body work together to maintain health. Students will engage in a hands-on dissection of a sheep brain (with options for a more hands-off computer based dissection) to study how body systems work together. Finally, students will play role of forensic scientist as they analyze evidence found at a “crime scene” and diagnose a disease using DNA evidence. Student Population: 8th grade students. ADDITIONAL OFFERINGS Academic interventions or targeted assistance may be provided to qualified students based upon the consideration of multiple data points. These interventions or supports are provided within a student’s daily schedule.

HOMEWORK Homework is an important component of all academic programs because it gives students an opportunity to practice and apply the skills and concepts taught in the classroom. Homework assignments are due on the date specified by the teacher. Teachers will provide guidelines for their individual classroom expectations at the beginning of the year. Late homework assignments may result in a reduction in credit. Students who have excused absences are responsible for asking teachers for the assignments missed and completing them in the timeframe the teachers specify. The amount of time students should spend on homework will vary depending on their unique needs and the work requirements of each class. However, as a general guideline, seventh-grade students may be required to spend 23


approximately 70 minutes daily on homework assignments and related reading, while eighth graders should plan on approximately 80 minutes per day of homework assignments and related reading.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION All junior high students are expected to participate in daily physical education classes. A variety of physical activities are offered during the year. Children may be exempted from some or all physical activities with an excuse from parent(s)/guardian(s) for a period of up to three days. Students who need to be excused beyond that or for an extended length of time must provide a written excuse submitted to the school by a person licensed under the Medical Practice Act. Alternative activities and/or units of instruction will be provided for pupils whose physical or emotional condition prevents their participation in the physical education courses as determined by a person licensed under the Medical Practice Act. • 7th Grade Physical Education—The 7th Grade physical education/health course provides each student with the opportunity to participate in a comprehensive program consisting of skill development, lead up games, individual sports, team sports and physical fitness activities. Emphasis is placed on active participation and positive social interaction during fitness and sport activities. Activity in the moderate to vigorous level is expected, as this contributes to the overall physical fitness and academic success of our students. Fitness testing, as required by law, will be conducted during the year using FitnessGram. P.E. uniform and athletic shoes are required every day in order to earn participation credit. Good sportsmanship, safety, appropriate language, and following all rules and procedures are expected at all times. The 7th Grade health curriculum is conducted in conjunction with the physical education program. The curriculum covers the following topics: development of character; bullying prevention, mental and emotional health, body systems, healthy relationships, sexual health, tobacco, and peer pressure in regard to health and drugs. Upon request, materials are available for viewing. • 8th Grade Physical Education—The 8th Grade physical education/health course provides each student with the opportunity to participate in a comprehensive program consisting of skill development, lead up games, individual sports, team sports and physical fitness activities. Emphasis is placed on active participation and positive social interaction during fitness and sport activities. Activity in the moderate to vigorous level is expected, as this contributes to the overall physical fitness and academic success of our students. Fitness testing, as required by law, will be conducted during the year using FitnessGram. All students are required to dress in a P.E. uniform daily in order to participate. All students are evaluated in a number of areas including, but not limited to: general participation; the process of skill development; and game play activity levels. Good sportsmanship, safety, appropriate language, and following all rules and procedures are expected at all times. The 8th Grade health curriculum is conducted in conjunction with the daily physical education program. The curriculum is based on the Glencoe Teen Health series. The eight-week program covers the following topics: conflict resolution; violence prevention; safety; healthy environment; disease prevention, nutrition; physical activity; tobacco; alcohol and drugs. Upon request, materials are available for viewing. Physical Education Lockers—The physical education teachers assign PE lockers. Students should lock all personal possessions in the gym locker. The school retains the right to inspect gym lockers and their contents to assure that the locker is being used for the intended purpose. Physical Education Uniforms and Supplies—Students are provided with physical education uniforms. For the convenience of parents, additional uniforms are sold at cost ($12) at each junior high school. PE uniforms should be clearly marked with the student’s name., and are to be worn every day during PE class. Students should take their uniforms home each week for laundering. Other supplies needed for PE include gym shoes, socks, and a sweatshirt for outdoor activities.

JUNIOR HIGH LOCKERS Students in junior high school are assigned a locker for storing coats or jackets, book bags or backpacks, and other personal items during school hours. Students may not change lockers without permission from administrative staff. Lockers should be kept locked and the combination kept confidential. The school assumes no responsibility for the loss of articles from a locker. School administrative personnel have the right to inspect lockers at any time.

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Lockers are on loan to students and remain the property of the Board of Education. Any damage to the locker is the student’s responsibility. Lockers should be kept clean and neat. No open food or beverage other than water may be stored in lockers. Scotch tape and masking tape may be used inside lockers, but stickers are not permitted, as they damage the paint. Lockers may be decorated before or after school for special occasions, but permission must be obtained from the office before decorating. No balloons, confetti, or hallway signs are permitted.

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS Seventh-Grade Requirements—Seventh-grade students will be required to: 1. Pass the United States and Illinois Constitution examinations. 2. Satisfactorily complete assignments demonstrating knowledge of the academic standards of the state of Illinois. 3. Pay all fines and fees (lost books, cafeteria, etc.). Eighth-Grade Requirements—Eighth-grade students will be required to: 1. Complete all required projects. 2. Satisfactorily complete assignments demonstrating knowledge of the academic standards of the state of Illinois. 3. Pay all fines and fees (lost books, cafeteria, etc.). GRADUATION PARTICIPATION/PROBATION (END OF THIRD QUARTER) Eighth-grade students who fail to meet the criteria below by the end of the first semester will receive notice that they are in danger of being placed on probation for the eighth-grade graduation ceremony and related graduation activities. Students who have not met the criteria below by the end of the third quarter will receive notice that they have been placed on probation. • The student must have a minimum cumulative (all subjects, all year) GPA of 1.5. • The student must have successfully completed all required courses and testing as designated by the state of Illinois (i.e., Illinois and U.S. Constitution tests). • The student must maintain an appropriate attitude and behavior during the school year. The administration reserves the right to remove any student from participating in graduation activities and/or the ceremony due to behavior infractions. • The student must be up-to-date with payment of all required fines and fees. GRADUATION PARTICIPATION REQUIREMENTS (END OF FOURTH QUARTER) The culmination of two years of junior high school is graduation. The graduation ceremony and all other graduation activities are provided to recognize and honor students who have successfully completed the District’s requirements for participation. Participation is a privilege, not a right, so students participating in the graduation ceremony and other end-of-the-year activities will need to meet the following requirements: • The student must have a minimum cumulative (all subjects, all year) GPA of 1.0. • The student must have successfully completed all required courses and testing as designated by the state of Illinois (i.e., Illinois and U.S. Constitution tests). • The student must maintain an appropriate attitude and behavior during the school year. The administration reserves the right to remove any student from participating in graduation activities and/or the ceremony due to behavior infractions. • The student must be up-to-date with payment of all required fines and fees. • A student on probation may not have a U grade in the fourth quarter. At the discretion of the principal or assistant principal, a student may be placed on probation at the mid-term point of the fourth quarter if the student has displayed a lack of effort either academically or behaviorally.

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HONOR ROLL/STUDENT AWARDS • High Honor Roll Award—This award is given to students who achieved a GPA of 3.76 to 4.0. • Honor Roll Award—This award is given to students who achieved a GPA of 3.5 to 3.75.

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CHAPTER 5

DISTRICTWIDE INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY District 15 recognizes that technology serves as a powerful tool to enhance teaching and learning. With this is mind, teachers and students have ready access to devices that allow for content creation, collaboration, inquiry, and problem-solving.

INTERNET Electronic networks, including the Internet, are a part of the District’s instructional program to help promote educational excellence by facilitating resource sharing, innovation, and communication. Students and parents must read and sign the Network Use Guidelines Letter of Agreement before students are granted use of the Internet. A copy of the agreement is available in all school offices. Students who have a signed Network Use Guidelines Letter of Agreement form on file will, under the supervision of a staff member, be allowed to use the Internet to access appropriate learning resources. District 15 provides supervision and uses a commercial Internet filtering program to prevent access to materials that may be defamatory, inaccurate, offensive, or otherwise inappropriate in the school setting. It is impossible, however, to control all material, and a user may inadvertently discover inappropriate material. Ultimately, parent(s)/guardian(s) are responsible for setting and conveying standards for their children. Student use of inappropriate material or language or violation of copyright laws may result in a student’s loss of Internet privileges. Parents are legally responsible for their child’s actions.

1:1 STUDENT TO CHROMEBOOK INITIATIVE Preparing students to be successful in a digital age and global economy is a responsibility that Community Consolidated School District 15 takes very seriously. Community Consolidated School District 15 issues a Chromebook to all students in Grades 6-8. Students in multigrade classrooms with 6th graders will be issued a Chromebook as well. Students will be able to use their individual, district-issued Chromebooks to access Google Apps for Education which are free learning tools that foster collaboration, exploration, and content creation. A Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) has been developed to answer many questions that parents and students may have about this exciting new initiative. The FAQ and other information about the Chromebook initiative can be found on the District’s website.

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CHAPTER 6

CLUBS & SPORTS INTRAMURAL & CLUB SPORTS ELEMENTARY AND JUNIOR HIGH PROGRAMS In order to participate in an intramural or club sport at the elementary or junior high level, all students must have the following on file: • A current physical on file with the school nurse. Physicals are valid for 13 months. • Emergency Medical Authorization Card • Concussion Information Form • A signed CCSD15 Code of Conduct Contract Students participating in intramural and club sports are expected to adhere to the same Sportsmanship Expectations and CCSD15 Code of Conduct as interscholastic sports participants.

INTERSCHOLASTIC SPORTS JUNIOR HIGH PROGRAMS District 15’s interscholastic sports program includes girls’ and boys’ soccer, girls’ and boys’ basketball, volleyball, cross-country, wrestling, and track and field. Junior high school teams compete against other District 15 junior high schools as well as other junior high schools from nearby school districts. In order to participate, all students on an interscholastic sports team must have a current physical examination on file in the nurse’s office. There is a non-refundable $85 participation fee per student with a maximum of $175 in total sports fees per student per year. Practices and games are scheduled after school. For volleyball, girls’ basketball, boys’ basketball, girls’ soccer, and boys’ soccer, players are selected based on tryouts. Cross-country, wrestling, and track and field are “no-cut” sports open to all students. PLAYER EXPECTATIONS Each student athlete will: • Not be failing any class or have a D in more than one class to be academically eligible for the week. At the start of the second week of ineligibility, the student may be removed from the team at the discretion of the principal and coach. • Display respectful and appropriate behavior at all times in line with PBIS policies and show good sportsmanship. • Sign and return the CCSD15 Code of Conduct Contract. Participation in extracurricular activities is a privilege, not a right. Therefore, compliance with the Code of Conduct is required. • Attend at least half the school day on the day of competition or practice. This includes absences due to a doctor’s appointment. Exceptions are made when attending a funeral. • Participate in PE in order to participate in any after-school scholastics or intramural activities. • Wear proper athletic shoes and socks. • Wear the appropriate team uniform that is provided. Understand that, in the event the assigned uniform is damaged or lost, the parent/guardian must replace the uniform at the current replacement cost. Launder and return the assigned uniform to the coach at the end of the season. PARENT EXPECTATIONS Parents/guardians of a student athlete will: • Have all forms and fees to coach prior to the first non-conference competition. 28


• Submit the following documents prior to tryouts: o A current physical for your child should be on file with the school nurse. Physicals are valid for 13 months. • Return these documents prior to the first practice (they will be provided at tryouts): o Emergency Medical Authorization Card o Concussion Information Form o CCSD15 Code of Conduct Contract • Provide proper athletic shoes and socks. • A team uniform will be provided to the student athlete. Replace uniform at current replacement cost in the event the assigned uniform is damaged or lost. Make sure the assigned uniform is laundered and returned to the coach at the end of the season. • Pick up your child promptly at the end of the event. • Communicate with the coach if the student athlete will be leaving an event with someone else, and who the responsible party will be. • Communicate any concerns directly to the coach prior to or after an event—not during an event. • Maintain good sportsmanship. SPORTSMANSHIP EXPECTATIONS According to the Illinois Elementary School Association (IESA), and the Illinois High School Association (IHSA): • “Sportsmanship is playing fair, taking a loss or defeat without complaint, not gloating when winning, and generally treating opponents and officials with courtesy, generosity, and fairness.” Student athletes, parents, and others attending interscholastic sporting events will: • Applaud during the introduction of players, coaches, and officials. • Accept all decisions of officials. • Treat the competition as a game, not a war. • Applaud the performance of ALL participants at the end of the contest. Shake hands with the other team. TIE BREAKER RULE 1. Head-to-head play 2. Highest point differential 3. Total point differential vs. other District 15 schools FALL SPORTS • Boys’ Soccer—There is one team of 18 players made up of seventh graders, and one team of 18 players made up of eighth graders. The season begins in August and runs through the end of October with a District tournament. • Cross-Country—There are four cross-country teams: seventh-grade girls, seventh-grade boys, eighth-grade girls, and eighth-grade boys. All students may participate, and there is no limit to the number of participants. The season begins in August and runs through the end of October, closing with a District meet. • Girls’ Basketball—The season begins in August and runs until mid-October. There are girls’ basketball teams for both seventh and eighth grades. Tryouts are held in mid-August. Twelve to 15 girls are chosen for each team. Both teams participate in a District tournament in October. WINTER SPORTS • Boys’ Basketball—There are boys’ basketball teams for both seventh and eighth grades. Twelve to 15 boys are chosen for each team based on tryouts. The season runs from mid-October through January, ending with a District tournament. • Wrestling—There is one team for both seventh and eighth graders, and it is open to all students. Wrestling season begins in December and concludes at the end of February with a District tournament. 29


• Volleyball—There are separate teams for seventh- and eighth-grade. Twelve to 15 players are chosen for each team based on tryouts. Volleyball begins after Winter Break in January and runs through mid-March. Both teams participate in an end-of-season District tournament. SPRING SPORTS • Girls’ Soccer—There is one team of 18 players made up of seventh graders, and one team of 18 players made up of eighth graders. The season begins in March and runs through the end of May with a District tournament. • Track and Field—There are teams for seventh-grade girls, seventh-grade boys, eighth-grade girls, and eighth-grade boys. Any student may participate. The season begins in April and runs through the end of May. A District 15 track meet is held at the end of the season. ACTIVITY BUS An activity bus is available at no charge for students who wish to participate in after-school activities. The activity bus departs at 4:15 p.m. Monday through Thursday. There will be no activity bus the day before a major holiday or when after-school activities are canceled due to inclement weather. Parents should be aware that activity bus stops are not always the same as the student’s regular bus stop. HAZARDOUS WEATHER GUIDELINES District 15 is committed to the safety and wellbeing of our students. For that reason, D15 is aligned with the Hazardous Weather Conditions Guidelines of our surrounding high school Districts 211 & 214, as well the Play it Safe in the Heat guidelines from IHSA—all of which use the WetBulb Globe Temperature (WBGT). District 15 weather guidelines mirror the Mid Suburban League (MSL), Districts 211, 214 and IHSA to determine if conditions are appropriate for our students to participate in outdoor athletic activities. This includes intramurals, interscholastic sports and outdoor physical education activities. See www.ccsd15.net/sports-d15 for details.

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CHAPTER 7

MISCELLANEOUS INSTRUMENT RENTAL District 15 requires students in Grades 5-8 to rent band and orchestra instruments from District-approved music stores, unless you already have an instrument to use. If a particular instrument is not available to rent from any of the District-approved music stores, your child will be able to rent that particular instrument from the school district for a one-time fee of $30 for elementary students, and $50 for junior high students. Students playing large instruments, such a cello or bass, rent a rehearsal instrument that remains at school. Students who play percussion pay a $15 fee for use of a school percussion kit. Please keep in mind that our district inventory may put limitations on instrument choice. Should you need financial assistance from the District in order to participate in the instrumental program, please contact Risa Cohen, Curriculum and Fine Arts Coordinator, at 847-963-3117, or e-mail cohenr@ccsd15.net. For assistance in Spanish, please contact Nancy Aguirre at 847-963-3130, or e-mail aguirren@ccsd15.net.

FIELD TRIPS Classroom teachers may plan educational trips to extend and enhance curriculum studies. Children must have a signed parental permission form to participate in these trips. The field trip form also provides space for parent permission for children who need medication while on the field trip. Field trips are an important part of the educational program, and all students should participate in them if possible. Students who do not turn in signed permission forms and fees by the deadline may be unable to participate and may be assigned to another classroom for the day. Student behavior expectations are the same for field trips as they are for the classroom. If there is a significant concern about a student’s ability or willingness to behave appropriately on a trip, there is the possibility that participation could be contingent on the parent accompanying the child. Parents of children who have severe allergies or other medical conditions may also be asked to accompany their children on field trips to ensure the child’s safety.

GIFTS AND PARTIES District 15 strongly discourages the collection of money by either students or parents for gifts to staff members. Gifts to staff members are also discouraged. At the teacher’s discretion, classroom parties may be held at Halloween and Valentine’s Day. Room representatives and PTA volunteers may be asked to help on these days. Based on the District’s Food Allergy Committee, food will not be allowed at class parties. A note about Halloween costumes: children are not allowed to bring weapons, toy weapons, or weapon-like objects to school, even if it is part of a costume. We also request that children not wear bloody, gruesome, or especially scary costumes. Costumes must be appropriate for a school setting. Treats provided in celebration of a child’s birthday must be non-edible. Parents will be provided with a suggested list of alternative, non-edible treats at the beginning of the school year. The classroom teacher will determine the best time to distribute them. It is against federal regulations to serve lunch to students in lieu of the regular lunch program. This includes pizza and other fast food. If you are planning a party for your child, please do not distribute invitations at school.

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CHAPTER 8

STUDENT SUPPORT PROGRAMS EARLY ENTRANCE TO KINDERGARTEN AND FIRST GRADE, AND ACCELERATED PLACEMENT In 2018, the Illinois legislature passed the Illinois Accelerated Placement Act (Public Act 100-0421). This act allows Illinois public school districts to include early entrance to kindergarten and first grade, and to provide grade accelerations (often referred to as grade skipping) for all grades. This process is reserved for students that demonstrate highly advanced skills, but do not meet the District’s regular age requirements for the desired grade (typically, children must turn five by September 1 to enroll in Kindergarten, and turn six by September 1 to enroll in first grade). Parents/guardians may apply to have their child considered for early entrance into kindergarten or first grade or grade acceleration. Applications for early entrance into kindergarten or first grade are accepted between February 15 and April 1 of each school year. Applications completed prior to February 15 will be returned. Applications completed after April 1 will be accepted but may delay the district’s placement decision such that this decision may occur after the start of the upcoming school year. Applications for grade acceleration are accepted from the first day of school until April 1 each school year.

ACADEMICALLY TALENTED AND GIFTED STUDENTS The District 15 Academically Talented/Gifted program is designed for elementary-age students in Grades 3-6 who may benefit from fully accelerated instruction. Students are selected for the program based on an identification process that uses multiple data points to assess a student’s academic and cognitive skills. The curriculum in the program follows Common Core State Standards. The Academically Talented/Gifted program uses a multi-age classroom model that combines Grades 3/4 and 5/6 for instruction in all academic and special area subjects. Instruction is specially designed to provide a classroom environment that adjusts and extends the general education curriculum. Teachers have participated in specialized professional development to help them understand the needs of academically talented and gifted students. As a result, classroom assignments provide many specialized learning opportunities to challenge and engage students. Test results and classroom performance are reviewed annually and a parent conference is held if a placement change is recommended. Students who qualify for the program typically remain in the program from the time they start the program through sixth grade.

READING INTERVENTIONS Students who are identified through testing as at-risk readers are recommended to get extra help through the research-based reading intervention programs available at their particular school. The school’s reading specialist or a trained program assistant works with children individually or in small groups. Struggling readers may be assigned to one of the District’s reading intervention programs. For more information about reading intervention programs, contact your child’s teacher or the school’s reading consultant specialist.

SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS AND DISABILITY SERVICES District 15 provides special education programs and services for children with disabilities in conformance with federal and state regulations. The following programs and services are available: • Early Intervention Transition Services—For all children with disabilities who receive Early Intervention Services and who are turning three years old. 32


• Early Childhood Programs and Services—For all children with disabilities from 3 to 5 years of age. • Transitional Kindergarten—Considered for children with significant special education and related needs who require a self-contained, special education kindergarten classroom. • Speech and Language Therapy—A service for students with speech and/or language impairments that impact their education, to the extent that special education is necessary. • Resource Services—For students with mild to moderate disabilities who can progress in the general education setting with supports and services. Students are included within the general education setting to the greatest extent possible, with special education and related services. • Instructional Classrooms (LEAP Program)—For students with significant academic disabilities who require a special education classroom in order to make adequate progress. • Social/Emotional Academic Learning (SEAL Program)—For students with primary needs in the areas of social, emotional, and/or behavioral learning who require a special education classroom. • ACES Day School Program—For students with significant social, emotional, or behavioral disorders who require a therapeutic day school setting. • Mild, Moderate, and Severe Cognitive Disability Program (AIME and MILE Programs)—For students with mild, moderate, and severe cognitive/intellectual disabilities who require a special education classroom. • Multiple Needs Program—For students with multiple cognitive and behavioral needs who require a special education classroom in an intensive, therapeutic day school setting. • Structured for Independence (SIP) Program—For students with autism or other developmental disabilities who require a highly structured special education classroom. • Visual Impairment Program/Services—For students with visual impairments who can progress in regular or special education classrooms with supportive services. • Hearing Impairment Program/Services—For students with mild to profound hearing impairments who can progress in regular or special education classrooms with supportive services. • Assistive Technology—Assistive Technology (AT) means any item, piece of equipment, product system, device or service (to provide access to AT) whether acquired commercially off the shelf, modified, or customized, that is used to increase, maintain, or improve the functional capabilities of a child with a disability and support the IEP services. Special education programs in CCSD15 may provide AT as part of the program or, when necessary to receive a free, appropriate public education, individualized AT is provided through an IEP process for students with disabilities. • Occupational Therapy—A related service for students with fine motor and/or sensory needs that impact their education to the extent that special education is necessary. • Physical Therapy—A related service for students with gross motor needs that impact their education to the extent that special education is necessary. • Social Work Services—A related service for students with social, emotional, and/or behavioral needs that impact their education to the extent that special education is necessary. • Homebound/Hospital Instruction—For students who cannot attend school due to a medical condition. • Interpreters—Sign language interpreters are assigned to children with a significant hearing loss that interferes with auditory communication (receptive and/or expressive). Programs and services are provided for students with specific learning disabilities, emotional disabilities, cognitive disabilities, speech/language impairments, orthopedic impairments, health impairments, traumatic brain injuries, autism, hearing impairments, visual impairments, deaf-blindness, developmental delays, or multiple disabilities. The Illinois School for the Deaf and Illinois School for the Visually Impaired provide educational services for children who are deaf, hard of hearing, blind or visually impaired. For additional information please contact the Department of Student Services at 847-963-3000.

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SECTION 504 SERVICES Students who do not qualify for an IEP under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act may qualify for services under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 if the child 1) has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities, 2) has a record of physical or mental impairment, or 3) is regarded as having a physical or mental impairment. All children with disabilities have the right to a free appropriate public education. If you have concerns about your child and believe that he/she has a disability that may require Section 504 Plan accommodations or special education services, please contact your child’s school administrator to begin the referral process. If your child is between the ages of 3 and 5, please call the John G. Conyers Learning Academy at 847-963-3400 to request an appointment for a screening. Additional information regarding preschool programming and services may be attained through the Department of Student Services at 847-963-3000. Inquiries regarding Section 504 may be directed to: Susan Gehring, Section 504 Coordinator Assistant Superintendent for Student Services 580 N 1st Bank Drive Palatine, IL 60067 847-963-3146 gehrings@ccsd15.net

ENGLISH LEARNERS District 15 supports families from within all our schools. As required by the state of Illinois, District 15 provides programs to meet the linguistic and academic needs of students whose native language is other than English— English Learners (ELs). The purpose is to accelerate English language literacy and value each child’s social and cultural knowledge while creating bilingual and bicultural individuals. QUALIFYING FOR EL SERVICES The Home Language Survey is required as part of the school registration process. If a language other than English is spoken in the home and indicated on the Home Language Survey, the child must be screened for English language services. The Illinois State Board of Education prescribes the assessment instrument and the qualifying scores for entrance. For students entering Kindergarten and the first semester of Grade 1, the WIDA MODEL test is given. For students entering the second semester of Grades 1-8, the WIDA Screener is given. Currently, the District serves families from more than 70 different languages, the vast majority being Spanish speaking followed by Polish, Korean, Japanese and Telugu. Per state regulations if an attendance center has 20 or more students who qualify for EL services and speak the same language, a district is mandated to establish a Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE) program for those students. Further assessment determines what those services may look like in District. Currently, D15 offers bilingual programs in accordance with state mandates in Spanish, Polish, Japanese, Telugu, Tamil, and Bulgarian. SPANISH DUAL LANGUAGE (ONE-WAY) For our Spanish speaking ELs, we use the dual language one-way model following the Literacy Squared (Escamilla et al., 2014) framework. Dual language one-way serves ELs from the same language background with the goal of bilingualism and biliteracy. Within this framework, English Language Development (ELD): • begins in Kindergarten with 45 minutes of ELD daily (80/20), • increases to 60 minutes for Grades 1 and 2, • 90 minutes of ELD in Grade 3, and • 2 hours of English Language Arts (ELA) in Grades 4-6 with Science and Social Studies taught in Spanish. • Students from the dual language one-way dual program enter our Spanish for Native Speakers class for Grades 7 and 8. 34


Because the enrollment for the other mandated bilingual programs is limited at each grade level, the district implements a TBE program using the collaboration model and uses co-teaching or small group pull-out instruction with native language support as needed. TRANSITIONAL PROGRAM OF INSTRUCTION When there are less than 20 students who qualify for the EL program who speak the same language in one attendance center, the district implements a Transitional Program of Instruction (TPI) in English using the collaboration model in accordance with ISBE regulations. Core academic subjects are taught in English with non-EL students. Services are provided using specific strategies for ELs in a co-teaching or pull-out model. For more information on the English Learner program, visit www.ccsd15.net/SecondLanguage or https://www.isbe. net/Pages/English-Learners.aspx.

SPANISH DUAL LANGUAGE (TWO-WAY) District 15’s Spanish Dual Language program is a two-way language immersion where students are taught literacy and curriculum in both Spanish and English beginning in kindergarten. The two-way dual program consists of native speaking Spanish students and students who speak English or another language in the home. The two-way dual program begins in kindergarten with 80% of instruction in Spanish and 20% in English. Each year, Spanish instruction decreases by 10% and English instruction increases by 10% until Grade 3 when each language is taught 50% of the day. This model continues until Grade 6. The program is available to incoming Kindergarten students and is housed at Jane Addams and Winston Campus Elementary Schools. The goal of the Dual Language program is to develop bilingualism, biliteracy, academic achievement, and cross-cultural competencies for students. Students whose home school is Jane Addams or Winston Campus Elementary School (Spanish Dual Language host sites) will be given preference into the program. For more information, please visit Second Language Services / Two-Way (Spanish) Dual Language Program (www.ccsd15.net/SDL).

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CHAPTER 9

DISTRICTWIDE STANDARDIZED TESTING Standardized testing serves several purposes. Some of these tests help teachers determine how much academic growth or progress students are making in a given subject area. Other tests help teachers determine the most important areas that require an additional or heightened teaching focus. Different types of testing take place throughout the school year. The Illinois State Board of Education mandates four assessments each year: • Illinois Assessment of Readiness (IAR)—Every Illinois school district is required to administer an annual statemandated academic achievement test. The IAR assessment includes a rich set of performance-based tasks that reflect some of the most important academic skills that we strive to develop in students. IAR tests are designed to assist teachers, schools, students, and parents to understand how the critical knowledge, skills, and abilities that help prepare young people to thrive in college and careers are being developed. The IAR assessment is given to students in Grades 3 to 8. • Assessing Comprehension and Communication in English State to State (ACCESS)—ISBE requires that school districts administer ACCESS annually to all students in a second language program. ACCESS measures an English Language Learners’ development and proficiency in English. The ACCESS test is also designed to demonstrate student’s growth toward English proficiency over time. • Illinois Science Assessment—Starting in 2016, Illinois school districts were required to assess student knowledge and skill in Science. The Illinois Science Assessment is aligned to the Next Generation Science Standards and is used to measure student mastery of the Illinois science standards. This test is administered online and is taken by students in Grades 5 and 8. • The Kindergarten Individual Development Survey (KIDS) is an observational tool, not a test, designed for teachers use to help understand the developmental readiness of children entering Kindergarten. KIDS focuses on the knowledge, skills, and behaviors across four key domains that most impact long-term student success. The domains are: Approaches to Learning and Self-Regulation; Social and Emotional Development; Language and Literacy Development; and Cognition: Math. In addition to these state-mandated tests, District 15 uses the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) testing system. Students in Grades 2-8 are tested at least twice a year (fall and spring). Some schools may also choose to administer MAP tests during the winter. The computer-based MAP tests measure individual student achievement in three academic areas: reading, language arts, and mathematics. They accurately reflect each student’s knowledge and understanding, and they measure growth over time. Tests dynamically adjust to a student’s performance level, making test scores more accurate. MAP test results are shared with parents at the close of each testing window. The information provided through MAP testing better enables the District to make appropriate, data-driven decisions at the classroom, school, and District levels. It also allows teachers to make rapid adjustments in instruction to respond to identified student needs. For students in Grades K-2, the District uses a short screening measure of students’ reading proficiency using curriculum-based measures. Curriculum Based Measures is used to record student early reading skills including alphabet recognition and sounds, phonemic awareness, and oral reading fluency. Other individually administered tests may be required if additional information is needed to provide more targeted educational programming for a child. For example, a variety of processed-based assessments are used, including the Fountas and Pinnell Benchmark Assessment System, Oral Language Assessment, Words Their Way Inventory, and additional classroom-based assessments. Other tests, like the Cognitive Abilities Test (CogAT), a standardized test that measures a student’s verbal, non-verbal, and quantitative abilities is used together with MAP reading and mathematics scores to determine whether or not a student would benefit from academically talented and gifted programming in Grades 3-6. When needed, individual evaluations may also include psychological or educational assessment as part of a case study evaluation for specialized educational services. Parent permission is required for this type of evaluation.

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Please be certain your child has adequate sleep prior to testing and encourage your child to do his or her best when taking the tests. The opportunity for making up tests is limited, so it is important that you schedule doctor appointments or important family commitments when students are not involved in standardized testing. No single test can provide a complete picture of a child’s achievement. Classroom performance, teacher observation, and other tests help provide additional information about your child. Parents are provided student’s achievement level and academic growth, if applicable and available, on each state academic assessment. Questions about your child’s test results should be directed to his/her teacher or the school principal. For more information on testing, see the District 15 website at www.ccsd15.net/testing.

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CHAPTER 10

STUDENT BREAKFAST AND LUNCH PROGRAM GENERAL OVERVIEW School Nutrition Services is made up of a team of more than 70 food and nutrition professionals dedicated to serving our students healthy meals. Breakfast is offered in most buildings, and lunch is offered to all students in all District buildings. At our elementary buildings, meals are prepared and delivered daily from our central kitchen facility. Our four junior highs have individual kitchens and prepare the multiple choices that are offered daily for students. School meals are healthy meals. We offer a variety of affordable and appealing choices daily. Programs are operated under the federally funded National School Breakfast and Lunch Programs. Regulations are developed and administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Illinois School Board of Education. We are inspected at least three times each year by local health departments and consistently score very high. Daily menu selections are served in age-appropriate portions, and ensure that students are receiving the recommended daily allowances of key nutrients, such as vitamins A and C, iron, and calcium when averaged over a five-day period. With the introduction of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, all students must select at least a half-cup serving of fruit and/or vegetable with their meal. Our Fruit and Veggie Boost Bars offer a variety of fruit and vegetables daily. In addition to fruit cups and chilled fruit, we also offer a daily fresh seasonal fruit basket. Our products are formulated to meet federal standards for low fat, low sodium, and no transfats. We purchase the same brands as you might: Tyson and Pilgrim’s Pride (GoldKist) chicken products, Simplot and McCain potato products, Land O’Lakes cheeses, and Del Monte and Dole fruit. Our pizza products are formulated to use low-fat cheeses and whole-grain crusts. At least half of our grain products offered are 51 percent whole-grain rich.

LUNCH Lunches are available for purchase daily at a cost of $2.60* per meal for elementary students and $2.70* per meal for junior high students. Reduced-price meals cost 40 cents*. Students eligible for free meals are entitled to a free lunch. All meals include low-fat white and non-fat flavored milks. All of our menus are processed through a nutritional analysis software to ensure that we meet or exceed all federal program requirements. Students who bring lunch from home may purchase milk for 45 cents*.

BREAKFAST In schools where breakfast is available, the daily cost is $1.30* per meal, including milk. Students who meet eligibility requirements for free meals are also entitled to a free breakfast, and those on the reduced program may purchase breakfast for 30 cents*. *prices based on 2018-19 school year

CEP SCHOOL BUILDINGS Jane Addams, Virginia Lake, Lake Louise, Winston Campus Junior High, and Conyers Learning Academy schools are in a program called the Community Eligibility Provision (CEP), funded by the federal government. All students in these schools are entitled to receive a free breakfast and a free lunch each day. No application or action is required by parents for this voluntary program. This program does not extend as a fee waiver for students. In order to apply for a fee waiver, parents/guardians must complete the purple “Application for Educational Benefits” form, available online and at each school building.

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Á LA CARTE All á la carte items meet the “Smart Snacks in Schools” regulations. They are: under 200 calories, less than 35% of weight from total sugars, 0 grams trans fats, less than 230 mg sodium, less an 35% total calories from fat, and less than 10% saturated fat. In the elementary schools, low-fat/reduced-fat ice cream novelties and other healthy snack items may be available for purchase at an additional cost. Not all items are available every day. (See website for a list of items available.) In the junior high schools, salads, sandwiches, baked chip/pretzel products, and other low-fat items are available daily. Parents may elect to limit á la carte purchases by calling their child’s school and speaking to the lunch coordinator.

MENUS District 15 uses MealViewer Menu software, which allows parents and students to view menus on a computer or a hand-held device through Apple and Google Play. It also provides parents and students the ability to view calorie counts, allergens, and other nutritional information.

ALLERGIES There are monthly menus available for students with celiac disease, peanut, tree nut, and dairy allergies. Parents must contact Nutrition Services at 847-963-3928 for further information.

FOOD SHARING Please remind your child not to share his/her lunch with others due to food allergy concerns.

PAYMENT Breakfast and lunch may be purchased by the day, week, month, semester, or year. Meal payments must be made in advance, and may be made two ways—online, or at each school by cash or check. • Online Payments via My MealTime—Payments into a student’s school meal account can be made online with credit or debit cards (Visa, Discover, and MasterCard). Parents may also monitor student account balances and transactions, and request low balance notifications. For more information or to enroll, go to the District 15 website, www.ccsd15.net/StudentMeals, or www.mymealtime.com. • Cash or Check Payments—Cash or check payments for meals should be brought to your child’s school in a sealed envelope with your child’s name and class/section written on it. Checks should be made payable to “CCSD15 School Nutrition Services.”

UNPAID MEAL CHARGES PROCEDURES Negative Balance Procedure—When an elementary student has a low balance (the amount remaining in account is less than the value of three lunches), a low balance reminder is sent home. When a junior high student has a low balance, they are advised if additional funds are needed. If a student has a negative balance in their meal account, a negative balance reminder will be sent home with the student. We ask that when the negative balance reminder is sent home that money is sent with the student the following day or deposited via My MealTime online. Students must have money in their account to purchase á la carte items (including milk).

BALANCES OWED Notices will be sent home weekly if your student has an outstanding balance. If families need assistance in paying outstanding balances, they should contact Nutrition Services at 847-963-3928 to discuss alternative payment arrangements. All charges not paid before the end of the school year will be carried forward into the next school year. All graduating students must pay all charges in full. 39


REFUNDS Any student who is withdrawn due to moving out of district or graduating is entitled to a refund of any money remaining in their account by submitting a written or email request or by a phone call to School Nutrition Services at 847-963-3928. If there are any remaining siblings in the district after a student has graduated, any remaining funds can be transferred to the sibling by submitting a written or email request to Kristin Voigts, Nutrition Services Director, voigtsk@ccsd15.net, or by calling 847-963-3928. Should you have any questions about these procedures, please contact School Nutrition Services at 847-963-3928 or email voigtsk@ccsd15.net.

FREE AND REDUCED-PRICE MEAL SERVICES Children from households that meet federal guidelines are eligible for free or reduced-price meal services under the National School Lunch and School Breakfast programs. Children who are eligible for free lunches can also receive breakfast at no charge at schools where breakfast is served. Application forms for free or reduced-price meals are available online, on Infinite Campus, and are available at the school. Applications can be submitted at any time during the school year. They can also be submitted for a single child or for an entire family, and all types of applications can be submitted—income-based, foster child, categorical certification, etc. Households should answer all applicable questions on the form. Applications that do not contain all required information cannot be processed and approved. For more information on free or reduced-price meal services, contact your child’s school or School Nutrition Services at 847-963-3928, or visit www.ccsd15.net/StudentMeals.

HOME FOR LUNCH In elementary schools, students who live within a reasonable walking distance from school may go home for lunch. Children who walk home for lunch may leave at the beginning of the lunch hour, and must be signed out in the school office. Approval for a student to go to a friend’s home for lunch requires a note from both students’ parents. Children need to return to the school no later than five minutes before the end of the lunch hour and sign back in upon return. Junior high schools do not have open campuses, so students are expected to eat in the school cafeteria. No food or drink may be taken from the cafeteria.

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CHAPTER 11

TRANSPORTATION GENERAL OVERVIEW Your child is entitled to bus transportation at no charge if you are a resident of District 15 and live 1½ or more miles from the District-assigned school he or she will attend, or in an area declared to be hazardous as determined by the Illinois Department of Transportation. All bus assignments, as well as routes and stops, are determined by Transportation Services. Parents whose children ride school buses are asked to be sure the information on the bus assignment is accurate. If the information is not correct, please call the school office.

PAID TRANSPORTATION The Board of Education makes transportation available to other areas on a paid basis and accepts riders to the extent that transportation services are available and are approved on a case-by-case basis by transportation. No stops will be made less than one-half mile from the school building. Transportation fees for pay riders for the 2019-20 school year are:

On or before October 1, 2019*

After October 1, 2019

One child.................................... $370....................................... $420 Two children............................... $470....................................... $520 Three or more children.............. $520....................................... $570 *Families new to the District after the beginning of the school year will pay a pro-rated amount dependent on the date of registration. Payments may be made by cash, check, or credit card, or can be paid online using RevTrak, D15’s Web Store, at ccsd15.revtrak.net. Payment in full, or proof of purchase (Web Store receipt) must accompany a completed Application for Paid Transportation on or before October 1, 2019, to avoid a service charge. Returned check fee charge is $25 per check. Unless you are new to the District or are leaving the District, the annual transportation fee cannot be pro-rated, waived, or refunded. Questions should be directed to Transportation Services at 847-963-3900.

BUS RULES AND SAFETY GUIDELINES School District 15 Transportation Department will not release kindergarten or younger students without a parent meeting the bus, unless the school has a letter from the parent authorizing the driver to release students to another adult. If a Kindergarten or younger student is not met at the bus stop by the parent or if there is not a letter indicating otherwise, transportation will try to contact the house before leaving the bus stop. It is important that the school office has your current phone numbers. If there is no response, Transportation will then bring the student back to school for pickup. All students who ride buses must follow the District’s School Bus Safety Guidelines: • Students are to board and depart the bus at their assigned stop only. Students are not permitted to ride another student’s bus. • Student walkers may not ride the buses. • Students should be at the bus stop 5 minutes before the scheduled arrival time of the bus. At the end of the school day, students are to go quickly to their bus’ designated area and wait in an orderly fashion for the bus to arrive. • While waiting for the bus, students are not to stand or play on the road or street. After exiting the bus, students who must cross the road must do so 10 feet in front of the bus and only when the stop arm is out and the flashers are operating, and must follow instructions from the bus driver. • Students are to remain seated throughout the entire bus ride. 41


• Windows are not to be lowered below the safety mark. Students’ heads, hands, arms, and feet, and all objects must be kept inside the bus. • Loud conversation, profane language, throwing objects, and discourteous actions toward the bus driver or other passengers will not be tolerated. • Students are responsible for any damage to the bus. • Glass containers, live animals, and large objects may not be carried on the bus. Please encourage your child(ren) to wear their seat belt while riding the bus. Students who display inappropriate behavior may have their transportation privileges taken away. Gross disobedience or misconduct providing grounds for suspension from riding the school bus includes: • Prohibited student conduct as defined in Board of Education Policy 7:190 Student Behavior; • Willful injury or threat of injury to a bus driver or to another rider; • Willful damage and/or defacement of the bus; • Repeated use of profanity; • Repeated willful disobedience of the bus driver’s directives; or • Such other behavior as the administration deems to threaten the safe operation of the bus and/or its occupants. To enhance bus safety, video cameras are installed on all District buses to assist the driver in monitoring student behavior. Students who display inappropriate behavior will be subject to consequences, which may include but are not limited to loss of bus riding privileges, detention, and/or suspension.

VERSATRANS MY STOP™ GPS PARENT PORTAL PROGRAM District 15 offers the Versatrans My Stop GPS Parent Portal program, providing parents with online access to a wide range of information regarding the transportation services that the District provides their children, via web browser (desktop, laptop, tablet, or smartphone) or through an app available for both Apple and Android devices. Access to My Stop is available to District 15 parents at no cost. My Stop allows parents to see an estimated time of arrival (ETA) for the bus arriving at their child’s specific bus stop. The ETA is updated frequently and My Stop will also inform parents if the bus is running late based on the pick-up and drop-off times. Use of the app version of My Stop also includes push notifications where District 15 may communicate other alerts to parents including manual and automatic notification of late buses, school closings/delays, or other pertinent messages. These can be targeted to a specific group or broadcast to all users by District 15, resulting in more relevant notifications to parents. To access My Stop, parents can download the app for free through the Apple or Android marketplaces. Login credentials are the same as with Versatrans e-Link. No other app-specific account creation is required. Further instructions on accessing My Stop and other frequently asked questions, including the URL for the browser-based version (without push notifications), can be found at: www.ccsd15.net/mystop.

TRANSPORTATION FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS Q: Can my child get off at a stop other than their assigned home bus stop? A: No. A driver is only permitted to drop students off at the designated stop indicated on their route sheet. Student school bus rosters need to remain consistent for the safety of all. Q: My child is staying over at a friend’s house. Can they ride their friend’s bus? A: No. A driver is only permitted to drop students off at the designated stop indicated on their route sheet. Student school bus rosters need to remain consistent for the safety of all. Q: Why are students asked to arrive at the bus stop five minutes before the bus pickup time? A: We ask students to arrive at their assigned bus stop at least five minutes prior to pick up time so that they are ready and waiting for the bus to arrive. This helps to ensure a faster loading time. It also ensures that they are there in case the time on their clock or watch differs slightly from the time for the driver. 42


Q: My child’s bus frequently arrives later than the scheduled pickup time. What causes the delays? A: Bus routes are planned to run on a fairly set schedule. Sometimes there could be traffic delays for various reasons. Sometimes children are not ready and waiting at earlier bus stops, which can cause the bus to run behind schedule on all future stops. This is another reason why we ask all children to be ready and waiting at their bus stops so we can minimize delays. Q: The bus didn’t show up on time for my child. How long should he/she wait at the stop? A: Your child should arrive at the stop at least five minutes before the regular arrival time of the bus. If there is a substitute driver, the times may not be absolutely consistent with the regular times. If the bus is late, ask your child to remain at the stop. Buses can break down, roads can be blocked, a driver may be ill or have emergencies, etc. which may result in a late bus. If the wait becomes extreme (approximately 20 minutes), please call the Transportation Office at 847-963-3909/3912. Q: My child’s bus arrives later/earlier than I want. Can the time be changed? A: All District 15 buses operate on a comprehensive schedule, completing two or three routes in the morning and again in the afternoon. This helps to ensure that the system operates safely and efficiently, while working to deliver students to school on time. Because of the number students needing transportation, and to ensure effective scheduling, the overall bus schedules cannot be adjusted to accommodate an individual request. Q: My child missed the bus. Can the bus come back to the bus stop? A: Buses cannot return for students who missed the bus. Please be sure your child arrives at the designated bus stop at least five minutes ahead of schedule. Q: My child missed the bus at school this afternoon. Can the bus come back? A: At most schools, the drivers receive a signal from school staff when they can depart after a sufficient time has been allowed for students to exit the school to board the buses. Sometimes students are held up at school for unforeseen reasons and miss their school bus. Once buses depart the school, if the Transportation Department is notified that a child is left behind, every effort will be made to return for the student. However, if the bus is no longer in the proximity of the school the driver will not be able to return until the entire route has been completed. Q: I can’t see my child’s bus stop from my house. How can I get the bus stop moved closer? A: Bus stops are placed at centralized locations that can be safely accessed by a significant number of students to minimize the time length and mileage of the run. If you have concerns about your child’s safety you are encouraged to accompany your child to the bus stop or arrange a neighborhood buddy to walk with your child. Q: The bus drives right past my house. Why can’t it stop at my house? A: Bus stops are placed to allow the buses easy access and egress through neighborhoods while keeping safety a priority. Bus stops are designed so that no child has to walk more than an average of two tenth of a mile (2 blocks). In addition, adding bus stops causes further delays on our bus routes and extends the student’s ride time. This means that bus routes would have to start earlier in the morning to arrive to school on time. Similarly, in the afternoon it would mean students arrive home later. Q: Does the driver have the right to assign seats on the bus? A: The bus driver may assign seats as he/she feels necessary to maintain order and safety on the bus. Q: To who should I speak to about problems that occurred on my child’s bus? A: If there is an issue or a concern on the bus or with a bus driver, route, or general questions, please call the Transportation Department Office at 847-963-3900.

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Q: Another child is harassing or bullying my child while they are on the bus. What should I do? A: Community Consolidated School District 15 has a policy that specifically prohibits bullying at school, during school events, field trips, and on a school bus. The bus driver’s main focus must be on operating the school bus safely. As a result, the majority of the driver’s attention is focused on the road and traffic conditions, so he/ she may not see or hear inappropriate behavior among the students on the bus when it occurs. Students who engage in bullying or harassing behaviors are subject to disciplinary action. Please report any problems to your child’s school or the Transportation Department at 847-963-3900 so appropriate steps may be taken. Q: Are there consequences if a student misbehaves on the bus? A: Yes. Bus drivers report problems to the student’s school. Administrators investigate and follow progressive disciplinary action as needed. Q: The bus driver disciplined my child on the bus today. Does the driver have the right to this? A: The school bus driver is responsible for the safe operation of the bus. He/she should receive the same level of respect afforded to a classroom teacher, assistant, or other school employee. When necessary, drivers may correct a student. In most cases, that resolves the problem. If the misconduct continues, the driver may complete a conduct report to notify the school of the event for further review, if appropriate, disciplinary action. Q: What is a student conduct report? A: A student conduct report is completed by the bus driver or bus aide and used to report a student who violated the safety rules on the bus that may cause harm to the student, to another student, or the public. This includes actions that distract the bus driver’s attention from the roadway. If the student conduct report is completed for a student, the school staff members will contact the student’s family if they need to speak to the parent or guardian as part of the disciplinary steps taken to resolve the problem. Q: Can a family member or other adult board a school bus at the bus stop or at school? A: No. It is illegal for any unauthorized individual to stop or board a school bus. Please do not attempt to board a school bus along the route or at school. The safety of the children is always our priority. Q: Can students bring large musical instruments with them on the bus? A: Musical instruments are permitted on the school bus as long as the student can carry the instrument or object on and off the bus by him/herself. They must be placed in the lap or stored between the student’s legs and the barrier in the front of the student. Instruments or large objects cannot block the aisle. Large instruments such as drum kits, cellos, and basses are too large to be transported on school buses safely. In an accident, these items can easily become a projectile object and can injure a student. If you are unsure, please check with your child’s school before bringing a large musical instrument or object to the bus stop. Q: How do I locate a lost item on a school bus? A: If a driver finds an item on the bus, he/she will hold it until the following day. The student may ask the driver if his/her item was found on the bus. If it remains unclaimed, the driver will bring the item to the Transportation Office. If you contact the Transportation Office, please provide us with a full description of the item. Often drivers are not able to inspect buses while they are on the road and will check for lost items at their next assignment. Because electronic devices such as cell phones, tables, iPods, and games are very popular, the recovery rate is very low. We recommend that students store all personal items in a secure place such as their backpack while traveling to and from school. For additional assistance, please contact Judith Bramer, Assistant Director of Transportation, 847-963-3904; Tom Bramley, Director of Transportation Services, 847-963-3905; or Mike Adamczyk, Chief School Business Official, 847963-3032. To find out your child’s student identification number, please contact your school. For questions regarding the Versatrans My Stop GPS Parent Portal program, contact Transportation Services at 847-963-3900.

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CHAPTER 12

HEALTH SERVICES GENERAL OVERVIEW Student health services provided within District schools is directed toward a goal of good health and based on the belief that learning and health are connected. The Health Services staff includes a health services coordinator, an assistant health services coordinator, and registered nurses in every school. Nurses positively affect student attendance. A registered nurse at school every day allows for prompt and professional responses to health concerns and medical issues. In the event of illness or accidents, the nurse provides emergency care. Responsibilities of the nurse include first aid and illness care, the maintenance of student health records, the development of healthcare plans, and screenings for student vision and hearing needs. Parents/guardians are encouraged to bring questions about immunizations, health exams, medications, or student health needs to the nurse.

GUIDELINES TO DETERMINE WHEN TO SEND YOUR CHILD TO SCHOOL Keep your child at home if they have: • • • • • • •

a fever (temperature of 100 or greater), vomiting, diarrhea, undiagnosed rash, communicable diseases (such as strep throat, influenza, chicken pox, measles, etc.), pink eye (conjunctivitis), or head lice infestation (live head lice).

Before a student may return to school, he/she must be free of the above symptoms (without medication) for 24 hours. If a student has been prescribed antibiotic medication, he/she may return to school after completing 24 hours of prescribed medication. When the above noted symptoms occur during school, parents will be contacted to pick the child up from school. An ill or injured student who is sent home may only be released to the parent/guardian or emergency contact provided by the parent/guardian. In the event of a serious or life-threatening injury or illness, EMS services/911 will be called to provide care. It is important that the school has accurate parent phone numbers and emergency contacts. Please keep the school office up to date with current contact information. Attending after-school events should be avoided when your child does not attend school due to illness symptoms or is sent home from school with illness symptoms. Best health practices recommends children remain home, in recovery, until they are no longer contagious and free from symptoms for 24 hours. Health Services staff provide care for students who become ill or injured at school. Generally, student injuries are easily managed with adhesive bandages, cold packs, and “TLC,” allowing students to return to their classrooms. It is required that parents/guardians call school to report their child’s absence. To prevent the spread of illness in the classroom, parents/guardians are encouraged to report symptoms and the student’s diagnosis to the school. In the event of a public health crisis, the District will follow the recommendations of public health officials.

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MEDICATION POLICY All medication (including over-the-counter medications) requiring administration at school must: 1. Be brought to school by the parents and turned into the school office, along with the Medication and Health Care Treatment Administration Form, available at www.ccsd15.net/MedicationAdministration. This form must be complete prior to medication being given. 2. The medication must be in the original container and have an appropriate label. 3. The Medication and Health Care Treatment Administration Form must be renewed annually, if needed in the next school year. 4. Any changes in a medication, dose, or time will require a written order from the licensed prescriber. 5. The medication must be picked up by a parent/guardian at the end of the year or when the medication is discontinued; medication that is not picked up will be discarded.

MEDICATION ADMINISTRATION The administration of medication to a student at school is discouraged unless it is absolutely necessary to allow the student’s academic participation. All medication will be stored in a secure location in the health office, with the exception of emergency medications and epinephrine. Students may carry these medications within the school properties if additional consent forms are provided. Medication at school is administered by the school’s registered nurse, a school administrator, or an authorized staff member, in accordance with the Illinois State Board of Education’s recommended guidelines and Board of Education Policy 7:270 Administering Medicines to Students. Note: The school district, school, and its employees and agents are exempt from liability or professional discipline, except for willful and wanton conduct, as a result of any injury arising from the administration of medication, including asthma medication, epinephrine (whether or not undesignated), or an opioid antagonist. Parents/ guardians will be notified after the administration of epinephrine (whether or not designated), or an opioid antagonist.

REQUIRED HEALTH EXAMINATIONS AND IMMUNIZATION RECORDING For the purpose of safeguarding the health of children, District 15 enforces Illinois student health requirements. These requirements consist of health, dental, and eye exams and immunizations specific to grade and age. HEALTH EXAMS Health exams are required for students entering preschool, kindergarten, and sixth grade, and those new to the school. The Certificate of Child Health Examination form is available in the school office and on the website. The exam form, completed and signed by a licensed healthcare provider, must be dated within one year prior to the first day of school and must include lead screening for children who are six years or younger and diabetes screening. A tuberculosis (TB) skin test is recommended. The Health History section of the form must be completed and signed by the parent/guardian. According to Board of Education Policy 7:100 Health, Eye, and Dental Examinations, Immunizations, and Exclusion of Students and Illinois School Code, students who do not provide proof of receiving the required immunization and/or exam are excluded from school on October 15. Students new to Illinois schools, who register midterm, are allowed 30 days following registration to comply with the health requirements. Required school immunizations are: Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis (DTP/DTaP) Pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten • Have received 4 doses of DTP/DTaP at the recommended intervals with the last dose received on or after the fourth birthday. 46


Grades 6, 7, and 8 • Have received 1 booster Tdap. Polio (IPV) Pre-Kindergarten • Have received 3 doses of IPV at the recommended intervals. Kindergarten • Have received 4 doses of IPV at the recommended intervals with the last dose received on or after the fourth birthday. Hepatitis B (HBV) Pre-Kindergarten and Grades 6, 7, and 8 • Have received 3 doses of Hepatitis B vaccine at the recommended intervals. Varicella (Chicken Pox) Pre-Kindergarten • Have received 1 dose of varicella vaccine after the first birthday. Kindergarten through Grade 8 • Have received 2 doses of varicella vaccine with the first dose on or after the first birthday. Measles (Rubeola) German Measles (Rubella, 3 Day) Mumps – (MMR) Pre-Kindergarten • Have received 1 dose of MMR vaccine after the first birthday. Kindergarten through Grade 8 • Have received 2 doses of MMR vaccine with the first dose on or after the first birthday. Meningococcal conjugate (MCV4) Grades 6, 7,and 8 • Have received 1 dose of meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV4) on or after 11 years of age. Additional immunizations for students less than 5 years old (Pre-Kindergarten): • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)—Have received the series of Hib vaccines. • Pneumococcal—Have received the pneumococcal vaccine according to the PCV schedule. Immunization data: Visit the District 15 website for the latest Student Health Data—Immunization, as reported to the Illinois State Board of Education. DENTAL EXAMS Dental exams are required for students in kindergarten, second grade, and sixth grade. The dental examination must have taken place within 18 months prior to May 15 of the school year. A waiver form is available in the case of an undue burden or lack of access to a dentist. The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) Dental Examination form and Dental Examination Waiver form are available in the school office and at www.ccsd15.net/HealthExams. If a student fails to present proof of a dental exam or a waiver form by May 15, the school may withhold the student’s report card until the student presents proof: (1) of a completed dental exam, or (2) that a dental exam will take place within 60 days after May 15. EYE EXAMS Eye exams are required for students entering kindergarten and those entering Illinois schools for the first time. A waiver form is available in the case of an undue burden or lack of access to an optometrist or to a physician who performs eye examinations. The State of Illinois Eye Examination Report and Eye Examination Waiver form are available in the school office and at www.ccsd15.net/HealthExams. If a student fails to present proof of an eye exam or waiver form by October 15, the school may withhold the student’s report card until the student presents proof: (1) of a completed eye exam, or (2) that an eye exam will take place within 60 days after October 15. 47


INTERSCHOLASTIC SPORTS PARTICIPATION In addition, annual health examinations are required for interscholastic sports participation. Health examinations are required, before trying out, for participation in interscholastic sports. The exam form, completed and signed by a doctor, must be dated within 13 months prior to the start of practice or tryouts, and on file in the school nurse’s office. Physical forms (Certificate of Child Health Examination forms) are available in the school office and online.

GUIDELINES APPLICABLE TO MEDICAL AND RELIGIOUS IMMUNIZATION EXEMPTIONS Religious Objection to Immunization and Examination: Under Illinois law, parents or legal guardians who object to immunizations and/or health, dental, or eye examinations, or any part thereof, on religious grounds are not required to submit their children to the examinations or immunizations. When the parent(s) or legal guardian(s) is requesting a religious exemption from a vaccine requirement, a Certificate of Religious Exemption form signed by a healthcare provider licensed under the IL Medical Practice Act is required. The instructions for completing the Certificate of Religious Exemption form and the actual form are available on the website and at https://www.isbe.net/Documents/ immun-exam-gdlns-religious-exempt.pdf. Medical Exemption: Under Illinois law, exemptions from student health requirements are allowed. The examining physician, advanced-practice nurse, or physician assistant responsible for the performance of the health examination shall endorse that fact upon the health examination form or in a statement attached to the student’s Certificate of Child Health Examination form indicating an immunization is medically contraindicated. Statements from physicians indicating a specific medical condition that predisposes a student to a potential health risk if vaccinated are forwarded to the Illinois Department of Public Health Immunization Program Representative for review. If the Illinois Department of Public Health does not approve the statement, a copy of the explanation will be forwarded to the student’s parent(s) informing them that the student must receive the required immunization(s).

ACTIVITY RESTRICTIONS In the event a student has an injury or illness that prevents them from participating in recess or PE, a parent/ guardian must provide written notice to both the school nurse and PE teacher. That note is valid for a maximum of three days. A student unable to participate in outdoor recess or physical education classes for a period of more than three days must provide the school with an activity order from a healthcare provider licensed under the IL Medical Practice Act. A student who arrives at school with a new cast, splint or orthopedic brace for a recent injury must provide school with an activity order from a healthcare provider licensed under the IL Medical Practice Act. It is recommended that an activity order from a healthcare provider licensed under the IL Medical Practice Act be provided for students returning to school after surgery or a hospitalization. Activity orders should specify the student’s injury or medical problem, the dates the student may not participate, and a date to resume activity. Students with an activity restriction are restricted from similar extracurricular and/or interscholastic activities during the activity restriction time period. Students may not resume activities until a release from the healthcare provider is provided to the school.

CONCUSSION AND HEAD INJURIES Students who have experienced a force of impact believed to have caused a concussion may not participate in: • athletic practices, • competition, • physical education class, • recess, • other physical activities during the school day, or • school-sponsored after-school activities. 48


The student may resume these activities after successful completion of the return-to-play protocol, in addition to a medical release from the licensed physician who has treated the student. Students exhibiting signs, symptoms, or behaviors consistent with a concussion will be immediately removed from these activities. The district’s return-tolearn protocol guides school staff on accommodations needed, including cognitive rest, for students recovering from a concussion. Student athletes and their parents/guardians must sign the Agreement to Participate before the student is allowed to participate in a practice or interscholastic competition.

COMMUNICABLE DISEASE MANAGEMENT Control of communicable diseases is managed within the District in accordance with the Cook County and Illinois Department of Public Health guidelines and directives. Students who exhibit symptoms of communicable diseases are excluded from school until a physician indicates they may safely return. Health Services staff alert families of reported communicable diseases within the schools as recommended by the health department. Communicable disease occurrence reporting to the health department is conducted in accordance with county and state mandates. The following chart lists common illnesses, symptoms, and recommended time out of school: Disease Chicken pox

Symptoms Rash (successive crops of red dots that turn into fluid-filled blisters and then dry up to form scabs) and fever. Mumps Fever, nausea, pain, and swelling of glands along neck and jaw. German Rash (small pinkish-red blotches beginning behind measles ears and on face), slight swelling of neck glands, and upper respiratory infection. Measles Starts as a cold with fever, watery eyes and nose, sneezing, and slight cough. Rash on face follows, then rash spreads to body. Strep Fever, sore throat, and enlarged glands in neck. infections/ The scarlet fever rash (pinpoint dots) appears 1-3 scarlet fever days after onset of sore throat and strawberry tongue. Pink eye Redness of the white part of eye, itching and (Conjunctivitis) burning of the lids, and discharge. Impetigo Skin infection appearing as honey-colored blisters, frequently on the face around the mouth. Staph infection Skin infection with redness, warmth, swelling, pus, and tenderness at site; a boil or appearing like a spider bite. Pinworm Perianal itching. Head lice and Itching at nape of neck and around ears. nits infestation

Exclusion From School Not less than five days after appearance of eruption. Nine days. Until all symptoms and rash are gone.

From the onset of symptoms until four days after symptoms and abnormal mucus secretions have stopped. Until completion of 24 hours of antibiotic treatment.

Until completion of 24 hours of antibiotic treatment. Until completion of 24 hours of antibiotic treatment. Until wound is no longer draining or can be covered. Until completion of 24 hours of antibiotic treatment. Until completion of medicated shampoo treatment and no live lice are found on the head.

VISION AND HEARING SCREENINGS Screenings for vision and hearing deficits are provided in accordance with the Illinois Department of Public Health and District 15 guidelines. Parents/guardians and staff members who suspect a problem with a student’s vision or hearing are encouraged to call the nurse and request a screening. Students who do not pass the school screenings are referred for medical follow up. 49


Parents or legal guardians who object to screenings for their child on religious grounds may contact the school nurse for additional information. Note: Vision screening is not a substitute for a complete eye and vision evaluation by an eye doctor. A child is not required to undergo the vision screening if an optometrist or ophthalmologist has completed and signed a report form indicating that an examination has been administered within the previous 12 months.

FOOD ALLERGIES If your child has a life-threatening allergy, please notify your school nurse. The nurse maintains a list of students who have food allergies to share with staff on a need-to-know basis and can assist you with the necessary documents needed for school. Please refer to the district food allergy guidelines page on our website to read more about guidelines and download needed documents.

ASTHMA An increased awareness of asthma and allergies is needed to keep students safe at school. The Health Services staff maintains a list of students with asthma to share with staff on a need-to-know basis. Asthma and recommended actions for responding to emergency events, including emergency medication, are provided to staff. Illinois law requires students with asthma to provide an Asthma Action Plan that guides staff response.

DIABETES A Diabetes Care Plan will be developed and implemented for students diagnosed with diabetes, per the Care of Students with Diabetes Act. When parents submit a medical Diabetes Medical Management Plan to the school district, the plan will then be incorporated into an IEP or Section 504 plan, with protocol for implementation and staff training.

WELLNESS POLICY Severe food allergies and childhood overweight/obesity rates among children are on the rise, resulting in serious health complications for our students. The Child Nutrition and Women, Infants and Children (WIC) Reauthorization Act requires school districts to develop a local wellness policy. Part of that act also calls for the formation of a local wellness policy committee. The local wellness policy committee made up of community members, parents, teachers, and administrators, and with a mission of producing healthy world-class learners by building a connected learning community, met to develop the District 15 Wellness Policy Guidelines, which can be found on the District website, www.ccsd15.net/HealthWellness.

STUDENT BIRTHDAYS Birthday treats during the school day must be non-edible. Visit the District website for non-edible celebration ideas for parents (www.ccsd15.net/HealthWellness).

SNACKS WITHIN THE SCHOOL DAY Food consumed within the classroom is discouraged. In the event that it becomes necessary for a classroom to schedule a “healthy snack” time on a daily basis, snacks high in fiber such as fresh fruits and vegetables and/or low in fat (less than 5 grams) and sugar are recommended. These snacks should be free of the 8 major food allergens: peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, fish, shellfish, soybeans, and wheat. Please contact your child’s school nurse with further questions. Avoid pre‑packaged processed foods that are generally high in calories and fat and have little nutritional value. Limiting portion sizes so that the snack does not become a substitute for a nutritious meal and can be eaten within a limited time period is also recommended.

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INDIVIDUALIZED HEALTH PLANNING Health Services staff members act as consultants and liaisons between the family, school staff, and healthcare provider. Individualized Health Plans are developed as needed to accommodate students with special health needs. For students with disabilities, the student’s Individualized Health Plan may become part of the student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP) or 504 Plan. All health information and recommendations are shared with staff on a need-to-know basis.

PRIVACY AND CONFIDENTIALITY Confidentiality of student health records is maintained in accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and the Illinois School Student Records Act (ISSRA).

CONTACT US The Health Services staff believes family is an essential part of good health. Your input is valued and welcome. Please stop by to ask questions, share thoughts, and exchange health information. We look forward to partnering with you.

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CHAPTER 13

SAFETY EMERGENCY SCHOOL CLOSINGS The District takes the responsibility of deciding whether to close schools seriously. Generally, schools will remain open except for extremely inclement weather. When severe weather conditions exist, parents must decide whether their children can get to school safely. Even when the District decides to keep schools open, parents should review their own situation to determine if they should send their children to school. As a parent or guardian, you are also responsible for making alternative arrangements for your child’s care in the event that schools are closed due to inclement weather. If the possibility exists that a parent or older sibling will not be home, we encourage parents to designate an alternate destination for the children if school dismisses early due to inclement weather or an unforeseen circumstance. If you do decide to keep your child home on a day in which the weather is extremely inclement but schools are not closed, your child will be marked absent, but the absence will not count against any attendance incentive programs and your child will be given every opportunity to make up missed work. Snow, ice, and extremely cold temperatures may affect bus pick-up and drop-off times, sometimes causing buses to run late. If a snow day is called, that decision is made by 5 a.m. You will be notified of the closure in a variety of ways: • Phone, Text, and Email—District 15 will send a message to all parents through a voice call, text message and email. Please ensure your contact information listed in the Campus Parent portal is accurate. If you have changes you’d like to make to your personal contact information, please contact your child’s school office. • Website—If classes are cancelled due to inclement weather, an announcement will be posted on the District and all of our school websites. • Radio and TV—Should a snow day be called, District 15 will inform radio stations WGN-AM 720, WBBM-AM 780, and WGN-FM 105.9; TV stations CBS-2, NBC-5, ABC-7, WGN-9, FOX-32, and CLTV News. The announcement on the radio and TV describes our district as: “District 15, Palatine, Rolling Meadows, Cook County.”

PARENT/VISITOR PROCEDURES Parents and visitors are welcome at school; however, because unannounced visits can be disruptive and interfere with instructional time, all visits must be arranged through an appointment with the classroom teacher or office staff. Younger siblings in the classroom are a distraction; please make other arrangements for them if you plan to visit. Visits immediately before school holidays or at the end of the school year are not encouraged because those are extremely busy times for teachers and other staff members. According to District 15 procedures, when visiting a school, all visitors are required to do the following: • Enter through the designated visitor entrance door. • Sign in to the school’s visitor’s log, providing any pertinent information listed on the log (i.e., name, destination, reason for visit, time-in/time-out, etc.). • Provide personal government-issued identification card in exchange for the visitor’s pass. • Visibly wear the visitor’s pass that is provided by the school’s office personnel for the duration of the visit. • Be escorted by staff to their destination, if staff is available. • Observe all laws, school policies, procedures, and rules while visiting the school. • Sign out of the visitor’s log and return the visitor’s pass in exchange for personal government-issued identification. VISITORS TO AND CONDUCT ON SCHOOL PROPERTY The School District expects mutual respect, civility, and orderly conduct among all people on school property or at a school event. Pursuant to Board of Education Policy 8:30 Visitors to and Conduct on School Property, no person on 52


school property or at a school event (including visitors, volunteers, students, and employees) shall perform any of the following acts: • Strike, injure, threaten, harass, or intimidate a staff member, a Board member, sports official or coach, or any other person. • Behave in an unsportsmanlike manner, or use vulgar or obscene language. • Unless specifically permitted by State law, possess a weapon, any object that can reasonably be considered a weapon or looks like a weapon, or any dangerous device. • Damage or threaten to damage another’s property. • Damage or deface school property. • Violate any Illinois law, or town or county ordinance. • Smoke or otherwise use tobacco products. • Distribute, consume, use, possess, or be under the influence of an alcoholic beverage or illegal drug; be present when the person’s alcohol or illegal drug consumption is detectible, regardless of when and/or where the use occurred. • Use or possess medical cannabis. • Impede, delay, disrupt, or otherwise interfere with any school activity or function (including using cellular phones in a disruptive manner). • Enter upon any portion of school premises at any time for purposes other than those that are lawful and authorized by the Board. • Operate a motor vehicle: (a) in a risky manner, (b) in excess of 20 miles per hour, or (c) in violation of an authorized District employee’s directive. • Engage in any risky behavior, including roller-blading, roller-skating, or skateboarding. • Violate other District policies or regulations, or a directive from an authorized security officer or District employee. • Engage in any conduct that interferes with, disrupts, or adversely affects the District or a School function. Any person who engages in conduct prohibited by Board of Education Policy 8:30 Visitors to and Conduct on School Property may be ejected from school property and/or local law enforcement may be contacted. The person is also subject to being denied admission to school events or meetings for up to one calendar year. Only students are allowed to enter into the building in the morning. If a parent or visitor would like to take their child to class in the morning, they must enter through the main doors and follow the visitor sign-in policy. Items dropped off for students, such as lunches, notes, homework, keys, or musical instruments, will be delivered from the office before lunch or before dismissal. Items must be labeled with the child’s name and room number/ teacher or delivery cannot be guaranteed. PARENT VOLUNTEERS Parent volunteers are encouraged and welcome in all District 15 schools; however, we ask that the following protocols be observed: • All volunteers must sign in at the school office and wear a guest or volunteer badge while in the building. • All volunteers must note the purpose and destination of their visit and not deviate from this purpose or destination without prior notification to the school office. • All volunteers follow confidentiality guidelines when working with students. • Volunteers should not bring either under-school-age children or school-age children not attending school (i.e., absent due to illness, half-day programming, etc.) with them while volunteering. • Volunteers are considered a part of the school population, and should observe all laws, school policies, procedures, and rules while visiting the school. In the event a visitor is in the building when a lockdown is initiated, remain in the area you are in and follow the directives of trained staff members. 53


SAFTETY/EMERGENCIES District 15 is strongly committed to school safety. This commitment is demonstrated through the following actions: • The implementation of a Standardized School Crisis Plan, created in conjunction with representatives from police and fire departments, that is designed to enable school personnel to respond appropriately to a variety of emergency and/or crisis situations that may occur on or near a school. • The formation of a District 15 Safety Committee that is comprised of parents, teachers, administrators, and representatives from police and fire departments from Hoffman Estates, Palatine, and Rolling Meadows that meets quarterly to review and improve on district-wide safety policies and practices. • Conducting the following drills at each school on an annual basis as required by Illinois School Code: — Three evacuation drills. One of the three evacuation drills must be supervised by the appropriate fire department. — One bus evacuation drill. — One law enforcement drill. Each school in D15 completes two law enforcement drills annually. One of these two law enforcement drills must be a staff initiated lock-down. — One severe weather and shelter-in-place drill. • Utilizing the District’s mass communication tools, allowing communications to be sent rapidly to parents via phone, text, and/or e-mail. • Conducting an annual drill review meeting with principals and representatives from police and fire departments to continuously improve each school’s readiness to respond to an emergency and/or crisis situation. • Utilizing Raptor, a visitor management system, to screens visitors at each school against national sex offender databases. • Implementation of an online bullying and safety reporting center that allows students, parents, staff, and community members to report concerns either by name or anonymously. • Installation and regular testing of silent alarms at each school. • Installation of video cameras at the main entrance at each school. • Implementation of a system known as Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) at each school in the District that is designed to teach, model, and reinforce desired student behaviors. PBIS also provides supports to students who are struggling behaviorally. Please note that the above list of actions are not representative of all measures that are taken to promote a safe and orderly learning environment at each school in District 15. PARENT ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES BEFORE, DURING, AND AFTER EMERGENCY/CRISIS Although there are many safety measures in place at each school in the District, an emergency or crisis situation may still occur. Parents should consider the following actions before, during, or after an emergency or crisis situation: • Speak regularly with your child(ren) about the importance of reporting any concern(s) that they have about safety to an adult either at school or at home so that their concern can be acted upon. • Similarly, contact building administration to report any concerns that you have regarding school safety so that your concern(s) can be acted upon. • In the event of an emergency or crisis, a parent’s first instinct may be to go to the school immediately. Instead, help law enforcement and school officials to keep the parking lot clear and roadways leading to the area open so that the appropriate first responders can arrive on the scene as quickly as possible. Once onsite, the responders will require staging space for vehicles and personnel. Staying clear of the school will help ensure a swift arrival of first responders. • Stay home or at your workplace to receive updates via text / phone / email OR wait to be informed of a location in the community where you can go to receive real-time updates from law enforcement / district officials / designated liaisons. Each municipality with schools in District 15 (Hoffman Estates, Palatine, and Rolling Meadows) 54


have a number of locations that can be used to provide in-person information about an emergency to parents and community members. To maintain both flexibility and to ensure security of these various sites, additional locations in each community will not be shared until the day of an incident. • Make sure your emergency contact information is up-to-date and includes accurate cell phone numbers and email addresses so that there is not a delay in contacting you in the event of an emergency. Also make sure you list trusted adults as emergency contacts who would be able to pick up your child if you are not available. Without exception, students will be released only to their parents, legal guardians, or emergency contacts identified in registration materials during an emergency or crisis situation. • Social media is a powerful communication tool, but in the event of a crisis or an emergency, rely on information provided by school officials and law enforcement, and refrain from posting incomplete or unconfirmed details that may fuel confusion and/or fear in the community. PARTNERSHIPS WITH POLICE AND FIRE DEPARTMENTS District 15 enjoys a positive working relationship with police and fire departments. This relationship has been built over time based on: a shared commitment for school safety; a focus on continuous growth and improvement; open communication; and trust. District 15 is grateful for the important service that police and fire departments provide for our schools and respective communities. DEFINITION OF TERMS District 15 recognizes that school personnel and emergency responders may use terms when discussing emergency and/or crisis response that might not be known to all parties. Commonly used terms in school safety, along with their definitions, are listed below. Soft Lockdown Procedures—A soft lockdown is primarily used in two different scenarios. The first is when conditions exist outside of the school building that could potentially present a threat to the safety of the students and staff. The second is a situation inside the building where the school or local emergency responders need to keep students and staff in their classrooms and away from an incident or activity. During soft lockdowns, students and staff can continue normal classroom activities, but they should not leave the classroom or offices until advised to do so. Additionally, no one is allowed to enter or leave the building until the soft lockdown has ended. Hard Lockdown Procedures—A hard lockdown is used when a serious/volatile situation exists that could jeopardize the physical safety of the students and staff. During a hard lockdown, staff members will ignore all bells and fire alarms unless they receive verbal instructions from local emergency responders or the conditions (fire, structural damage, etc.) warrant the evacuation of the area. Additionally, no one will be allowed to enter or leave the building until the hard lockdown has ended. Relocation (Evacuation) Procedures—An evacuation may be necessary whenever it is determined that it is safer outside the building than inside the building. In situations where weather is inclement or students and staff will be required to evacuate for an extended period of time, an off-campus evacuation may be initiated rather than evacuating to the on-campus location. Conditions requiring an evacuation may include a fire, an explosion, a hazardous material release within the building, or some type of structural failure in the building. Severe Weather Watch—A tornado watch means that conditions in the area are such that a tornado is possible. No siren will be sounded when the National Weather Service issues a tornado watch. During a tornado watch, all activities should continue as usual. Classes should be dismissed at the regular time, etc., but children who ride buses should be kept inside the school until their buses arrive, and students who walk home should be advised to go straight there. Severe Weather Warning—A tornado warning means a tornado has actually been sighted or has touched down in District 15 or the surrounding area. When a tornado warning is issued, sirens are activated by Palatine, Rolling Meadows, and Hoffman Estates police departments. This warning will be a three-minute, sustained, steady blast. If school is in session when notification of a tornado warning is received from the National Weather Service via the schools’ weather alert receivers, children will be required to remain in school. School personnel should stop all outside activity, and allow no one in areas under large roof spans, such as gymnasiums. 55


Each school has devised a “take cover” plan that is best suited to its unique building characteristics, and principals and emergency management have cooperatively identified the safest places to take shelter in each building. When a warning is issued, all personnel and students should leave their classrooms, closing the doors on their way out, and go directly to the area designated as the tornado shelter. Once there, children must sit on the floor with their backs to the wall and their heads in their folded arms. Under no circumstances will classes be dismissed as long as a tornado warning is in effect. Once the warning has expired and the danger has passed, an “all clear” message and updates on the status of the emergency weather conditions will be sent from the superintendent’s office, at which point children can be dismissed. If a tornado warning occurs at regular dismissal time, every effort should be made to bring the students back into the building and provide them shelter until the “all clear” signal is given. At that time, walkers can be dismissed, and bused children can be picked up at their schools in the normal sequence on a delayed basis.

ACCIDENTS Minor accidents which occur during the school day are treated by the classroom teacher or registered nurse. If the injury appears serious, the school nurse will call a parent. If a parent cannot be reached, the school will call the emergency number provided on the enrollment form. If a parent or designated emergency contact are not available and the injury requires immediate aid, the child will be taken to the nearest hospital by paramedics. Either the school nurse, principal, or assistant principal will accompany the child while school staff continues to try locating a parent.

CARING, SAFE, AND ORDERLY LEARNING ENVIRONMENT Community Consolidated School District 15 is committed to maintaining safe and orderly schools and offices. Board of Education Policy 8:11 Caring, Safe, and Orderly Learning Environment supports the District’s Civic Beliefs by promoting mutual respect, civility, and orderly conduct among students, employees, parents, and other community members. Any individual entering District 15 property or attending District-sponsored activities including extracurricular activities, Board meetings, or athletic events shall treat others with dignity and respect. This policy is not intended to deprive any person of his/her right to freedom of expression, but rather to maintain to the extent possible a reasonable and safe, harassment-free educational atmosphere for the school community with minimal disruption. The District encourages positive communication and discourages volatile, hostile, or aggressive behaviors. The District expects public cooperation with this endeavor.

KEEPING OUR STUDENTS SAFE The safety of all children attending District 15 schools is a top priority. Please review the school’s general rules and safety precautions with your child, putting particular emphasis on bus rules, bicycle rules and wearing a helmet, obeying the safety patrol, and returning home immediately after school unless other arrangements have been made. If you transport your child to school by car, please use the areas designated by the school for dropping off and picking up your child. District 15 schools do not permit such items as knives, bean shooters, hard baseballs, etc., to be brought to school. If items that are deemed potentially hazardous to the student or others are brought to school, these articles will be confiscated.

SCHOOL THREATS TAKEN SERIOUSLY If students write or talk about injuring or killing another student, staff member, or any other person, or about using weapons through any media, these statements will be taken as serious threats. All reports of such threats or statements will be fully investigated. If the information is substantiated, the student(s) involved will be disciplined as appropriate under District and/or building policies and local municipal ordinances. It is important for students to think about what they say, especially when angry or upset. Teachers, social workers, school psychologists, administrators, and services are available to assist students with behavioral or anger management issues. 56


BULLYING/SAFETY TIP LINE District 15’s Bullying/Safety Tip Line provides parents and students with an additional option to report bullying and/or other safety concerns within their schools. Similar to making a report in person or over the phone, when making an online report, please include as much detailed information as possible because doing so will greatly assist administrators in investigating and addressing the concern(s). Although it is usually best to speak directly with an administrator when making a report about bullying and/or other safety concerns at your school, sometimes students and parents are not comfortable doing so. Toward that end, this tool also allows for anonymous reporting. Please keep in mind that online reports received outside of school hours will not be reviewed and acted upon until school is back in session. With that said, if your concern(s) require(s) immediate attention, please contact local law enforcement. To submit a concern via the Bullying/Safety Tip Line, visit www.ccsd15.net/TipLine.

STUDENT APPEARANCE POLICY Appropriate student dress helps the school maintain an atmosphere conducive to learning not only during school hours, but also at all school functions. Clothing and accessories that display undesirable and/or unhealthy images (such as, but not limited to, alcohol, drugs, cigarettes, violence, or gang-related symbols) do not belong in a school setting. Also inappropriate are depictions of vulgar actions/language/behavior, gang signs, or sexually suggestive pictures or statements. Any obvious combinations of current gang colors will not be allowed. These policies will be strongly enforced. A determination that a student’s dress is inappropriate will be made by the principal, assistant principal, or police liaison officer. The following guidelines are used in determining whether attire is appropriate. They include, but are not limited to: • No bare midriffs. • No undergarments of any kind showing. • No bare or lace-up backs. • Shoulders must be covered by at least two inches of fabric. • Skirts and shorts must not be shorter than four inches above the knee. • Tops may not be lower than an imaginary line drawn from armpit to armpit. • No hats or bandanas are to be worn inside the building except when entering or preparing to leave the building unless they are for religious or medical purposes. • Temporary hair coloring, glitter, or other alterations that may cause distractions in the classroom are not permitted. • No night clothes (e.g., pajama pants). • No mismatched shoelaces. For safety reasons, students should follow these guidelines: • Footwear which is safe for indoor and outdoor physical activity should be worn at all times. (Shoes with wheels are not allowed, platform shoes and thong-style sandals are discouraged.) • No belts, necklaces, or bracelets with spikes or chains, including chains connecting wallets to a belt. • No pants or skirts that drag on the floor. • No coats, jackets, or other outerwear in the classroom. Students who do not comply with the student appearance policy are subject to disciplinary action and will be required to change into appropriate attire. Students are permitted to wear costumes on Halloween as long as their attire complies with the above student appearance policy and the following set of expectations: 57


• Costumes involving fake blood are not allowed. • Actual weapons or look-alikes weapons are not allowed. • Masks that cover the face and head are not allowed. • Costume make-up is allowed provided it does not cover the student’s entire face. Staff members must be able to identify students. • Costumes that could be offensive or perpetuate a stereotype about someone’s culture, gender, heritage or religion are not allowed.

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL RESOURCE OFFICERS The Village of Palatine and the City of Rolling Meadows have intergovernmental agreements with the District to provide a part-time school resource officer assigned to each junior high school. The purpose of the school resource officer is to assist school officials in maintaining a safe, orderly, and caring educational environment for all students. The officers provide a variety of services to students, parents, and staff and serve as positive role models for all students. They meet with individual students, small groups of students, and entire classes to discuss various aspects of the law and procedures of the court system. They are available to discuss specific situations with parents and staff. The officers are also available to elementary school parents, staff, and students.

CANINE SEARCHES Creating and maintaining a safe environment for our students and staff is one of the most important tasks educators have. It is with this in mind that each junior high school in Community Consolidated School District 15 partners with local law enforcement to conduct two (2) unannounced canine searches each year for illegal drugs. All canine searches are limited in scope to lockers and other common areas (e.g., gym lockers, library, etc.) with building administration being present throughout the exercise. When a canine search is being conducted, the school is placed into a soft lockdown. A soft lockdown requires students and staff to remain in their classroom where instruction continues to take place. In the event that illegal drugs are found during a canine search, building administration conducts a full investigation that would most likely involve the participation of our school resource officer and appropriate school-based and legal consequences would be issued. Junior high administration will inform their parent and staff communities of each canine search after it has taken place. Additional information about searches in Community Consolidated School District 15 can be found in Board of Education Policy 7:140 Search and Seizure.

SEX OFFENDER REGISTRATION ACT Public Act 94-004 makes information about registered child sex offenders available to the public, including names, addresses, and offenses committed. This information can be viewed on the Illinois State Police website at www.isp.state.il.us/sor, or parents may obtain information from their local police department or sheriff’s office.

ERIN’S LAW Public Act 096-1524, known as Erin’s Law, amends the school code to address the prevention of child sexual abuse. In partnership with parents and families, the District is committed to raising awareness and providing resources to further community prevention efforts. Parents are encouraged to review the warning signs of possible child abuse as listed below: • Unexplained injuries and changes in behavior, • Returning to earlier behavior (regressing to behaviors more appropriate for younger children), • Fear of going to certain previously welcome locations (neighbors, relatives, friends, etc.), • Changes in eating habits and/or sleeping patterns, 58


• Changes in school performance and/or attendance, • Risk-taking behavior, • Inappropriate sexual behavior, • Mood swings, and/or • Lack of personal care or hygiene. Visit the District 15 website (search “Erin’s Law”) for additional resources for parents. In addition to the schools, local and national resources committed to child safety, abuse prevention, and intervention include: • Northwest CASA (Center Against Sexual Assault)—24-Hour Hotline 888-802-8890 • The Bridge Youth and Family Services—Crisis Line 847-359-7490 • AMITA Health Center for Mental Health—Crisis Prevention 847-952-7460 • National Child Sexual Abuse Help Line—866-FOR-LIGHT (866-367-5444) • www.preventchildabuse.org • www.childluresprevention.com

SUICIDE AND DEPRESSION AWARENESS The District addresses suicide and depression awareness in conjunction with Board of Education Policy 7:290 Suicide and Depression Awareness and Prevention, in order to provide students, parents/guardians and employees with practices and procedures for early identification and referral of students possibly at risk of suicide.

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CHAPTER 14

MISCELLANEOUS CARE OF SCHOOL PROPERTY Damage to school property is a concern for all members of the community due to rising repair costs. Students and their families are responsible for the cost of repairs and/or replacement if a student damages school property. Please review with your child the school’s instructions on proper respect for school property and material.

USE OF SCHOOL BUILDING Application for use of a school building must be made on a form provided by the principal and signed by a responsible representative of the organization or group making application. The District remains viewpoint neutral when granting access to school facilities under Board of Education Policy 8:20 Community Use of School Facilities. The terms and costs, where applicable, are printed on the form. The applicant also agrees to furnish District 15 with a Certificate of Insurance or a Hold Harmless Agreement before an event can take place. School schedules and park district activities have priority for facility use.

PESTICIDE APPLICATION PROCEDURES District 15 follows state and federal regulations that require notice two business days prior to any pesticide application in a school. In the event pesticide use is required, District 15 will provide the appropriate notification to parents.

AVAILABILITY OF ASBESTOS MANAGEMENT PLAN The District is required by law to maintain an Asbestos Management Plan and provide written notice at least once each school year to parents and guardians. The Asbestos Management Plan is specific to each school building and a copy is available for review in every school office. The Asbestos Management Plan is updated every six (6) months and includes the results of periodic re-inspections, response actions, and post-response actions, if any. Please contact your school office if you wish to view the Asbestos Management Plan.

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CHAPTER 15

BOARD OF EDUCATION POLICY STUDENT EQUAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES Board of Education Policy 7:10 Equal Educational Opportunities provides: Equal educational and extracurricular opportunities shall be available for all students without regard to color, race, nationality, religion, gender, sexual orientation, ancestry, age, physical and mental handicap or disability, gender identity, status of being homeless, order of protection status, or actual or potential parental or marital status, including pregnancy. Further, the District will not knowingly enter into agreements with any entity or any individual that discriminates against students on the basis of any protected status, except that the District remains viewpoint neutral when granting access to school facilities under Board of Education Policy 8:20 Community Use of School Facilities. Any student may file a discrimination grievance by using the Uniform Complaint Procedure. NONDISCRIMINATION The District prohibits discrimination against individuals on the basis of color, race, national origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, pregnancy, ancestry, age, marital status, physical or mental disability, immigration status, order of protection status, status of being homeless, military status, or unfavorable discharge from military service, or any other legally protected characteristic. District employees are expected to demonstrate sensitivity and respect in dealing with students. The District’s prohibition against discrimination includes, but is not limited to, proscribing any employee from making any discriminatory statements, comments, or remarks to or about any student or engaging in any discriminatory conduct toward any student because of or relating to the student’s legally protected characteristic. District employees found to have violated the District’s non-discrimination or equal education policies will be subject to discipline, up to and including termination. GENDER EQUITY No student shall, on the basis of gender, sexual orientation, or gender identity, be denied equal access to programs, activities, services, or benefits, or be limited in the exercise of any right, privilege, advantage, or denied access to educational and extracurricular programs and activities. Any student may file a gender equity complaint by using the Uniform Complaint Procedure. A student may appeal the Board of Education’s resolution of the complaint to the Regional Superintendent of Schools (pursuant to 105 ILCS 5/3 10 of The School Code) and, thereafter, to the State Superintendent of Education (pursuant to 105 ILCS 5/2-3.8 of The School Code). The Superintendent appoints a nondiscrimination coordinator. The Superintendent and building administrators shall inform staff members and students of this policy and grievance procedure. Any District employee, parent, or student may file a complaint of discrimination pursuant to Board of Education Policy 2:260 Uniform Grievance Procedure by bringing his or her complaint to one of the non-discrimination coordinators identified below. EQUAL ACCESS The District provides equal access to the Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, and other designated youth groups. Nondiscrimination coordinators: Dr. Claire Kowalczyk at 847-963-3202 or kowalczc@ccsd15.net, and (to be determined), 580 North 1st Bank Drive, Palatine, IL 60067.

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STUDENT AND FAMILY PRIVACY RIGHTS SURVEYS All surveys requesting personal information from students, as well as any other instrument used to collect personal information from students, must advance or relate to the District’s educational objectives as identified in Board of Education Policy 6:10 Educational Philosophy and Objectives, or assist students’ career choices. This applies to all surveys, regardless of whether the student answering the questions can be identified and regardless of who created the survey. SURVEYS CREATED BY A THIRD PARTY Before a school official or staff member administers or distributes a survey or evaluation created by a third party to a student, the student’s parent(s)/guardian(s) may inspect the survey or evaluation upon their request and within a reasonable time of their request. This section applies to every survey that is created by a person or entity other than a District official, staff member, or student regardless of whether the student answering the questions can be identified, and regardless of the subject matter of the questions. SURVEYS REQUESTING PERSONAL INFORMATION School officials and staff members shall not request, nor disclose, the identity of any student who completes any survey or evaluation (created by any person or entity, including the District) containing one or more of the following items: 1. Political affiliations or beliefs of the student or the student’s parent/guardian; 2. Mental or psychological problems of the student or the student’s family; 3. Behavior or attitudes about sex; 4. Illegal, anti-social, self-incriminating, or demeaning behavior; 5. Critical appraisals of other individuals with whom students have close family relationships; 6. Legally recognized privileged or analogous privileged relationships, such as those with lawyers, physicians and ministers; 7. Religious practices, affiliations, or beliefs of the student or the student’s parent/guardian; 8. Income (other than that required by law to determine eligibility for participation in a program or for receiving financial assistance under such program). The student’s parent(s)/guardian(s) may: 1. Inspect the survey or evaluation upon, and within a reasonable time of, their request, and/or 2. Refuse to allow their child or ward to participate in the activity described above. The school shall not penalize any student whose parent(s)/guardian(s) exercises this option. INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIAL A student’s parent(s)/guardian(s) may inspect, upon their request, any instructional material used as part of their child/ward’s educational curriculum within a reasonable time of their request. The term “instructional material” means instructional content that is provided to a student, regardless of its format, printed or representational materials, audio-visual materials and materials in electronic or digital formats (such as materials accessible through the Internet). The term does not include academic tests or academic assessments. PHYSICAL EXAMS OR SCREENINGS No school official or staff member shall subject a student to a non-emergency, invasive physical examination or screening as a condition of school attendance. The term “invasive physical examination” means any medical examination that involves the exposure of private body parts, or any act during such examination that includes incision, insertion, or injection into the body, but does not include a hearing, vision, or scoliosis screening. 62


The above paragraph does not apply to any physical examination or screening that: 1. Is permitted or required by an applicable state law, including physical examinations or screenings that are permitted without parental notification; 2. Is administered to a student in accordance with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (20 U.S.C. §1400 et seq.); 3. Is otherwise authorized by Board policy. SELLING OR MARKETING STUDENT PERSONAL INFORMATION IS PROHIBITED No school official or staff member shall market or sell personal information concerning students (or otherwise provide that information to others for that purpose). The term “personal information” means individually identifiable information including: (1) a student or parent’s first and last name, (2) a home or other physical address (including street name and the name of the city or town), (3) a telephone number, (4) a Social Security identification number or (5) driver’s license number or state identification card. The above paragraph does not apply: (1) if the student’s parent(s)/guardian(s) have consented; or (2) to the collection, disclosure or, use of personal information collected from students for the exclusive purpose of developing, evaluating or providing educational products or services for, or to, students or educational institutions, such as the following: 1. College or other post-secondary education recruitment, or military recruitment. 2. Book clubs, magazines, and programs providing access to low-cost literary products. 3. Curriculum and instructional materials used by elementary schools and secondary schools. 4. Tests and assessments to provide cognitive, evaluative, diagnostic, clinical, aptitude, or achievement information about students (or to generate other statistically useful data for the purpose of securing such tests and assessments) and the subsequent analysis and public release of the aggregate data from such tests and assessments. 5. The sale by students of products or services to raise funds for school-related or education-related activities. 6. Student recognition programs. Under no circumstances may a school official or staff member provide a student’s “personal information” to a business organization or financial institution that issues credit or debit cards. NOTIFICATION OF RIGHTS AND PROCEDURES The Superintendent or designee shall notify students’ parent(s)/guardian(s) of: 1. This policy as well as its availability upon request from the general administration office; 2. How to opt their child or ward out of participating in surveys or other provisions addressed in this policy; 3. The approximate dates during the school year when a survey requesting personal information, as described above, is given or expected to be given; and 4. How to request access to any survey or other material described in this policy. This notification shall be given to parent(s)/guardian(s) at least annually, at the beginning of the school year, and within a reasonable period after any substantive change in this policy. The rights provided to parent(s)/guardian(s) in this policy transfer to the student when the student turns 18 years old, or is an emancipated minor.

SEXUAL HARASSMENT AND GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE Sexual harassment of students is prohibited. An employee or District agent, or student engages in sexual harassment whenever he or she makes sexual advances, requests sexual favors, or engages in other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual or sex-based nature, imposed on the basis of sex, that:

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1. Denies or limits the provision of educational aid, benefits, services, or treatment; or that makes such conduct a condition of a student’s academic status; or 2. Has the purpose or effect of: a. Substantially interfering with a student’s educational environment; b. Creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive educational environment; c. Depriving a student of educational aid, benefits, services, or treatment; or d. Making submission to or rejection of such unwelcome conduct the basis for academic decisions affecting a student. The terms intimidating, hostile, and offensive include conduct which has the effect of humiliation, embarrassment, or discomfort. Examples of sexual harassment include touching, crude jokes or pictures, discussions of sexual experiences, teasing related to sexual characteristics, and spreading rumors related to a person’s alleged sexual activities. The term sexual violence includes a number of different acts. Examples of sexual violence include, but are not limited to, rape, sexual assault, sexual battery, sexual abuse, and sexual coercion. MAKING A COMPLAINT Students are encouraged to report claims or incidences of bullying, harassment, sexual harassment, or any other prohibited conduct to the building principal, assistant principal, complaint managers, or non-discrimination coordinator. A student may choose to report to a person of the student’s same gender. Complaints will be kept confidential to the extent possible given the need to investigate. Students who make good faith complaints will not be disciplined. An allegation that a student was a victim of any prohibited conduct perpetrated by another student shall be referred to the building principal or assistant principal for appropriate action. Any student of the District who is determined, after an investigation, to have engaged in sexual harassment of another student will be subject to disciplinary action, including, but not limited to, suspension and/or expulsion. Any person making a knowingly false accusation regarding sexual harassment will likewise be subject to disciplinary action, up to and including discharge with regard to employees, or suspension and/or expulsion with regard to students. Complaint Managers/Nondiscrimination Coordinators: Dr. Claire Kowalczyk at 847-963-3202 or kowalczc@ccsd15.net, and (to be determined), 580 North 1st Bank Drive, Palatine, IL 60067.

STUDENT RECORDS In District 15, all records, except health, reports of individual testing, records of other student services, and suspension, are kept in the student’s cumulative folder. Health records are maintained in the Health Services Office. Records of individual testing and other student services records are kept in the Student Services Department with copies also maintained in the office of the principal. Suspension records are maintained in the Superintendent’s Office. Authorized District 15 personnel who have access to the student records are: the principal of the school the child attends, teachers working with the student, and instructional or student services personnel or administrators involved in serving the child. The records of students who are enrolled in public or private school programs outside the school district are made available to personnel who work with the students in those programs. The laws also specify certain state and federal officials who may have access to the files if the use of the records is consistent with the fulfillment of their responsibilities. Questions about student records should be directed to the principal of the school your child attends or to the Student Services Department at 847-963-3149. All student records may be examined by the child’s parent(s) or guardian(s) who also may obtain copies of the records. A parent wishing to read the records or obtain copies must make a written request to the Assistant Superintendent for Student Services, as explained in #3 (below). The following information pertains to the rights and obligations of parents, students, and the school district under the Illinois School Student Records Act (ISSRA), Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act 1974, and 34 CFR Part 99. 1. The student permanent record consists of basic identifying information, the academic transcript, the attendance record, accident reports and the health record, and a record of release of permanent information. It also may consist of honors and awards and information concerning participation in school-sponsored activities or 64


athletics, or offices held in school-sponsored organizations. No other information will be placed in the student permanent record. The permanent record will be kept for 60 years after graduation or permanent withdrawal. (ISSRA, Par. 50-2(e); 50-4(e)) 2. The student temporary record consists of all information that is of clear relevance to the education of the student but is not required to be in the student permanent record. It may include family background information, intelligence test scores, aptitude test scores, psychological and personality test results, achievement test results, teacher anecdotal records, disciplinary information, and special education files. A record of release of temporary record information must be included in the student temporary record. The temporary record will be reviewed periodically for elimination of out-of-date, inaccurate, or unnecessary information. The temporary record will be destroyed entirely within five years after permanent withdrawal from the District. (ISSRA, Par. 50-2(f) and 50-4(f)) 3. Parents or any person specifically designated by a parent have the right to: a. Make a written request to inspect and copy all permanent and temporary records. Parents have a right to review the records within 15 days from the time the custodian of the records receives the request. The official records custodian in District 15 is the Assistant Superintendent for Student Services. A student shall have the right to inspect and copy his or her school student permanent record. The charge for copying records is 35 cents per page. No parent or student shall be denied a copy of school student records due to inability to bear the cost of such copying. (ISSRA, Par. 50-5) b. Have present, at the option of either the parent or the school district, a qualified professional who may be a psychologist, counselor, or other advisor, and who may be an employee of the school district or employed by the parent, to interpret the information contained in the student temporary record. If the school district requires that a professional be present, the school district shall secure and bear any cost for the presence of a professional. If the parent so requests, the school district shall secure and bear any cost for the presence of a professional employed by the school district. (ISSRA, Par. 50-5(b)) c. Challenge the accuracy, relevancy, or propriety of any entry in the student records, exclusive of grades, by requesting a hearing with the school district. (i)

The request for a hearing shall be submitted in writing to the records custodian and shall contain notice of the specific entry or entries to be challenged and the basis of the challenge.

(ii) An informal conference will be held within 15 school days of receipt of the request for a hearing. (iii) If the challenge is not resolved by the informal conference, a formal hearing shall be initiated. (iv) For a formal hearing, a hearing officer who is not employed in the attendance center in which the student is enrolled shall be appointed by the school district and shall conduct a hearing within a reasonable time but no later than 15 days after the informal conference, unless an extension of time is agreed upon by the parents and school officials. The hearing officer shall notify the parents and school officials of the time and place of the hearing. Each party shall have the right to present evidence and to call witnesses, the right to cross-examine witnesses, and the right to counsel. A record of the hearing shall be made by tape recording or by a court reporter. The decision of the hearing officer shall be rendered no later than 10 school days after the conclusion of the hearing and shall be transmitted to the parents and the school district. The hearing officer’s decision shall be based solely on the evidence presented at the hearing and shall order (a) retention of the challenged contents of the student record; or (b) removal of the challenged contents of the student record; or (c) a change, clarification or addition to the challenged contents of the student record. The parties shall have the right to appeal the decision of the hearing officer to the Regional Superintendent of Schools. (v) A notice of appeal must be presented to the Regional Superintendent of Schools within 20 school days after the decision of the hearing officer. The opposing party shall be notified of the appeal at the same time. Within 10 school days, the school district shall forward a transcript of the hearing, a copy of the record entry in question and any other pertinent materials to the Regional Superintendent of Schools. Upon receipt of such documents, the Regional Superintendent of Schools shall examine the documents and record, make findings and issue a decision to the parents and the school district within 20 school days of receipt of the documents. If the subject of the appeal involves the accuracy, relevance, or 65


propriety of any entry in special education records, the Regional Superintendent of Schools should seek advice from appropriate special education personnel who were not authors of the entry and whose special education skills are relevant to the subject(s) of the entry in question. The school district shall be responsible for implementing the decision of the Regional Superintendent of Schools. Such decision shall be final, but may be appealed to the Circuit Court of the county in which the school district is located. (ISSRA, Par. 50-7) 4. No student records or information contained therein may be released, transferred, disclosed, or otherwise disseminated, except: a. To a parent or student or person specifically designated as a representative by a parent; (ISSRA, Par. 50-6(a) (1)) b. To an employee or official of the school district or the State Board of Education with a current demonstrable educational or administrative interest in the student, in furtherance of such interest; (ISSRA, Par. 50-6(a) (2)) c. To the official records custodian of another school in which the student has enrolled or intends to enroll. The records may be transferred to the requesting school 10 school days after the student transfers out of the school district. Parents have the opportunity to inspect, copy, or challenge contents of the student records within those 10 days or before the records are transferred (ISSRA, Par. 50-6(a) (3)). Also, Public Act 89-261 requires the sending school district to verify that the student’s medical records are up-to-date and the student is not currently being disciplined by an out-of-school suspension or expulsion. Records of students who graduate from eighth grade are automatically forwarded to the high school the student will attend in District 211 or 214; d. To any person for the purpose of research, statistical reporting, or planning, provided that no student or parent can be identified from the information released and the person(s) requesting the use of such information has signed an affidavit agreeing to comply with all rules and statutes regarding school records; (ISSRA, Par. 50-6(a) (4)) e. Pursuant to a court order, provided that the parent shall be given prompt written notice upon receipt of such order, of the terms of the order, the nature and substance of the information proposed to be released in compliance with such order and an opportunity to inspect, copy, and challenge the contents of the school student records; (ISSRA, Par. 50-6(a) (5)) f. To any person as specifically required by state or federal law, provided that such person shall provide the school with appropriate identification and a copy of the statute authorizing such access and that the parent receives prior written notice of the nature and substance of the information to be released and an opportunity to inspect, copy, and challenge such information. If the release of information relates to more than 25 students, such prior notice may be given in a local newspaper of general circulation or other publication directed generally to parents; (ISSRA, Par. 50-6(a) (6)) g. Subject to regulations of the Illinois State Board of Education, in connection with an emergency to appropriate persons if the knowledge of such information is necessary to protect the health or safety of the student or other persons, provided that the parents are notified as soon as possible of the information released, the date of release, the person, agency or organization receiving the information, and the purpose of the release; (ISSRA, Par. 40-6(a) (7)) h. To any person with the prior specific, dated, and written consent of the parent designating the person to whom the records may be released and the designated records or designated portions of the information to be released. The parent has the right to inspect, copy, and challenge the records and to limit any such consent to designated records or designated portions of the information contained within the records. (ISSRA, Par. 50-6(a) (8)) 5. Parents may insert in their child’s school student record a statement of reasonable length setting forth their position on any disputed information contained in that record. The school shall include a copy of such statement in any subsequent dissemination of the information in dispute. (ISSRA, Par. 50-7(d))

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6. Parents will be given reasonable prior notice before any school student record is destroyed or information deleted therefrom and an opportunity to copy the record or information proposed to be destroyed or deleted. (ISSRA, Par. 50-4(h)) 7. Except for the student and his/her parents, no person to whom information is released and no person specifically designated as a representative by a parent may permit any other person to have access to such information without prior consent of parent obtained in accordance with ISSRA, Par. 50-6(a) (8). (ISSRA, Section 50-6(d)) 8. A record of any release of information shall be maintained for the life of the school student records and shall be available only to the parents and the official records custodian. The record of release shall include the nature and substance of the information released, the name of the person requesting such information, the capacity in which such a request has been made, the purpose of such request, the date of the release, the name and signature of the official records custodian releasing such information, and a copy of any consent to such release. (ISSRA, Par. 50-6(c)) 9. All rights and privileges accorded a parent under the ISSRA shall become exclusively those of the student upon his/her 18th birthday, graduation from secondary school, marriage, or entry into the military service, whichever occurs first. Such rights and privileges also may be exercised by the student at any time with respect to the student’s permanent school record. (ISSRA, Par. 50-2(g)) 10. No person may condition the granting or withholding of any right, privilege or benefit, or make as a condition of employment, credit, or insurance the securing by any individual of any information from a student’s temporary record which such individual may obtain through the exercise of any right secured under the Illinois School Student Records Act. (ISSRA, Par. 50-8) 11. Psychological evaluations, special education files, and other information contained in the student temporary record which may be of continued assistance to the student may be transferred to the custody of the parent or student if the student succeeded to the rights of the parents no sooner than five years after graduation or permanent withdrawal of a special education student. The official records custodian for School District 15 is: Susan Gehring, Assistant Superintendent for Student Services, 580 N. 1st Bank Drive, Palatine, IL 60067, 847-963-3000, gehrings@ccsd15.net.

HOMELESS STUDENTS Board of Education policies provide that any homeless child shall be immediately admitted, even if the child or child’s parent/guardian is unable to produce records normally required for enrollment. A homeless child may attend the district school that the child attended when permanently housed or in which the child was last enrolled. A homeless child living in any district school’s attendance area may attend that school. Students eligible for services under the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act shall have transportation provided to them in accordance with both state and federal law. Homeless students will also have all school fees waived and will become automatically eligible for free or reduced cost meals provided by the District. The District 15 liaison for homeless children is: Alicia Corrigan, Director of Student Services, 580 North 1st Bank Drive, Palatine, IL 60067, 847-963-3152, corrigaa@ccsd15.net.

STUDENT BEHAVIOR The goals and objectives of this policy are to provide effective discipline practices that: (1) ensure the safety and dignity of students and staff; (2) maintain a positive, weapons-free, and drug-free learning environment; (3) keep school property and the property of others secure; (4) address the causes of a student’s misbehavior and provide opportunities for all individuals involved in an incident to participate in its resolution; and (5) teach students positive behavioral skills to become independent, self-disciplined citizens in the school community and society.

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WHEN AND WHERE CONDUCT RULES APPLY A student is subject to disciplinary action for engaging in prohibited student conduct, as described in the section with that name below, whenever the student’s conduct is reasonably related to school or school activities, including, but not limited to: 1. On, or within sight of, school grounds before, during, or after school hours or at any time; 2. Off school grounds at a school-sponsored activity or event, or any activity or event that bears a reasonable relationship to school; 3. Traveling to or from school or a school activity, function, or event; or 4. Anywhere, if the conduct interferes with, disrupts, or adversely affects the school environment, school operations, or an educational function, including, but not limited to, conduct that may reasonably be considered to: (a) be a threat or an attempted intimidation of a staff member; or (b) endanger the health or safety of students, staff, or school property. PROHIBITED STUDENT CONDUCT The school administration is authorized to discipline students for gross disobedience or misconduct including, but not limited to: 1. Using, possessing, distributing, purchasing, or selling tobacco or nicotine materials, including without limitation, electronic cigarettes. 2. Using, possessing, distributing, purchasing, or selling alcoholic beverages. Students who are under the influence of an alcoholic beverage are not permitted to attend school or school functions and are treated as though they had alcohol in their possession. 3. Using, possessing, distributing, purchasing, selling, or offering for sale: a. Any illegal drug, controlled substance, or cannabis (including medical cannabis, marijuana, and hashish). b. Any anabolic steroid unless it is being administered in accordance with a physician’s or licensed practitioner’s prescription. c. Any performance-enhancing substance on the Illinois High School Association’s most current banned substance list unless administered in accordance with a physician’s or licensed practitioner’s prescription. d. Any prescription drug when not prescribed for the student by a physician or licensed practitioner, or when used in a manner inconsistent with the prescription or prescribing physician’s or licensed practitioner’s instructions. The use or possession of medical cannabis, even by a student for whom medical cannabis has been prescribed, is prohibited. e. Any inhalant, regardless of whether it contains an illegal drug or controlled substance: (a) that a student believes is, or represents to be capable of, causing intoxication, hallucination, excitement, or dulling of the brain or nervous system; or (b) about which the student engaged in behavior that would lead a responsible person to believe that the student intended the inhalant to cause intoxication, hallucination, excitement, or dulling of the brain or nervous system. The prohibition in this section does not apply to a student’s use of asthma or other legally prescribed inhalant medications. f. Any substance inhaled, injected, smoked, consumed, or otherwise ingested or absorbed with the intention of causing a physiological or psychological change in the body, including without limitation, pure caffeine in tablet or powdered form. g. “Look-alike” or counterfeit drugs, including a substance that is not prohibited by this policy, but one: (a) that a student believes to be, or represents to be, an illegal drug, controlled substance; or other substance that is prohibited by this policy; or (b) about which a student engaged in behavior that would lead a reasonable person to believe that the student expressly or impliedly represented to be an illegal drug, controlled substance, or other substance that is prohibited by this policy. h. Drug paraphernalia, including devices that are or can be used to: (a) ingest, inhale, or inject cannabis or controlled substances into the body; and (b) grow, process, store, or conceal cannabis or controlled substances. 68


Students who are under the influence of any prohibited substance are not permitted to attend school or school functions and are treated as though they had the prohibited substance, as applicable, in their possession.

4. Using, possessing, controlling, or transferring a “weapon” as that term is defined in the Weapons section of this policy, or violating the Weapons section of this policy. 5. Using or possessing an electronic paging device. 6. Using a cellular telephone, video recording device, personal digital assistant (PDA), or other electronic device in any manner that disrupts the educational environment or violates the rights of others, including using the device to take photographs in locker rooms or bathrooms, cheat, or otherwise violate student conduct rules. Prohibited conduct specifically includes, without limitation, creating, sending, sharing, viewing, receiving, or possessing an indecent visual depiction of oneself or another person through the use of a computer, electronic communication device, or cellular telephone. Unless otherwise banned under this policy or by the Building Principal, all electronic devices must be kept powered off and out of sight during the regular school day unless: (a) the supervising teacher grants permission; (b) use of the device is provided in a student’s individualized education program (IEP); or (c) it is used during the student’s lunch period, or (d) it is needed in an emergency that threatens the safety of students, staff, or other individuals. 7. Using or possessing a laser pointer unless under a staff member’s direct supervision and in the context of instruction. 8. Disobeying rules of student conduct or directives from staff members or school officials. Examples of disobeying staff directives include refusing a District staff member’s request to stop, present school identification, or submit to a search. 9. Engaging in academic dishonesty, including cheating, intentionally plagiarizing, wrongfully giving or receiving help during an academic examination, altering report cards, and wrongfully obtaining test copies or scores. 10. Engaging in hazing or any kind of bullying or aggressive behavior that does physical or psychological harm to a staff person or another student, or urging other students to engage in such conduct. Prohibited conduct specifically includes, without limitation, any use of violence, intimidation, force, noise, coercion, threats, stalking, harassment, sexual harassment, public humiliation, theft or destruction of property, retaliation, hazing, bullying, bullying using a school computer or school computer network, or other comparable conduct. 11. Engaging in any sexual activity, including without limitation, offensive touching, sexual harassment, indecent exposure (including mooning), and sexual assault. This does not include the non-disruptive: (a) expression of gender or sexual orientation or preference, or (b) display of affection during non-instructional time. 12. Teen dating violence, as described in Board of Education Policy 7:185 Teen Dating Violence Prohibited. 13. Causing or attempting to cause damage to, or stealing or attempting to steal, school property or another person’s personal property. 14. Entering school property or a school facility without proper authorization. 15. In the absence of a reasonable belief that an emergency exists, calling emergency responders (such as calling 911); signaling or setting off alarms or signals indicating the presence of an emergency; or indicating the presence of a bomb or explosive device on school grounds, school bus, or at any school activity. 16. Being absent without a recognized excuse; State law and School Board Policy regarding truancy control will be used with chronic and habitual truants. 17. Being involved with any public school fraternity, sorority or secret society, by: (a) being a member; (b) promising to join; (c) pledging to become a member; or (d) soliciting any other person to join, promise to join, or be pledged to become a member. 18. Being involved in gangs or gang related activities, including displaying gang symbols or paraphernalia. 19. Violating any criminal law, including but not limited to, assault, battery, arson, theft, gambling, eavesdropping, vandalism, and hazing. 20. Making an explicit threat on an Internet website against a school employee, a student, or any school-related personnel if the Internet website through which the threat was made is a site that was accessible within the 69


school at the time the threat was made or was available to third parties who worked or studied within the school grounds at the time the threat was made, and the threat could be reasonably interpreted as threatening to the safety and security of the threatened individual because of his or her duties or employment status or status as a student inside the school. 21. Operating an unmanned aircraft system (UAS) or drone for any purpose on school grounds or at any school event unless granted permission by the Superintendent or designee. 22. Engaging in any activity, on or off campus, that interferes with, disrupts, or adversely affects the school environment, school operations, or an educational function, including but not limited to, conduct that may reasonably be considered to: (a) be a threat or an attempted intimidation of a staff member, or (b) endanger the health or safety of students, staff, or school property. For purposes of this policy, the term “possession” includes having control, custody, or care, currently or in the past, of any object or substance, including situations in which the item is: (a) on the student’s person; (b) contained in another item belonging to, or under the control of, the student, such as in the student’s clothing, backpack, automobile; (c) in a school’s student locker, desk, or other school property; (d) any other location on school property or at a school-sponsored event. Efforts, including the use of early intervention and progressive discipline, shall be made to deter students, while at school or a school-related event, from engaging in disruptive behavior that may reasonably produce physical or psychological harm to someone else. The Superintendent or designee shall ensure that the parent/guardian of a student who engages in aggressive behavior is notified of the incident. The failure to provide such notification does not limit the Board’s authority to impose discipline, including suspension or expulsion, for such behavior. No disciplinary action shall be taken against any student that is based totally or in part on the refusal of the student’s parent/guardian to administer or consent to the administration of psychotropic or psychostimulant medication to the student. DISCIPLINARY MEASURES School officials shall limit the number and duration of expulsions and out-of-school suspensions to the greatest extent practicable, and, where practicable and reasonable, shall consider forms of non-exclusionary discipline before using out-of-school suspensions or expulsions. School personnel shall not advise or encourage students to drop out voluntarily due to behavioral or academic difficulties. Potential disciplinary measures include, without limitation, any of the following: 1. Notifying parents(s)/guardian(s). 2. Disciplinary conference. 3. Withholding of privileges. 4. Temporary removal from the classroom. 5. Return of property or restitution for lost, stolen, or damaged property. 6. In-school suspension. The Building Principal or designee shall ensure that the student is properly supervised. 7. After-school study or Saturday study, provided the student’s parent/guardian has been notified. If transportation arrangements cannot be agreed upon, an alternative disciplinary measure may be used. The student must be supervised by the detaining teacher or the Building Principal or a designee. 8. Community service with local public and nonprofit agencies that enhances community efforts to meet human, educational, environmental, or public safety needs. The District will not provide transportation. School administration shall use this option only as an alternative to another disciplinary measure, giving the student and/or parent/guardian the choice. 9. Seizure of contraband; confiscation and temporary retention of personal property that was used to violate this policy or school disciplinary rules. 10. Suspension of bus riding privileges in accordance with Board of Education Policy 7:220 Bus Conduct.

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11. Out-of-school suspension from school and all school activities in accordance with Board of Education Policy 7:200 Suspension Procedures. A student who has been suspended may also be restricted from being on school grounds and at school activities. 12. Expulsion from school and all school activities for a definite time period not to exceed 2 calendar years in accordance with Board of Education Policy 7:210 Expulsion Procedures. A student who has been expelled shall be restricted from being on school grounds and at school activities. 13. Transfer to an alternative program if the student is expelled or otherwise qualifies for the transfer under State law. The transfer shall be in the manner provided in Article 13A or 13B of The School Code. 14. Notifying juvenile authorities or other law enforcement whenever the conduct involves criminal activity, including but not limited to, illegal drugs (controlled substances), “look-alikes,” alcohol, or weapons or in other circumstances as authorized by the reciprocal reporting agreement between the District and local law enforcement agencies. The above list of disciplinary measures is a range of options that will not always be applicable in every case. In some circumstances, it may not be possible to avoid suspending or expelling a student because behavioral interventions, other than a suspension and expulsion, will not be appropriate and available, and the only reasonable and practical way to resolve the threat and/or address the disruption is a suspension or expulsion. Corporal punishment is prohibited. Corporal punishment is defined as slapping, paddling, or prolonged maintenance of students in physically painful positions, or intentional infliction of bodily harm. Corporal punishment does not include reasonable force as needed to maintain safety for students, staff or other persons or for the purpose of selfdefense or defense of property. WEAPONS A student who is determined to have brought one of the following objects to school, any school-sponsored activity or event, or any activity or event that bears a reasonable relationship to school shall be expelled for a period of at least one calendar year but not more than two calendar years: 1. A firearm, meaning any gun, rifle, shotgun, or weapon as defined by Section 921 of Title 18 of the United States Code (18 U.S.C. § 921), firearm as defined in Section 1.1 of the Firearm Owners Identification Card Act (430 ILCS 65/), or firearm as defined in Section 24-1 of the Criminal Code of 1961 (720 ILCS 5/24-1). 2. A knife, brass knuckles, or other knuckle weapon regardless of its composition, a billy club, or any other object if used or attempted or intended to be used to cause bodily harm, including “look-alikes” of any firearm as defined above. The expulsion requirement under either paragraph one or two above may be modified by the Superintendent, and the Superintendent’s determination may be modified by the Board on a case-by-case basis. The Superintendent or designee may grant an exception to this policy, upon the prior request of an adult supervisor, for students in theatre, cooking, ROTC, martial arts, and similar programs, whether or not school-sponsored, provided the item is not equipped, nor intended, to do bodily harm. This policy’s prohibitions concerning weapons apply regardless of whether: (1) a student is licensed to carry a concealed firearm, or (2) the Board permits visitors, who are licensed to carry a concealed firearm, to store a firearm in a locked vehicle in a school parking area. RE-ENGAGEMENT OF RETURNING STUDENTS The Superintendent or designee shall maintain a process to facilitate the re-engagement of students who are returning from an out-of-school suspension, expulsion, or an alternative school setting. The goal of re-engagement shall be to support the student’s ability to be successful in school following a period of exclusionary discipline and shall include the opportunity for students who have been suspended to complete or make up work for equivalent academic credit. REQUIRED NOTICES A school staff member shall immediately notify the office of the Building Principal in the event that he or she: (1) observes any person in possession of a firearm on or around school grounds; however, such action may be delayed 71


if immediate notice would endanger students under his or her supervision, (2) observes or has reason to suspect that any person on school grounds is or was involved in a drug-related incident, or (3) observes a battery committed against any staff member. Upon receiving such a report, the Building Principal or designee shall immediately notify a local law enforcement agency, State Police, and any involved student’s parent(s)/guardian(s). “School grounds” includes modes of transportation to school activities and any public way within 1000 feet of the school, as well as school property itself. DELEGATION OF AUTHORITY Each teacher, and any other school personnel when students are under his or her charge, is authorized to impose any disciplinary measure, other than suspension, expulsion, corporal punishment, or in-school suspension, that is appropriate and in accordance with the policies and rules on student discipline. Teachers, other certificated [licensed] educational employees, and other persons providing a related service for or with respect to a student, may use reasonable force as needed to maintain safety for other students, school personnel, or other persons, or for the purpose of self-defense or defense of property. Teachers may remove students from a classroom for disruptive behavior. The Superintendent, Building Principal, Assistant Building Principal, or Dean of Students is authorized to impose the same disciplinary measures as teachers and may suspend students guilty of gross disobedience or misconduct from school (including all school functions) and from riding the school bus, up to ten consecutive school days, provided the appropriate procedures are followed. The Board may suspend students from riding the bus in excess of ten school days for safety reasons. PARENT/STUDENT HANDBOOK The Superintendent, with input from the parent-teacher advisory committee, shall prepare disciplinary rules implementing the District’s disciplinary policies. These disciplinary rules shall be presented annually to the Board for its review and approval. A parent/student handbook, including the District disciplinary policies and rules, shall be distributed to the students’ parents/guardians within 15 days of the beginning of the school year or a student’s enrollment. Student behavior extends to social networking sites.

SEARCH AND SEIZURE In order to maintain order and security in the schools, school authorities are authorized to conduct reasonable searches of school property and equipment, as well as of students and their personal effects. “School authorities” includes school resource officers. SCHOOL PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT AS WELL AS PERSONAL EFFECTS LEFT THERE BY STUDENTS School authorities may inspect and search school property and equipment owned or controlled by the school (such as, lockers, desks, and parking lots), as well as personal effects left there by a student, without notice to or the consent of the student. Students have no reasonable expectation of privacy in these places or areas or in their personal effects left there. The Superintendent may request the assistance of law enforcement officials to conduct inspections and searches of lockers, desks, parking lots, and other school property and equipment for illegal drugs, weapons, or other illegal or dangerous substances or materials, including searches conducted through the use of specially trained dogs. STUDENTS School authorities may search a student and/or the student’s personal effects in the student’s possession (such as purses, wallets, knapsacks, book bags, lunch boxes, etc.) when there is a reasonable ground for suspecting that the search will produce evidence the particular student has violated or is violating either the law or the District’s student conduct rules. The search itself must be conducted in a manner which is reasonably related to its objectives and not excessively intrusive in light of the age and sex of the student and the nature of the infraction.

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When feasible, the search should be conducted as follows: • outside the view of others, including students; • in the presence of a school administrator or adult witness; and • by a certificated employee or police liaison officer of the same sex as the student. Immediately following a search, a written report shall be made by the school authority who conducted the search, and given to the Superintendent. SEIZURE OF PROPERTY If a search produces evidence that the student has violated or is violating either the law or the District’s policies or rules, such evidence may be seized and impounded by school authorities, and disciplinary action may be taken. When appropriate, such evidence may be transferred to law enforcement authorities. NOTIFICATION REGARDING STUDENT ACCOUNTS OR PROFILES ON SOCIAL NETWORKING WEBSITES The Superintendent or designee shall notify students and their parents/guardians of each of the following in accordance with the Right to Privacy in the School Setting Act, 105 ILCS 75/: 1. School officials may not request or require a student or his or her parent/guardian to provide a password or other related account information to gain access to the student’s account or profile on a social networking website. 2. School officials may conduct an investigation or require a student to cooperate in an investigation if there is specific information about activity on the student’s account on a social networking website that violates a school disciplinary rule or policy. In the course of an investigation, the student may be required to share the content that is reported in order to allow school officials to make a factual determination.

OUT-OF-SCHOOL SUSPENSION PROCEDURES The Superintendent or designee shall implement suspension procedures that provide, at a minimum, for each of the following: 1. A conference during which the charges will be explained and the student will be given an opportunity to respond to the charges before he or she may be suspended. 2. A pre-suspension conference is not required, and the student can be immediately suspended when the student’s presence poses a continuing danger to persons or property or an ongoing threat of disruption to the educational process. In such cases, the notice and conference shall follow as soon as practicable. 3. An attempted phone call to the student’s parent(s)/guardian(s). 4. A written notice of the suspension to the parent(s)/guardian(s) and the student, which shall: a. Provide notice to the parent(s)/guardian(s) of their child’s right to a review of the suspension; b. Include information about an opportunity to make up work missed during the suspension for equivalent academic credit; c. Detail the specific act of gross disobedience or misconduct resulting in the decision to suspend; d. Provide rationale or an explanation of how the chosen number of suspension days will address the threat or disruption posed by the student or his or her act of gross disobedience or misconduct; and e. Depending upon the length of the out-of-school suspension, include the following applicable information: i.

For a suspension of 3 school days or less, an explanation that the student’s continuing presence in school would either pose: 1. A threat to school safety, or 2. A disruption to other students’ learning opportunities.

ii.

For a suspension of 4 or more school days, an explanation: 1. That other appropriate and available behavioral and disciplinary interventions have been exhausted, 73


2. As to whether school officials attempted other interventions or determined that no other interventions were available for the student, and 3. That the student’s continuing presence in school would either: a. Pose a threat to the safety of other students, staff, or members of the school community, or b. Substantially disrupt, impede, or interfere with the operation of the school. iii. For a suspension of 5 or more school days, the information listed in section 4.e.ii. above, along with documentation by the Superintendent or designee determining what, if any, appropriate and available support services will be provided to the student during the length of his or her suspension. 5. A summary of the notice, including the reason for the suspension and the suspension length, must be given to the Board by the Superintendent or designee. 6. Upon request of the parent(s)/guardian(s), a review of the suspension shall be conducted by the Board or a hearing officer appointed by the Board. At the review, the student’s parent(s)/guardian(s) may appear and discuss the suspension with the Board or its designee and may be represented by counsel. Whenever there is evidence that mental illness may be the cause for the suspension, the Superintendent or designee shall invite a representative from the Department of Human Services to consult with the Board. After presentation of the evidence or receipt of the hearing officer’s report, the Board shall take such action as it finds appropriate. If the suspension is upheld, the Board’s written suspension decision shall specifically detail items (a) and (e) in number 4, above. A student seeking to transfer into District 15 must serve the entire term of any suspension or expulsion, imposed for any reason by any public or private school in Illinois or any other state, before being admitted into a district school, as specified in Board of Education Policy 7:50 Student Admissions and Student Transfers To and From Non-District Schools.

GANGS AND GANG-RELATED ACTIVITIES Board of Education Policy 7:191 Gangs and Gang-Related Activities states: Student involvement in gangs or gang-related activities, including the display of gang symbols or paraphernalia, on school property or at school-related events is strictly prohibited. Any student who violates this policy shall be subject to disciplinary action which may include suspension or expulsion in accordance with the District’s student behavior policy. As used herein, the term “gang” shall mean any organization, club, or group composed wholly or in part of students and which is assembled for the common purpose or design of: 1. committing or conspiring to commit criminal offenses, 2. engaging in conduct that is contrary to the public good, or 3. engaging in conduct that interferes with, or disrupts, the District’s educational process or programs. As used herein, the phrase “gang-related activity” shall mean any conduct engaged in by a student on behalf of any gang: 1. to perpetuate the existence of any gang, and 2. to effect the common purpose and design of any gang including, without limitation, recruiting students for membership in any gang and/or threatening or intimidating other students or employees to commit acts or omissions against their will in furtherance of the common purpose and design of any gang.

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BUS CONDUCT All students must follow the District’s School Bus Safety Rules. SCHOOL BUS SUSPENSIONS The Superintendent, or any designee as permitted in school code, is authorized to suspend a student from riding the school bus for up to 10 consecutive school days for engaging in gross disobedience or misconduct, including but not limited to the following: 1. Prohibited student conduct as defined in Board of Education Policy 7:190 Student Behavior. 2. Willful injury or threat of injury to a bus driver or to another rider. 3. Willful damage and/or defacement of the bus. 4. Repeated use of profanity. 5. Repeated willful disobedience of a directive from the bus driver or other supervisor. 6. Such other behavior as the Superintendent or designee deems to threaten the safe operation of the bus and/or its occupants. If a student is suspended from riding the bus for gross disobedience or misconduct on a bus, the School Board may suspend the student from riding the school bus for a period in excess of 10 days for safety reasons. The District shall provide the student with notice of the gross disobedience or misconduct and an opportunity to respond. ACADEMIC CREDIT FOR MISSED CLASSES DURING SCHOOL BUS SUSPENSION A student suspended from riding the bus who does not have alternate transportation to school shall have the opportunity to complete or make up work for equivalent academic credit. It shall be the responsibility of the student’s parent or guardian to notify the school that the student does not have alternate transportation. All District 15 buses are equipped with video cameras to monitor conduct and maintain a safe environment for students and employees.

TITLE IX COMPLIANCE School District 15 is in full compliance with regulations for implementing Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, which prohibit sex discrimination in federally assisted education programs. The school district complies fully with the nondiscriminatory provisions of federal and state law pertaining but not limited to students, parents, members of the community, employees, and applicants for employment.

HARASSMENT/BULLYING Bullying, intimidation, and harassment are not acceptable behaviors in any form. Board of Education Policy 7:180 Prevention of and Response to Bullying, Intimidation, and Harassment states: PREVENTION OF AND RESPONSE TO BULLYING, INTIMIDATION, AND HARASSMENT Bullying, intimidation, and harassment diminish a student’s ability to learn and a school’s ability to educate. Preventing students from engaging in these disruptive behaviors and providing all students equal access to a safe, non-hostile learning environment are important District goals. Bullying on the basis of actual or perceived race, color, national origin, military status, unfavorable discharge status from the military service, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender-related identity or expression, ancestry, age, religion, physical or mental disability, order of protection status, status of being homeless, or actual or potential marital or parental status, including pregnancy, association with a person or group with one or more of the aforementioned actual or perceived characteristics, or any other distinguishing characteristic is prohibited in each of the following situations: 1. During any school-sponsored education program or activity.

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2. While in school, on school property, on school buses or other school vehicles, at designated school bus stops waiting for the school bus, or at school-sponsored or school-sanctioned events or activities. 3. Through the transmission of information from a school computer, a school computer network, or other similar electronic school equipment. 4. Through the transmission of information from a computer that is accessed at a nonschool-related location, activity, function, or program or from the use of technology or an electronic device that is not owned, leased, or used by the School District or school if the bullying causes a substantial disruption to the educational process or orderly operation of a school. This paragraph (item #4) applies only when a school administrator or teacher receives a report that bullying through this means has occurred; it does not require staff members to monitor any nonschool-related activity, function, or program. Definitions from Section 27-23.7 of The School Code (105 ILCS 5/27-23.7) Bullying includes cyber-bullying and means any severe or pervasive physical or verbal act or conduct, including communications made in writing or electronically, directed toward a student or students that has or can be reasonably predicted to have the effect of one or more of the following: 1. Placing the student or students in reasonable fear of harm to the student’s or students’ person or property. 2. Causing a substantially detrimental effect on the student’s or students’ physical or mental health. 3. Substantially interfering with the student’s or students’ academic performance; or 4. Substantially interfering with the student’s or students’ ability to participate in or benefit from the services, activities, or privileges provided by a school. Cyber-bullying means bullying through the use of technology or any electronic communication, including without limitation any transfer of signs, signals, writing images, sounds, data, or intelligence of any nature transmitted in whole or in part by a wire, radio, electromagnetic system, photo-electronic system, or photo-optical system, including without limitation electronic mail, Internet communications, instant messages, or facsimile communications. Cyber-bullying includes the creation of a webpage or weblog in which the creator assumes the identity of another person or the knowing impersonation of another person as the author of posted content or messages if the creation or impersonation creates any of the effects enumerated in the definition of bullying. Cyber-bullying also includes the distribution by electronic means of a communication to more than one person or the posting of material on an electronic medium that may be accessed by one or more persons if the distribution or posting creates any of the effects enumerated in the definition of bullying. Restorative measures means a continuum of school-based alternatives to exclusionary discipline, such as suspensions and expulsions, that: (i) are adapted to the particular needs of the school and community, (ii) contribute to maintaining school safety, (iii) protect the integrity of a positive and productive learning climate, (iv) teach students the personal and interpersonal skills they will need to be successful in school and society, (v) serve to build and restore relationships among students, families, schools, and communities, and (vi) reduce the likelihood of future disruption by balancing accountability with an understanding of students’ behavioral health needs in order to keep students in school. School personnel means persons employed by, on contract with, or who volunteer in a school district, including without limitation: school and school district administrators, teachers, school guidance counselors, school social workers, school counselors, school psychologists, school nurses, cafeteria workers, custodians, bus drivers, school resource officers, and security guards.

BULLYING PREVENTION AND RESPONSE PLAN The Superintendent or designee shall develop and maintain a bullying prevention and response plan that advances the District’s goal of providing all students with a safe learning environment free of bullying and harassment. This plan must be consistent with the requirements listed below; each numbered requirement, 1-12, corresponds with the same number in the list of required policy components in 105 ILCS 5/27-23.7(b) 1-12. 1. The District uses the definition of bullying as provided in this policy.

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2. Bullying is contrary to State law and the policy of this District. However, nothing in the District’s bullying prevention and response plan is intended to infringe upon any right to exercise free expression or the free exercise of religion or religiously based views protected under the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution or under Section 3 of Article I of the Illinois Constitution. 3. Students are encouraged to immediately report bullying. A report may be made orally or in writing to the District named officials or any staff member. The District named officials and all staff members are available for help with a bully or to make a report about bullying. Anonymous reports are also accepted. Nondiscrimination Coordinator: (To be determined), 580 North 1st Bank Drive, Palatine, IL 60067. Complaint Managers: Dr. Claire Kowalczyk at 847-963-3202 or kowalczc@ccsd15.net, and (to be determined), 580 North 1st Bank Drive, Palatine, IL 60067. 4. Consistent with federal and State laws and rules governing student privacy rights, the Superintendent or designee shall promptly inform the parent(s)/guardian(s) of every student involved in an alleged incident of bullying and discuss, as appropriate, the availability of social work services, counseling, school psychological services, other interventions, and restorative measures. 5. The Superintendent or designee shall promptly investigate and address reports of bullying, by, among other things: a. Making all reasonable efforts to complete the investigation within 10 school days after the date the report of a bullying incident was received and taking into consideration additional relevant information received during the course of the investigation about the reported bullying incident. b. Involving appropriate school support personnel and other staff persons with knowledge, experience, and training on bullying prevention, as deemed appropriate, in the investigation process. c. Notifying the Building Principal or school administrator or designee of the reported incident of bullying as soon as possible after the report is received. d. Consistent with federal and State laws and rules governing student privacy rights, providing parents/ guardians of the students who are parties to the investigation information about the investigation and an opportunity to meet with the Building Principal or school administrator or his or her designee to discuss the investigation, the findings of the investigation, and the actions taken to address the reported incident of bullying.

The Superintendent or designee shall investigate whether a reported incident of bullying is within the permissible scope of the District’s jurisdiction and shall require that the District provide the victim with information regarding services that are available within the District and community, such as counseling support services, and other programs.

6. The Superintendent or designee shall use interventions to address bullying, that may include, but are not limited to, school social work services, restorative measures, social-emotional skill building, counseling, school psychological services, and community-based services. 7. A reprisal or retaliation against any person who reports an act of bullying is prohibited. A student’s act of reprisal or retaliation will be treated as bullying for purposes of determining any consequences or other appropriate remedial actions. 8. A student will not be punished for reporting bullying or supplying information, even if the District’s investigation concludes that no bullying occurred. However, knowingly making a false accusation or providing knowingly false information will be treated as bullying for purposes of determining any consequences or other appropriate remedial actions. 9. The District’s bullying prevention and response plan must be based on the engagement of a range of school stakeholders, including students and parents/guardians. 10. The Superintendent or designee shall post this policy on the District’s website, if any, and include it in the student handbook, and, where applicable, post it where other policies, rules, and standards of conduct are currently posted. The policy must be distributed annually to parents/guardians, students, and school personnel 77


(including new employees when hired), and must also be provided periodically throughout the school year to students and faculty. 11. The Superintendent or designee shall assist the Board with its evaluation and assessment of this policy’s outcomes and effectiveness. This process shall include, without limitation: a. The frequency of victimization; b. Student, staff, and family observations of safety at a school; c. Identification of areas of a school where bullying occurs; d. The types of bullying utilized; and e. Bystander intervention or participation. The evaluation process may use relevant data and information that the District already collects for other purposes. The Superintendent or designee must post the information developed as a result of the policy evaluation on the District’s website, or if a website is not available, the information must be provided to school administrators, Board members, school personnel, parents/guardians, and students. 12. The Superintendent or designee shall fully implement the Board policies, including without limitation, the following: a. 2:260 Uniform Grievance Procedure. A student may use this policy to complain about bullying. b. 6:60 Curriculum Content. Bullying prevention and character instruction is provided in all grades in accordance with State law. c. 6:65 Student Social and Emotional Development. Student social and emotional development is incorporated into the District’s educational program as required by State law. d. 6:235 Access to Electronic Networks. This policy states that the use of the District’s electronic networks is limited to: (1) support of education and/or research, or (2) a legitimate business use. e. 7:20 Harassment of Students Prohibited. This policy prohibits any person from harassing, intimidating, or bullying a student based on an identified actual or perceived characteristic (the list of characteristics in 7:20 is the same as the list in this policy). f. 7:185 Teen Dating Violence Prohibited. This policy prohibits teen dating violence on school property, at school-sponsored activities, and in vehicles used for school-provided transportation. g. 7:190 Student Behavior. This policy prohibits, and provides consequences for, hazing, bullying, or other aggressive behaviors, or urging other students to engage in such conduct. h. 7:310 Restrictions on Publications; Elementary Schools. This policy prohibits students from and provides consequences for: (1) accessing and/or distributing at school any written, printed, or electronic material, including material from the Internet, that will cause substantial disruption of the proper and orderly operation and discipline, of the school or school activities, and (2) creating and/or distributing written, printed, or electronic material, including photographic material and blogs, that causes substantial disruption to school operations or interferes with the rights of other students or staff members. BULLYING/SAFETY TIP LINE District 15’s Bullying/Safety Tip Line provides parents and students with an additional option to report bullying and/or other safety concerns within their schools. Similar to making a report in person or over the phone, when making an online report, please include as much detailed information as possible because doing so will greatly assist administrators in investigating and addressing the concern(s). Although it is usually best to speak directly with an administrator when making a report about bullying and/or other safety concerns at your school, sometimes students and parents are not comfortable doing so. Toward that end, this tool also allows for anonymous reporting. Please keep in mind that online reports received outside of school hours will not be reviewed and acted upon until school is back in session. With that said, if your concern(s) require(s) immediate attention, please contact local law enforcement. 78


To submit a concern via the Bullying/Safety Tip Line, visit www.ccsd15.net/TipLine.

PARENT RIGHTS Parents have the right to request information regarding the professional qualifications of any teacher instructing their child(ren). Information that may be requested includes: • Whether or not the teacher has met state licensure requirements; • Whether or not the teacher is teaching under emergency or provisional status; • The bachelor’s degree major of the teacher, any other certification or degrees held by the teacher and the subject areas of the certification or degrees; and • Whether your child is provided services by teacher aides/paraprofessionals and, if so, their qualifications. For more information, contact Lisa Nuss, Assistant Superintendent for Human Services, 580 North 1st Bank Drive, Palatine, IL 60067, 847-963-3013.

ACCOMMODATING INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES Individuals with disabilities shall be provided an opportunity to participate in all school-sponsored services, programs, or activities, including parent-teacher conferences, school programs and school board meetings, on an equal basis and will not be subject to illegal discrimination. Where necessary, the district may provide to persons with disabilities separate or different aids, benefits, or services from, but as effective as, those provided to others. The district will provide reasonable accommodations where necessary to afford individuals with disabilities equal opportunity to participate in or enjoy the benefits of a service, program, or activity. Each service, program, or activity operated in existing facilities shall be readily accessible to, and useable by, individuals with disabilities. Individuals with disabilities should notify the Superintendent or building principal if they have a disability which will require special assistance or services and, if so, what services are required. This notification should occur as far as possible before the school-sponsored function, program, or meeting. Individuals with disabilities may allege a violation of this policy or federal law by filing a grievance under the Uniform Grievance Procedure. Complaint Managers: Dr. Claire Kowalczyk at 847-963-3202 or kowalczc@ccsd15.net and (to be determined), 580 North 1st Bank Drive, Palatine, IL 60067.

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CHAPTER 16

OTHER PROGRAMS NORTHWEST SUBURBAN COUNCIL OF PTA/PTSA The Northwest Suburban Council (NWSC) of PTA/PTSA (Parent Teacher Student Association) consists of 20 local PTA or PTSA units. Each local unit is affiliated with one of the elementary or junior high schools in District 15. These units work in partnership with their school’s principal and staff, as well as the community at large, to provide programs and services that enhance the educational environment for all children. They also implement programs that create a sense of community for the families of children enrolled at their schools. The PTA/PTSA units work to keep parents informed of legislative activities pertaining to children and public education at both the state and federal levels. They keep parents and community involved and informed through PTA websites, calendars, newsletters, and e-mails. The NWSC promotes communication and cooperation among the local units. NWSC works with District 15 and the units to support parent involvement both at home and in the schools. The Council provides local units with state and national PTA programs, and gives volunteers opportunities to develop as leaders in their schools and community. PTA is a private, not-for-profit 501(c)(3) service organization. The National PTA, of which all local units are members, is the largest volunteer organization advocating on behalf of children. All PTA/PTSA units in NWSC are committed to the Purposes of the National PTA: • To promote the welfare of children and youth in home, school, places of worship, and throughout the community; • To advocate for laws that further the education, health, welfare and safety of children and youth; • To raise the standards of home life; • To advocate for fiscal responsibility regarding public tax dollars in public education funding; • To promote the collaboration and engagement of families and educators in the education of children and youth; and; • To engage the public in united efforts to secure the physical, mental, emotional, spiritual, and social well-being of all children and youth. For information on becoming involved, consult your school’s website. “every child, one voice”

THE ONE-FIVE FOUNDATION The one-five Foundation is a not-for-profit organization whose purpose is to enhance the excellent educational programs that are synonymous with District 15. The one-five Foundation supports the following programs: • Rainbows Grief Support Groups for Children • Motorola Lego League/Vex Robotics • Teacher/Staff Mini-Grants • Keep Music Strong • Teacher Tributes Programs like these benefit all 20 schools in District 15. They are funded by the one-five Foundation in large part through the community’s support of our annual fundraising drives and employee contributions. For more information about attending one of our events, becoming a Board member, or making a donation, please visit the Foundation’s website at www.one-five.org, or contact us at 847-963-3160.

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PALATINE ASSISTING THROUGH HOPE (PATH) COMMUNITY CLOTHING CLOSET Palatine Assisting Through Hope (PATH) Community Clothing Closet provides District 15 families in need of assistance with monthly opportunities to shop for free, gently used clothing in all sizes—infant through adult—and for all seasons. Families in need should contact their school’s social worker to sign up to receive a voucher to shop the PATH Community Clothing Closet, which will be open one evening each month at the Community Resource Center, 1585 N. Rand Road, Palatine. Donations to the PATH Community Clothing Closet can be dropped off in the “Community Closet” boxes located at all District 15 schools. All garments should be washed and/or in clean condition without rips or broken zippers. Donations of packages of new socks and underwear in any size would also be greatly appreciated. Receipt forms will be available at each donation location.

PARTNERS FOR OUR COMMUNITIES (POC) Partners for Our Communities (POC) is schools and churches, cities and townships, libraries and individuals along with Northwest Community Hospital coming together as partners to make our communities stronger. It partners together to build stronger and healthier communities in Palatine, Hoffman Estates and Rolling Meadows by strengthening families. Since 1999, the POC has welcomed and introduced families and individuals in need to the Palatine community. The POC connects people with local resources and provides a pathway for their integration and success. It is dedicated to helping people help themselves through a variety of programs and services. In early 2015 the POC board of directors voted to share its programs with neighboring communities. For more information about the POC, please visit its website at http://www.poc.news/ or call 847-776-9500.

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DEFINING

STUDENT SUCCESS

A District 15 student is ... 3 A critical thinker 3 An effective communicator 3 An engaged community member 3 A self reliant & resilient individual 3 A healthy person ... equipped for continued success.

Generations of Excellence 82


VALUES VISION MISSION

Producing world-class learners by building a connected learning community.

Preparing students to be critical thinkers, effective communicators, engaged community members, self-reliant, resilient & healthy individuals who are equipped for continued success.

• Innovation • Students prepared for future success • Meeting the needs of every child every day • Healthy & supportive culture • Rigorous, personalized learning

Generations of Excellence

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Profile for Community Consolidated School District 15

CCSD15 Parent/Student Handbook 2019-20  

CCSD15 Parent/Student Handbook 2019-20  

Profile for dist15
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