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2015 Dodge RAM 1500 ST CREW CAB

5.7L HEMI, auto, air, cruise, pdl, pw, tow pkg. 210,174 kms. $14,900. Call Pete at (204) 331-3326 Pembina Valley Auto.

2012 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 LTZ

2009 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 LT EXT

5.3L VORTEC, 6 spd auto, 4x4, air, alloy wheels, cruise, leather heated seats, pdl, pm, ps, pw, remote start, tow pkg and lots more. 206,904 kms. $18,999. Dealer permit #4222. Call Kyle 204-822-3047.

4.8L V8, auto, 4x4, air, bed liner, cruise, keyless entry, pdl, pm, pw, tow pkg and more! Only 121,527 kms. $13,999. Dealer permit #4222. Call Kyle 204-822-3047.

Current Until March 27, 2020

2011 Ford F250 Super Duty Diesel 4x4

6.7L Diesel, auto, Ext cab, Long Box, air, cruise, pdl, pw, tow pkg. 432,000 kms. $14,900. Call Pete at (204) 331-3326 Pembina Valley Auto.

2010 Ford Escape

2012 Chevrolet Orlando 1LT

4cyl auto, pw, pdl, cruise, air. 160,000 kms. $8,499. Skyline Autobody at 204-325-8155.

2.4L 4 cyl, 3rd row seating, keyless entry, air, cruise, pw, 1st row LCD monitors, and more! 142,854 kms. $9,997. Call Steinbach Dodge at 1-888-458-5094.


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Ingenious Pioneer Lime Kiln Creates More Questions

The preparation of Manitoba Agricultural Museum press releases often results in research being carried out in various Manitoba municipal history books. Many of these books have been digitized by the University of Manitoba which makes this research very easy. During one of these research projects, we also found a description of a pioneer lime kiln in Southwestern Manitoba including some discussion of the kiln’s operation. While lime kilns in the Stonewall area are well known, pioneer lime kilns in southwestern Manitoba are somewhat of a revelation. The researcher mentioned the lime kiln description to another member of the Museum’s interpretation committee with the interesting reply that he knew of a pioneer lime kiln on his family farm northeast of Killarney and also knew that there are other lime kilns in the area. This discussion resulted in a visit to this kiln site in the fall of 2019. The lime kiln in the Municipal history book described the construction and operation of a kiln that was in use in 1899 and 1900. The kiln consisted of a hole that was 10 feet by 10 feet and 8 feet deep. This hole was dug at the top of a slope. A trench was dug from this hole down to the bottom of the slope. This trench was 3 feet wide and was dug into the bottom of the kiln hole so it must have been 8 feet deep as well. To get to the bottom of the slope, the trench was some 30 feet long. The purpose of the trench was to act as a damper to the kiln. Limestone was gathered in the area of the kiln and stacked within. The first stones in the kiln were stacked to form an arch 3 feet wide by some 2 feet high running from the trench to the very back of the hole. This arch had to be well built as further limestone was stacked on top of the arch until the hole was completely filled. When the kiln was being fired, fuel was fed into the arch through the trench and pushed to the very back of the arch. This was a further reason to make sure the arch was stoutly constructed as the kiln could not be properly fired if the arch collapsed or even partially collapsed. The fuel used was wood. When the kiln was being fired, it was fired continuously for three days until blue flame could be seen coming through the top of the limestone filling the hole. When the blue flame was seen, then the operator could be as-



A photo of the lime kiln northeast of Killarney taken while standing below the kiln in the remains of the damper trench running from kiln pit down the slope of a ravine. The trench has slumped in over the years as has the lime kiln pit. The back wall of the kiln remains largely intact however and is the stone wall visible here. There is a large amount of white material behind and to the right side of this wall. It is thought this material is reject material from the crushing of the burnt limestone. It would appear that the burnt limestone was removed from the pit and piled at the back of the pit for crushing. As the pit was located at the top of a ravine, the back of the pit was the ideal location for hauling away the lime when crushed.

sured the limestone would slack when the limestone was cooled. When the lime kiln site east of Killarney was investigated, it could be seen that this kiln was similar to the kiln in the written description. The kiln visited was basically a hole, some 10 feet by 10 feet, on the lip of a ravine with a trench running from the hole into the bottom of the ravine. This kiln had the hole lined with a dry fitted stone wall. How deep the kiln and trench were originally, could not be determined as the kiln had filled in with dirt and other material over the years and the trench walls had slumped in. It appeared that the trench was close to being some 30 feet long. At this site, there was also a pile of white stone chips behind the kiln which is thought to be material left over from the crushing of the burnt lime and consisted of limestone that had not been completely burnt during the firing of the kiln. The lime kiln in the written description was built on section 5-2-19 which is some 50 miles further to the west of the lime kiln visited. The lime kiln in the written description was bulldozed in the late 1950s and nothing of the kiln now remains visible on the site. Questions arose when the lime kiln near Killarney was being examined. Was the damper trench roofed over as what would be the point of a damper

trench some 30 feet long and eight feet deep if the trench was open on the top? One could not control the flow of air in such a trench. And if you need to closely control the flow of air into the fire, was there some sort of door at the end of the trench that the operator could adjust to produce the air flow needed? At the start of firing the kiln, did the operator slowly build up the fire in order to bring all the stone in the kiln up to temperature? One would think if you built a roaring fire immediately, the stone above the arch would be burnt well before the stone at the edge of the kiln pit as heat rises up quite well but does not spread out nearly as well. Obviously if one went to all the work of constructing a kiln, collecting limestone to fill it and cutting the firewood, one would want as much lime as possible so getting all the limestone properly burnt would be major consideration. As well, the written description does not discuss how the burnt limestone was prepared for use. When cool, were the stones removed from the kiln and then crushed up with a sledge hammer into dust? Lime straight from a kiln could be quite caustic so were any safety precautions taken to prevent burns and damage to eyes and lungs of people crushing the stones? Various inquiries were made on lime kilns however; we could

not find anyone with answers as to details of operation. Considering lime kilns in southwestern Manitoba have not operated in over 100 years, this is not surprising. The pioneers used lime for a number of purposes. Lime could be used to produce lime mortar used to “chink” log buildings or to construct stone buildings. Lime was used to make plaster for the interior of buildings or for covering the interior of cisterns to make the cistern waterproof. Stone basements were also plastered to make them waterproof. Lime was used to make white wash used to paint the interior of buildings. White washing of the interior of barns, particularly dairy barns, was commonly carried out as the white wash served as a mild disinfectant, produced a white surface which made the interior of a dimly lit barn more visible and also filled in the rough surface of the wood used to build barns which resulted in

barns more easily kept clean. White wash could be mixed with other materials such as clay or even pigs blood to produce a colored wash then used to paint buildings. Various clays could produce yellow or red colors. However it is not known if this was done in pioneer Manitoba. It was recommended that people with wood stoves clean the stove pipes carrying away the combustion gases on a monthly basis and when the pipe sections were reinstalled, the pipe joints should be sealed with a mixture of lime and sand which was fireproof and prevented the gases from being vented into the building. So there were lots of uses for lime and in pioneer days with money short, pioneers were able to produce their own lime even in southwestern Manitoba. The Manitoba Agricultural Museum is open year round. For more information visit ag-museum.mb.ca.




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Dedicated Assiniboine Instructor Donates Agricultural Parts An influx of donated combine equipment parts will benefit Assiniboine Community College students studying in the Heavy Duty and Ag Equipment Technician programs and one of their instructors, Lloyd Carey, is to thank. When Carey looked at the online auction list for the closing of Harvest Salvage in fall 2019, he saw many items that could benefit the college. “Knowing from being in the industry what some of the stuff was worth, I thought it was a good opportunity to acquire it,” said Carey, Heavy Duty Equipment and Ag Equipment Technician instructor at Assiniboine. From his auction purchases he donated agricultural parts valued at over $95,000, mainly a variety of combine hydraulic and hydrostatic pumps and motors that will be used directly by the students he teaches, though not in the parts of the program he touches. “I teach mostly electrical component stuff, so the actual stuff I donated, I probably won’t actually touch in class but it’s all part of the same program.” Along with being a faculty member at Assiniboine, Carey received his journeyman Heavy Duty Equipment Technician certification following his studies at the college in 1994. He is also in his first term as the faculty representative on the college’s Board of Governors. No stranger to supporting the college, Carey has been a champion of in-kind donations to trades programming for many years, even prior to his employment with Assiniboine. “After I got my journeyman certificate, I

Lloyd Carey stands in his classroom at Assiniboine with one of the donated items, a Case IH Combine DVT drive unit.

the parts to Assiniboine. “I knew that the stuff was used here and used well. It’s not like the parts come in and they get left collecting dust. They do get put to good use with the classes,” he said. “It’s almost better sometimes for students if they take something apart and they can figure out ‘Oh, that’s what was wrong with this.” He admits that in the Harvest Salvage auction, he also acquired some parts for his

“It’s almost better sometimes for students if they take something apart and they can figure out...” ended up working for MacDon Industries in Winnipeg. I guess that’s kind of where I got the idea that we can donate stuff to the college, because working at MacDon we would sometimes donate pallets of parts that were destined for the scrap bin.” These items were no longer marketable, but still useful for training, so he put a bug in the ear of his supervisors and when they had service vehicles in the Brandon area, they would deliver

personal use. “I have a shop at home and I dabble a bit with farming so I am always looking for something. Out of the auction, I also bought an engine for one of my tractors.” In much of his spare time, you can find Carey in his automotive shop that he calls a “hobby turned into a business”, fixing up cars, trucks and tractors for his customers or working on the ‘99 to ‘03 Volkswagens he is continually keeping an eye out

for. “I have a bit of a Volkswagen problem. My wife thought there were 20 around home right now, maybe more.” Of these many vehicles, he said, it may take the parts of several to make one running vehicle, much like he did with his current car, which is made up of a Volkswagen he bought on the cheap and an engine from a car he purchased at a write-off auction. One of his more prized Volkswagen acquisitions was a rare

Volkswagen Rabbit Pickup that was recently rented by a crew filming an Amazon television series out of Morden. Carey is a father of three, with a school-age son, a daughter who just graduated high school and also drives a Volkswagen, and a 22-year-old son. “My youngest boy is a real gear-head too, he loves tinkering around with stuff.” Carey’s unique mix of learning and teaching at Assiniboine, and ongoing industry experience has

shown him the opportunity for industry involvement in trades’ education. Outside of his most recent large-scale $95,000 donation, he has regularly donated core transmissions and other parts as they become available in his shop. “Look at what you’ve got sitting around that maybe you can’t sell or market and consider giving us a call to see if it’s something we could use or want,” he said. “There’s some good stuff that happens when industry gets involved.”

“Look at what you’ve got sitting around that maybe you can’t sell or market and consider giving us a call to see if it’s something we could use or want.”




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Cruisin' for Deals February 28 2020  

Manitoba auto sales and features.

Cruisin' for Deals February 28 2020  

Manitoba auto sales and features.

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