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Current Until May 31, 2019

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2010 Ford F150 XLT 4×4 Supercab

Current Until May 31, 2019

2008 Ford Focus SE

2012 Chevy Malibu

Air, pw, pdl, cruise. 107,000 kms. $5,799. Skyline Autobody at 204-325-8155.

2.4L 4 cyl, air, pw, pdl, cruise. 137,000 kms. $6,900. Skyline Autobody at 204-325-8155.

2012 Chevy Cruze LT 5.4L V8 Triton, 6 speed auto, air, pdl, pw, cruise, tow pkg. $7,900. Call Pete at (204) 331-3326 Pembina Valley Auto.

2008 Ford Escape XLT

2008 Chevrolet Equinox Sport AWD

Air, pdl, cruise. 179,000 kms. $7,699. Skyline Autobody at 204-325-8155.

3.6L V6, auto, air, cruise, heated leather, pdl, pw, sunroof, tow pkg. 155,853 kms. $7,500. Call Pete at (204) 331-3326 Pembina Valley Auto.

1.4L Turbo, air, pw, pdl, cruise. 83,000 kms. $7,899. Skyline Autobody at 204-325-8155.


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2012 Ford Mustang GT CONVERTIBLE

5.0L auto, air, alloy wheels, heated leather, keyless entry, pdl, pm, ps, pw. 122,500 kms. $20,999. Dealer permit #4222. Call Kyle 204-822-3047.

2019 Chevrolet Spark 1LT

2.4L 4 cyl, auto, keyless entry, cruise, air, pw. 148,244 kms. $7,997. Call Steinbach Dodge at 1-888-458-5094.

1.4L 4 cyl, auto, rear parking camera, keyless entry, air, cruise, pw. 17,167 kms. $17,997. Call Steinbach Dodge at 1-888-458-5094.

2012 Ram 2500 SLT/CREW 4X4

2011 Acura MDX MDX ELITE AWD

2011 Ford F150 4×4 Crew Cab XTR

5.0L V8, 6 speed auto, 4WD, SYNC, air, PW, PDL, cruise, alarm, reversing camera. 229,276 kms. $13,900. Call Pete at (204) 331-3326 Pembina Valley Auto.

2007 RAM 3500 Cummins Diesel Mega Cab

6.7L Cummins, auto, loaded with upgrades! 158,708 kms. $32,900. Dealer permit #4222. Call Kyle 204-822-3047.

3.7L, 6 speed auto, rear DVD, heated/cooled leather, loaded! 184,156 kms. $17,399. Dealer permit #4222. Call Kyle 204-822-3047.

2014 RAM 1500 SLT Crew Cab 4×4

2008 Ford Escape Limited

2013 Ford Focus Hatchback

2011 Buick Enclave CXL2 AWD

5.7L Hemi, auto, air, cruise, pdl, pw, tow pkg. 192,000 kms. $15,400. Call Pete at (204) 331-3326 Pembina Valley Auto.

V6 AWD, leather, air, pdl, cruise. 158,000 kms. $7,999. Skyline Autobody at 204-325-8155.

4 cyl auto, pw, cruise, pw, pdl. $9,399. Skyline Autobody at 204-325-8155.

3.6L 6 speed auto, loaded! 197,000 kms. $13,899. Dealer permit #4222. Call Kyle 204-822-3047.

5.9L Cummins, 4WD, auto, air, leather, pdl, pw, tow pkg. 675,130 kms. $12,000. Call Pete at (204) 331-3326 Pembina Valley Auto.

2012 Chrysler 200 LX

2.4L 4 cyl, auto, keyless entry, cruise, air, pw. 148,244 kms. $7,997. Call Steinbach Dodge at 1-888-458-5094.




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Your Buying Guide

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Current Until May 31, 2019

Your Buying Guide

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Your Buying Guide

Current Until May 31, 2019

Minneapolis Threshing Machine Company’s Kerosene Tractor The Dickson-Henderson family of the Boissevain area donated to the Manitoba Agricultural Museum digital copies of photos taken on the farms operated by these families. One of the photos shows a “prairie style” tractor breaking sod in 1913. Prairie style is a term applied to early gas tractors, all of which were large, heavy and borrowed design elements from steam tractors. The photo contains the hand written caption, “Minneapolis Kerosene tractor plowing on the farm of Duncan Henderson three miles west of Boissevain Fall 1913”. The man on the plow has been identified as Earl Henderson, the son of Duncan Henderson. Earl Henderson was born in 1898 so he would have been 15 years old in this photo. Earl went on to gain a Degree in Agriculture at the University of Manitoba. He then returned to the Boissevain area and farmed in the area until the mid 1950s. Apparently he was mechanically adept, building a snow plane out of a wrecked Cessna airplane and modifying the steering of early John Deere tractors with the steering boxes out of Starr autos in order to achieve easier steering. For many years after retiring from farming, Earl and his wife, Alberta, operated a lapidary shop in Boissevain, the first rock shop in Manitoba. It is quite noticeable in the photo that the engine man has plowed straight. Given the crude nature of the chain steering common on tractors at this time, the engine man knew his business. In many other pioneer photos, arrow straight furrows are also very noticeable. Probably a plow man who could not plow straight could not hold up his head in the community! While the tractor was identified in the photo as a Minneapolis tractor, it caused some confusion to the Interpretation Committee as the tractor had an inline engine and the prairie style Minneapolis tractors the committee was familiar with, had cross mount engines. As well the tractor had an elaborate cab and no fenders. The Minneapolis tractors normally had simple cabs and had fenders. In this time period there were two Minneapolis companies active in tractor manufacture, the Minneapolis Threshing Machine Company (MTM) and the Minneapolis Steel and Machinery Company (MS&MC). MTM tractors are generally known as Minneapolis and MS&MC sold their tractors under the Twin City name brand. The Committee then began to wonder which company the photograph label was referring to.

After some research, the tractor was identified as a MTM 25-50. The MTM 25-50 is the only MTM prairie style tractor with an in-line engine. The committee identified the tractor after one of the members found a photo of a 25-50 in a recent US action sale bill. The 25-50 was not equipped from the factory with fenders while other MTM prairie style tractors had fenders as factory equipment after 1912. The tractor features a fairly elaborate cab for 1913. The cab features a clerestory roof, a windshield and canvas side curtains on the side windows. It appears the windshield was also equipped with slides as the right hand side of the windshield looks to be open. The photo also shows the Henderson crew plowing in the late fall of 1913 so the engine man probably appreciated the protection the cab would provide on a cold, windy fall day. The Minneapolis Threshing Machine (MTM) originated as the Fond Du Lac Threshing Machine company of Fond Du Lac Wisconsin in 1874 but soon went bankrupt. However one of the investors in the company, a Mr. MacDonald, reorganized and re-started the manufacture of threshing machines under the name MacDonald Manufacturing Company. He was successful and attracted the interest of investors from Minneapolis. They struck a deal with MacDonald to invest in his company but with the condition it move to Minneapolis, Minneso-

ta. This move took place in 1887. Around this time the company became known as the Minneapolis Threshing Machine Company. In 1893, the company began to manufacture steam traction engines with an initial production run of 250 engines. In 1908, MTM entered the gas engine business by selling the Universal Tractor Company’s (UTC) 20-40 tractor also known as the Universal 20-40. The Universal was also sold by the American Able Company and the Union Iron Works. Around 1910 Walter McVickar of the McVickar Engineering Company designed the 25-50 kerosene tractor. Somehow MTM came into possession of the design, either they commissioned McVickar to design the tractor or paid McVickar for the design. Lacking a gas tractor manufacturing plant, MTM in 1911 contracted the Northwest Threshing Machine Company to build the tractor for MTM. Northwest was capable of manufacturing gas tractors as they built the Universal 20-40 for UTC. MTM ordered 25 tractors in 1911 and 48 in 1912. By 1913, MTM had built its own gas tractor manufacturing plant and began to manufacture the 25-50 along with a 40-80 tractor of MTM’s design and the Universal 20-40 design. Steam engine manufacturing continued through this period as well. McVickar Engineering in 1909

designed a large tractor for the Joy-Wilson Sales Company which was sold under the name JoyMcVickar. These tractors were built by the MS&MC. Walter McVickar is thought to have been employed by MS&MC around 1912. MS&MC began to build their own tractors in 1910 after their experience building the Joy-McVickar tractors. It is also suggested in some quarters that O.E. Espy, who is thought to have designed the Universal 20-40 tractor, was working for McVickar Engineering at the time he designed the Universal tractor. This points out how limited expertise and knowledge of tractor design was in this era so companies often obtained designs from where ever they could. The story of the MTM 25-50 design also explains why the MTM 25-50 was so different from the other MTM tractors of the time. The designers were completely different people with different ideas. Not much is known about the technical details of the 25-50 only that it was equipped with a 4 cylin-

der engine with a bore and stroke of 6 X 8 inches governed at 530 rpm and equipped with a jump spark ignition. The 1911 production came with a tank type radiator cooled by an induced draft from the escaping exhaust. In 1912 this was changed to an automotive type radiator cooled using a fan driven off the engine. The 6 bottom plow is thought by the committee to be J.I. Case Plow Works engine gang plow. This design featured one lift lever for every two bottoms, a tail wheel on the left hand bottom and a second set of shorter levers alongside the longer lift levers. The shorter levers are thought to have worked the depth stops for the bottoms. The plow in the image features these design elements. While John Deere engine gang plows also featured one lift lever for every two bottoms the JD design did not feature a tail wheel or depth stop levers. For more information on the Manitoba Agricultural Museum and the Reunion visit ag-museum. mb.ca.


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McCrindle’s Sawyer Massey 25-45 Gas Tractor

The Manitoba Agricultural Museum’s collection contains a Sawyer Massey 25-45 gas tractor donated in 1960 by J.M. McCrindle of Foxwarren, Manitoba. James Marshall McCrindle was born in Nova Scotia in 1879 and later came to Winnipeg when his family moved there. Later McCrindle moved to Foxwarren in 1897 to work as a clerk in Laycock’s General Store. In 1900, he ended up taking over the general store. McCrindle also served as the telegraph operator for the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) in Foxwarren until 1905 as the newly appointed station agent. While this seems like an unlikely arrangement one has to remember that the line through Foxwarren was owned by the Manitoba and North Western (M&NW) railway until 1900 until it was sold to the CPR. The M&NW was in bankruptcy from 1894 forward. Most likely the M&NW’s bankruptcy trustees were operating the line as cheaply as possible so that employing locals on a part time basis made financial sense particularly as there may not have been a large volume of business to handle at the time in Foxwarren. It would have taken the CPR some time to get organized after buying the M&NW and as well the CPR had to determine which of the existing stations on the line

had the potential to warrant a full time station agent and telegraph agent. This may explain why it took the CPR until 1905 to appoint an agent at Foxwarren. McCrindle continued to operate his general store and was very active in the community. He played a part in opening the first bank in Foxwarren, building a rink, starting an athletic association and he served as the President of the Foxwarren local of the United Farmers of Manitoba. He married Agnes Leckie in 1907. Miss Leckie was born in Glasgow, Scotland and immigrated to Canada with her parents moving to Foxwarren where the family operated a general store in Foxwarren in competition with McCrindle. In 1912, he began farming with the purchase of a 1/4 section of sod near Foxwarren breaking his land with horses. He later added more acres and the Sawyer Massey 25-45 was purchased to replace horses. Eventually he became a purebred Percheron heavy horse breeder and won numerous prizes with his horses. McCrindle also joined the Canadian Registered Seed Growers Association in 1940 and entered into registered seed production. He retired to Foxwarren in 1943 and his son continued to farm. Even in retirement, McCrindle remained active as he served as councillor

and then as Mayor of Foxwarren for some years. Mr McCrindle passed in 1966. The Sawyer Massey 25-45 tractors were somewhat common on the Prairies as the Museum has seen a number of photos of 25-45s being used to farm. The 25-45 is in the category of “prairie” style tractor, that is, the first round of tractor designs which borrowed heavily from steam engines as tractor designers had no other experience to draw upon. Designers borrowed many elements from Sawyer Massey steam engines such as wheels, drive gears and steering gear. Sawyer Massey was a major Canadian manufacturer of steam engines, threshing machines and other implements. The company was formed in 1892 when the Massey family bought into the L.D. Sawyer Company. While the Massey family was also a major shareholder in the Massey Harris Company there was no other connection between the two. Sawyer Massey achieved sales success from 1892 to 1910 but the emergence of gas tractors by 1910 posed problems. The Massey family felt gas tractors were the future however the other partners in Sawyer Massey thought steam engines still had a place. The Massey family felt strongly enough about the issue, they sold their interest in Sawyer Massey. After the departure of the Massey family, Sawyer

Massey changed its mind and moved into production of gas tractors. Sawyer Massey designed and built the engine used in the 20-40 and 25-45 tractors. This became a major expense for Sawyer Massey. Records indicate the first Sawyer Massey tractor model was rated as a 20-40 but it was discovered that the engine actually turned out 51.85 horsepower on the pony brake which was a belt driven dynamometer. The design was then re-rated as a 25-45. The 25-45 design did evolve over time. The 20-40 and the early 25-45 tractors used a tank type radiator in which engine exhaust was ducted into a stack on the top of the square cooling water tank. As the exhaust escaped up, cooler air was pulled into the tank and drawn upwards through the exhaust stack. Along the way the air was directed through baffles in the tank over which hot coolant from the engine was trickled. While this arrangement cooled the water, the loss of cooling water was substantial. The Sawyer Massey 25-45s with the tank type radiators also featured a trombone type arrangement in the piping which took heated cooling water from the engine to the tank for cooling. This arrangement appears to have been installed to increase the cooling capacity. The 25-45 tractors built after



1912 featured an automotive type, non-pressurized radiator cooled by an engine driven fan. The McCrindle 25-45 features an automotive type radiator. Sawyer Massey also produced two smaller tractors, an 11-22 and a 17-34 using engines from outside suppliers. Sawyer Massey tractors were sold in western and eastern Canada. The company continued to build steam engines, threshing machines, clover hullers, saw mills and road machinery along with gas tractors. By the mid 1920s, Sawyer Massey along with other small manufacturers of farm equipment began to find it increasingly difficult to compete with larger concerns such as International Harvester Corporation (IHC) which were better financed, had integrated manufacturing facilities, offered complete machinery lines, larger sales organizations and could afford the increasingly expensive research and development costs associated with new farm machinery. Sawyer Massey exited the farm machinery business in the mid 1920s and concentrated on road machinery. After WWII, the Sawyer Massey Company liquidated and entered history. The Manitoba Agricultural Museum is open year round. For more information visit ag-museum.mb.ca.




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Cruisin' for Deals April 26 2019  

Manitoba auto sales and features

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Manitoba auto sales and features

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