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Local History Treasured in Sprague Museum

Cheyenne Days Coming to Ste. Agathe By Marianne Curtis For the 11th year in a row, the population of Ste. Agathe is expected to swell when several hundred will descend upon the community during their annual Cheyenne Days. The 2-day festival will take place on July 19 and 20 at the Sir Etienne Cartier Park located along Highway 75. One of the biggest draws of the weekend is the annual ball tournament, which brings teams in from all over the region. Festivities kick off Friday evening with baseball and live entertainment by Mrs. Hoo Hoo and Keith and Renee. On Saturday, the day starts with a bike parade and free pancake breakfast. Opening ceremonies take place at 10:30 am followed by a day filled with kids’ activities, a circus workshop, and kid’s entertainment with MarieClaude McDonald and juggler Isaac Girardin. Lucky Luc’s is providing a steak supper in the evening. Live bands will be playing all day including Nic Messner, Rambling Dan, Hammer Pigeons, Les Louis Boys, and Momentary Madness. The night will be capped off with fireworks. Ste. Agathe’s annual Cheyenne Days commemorates the discovery of the Cheyenne River Boat that sank in the Red River in 1875 near Ste. Agathe.

Hanover School Division Stands by Bill 18 Decision Located in an old community church, Sprague and District Historical Museum holds a vast array of artefacts and information pertaining to the history of the RM of Piney. Photo by Marianne Curtis

By Marianne Curtis On June 16, the community of Sprague opened the doors of the Sprague and District Historical Museum with a special community event. Doris Havorka could be considered the local historian. Her family is part of the region’s rich history and she has personally researched and commemorated many of the men and women from the area.

By Marianne Curtis

“My family has been here for many years. My father was a Cote and a pioneer lumber worker. He made his living harvesting the land,” Havorka explained. “There are so many things that people do not know about this area and this museum has it all.” As part of her research, Havorka has spent countless hours researching, then creating binders full of the names of

Over the past months, a group of concerned citizens from the Steinbach area have been petitioning the Hanover School Division to take a stand against the proposed Bill 18. Nearly 3,000 residents in the division contacted trustees to demand the division take a stance on their behalf and publicly oppose the controversial bill. The Hanover School Division had already agreed to

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July 2013

More Than Just News!

Dawson Trail Dispatch


More Than Just News!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

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Ile Des Chênes Couple Grateful for Act of Kindness By Marianne Curtis A 19-year-old Ile Des Chênes woman is trying to pay it forward after a complete stranger stepped up and saved the day after she was a victim of ticket fraud. According to Hugutte Alcroix, her daughter Roxanne and her boyfriend were devastated to discover that tickets they purchased on Kijiji for a Taylor Swift concert were fake. “When our daughter and her boyfriend arrived at the stadium gate to enter the Taylor Swift concert they were shocked to find out that their tickets, which they purchased on Kijiji, were bogus,” explained Alcroix. “After finding this out, she was obviously very upset and crying outside the stadium gate area. Out

Roxy Alcroix and her boyfriend, Quentin, were stunned when Raymond Bernier gave them his Taylor Swift tickets after discovering at the gate that they’d been swindled.

Bill 18

of nowhere an elderly man walked by them and simply offered her his two tickets for free.” Unable to believe their luck, the couple attempted to offer the man $40, all the cash they had on them but at first, he refused to accept the token. “He then explained to them that the reason he wanted to see Taylor Swift was that he had met her a few years ago at the Winnipeg Children’s Hospital and was really amazed by her kindness and thought that she was a great artist. He had a chance to hug her then but did not get a picture of her,” Alcroix continued. “He was on a quest to finally get his picture with Taylor Swift. He was very excited about going to see her at the concert but instead offered his tickets to two

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support the Bill 18 back in April until School Trustee Lynn Barkman brought the matter back to the table at the beginning of June with a motion to rescind the board’s decision. “Ninety-five percent of my rate payers do not support Bill 18 and that is why I brought it up,” Barkman stated. “I am voted in by the people, and the parents of my students do not support Bill 18”. Barkman was able to gain the support of only one other Trustee, Ron Falk, and the motion was defeated. Prior to the June meeting close to 3,000 ratepayers within the Hanover School Division boundaries either called or emailed their trustees saying they were “disappointed” and “disgusted”, noted Trustee Cyndy Friesen. “It is the responsibility of the trustees to support the students; it isn’t the board’s job to fight legislation,” stated Friesen. “People have the opportunity to go and speak at the Legislative building to oppose and address their concerns there. They think we have the political power to fight this when we don’t.” Hanover School Division Chairperson, Randy Hildebrand referred to Bill 18 as a journey. “We are trying to understand what it means to protect and offer safety to all our students,” stated Hildebrand. “Part of the journey is just listening to each other, not always agreeing but realizing we still have a job to do”.

At the meeting, the board was also presented with a petition signed by 2,776 people from Hanover by one of the attendees. The board voted to send that petition to the provincial government. To date nearly 3,000 people have contacted the Hanover School Division Board of Trustees to demand that the Hanover School Division oppose Bill 18 “as written”. Nearly 300 of these people have registered to speak at the Legislature before a committee before the matter goes for a final vote at the provincial level. A vast majority do agree that bullying needs to be addressed but do not feel that Bill 18 will actually address the issue. Bill 18, otherwise known as The Bullying Bill, has caused endless controversy in the region since it surfaced about five months ago. The bill amends The Public Schools Act in the areas of bullying and respect for human diversity. While the premise of the bill is to promote inclusion, one portion is upsetting many people within community of Steinbach. This portion specifically names student activities and organizations that use the term “gay-straight alliance. Once in effect Bill 18 would apply to all public and independent schools including Steinbach Christian High School. Funded independent schools receive 50 percent of their funding from educational taxes collected, the rest through tuition and donations. There are 14,000 students in Manitoba that attend funded independent schools, most of which are faith-based.

RM of Piney Seeks Great Photos By Marianne Curtis

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young strangers.” The gesture meant so much to the couple that they took their story to social media in hopes to find him and thank him properly. “We really wanted to find him and personally thank him,” Alcroix added. “We don’t want his kindness to go by unnoticed!” After the story went viral, the couple discovered their ticket angel was Raymond Bernier from Fisher Branch. A few days after the concert a meeting was set up and the grateful couple presented Bernier with a photo they took during the concert. They are also working hard at contacting various media, including the Ellen Show, with hopes that his act of kindness will lead to a face-toface meeting with Taylor Swift.

Doris Havorka shows one of the many local history books she has compiled that extensively pays tribute to various aspects of the RM of Piney including the fire department, forestry and local veterans. Photo by Marianne Curtis

Continued from page 1 residents past and present along with their contributions to the area. “It is very important that this information does not get lost,” Havorka continued. Currently she is putting the final changes on a complete history of the fighting men and women from the area. While she did not count the exact number of men and women who served our country, she estimated that the number was a few hundred. “This fall we are unveiling a plaque in memory of our many veterans,” she added and that in her experience as a former educator, she believes that young people are less informed on the sacrifices of their ancestors. “The young people need to know that many people from this area made this sacrifice and are still making sacrifices.” A special ceremony for the unveiling will take place on September 8. The Sprague and District Historical Museum highlights the rich history of the Sprague area including the RM of Piney. Some points of interest include a mock-up of a CN telegraph station from the 1940s, a pioneer kitchen and bedroom displays, displays featuring the early logging days and businesses of Sprague, as well as churches and military history. There are also five videos focused on the Canadian National Railway, sports, clubs, history of the RM of Piney and a book on the stores in the RM from 1890 and on. The Sprague and District Historical Museum is open Saturdays and Sundays from early June until after the September long weekend, from 1 to 5 pm. Tours during the week are available by appointment.

The RM of Piney is hosting a photo contest with the intention of showcasing the majestic and peaceful areas that the municipality has to offer and to expand their current library of photographs. The municipality is looking for entries in three categories including scenery and outdoor fun, wild encounters and tranquil moments and community living. “We want to see what kind of creative and unique photography you are able to capture that showcases nature and country living at its best,” council explained. “We are (also) looking for photographs captured of wildlife peacefully enjoying the rural living and the everyday moments that make up their day.” The municipality is also hoping to reflect on the times that the community has gotten together for both joyous and devastating moments. “The past few years for the RM of Piney has been filled with joyful memories, but there have been some devastating memories that will remain for years to come,” noted council. “We are asking anyone who has taken a picture during those heartbreaking moments to show us that, even when we feel that things could not get worse, the beauty of our area and how our communities work together as one will always shine through.” One winner in each category will be awarded $100. Entries are limited to two per entrant in each category. Entries will be accepted by the RM of Piney until July 31 at 1 pm. Photos can be mailed to the RM of Piney, 2013 Photo Contest, PO Box 48, Vassar, Manitoba R0A 2J0 or emailed to rmofpiney@wiband.ca. The winners’ names and photographs will be posted on rmofpiney.mb.ca on August 15.


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More Than Just News!

July 2013

Summer at Last, Eh The days are long, hot summer days are back and a welcome end to the political season. As the polls indicate, it has been a tumultuous time. I feel a wee bit sorry for Prime Minister Harper; if it wasn’t for bad luck, I fear he would have none at all. It must be difficult to keep any momentum when you are consistently be smacked around like a “piñata”. Still his seemingly dictatorial style is not buying him much sympathy. His second budget presented as an omnibus bill has left him open to considerable aggravation. The Senate fiasco is quiet now but will grow legs in the fall as the investigation progresses with, of course, the usual leaks. The last election is producing a continuous saga of perceived and very real past electoral misdeeds. Attempting to blame the opposition on this file will only make matters worse. The bold statement a few years ago professing to clean up politics is turning around and biting you in an embarrassing part of your anatomy. With not much left to do, he can maybe shuffle the Cabinet to deflect some attention. That is probably a painful experience for some and who knows if it will help. It never seems to do much for the polls. At present, the Conservative have difficulty reaching 30% in national polling. That’s opposition numbers. Mulcair and the NDP are a shade over 20%, which is nothing to write home about it. If it weren’t for Quebec and B.C., nobody would pay much heed. His approach is divisive. I think if he

took the summer to hitchhike across Canada he would get a much-needed perspective of what we are all about. The question is would anybody pick him up? Then there is this Liberal upstart… this Justin kid. The polls have him at 40%. But it all depends on his staying power. Is it to be history or a simple footnote? To the surprise of many Canadians, Bob Rae, the interim leader took the lofty road and Trudeau seems to have the same comfort and ease navigating. So far, the attack ads have been counter productive. It would be nice if after all is said and done, we Canadians would find ourselves better than Americans in that regard. Elections should be about the collective direction we want to take; electoral shenanigans and negative ads are undemocratic, unnecessary and unproductive, painting us all with collective shame. I suspect we would be more responsive to a more mature contest. A Canadian election should reflect a little more Roosevelt or Disraeli and a wee bit lest Putin or Mugabe. Yes, this is the season of refuge for kids and politician. For kids, fun, games and ample bravado. For politicians as quiet as possible, slightly subdued some showing symptoms of PTS, but all with an eye on the polls. As for the rest of us we will be swatting mosquitoes and keeping an eye on the weather, fitting in vacation time and maybe snoozing through the odd rerun.

Fundraiser Dance Still On Serving the communities along the historic Dawson Trail and beyond.

The Dawson Trail Dispatch is a monthly newspaper distributed free of charge to 50 Southeastern Manitoba communities. Published by: One One Consultants Inc. Box 308, Richer, MB R0E 1S0 Phone: (204) 422-8548 Fax: (204) 422-9768 Dan Guetre, Managing Editor One One Consultants Inc., Publisher News Writers: Marianne Curtis and Dan Guetre Columnists: Lee Guetre, Peter Friesen, Anni Markmann, Peter Martens, Raylene Snow, Dave Millar Production/Design: Dan Guetre, Myriam Dyck, Monica Guetre and Wilma Priebe Advertising: Karen Jorgenson and Dan Guetre

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Gardenton Ukrainian Festival Cancelled By Marianne Curtis The community of Gardenton was gearing up for their 48th annual Ukrainian Festival but a sudden change of plans has forced the committee to cancel this year’s event. According to Kelvin Chubaty, a Director with the Gardenton Ukrainian Museum and Village Society, this year’s festival that would have taken place July 13 and 14 has been cancelled. “We had our meeting regarding

Dawson Trail Dispatch

Global Alliance Against Child Sexual Abuse Online Last month Canada joined the Global Alliance Against Child Sexual Abuse Online. Our Conservative Government is committed to keeping our streets and communities safe and to protecting the most vulnerable members of society - our children. Child sexual exploitation is a horrific crime. Canada continues to lead, support and implement numerous initiatives, domestically and abroad, to prevent and combat the sexual exploitation of children, but we cannot fight this crime in isolation. The goal of the Global Alliance is to strengthen international determination to fight internet predators and child abuse images online. It focuses on identifying and helping victims, prosecuting offenders, increasing public awareness and reducing the availability of child pornography online. The internet has created new opportunities for sex offenders to prey on children all over the world. International cooperation is critical to effectively investigate cases of online sexual exploitation and to better identify and prosecute offenders. By working together through this international initiative, Canada and its partners will be able to secure the progress required to

bring criminals to justice and get exploited children to safety. We know that online sexual exploitation of children knows no borders. Formed in December 2012, Canada looks forward to working with the Global Alliance and its more than 40 member nations to achieve our common goals. Along with the 27 European Union members and the U.S., the members of the Alliance include Albania, Australia, Cambodia, Croatia, Georgia, Ghana, Japan, Moldova, Montenegro, New Zealand, Nigeria, Norway, the Philippines, Serbia, Republic of Korea, Switzerland, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine and Vietnam. It is estimated that more than one million images of children subjected to sexual abuse and exploitation are currently online. According to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime 50,000, new child abuse images are added each year. No country can fight this horrible phenomenon alone, as the criminal networks behind it know no boundaries and exploit the lack of information exchange and the legal loopholes that exist within and between countries. This is why international cooperation is crucial to effectively investigate cases of child sexual abuse online and to better identify and prosecute offenders. On February 4, our Conservative Government announced its intention to bring forward legislation to further toughen penalties for child sexual offences and to better address the risks posed by known child sex offenders. Our Plan for Safe Streets and Communities is one of four priorities identified by the Prime Minister. It focuses on holding violent criminals accountable, enhancing the rights of victims, and increasing the efficiency of our justice system.

the festival and due to some unforeseen circumstances we have to cancel the festival this year,” stated Chubaty. “However, we are still having the evening dance with music provided by the Fraser River Boys.” The downsized event, which consists of a fundraising dance and dinner, will take place at the Gardenton Ukrainian Museum on July 13. Tickets cost $15 per person. Money raised at this event will go towards preparing the site for the upcoming 50th anniversary celebration, which is planned for 2015. Before the big event can take place, the Gardenton Ukrainian Museum and Village Society would like to complete some rejuvenation

projects throughout the park. “We have a new committee this year and we have a lot of fix-ups to do in order to get the park in shape,” Chubaty continued. “It [the park] has been neglected in the past and we are having our 50th jubilee in 2015 so we need to reassess and see what we need to do. Two years comes up fast.” With the help of a number of upcoming fundraising events, the group hopes the site can be restored to its original state, as it was when it became a reality in 1965. The committee is planning a family fun day fundraiser in August and a fall supper later in the year to help raise money to prepare the site and host the upcoming anniversary event.


More Than Just News!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

NDP Above The Law On July 1, Canadians across the country celebrated Canada Day and the great country that we are privileged to live in. It is a country where we cherish our democratic rights and the fact that they are protected by law. Many new Canadians have come to this country for those very qualities that we as a nation enjoy. It is sadly ironic then that on July 1, Manitobans started to pay 8 percent provincial sales tax (PST) up from the previous 7 percent rate. It’s more than the fact that the tax rate has gone up because of the NDP government’s inability to control its spending it’s how it happened. First Greg Selinger and the NDP decided to take away the right for Manitobans to vote on the PST increase through a referendum. It has been Manitoba law since the mid 1990’s that no increase to the PST could happen without a referendum. That is a key part of the current Taxpayer Protection Act in Manitoba. But, the NDP are taking that right away. Hardly a great day for democracy. Added to that is the fact that the NDP have told retailers that they need to start collecting the 8 percent PST from Manitobans on July 1, even though the law that increases the PST (Bill 20 in the Manitoba Legislature) hasn’t actually passed into law. Bill 20 isn’t even close to passing in the Manitoba Legislature and becoming law. The public hearings portion of Bill 20 only

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NDP Waste Real Millions on a Virtual Community Centre started at the end of June and will continue into July. That means that at the same time that more than 200 people are ready to tell the NDP at committee on Bill 20 why the PST increase isn’t necessary, the NDP will already be collecting the tax. Not a very democratic process. What all of this demonstrates is that the NDP are willing to put themselves above the law. They are willing to increase taxes that are unnecessary. They are willing to eliminate a referendum requirement that would have given Manitobans a say on the PST increase. And they are willing to begin collecting the new 8 percent PST before the legislation that increases the tax rate has even passed in the Manitoba Legislature. And the most ironic thing about it all, and one of the saddest, is that the NDP chose to do all of these things on Canada Day, the day that we celebrate our democratic and legal freedoms as a nation. Hardly the example that we would expect government to set for the people they govern. I appreciate your comments and concerns. If you have any comments on these or other issues, you can contact me by writing, #3 - 227 Main Street, Steinbach, MB R5G 1Y7, by phone at (204) 326-5763, by fax at (204) 346-9913, by e-mail at kelvin.goertzen@leg.gov.mb.ca or by visiting my website at kelvingoertzen.com. I look forward to hearing from you.

St. Labre 200 Revs Up By Marianne Curtis Organizers are gearing up for what promises to be an exciting race weekend when the fifth annual St. Labre 200 takes place July 12 to 14. The annual St. Labre 200 is a go-kart build off competition where fourteen teams are challenged to build their own go-karts within 24 hours. Each team is given basic materials along with their own basic framing materials. Teams build go-karts from scratch on the first day and race their new creations the next day in a fast-paced nail biting 200-lap race on a quarter mile dirt track. The winner earns the right to hoist the Best Sleep Centre Sparkplug Cup. François Grenier, one of the organizers of the yearly event, is excitedly looking forward to the weekend, which draws mechanically inclined individuals to the community. “We are looking forward to another fun weekend,” stated Grenier. “Teams are all registered and we are ready to go.” In the past four years, the St. Labre 200 has been able to give over $20,000 to different local organizations. Profits from the concessions, merchandise, community supper, team auction, business donations, an on site donation jar and in the past, a big raffle are what make it possible for the Give Back to the Community campaign. This year funds are to be divided between Recreation Opportunities for Children Eastman, Today House in Steinbach and Community Resource Council in Piney. The main event is a 24-hour go-cart build off followed by a 200-lap race (50 miles). Other activities on the grounds include excavator and skid steer rodeo, bounce castles, R/C race cars, rubber boot toss, live bands, Red Bomb Fireworks, Manitoba Arm Wrestling Association sanctioned tournament and many others. All fourteen go-cart spots have been filled for this year’s race. Teams who have entered include Marchand West, SouthEastern Farm Equipment, Red Bearings, Hitrac, Team Awesome, Bandits, Moteur Busters, Moonshadow Holsteins, Funks Toyota, Thibaultville Thunder, Florze Boys, Penn-Lite Lightning, Camp Perdue, and Pist’n Broke.

The start of the summer season means sunshine, festivals, camping and a new class of high school graduates. Our graduates have brought pride to their family, friends and communities on this significant life accomplishment. As the critic for Child and Youth Opportunities, I wish them all the best in their future endeavours as they embark on the next exciting chapter of their lives. As you might have been following recently, there have been many problems with the NDPs mismanagement of Manitoba Hydro. In 2009-10, the NDP government entered an agreement with the TCN First Nations for a Keeyask Centre which was supposed to house museum-like displays of artefacts and a reference centre for information about language, culture and history of Canada’s Indigenous peoples. The NDP funded a Keeyask community centre for $4.5 million that was never built. After the Keeyask community centre was never built, the NDP government funded the operating costs that never existed. They allocated $750,000 toward covering staff and program costs at the centre, and are under contract to pay another $350,000 this year. Then, $125,000 of Hydro ratepayer money was spent on equipment and furniture for the Keeyask Centre, which doesn’t exist. Four years later, the TCN First Nation has a $6million virtual community centre, no centre, no staff, and no programs. As Manitoba Hydro Critic Ron Schuler said in the House, “this is not political hay, the community of TCN First Nations deserves to know why the Keeyask Centre that was funded under the NDPs watch, was never built.” To make matters even worse, now there is proof the $6 million the NDP claims was being held in trust to build the centre is gone. Documents obtained by Manitoba Hydro Critic Ron Schuler show that where $6 million is supposed to be held in trust, but as of December 12, 2012, only $12,476 remains. Additionally, Minister David Chomiak has refused to release a single receipt for the $224 million worth of dam negotiation expenses they have paid for northern aboriginal reserves adding to his bad track record of maintaining accountability and transparency. We have asked the NDP time and time again to tell us where the money for the Keeyask Centre went. Instead, we get more broken promises and tired-old rhetoric. I am proud to be a member of a party that is calling on the government to respect Manitobans. We believe that it’s the government’s responsibility to ensure Manitobans’ tax dollars are wisely spent. If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact me by email at dennis.smook@leg.gov.mb.ca. I can also be reached at my Legislative Office at 204-945-4339, or my Constituency Office at 204-424-5406.

R-E-S-P-E-C-T Driving down a busy three-lane street in Winnipeg, a 37-yearold woman, who had just received a call that her husband had died, was on the way to the hospital. She was alert, but not herself and was driving slower than speed with tears running down her face... fast, and from out of nowhere, a car whizzed around her, blasting its horn and the driver giving her the ‘finger’ sped away. Her heart skipped a few beats and she thought she was going to be sick with the knot that formed in her stomach. Yes, she was driving 10 KPH less than the speed limit, but was still moving along in her lane. The passerby was exceeding the speed limit. “How rude, thoughtless and inconsiderate,” she thought. I’m sure we’ve all had times when some one has demonstrated very little respect or consideration to us. It really sends the internal emotions for a whirl. Respect is a difficult behaviour to teach because it has a lot to do with being outside your selfish world, kind to others, considerate to all, and being polite. Not an easy concept. It must be modeled right from birth. I have come to a conclusion that RESPECT, if it were at the front of all human reaction, would eliminate or solve the large and small conflicts in life. Problems between family members are often avoided if the members respect each other. Problems between neighbours are easily handled when each respects the other. Problems in Municipalities, Towns, Cities, Provinces, and even countries (although much more detailed and complicated), could be worked out if the basis for solution is ‘RESPECT’ on both parties. Life seems more complicated and disturbing if lack of respect abounds. Oh, and don’t blame the youth. It is not just the young and inexperienced that create problems by being disrespectful. There are many adults that demonstrate rude behaviour and do not take responsibility for it. There are always those who have no remorse, blame everyone else, lack empathy, and only think about themselves. I am writing about this not with negative intentions, but with the intent of helping you understand that not only does disrespectful behaviour hurt others, but also it truly hurts the person who is dishing it out. If you are one of those folks who lack respect for all, you also lack respect for your own spirit and soul. You become argumentative, impatient, and selfish, while holding on to lots of anger. Think about it. Anger is a very negative emotion. Anger dwells in all your cells. It builds more thoughts that are

negative, raises your blood pressure, causes the body to stay stressed and releases a rush of hormones that keep you in the ‘fight-or-flight mode’. It actually harms you more than it hurts your opponent because your health is so negatively charged. Your whole body suffers physically every time you act out in disrespect. Mentally and emotionally, you are in a state of detriment. You won’t “feel” very good and the whole incident is avoidable if only you could develop a more respectful approach to living. Give your own body the respect to learn proper responses to things that may not appeal to you at that moment. Give yourself another gift that promotes your good health. Learn more, teach more, and demonstrate more R-ES-P-E-C-T to everyone. In doing so, you are also respecting your self. Show cooperation, kindness, good manners, think of other’s feelings and try to really care about those around you. Do things that make people feel great. And, the reward will be that YOU feel great. Your world and everyone’s world will be a happier, thus healthier place. Build bridges, not barriers. Treat people the way, deep down, you really like and want to be treated yourself. Raylene Snow is the owner of Raylene’s Wellness Spa, Ste. Anne located on Hwy. 210 towards La Broquerie.


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July 2013

More Than Just News!

New La Broquerie Pharmacist Prefers Small Communities

Dawson Trail Dispatch

RM of Ste. Anne Concerned about Illegal Dumping

An ongoing problem with garbage being left at a recycling drop-off south of Paradise Village is leaving the RM of Ste. Anne council scratching their heads with frustration. According to Councillor Dan Brunel, residents continue with the illegal dumping of garbage at the recycling drop-off area near Paradise Village. The municipality is actively trying to find a solution to the problem but council has not yet successful. In the meantime, the municipality would like to remind residents that only recyclable materials are allowed to be dropped off at any of the four designated depots in the municipality. The RM of Ste. Anne has recycling depots set up in Giroux, Richer, La Pharmacist Joseph Sharobeem owner of La Broquerie Pharmacy offers a wide range of pharmaceuticals along with free home delivery to communities of La Broquerie, Richer, Coulee and near Paradise Village. The Woodridge, Sandlilands and Marchand. Photo by Marianne Curtis drop off depots replaced the curbside recycling program that was a better service by getting to know patients; added convenience,” Sharobeem added. “La Broquerie discontinued back in 2011. By Marianne Curtis in a big pharmacy you are a name or number. and Ile Des Chenes are seeing a lot of development so the service is needed.” Here you are a person.” Residents living in La Broquerie and The Ile Des Chene Pharmacy is expected to open by Since opening the doors of La Broquerie surrounding area no longer have to travel Pharmacy earlier this year, Sharabeem is the end of summer. for their pharmaceutical needs after the constantly adding stock including greeting recent opening of the first pharmacy in the cards and other items normally found in community. community drug stores. Over the past few months, Joseph “The business is doing well and we are Sharobeem, pharmacist and owner of the growing; people like that can find their newly opened La Broquerie Pharmacy has pharmacy needs just down the street instead been stocking shelves and adding to his of several miles away,” he added. “I can even inventory after opening his doors. Located supply home health care stuff like at the corner of Principal Street and Highway wheelchairs.” #52, Sharobeem promises that patients are Sharobeem’s love for small towns is shared guaranteed quality service at competitive by his wife Gina Gourgy, who is also a pricing. pharmacist. With business booming in La “Most people think it will be more Broquerie, the couple is preparing to open a expensive to buy from a rural pharmacy but second pharmacy in Ile Des Chenes. I am keeping my prices competitive,” “My wife is really excited about opening promises Sharobeem. “Plus we do free this new store,” Sharobeem says. “This store deliveries to communities of La Broquerie, will be even bigger and we will be offering a Richer, Woodridge, Marchand and wide range of services.” The new store Sandilands.” includes space for a visiting physician but Sharobeem currently commutes daily from nothing has been finalised. Winnipeg, but he does not mind. “Pharmacies are cropping up in rural “I love to work in small communities; I used communities because people are recognizing to have a pharmacy in Egypt,” Sharabeem the value of keeping business local and the explains. “In a small pharmacy I can provide

RCMP Seek Armed Vandal

The St. Pierre-Jolys RCMP is seeking the public’s assistance with any information regarding two reported incidents of Mischief that occurred in Grunthal between June 7 and June 9. In both instances, police believe a shotgun was used to shoot out some outdoor lights. One was at the Arena; the other was at the Manitoba Hydro Generating Station. Police are asking anyone with information regarding these incidents to contact the St. PierreJolys RCMP at (204) 433-7908. If you wish to remain anonymous, contact Manitoba Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS) or manitobacrimestoppers.com, or text “TIPMAN” plus your message to Crimes (274637).


Dawson Trail Dispatch

More Than Just News!

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More Than Just News!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

Care Home Construction Nears Completion Gord Daman, Board Chair for Niverville Heritage Holdings, is excited to see the final pieces of the $13 million modern care centre coming into place. The project shot gunned forward when Niverville Heritage Holdings took ownership of the privately owned 42-bed personal-care home in St. Adolphe. “This has been an incredible venture; this whole project would not have been possible without the partnerships we’ve had,” explained Daman. “This is a very unique project, and we have to thank our MLA because he was invaluable in helping us get the province to think outside the box.” The new personal care home consists of 60 general care beds on the main floor and 20 Special Care Unit (SCU) beds on the second floor. The SCU beds provide the facility the unique opportunity to assess patients in crisis situations and determine the Gord Daman, Board Chair for Niverville Heritage, and Steven Neufeld, Heritage Life PCH best possible care for them. Executive Director, are counting down the weeks to moving day now that construction of a Heritage Life PCH Executive new personal care home in Niverville is nearing completion. Director, Steven Neufeld, added Photo by Marianne Curtis that construction of the SCU was By Marianne Curtis Over the past year and a half instrumental in the project’s constructions crews have been approval. In a few short months, busy erecting the new Niverville “This allows us to bring patients Niverville’s dream of having a Personal Care Home and by the in crisis to a response team that state of the art personal care home end of August, residents will start will monitor and decide what in the community will be a reality. moving in. works before the patient gets

about two months and the Niverville Personal Care Home expects to be at full capacity by November. The new personal care home has many great design features including a timber-frame atrium similar to the one in the Heritage “The first thing we Centre. It consists of three pods of 20 beds each with the SCU are going to do is occupying the second floor. bring people home Forty of the rooms have ceiling lifts, along with three of the five that want to be in tub rooms to ensure the safety of both patients and staff. A state of their community.” the art electronic nurse paging system and roam alerts are also installed. Patients are expected to start The personal care home will moving in near the end of August. While the plan is to bring most of provide employment for 160 people including nurses, health the care home residents from St. care aides and support staff. Adolphe, they will have to wait. The new facility is located next The first occupants are expected to be Niverville residents currently to the Niverville Heritage Centre, residing in facilities outside of the an 80,000-square-foot complex that is home to a primary health-care community or waiting for centre, a medical clinic, placement in regional hospitals. physiotherapy and dental clinics, a “The first thing we are going to do is bring people home that want daycare and an event centre. It to be in their community,” Neufeld will also be next to the Niverville Credit Union Manor, an assistedsaid. “Once that is done then we will be transferring everyone from living and supportive-care St. Adolphe.” Some patients have residence for seniors and people found placement in other facilities with disabilities. and will not be making the move, he added. The move is expected to take repatriated back into the community,” explained Neufeld. “This project is more than moving beds from St. Adolphe; it doubles the number of care beds we can offer to the region.”

to retain all assets. Remember the guiding principle: “in the best interests of the individual”. No “pre-inheritance payouts”. Even if there is consensus by all the children (the eventual beneficiaries) there is no more gifting. You cannot quit. Once you become the official attorney, you cannot quit or change your mind. Or you will need to get court approval first. Confidentiality is now necessary. No more sharing information. Even with other family members. Only the one person you are held accountable to will get financial information from you once a year. All assets must be insured. Your parent may not have had house insurance or tenant’s insurance before. But now you have to. You are obligated to protect all assets. Secure all assets including jewellery and other valuable items. I recently attended a course on the responsibilities of being an Inventory all assets and debts. You need to start with an Alternate Decision Maker when someone appoints you in their Power of Attorney document. I thought I knew all about it, but I sure “opening inventory” of all the assets and debt when you took over. didn’t know all the important details. Cash can only be in the bank. No more cash lying around. I’m really glad I went, as I am likely to become the attorney for one And investments must be conservative. If the individual had or both of my parents as they continue to age in their 90s and I can some “risky” investments (small cap stocks, penny stocks, oil share my knowledge with you, my loyal readers, and my clients. There is a guiding principle when acting as the Alternate Decision and gas growth companies), you must as soon as possible Maker: To act honestly, in good faith, and in the best interests of the change these to more conservative investments. Credit cards must be cancelled. You or the individual can no incapacitated individual, using the assets for his or her benefit only. longer use their credit card. Cancel the bankcard. Arrange for The first thing I learned is there has to be a specific point in time when you actually take over the finances of the person and actually direct deposits. No more free rent. Say one of the children or grandchildren act as their attorney. Sometimes this is very clear – when someone were living with the individual rent-free, as the attorney you suffers a stroke and becomes incapacitated. But, often it’s not as can no longer allow this. You must charge reasonable rent, or clear-cut. It’s up to you as the attorney to document when you ask them to leave. actually take over the finances. Sometimes you can get a doctor’s Ensure income taxes are up to date. Give Canada Revenue certification that the person is no longer mentally capable of handling his or her own affairs. There is often a grey area before this Agency a notarized copy of the Power of Attorney so you can deal with them as the legal representative. time. You may be “helping” them with writing out cheques and There can no longer be any changes to the estate plan. No keeping track of things, but you are still not acting as the official attorney. Yet. Once you do become the attorney, there are some very changes to the Will, no changes to beneficiaries, no transferring money to a joint account. important dos and don’ts that I learned. Now if you are contemplating your own Power of Attorney, Here are some important ones. First, you now need to keep records. Yes, you must account for all you can include clauses that allow for actions that are otherwise prohibited: support for disabled family member, allow financial transactions including cash (best to avoid cash transactions if you can). You may need to provide this accounting to for gifts to charities, allow for pre-inheritance by children, and someone else once a year. (I’m starting to see these clauses in some allow gifts to reduce US Estate taxes. But if these clauses are not in there, the actions are indeed prohibited. newer well-worded Powers of Attorney documents.) Even if the Compensation should be indicated in the Power of Attorney document doesn’t state it, assume you will have to eventually and form. And normally it is approved by the individual receiving it’s easier to record everything each month. Even if you just write the accounts, the individual you are accountable to (often notations on the bank statements each month describing every another sibling). And the compensation you receive is deposit and payment. If you are not the executor for the individual, considered taxable income. the executor may ask for this information when the individual dies. At my recent Estate and Funeral Planning seminar, my guest Be prepared! The next don’t was one I had no idea about. No more gifting. Once lawyer, Jim Henderson, opened his presentation with, “The you are acting as the official attorney, you can no longer give money Power of Attorney document is more important than a Will”. And he is right. away. To you and your siblings, or to charity. Your responsibility is

In Estate Planning the Power of Attorney is the Most Important

We do have provincial laws that determine who gets your assets when you die. And it’s likely what you are contemplating for your Will: spouse then children. So if you don’t have a Will, it’s likely your assets will go to whom you want them to anyway. It may take a bit longer and it may cost a bit more in lawyer fees, but your assets will be distributed accordingly. So if you go to a lawyer’s office thinking you only need to get your Will done, maybe you should get your Power of Attorney document in place first. And make sure you name an alternate in case the first choice is unable or unwilling or passes away. My lawyer friend, Jim Henderson, left us with a great tip on where and how to keep your important papers, “Get a fire proof lock-box, put your Wills and Power of Attorney and other important documents in there. Do not lock it. Throw away the key!” It does not need to be locked, thieves don’t want your papers, but if it’s locked, they may take the box! In an upcoming article, I’ll be sharing information about “mirror” or “mutual” Wills that are very important for those in second marriages or common law relationships. Stay tuned! Anni Markmann is a tax professional and owner of Ste Anne Tax Service, working, living, and volunteering in our community. Contact Anni at 204-422-6631 or at 36 Dawson Road in Ste Anne.


Dawson Trail Dispatch

More Than Just News!

July 2013

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July 2013

Off Road Vehicle Rollover

More Than Just News!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

Wetland Creation Gets Federal Funding

On June 4, at about 6:15 pm, Steinbach RCMP and local area Fire and EMS were called to the scene of an ATV rollover on Centre Street in Mitchell. The 41-year-old ATV operator and his 7-year-old daughter, who was a passenger on board, were transported to Bethesda Hospital. Due to the severity of their injuries, both individuals were transported to Winnipeg for further treatment. Early investigation suggests the operator was travelling on Centre Street when he lost control of the ATV, which resulted in the ATV, going into the ditch. Alcohol has not been ruled out as a contributing factor in this collision. Police are reminding the public that off road, vehicles are not to be operated on roadways and helmets are mandatory.

Pat Porter Active Living Centre offers programs, activities, services and volunteer opportunities, striving to promote healthy and active living for older adults of the southeast region. We invite you to come and pay us a visit and consider participating in some of our programs. For more information drop by the Centre, Monday to Friday 9 am to 4 pm, call 204320-4600 or online steinbach55plus.com. Membership is only $25 per year due in January of each year for those 55 Members of the Niverville council, Ducks Unlimited and the University of Manitoba have collaborated to create a significant wetlands years of age and older. Benefits include reduced program rates, a voice in project within Hespler Park. business meetings, voting rights, and eligibility to serve on the board or committees. With the funding, the Town of noted that the project should be By Marianne Curtis Up and Coming Events and Monthly Programs: Niverville will carry out a multi-year good for the environment and Urban Poling: Join us on Thursday, July 4 for our first Urban Poling The Town of Niverville council is project that will investigate the benefit the community financially. It instructional class. For more information call Carrie at 204-320-4604 or pleased to receive $159,330 in feasibility of remediation of is cheaper to turn the old lagoon into Kathy at 204-320-4603 about this new trend in keeping active and fit. (sludge) in the a wetlands site than to undertake funding from the Lake Winnipeg biosolids July Birthday Celebrations: Wednesday, July at 2 pm - Come celebrate Basin Stewardship Fund for a new decommissioned wastewater lagoon traditional decommissioning. with us! Bring your friends! Guest pay $2 for coffee and cake. The natural wetlands will be water quality project in the through in situ treatment using Potluck: Thursday July 11. If you would like to attend, please call ahead community. The funding will be phyto- and bio-remediation methods created as an extension of Hespler and let us know what you would like to bring. Call 204-320-4600. As always used to successfully turn the under both aerobic (native Park. needed are salads, casseroles, desserts and buns. Cost is $5. The Lake Winnipeg Basin former community lagoon into a grasslands) and anaerobic (wetland Foot Care on the first and third Tuesday of the month from 9 am -3 pm. viable wetlands habitat. plants) processes. A positive Stewardship Fund is a federal Run by a professional foot care nurse. Cost $30. Bring your own towel. Niverville Mayor Greg Fehr is outcome from this project will have program that supports community Contact the centre to book an appointment. confident that this project will broad applications for other stewardship actions that improve Computer Labs are 1 hour long and available every other Wednesday become a lasting legacy for the municipal governments across water quality and measurably reduce morning from 9 am - noon. nutrient loading that creates alga Manitoba and Canada. community. Pot Luck Supper on the second Thursday of every month at 6 pm, meat The Town of Niverville council blooms. “We’re entering a new reality and beverages provided. Cost $5 ea. Bring a casserole, salad or desert. where people realize that the Contact the centre to reserve a seat. environment and the economics Beltone Hearing on the third Friday of each month. Contact 1-800-661- don’t need to be in conflict,” said 2653 for appointment. Fehr. “If you can find ways to Brain Injury Support Group on the last Monday of the month at 7 pm. protect the environment and save Parkinson’s Support Group on the fourth Wednesday of the month at money, it’s just good business.” 1 pm. “Improving water quality and reducing nutrient loading at the Weekly Programs: community level contributes to the Monday 9:30 - 10:30 am Urban Poling (for the summer) efforts our government is taking to 12 - 4:30 pm Drop-in Pool clean up Lake Winnipeg,” added 1 - 4:30 pm Model Trains Provencher MP Minister Toews. 1 pm Canasta “We are proud to support exciting 7 pm Tai Chi new environmental initiatives such Tuesday 9:30 am - 3 pm Circle of Friends as this project in Niverville.” 12 - 4:30 pm Drop in Pool Wednesday 10 am Tai Chi 12 - 4:30 pm Drop in Pool 1 - 4 pm Cribbage 1:30 pm Floor curling 7 pm Old Time Country Band Practice Thursday 9:30 - 10:30 am Urban Poling (for the summer) 12 - 4:30 pm Drop in Pool 1 - 4 pm Whist Friday 9:30 am - 3 pm Circle of Friends 12 - 4:30 pm Drop in Pool Noon meals are available Monday through Friday. Cost $5. Call 204-3204605 by 9 am to reserve your meal for that day. Purchase your meal ticket at the receptionist desk before noon. Monthly menus available at the office or in the newsletter. Bring a friend. Computer Lab from Monday to Friday, 9 am - 12 pm and 1 - 4 pm. Cost $1. Lessons with Alex Cupples every other Wednesday from 9 am - 12 pm. Call the Centre for more information and to book an appointment. Volunteer Opportunities include perogy making, decorating and setting tables, birthday party hosts, food preparation and serving, clean up, greeters, receptionists.


Dawson Trail Dispatch

More Than Just News!

Piney Holds House Arrest for Landmark Voyeur Water Testing Seminars By Marianne Curtis The RM of Piney council recently held a couple of seminars in the municipality in hopes of educating residents on well maintenance. Reeve Duane Boutang said that the meetings were held to educate residents on well maintenance in Woodridge and Vassar. “Well maintenance is something that residents are not truly aware of, regular maintenance is like maintaining your car,” explained Boutang. “It is important that you do a good job so you don’t run into problems.” Boutang explained that, while he was an employee for Prairie Farm Rehabilitation Administration (PFRA), he performed many water supply projects for farmers. During this time, he realized that many people do not take care of their wells. The RM of Piney brought in PFRA to run the seminars, which attracted nearly two dozen residents at each session. At these sessions, residents were informed on ways to ensure that their well water remains drinkable for years to come. “Residents want to make sure that the ground around their well is draining away. This prevents contamination,” explained Boutang. “They also need to be aware not to dig too close to septic fields to prevent E Coli.” Another issue is iron bacteria, which can be prevented by chlorinating wells properly. “Many people do not chlorinate their wells,” Boutang added, noting that it can be difficult to convince residents that chlorinating wells is important. Wells should be properly chlorinated once a year. Chlorinating can reduce iron build up on the screen that can affect well production. Boutang said that residents should get into the habit of testing their wells whenever any work is done with or around the well. Testing can be done with the help of Seine-Rat River Conservation District. Over the summer months, the Seine-Rat River Conservation District has prescheduled water collection dates so residents can plan ahead for their sample collection. Water testing through this program is available to all residents living within the conservation districts boundaries. It will cost $8.03 per sample. Water bottles can be picked up in advance; however, samples must be taken on the day of the drop-off and submitted with a completed form prior to 11 am on the collection dates. Collection dates are scheduled for July 18 and August 15. Bottles can be picked up and dropped off at a number of locations including the Seine-Rat River Conservation Office in La Broquerie, the RM’s of Ste. Anne, Hanover, De Salaberry, Tache, Ritchot, Stuartburn and Piney offices, along with the Town of Niverville office. Contact Seine-Rat River Conservation at (204) 424-5845 for more information.

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During her testimony, the victim said she was discouraged from going to the conditional sentence while the By Marianne Curtis while she was showering at the police by church members and defence suggested a period of end of her shift. After-shift A Landmark area hog barn made to feel that she was to probation and community service. showers are common practice in worker has been sentenced to blame for what happened. “The circumstances of this the hog industry to prevent the eighteen months house arrest “Her life has been turned particular offence of voyeurism are spread of disease as workers move after pleading guilty to one upside down,” Martin said. serious as they go beyond the between barns. He told the court count of voyeurism in a case “She cannot fathom how mere invasion of privacy and that he spied on the woman involving a fellow employee. people she believed would affect the physical and emotional several times while she showered On June 25, forty-eight year protect and support her could integrity of the victim,” stated and even took photos and video old Glen Brandt, the Manager hid this offending conduct Martin. of her on his cell phone. His wife of a hog barn in Landmark from her for so many years.” The offences against the woman, later found the videos on the appeared in Steinbach court to who cannot be named to protect Martin noted that she was family’s home computer. be sentenced after admitting satisfied that Brandt was truly her identity, took place more than Brandt admitted that he told his that he had masturbated into a five years ago. However, the remorseful for his actions. A minister that he kept track of the female co-worker’s underwear probation report assessed that matter only became known in 2012 victim’s menstrual cycle and in an attempt to impregnate her. after the victim’s pastor informed he as a low risk to re-offend. hoped that he would get her Prior to sentencing Judge Lee her that Brandt had “sinned Brandt was ordered to pregnant, stated Crown attorney Ann Martin says that Brandt’s against her.” Mitchell Lavitt. The victim did get observe an absolute curfew actions demanded a custodial for the first twelve months of The court heard how Brandt pregnant approximately nine sentence, not probation as his sentence and to have no admitted to his minister that he months later but DNA testing requested by the defence. The had an infatuation and took to contact with the victim. confirmed that her husband was crown requested a two-year masturbating on her underwear the father.


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July 2013

Open over summer holidays – July Hours – will be irregular as staff is enjoying a well-deserved break! Call before you come – 204-346-1077 please. August - Monday-Friday 9 - 5 pm (closed for lunch Noon – 1 pm). So come on down! We are currently taking registrations for Summer Arts Day Camps and fall classes. Last call – Reserve your seats as a Season Ticket holder! Our 2013-14 concert series includes Ça Claque French Fiddle and Dance, True Jive Pluckers, our annual Holiday Pops concert with the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra, Miracle on South Division Street with Manitoba Theatre Centre, and Showcase of Stars, and a variety night featuring local ‘celebrities.’ You won’t want to miss this season! Call now. Cinema in the City – coming up on Saturday, August 17. Have ‘amazing’ fun from 3 – 5 pm. Register your team of four for The Amazing Race: Steinbach Edition. Compete in exciting challenges for your chance to win! Applications will be available online. The City of Steinbach will be showing a family film on an outdoor screen starting between 8 – 9 pm. Bring your lawn chairs and blankets. FREE Zumba – The Arts Council is pleased to offer three Saturday classes August 10, 17 and 24. You will love the Latin rhythms and easy moves – try it for free! Limited spaces – please let us know you’re coming. Instructed by Tammy Schroeder. Register now for Fall Classes! Creative Wellness: Pre/Post Natal Pilates, On the Ball Pilates, Pilates Basic Core and Fusion, Gentle Hatha Flow Yoga, NEW ‘Chair’ Yoga. Belly Dance for Beginners or Intermediate. Visual Arts: Kid’s Art Adventure, Art X-Travaganza, Cartoon Illustration, Realism/Impressionism/Abstraction Acrylic Painting, Exploring Acrylics, Mixed Media watercolor and acrylics. Photography: Photography for Moms, Digital Photography for teens or adults. Pottery: Clay Creators Hand Building or Intro to the Wheel, Pottery Passion. Theatre: Backyard Theatre Company or NEW Musical Theatre. Cooking: Kids in the Kitchen, Creative Cooking. Languages: Spanish Beginner 1, 2 and Intermediate or French Beginner 1 and 2 or NEW French4Kids. Dance & Martial Arts with XCOMPANY – Little Ballerinas, Broadway Stars, Jazz, Tap, Ballet, Contemporary, Hip Hop, Breakdance, Hawaiian Hula, Junior and Senior performance teams, Musical Theatre, S.T.U.N.T. Kinetix/Stage Combat, High Intensity Kickboxing, Chinese and Filipino Martial Arts. Music Lessons – Southeastern Manitoba Teachers’ Association, Manitoba Conservatory of Music & Arts – piano, flute, guitar, theory, voice and accordion. Ages 3 - 5 will love the Arts for Tots Preschool Program. Early childhood education through Drama, Dance, Music, Crafts and Culture. Join Miss Treena and Miss Pam for the 2013-14 year. Limited spaces – call now! On Now in the Hall Gallery – ‘30’, a digital poster exhibit. You can expect to see cutting edge Photoshop effects and original digital illustrations. Loewen Green Art Scene – Stop by this summer! Current hours are Tuesday and Friday 7 – 9 pm and the first and third Saturday of the month. Check our website for upcoming events like free art classes and more. Don’t miss Summer Arts Day Camps! Ages 5 - 12 – Most camps are full but we still have room in Goin’ Green. Camps run 9am-4pm daily at the Cultural Arts Centre. All camps include Music, Drama, Dance, Crafts, Sports, Swimming and Field Trips. Volunteers Wanted! If you love working with children and would like to help at any of our summer camps, please let us know! Registration Day at the Steinbach Cultural Arts Centre, 3 – 8 pm on April 29. Have a blast, plus get 10% fall programs! Sign up for classes in Creative Wellness, Visual Arts, Drama & Musical Theatre, Dance & Martial Arts, Cooking and Languages. Meet the instructors! Contact information available for music lessons – piano, guitar, theory, voice, flute and accordion. We are looking for Board Nominees to serve on the Steinbach Arts Council Board of Directors for 2013-14. Nominees should show an interest in the Arts and a willingness to support community programs. Please email a letter of intent to Cindi at director@steinbachartscouncil.ca. Eastman Youth Choir is looking for singers entering grade 9, 10, 11, and 12 in September 2013. For info or to apply visit emyc.weebly.com or email us at eastmansings@gmail.com. View all our events on steinbachartscouncil.ca.

More Than Just News!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

Thousands Attend Summer in the City

Juno and Canadian Country Music Award winner Gord Bamford performed before a few thousand fans Saturday night. Photos by Marianne Curtis

By Marianne Curtis For three exciting days downtown Steinbach was transformed into a marketplace and entertainment hub when the 5th annual Summer in the City took place June 13, 14 and 15. Shoppers were treated to fantastic city-wide deals during the three-day event as participating businesses reminded shoppers why “It’s Worth The Trip!” to Steinbach. Steinbach Credit Union kicked off the three-day event by hosting their annual Pancake Breakfast on the morning of June 13. Summer in the City committee Chair Crystal Hildebrandt said the threat of rain did little to dampen the spirits of those who participated in this year’s festival. “We were really focused on arts and culture this year,” Hildebrandt explained. “Eastman Immigrant Services was very involved and they did a fantastic job.” During Cultures in the City food, jewellery and clothing venders set up displays from their country of origin. Local artists also set up displays and showed off their talents with live demonstrations of their craft. Hildebrandt added that the highlight of the weekend for her was to see the community come together. The Summer in the City committee had a rough time collecting volunteers this year but in the end people stepped up. What surprised her was a group of young volunteers about 12 years old. “They blew me away,” she praised. “They worked a couple long days and loved it. It was enlightening for me to see.” When it comes to music the Summer in the City organizing committee kept up the tradition of bringing in two major acts. On Friday night, Myles Goodwyn and April Wine took to the stage while Main Street was transformed into a classic car show. Juno and Canadian Country Music Award winner, Gord Bamford, performed for several thousand-country fans on Saturday.

For three days, Main Street in Steinbach was transformed into a summer playground complete with rides, music and dozens of kiosks offering food and merchandise.


More Than Just News!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

TimberFalls Store and Auto-Spa Opens in Steinbach

July 2013

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Lorette Businessman Not Guilty in Flagger’s Death By Marianne Curtis

Instead of cutting a ribbon, Steinbach MLA Kelvin Goertzen and Steinbach Mayor Chris Goertzen sawed a log during the official grand opening of TimberFalls Store and Auto Spa while owners Lorne Funk and Ron Unger look on.

By Marianne Curtis On June 9, hundreds of people came out to help celebrate the grand opening of TimberFalls Store and Auto Spa. The new business, which is located on the west side of Steinbach along Highway 52 is a one stop car shop that offers a variety of services including a car wash, convenience store, meat store and gas bar. Manager Ron Unger says that the operation was a huge task to put together. “It was a bit of a challenge because we were not setting up one business,” Unger explained. “Sometimes it felt like we were setting up five or six businesses at once; coordinating everything was a bit of a challenge but it was fun.” Not only is TimberFalls Store and Auto Spa the community’s newest one stop shop, it also provides employment for about fifty people. “It is great for the region,” stated Steinbach MLA Kelvin Goertzen. “This is a unique business; I don’t think I have seen anything like it.” Unger says that TimberFalls is the result of a lot of research. “We looked at a lot of different concepts through the states and figured out what kind of things worked together,” Unger explained. “Even though some things don’t look like they go together, they actually are a good fit.” TimberFalls Store and Auto Spa is located in the former Funk’s Livestock Building. The building was renovated and upgraded to accommodate the new enterprise.

Pool Decision Made in Niverville During a special meeting recently, the Town of Niverville council met to discuss financing a new outdoor pool and splash park for the community.

According to Councillor Myron Dyck, the council has developed a Community Campus concept for the arena site with potential for recreation, commercial, residential and education campus on the current 14-acre arena and curling rink site. In May, council decided to research the cost associated with the development of a water park/pool facility adjacent to the Niverville Arena. Council charged staff with the task of obtaining cost estimates and the numbers was recently presented to council. “We now have some cost information regarding

the pool, some of the amenities and requirements such as change rooms,” stated Dyck. “This information opens the door for council to finalize some of our financing decisions.” With preliminary estimates on the table, council will now look for a way to fund the facility. “We still have to get our funding in place and that is going to take some time,” Dyck continued. “Once we have numbers confirmed we will send out requests for proposals.” Similar water park projects based on developments in

The driver of a car that struck and killed a young Winnipeg woman working as a highway flagger has been found not guilty after facing a charge of dangerous driving causing death. On June 28, Mitchell Blostein a 70-year-old businessman from Lorette was found not guilty of dangerous driving charges after a trial earlier in the month. The charges stemmed from the death of 21-yearold Brittany Murray on October 10, 2010. She was struck by a 1996 Chrysler Intrepid in a construction zone on Highway 207, between Highway 15 and the Trans-Canada Highway. Murray was hit at 89 kilometres per hour and was thrown over 38 metres and her earphones were still in her ears, court was told during the trial. She was rushed to hospital but died of her injuries. The driver of the Intrepid, Blostein was charged with dangerous driving causing death after an initial investigation stated he was travelling 112 kilometers per hour through an area marked 60 km/hour while passing road workers. Blostein had been returning to his Dugald home from working in Lorette when he approached the construction site and noticed no workers present. There was a sign onsite to notify drivers to slow down when passing construction workers. During the brief trial, Blostein told the court he did not see Murray until it was too late. “I told a police officer I had no idea where she came from,” Blostein testified. “I did not see any workers.” The court also heard that Murray was wearing iPod ear buds against her employer’s rules while on the job which prevented her from paying attention. Murray was part of a highway crew with Mulder Construction. RCMP Constable Wayne Goetz told the court he had received complaints in the area after the fatal collision from five or six motorists who said the flaggers showed lack of attention, were listening to music and had their backs to traffic. “One of the complaints about the flaggers had come from a police officer in the RM of Springfield,” Goetz testified. Witnesses testified that Murray was still wearing iPod ear buds in her ears after the collision and her iPod was found nearby. Wawanesa and Souris suggest the project could cost between $1.1 and $1.5 million. Council assures residents that before a project is approved or any funds are borrowed public hearings would be held. The Town of Niverville council is hoping to have a new outdoor pool and splash park ready to open in August of 2014.


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More Than Just News!

July 2013

Smaller Kindergarten Classes Coming to Hanover

Dawson Trail Dispatch

RCMP Seize Drugs at Checkstop

By Marianne Curtis The Hanover School Division has hired a few extra teachers in preparation for the upcoming school year. In an effort to meet the province’s edict for school divisions to have smaller class sizes from kindergarten to grade 3, the Hanover School Division will have no more than 20 students per class. According to Hanover School Division Superintendent Randy Dueck, Hanover has committed itself to comply with the province’s plan to reduce class sizes at the kindergarten this year and for the coming year. “That means that most of our classes throughout the division will have 20 or less kindergarten students,” Dueck said. “We are allowed to go over a small percentage to make things work.” Earlier in June, Education Minister Nancy Allan announced that $1 million in funding would be made available to help the Hanover School Division create three additional kindergarten classrooms. A new classroom, including its own attached bathroom, is being constructed at Niverville Elementary, Blumenort School and Kleefeld School. In addition, the Hanover School Division has hired additional kindergarten teachers and converted classrooms for their use. “The plan right now is to roll this out year by year,” Dueck added. This year the focus will be on the kindergarten students. Over the next three years, the Hanover School Division plans to implement the reduced classroom sizes one grade at a time.

Hadashville Loses Conservation Officers A decision by the province to close the Manitoba Conservation Office in Hadashville has raised concerns in the RM of Reynolds and they are requesting that the province reconsider. Council was recently informed that Conservation Officers would no longer be stationed in the Hadashville District Conservation office. The province has re-drawn the boundary lines and relocated one of the officers to Falcon Lake and the second to Beausejour. The RM of Reynolds is concerned about this action as it, “Leaves animals and trees south of the Trans Canada Highway to the U.S. border free for the taking.” As a result, the RM of Reynolds is appealing to the province to reverse this decision because the municipality is a highly wooded area with an abundance of natural resources that requires protection. According to council, the decision to remove officers from Hadashville will also inconvenience residents and loggers. Residents and loggers will have to travel to Falcon Lake, Lac du Bonnet or Beausejour to obtain burning, logging or firewood permits. Until the change, conservation officers regularly patrolled the municipality’s many roads, keeping an eye open for poachers, illegal foresting, disease and brush fires. While conservation officers will no longer be situated in Hadashville, the fire crew will remain in the community. The RM of Reynolds consists of about 1,333 sections of land with a vast majority consisting of four forest reserves including the Sandilands, Agassiz, Whiteshell and North West Angle.

RCMP Satellite Office Reopens in Niverville The Town of Niverville is pleased to announce that it has re-opened its RCMP satellite office located next to the fire hall. The Town of Niverville along with the St. Pierre-Jolys RCMP have hired Robyn Yates as its municipal representative ready to offer assistance to the public with many services offered by the RCMP. Yates has been an employee of the Town of Niverville for the past 5 years working in both the Town office and the Recreation office and brings her experience gained in those roles into the RCMP satellite office. The satellite office offers local access for those needing to report a motor vehicle collision, obtain a Criminal Record Check, file a complaint, or need access to other police service. Anyone with concerns regarding non-emergency matters or further questions about the services offered through the satellite office can call 204-388-6091 for assistance. For urgent matters, please dial 204-433-7433 or 911 for immediate assistance. The Niverville RCMP Satellite office will be open from 1 - 4:45 pm from Monday to Friday. It will be closed from Monday, July 8 – Friday, 19 then reopens Monday, July 22. The St. Pierre-Jolys RCMP Detachment will remain open from 8 am - 4 pm for those needing access any other time.

On June 8 shortly before 7 pm, the St. Pierre-Jolys RCMP conducted a roving Checkstop on Highway 52 near the junction of Highway 59. A 2000 Honda Odyssey van was observed travelling west on Highway 52 with a burned out headlight. The vehicle was stopped and approached. Officers noted an odour of marihuana from the vehicle. The driver, identified as a 32-year-old RM of Stuartburn man, was arrested. He was uncooperative with officers and resisted arrest. He was escorted to the RCMP Detachment for processing. Officers seized about 1,100 grams of dried marihuana divided into 20 baggies, two cellular phones, and $700 cash. While the suspect produced a Health Canada licence authorizing possession of dried marihuana for personal medical purposes, the evidence seized by officers’ warrants additional investigation. Health Canada has confirmed that this individual is authorized, for personal use only, to possess and produce medicinal marihuana. At present, no formal charges have been laid. The suspect was released on a promise to appear in St. Pierre-Jolys Provincial Court on August 27. The RCMP continues to investigate.

Habitat Projects Underway in Richer Two deserving families will see themselves in a new home, now that the Southeast Chapter of Habitat for Humanity is ready to start building in Richer. According to Sherry Bueckert, Chair of the Family Selection Committee for Habitat for Humanity Southeast, construction of two new Habitat for Humanity homes in Richer is expected to begin this month. “Two new homes will be built to accommodate one family of 5 and one family of 6!” stated Bueckert. “July is the start month and families are pumped.” The new homes will be built on Lots 10 and 11 on Godard Street in Richer. Habitat for Humanity Manitoba (SE Chapter) offers families living in difficult situations the opportunity to break the cycle of poverty. Habitat homes are sold at market value with selected families offered a hand up through no down payment, interestfree mortgages. To become a Habitat for Humanity homeowner, the family has to demonstrate a need, have an ability to pay based on income and be willing to work alongside Habitat on

the project. For example, single families need to put in 350 hours of sweat equity while a couple would have to put in 500 hours. To ensure these projects proceed, Habitat for Humanity relies on donations and public support. A fundraising community garage sale will take place on July 27 and 28 in Richer to help fund the project. Donations can be dropped off at 320 Southeast Drive, Steinbach or by calling (204) 326-1455.


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Father’s Day Fun

MYC Choir Opens Goldeyes Baseball Hall of Fame Game

The 38-member choir Music for Young Children (MYC) made up of students ages 5-11 and teachers, led by Arlene Schulz an MYC teacher, opened the Winnipeg Goldeyes game on Sunday, June 2. The choir sang both the Canadian and US national anthems making an exciting day for everyone involved. MYC is taught to 24,000 children

annually across Canada, the U.S., New Zealand, South Korea, Vietnam, Singapore and Malaysia. The piano can be the best instrument upon which to build a child’s love of music. Taking piano lessons gives the child a good pedagogical and practical knowledge of music, which can help them if they decide to move on to any other instrument. “We

have found many of our graduates do move on to several other instruments,” says MYC spokesperson Janice Reade. The youngest age to start on an instrument should be three. “The learning window is three to 10 years old, this is the ideal age to start a child in music lessons,” she said. “The circuits formed by learning to play an instrument during these years last a lifetime”. While most children likely will not be the first to express an interest in taking piano lessons, Reade says it is worth getting started early. “With the parent making the decision and give their child the opportunity to experience lessons, the child will have an increased intellectual and social development, better marks at school, better spatial reasoning, improved memory and a better emotional equivalent.” she added. Back row from left to right are Dominic Johanneson (Lorette), Kaiden Kalcsics (Lorette), Isaiah Klassen (Niverville) Cally Phillips (Lorette), Rebecca Ronald (Grande Pointe), Gabrielle Thomas (St Adolphe). Front row left to right Jack Grantham (Niverville) and Abigail Wilkinson (Dugald).

Well, Father’s Day has come and gone. Sadly, I was not taken fishing this year. Since most of our fishing is done while standing on the shore, this year would have been rough with the crazy amount of mosquitoes that lay in wait for us at our fishing spot. Throw in several small children and I’m not sure if we would have survived the blood loss due to the sheer number of bites that would have been inflicted upon us. No, this year after going to church, I was treated to a Father’s Day lunch and then I spent the rest of the day at home with my wife and children. After all, how can I celebrate Father’s Day without my children (and yes, I guess my wife had something to do with them, too). One of the gifts that I received was a “coupon” that I can use to buy a book of my choice. This is a good gift for me since I love books and I love to read. Another gift that I received was a talking gnome. Maybe I should explain that it is not a real gnome but is a small plastic statue of a gnome that speaks several different phrases. This is actually the gnome that watchers of “The Amazing Race” will frequently see. This is a great gift for me for a couple of reasons. One reason is that my wife knew that I liked this little gnome. If you’re going to buy your spouse a gift, you should try to make sure that it’ll be something that they want and like. Another reason why this is a great gift for me is that it is something that I wouldn’t buy for myself. Now I know that I just finished saying that this is something that I like and now I say that it’s something that I wouldn’t buy for myself. Kind of contradictory, isn’t it? The reason that I wouldn’t buy it for myself is that while I’ve seen the gnome in the store several times, I just couldn’t bring myself to spend the money on it. Kind of funny since it really isn’t that expensive either. Not sure why, but I just couldn’t do it. Perhaps I wasn’t meant to purchase it I just had to wait. Either way, the smiling little fellow stands near me as I write this column and I can’t help but wonder if he’s not thinking of getting into some mischief in the near future. If so, I’ll be sure to let you know. Until next time, take care and keep your world spinning.


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Students Plant Trees for Seniors By Marianne Curtis Seniors living at the East Borderland Community Housing have several new trees around the facility thanks to a group of hard working students from the local school. During the last week of June, students from the Grade 7 to 10 classes at Ross L. Gray volunteered to plant a shelterbelt at the facility. Ross L Gray Principal Danielle Charrette is very proud of her students for taking on this community initiative. By selling Mom’s Pantry products the students raised about $800 and used the money to purchase ten mature trees. During the last week of classes, students from grade 7 to 10 then volunteered to plant a shelterbelt along the East Borderland Community Housing complex. “I firmly believe in paying it forward and I wanted to have a connection between the youth and the seniors,” explained Charrette. “It helps develop relationships and respect; what better way than to plant something that will grow; the students will eventually have grandparents living in there and they can look back at the trees they planted with pride.” She added that it also teaches them to take pride in the community and help students recognize that to be part of a community one must give back. This is not the first time that students took on such a large project. A few years ago, students held a skate-a-thon that raised over $2,000 Ross L. Gray students Justin Goodman, Marko Schoenbach, Joshua Hebel Allard, along with Education Assistant Margie Prevost plant a tree in front of East Borderland Community for the community arena. The 138 Housing. students attending Ross L. Gray to use the arena but it is also someone has to get paid to clear the Charrette noted. “We are small but have free use of the facility during a unique way to give back. school hours and the fundraiser was “It is wonderful that we are allowed important to teach students that ice or to heat the building,” proud!”

Sober Ride Team Represents Region in Strides for Change By Marianne Curtis On June 9, 16 members joined the Sober Ride team to participate in this year’s Strides for Change. This was the first time since it was founded three years ago that Sober Ride has joined forces with MADD to help host the annual Strides for Change, which is an annual runwalk-wheel event that also promotes safety and awareness for MADD. Sober Ride founder Shay Hawthorn, from Ile Des Chênes, is excited with the support they received in for the Strides for Change Walk-A-Thon. “This is a big step for Sober Ride being a sponsor of this event,” explained Hawthorn. “We’ve done

The 16-member Sober Ride team was recognized for being the biggest and sharpest dressed team when the group participated and co-sponsored this year’s Strides for Change, a MADD fundraising initiative.

well this year with donations and awareness raised within our own program to be able to give back and help MADD with this.” Sixteen people joined Team Sober Ride including friends and family from Ile des Chênes, Steinbach, Ste. Anne, Pinawa and Winnipeg. “We had sixteen team members and all participated and finished the 5 km walk,” added Hawthorn. “Best part was we won biggest team and best in show with our snazzy shirts!”

The Sober Ride Team also raised over $600 in pledges for the cause. Hawthorn, a paramedic with Southern Health, founded Sober Ride three years ago with a goal to eliminate impaired driving one vehicle at a time by encouraging drivers to take the Sober Ride pledge. By joining Sober Ride, people take a pledge to not drink and drive. The initiative targets drivers of all ages, especially young adults. To find out more about Sober Ride the group has a Facebook page or email soberride@live.com.


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Stay Safe Around Dams and Waterways Fishing, boating, and swimming are great ways to enjoy the summer. However, these activities can be dangerous if you’re close to a hydroelectric dam or station. Be alert; don’t get hurt if you find yourself near a hydroelectric dam this summer. Obey all warning signs, fences, buoys, and barriers. Signs near a dam are posted to warn the public that the areas inside and around them are dangerous. There are many areas above and below hydro generating stations and dams, where the water is flowing quickly, currents are unpredictable, and the river is deep. The rocks next to these areas can be unstable and slippery. Never wade into any moving water. Falling in these locations could be fatal. Never stand below a dam or anchor a boat there. Water levels can change quickly, and the change in water flow can take you by surprise, swamp your boat, or pull you into an undertow. Always stay clear of hydroelectric dams and station structures, unless Manitoba Hydro has clearly indicated walkways or observation points. Be aware of the water levels on the river. Check upstream often for any signs of increasing currents or rising water levels. The sound of a horn near a generating station indicates the spillway is opening, which means a change in water flow. Contact your nearest Manitoba Hydro office for more information or visit hydro.mb.ca.

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I’m Sooooooo…. Bored! By Dr. Susan Linn “I’m soooo bored,” sighs eight-year-old Jason as he sits down to lunch. “There’s nothing to do.” For many children, summer means long lazy days that are a sharp contrast to the scheduled school year. In theory, parents and children alike look forward to a break from the pressure of homework and afterschool activities. But in practice, a sudden wealth of downtime can add friction to families. Here are ten replies to “I’m bored!” that will help your kids develop the internal resources that are important for a creative, satisfying life. What to Say 1) “So, you’re feeling like there’s nothing interesting to do right now?” It’s tempting to jump right in with suggestions for activities. Instead, take a moment to acknowledge your child’s feelings. This will go a long way toward helping him see you as a resource rather than an adversary. 2) “If you could do anything, what would you like to do?” Try to encourage your children to generate ideas for activities. Some of them might be far-fetched or impossible. But by sorting through their preferences, you both may get ideas for things to do. 3) “That’s a great idea. We can’t do it today, but let’s make sure we do on Tuesday.” If your child suggests something that can’t be done right away, reinforce the suggestion instead of disregarding it. If you can, set a specific time for doing it, and then make sure that you both follow through. 4) “You’re usually so good at thinking of things to do.” Reinforcing a child’s sense of competence to generate activities will help him develop a sense of resourcefulness. 5) “Let’s think of some things together.” If your child can’t think of anything to do, even with your encouragement, it’s okay to start making suggestions. 6) “I sure could use some help for a while.” Most young children like to help with household tasks. If you’re cooking, sewing, or cleaning, find small jobs that your child can do with you. Even older kids can get into helping, especially if they feel like they’re accomplishing something. Special projects, such as reorganizing toy boxes or shelves, can occupy long periods of time — especially when children are encouraged to re-examine lost treasures or reminisce about “the old days.”

7) “Remember how we wanted to sort through our old pictures?” Sorting through family photos is a great activity for children. They love seeing pictures of themselves when they were younger, and are often interested in seeing younger versions of family members. If possible, get a blank picture album for them to fill with pictures. 8) “Want to hose some things down for me?” Water is soothing and magical for children. Kids can while away long hours hosing, washing, and scrubbing — and keep cool during hot summer days. Let them commandeer the bathtub, the porch, driveway, or backyard for some serious water play. 9) “How about making Grandma a present?” Keep a stash of art supplies handy, including scissors, glue, stamps, and stickers. Rummaging through boxes of buttons and beads to make collages or jewelry can sometimes occupy children for long periods of time — even longer than it takes to make things. 10) “Let’s do something together!” Sometimes, especially with younger children, cries of boredom are really calls for companionship and attention. Designate some special times for you and your children to do simple, fun things together, such as playing a board game, reading aloud, or taking a walk. Encouraging children to pick the game, select the books you read, or plan your route will help them get in the habit of making their own choices about how they spend their time. Supplies You’ll Need It’s tempting to rely on television and videos to keep kids occupied during the long summer days. But you’ll be doing your young children a favor by encouraging them to use simple materials, along with their imaginations and ingenuity, to generate summer fun. Here are the supplies you’ll need: - Art supplies — glue and glitter, construction paper, colored pipe cleaners, markers, colored pencils, scissors, and crayons - Lemonade, ice, and pitcher — for a lemonade stand - Blocks — all kinds - Water — for washing the car and water fights - A library card — for trips to the library - Ingredients for baking cookies, cupcakes, or bread - A deck of cards — for solitaire, two-person games, or even building! - A collection of grown-up clothes — for dressup - Old family photographs Susan Linn is co-founder and director of the coalition Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood and Instructor in Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.


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Canadian Travel Destinations

Rocky Mountains. For those who want to witness something many in the world never will, be sure to take a heli-tour of the Columbia Icefields. This is where the summit of the Saskatchewan Glacier marks the “hydrographic apex” of North America, the point on the continent where headwater streams flow into the Pacific, Arctic and Atlantic oceans.

Those of you looking to get out of the province and visit some of * Georgian Bay. Located on the eastern edge of Lake Canada’s idyllic locales this summer as a vacation spot may want to give Huron in Ontario, Georgian Bay is home to the world’s the following a visit. longest freshwater beach. Visitors with an adventurous streak can explore a labyrinth of caves carved deep * Bay of Fundy. The Bay of Fundy is a 170-mile ocean bay that stretches into Blue Mountain or dive among the shipwrecks at between New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. Visitors can enjoy a guided Fathom Five National Marine Park. beach walk and stick around for outdoor theater that’s performed in French or English. And be sure to catch the view at Cape Enrage, a view * Eastern Townships. The Eastern Townships of Quebec some insist is the best in all of Canada. at Knowlton on Lake Brome provide visitors with endless views of mountains, lakes and fields. Camping * Jasper & Banff National Parks. Outdoor enthusiasts simply must take in afficionados can camp at an altitude of 840 metres Alberta’s Jasper or Banff national parks. Waterfalls, pure emerald lakes (2,756 feet) at Parc d’environnement naturel Sutton. and flourishing wildlife characterise both parks, which are part of the Those who appreciate a great bottle of wine will no doubt love La Route des Vins, which links 16 vineyards in Brome-Missiquoi, the mainstay of Quebec’s renowned wine region. * Okanagan. Located in south-central British Columbia, Okanagan is another ideal locale for wine afficionados. Often referred to as British Columbia’s “Napa of the North,” the Okanagan Valley is home to Canada’s first Aboriginal-owned-and-operated winery. Those who enjoy nature’s aesthetic appeal can fall in love with Okanagan, which features lavender farms that bloom in waves of white, pink or soft purple. Orange sunsets are known to reflect off the 136-metrehigh (449-foot-high) Helmcken Falls, one of Canada’s highest waterfalls.

Labrador has a large area of relatively untouch wilderness to explore.

* Labrador. One of the world’s largest wilderness regions, Labrador is tailor-made for outdoors enthusiasts. Fishermen will love angling for speckled trout and Northern pike near Labrador City, while bird watchers can visit the Gannet Islands Ecological Reserve, which is home to the largest razorbill colony in North America and 38,000 pairs of puffins. A network of more than 1,931 kilometres (1,200 miles) of trails crisscrosses Labrador, and the North West River Beach Festival and Labrador Canoe Regatta annually attracts thousands to the lakeshores for music, dancing, sports and fun.

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Swim Safely this Summer Keep your family safe around the pool this summer by ensuring all potential electrical hazards have been inspected, detected, and corrected. To protect swimmers from electrical hazards: - Keep electrical cords, radios, and other appliances away from the water. - Never touch electric cords, switches, or appliances when wet, standing in water, or with wet hands. - Ensure all wiring and lighting in and around the pool is protected by Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCIs). - Keep long-handled cleaning tools and poles away from nearby utility power lines. Prepare an emergency plan with your family so they know how to stay safe if an accident occurs. Show your family where the electrical switches and circuit breakers are and how to turn them off in an emergency. If an electrical cord or appliance falls into the water, do not try to retrieve it until you turn off the power at the main switch.


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Niverville Buys New Relay Pumper The Niverville Fire Department will be adding a new piece of equipment to their fleet after the Town of Niverville council recently agreed to purchase a new relay pumper for the community. Councillor Angela Janz said that council is excited about the new purchase. “It is something that we needed in our community,” Janz explained. “We have higher needs with new high density housing and we have the new personal care home opening soon.” The new fire truck is costing the Town of Niverville $319,000 from Keewatin Truck Service plus an additional $30,000 in equipment such as a high volume hose, suction hose and 35-foot ladder. A relay pumper is designed to relay water to a primary fire pumper from a fire hydrant. The new pumper will be able to transport up to six more personnel to fire scenes or motor vehicle accidents. The Niverville Fire Department is expected to receive their new truck within the next month.

Piney to Close Two Dumps Residents in the RM of Piney can expect some significant changes when it comes to disposing of solid waste now that the municipality has decided to close two municipal dumps. Effective October 31, the RM of Piney is closing both the Sandilands and Vassar Waste Disposal sites. The facilities may be opened seasonably for the acceptance of recyclables and burnable materials however hours and dates of operations are yet to be determined. Currently the RM of Piney operates five landfills located in Piney, Sandilands, Menisino, Vassar and Sprague. A year ago, the municipalities residents decided to close the dumps and establish three transfer stations instead. This decision was made after Manitoba Environment told the RM of Piney they needed to reduce the number of sites within the municipality.

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Guidance from the Holy Spirit Question: Is the Holy Spirit a real Person, or is He just a spirit or influence that God gives to His children when they are saved? Answer: The Bible teaches that the Holy Spirit is part of the Trinity (3 parts). There is God the Father, God the Son and God the Holy Spirit. Although it is difficult to understand, these three parts are separate Beings, yet one God. Each part is just as much God as the other. Someone said in trying to help us understand the Trinity, it is not 1+1+1=1; rather it is 1X1X1=1. As a Person, the Holy Spirit is given a name. In John 14:16, He is called the Comforter. When a person trusts Jesus Christ as Saviour today, God the Father sends the Holy Spirit to indwell that person. He has a very important job in a Christian’s life. He guides us into all truth (John 16:13) using the Bible. He doesn’t lift Himself up but rather points people to Jesus Christ (John 14:26). He teaches us how to live the Christian life and then reminds us of things when we forget (John 14:26). The Holy Spirit convicts the lost person of sin (John 16:8) and when that person turns to God for salvation, it is the Holy Spirit who does the actual transformation (Titus 3:5). He gives power to the Christian to live for God (Acts 1:8) and He produces His fruit in our lives (Gal 5:22, 23); love, joy, peace, long suffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, meekness and temperance. As a Person, the Holy Spirit can be grieved (Eph. 4:30). He can also be resisted (Acts 7:51). In this case, people are actively taking a stand against God and deliberately opposing Him. The Holy Spirit can also be quenched (I Thess. 5:19). If people continually oppose God and His prompting in their lives, eventually the Holy Spirit may quit working. Then He has been quenched. The other aspect of the Holy Spirit is that He can be vexed (Isa. 63:10). This means He is harassed, tormented and irritated to the point where He begins to fight against us, trying to get our attention in order to bring us back to God. But, if as Christians, we yield to the Holy Spirit, then He becomes that Comforter, who comes along side in every trouble and trial of life and encourages and enables us thru all life’s challenges. The Bible says He will never leave us or forsake us (Heb. 13:5). Eventually He will take us to Heaven to be with God forever, if we have trusted Christ as our Saviour. Do you know Jesus Christ as your Saviour? If not, don’t hesitate to contact me on my email dmillar@nlis.ca. God bless & have a good day! David Millar has been involved with pastoral work for the past 22 years and is currently pastoring First Baptist Church in Steinbach.

Niverville Student Recognized for Healthy Living Initiative The province recently presented ten grade 12 students including a student from Niverville with Healthy Living Awards for Youth to commemorate their contributions towards healthy living. Niverville Collegiate student Jodi Ruchkall was recognised for her efforts after she organized a “blue month” in the school to raise awareness of the importance of mental health. In April, Ruchkall implemented many planned activities including daily announcements and posters on mental health issues, a “Blue Bites” bake sale to raise funds for mental health, a “Blue Expressions” art contest, a “Wear Blue” day which included a friendly game of murder ball with several Blue Bomber players, the staff and students of NCI, “Pages of Encouragement” class activity and a noon hour Jeopardy game. Ruchkall was also recognized for participating in anti-bullying initiatives such as Day of Pink and other encouragement activities in the school. The Healthy Living Award for Youth awards was given to the students to recognize their dedication and commitment to making their schools and communities better.

Recreation Survey Underway in Ste. Anne The Town of Ste. Anne is developing a recreation master plan that will guide the development of facilities and allocation of public resources over the short and long-term future. According to council, the plan will create a vision for recreation development, set priorities for future services and examine the feasibility and viability of developing proposed new and/or improved facilities including trails, pathways, splash pad, skateboard park, indoor halls, arenas, playgrounds and green space. The Town has mailed out a community recreation survey seeking the views and opinions of local residents on the future development of recreation services. Early in the fall, a public meeting will be held to review the results of the survey and seek the community’s opinion about the plans and priorities for future recreation development in Ste. Anne.

De Salaberry Supports Daycare The RM of De Salaberry council has agreed to support a local day care centre by providing them with an annual grant equivalent to their yearly tax bill. According to council, the Garderie De Bambins is planning to build a new daycare centre. A request was made to council that once the building is completed that council grant the Garderie de Bambins funding based on the value of their yearly municipal taxes. Council agreed to the request up to the amount of $25,000 with funding out of the municipality’s Economic Development Budget.

New Pumper Ordered for St. Adolphe The RM of Ritchot has been given the green light to purchase a new pumper truck for the St. Adolphe Fire Department. At a recent meeting, council agreed to purchase a 2013 E-One Triple Custom Pumper from Keewatin Truck Services. The new truck will cost the municipality $403,584 plus taxes. Once the municipality has the new truck in its possession the 1999 Freightliner that is currently in operation will be sold to the RM of Riverside for $90,000.


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July 2013

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Christ the Wisdom of God 1 Corinthian 1:18-19 ... 18) for the message of the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God. 19) For it is written: “I will destroy the wisdom of the wise, and bring to nothing the understanding of the prudent.” (NKJV) We know very well how foolish it might sound to those who do not believe what the Scriptures teach about Jesus dying on the cross to save them. However, those who by faith have put our trust in Christ recognize this message as being the very centre and power of God. Scripture teaches that God destroys all human devices or ideas about salvation where that foundation does not include Jesus Christ... no matter how smart or wise they might seem. In fact, the Bible teaches that God in His wisdom ignores the very best ideas that humanity dreams up. The story that Christianity has to tell sounds at times, absolute foolishness to those who are perishing. It appears foolish because it shows how mere human wisdom and understanding are certain to fail. It is an undeniable fact that for all humanity’s wisdom, many are still seeking a God they have never found. Even in today’s age of enlightenment a great number of folks have failed to understand who God really is. There are brilliant astronomers who search the heavens and map the very orbits of the planets. But, they have never made a proclamation that their telescopes have found where God lives. The details of a world invisible to the human eyes have been investigated, analyzed, cut up and put back together again. But, never has anyone stated that they have seen God through their microscopes. Could we call this foolishness? As Christians, we see the marvellous work of God’s creative power in all creation – in the stars of the universe and the tiniest microorganisms visible only through the microscope. Unbelieving truth-seekers study and read; they probe this and poke at that, they have turned every rock upside down to find how they can discredit the creative power of God. They too will come to know that it is impossible through their humanistic research to find God. There is no way that the world through their wisdom will ever find God. One more foolish thought. It seems incredulous to many folks that one whose life was taken from him on a cross could possibly be Jesus Christ, God’s Chosen Son. You see in Jesus’ day, folks were guided only by what the letter of the law stated. That law stated, that anyone who was hung on a cross was considered cursed. It was absolute foolishness to imagine a suffering Saviour. There were those who thought that God was unable to feel the pain of His people. They went so far as to say, “That if God can feel joy or sorrow or anger or grief it means that someone has at that moment influenced God.” As a result, they might think that God is no greater than the person who influenced him. It seems so incredulous to think that one who had to suffer as Jesus had suffered could possibly be the Son of God. It’s no wonder that the story of Christ on the cross is hard to accept. But, what looks like foolishness to us, is really wiser than all the combined wisdom of humanity; what looks like God’s weakness is really stronger than all the might of humanity. How do we view the cross? What do we think of when we hear or read about the death of Jesus on the cross, and three days later He rose again? Do we think it is foolishness? Or can we be convinced that it is the very power and wisdom of God. There will be those who will stand back, beat their chests, suspicious... clamouring for a credible sign. They want more before they will turn to the cross for salvation. We may have to step on our pride before we can accept the fact that God’s foolishness is after all wiser than our own wisdom and His weakness far stronger than our own strength. The cross, the resurrection that followed is the only hope Christians have. The cross reveals the love and forgiveness of God. Many folk think it is too complicated to come to the Jesus who died on a cross. But, Jesus invites us to come just as we are and welcome Christ into our heart. We can do that right where we are at this very moment. Would you pray this prayer with me … “Lord Jesus, come into my heart. Forgive my sins. I want my life to change. My thoughts and my attitude need to change. I do not have the peace in my heart that I yearn for. I really want that peace, joy and happiness that will fulfill my heart’s desire. Please let the Holy Spirit help me be the kind of Christian that will honour Your Name.” Amen.


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July 2013

COMMUNITY EVENTS EMAIL YOUR COMMUNITY EVENT TO EDITOR@DAWSONTRAIL.CA OR FAX 204-422-8548

Marchand Rodeo Days – Saturday, July 27 at 1 pm and Sunday, July 28 at 1 pm. Cost $5/day. Enjoy one of the best rodeos’ in the world. Calcutta, Steer Mugging, Steer Doctoring, Wild Cow Milking, Calf Branding, Barrel Racing, Goat Tying and Much More. For Falcon Lake Fun Fest – From Friday, July 5 – Sunday, only $15, you can enjoy the Dinner and July 7. Featuring Wonder Shows Carnival Dance with the live band Quinton Blair. & Rides, live music and more. Fireworks Mitchell take place Saturday, July 6. Mitchell Fun Days – From Friday, July 12 – Sunday, July 14. Details to be Announced. Gardenton The Ukrainian Museum and Village Society on Saturday, July 13 invites you to an Breakfast and Social - every Tuesday evening dance to music of Fraser River morning, 7:30 - 9 am except the last Boys $15. Contact Kelvin (204) 425-8197 Tuesday of the month when the social is held instead. Lunch starts at noon at the or Bob (204) 425-3072. Mitchell and Area Seniors Centre. Contact 204-326-6944. Grunthal Hanover Ag Fair – From Thursday, August 15 – Sunday, August 18 at Albert & Niverville Southwood. Fun for the whole family Moms N’ Tots Playgroup - Moms with including the Prudential Family Funzone, children up to age six. Wednesday entertainment on the Fairway Ford mornings from 9:30 - 11:30 am located Mainstage, MRCA/CCA semi-pro rodeo in the lower level of Fourth Avenue Bible action, Bullarama, and coming on Church (62 4th Avenue S.). Free drop-in Thursday at the Fair, Demolition Derby. program with coffee and snacks provided, along with a large open space for the kids Contact email info@hanoverag.com to play while the moms visit. Contact Karen at klenzrpeters@hotmail.com. Hadashville Tae Kwon Do - Every Wednesday at 6 pm at the Hadashville Community Club Piney (Reynolds Recreational Centre) from 6 years Photo Contest – Runs until Wednesday, old to adults. Pursue a black belt or learn July 31 at 1 pm. Three categories – Scenery new skills, great stress release and have an & Outdoor Fun, Wild Encounters, and excellent workout at the same time. Cost Tranquil Moments & Community Living. after registration fee is $40/month per Each winner to receive Prize of $100. Photos be mailed or emailed person. Ask about 2 week free trial. Contact can Shelly at 204-426-5266 or e-mail rmofpiney@wiband.ca. KSTA.academy@gmail.com. Bingo - Every 2nd Friday. Kleefeld Honey Festival – From Friday, August 9 – Prawda Saturday, August 10 at the Kleefeld Sports Circuit 30 - Alternate aerobic and weight Grounds. The Festival is the Kick off Party exercises, with cool down and stretch for Helping Hooves’ 3 week-ride to raise exercises. Wear comfortable clothing, clean money with your help! Friday night youth runners, and bring a bottle of water. Cost: Praise and Worship Night with Fresh I E $2/class Mondays and Thursdays at 7 pm, headlining. Cost $10. Canteen open. in the Reynolds School Gym. Contact Saturday begins with Free Pancake Wendy 204-348-2433. Breakfast followed by the Parade, car show on Park Ave., evening concert starts at 7 Busy Bodies Playgroup – Every Wednesday pm. Cost $20. Fireworks. Contact 204- from 9 - 11 am at the Reynolds School Gym. Free to parents and children. Snacks 326-4488 provided. Contact Cassie 204-793-8290. Community Playgroup - for parents, caregivers and children ages 0-5. Activities Richer include time for playing, stories, songs and Women’s Business Networking Lunch – On snacks. Every 2nd and 4th Thursday of the Wednesday, July 10 at 11:00 am at The month at the Kleefeld Rec Centre. Contact Pink Ivy Tea House. Members and future members welcome. Contact Irene Ascough 377-5013. diane@embracingsimplicity.ca La Broquerie Fundraiser for Sandee Friesen – On Daily Vacation Bible School – From Saturday, July 27 from 5:30 - 8:30 pm a Monday, July 29 – Friday, August 2 from Bud, Spud & Steak at Frantz Inn for Sandee 10 am - Noon at Richer Fellowship Friesen of New Bothwell. Tickets are $20 Church, 50 Southeast Drive. Registration each, silent auction and 50-50 draw. in the morning and free for ages 5 – 12, Please remember to RSVP by July 17. free. Parents welcome to stay and have coffee. Fun stories, games, crafts and Presentation by Ken Hiebert. songs, snacks. Contact Anke 422- 8664 Seine River Services for Seniors- Health or Michelle 424-5216. Centre/Centre de Santé from Monday to Friday 8:30 am - 4 pm. Offers services Monday Night Bingos - To raise funds for and programs for seniors. Income Tax Stacey Pchajek Memorial Foundation Inc. help, Lifeline, mobility equipment, foot The foundation provides scholarships, care, hair care, transportation, home bursaries and prizes to students graduating maintenance, yard maintenance, grades 8 and 12. Children Under 14 must Telecheck, the E.R.I.K. program, puzzles be accompanied by an adult to be on and games. Contact Community Resource premises and must play bingo. Doors Coordinator Juliette Rowan at 424-5285 Open at 5:30 pm at the Young at Heart Club 22 Dawson Rd. in Richer. MGCC or labseinerss@gmail.com. Shopping Trips - Winnipeg’s St.Vital Mall License # BI/BO4164. Contact: Doreen every first Thursday of the month, leaving Pchajek at 422-5243 or email at 10 am - 3 pm. Cost $15. Steinbach’s doreen@spmf.ca. Clearspring Centre every last Thursday of the month, leaving at 10 am - 1 pm. Cost South Junction Annual Family Slowpitch Tournament – $10. July. Details to be announced. Lorette TD Summer Reading Program – at the South East Farmers Market - from Friday, Bibliothèque Taché Library Summer August 9 – Friday, August 30 at 3 - 6:30 schedule open on Tuesday, Wednesday, p.m. Locate .4 km (.25 mile) E of South Thursday, & Saturday. For ages: 4-15 Junction turn-off on Hwy 12 (north side of Summer Reading begins Tuesday, July 2 Hwy). Contact 204-437-2294. from 10 am – Noon until Sunday, September 1, but, closed from Friday, July Sprague 26 – Monday, August 19. Come join the Western Fest – August. Details to be fun! Read as many books as you can over announced. the summer months for a chance to win a grand prize. All participants receive a R Biz Camp – Now open for registration goody bag at the end of the program. for Youth Ages 9 -14 on Monday July 29 – Wednesday July 31 and Thursday August Contact the library for more details. 8 – Friday August 9. Learn, have fun and make money. Cost $40 each, youth get Carrick Carrick Days – On Saturday August 10, 1 - 4:30 pm, old-time town picnic corn & pig roast, open-air dance. BBQ Supper starts at 4:30 pm.

More Than Just News!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

back $20. Contact Dayna Lalchun 204- wisekidneticenergy.ca. Contact Jill St. Ring the front door bell. Lautenschlager to register 204-422-6234, 746-6180 or dlachun@cftripler.ca. 1-800-432-1960, ext. 9340, Young moms to be - Bi-weekly support wise@kidneticenergy.ca group starts at 4:30 pm at Anna’s House Bingo - Every 2nd Wednesday. B-11, Hwy 12N. Contact 346-0413. Steinbach Farmers’ Market – Every St. Labre Annual St.Labre 200 go-kart build off Thursday from 3 – 7 pm at the Clearspring Vassar competition on Friday, July 12 – Sunday, Centre Parking Lot, PTH 12 N. Fresh Baseball Tournament – August. Details to July 14. This is challenging to 14 teams to garden produce, baked goods, preserved be announced build their own go-karts within 24 hours, jams, pickles, etc., crafts and more. Track Hoe Rodeo, Rubber Boot Toss, Contact Brenda Gregoire 204-424-9494. Whiteshell Whiteshell Cinema – On Fridays from 9 – Alumni Race, Powder Puff Race, Old Fart Adult Book Club - Tuesdays from 7 – 9 10 pm at the Whiteshell Natural History Race and much more. pm. Bring book suggestions or peruse our Museum. Join us on the grounds of the book lists. Meet some other book lovers museum at Nutimik Lake to watch feature St. Pierre-Jolys St. Pierre- Jolys Frog Follies and too and bring a friend. At the Jake Epp films related to your favourite wild animals Agricultural Fair – On Friday, July 11 – Library 255 Elmdale St. Contact Tracey and other fun topics. Be sure to bring a 204-326-6841 chair or blanket for seating! July 5 Sunday July 14. Canadian Frog Jumping Pankratz Creatures of the Sun, get an underwater Championships where adults and children programming@jakeepplibrary.com. glimpse the amazing world of the painted compete for top prize. Children’s games, sport tournaments, music and Ladies Get Fit Classes - Sponsored by turtle. Be Bear Smart July 12 – Learn how Eastman Immigrant Services, every to give black bears proper respect to keep entertainment are also featured. Wednesday at 7:15 pm at the Woodlawn yourself, and the bears, safe. Old Time Mood Disorders Association of Manitoba School gym. Aerobic, circuit training, Movie Night, July 19 – Travel back in time – Depression support group meetings held weights, mats and stretching exercises. and see how the Whiteshell has changed. on the 4th Tuesday of every month at 7 pm. Suitable for all ages and levels of fitness. Bats in the Boreal, July 26 – What is myth, what is fact about these mysterious Located at the Health Corner DeSalaberry Register contact Lois 204-346-6609. creatures? Find out tonight. August 2 Hospital. Contact Judy Dunn 444-5228. Steinbach Girl Guides - Every Tuesday at The Last Trapper, see the forest through the United Church of Steinbach, 541 Main the eyes of those who rely on its health for Ste. Agathe Cheyenne Days – From Friday, July 19 – St. Registration for girls 5-17. Develop their survival. Interpretive events are free. Sunday, July 21, a country fair for the whole personal values and well-being, self- Contact the Park Interpreter’s office at 204or email family, featuring a pancake breakfast, respect and respect for others; promote fun, 369-3157 horseshoe tournament, beach volley-ball, friendship, adventure and challenges Brock.Houndle@gov.mb.ca. baseball, children’s crafts, community through new experiences; develop supper, “beer and skits”, a dance and leadership and decision-making skills; give Woodridge fireworks. Plenty of fun from morning to service to the community; value the natural Sports Day – July. Details to be announced. environment. night! Bingo - Every 2nd Sunday night at 7 pm. Green Drinks South Eastman - South Ste. Anne Sainte Anne Lighthouse Aglow - Features Eastman Transition Initiative presents General from Monday, July 15 – Thursday, July 18 Green Drinks South Eastman. On the 3rd Environmental Farm Plan Workshop – On at 7 pm with Lorraine Bastien and Tuesday, Tuesday of every month at 7 pm at LBees, Thursday, July 18 from 9:30 am – Noon, July 16 – Wednesday, July at 2 pm with 5-275 Main St. Grab a coffee and discuss by Video Conferencing. Contact to register living. Contact MAFRI GO Office. Guided thru EFP Darlene Smith at the Seine River Banquet sustainable workbook to identify environmental assets Hall, A-80 Arena Road. Contact Lucille rebecca_hiebert@yahoo.com. and risks on farm operation. Workbooks Fiola at 204-371-6657. Seniors (60 +) Shinny Drop-in Hockey - and support material provided. Find out Bibliothèque Ste. Anne Library Used Book every Monday from 10 -11 am at more about Environmental Farm Plans. Fundraiser – Sale of huge selection of used Centennial Arena. Contact Bob Barrow at or email The Super Start Program, A Healthy Baby book proceeds will be used towards new 392-3596 program with the Southern Regional library books. For further information call bob.r.barrow@gmail.com. Health Authority. Program for pregnant Mona at 422-9958 or drop in at the library at 16 Rue de l’Église. Cost of books $1- The Steinbach Rotary Club - meets every women and families with infants up to Monday at noon at Steinbach 55 Plus one year of age. Sessions include song $5. Centre. Contact Cornie at 326-3155. and rhyme time, discussions and games on topics related to healthy babies and Seine River Services for Seniors – Invite all seniors interested in the Wii Bowling game Mental Health Information and Support healthy moms. Door prizes, nutritious to come, try it out, and have fun. Monday sessions - for family and friends of people snacks and milk coupons for all afternoons, at Le Club Jovial. Contact with mental health issues are held the 2nd participating expectant moms or mothers Juliette Rowan at 204-424-5575 Tuesday of every month from 7 – 8:30 pm who have babies up to six months of age. Community Resource Coordinator for at the Eden East building, 21 Loewen Contact: Terry from Super Start at 346-7021 local services or e-mail Blvd. Contact Kim at 371-0824 or email or just drop in. eastmanmss@mts.net Blumenort - EMC Church on Thursday, labseinerss@gmail.com. July 4 at 10 am – 12 pm Are you interested in going to the Passion MS Monthly Self-Help group meeting - for Niverville - Community Fellowship Church Play in La Riviere? We are organizing a people living with multiple sclerosis. The on Tuesday, July 9 at 10 am - 12pm bus tour leaving on July 14 at 12:45 pm group meets on the second Thursday Ste. Anne - Dayspring Fellowship Church from Ste. Anne Catholic Church. Cost is evening of each month from 6 - 7 pm at on Thursday, July 11 at 10 am – 12 pm $35. Call Rita Lacoste at 204-422-5683 Fernwood Place apartments. Contact Kleefeld – Mitchell Community Fellowship Nadine Konyk, Rural Client Services on Thursday, July 25 at 10 am – 12 pm for more info. Coordinator at 1-800-268-7582 or email St. Malo -St. Malo School on Wednesday, nadine.konyk@mssociety.ca. June 19 at 10 am – 12 pm Ste. Geneviève St. Pierre-Jolys - St. Pierre Health Corner Library Night - Bibliothèque Taché Library at the Community Centre on the 2nd and MS Lunch Group- on fourth Thursday of on Thursday, July 18 at 10 am – 12 pm 4th Tuesday of each month, from 6:30 - 8 every month, from 12 – 1 pm at the Village Ste. Agathe - Community Hall Centre on pm. Selection of books in both French and Green Restaurant. Contact Nadine Konyk, Tuesday, July 16 at 10 am – 12 pm English, all ages. Over 21,000 books Rural Client Services Coordinator 326- Lorette - Seine River Church on Tuesday, or email June 23 at 10 am – 12 pm including audiobooks, DVDs, CDs, large 1434 Mitchell - Fellowship Church on Thursday, print books and magazines plus they can nadine.konyk@mssociety.ca. July 25 at 10 am – 12 pm import books from any library in Manitoba. Special requests can be made to the Mood Disorders Association of Manitoba Grunthal - Bergthaler Church on Tuesday, librarian, Brandi Schmitz at 204-878 - individual and support groups - for persons July 2 at 10 am – 12 pm 9488, bibliotachelibrary.com or in person. experiencing depression, anxiety, stress, bipolar disorder and other mental health/ emotional concerns. Meets on the first Steinbach Pioneer Day Camp - At the Mennonite Wednesday of each month at Jake Epp Heritage Village from Monday, July 8 – Library from 7 – 9 pm. Contact Judy Dunn Friday, July 12, 10 am – 4:30 pm for ages 204-444-5228. 5-8 and Monday, August 19 – Friday, 23 forages 9-12. Cost $150/week. Contact The Bethesda Regional Healthcare Devon Guenther 201-326-9661 ext 225, Auxiliary - meets on the first Tuesday of every month except for the months of July devong@mhv.ca. and August at the Bethesda Hospital. We Pioneer Days – From Friday, August 2 – welcome anyone interested in auxiliary Monday, August 5, opens at 9 am at the work. Contact Verna Thiessen at 326-3028. Mennonite Heritage Village Pioneer life Steinbach and Area Lions Club with festivities featuring interpretive demonstrations such as butter churning, Lions Club - meets on the second and threshing, log cutting and quilting. fourth Wednesdays of every month at the Auction sale, horse show, children’s events Magnolia Restaurant. Contact 204-3262313. and barbecues. WISE Kid-Netic Energy Camp - Travelling across Manitoba on Monday, August 12 – Friday, August 16, from 9 am – 4 pm at Southwood School. Cost $87.50 for ages 9 -12, summer camp theme days include Medical Science, Sustainable Energy, Mining, Space Discovery and Genetics. Learn how to make your own stethoscope, construct a solar oven, go asteroid mining, and much more! Register online at

Carillon Toastmasters - meetings are open to adults who want to improve their leadership and communication skills. Thursday evenings starting at 7 pm at the Jake Epp Public Library. Contact Doreen 204-326-7525. Steinbach AA 12 Step Recovery Program Meetings are held on Wednesdays at 7 pm. Steinbach United Church, 541 Main


Dawson Trail Dispatch

More Than Just News!

July 2013

23

Niverville Fair Attracts Thousands of Visitors By Marianne Curtis On the second weekend of June the population of the Town of Niverville swelled by a few thousand people when the Olde Tyme Country Fair took over the community’s Main Street. Starting Friday, June 7 the community of Niverville was transformed into a tourist’s playground when the two-day festival kicked off with old time favourites such as the Midway, Show and Shine, and Country Street Market. Activities geared to attract the younger crowd included motocross, high dive and trampoline were big draws but the biggest change was the Friday night music line up. For the first time, eight local bands took to the stage and entertained the crowds. Spokesperson Jeff Stott explained that eight bands from in and around Niverville took to the stage before the blackout fireworks took place. “This was a new idea this year to give local bands an opportunity to present themselves in this manner,” stated Stott. “Overall the weekend was a huge success and, as always, we are grateful to our many volunteers who helped make this happen.” Saturday, June 8 kicked off with a

Canadian Country Music Award winner Aaron Pritchett got the crowd going at the Niverville Olde Tyme Country Fair.

community pancake breakfast, crafters and traders filled the street followed by an open-air farmers with booths to sell their wares. market that helped to retain the A parade took place at noon crowds as Manitoba’s artisans, followed by an afternoon full of

Blumenort Family Fun Days Bigger than Ever Hundreds of people came out to Blumenort over the weekend of June 21 and 22 to participate in this year’s Blumenort Family Fun Days. Blumenort Family Fun Days planning committee President Mike Dueck says that this year’s event successfully surpassed previous years. “We had about 550 people come out for the pancake breakfast Saturday morning, which is about A number of local entertainers took to the stage and provided hours of live entertainment for the hundreds of people who attended the fair. what we were expecting,” stated Dueck. “The parade was also a huge success this year. We had more floats and more people lined the streets than the previous three years.” The weekend included numerous activities for the entire family including a number of bouncers, children’s activities and tons of local entertainment. With this year’s festival over for the year, the committee is already looking forward to next year’s event.

A wide variety of children’s activities kept this year’s Blumenort Family Fun Day bustling. Photos by Marianne Curtis

activities including a petting zoo, capped off with performances by dance performances and live bands. Jerry Sereda, Charlie Major and For the first time ever, three big Aaron Pritchett. names took the stage. The weekend

Providence College Appoints New President At the beginning of July, Providence College and Theological Seminary in Otterburne will have a new President. After serving a year as interim President, David Johnson has been named President. “I am very excited,” stated Johnson. “Providence is on the edge of real growth and greatness and I am excited to be the leader at this point.” Johnson said that he got a good feel for the position during the past year while serving as interim president. “Enrolment has gone up and donations have gone up so we are excited,” Johnson continued. “We keep going forward. We are in the midst of a strategic planning process and we will unveil that in the near future.” In the fall, a couple of new programs will be initiated. The first will be the introduction of a new one-year Bible School program. “We are excited about being able to serve younger people in terms of a Bible School experience,” Johnson added. Providence College has also established a relationship with the North American Institute for Indigenous Theological Studies. This program is expected to bring aboriginal students to the campus where they can earn a Bachelor of Arts in Community Development degree.

Frog Follies Promises Hopping Good Times The community of St. Pierre-Jolys is ready to celebrate tradition, family and community with the 44th annual Frog Follies & Agricultural Fair on July 11 to 14. The non-profit event promises to bring together people from all over for a fun-filled, action packed weekend. Festivities kick off Friday night with the Great Canadian Frog hunt where people can participate in catching the frogs to be used for the Canadian National Frog Jumping Championship. Some of the featured activities include one of Manitoba’s premier agricultural exhibition displays and fair, numerous children’s activities, a slo-pitch tournament, a parade, fireworks, a Sunday night DJ social, and the Canadian National Frog Jumping Championship. There will be a variety of entertainment including performances by Julian Austin, David James, La Claque, Lindsay Johnson, Amanda Cannon, The Ricky Smits, Cold Hard Cash, Steven Porter, Caty St. Germain and Marc Labossiere.


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July 2013

More Than Just News!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

De Salaberry Takes Advantage of Gravel Pit

St. Malo Church Receives Grant for Elevator

The RM of De Salaberry is taking advantage of last year’s decision to purchase a gravel pit for their unlimited use. Council plans to reap the benefits of the purchase of their own gravel pit for municipal use by blanketing all the gravel roads identified in its grid with high quality gravel. According to council all gravel roads that have been identified within the municipality will receive 200 yards per mile application. On top of that, 20 more miles will receive an additional 200 yards per mile. The municipality has hired Derkson Trucking to crush 40,000 yards of gravel per year which is expected to meet its needs. An additional 20,000 yards will be crushed to meet needs within the LUD of St. Malo.

People with disabilities in St. Malo will soon benefit from improved accessibility because of a grant from the Federal Government. The Paroisse St. Malo/Blessed Margaret Church recently received $26,524 from a Federal grant for the installation of a new elevator, lighting and tiles through the Enabling Accessibility Fund. The project is actually costing the church $50,000 to complete, but the church Provencher MP Vic Toews delivered the news that the Paroisse St. Malo / Blessed fundraised $25,000 towards the Margaret Church were receiving over $26,000 to install an elevator that will give access to project. the church basement. Denis Clement, a spokesperson for the Paroisse St. Malo/Blessed Margaret Church, said that installation of an elevator is The City of Steinbach is happy to report that in a mere three important for accessibility to the hours, nearly 3,315 litres of used motor oil was kept out of the church’s basement. landfill during a recent collection event. “There are quite a few steps to go On June 12, the City of Steinbach invited residents to bring in down there,” explained Clement. their used oil to the community’s Eco Centre that is located at the “Having an elevator going down to community landfill. the hall will allow everyone in town “In three hours, the staff at the Steinbach Landfill took in 3,315 to participate in social activities that litres of used oil,” confirmed Ed Wallman, on behalf of the Solid take place in the church basement.” Waster Department. Construction has already begun In exchange, residents received a free litre of oil for every five and the project is expected to take a litres of used motor oil that was brought into the depot. A total of month to complete. 663 litres of free oil was distributed.

Oil Collection Cleans up Community

Former Municipal Employee Pleads Guilty to Sexual Assault In a recent court appearance Mel Schroeder, former finance and administration manager from the RM of Hanover recently plead guilty to several charges of sexual assault involving two male youths and two other charges were stayed. In 2011, Schroeder was charged with four counts of sexual assault dating back from 1976 to 2000. He made his first appearance in Steinbach court on January 2012. Sentencing was delayed pending a pre-sentence report. Schroeder is expected to appear in Steinbach court on August 14. Schroeder worked for the RM of Hanover for eighteen years, a position he held until his retirement in June 2011.

Quebec Man Dies in Falcon Lake Severe wind and thunderstorms that tore through the region during the early morning of June 26 have claimed the life of a Quebec man. According to Falcon Lake RCMP, officers were called to a campsite in the Falcon Beach Campground around 2 am after it was reported that strong winds had uprooted a tree and toppled it onto a tent. A 45-year-old man was rushed to hospital where he was pronounced dead. His 44-year-old wife was also transported to hospital where she treated for minor injuries and released. Police said the weather was severe at the time of the incident and they have determined that it was a contributing factor in the accident. The names of the victims have not been released.

Dawson Trail Dispatch July 2013  

Southeast Manitoba news and features

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