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Dawson Trail Dispatch

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Annual Lobsterfest… Record Breaking Amount Raised!

November 2017



Tragic Rollover Claims Vita Woman The community of Vita is mourning after a single vehicle rollover claimed the life of an 88-year-old grandmother. On October 21, Morris and Emerson RCMP responded to a single vehicle rollover on Road 38E, about 3 kilometers south of Highway 201. RCMP say upon arrival, officers located a Ford truck in the ditch. The initial investigation has determined that Denise Pachniowski was travelling south on a gravel road when she lost control and rolled the vehicle. She was ejected and was pronounced deceased on scene. RCMP says she was not wearing a seat belt. The investigation is ongoing.

Assault Victim Targeted Twice

800 pounds of lobster was served during the evening as part of the four-course meal

The Ste-Anne Hospital Fund held its 12th annual all you can eat Lobsterfest recently at the Niverville Heritage Centre. It was the first time this event was held at this venue. The fundraising evening raised a record breaking $58,000 gross revenue this year, thanks to a sold out crowd of 200 and many local sponsors. The evening had a festive atmosphere as guests delighted in fresh New Brunswick lobster and enjoyed a live twopiece blues band. In total, 800 pounds of lobster was served during the evening as part of the four-course meal. The guests also enjoyed silent auction with impressive prizes and Wine Pull fundraising activities. This event was also an opportunity to thank the Ste-Anne Hospital Fund’s generous donors. “We were happy to take

this opportunity to honour some very generous and hard working community organisations that held fundraisers for the SteAnne Hospital this year: Oakwood Golf Course, St-Labre 200 and the residents of Paradise Village,” says Ste-Anne Hospital Fund Executive Director, Zoé Nakata. “I’m very proud of the sold out Lobsterfest held at the beautiful Niverville Heritage Centre!” shared Ste-Anne Hospital Fund Board President, Raymond LaFlèche. “The Hôpital SteAnne Hospital community came out in full force to support the continued success of its facility. A very positive atmosphere!” Funds raised at this year’s Lobsterfest will go towards the purchase of specialized equipment for the hospital’s new Operating Ward.

On September 17, Steinbach RCMP responded to an assault outside of Subway on Main St. A man was assaulted by an individual wearing a black sweater and dark pants. Witnesses on scene stated that they did not recognize the male suspect who fled on foot, eastbound down main. In a previous incident, the same victim was also assaulted one week prior on September 9 near Lumber Ave. and First St. RCMP believe that these two incidents are related. If you have any information in regards to the above you are asked to contact the Steinbach RCMP Detachment at 204-326-4452 or CrimeStoppers at 1800-222-8477 or manitobacrimestoppers.com or text “TIPMAN” plus your message to Crimes (274637).

Utility Trailer Stolen Between the dates of September 29 and October 1, a Marathon Utility Trailer was stolen off of Highway #1, just east of Richer. If you have any information in regards to the above you are asked to contact the Steinbach RCMP Detachment at 204-326-4452 or CrimeStoppers at 1800-222-8477 or manitobacrimestoppers.com or text “TIPMAN” plus your message to Crimes (274637).




November 2017

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

Remembrance Day LEST WE FORGET

Photo by Staberinde / Wikipedia

Former German Submariner Finds Redemption in East Braintree By Marianne Curtis

August Zwengauer (right) in his navy uniform while training as a member of the German Imperial Navy, Submarine Corps.

Doris Ames is celebrating the official launch of One Man’s Journey on November 14 at McNally Robinson Bookstores on Grant Park at 7:30 pm. in the Travel Alcove. Everyone is welcome.

A new book penned by an East Braintree author shares the intimate story of her father, who serving on a German U-boat in WW1 and then immigrated to Canada. In One Man’s Journey, Doris Ames tells the story about August Zwengauer who lived and fought through WWI in Germany as a member of the German Imperial Navy, Submarine Corps where he served on a U-boat. After the war, he became involved in the extreme politics in its aftermath and then fled to Canada in 1927. Upon immigrating, he quickly became an avid pioneer, and enthusiastic Canadian. He changed his named to Carl Huss, settled in East Braintree and became a husband and father. “My father’s story is one that many families in our district share. Someone who lived through a stressful and bitter period at that time in Europe and made a new life for himself here,” Ames explained. “My father’s experiences and indeed his whole life was affected by WWI and its aftermath, as was the rest of the world.” The first part of One Man’s Journey deals with his early life in Germany, WWI and the immigrant experience. “My father’s story might illustrate to a small degree its malignant effect on millions as we see the effect it had on him. It also gives us all hope because it shows how he got off on the wrong foot but managed to turn his life around with a fresh start in Canada,” Ames continued. Once in Canada, Huss’s experiences with rural life in East Braintree from 1927-1967 were filled with adventure, triumph, tragedy and humour. Ames said her father loved the bush and started cruising for timber and cutting wood as a means of survival and later developed it into a logging business. He would later use the logging company to help young men who were homeless to find a new life in Canada because he knew how difficult it was for him years before. “My father sponsored immigrants after WWII. He came here in 1927 and during the Depression years he had a hard time just getting by, but still got married and started his family,” Ames continued. “He was more established after WWII and then started to help others by sponsoring immigrants from Europe who were displaced by the war.” Many people from the East Braintree area are the children or grandchildren of immigrants my father helped, Ames added. “It is a story of hope that is repeated again and again in Canada.” Here is an excerpt from One Man’s Journey. (used with permission) “After WWII my father sponsored many young displaced men who emigrated to Canada looking for work and a place to start a new life, usually Germans or Italians, as he spoke those languages fluently. They would work at his logging camp for one year while they made some money and learned English and then they would move on to get their own homes in other parts of Canada or sometimes the US. They would cut trees with an axe or crosscut saw, skid them out of the bush with a horse, limb them, cut them up into eight foot lengths with a

bucksaw and pile them up into cords. The best workers could cut 3-4 cords of wood per day. A full cord is a large amount of wood. It measures four feet high by four feet wide by eight feet long (4 ft. x 4 ft. x 8 ft.) and has a volume of 128 cubic feet. In the spring they would haul the logs out of the bush to the railway by horse and wagon and put them in a boxcar on the GWWD and send them to Winnipeg to be sold. It must have been hard on them because most of these immigrants hadn’t done that sort of hard work before. They lived out in the bush in a caboose all winter. Dad would provide them with flour, salt, lard, bread, sausage, cheese, jam, bacon and eggs and coffee, to eat and not much more and they smelled pretty bad when we went to pick them up in the spring. They got paid when they came out on the basis of the amount of wood they cut. I think my Dad got about $5.75 per cord for the wood. My father commissioned me as a young kid to help these men practice their English with a big picture and phrase book made for that purpose the minute they arrived in summer before it was time for them to go into the bush in the fall. They learned English very quickly, some of them in a matter of 6 weeks or so. They worked hard but had fun too, wrestling, laughing and playing tricks on each other. They enjoyed teasing new arrivals by telling them stories about the big wood ticks (Holzbock in German). Then the first night usually in June, they would put a young turtle in their bed just to hear them scream when they thought it was a giant wood tick!”

East Braintree author Doris Ames with a copy of her new book called One Man’s Journey, which is based on her father’s life story.


Dawson Trail Dispatch

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

November 2017



Remembrance Day Services 2017 Ritchot

St. Pierre-Jolys

Ste Anne

Niverville

Steinbach

Lorette

10:30 am at 352 St. Adolphe at 10:45 am at St. Pierre Rec Centre 10:30 am at the Ste Anne Catholic the Club Amical, 344 Main St, Hall, 545 Avenue Hebert, St-Pierre- Church, 162 Central Avenue, Ste. Jolys. Bilingual Ceremony and Anne. St. Adolphe. Lunch to follow. lunch to follow. 10 am at the Niverville Heri- 10:45 am at Emmanuel Evangelical 10:30 am at the Community Spirit tage Centre, 100 Heritage Trail, Free Church, 360 McKenzie Ave, Park, Station Road in Lorette Steinbach. Lunch to follow. Niverville. Lunch to follow. (unless otherwise posted).

Whitemouth

Morris

10:45 am at the Cenotaph on Main 10:30 am at the Whitemouth Street at the RM Building in Morris. Community Centre, 61 First St, Whitemouth. Reception at the Legion Hall afterwards.

We thank those who have served and sacrified

Names Wanted for Military Recognition Book By Marianne Curtis On October 17, the Manitoba and Ontario Royal Canadian Legions released Military Service Recognition Book Volume 8. This is the eighth edition in a series devoted to recognizing veterans and ex-military service personnel throughout Manitoba and Northwestern Ontario. Manitoba and Northwestern Ontario Command of The Royal Canadian Legion produces the Military Service Recognition Books to help identify and recognize many of the brave military personnel of Manitoba and NW Ontario who have served Canada in times of great world conflict. These books help the Legion in their task as the “Keepers of Remembrance” so that none of us forget the selfless contributions made by our Veterans. As new names are added, new editions are printed. According to Gerald Fontaine, President, of the Royal Canadian Legion Branch # 111, Morris, the publisher of the book Fenety Marketing Services has advised the Legions that if they do not get any

There are many local names listed in the 8th edition of the Military Recognition Book.

more names they will cease to publish the books. “Locally we know that there are many, many people who have served who are not in the book yet,” said Fontaine. “At our Legion District and Zone meetings we are urged to ask families to submit the names and stories of their loved ones and where they served.” Fontaine believes that many people have not submitted their loved one into the books because everyone expects someone else to provide the information. “We have cemeteries full of bodies of loved ones who have in one way or another contributed in service to our country,” Fontaine continued. “The responsibility lies with family members to provide the information in the book. It seems that many families may not be aware of this.” Family members are encouraged to submit their names of loved ones who many have served in various capacities, including military, peacetime, and even police or RCMP officers. “All who served in the conflicts throughout the world where our country was called upon who have a place of honour in this book,” Fontaine stressed. Copies of the Military Service Recognition Book Volumes 1 to 7 are available at the St- PierreJolys Regional Library and at the St. Malo Library. PDF versions can be found at mbnwo. ca/fenety along with submission forms.




November 2017

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Justin Trudeau Has a Spending Problem It’s been a difficult past few weeks for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his Finance Minister Bill Morneau. Fresh off weeks of negative coverage and public outcry over their proposed tax changes - that equal a massive tax hike on the middle class - we have now learned that the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) has been denying diabetic’s applications for the Disability Tax Credit, even when their doctors have certified that they are eligible under the law. This has resulted in them paying thousands of dollars more in taxes. In addition, diabetics risk losing funds already built up in their Registered Disability Savings Plans, because the CRA no longer considers them to be disabled. Justin Trudeau has a spending problem, and because he’s running out of other peoples’ money to spend, he’s now looking to raise taxes in even more creative ways. His attempt to find extra spending money by taxing small business owners, taxing workers on their employee discounts or denying diabetics for the Disability Tax Credit shows how his priorities are completely offside with Canadians. And recently we learned that his proposed new tax hikes would not affect his own “family fortune”, or the fortune of his embattled Finance Minister. Conservative Shadow Minister for National Revenue Pat Kelly recently stated, “This government is trying to raise additional tax revenue at the expense of diabetics. This is part of an alarming trend from a government increasingly desperate to raise revenue to fund its out-of-control spending. While the Finance Minister uses complex corporate structures to shelter his personal wealth, this government is rejecting Disability Tax Credit claims from diabetics.” As Conservatives, we have been fighting Justin Trudeau’s high-tax agenda every step of the way and we will continue to do so until you finally have your say in 2019.

Dawson Trail Dispatch

Made in Manitoba Solution: Blame it on Someone Else The Manitoba carbon tax plan was finally unveiled, $25 a ton, starting next year, and will not increase to $50 a ton to meet the Federal goal. Manitoba is still hoping to get credit for Hydro investments. I don’t see this succeeding. This is the made in Manitoba plan apparently, yet it needs fleshing out it seems. This cost per ton can be achieved by charging 5 or 6 cents a litre for gas. It should be safe to assume that diesel and propane will see an upward hit also. What we can assume is the Premier favours applying a tax to fossil fuels as opposed to any other scheme, fair enough. But in the mean time, we shouldn’t discount other methods of producing hydro. I hear the green tax collected could go to hydro in lieu of our hydro bill increasing. Overall the plan is surprisingly sparse. And an adviser has so far cost us $60 thousand in travel expenses since August and this is the plan? This seems like a lot of bucks for no bang. I get the feeling that the emerging feud between the Premier and the Prime Minister on this file amongst other past irritants are becoming a made in Manitoba costly distraction. I see the Premier’s win something at all cost from the Federal leadership as a potential detrimental and unnecessary stress to our Manitoban tax bill. The floating of a potential health tax, the second look at the senior’s discount on the municipal tax bill for school tax and the continuing fossil fuel saga, leads one to believe our tax bill will go up and blame will be assessed on the Feds or the previous Manitoba administration. This seems about right, politics as usual.

Province to Replace Obsolete Emergency Communication System I would like to thank all Manitobans who have participated in our government’s pre-budget consultations across the province, especially those who attended the meeting I held in La Broquerie. We have been listening to Manitobans since we took office a year and a half ago, and will continue to do so. More than 35,000 Manitobans have provided input through our online survey, telephone town halls and constituency town halls held by our MLAs. Health care is the No. 1 issue for many Manitobans, and it’s clear that Manitobans do not support a healthcare premium. We are listening and will not proceed with a health-care premium at any point in our first term. What Manitobans have also told us through these consultations is that we are correct in taking a moderate approach to fixing our province’s finances and working toward fiscal balance. We will continue to take this approach by looking within our government for efficiencies, controlling expenditure growth and reducing senior management. We won’t do it by adding a tax burden to Manitoba families. Since we came into government, one question I have been asked by our area’s rural municipalities, fire departments and other emergency providers is, “When are you replacing our Fleetnet?” Our provincial public-safety emergency communication system, commonly known as Fleetnet, is obsolete and should have been replaced years ago. However, the previous NDP government kept dragging its heels on this issue, despite safety and security concerns of Manitobans. Replacement parts for the system have not been manufactured since 2003. Warnings were issued to the former NDP administration as early as 2008 that this equipment would no longer be supported as of the end of 2014. The good news is that this past summer, our government released a request for proposals to replace this system with a modern and digital communication system that meets current technical standards. It should have a radio frequency reserved for public-safety use and additional towers to expand coverage in under-serviced areas. It’s expected that a tender for the new emergency communication system will be awarded in early 2018. Further good news is our government’s introduction of our Climate and Green Plan, a made-in-Manitoba solution for protecting the environment while growing the economy. Our plan was developed through direct input from Manitobans and more than a year of consultations with environmental, business and other expert stakeholders. An online survey is available for Manitobans to make choices on the plan as well as carbon revenue recycling by investing in families, green growth and climate adaptation. The survey is at ManitobaClimateGreenPlan. ca. As always, I look forward to hearing from you with your questions or concerns. I can be reached at my constituency office at 204-424-5406, at my legislature office at 204-945-4339 or at dennis.smook@leg.gov. mb.ca.


Dawson Trail Dispatch

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

No Health Care Premium Planned in Government’s First Provincial Term The Dawson Trail constituency took part in the Manitoba government’s pre-budget consultations on Thursday, October 26 in Ste. Anne. This was the second and final town hall in advance of Budget 2018 in our area. It was my pleasure to host the Honourable Cameron Friesen, Minister of Finance who was with us to make the presentation and take questions. It was great to see such a good turnout from Dawson Trail stakeholders and public citizens alike. Presentations, questions and discussion were all extremely valuable and will go a long way to inform our government’s planning on the topics of the night that included the legalization of marijuana, healing our health care system, and budget planning for 2018. What Manitobans overall have told us, is they generally agree we are on the right track. By October 24, close to 37,000 of them had provided input through our consultations and 49 per cent urged us to continue on this path. Our online survey has brought more than 18,000 responses. More than 16,000 people have taken part in the telephone town halls, and hundreds have attended consultation meetings held by our MLAs. Through the unprecedented participation in the pre-budget consultations this fall, we know we have been able to hear Manitobans. And we’re correct in taking our moderate approach to fixing our province’s finances and working toward fiscal balance. With this in mind, we will not proceed with a health-care premium at any point in our first term. Through the consultations we launched in September with public meetings, telephone town halls and an online survey, it’s clear Manitobans do not support a health-care premium. They have indicated they want us to make some reallocation decisions to move toward a balanced budget, though our government believes that leaving more money in the hands of Manitobans is positive for our economy and for Manitoba families. We are committed to further reducing the deficit by at least $100 million per year. This will assist, over time, in moving Manitoba back to sustainability and to a more secure health-care system. It will take hard work to maintain this progress. We have 17 years of mismanagement to clean up, and have had a little over 17 months to start. We are undertaking this work with enthusiasm and passion, and doing it with Manitobans as our guide. Stay up to date by following me on Facebook. If you have questions or comments, I can be reached at 204-807-4663 or by e-mail at bob.lagasse@leg.gov.mb.ca.

Clean Environment Report Issued on the Manitoba-Minnesota Transmission Line The province has released the Clean Environment Commission report on the proposed Manitoba-Minnesota Transmission Project. “We appreciate the careful review the Clean Environment Commission has undertaken on this important project and thank all those who participated,” said Sustainable Development Minister Rochelle Squires. “We will be considering the report and recommendations carefully over the next several months. The province is also working with the National Energy Board to ensure that Federal-Provincial decision-making processes are streamlined and cost effective.” The minister noted the report’s recommendations will be considered as part of the licensing decision, along with ongoing Crown consultations with Indigenous communities. Some of the recommendations include transparency and land owner rights within access agreements between property owners and Manitoba Hydro. The Com-

mission is recommending that the Crown Corporation must inform all landowners whose property is crossed by the line that certain control options exist and that the cost of these access controls will be borne by Manitoba Hydro. In addition, to ensure that the Right of Way does not lead to further degradation of adjacent lands, Manitoba Sustainable Development should not consider transmission lines on Crown land as locations for new vehicular recreational trails, without consideration of its effects on wildlife, vegetation, wetlands and waterways and other valued components of the environment. The report details further environmental protection measures that Manitoba Hydro should be responsible for by controlling invasive species on its own land, as well as its commitment to work with private landowners or the provincial government in cases where Manitoba Hydro’s activities have introduced invasive species to private or Crown land, estab-

lishing buffer zones around waterways, carrying out construction in certain areas while the ground is frozen and avoiding sensitive areas, selective control of vegetation by targeting the taller forms of vegetation and sharing with the public when vegetation control will occur. The time frame for monitoring pre and post project construction was also a concern. The effects of a project may not be fully seen until after the current two year monitoring is up or for new conditions to become fully established. The Commission has recommended monitoring post project construction longer than the current two years that the monitoring advisory committee minutes and reports or other material relevant to the project is posted publicly. For a licensed project, the Commission is looking at Manitoba Hydro providing to Manitoba Sustainable Development annual monitoring reports, for a period of at least 10 years and thereafter if it is determined to be needed.

Steinbach Sees Significant Drop in Litter When the annual litter audit commissioned by the Canadian Beverage Container Recycling Association (CBCRA) and its Recycle Everywhere program was released on October 12, the City of Steinbach reported a 69% decrease in littered empty beverage containers. The 2017 results show a consistent decrease in five Manitoba cities included in the audit. In each instance, beverage container litter on city streets has decreased since baseline audits began, with no new litter abatement programs implemented other than the addition of Recycle Everywhere bins.

“Manitobans are putting more effort into keeping their city streets clean, which includes thinking about where they place their beverage containers once they’re empty,” said Ken Friesen, Executive Director of CBCRA. “With an increased focus on placing more Recycle Everywhere bins throughout the province and targeted promotional and education campaigns.” Steinbach saw a 69 per cent drop in empty beverage container litter rates since its baseline year of 2013. The audits are conducted by third-party consulting firms who execute litter audits across North America. The study classi-

fies litter in two ways, “large” litter for items more than four square inches in size and “small” for anything less. Empty beverage containers are considered large litter items. These results coincide with Manitoba’s beverage container recovery rate also being at an all-time high, with 70 per cent of all beverage containers brought into the province in 2016 ending up in a blue bin. Recycle Everywhere strives to educate Manitobans on beverage container recycling, and ensure that it is convenient to recycle empty beverage containers no matter where citizens live, work or play.

November 2017



Landmark Betrayed Dear Editor: This is a response to the Carillon article from January 5 & September 28, 2017, “Taché Votes to Join Francophone and Taché passes Bilingualism By-law”. For over 40 years, I have been living in a Mennonite town called Landmark, which includes citizens from all different national backgrounds, and we are very proud of that make up of our community. To have diversity is a breath of fresh air to our community. This is what is called “DIVERSITY”. That is who we are. The RM of Taché, forced Francophone and Bilingualism upon Landmark, without asking the opinion of the citizens. For the RM of Taché to turn their backs on Landmark, which is blatantly Menno, is very disrespectful to the History, Heritage and Culture of our community that brings a lot of money into Taché. This is, definitely, NOT in the best interest of our community. Some things cannot be bought… Taché has crossed the line. Now to further explain my position on this horrific act. Up until now, I have been an ACTIVIST, defending and standing up for the History, Culture and Heritage of Landmark. With no support from Landmark LUD, who approved the Development Plan and joining Francophone, I opposed the New Development Plan and took this objection all the way to the MINISTER to help keep Landmark from becoming Francophone. For Taché to say that they are proud to be the “Centre of Canada” with respect to welcoming “ALL DIVERSITY” which make up our great country and community, in the same breath, forcing Francophone and Bilingualism on Landmark is hypocritical and a sign of racism. As soon as the RM of Taché took over the Centre of Canada committee, I was literally emotionally abused and shunned for some time. Then, later, I was “‘FIRED”’ from a volunteer position because of my Nationality and Religion being a non-French Mennonite representing Landmark. The abuse I had to suffer from the hands of the RM of Taché was horrible, to say the least. I was in this committee standing up and defending my position for Landmark and the diversity that we stand for. I had a vision of helping bring all people together and break down barriers for all. Without any foreknowledge, they said that they wanted to get rid of me from the committee, comprised of Francophone, using false allegations. I was warned not to come to the meeting because I would be ATTACKED. This kind of abuse should not be tolerated from any member of any committee and definitely not against any person. This abusive behaviour does not constitute the RM of Taché’s committee for the “Centre of Canada” and what it’s supposed to stand for. They wanted to discard Landmark and the Mennonite communities out like a piece of garbage. No wonder Ted Falk was not asked to speak at the unveiling for the Centre of Canada Park. So where are their values? Having noted what Armand Poirier said On January 5, 2017 article in the Carillon, “By becoming Francophone, could result in future Francophone immigration.” By these words is the foundation of Taché’s vision that makes them Anti-diversity and a racist municipality. When the majority of Taché is Francophone and stop respecting minorities by stacking the deck for their own gain by out-voting us then it’s time for Landmark to separate. Hettie Penner (Stam) Landmark, MB




November 2017

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Dawson Trail Dispatch


Dawson Trail Dispatch

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

November 2017



Four Groups Benefit from St. Labre 200 Campaign By Marianne Curtis On October 19, the organizers of St. Labre 200 committee handed out four grants to organizations in southern Manitoba during their annual general meeting. Since its inception nine years ago, the St. Labre 200 has donated thousands of dollars to different local organizations from their Give Back to the Community campaign. St. Labre 200 spokesperson Mariette Kirouac said the group is proud to support the many local organizations that they have. “We are proud to have donated $18,000 back to the community of which $4,000 to each of the organizations,” said Kirouac. “Our Giving Back to the Community campaign has a 74% year Camp Bridges was one of four nonprofit groups who got funds from the St. over year increase.” Labre 200 Giving Back to the Community campaign. The proceeds from this year’s event were divided between four worthwhile local organizations, including Camp Bridges, which supports children and teens in grief and bereavement. The Woodridge Fire Department is getting a portion to help fund the purchase of an ATV for their department, and Fonds Hôpital Ste-Anne Hospital Fund (SAHF) for equipment in Members of the Woodridge Fire Department accept their cheque. the new operating ward. The Sprague and Area Arena also received a grant. Kirouac credits the volunteers, sponsors and close to 1,500 people who come to this unique back yard gathering for the events success. At the general meeting, attendees heard how in its 9th year, St. Labre 200 has seen an 18% increase in sponsorship revenues; 44% increase in canteen net income; $1,700 raised on-site Volunteers from the Sprague and Area Arena committee. auction income and 10% overall increase in revenue. The St. Labre 200 is a gokart build off competition where fourteen teams are challenged to build their own gokarts within 24 hours. Teams build go-karts from scratch on the first day and race their new creations the next day in a fastpaced nail biting 200-lap race on a quarter mile dirt track. The winner earns the right to hoist the coveted Sparkplug Cup. Planning is already in the works for next year’s 10th anniversary event, which will take place July 6 - 8th 2018. Members of the Fonds St. Anne Board of Directors.

See the Dawson Trail Dispatch online at www.dawsontrail.ca




November 2017

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

Ste. Anne Senior Recognized

Guy Lévesque, (second from right) from Ste. Anne was presented with a Manitoba Council on Aging Recognition Award at the Manitoba Legislature on October 20.

By Marianne Curtis A Ste. Anne senior is one of several individuals across the province recognized by the Manitoba Council on Aging during an awards event acknowledging the hard work of seniors. On October 20, Guy Lévesque was honoured for his volunteer work in the areas of health, sports, education, heritage, financial services, public affairs, humanitarianism, culture, literacy, faith and charity. The former Southern Health Board Chair and Town of Ste. Anne administrator said that

the nomination was unexpected. “I was surprised because I did not know that my name was sent in,” said Lévesque. He later found out it was his colleagues at the Ste. Anne food bank, which he helped found, who nominated him for the award. “When I was CAO, you got involved in everything, but you don’t do it for awards; you do it to help and be part of your community,” Lévesque added. Health, Seniors and Active Living Minister Kelvin Goertzen explained the awards are a way to acknowledge the hard work of seniors in the province. “Seniors and others from across the province are working to strengthen their communities and make life

better for all residents,” said Goertzen. “These awards recognize their contributions and thank them for taking the time to make their communities better places to live.” The Manitoba Council on Aging is an advisory body to government that strives to ensure seniors’ perspectives are shared with government. The Manitoba Council on Aging Recognition Awards were created to recognize the many seniors who are community leaders and to celebrate their contributions. Seven awards was presented during a special ceremony at the Legislative Building.

Enzo Captures Armed Robber On October 22, at approximately 10 pm, Steinbach RCMP received a report of an armed robbery at a business on Main Street in Steinbach. The suspect was reported to have a firearm. He fled from the scene with an undisclosed amount of stolen money. Police Dog Enzo and his RCMP handler were able to track the suspect from the scene to a nearby residence. A 14-year-old male was taken into custody and is charged with Robbery Using Firearm, Disguise with Intent, Carrying Concealed Weapon, Careless Use of a Firearm, Using Firearm in Commission of an Offence and Possession of a Firearm for Dangerous Purpose. He remains in custody. Police Dog Enzo


Dawson Trail Dispatch

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Baseball Manitoba Recognizes Local Athletes

The La Broquerie 15UAA has been named Grassroots Team of the Year by Baseball Manitoba. The team consists of Assistant Coaches Ray Grimard and Mitch Tetrault, Eric Mateychuk, Darius Morrow, Dustin Broesky, Keyan Grimard, Gabe Ross, Coach Mitch Nadeau, Meech Nadeau, Carson Tufford, Rialey Lawless, Zac Tetrault, Dawson Tanner, Mason Hartung and Justin Gudmundson.

With the baseball season over, Baseball Manitoba is ready to recognize the accomplishments of all that were involved throughout a successful the year and to thank those who have contributed. This year, a team, a coach and one player are among the winners who will be presented with awards at this year’s annual Baseball Manitoba Awards banquet, taking place in Brandon. The La Broquerie 15UAA Team has been named as the Grassroots Team of the Year. Under the direction of Coach Mitch Nadeau and assistant Coaches Ray Grimard and Mitch Tetrault, they claimed the provincial championship back in July. The win was extra special for the team because it was the first time the community had hosted provincial championship baseball. In August, the team went on to capture the Western Canada

Theft of Bike Trailer On October 25 Steinbach RCMP responded to a report of a theft where an individual took a bike trailer from the yard of a residence on Hanover Street in Steinbach. The incident is still being investigated. The item is described as a Grey and Red Schwinn double seater trailer with two seatbelts. If you have any information in regards to the above you are asked to contact the Steinbach RCMP Detachment at (204) 326-4452 or CrimeStoppers at 1-800-222-8477 or www.manitobacrimestoppers. com or text “TIPMAN” plus your message to Crimes (274637).

Championship title in Kamloops, BC. Jeremy Culleton from Vassar won the Grassroots Coach of the Year. The Team Manitoba coach successfully led the women’s team to a fourth consecutive Baseball Canada’s 21U Invitational Championship title win. Dawson Tanner, from La Broquerie has been named Bantam Player of the Year. He was instrumental in the La Broquerie 15UAA team’s championship win. All three, along with the other eighteen winners will be recognized at the Baseball Manitoba’s annual awards banquet on November 4 at 6:30 pm at the Clarion Hotel in Brandon. Tickets for the banquet can still be purchased through the Baseball Manitoba office for $75 each by calling 1-204-9255763.

November 2017



La Broquerie Shell B&E On October 28 at approximately 2:40 am Steinbach RCMP responded to a break in at the Shell Gas station in La Broquerie by pulling of the door and smashing the glass. Suspects took cigarettes and lottery tickets. RCMP believe there may have been witnesses as the La Broquerie Bar Hallowe’en party had just let out. This investigation is still on going and police are seeking the public’s help in regards to any information that may be of help. If you have any information in regards to the above you are asked to contact the Steinbach RCMP Detachment at (204) 326-4452 or CrimeStoppers at 1-800-222-8477 or www.manitobacrimestoppers.com or text “TIPMAN” plus your message to Crimes (274637).


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November 2017

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

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Dawson Trail Dispatch

Providence President Shares Optimism at Harvest Festival

Providence College President Dr. David Johnson addresses guests at this year’s Harvest Festival.

By Marianne Curtis At Providence College’s 2017 Harvest Festival, guests were invited to join the college in making a “climb”. Themed “Climb with Us”, this year’s celebration was hosted by Crossroads Christian Communications CEO Lorna Dueck and featured musical performances by Candace Hamm and Jeongah Park. Providence President Dr. David Johnson told guests that, “We are climbing to become a leading Canadian Christ-centred university right here in Manitoba.” He pointed out that even though the Bergen Hall, the institutions men’s residence was destroyed in a June fire; they have never lost their optimism. “In recent years the culture here at Providence has

changed,” he said. “We are more optimistic today than we were five years ago.” He noted that there were other reasons to celebrate, including three consecutive budget surpluses and the near completion of a fundraising campaign for Providence. “This week we went over $11 million in IMPACT 2020: The Campaign for Providence,” he said. “In less than half the duration of the campaign, we have been blessed with 88 per cent of our goal.” That changed culture may be the reason that enrollment is booming. Figures show a 20 percent increase in new registrations.

The most popular study areas in the University College are Business, with seventy students pursuing Business degrees at Providence, 34 of which are in the Bachelor of Business Administration program. Sociology and Social Science are growth areas as well, and Psychology continues to be a robust driver of enrollment. As part of the booming enrollment numbers, there are currently 111 international students at Providence representing Africa, Central and South America, Asia, Europe and the United States. Also notable are the 97 students from Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia.

St. Pierre-Jolys Based Education Program Wins Award By Marianne Curtis A program offered in St. Pierre-Jolys designed to assist older workers return to the workforce has been named as the winner of an Award for Excellence in Leadership from the Manitoba Tourism Education Council (MTEC). St-Pierre en Boom Inc. was recently recognized for their work with older workers through the Baby Boomers in/en Action project with the Award for Excellence in Leadership Investing in Human Resources Development. This award is given to a business who works with MTEC to increase the skills, knowledge and adaptability of their workforce. St. Pierre en Boom Inc is the service provider for the Baby Boomers in Action (BBA) project, which is a jointly funded Federal-Provincial program that assists older individuals between 55-64 years of age return to the workforce.

Ralph Collette, Coordinator for the program, they have been assisting older workers in southeastern Manitoba with finding employment since 2009. “Baby Boomers in Action has helped hundreds integrate back into the workforce after they thought there was no longer a spot for them,” said Collette. “Winning this award is rewarding because we know that Baby Boomers in Action is working. Best of all, our clients’ say our help is life changing.” Eligible participants are enrolled in a 6 week group-based job related training session and 8 weeks of mentorship/job search, with the end goal of joining the workforce full-time, part-time, casual or becoming self-employed. Some participants may be eligible for financial support. “A lot of our clients

ask the questions ‘Am I too old, is it the way I look, is it my gray hair?’” We all know it’s not the case,” Collette encouraged. “They have a ton of experience, they just need some short-term help and it seems to be working very well.” The program also works closely with many partners and employers that know what the market is looking for. The group sessions have proven to be valuable for clients because it shows them that they aren’t alone looking for a job and they can do better networking, Collette added. The next intake for this program started October 10. Anyone interested is encouraged to contact Ralph or Brooke at Baby Boomers in Action at 204-433-2888, to get more information and enroll.


Dawson Trail Dispatch

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

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MennoMart Gives Back to Help End Homelessness The annual Royal MTC production - A Christmas Carol – On Sunday, November 19 at 7:30 pm, Pat Porter Active Living Centre. Watch Ebenezer’s epic transformation in this classic tale of compassion, hope and redemption that will leave hearts glowing. Tickets available now! They make a great gift. Adults $28 / Students $12 and Theatre & Music Students buy a ticket for only $6.

Menno Mart helps support those at risk in the community, with a donation to Steinbach Community Outreach.

Recently the Steinbach Community Outreach program that helps to end homelessness received a donation from Menno Mart Inc. that raises money for local community charities in and around Steinbach. Through Menno Mart’s efforts, local needs and challenges are supported while goods are repurposed and diverted from the waste stream, reducing landfill excess. “At Menno

Mart supporting local charities is our only business. This donation will assist Steinbach Community Outreach to continue providing such needed services locally,” explained Steve Denault, Manager of MennoMart Inc. “Steinbach Community Outreach is a charitable organization working with the poor and homeless in our community. We are pleased to

receive this donation from MennoMart,” said Myra Gerbrandt of Steinbach Community Outreach. “Every donation we receive enables us to help a homeless person find a roof over their heads, assist the underprivileged with basic needs, and work towards helping our guests become a healthy, functioning part of the community.”

Hanover Bus Cameras Nail Drivers The Hanover SD has gotten proactive against drivers who fail to stop for school buses by installing cameras on twenty-seven of the school division’s bus fleet. According to Robert Warkentin, Hanover SD Transportation Director, there is an ongoing problem with drivers failing to stop when school buses have their red lights flashing and stop signs out. “We are not having these things happen on our rural roads,” Warkentin said. “Drivers are failing to stop along high speed areas such as Highways #12, #52, #59 and 205.” Since the cameras were installed in June, the Steinbach RCMP has charged eight drivers for driving through the stop sign and flashing lights.

Steinbach RCMP Staff Sergeant Harold Laninga confirmed that the Hanover SD provides the detachment with photos and video of the offense, which helps prosecute the drivers. “When they get the ticket, they have the choice of pleading guilty or not guilty,” he added. Failing to stop for a school bus when its lights are flashing carries a fine of $673.65 and 2 demerits. Warkentin said drivers will be given plenty of time to adjust their speed accordingly. Hanover SD policy requires that bus drivers active their amber lights for at least 8 seconds before turning on the red lights to provide ample warning. According to the Manitoba Driver’s License Handbook, traffic in both directions of a two-lane or four-lane

non-divided highway must stop at least five metres from a bus with flashing lights or another warning device and remain stopped until the signal is turned off or the bus starts moving again. The handbook also states, “You need not stop when approaching a school bus from the opposite direction of a divided highway, providing there’s a physical separation such as a median between the two roads. However, you must slow down and watch out for children. A double solid line is not a physical separation.” The Hanover SD hopes to install another 25 cameras on their buses in the next budget year.

Arts Council Hosts First Tea and Bannock Gathering On October 28, the community gathered at the Steinbach Arts Centre for its first Tea and Bannock gathering. Hosted in partnership with Stonybrook Middle School, the gathering was the perfect place to meet neighbors, while enjoying traditional cuisine, and celebrating the mix of cultures that makes up Steinbach and area. According to Alyssa Reimer, the event was an important first for Steinbach. “As Aboriginal education becomes more important across the country, the Steinbach Arts Council is excited to host this first gathering of many cultures to celebrate Canada’s Indigenous people,” said Reimer. “This amazing opportunity is free of charge to the community, an encouragement to meet the neighbours.”

Fresh bannock bread

On Saturday, November 18 an afternoon Session for Artists. Linda will create an art piece using resin, after which participants will create their own resin art pieces with Linda’s guidance.

See you at SALS! The new Gallery at Salisbury House! Salisbury House is unveiling a new exhibit of local artists – all mediums – and some great music memorabilia with the latest adConcerts, Family and Youth dition of Tom Cochrane’s guitar. shows! Purchase for Birthdays, All are invited on Monday, NoAnniversaries, Weddings and vember 6 at 1:30 pm. more. Manitoba Theatre Centre - Winni- New! Southeast Centre for peg Symphony Orchestra - Mani- Music toba Hydro Holiday Tour -Quar- Nathan Dyck – Guitar; Darryl Fritetto Gelato - Mission Potluck esen – Piano; Hannah Humphries Added Attractions: A Fringed – Violin; Natalie Dawe – Cello; Family Day and Turnip the Mu- Candice Hamm – Piano & Theosic! Concerts. ry; David Klassen – Voice. Please New Koncertz 4 Kidz Series call us if you want your name on – PTE – The Good, The Bad the list to study with some of the and the Munsch and Bubbleman. best teachers in the southeast. Tickets available online steinbachartscouncil.ca or call us at New FUSION! Musical Theatre 204-346-1077. Master Classes - For Ages 9 - 14 Everyone should see the Winni- and 15 – 19. Teachers send your peg Symphony Orchestra – On students for a 45-minute private Tuesday, December 5 at 7:30 pm, lesson and then perform in a masSteinbach Mennonite Church. ter class setting. Enhance your Ticket Specials: Family - 4 for Music, Dance and Drama facili$66; Seniors Plus - 2 for $49; tated by David Klassen. Music/Theatre students $6, Class- Character Development - On Satroom with 20 or more students $6 urday, December 9, find believper student! Teachers Free, able character in your Musical Corporate - 5 or more, $20 per Theatre selection. ticket. Musical Theatre Ballad – On Saturday, February 10, use the beauNew! Kids and Parents Paint ty of your voice to captivate your Parties at SAC audience. Canvas & Cabernet is back. Join Musical Theatre UPTEMPO – us on Thursday, November 16. On Saturday, March 24, keeping Paint “Northern Lights” with Ar- your energy up as you entertain lene Enns! Only $35 for supplies, your audience with rapid text and appies, and drinks. quick tempo. New! Canvas & Colas brings Paint Dance Break! – On Saturday, Parties for ages 8 - 17. Make it an April 28, take the opportunity to evening to remember with your add the extra layer with Dance in parent/guardian/partner. Join us your musical number! on Thursday, November 16. Paint “Tire Swing” with Arlene Enns. Backyard Theatre Company Only $25 for supplies, snacks, Wants You! and beverage. New! Young Company – Performance troupe in Steinbach, diMoccasin Making with Donna rected by Jeremy Plett and MalToews – Celebrating Aboriginal colm Roulette for ages 16 +. Arts. Make your own moccasins, mukluks, gloves…and learn how Purchase original art! - 14th to bead! Annual Expressions ‘Recovery Through the Arts’ New! Fall Workshops Come check out their artworks Couples Cooking for Ages 18+ in the Hall Gallery. Perfect gifts on Friday, November 10 from – thoughtful and unique. 5:30 - 8:30 pm. Food brings people together and tastes best when Calling Creative Youth – Fun! shared with your significant other. Get involved - Meet with other Join Chef Cassandra for your Fri- like-minded youth interested day Night Date Night! in the arts to plan creative epic Resin Workshop for Ages 16+ on events and projects for ages 16 Saturday, November 18 from 10 – 29. am – 12 pm. Workshop Fee $45, Or…plan a visual arts project, Material Fee $20. Participants mural, etc… will create their own decorative OR…join a performing arts commaple serving boards using food mittee and help plan the next safe art resin, paints, and/or me- Turnip the Music! event with The tallic pigments. These can be used Middle Coast Band at the Neufeld as charcuterie, cheese, or dessert Garage in March 2018! boards.


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November 2017

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Dawson Trail Dispatch


Dawson Trail Dispatch

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Rare Ojibway Ponies Saved at Grunthal Auction

Rhonda Snow said goodbye to one of 23 rare ponies that she was forced to auction off recently at the Grunthal Auction Mart.

By Marianne Curtis On October 14, 20 critically rare ponies and 3 horses found homes with families across Canada and the US after the former owner was forced to sell the animals at auction.

The ponies, known in the Ojibwa language as bebezhigooganzhii or mishdatim meaning “one big toenail”, is a small, semi-feral horse that once lived in the wild and worked as a service animal but is also considered a spirit animal for the Ojibwa people of northwestern Ontario

and northern Minnesota. Emerging DNA evidence of fossilized bone indicates that the Lac La Croix pony may predate the arrival of the Spanish mustang. Some researchers believe that small pockets of wild horses may have survived the ice age, just as deer, moose and elk did.

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Pamela Heath, office manager with Rare Canada Breeds, said, “The pony breed is critically rare and needs to be protected. She said the smaller, muscular breed measures about five feet tall (1.5 metres) and in the past, roamed the wilds from Fort Frances to Minnesota.” The 23 horses, including 20 endangered Lac La Croix, or Ojibway ponies, went up for sale at the Grunthal Auction Mart after Rhonda Snow, from Fort Frances Ontario brought the animals here for disposal. According to Snow, the breed is so rare that there is only one purebred breeding stock left in the world. They are considered a hearty breed that has deep roots with the indigenous peoples of Northwestern Ontario. Snow claims she was forced to sell the animals at auction as part of a divorce settlement. “I tried for years to get people to understand that these little horses need protection and now I felt backed into a corner that I had to sell them,” she said. Initially Snow was concerned the ponies would be sold for meat because many of them were wild, but once word got out about how rare the animals were, the horse community stepped up. “I am shocked this turned out so positive,” Snow told media. “They did everything they could to make sure the horses would not go to meat buyers.” It was obvious during the auction the meat buyers were not interested in getting in the way of saving the rare herd. As a result, a number of private individuals and rescues were able to rehome all the animals in an effort to protect the breed. Grunthal Auction Mart Manager Harold Unrau said they got a lot of extra attention because of the ponies with over 200 calls coming in from across the country and about four hundred people came out to physically attend the auction sale. The Lac La Croix Indigenous Pony has cultural and spiritual significance for many First Nations and Métis communities, especially for their original caretakers: the peoples of Bois Forte Band of Chippewa and Lac La Croix First Nation. The preservation of the Lac La Croix Indigenous Pony breed and its story of survival against all-odds “marks a reclaiming of what was once the way of their grandparents and great-grandparents” For more info on the breed and its history see http:// www.theredponystands.com/history.html.


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Dawson Trail Dispatch

Want to Fly Like an Eagle Isaiah 40:30-31 ... 30) Even youths grow tired and weary, and young men stumble and fall; 31) but those who hope in the LORD will renew their strength. They will soar on wings like eagles; they will run and not grow weary, they will walk and not be faint. (NIV) When you take a boat ride on Lake of the Woods around Kenora Ontario you can watch eagles soar high above the water. Ever so graceful, just riding the wind. They seem to be totally in harmony with nature. Not a care in the world as they sail through the air, always watchful, but always up high above the blare and turmoil of the world down below. Sometimes I wish I could be like those eagles. There are times when I am just worn out, even my bones feel tired, and I feel exhausted. Ever get that way? When I get like that, I kind of feel ... you know ... a bit irritated with life. It is during those times that I can get really upset with other folks around me and perhaps a bit shortsighted too. Even though I am a Christian, I need to be as watchful as those eagles on days that I am not running the Christian race very well. For those of you who are my age (80) remember when you were younger? You did not get tired, did you? You seemed to have an inexhaustible supply of energy. However, even Isaiah, the Old Testament prophet, says that young people have struggled with weariness at times. Some of us have forgotten that. Yes! We did get tired when were younger, but we bounced back so quickly, we thought we could go on forever. Now that we are older, we should behave in a more grown-up way. In fact, we must “act our age” because our bodies cannot handle more! We cannot do the things we did when we were younger because everything will hurt, and those things that will not hurt, do not work anymore. How do we tap into that inexhaustible supply of God’s storehouse of energy? Verse 31 tells us that God is here to help us make our day, help us get through those difficult times; past all the distractions and perplexities of this life. It seems so simple, yet so tough to do. All we need to do is put our trust and hope in Jesus Christ. Invite Him into our heart, and He will supply that energy level we need for this life. There is a person in the Bible by the name of Esau who sold his birthright when he was physically and mentally exhausted. We may not sell our birthright, but we do other things that cause us grief later in life ... things that feed that weariness in both body and soul. When our energy is drained and we are totally beat, we do things that we would not normally do. But when we put our hope and trust in God, we gain strength from God’s strength. He allows us to exchange our strength for His. We never need to fear that our struggle is too big for Him. So, if this is the case would it not make sense to make our relationship with God the highest possible priority of the day? We are told that God is able to restore our weary soul with His strength if we are but willing to wait for Him to act. There are so many things that demand our attention, our time. We must not let the noise and clatter; the pull and tug of this world rob us of our daily time with the Lord. We are to trust in Him, when we do, we will draw strength from Him. It is in these daily times of drawing on the eternal storehouse of God’s resources, that we are given the strength to live for Him… To God Be the Glory! Would you pray with me ... Heavenly Father you know my heart? I acknowledge that I am a sinner. I now invite Jesus Christ to come into my heart to forgive all my sins. I want my life to change. Many times, my thoughts and attitude are not that great; please help me to have a positive attitude and good thoughts. I pray that Your Holy Spirit will help me to be the kind of Christian that will bring honour to Your Name. I pray this in Christ Jesus’ Name. Amen.

Regional Hospital to Receive Patient Chairs Thanks to Volunteer Efforts and Books By Marianne Curtis The Bethesda Health Care Auxiliary hosted another successful fall book sale at the Clearspring Centre in the middle of October. The annual fall book sale raised $14,347 to go towards the purchase of a number of specialized chairs for the Bethesda Regional Health Centre in Steinbach. “The chairs requested for this year are all going to make patient care easier and provide a safer environment,” said Spokesperson Verna Thiessen with the Auxiliary. “They will be

made of hospital grade vinyl, and placed in the Emergency Room and Surgical/Obstetrics department.” Four patient chairs will be purchased for the emergency room, for stable patients waiting for treatment at a cost of $6,400. They are expected to enhance patient flow and reduce waiting times for people needing a stretcher. Another $2,900 will be spent on a Broda Elite Tilt Recliner, which will be used to assist elderly patients requiring supportive seating. Last but not least, the group will purchase five sleeper chairs, 2 for the emergency room and 3 for the OB/Surgery department. These chairs can be used in

an ottoman position or converted into a pull out bed. They will cost $12,500 for all five. Over the years, the Bethesda Hospital Auxiliary has hosted two used book sales per year as part of their mandate to raise funds in support of the region’s largest hospital. These biannual events have raised well over $500,000 for medical equipment necessary for patient comfort or safety, but not funding through Manitoba Health programs. The Bethesda Health Care Auxiliary Book Sale is the organization’s largest fundraiser with the next one expected to take place in March.


Dawson Trail Dispatch

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

November 2017

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Arrogance Will Be Our Downfall

Climate change is currently a seriously debated issue in public and political arenas. How should the average person respond to these potential problems and does the Bible have anything to offer as a help in this area? The following are some Biblical facts that may help you come to a conclusion: 1. The God of heaven is a sovereign God and He controls all aspects of the weather. Psalm 148:8 says, “Fire and hail; snow and vapours; stormy wind fulfilling his work.” In Matthew 8:26 Jesus Christ rebuked the wind on the Sea of Galilee and the storm stopped. When Jonah was running from God, God sent a storm to get Jonah’s attention and when the mariners in the ship obeyed God, the storm immediately stopped. There is no such thing as a freak storm. Almighty God determines all weather patterns and there is a purpose for everything He does. 2. God has promised some constants that we can depend on. Genesis 8:22 says, “While the earth remaineth, seedtime and harvest, and cold and heat, and summer and winter, and day and night shall not cease.” 3. God uses weather as a judgment on people when they turn their backs on Him and refuse continually His mercy and grace. Deuteronomy 28:23 says, “And thy heaven that is over thy head shall be brass and the earth that is under thee shall be iron. The Lord shall make the rain of thy land powder and dust; from heaven shall it come down upon thee, until thou be destroyed.” 4. It is the height of pride and arrogance for man to think that he can alter the earth’s climate patterns in any significant way. Man cannot alter what God sets in motion. It is man’s lack of acknowledgment and submission to the God of heaven that has put our world on a collision course with tragedy. The Bible tells us that the world, as a whole, will refuse to yield to God’s authority. As a result, climate problems and environmental disasters will increase. This just confirms that we are living in the last days that the Bible describes. But you, as an individual, don’t have to follow in the world’s footsteps! You can come to God, just as you are, right now. Acknowledge you are without help and hope. Believe that God sent His Son to this earth 2,000 years ago. Jesus Christ died, shed His blood, and paid for all your sins. If you will pray and accept Him as your Saviour, He will forgive your sins, save you from the destiny of a God-rejecting world, and give you new life and hope in Him. In Matthew 11:28 Jesus Christ said, “Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden and I will give you rest.” John 6:37 says, ‘…him that cometh to me I will in no wise cast out.” Dear friend, if climate change and environmental issues have you worried, come to the One who is in charge of it all, and let him calm your fears and give you a peace that passeth understanding. God bless you as you seek Him and His will in your life.

Self and Family-Managed Home Care For those who need home care, there are options to the traditional home care that is arranged by the local regional health authority. It is not well known, but it may be appropriate for your family’s situation. It is taking over the management of the home care for yourself or for a family member. If interested, you would contact your Home Care Case Coordinator for more information. Self-Managed Care enables clients with assessed Home Care needs to accept full responsibility for their personal care as Self Managers. Individuals who choose this option rather than receiving their service through the regular Home Care Program are responsible for coordinating, managing and directing the non-professional services they need to remain living at home and in the community. Family Managed Care enables the families of clients with assessed Home Care needs to accept full responsibility for their family member as a Family Manager. The Family Manager is responsible for coordinating, managing and directing the non-professional services needed by their family

member. Hiring of family members is not allowed except in unique circumstances (communication or cultural barriers, or the nature and degree of the care required, or rural or remote location). You would be funded for the home care service, but you would find a home care agency or employ staff to provide the non-professional services such as companionship visits (respite care), meals, light housekeeping and laundry and personal care assistance such as transferring to and from a wheelchair, and with your personal care, such as bathing, dressing, and toileting. You continue to be eligible for Home Care’s professional services such as Nursing and Community Therapy Services. One of the biggest challenges to Self/Family Managed Care is the payroll administration: If you choose to employ staff as a Self/Family Manager you take on full responsibilities as an employer including: Registering with Canada Revenue Agency, Employment Insurance, Workers Compensation, making required payroll deductions etc. A payroll company

may be hired to assist with these employer obligations. Alternatively, you may choose to engage a personal care agency to provide the care. I have had a few clients that have arranged for Family Managed Care and it has worked well. It allowed them to hire one or two people to provide some respite care for the spouse (the main caregiver) so the spouse could leave the home a few times a week for shopping or other social activities and know that someone was in the home to provide companionship and supervision and know the family member was safe. The main reason for seeking this type of solution was to ensure consistent caregivers. Some recipients of home care find it challenging to have too many different home care providers; it can be confusing. In one situation, a well-known neighbour provided the respite care. The spouse issued the bi-weekly paycheque after I helped her determine the deductions for CPP, EI and income taxes. She also looked after the monthly remittance (sent the form and the monthly payroll deductions to

Canada Revenue Agency). I helped her with the T4 tax slips that she issued each January. If this is too much administration for you to handle, you can hire a payroll company to assist with these employer obligations. Or you can choose to engage a personal care agency to provide the care. To apply for the Self/Family Managed Care you or your family member need to be a client of the regional health authority Home Care Program and be eligible to receive Home Care attendant/homemaker services. Contact your Home Care Case Coordinator to discuss your interest in the service. A couple of reminders: First, Service Canada is in Ste Anne the third Thursday of the month (November 16) at the Manitoba Bilingual Service Centre, 30 Dawson Road (next to my office); they can help with your Canada Pension Plan or Old Age Security questions, and EI and Social Insurance Number issues and more. Secondly, the monthly Death Cafés have been very well attended and well received. Some past participants have

said, “Very informative and love the cozy environment for a frank discussion of sensitive topics.”, “A wonderful resource for information about subjects that are usually taboo!”, “Excellent opportunity to discuss end of life information.” Previous Death Café topics have included Power of Attorney, Executor & Will, Natural Death, Palliative Care, Hospice, Funeral Planning, Personal Care Home, Home Care, Terminal Sedation, Eulogy, Obituary, Link Charity, Family Conferences, Compassionate Care Contracts, and more. We have two more in November including one specifically for Baby Boomers. If you are interested in attending either one, please call our office for dates and times. Anni Markmann is a Personal Income Tax Professional and Certified Financial Planner; living, working, and volunteering in our community. Contact her at 204.422.6631 or 36 Dawson Road in Ste Anne (near Coop) or Info@SteAnneTaxService.ca.


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Dirt Bike Stolen On August 26, a yellow Suzuki dirt bike was stolen from a residence on Dawson Road. The dirt bike is described as a 2004 Suzuki RM 125. Steinbach RCMP is seeking the public’s assistance in locating the person responsible. If you have any information in regards to the above you are asked to contact the Steinbach RCMP Detachment at 204-326-4452 or CrimeStoppers at 1-800-222-8477 or manitobacrimestoppers.com or text “TIPMAN” plus your message to Crimes (274637).

Police Seek Leads on Stolen Truck On October 7, Steinbach RCMP received a report of a stolen 2003 F150 pick-up truck from the Dawson Road area. The theft occurred between October 6, 11 pm and October 7, 8 am. The truck is brown in colour with a black tailgate and Manitoba plate FET289. If you have any information in regards to the above you are asked to contact the Steinbach RCMP Detachment at (204) 326-4452 or CrimeStoppers at 1-800222-8477 or manitobacrimestoppers. com or text “TIPMAN” plus your message to Crimes (274637).

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

Curling Returns to Ste. Anne Amid Deficit By Marianne Curtis Curling is returning to the Ste. Anne Curling Club after the Town of Ste. Anne gave approval for the organization to proceed with the 2017-2018 season. According to Ste. Anne Curling Club board member Robert Regnier, a mainly new board of directors has been working hard with the Town council to ensure that the club stays open. After a few poor seasons and declining membership, the Club is sitting on a $17,000 deficit. The Town of Ste. Anne council advised the club that curling would be shut down if they did not come back

with a solid financial plan. “It was a wake-up call for us,” said Regnier. The group held emergency meetings, which drew support. As a result, the Town of Ste. Anne approved this years curling season on the condition that they meet again in the next year to reassess. To maintain operation, the Ste. Anne Curling Club rents the facility, which includes four sheets of ice from the Town of Ste. Anne for a total of $35,000 a year. Unfortunately, the club ended last season with a $17,000 deficit, which is why the Town of Ste. Anne threatened to shut them down. Regnier is confident the Club is

capable of paying off some now, and hopefully negotiates terms for the balance with town council. “It’s going to take hard work to make sure we balance our budget this year, and put stuff in place so we can be sustainable long term,” he told media. “I appreciate that the town did not want to continue supporting a deficit.” While the public showed support at the meetings, to ensure the program’s viability, people need to sign up and participate, Regnier reminds curlers. The Ste. Anne Curling Club has operated in the town’s curling facility since before 1963. To date membership numbers include 9

men’s teams, 8 women’s teams and 9 mixed teams from Ste. Anne and many surrounding communities. There are also 15 junior curlers this year, which is a program that the Club would like to see grow. On November 24 - 26, the Ste. Anne Curling Club also will be hosting their first bonspiel of the season. With the season, just starting there is still room for more members. Men’s Division meet Wednesdays; Ladies’ Division on Thursdays; Mixed Division meets Fridays and Juniors (Age 8 and up) on Tuesdays. Contact Mike Buss to register a team at 204-371-7374.

Richer Paving Projects Goes to Hearing By Marianne Curtis The RM of Ste. Anne is holding a public hearing on November 8 to discuss a proposed borrowing bylaw for $300,000 to pave the streets in Richer. Incidentally, the $500,000 project has already been completed without public consultation. The Richer paving project encompasses 2.8 km of asphalting on portions of the Dawson Road East, Forsythe Road, Godard Street, Nault Street, Therrien Drive and Northeast Drive. The project included sub-base preparation, base

and finished road surface. The borrowing bylaw would allow the RM of Ste. Anne to borrow $300,000 over a 7 year term at the rate of 5.88%. Based on the 2017 assessment roll, this translates to a mill rate of 2.465. Calculated on residential property valued at $160,000, an estimated $177.48 in taxes will be applied from within the current LUD budget over the next 7 years to the project. RM of Ste. Anne Reeve Art Bergmann said the project is a positive for the community. “The LUD’s intentions are not to raise taxes, but to work within the mill rate of their cur-

rent budget,” said Bergmann. The LUD of Richer has already levied $100,000 in their 2017 Financial plan with $50,000 coming from reserves and $50,000 from their operation budget. The RM matched the $100,000 with money taken from the Gas Tax Reserve Fund. Bergmann confirmed that paving began at the end of September and was completed in about ten days. “It is very pleasant for the residents in that corner of the community,” Bergmann told media. The project is complete, but ratepayers still have an opportunity to voice their support or concerns to the

$300,000 borrowing bylaw by sending in letters of objection or attending the public hearing on November 8 at 11 am in the RM of Ste. Anne council chambers. If no objections are heard, the RM of Ste. Anne will move to approve the bylaw. However, if twenty-five people object, it would go to a municipal board hearing and a decision would be made based on their findings on whether the municipal board has the authority to approve or make recommendations to the bylaw. If denied, the RM of Ste Anne may have to consider other options to pay for the project.

Ritchot Chamber Ste. Agathe Firehall to Host Goes Over Budget Awards Gala The Ritchot Chamber of Commerce is now accepting nominations in three categories of business awards, which will be handed out during a formal evening gala taking place in the beginning of December. Ritchot Chamber of Commerce President Larry Niebel said the gala event is an, “Evening of celebration, recognition and awards for businesses contributing to our local economy.” He encourages businesses to use the event as an all-in-one Christmas staff party with other businesses in the region. Scheduled to take place on December 2 at the TransCanada Centre in Ile des Chenes, the evening will consist of a formal sit down dinner, followed by the highlight of the evening, the 3rd Annual Business Award presentations. Nominations are being accepted for three awards, including Business of the Year, Entrepreneur of the Year and the Corporate Volunteerism Award. The evening will end with a fun casino night, live music with Project B and dancing. Tickets are $50 each for chamber members and $60 for non-members. Complimentary casino bucks come with every ticket. To purchase tickets or to nominate a business for an award, email inquiries to info@ritchotchamber.ca or call Yvette at 204-881-2351. This year’s Ritchot Chamber of Commerce annual general meeting will take place on December 4, at Club Amical in St. Adolphe starting at 7 pm. At this time, board elections for vice president, secretary and treasurer will take place. This event is free and open to the public.

Last fall, RM of Ritchot residents were told the municipality would need to borrow $2.25 million to build and equip a new fire hall in Ste. Agathe. At the time, a borrowing bylaw for $2.25 million on a 20-year term was approved by the municipal board so the municipality could proceed with the construction of a new hall and purchase a new fire truck along with all the equipment and training for the new firefighters. The original proposal estimated that a new fire hall would cost $1.5 million, but when the project came back the lowest tender was $1.77, a shortfall of $270,000 was estimated. The RM budgeted $500,000 for a new fire truck, but the tendering process came back with an estimate of $616,000 bringing the project $116,000 over budget. In total, the municipal board approved the borrowing of $2.25 million and the final project costs have risen to $2.86 million making the project $576,000 over budget. To cover this overage, the municipality has agreed to transfer funds from the Gas Tax Reserve Fund.

Ritchot Mayor Chris Ewen told the media that costs have risen due to construction delays because of the midsummer by-election. The delay pushed construction into the winter months, which has added additional heating costs. “We really want this project to go, and I think the rest of the RM does as well,” he stated. Currently, the RM of Ritchot Fire Department consists of a fleet of thirty volunteers working out of two stations in Ile des Chenes and St. Adolphe. The need to build a third hall in the municipality was driven by the construction of a number of new subdivisions, along with two canola plants in the area which have contributed significantly to the growth of the community. Level 1 fire training of the almost two dozen volunteer firefighters for the Ste. Agathe hall was completed in the spring and the new truck is already purchased. The RM of Ritchot hopes to have a spade in the ground soon and a summer 2018 opening is being anticipated. The new fire hall will be located on the east side of Highway 75, on the north side of 305.


Dawson Trail Dispatch

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

November 2017

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Niverville Student Named Tri-Star A female soccer player from Niverville Collegiate has been named as Powerland Rural High School Athlete of the Week. On October 10, Holly Reimer of the Niverville Collegiate’s Panthers soccer team was recognized after the 5’5” defensive midfielder helped the Panthers earn a second place finish at their recent home tournament and the Zone 13 finals. “Holly’s ability to anticipate the play makes her one of our most valuable players,” explained Panther’s Coach Gerald Negrave. “As a defender, she knows which way the attack has to come. She is always two steps ahead of the opposition.” When she is not on the field, the grade 12 student maintains an 84% academic average, while also participating in basketball and track & field. Holly Reimer

Falk Raises Concerns Over Border Crossings Provencher MP Ted Falk is raising concerns after the US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) informed the Federal government that they are changing their hours of operation in the new year. According to Falk, the changes will specifically affect the Lancaster, Minnesota crossing (Tolstoi) and Port of Roseau (South Junction) crossing. Starting January 7, 2018, the Lancaster crossing will be closed from 4 pm instead of 10 pm and the Port of Roseau, which coincides with the Canadian Port of South Junction, will operate from the hours of 8 am to 8 pm instead of 8 am to midnight. “The proposed 4 pm closure of this busy crossing (Lancaster) would severely impact a very large number of travelers as well as negatively affect commercial traffic between the two countries,” Falk said of the Lancaster crossing.

Christopher Misson, Assistant Area Port Director-Tactical Operations US CBP said the matter is reviewed regularly. “Annually we review and assess workload volumes, staffing, and infrastructure costs within the Area Port of Pembina. The ports of Lancaster and Roseau were identified for modification of operational hours to realign resources to workload,” stated Mission. “This adjustment will allow us to properly align staffing with workload, maintain CBP’s inspectional and enforcement missions, and redirect resources to ports with greater commercial and passenger volumes. Northbound travelers and cargo exports will not be affected by this change.” “The proposed 4 pm closure of this busy crossing would severely impact a very large number of travelers as well as negatively affect commercial traffic between the two countries,” Falk said of the Lancaster crossing.

Falk has sent a letter to the US CBP Headquarters in Washington requesting that they review the decision. “To request that the decision to change the hours of operation at these two ports be reviewed and ultimately reversed so that the free flow of traffic can continue as residents on both sides of the border have come to expect,” Falk wrote. Approximately 70,000 travelers cross the US/Canada border each day. While no official meetings planned on this side of the border, US town halls are taking place in, Minnesota on November 2 Civic Center, located at 121 Center Street East, Roseau, MN, and Lancaster November 6 with a town hall meeting starting at 7 pm, November 2, at the Civic Center, located at 118 Central Avenue South, Lancaster, MN.

Steinbach Signs Up for National Skating Party On Sunday, December 10, Canadians across the country will be lacing up all on the same day to enjoy a favorite pastime, skating. A number of communities throughout the region have applied for small grants to help host an event. A final listing will not be published until mid-November. However, the City of Steinbach is one of many local communities confirmed to be participating in Canada 150 Skating Day. Everyone is welcome to enjoy the fun at the T.G. Smith Centre - Smith Arena from 11 am – 2 pm. As part of the community’s Canada 150 Skating Day, skaters will enjoy hot chocolate and treats at the Community

Plaza and meet and skate with Steinbach Pistons players. Communities were encouraged to plan the event, with the offer of a $400 grant from the Federal government. Because of the fund, on December 10, over 200 communities are already set to participate in the national event. The locations of these events will be posted on the Canada 150 website by mid-November. Communities interested in joining the party, but who missed the funding can still plan an event. Check out canada.pch.gc.ca for some useful resources.

Pat Porter Active Living Centre offers programs, activities, services and volunteer opportunities, striving to promote healthy and active living for mature adults of the southeast region. We invite you to come, pay us a visit, and consider participating in some of our programs and events. News and Activities Memberships: As of October 1, 2017, all regular program fees will be $2 if you are a member and $4 for all non-members. Purchase a 2018 membership for $25 per person and receive the remainder of 2017 free! Memberships also give you a discount on other special events, discount on rentals and more! Rentals and Functions: Book your next function/event at our Centre. We can accommodate Birthdays, Anniversaries, Weddings, Christmas Gatherings and Showers (amongst others). Call Lynda 204-320-4600 for more information and to book. Old Time Country Dance – Friday, November 17 from 7 - 11 pm. Live band is Steve Ambrose Band. Get tickets a week in advance to save on ticket price. Christmas Craft Workshop – Friday, November 17 at 2 pm. Learn to make and take home a Christmas Swag, Bows and Fancy Napkins! Cost is $5 per person. Must Pre-register by calling our receptionist at 204-3204600. Cooking Class – Healthy Tasty Snacks – Thursday, November 30 at 1 pm. Cost is $5 per person. Must Pre-register! Christmas Banquet – Thursday, December 14 at 5:30 pm, Punch at 6 pm and Supper. Tickets $15 for Members/$18 for Non-Members. Christmas Banquet is open to Every One of all ages! Deadline for tickets is Thursday, November 30. Volunteer Opportunities: Volunteer with us – we could use volunteers in many different areas. Whatever your skill set or age we have a place for you. Whether you can volunteer for an hour a month, week or day or several hours we can accommodate you with tasks. Call Lynda at 204-320-4603 for more information. Regular Activities: Make sure to check out our quar terly Newsletter. All Programs have a fee of $2 to participate, unless otherwise stated. Out With Friends: Next outing Friday, November 24, Christmas Craft Sale – Convention Centre. Meet at PPALC at 4 pm. Fun Bingo: 3rd Thursday of each month from 10 - 11 am. No Cash prizes – fun prizes are offered. Movie Time: 4th Monday of each month at 1 pm. Next Movie, “Francis the Talking Mule” is on November 27. Family friendly movies. Floor Curling/Floor Shuffle: Wednesdays from 1:30 – 4 pm.

Pickleball: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Fridays from 9 11:30 am. Drop in Billiards: Monday- Friday from 9 am - 4 pm. Cards: Monday – Canasta; Wednesday – Cribbage. All card games are from 1 - 4 pm. Ho Model Railway Project: Wednesdays from 9 am – 4 pm. Choir: Wednesdays from 10 11:30 am. Dancing Shoes: Tuesdays from 7 - 9 pm. Practice your dance moves to your own music. Computer Classes: Wednesdays from 9 am – 1 pm. Please call to book your appointment. Old Time Country Jam: Wednesdays from 7 - 9 pm. New Connection: 1st Thursday of each month from 2 - 3:30 pm. Fitness Class: Resume in fall. Free Programs Crafty Corner: every Friday from 2 - 4 pm. Bring your craft (anything goes – knitting, scrapbooking, woodwork, etc), have some good conversation, coffee, and share in learning from each other. Cozy Corner Coffee Time: 10:30 am every morning for FREE coffee, tea, and a cookie. Meet new people and staff in a friendly and inviting atmosphere. Walking Program: Every Morning from 8:30 - 9 am (Weekdays) in our Auditorium. FREE to the public! Enjoy Free Coffee or Tea after! Buddy Up – This program is designed to touch base daily (short phone call) with a buddy to act as a safety net. If you live alone or spend part of your week alone this would be a program for you! If you are interested, please contact Lynda 204-320-4603 for more details. Other Programs/Services Provided/Misc. Information Memberships can be purchased at $25 per person and will include from October 1, 2017 – December 31, 2018. Noon Meals: Available Monday through Friday Cost $6. Come join us for lunch. Call Deb at 3204605 the day before or by 9 am that day to reserve your meal. Tai Chi: Monday evenings at 7 pm and Wednesday mornings at 10 am. Foot Care Clinic: Foot care is available the first Tuesday and Wednesday of every month and the third Tuesday and Thursday of every month. Call Reception at 204-320-4600 to book your appointment. Beltone Hearing Clinic: Third Friday of the month. Call 1-800661-2653 to book your appointment. For more information on programs, events, activities or volunteer opportunities, drop by the Centre Monday - Friday from 8:30 am - 4 pm or call reception desk at 204-320-4600 or Lynda at 204-320-4603. Visit our website at patporteralc.com.


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November 2017

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

RCMP Seek “Cool” Thief On July 5, Steinbach RCMP received a report of a theft from one of the local building supply businesses in Steinbach. A male attended the store, identified himself as working for a local appliance business, and was there to pick up 3 A/C units. It was later found that the male was not an employee of the local appliance business. The RCMP is requesting the

public’s assistance with identifying the suspect(s) responsible. If you have any information in regards to the above you are asked to contact the Steinbach RCMP Detachment at 204326-4452 or CrimeStoppers at 1-800-222-8477 or manitobacrimestoppers.com or text “TIPMAN” plus your message to Crimes (274637).

ATV Stolen from Garage On October 4 Steinbach RCMP received a report of a break-in at a residential garage in the Chancellor Bay area of Mitchell. A yellow 2014 CAN AM Outlander 500 CC ATV was reported stolen between 5:30 pm on October 3 and 8 am on October 4. Police are requesting the public’s assistance with identifying

the suspect(s) responsible and locating the stolen ATV. If you have any information in regards to the above you are asked to contact the Steinbach RCMP Detachment at 204-3264452 or CrimeStoppers at 1-800222-8477 or manitobacrimestoppers.com or text “TIPMAN” plus your message to Crimes (274637).

Dawson Trail Dispatch

Seasonal Flu Clinics Open Across the Region Southern Health-Santé Sud will be holding seasonal Flu Clinics throughout the region ending November 18. Yearly vaccination is one of the best ways to protect yourself, your friends and family from getting the flu. Influenza, commonly known as “the flu”, is a viral illness caused by the influenza virus that affects many people every year. The virus spreads easily from person to person by direct contact, coughing and sneezing. The flu is different from a common cold virus infection because of its ability to cause serious complications. The most common symptoms of the flu include a high fever, sore throat, muscle aches, coughing and feeling tired. These symptoms typically begin two days after exposure to the virus and most last less than a week. The cough, however, may last longer. In children, there can often be nausea and vomiting, which are less common in adults. “By getting the quadrivalent influenza vaccine, you will have better odds of fighting circulating flu viruses,” said Dr. Michael Routledge, Medical Officer of Health for Southern Health-Santé Sud. “It is important that everyone who is six months of age and older considers getting immunized to protect not only your own health, but also the health of your friends and family.” An annual flu vaccine is especially important for those at increased risk of serious illness from the flu, their caregivers and close contacts. This includes: - Seniors age 65 or older - Residents of personal care homes or long-term care facilities - Children age six months to five years

- Those with chronic illness - Pregnant women - Health care workers and first responders - Individuals of Aboriginal ancestry - People who are severely overweight or obese - or as determined by your primary health care provider Adults over the age of 65 who have not previously received a pneumococcal vaccine can get one at the same time as the seasonal flu vaccine. Both the flu and pneumococcal vaccine are offered at no charge for people aged 65 and older. The pneumococcal vaccine helps pro-

tect against pneumococcal disease, including a serious type of pneumonia, blood infections and meningitis. Most adults only need one pneumococcal vaccine in their lifetime. To find out where you and your loved ones can get your seasonal flu shot, please view the Southern Health-Santé Sud, 2017 Seasonal Flu Clinic Flyer at southernhealth. ca. For more information about seasonal or H1N1 flu or to find out if you, need a flu shot contact your health care provider or call Health Links-Info Santé at toll-free 1-888315-9257 or 788-8200.

Rat River Health Council Seeks Members By Marianne Curtis The Rat River Health Council has put out a call for volunteers from residents living in St. Pierre-Jolys and the RM of De Salaberry to join their board of directions. Francine Roy, President said Council is looking for individuals or organizations who would like to have a voice on the council by appointing a representative to the board. “Why? To ensure that our Council has greater input to best represent community needs,” Roy said. “We want to be proactive and ready to ensure that our health care services, public,

private and non-profit will be there quality health care services. for us and our families well into the If interested in joining the counfuture.” cil, email info@ratriverhealth.ca for Health care is the number one con- more information. cern for Manitobans. It is also the biggest expense in this province’s budget, and more money does not equal better health care. “Big changes are coming in health care and residents of the RM of De Salaberry and the Village of StPierre-Jolys deserve quality health care close to home, and in the official language of choice,” Roy added. The Rat River Health Council is a non-profit organization created in 1994 to represent the residents of the Village of St-Pierre-Jolys and of the RM of De Salaberry to ensure


Dawson Trail Dispatch

Pizza Night!

Today, we are having pizza for supper. Not take out, not pulled from the freezer, just good old, homemade pizza. Making the crust herself, my wife is great when it comes to making pizza. We typically will have one of two types of pizza; the first is the regular pepperoni pizza with piles of cheese and plenty of pepperoni. The second type of pizza that she makes is Barbeque Pizza, also, with lots of cheese. Cheese? Yes, please! Since everyone in the family likes our pizza crust thin, then that is the way she makes it. Unlike other places, in my wife’s kitchen, there is no skimping on toppings! Delic-i-ous!! I will have to admit that we do buy the sauce that we use on the pizza. Years ago, when my wife and I were first married she’d make the pizza using her own homemade sauce and the pizza wasn’t the greatest of tasting. It was still edible but there were always leftovers. At the time, we didn’t know what it was that tasted off so we tried replacing different ingredients. First, we substituted the crust with a store bought one and it didn’t get away from the strange taste. We then tried several other brands of crust (even the one that a friend of ours used with her great tasting pizza) and yet the taste still didn’t change. When we changed the sauce from homemade to store bought, there was an immediate improvement in our pizza quality. It was great, excuse me, it IS great! Now my wife, three children and I can nearly finish off a large pizza on our own and that is only because we have to rein the children in so that they don’t overeat. If it was up to my twelve-year old son, he’d probably eat it all himself and ask for dessert too! In time, I’m hoping that my wife will go back and try to improve on her homemade sauce until it tops our taste buds chart of greatness. Until she does, I think that she’ll just be happy that her family loves the great food that she makes. Until next time, take care and keep your world spinning.

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

November 2017

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RM of Tache Goes Bilingual By Marianne Curtis The RM of Tache has officially become a member of the Association of Manitoba Bilingual Municipalities (AMBM). LUD of Lorette Councilor and member of the of the AMBM’s Board of Directors Armand Poirier told media the seven-to-one approved bylaw represents, “A step that should have been taken a long time ago.” “When I moved to Lorette in 1998, I was surprised to learn that the municipality was not bilingual,” Poirier explained. He joined the Board of Directors of the AMBM after an unsuccessful attempt to push the LUD

of Lorette to join in 2002. “One of my goals, when elected in 2014, was to propose that the entire municipality be part of the AMBM.” He added that the RM of Tache’s roots go back to 1880 when Francophones founded the municipality. Yann Boissonneault, the President of the Lorette Community Development Corporation, had “The same mission” as Armand Poirier. “I believed the municipality was already bilingual when I became president in 2015,” Boissonneault added. “The economic, touristic and cultural benefits of bilingualism seemed so obvious to me that in mid-June, I gave a presentation to the board extolling the added value of French.” Joining the AMBM is expected to

benefit the RM of Tache as a whole by giving them access to funding and services that may otherwise be missed. Along with the support of the AMBM and its economic development council, which provides feasibility studies and a translation service there will be opportunities to access grants that are designated specifically for bilingual municipalities. AMBM Director General Louis Tetrault welcomed Tache to the group, adding that he’d been campaigning council to join since 1995. He said the board has met with council on four separate occasions over the years. “What changed is that councilors elected in 2014 showed goodwill,” Tetrault noted. He added that the former unilingual chief administrator

has been replaced with a bilingual administrator, making the transition easier now. While the RM of Tache was not an official member, there were already many bilingual elements in place, such as community posters, the RM website and some signage was already in both official languages. Founded in 1995, the AMBM is the voice for those Manitoba municipalities, which have adopted policies favouring the active offer of bilingual services to their population. The AMBM municipalities regroup official language communities, which are in a minority situation, where the use of French is recognized as a benefit, both economically and culturally.


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November 2017

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Rim Thief Caught on Camera On August 28, Steinbach RCMP received a report of a theft of rims and batteries from a business located along Highway 12 just north of Steinbach. The theft occurred between August 13 and August 28. A newer beige Ford truck with an extended cab with an Under Armor logo on the back window was captured on surveillance video.

Steinbach RCMP is seeking the public’s assistance in locating the person responsible. If you have any information in regards to the above you are asked to contact the Steinbach RCMP Detachment at 204-326-4452 or CrimeStoppers at 1-800-2228477 or manitobacrimestoppers. com or text “TIPMAN” plus your message to Crimes (274637).

Dawson Trail Dispatch

Southern Health Quality Service Awards Southern Health-Santé Sud Quality Service Awards recipients are nominated by their peers to staff who embody Southern Health-Santé Sud core values of integrity, compassion, excellence and respect. Featured highlights of the 2017 Southern Health-Santé Sud Quality Service Award award-winners below:

This year’s Quality Service Awards were presented by Jane Curtis, Chief Executive Officer and Abe Bergen, Board Chair. Pictured above are: (lt.-rt.) Abe Bergen (Board Chair), Sheila Dheilly (Laundry Aide - Centre de santé St. Claude Health Centre), Stephanie Roza (Clinical Resource Nurse - Vita & District Health Personal Care Home), Carol Cairn (Payroll Supervisor Home Care Services - Southport), Pearl Plett (Registered Nurse - Bethesda Regional Health Centre) & Jane Curtis (Chief Executive Officer); missing from the photo is; Karen Dyck (Client Services Manager - Altona Community Memorial Health Centre).


Dawson Trail Dispatch

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Canada Post Supports Local Schools’ Meal Program By Marianne Curtis Nutrition programs in ten different schools throughout the region will benefit from a $10,000 contribution that the Child Nutrition Council of Manitoba received from the Canada Post Community Foundation. Wendy Bloomfield, Chair of the Child Nutrition Council of Manitoba is very pleased with the grant. “We are thrilled to have received the support of Canada Post Community Foundation, this grant means so much to so many students who come to school without having had

enough to eat, it’s important that all students have equal footing when it comes to learning in school and having the best chance at success,” said Bloomfield. The funds will go towards supporting breakfast, snack and lunch programs in a number of local schools, including Arborgate School, Dawson Trail School, Green Valley School, Kleefeld School, Richer School, Ross L. Gray School, Shevchenko School, Ste. Anne Elementary, Ste. Anne Collegiate, and Stonybrook Middle School. The Child Nutrition Council of Manitoba is a charitable organiza-

The Reeve of the RM of De Salaberry wants to assure residents that before the municipality proceeds with the construction of a new arena in the municipality, there will be public consultations. Reeve Marc Marion confirmed that council is looking at replacing the St. Malo Arena, which is the municipality’s only major recreation facility. The rink is at least four decades old, and past its prime, he noted. Earlier this year, the municipality even met with the RM of Hanover to discuss the possibility of building a regional arena to be shared between the two municipalities. “When it comes to costs, I believe regional projects are the way to go,” said Marion. He confirmed that his council was interested in a regional facility, but Hanover has since chosen to build their new arena right in Grunthal at the Hanover

Ag ground site. The new facility is expected to cost $11 million. While the St. Malo Arena needs to be replaced, Marion said council wants to be prudent in their decisions. They would be looking at the same price range, since new facilities can cost up to $15 million. “It is a challenge for local councils to justify spending that kind of money,” Marion told media. “You need a population of at least 5,000 for a project of this size and no town in this year has that population.” One of the main concerns of council at this point, is that the lifespan of the facility has reached its peak and now an investment is needed to bring it up to par. “The longer we wait, the more the facility will cost,” Marion noted. While De Salaberry continued to discuss the future of their facility, Grunthal is ready to move forward with their project at their preferred site, the Hanover Ag Fair grounds. RM of Hanover project manager and Recreation and Community Services representative Lisa Bald-

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3 Vital Vehicle Necessities Before the Big Freeze Hits

tion dedicated to helping school children learn, grow, and succeed by supporting breakfast, snack, and lunch programs. In 2016-17, the Council funded over 200 child nutrition programs across Manitoba, providing approximately 20,000 children and youth with consistent, healthy meals. The Canada Post Community Foundation for Children’s vision is to help ensure every child in Canada is happy, healthy and part of a community that supports and cares for them. It has granted more than $6 million to over 500 community organizations across Canada.

Community Arenas Hot Topics in St. Malo and Grunthal By Marianne Curtis

November 2017

win said that for this project to proceed, funding will have to be secured. The community of Grunthal has until 2023 to collect funds for the project. Baldwin said this can move forward by obtaining Federal and Provincial infrastructure funds for two thirds of the project and one third would be raised locally through a municipal levy and fundraising. The next step is to decide on a design and take the matter to the community. Baldwin said there is still a chance that this could be a regional facility. “Our steering committee and councils are open and positive about the idea,” she added. “We plan to delve deeper into discussions.” She added that the main issue could become the final location of a regional arena. The RM of Hanover steering committee prefers the facility within Grunthal, and the RM of De Salaberry wants it outside of town within easy access to residents on both sides of the boundary.

3 vital necessities to check before winter begins.

It’s tough enough for you getting out of a warm bed on a cold winter’s day, so imagine what it’s like for your vehicle that’s been outside overnight to face the sub-zero frigid elements. Prepare your ride for winter driving in Canada by having your local service centre check these essential components first. 1. Battery. Your battery provides all electrical power for your car. It powers the ignition, fuel systems and any onboard computer systems. A routine inspection of the battery is the only way to determine if it will last the winter. Batteries should generally be replaced every five years. Don’t forget to keep a set of jumper cables in the trunk, so you will not be left stranded should you need a boost. 2. Winter tires. Made to perform in icy, frigid conditions, winter tires are crucial for a safer driving experience. “We always advise our customers to put on four winter tires that match the vehicle’s specifications. For ease of installation, purchasing alloy or steel rims with your new tires

is a smart investment. Don’t forget that certain vehicles require tire pressure monitoring system sensors to be installed in each new rim,” says Darryl Croft, OK Tire automotive expert. 3. Fluids. Just as your doctor always advises to drink plenty of fluids during cold and flu season, it’s important for your vehicle to maintain healthy fluid levels as well. Your automotive expert will look for low fluid levels in your power steering, transmission, brakes, motor, coolant/antifreeze and windshield washer. If fluid levels are low in any of these areas, it could mean there is a leak that could lead to serious problems on the road. For winter, it’s especially important to maintain your antifreeze levels. Your radiator is filled with a 50/50 mix of water and antifreeze, which keeps the water from freezing or boiling in extreme temperatures. Replace your summer washer fluid with a winter version that has a special de-icing fluid to melt away windshield ice. (www.newscanada.com)


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November 2017

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

C ommunity E vents Falcon Lake Alcoholics Anonymous - Whiteshell group meets every Wednesday and Saturday at 8 pm in All People’s Church, Falcon Lake. Come and meet with us or call 204-349-2374. We can help. Friedensfeld Member Christmas Banquet – On Friday, December 15 at 7 pm in the Community Centre. Contact 204-381-1835 or friedensfeldcc@gmail.com New Year’s Eve Dinner/Dance - On Sunday, December 31 at 6:30 pm in the Community Centre. Contact 204-381-1835 or friedensfeldcc@gmail.com Giroux Bingo - Every Thursday at Giroux Hall. Doors open at 5 pm, Bingo starts at 7 pm. Hall rental information for Socials, weddings, family functions, Meetings and more please call Debbie 204-424-5506 or Mike 204-326-6260. Grande Pointe Bingo Bowl – On Friday, November 3 hosted by Home Owners Association. Contact Lynne dotremont@sjrb.ca. Hadashville Circuit 30 - Mondays and Thursdays at 7 pm, in the Rec Centre .Alternate aerobic and weight exercises, with cool down and stretch exercises. Wear comfortable clothing, clean runners, and bring a bottle of water. Cost $2/class. Contact Wendy 204-348-2433. Tae Kwon Do - Every Wednesday at 6 pm at the Hadashville Community Club (Reynolds Recreational Centre) from 6 years old to adults. Pursue a black belt or learn new skills, great stress release and have an excellent workout at the same time. Cost after registration fee is $40/month per person. Ask about 2 week free trial. Contact Shelly at 204-426-5266 or KSTA. academy@gmail.com. Ile-des-Chênes Southeast Lifestyles Expo – From November 3 – November 5. Friday from 4 – 8 pm, Saturday 10 am – 3 pm and Sunday 11 am – 3 pm at the Trans Canada Centre. Home, Health & Hobby Workshops, and an Artist Market. Cost adults $5 and under 18 Free. Many free work shops. Salon 421 benefits of healthy products (Free), Cheese & Cracker Workshop ($25), Mixology with the Mayor (Free), fitness & Yoga (Free) bring clean runners, water bottle and a yoga mat, everything you need to know about HOME! Whether you are building, renovating (Free) and many other workshops. Contact 204898-1343. Breakfast with Santa – On November 19 at the Trans Canada Centre. Contact Yvette Bernat 204-878-2661. Christmas Craft Show – On November 25 from 10 am – 3:30 pm at the Trans Canada Centre. Canteen available. $2 admission or non-perishable item which goes to the local foodbank. Contact Cathy 204-261-6417. Seniors Christmas Dinner – On November 26 at the Trans Canada Centre. Tickets $15. Contact Yvette 204-878-2661. Ritchot Chamber Gala and Business Awards – On Saturday, December 2 at the Trans Canada Centre. Tickets $50. Contact Yvette 204-878-2661 Taekwondo – On Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:30 – 8 pm at the Ecole Ile Des Chene School. Cost $40/month, family rates available. Contact Kangs.mb.ca, Master Bill Tam 204296-8217. Parent Child Playgroup - On Wednesdays 10 am – 12 pm at the School, Rm142. Contact idc.mb.playgroup@gmail.com. Story Time in Pyjamas - Every Thursday evening at the Ritchot Library Ecole Regional Gabrielle-Roy at 6:30 pm. Ages 2-8 however all ages are welcome. Yoga - On Tuesdays and Thursdays at 6:30 - 7:30 pm at the TransCanada Centre. Cost $15/class or 10 classes for $125. Zumba - On Mondays and Wednesdays, from 7 pm – 8 pm at the TransCanada Centre. 10 classes for $75 or $10 drop in. Contact sarah.abraham@gmail.com. 50+ Programs - At the Trans Canada Centre Indoor Walking - Mondays, Wednesday & Friday 9 – 10 am Yoga - Monday 10 -11 am Coffee Talk - Wednesday 10 - 11 am Block Therapy - Tuesday 10 - 11 am Water Colour Painting – Thursday 10 - 11:30 am Line Dancing - Thursday 7 - 8 pm Floor Curling - Friday 10 am – 12 pm Contact to register Mary Ann vintageclub@transcanadacentre.com, 204-339-6141. Our Lady of the Roses Prayer Group – Meets on the first Saturday of every month, at 6:30 pm to recite the Rosary and learn about Our Lady of the Roses, Mary Help of Mothers and receive Blessed Rose Petals and other Sacramentals from Blessed Mother’s place of miracles. Contact Corinna 204878-4908 or email her at corinnaswetz@hotmail.com for more info and register. Kleefeld Community Playgroup - For parents, caregivers and children up to age 5. Activities include time for playing, stories, songs and snacks. Every 2nd and 4th Thursday of the month at the Kleefeld Rec Centre. Contact Irene Ascough 204-377-5013.

La Broquerie Seine River Services for Seniors- Health Centre/Centre de Santé from Monday - Friday 8:30 am - 4 pm. Services and programs for seniors. Income Tax help, Lifeline, mobility equipment, foot care, hair care, transportation, home maintenance, yard maintenance, Telecheck, E.R.I.K. program, puzzles and games. Contact Community Resource Coordinator Juliette Rowan, 204-424-5285 or labseinerss@gmail.com. Shopping Trips to Winnipeg’s St.Vital Mall every first Thursday of the month, leaving at 10 am - 3 pm. Cost $15. Steinbach’s Clearspring Centre every last Thursday of the month, from 10 am - 1 pm. Cost $10. Lorette Storytime and Craft - On Saturday, November 4, 11 am English, 11:30 am – French at the Tache Library. Lego Club - On the last Wednesday and Thursday of each month November 29 and 30 from 6:30 - 7:30 pm at Tache Library. Join us to build, create & explore! Drop-in, no registration required. Contact 204-878-9488, email btl@srsd.ca. Community Christmas Market - On Saturday, December 2 at Lorette Collegiate, 1082 Dawson Rd. Vendor table rentals, contact yvonneromaniuk@gmail.com. Chase the Ace Lottery – On Thursdays from 6 - 8 pm., draw at 8:15 pm in November and December until the Ace of Spade is chosen at Dawson Trail Motor Inn Bar. Tickets $1 each. Proceeds going towards the complex consisting of an arena, gym, library and a daycare. Your support is needed. Community Christmas Market – On Saturday, December 2 from 10 am – 3 pm at Bibliotheque Tache Library. Homemade crafts, trades, used book sale, Elves’ Shelves, Silent Auction, 50/50 and canteen open. Everyone Welcome. Grief Support Group - This fall to provide education about the grieving and mourning processes to individuals who have lost a loved one through death. The format is 9 weekly meetings of 2 hrs per week and group size will be limited to 6 participants. The facilitator will be Maryanne Rumancik and we will be following the program found in Understanding Your Grief: Ten Essential Touchstones for Finding Hope and Healing Your Heart (book with journal) by Dr. Alan Wolfelt. Suggested donation to cover book costs is $45. Registration deadline Sunday, October 1. Contact Fr. Charles Fillion 204- 878-2221 or Maryanne Rumancik 204-878-3901. Exact meeting time and day of the week TBA. New Horizons Seniors - Play cards, Scrabble and more. Drop in Tuesdays 1 - 5 pm at Foyer Notre Dame Lorette, 12 St. Amant Ave. Contact Iris 204-878-3552. Ritchot Senior Services Foot Care Clinic - On Wednesdays by appointment. To reserve contact Janice 204-883-2880. With Cheryl Palmer, foot care nurse. Mitchell Annual Mission Soup & Dessert Fundraiser – On Friday, November 3 at 5 pm, Seniors Centre. Annual Mission Auction and Bake Sale with Silent Auction and a delicious Soup & Bun and Dessert Supper hosted by the Hoffnung Fuer Alle Church. Niverville Beginner & Intermediate Dog Obedience – On Wednesdays, from November 8 - December 13 at 7:45 pm south end of Arena with Instructor Carol O’Callaguan. You and your dog will learn the basic skills that are needed to start working together as a team. Great fun for both the dog and handler! For dogs 5 months and older. We need a minimum of 7 dogs/handlers to register. Stained Glass Party – On Friday, November 17 from 7 – 9 pm. south end of Arena. In a few hours of fun, you and your friends will be guided into creating your very own masterpiece! No experience required. Cost $35 + GST ($36.75). Pre-registration required. Holiday Shoppes - Winterfest & Market – On Saturday, November 18 from 9 am – 1 pm at the Elementary School, 181 Main St, Gym Entrance. Free Admission. One-stop Shop for Children. Contact: nesparentcouncil@gmail.com. Winterfest Market & Craft Sale - On Saturday, November 18 from 10 am – 3 pm at the Heritage Centre, 100 Heritage Trail. Cost $2. Contact chamber@niverville.com. Skating with Santa - On Saturday, November 18 from 2:45 – 4:15 pm at the arena. Free. Annual Tree Lighting - On Saturday, November 18 at 5:30 pm, Niverville Credit Union Parking Lot, Sleigh rides, Carols & Hot Chocolate. Free. GriefShare - If you or someone you know has experienced the loss of a loved one we wish to help, you get support and learn about the grieving process. Contact 204-381-1155 to register or go to Nivervillegriefshare.com. Moms N’ Tots Playgroup - Moms with children up to age six. Wednesday mornings from 9:30 - 11:30 am located in the lower level of Fourth Avenue Bible Church (62-4th Avenue S.) Free drop-in program with coffee and snacks provided, along with a large open space for the kids to play while the moms visit. Contact Karen at klenzrpeters@hotmail.com. Paradise Village Paradise Squares Dance Club - On Tuesdays from 7 – 9:30 pm at the Paradise Village Rec. Hall. Modern Square Danc-

ing is fun and a great social activity. Couples and singles are welcome. Contact Larry 204-422-5424. Prawda Circuit 30 - Alternate aerobic and weight exercises, with cool down and stretch exercises. Wear comfortable clothing, clean runners, and bring a bottle of water. Cost $2/class, Mondays and Thursdays at 7 pm, in the Reynolds School Gym. Contact Wendy 204-348-2433. Busy Bodies Playgroup – Every Wednesday from 9 - 11 am at the Reynolds School Gym. Free to parents and children. Snacks provided. Contact Cassie 204-793-8290. Randolph Annual Prairie Attic Christmas Market – On Saturday, November 4 from 10 am - 3 pm at the Neufeld Garage. Admission $2. Stop by for beautifully handcrafted gifts from farmhouse décor and repurposed items to vintage antique and shabby chic. Specialty soaps, infused oils and cozy knits to keep you warm on those frosty winter days. With 21 local artisans. Richer Richer Community Club Chase the Ace! - Every Saturday at the Richer Inn from 5:30 - 7:45 pm. Tickets only $1 each. Jackpot is growing! Door prizes on random Saturdays ranging from glassware to Jets tickets and jerseys! Bud, Spud and Steak Special and more! Check out and like Richer Community Club Facebook page for updates. LGA License #1392RF. Adult & Teen Challenge Concerned Persons Support Group Join us Thursday evenings at 7 pm, in the Richer Fellowship Church, 50 Southeast Drive. If you have a relationship with someone who has a life-controlling problem, join us for this nine-week Living Free course. Receive encouragement and support in a safe setting, and learn practical ways to best help your loved one. Contact Pastor Ben Funk at 204-326-2254 or phone the church at 204-422-5308. Richer Recovery AA - Group meets Monday from 7:30 - 8:30 pm at LUD Hall in Richer. Contact Paul at 204-422-7673. Monday Night Bingos - To raise funds for Stacey Pchajek Memorial Foundation Inc. The foundation provides scholarships, bursaries and prizes to students graduating grades 8 and 12. Children under 14 must be accompanied by an adult to be on premises and must play bingo. Doors Open at 5:30 pm at the Young at Heart Club, 22 Dawson Rd. MGCC License # BI/BO4164. Contact Doreen Pchajek at 422-5243 or doreen@spmf.ca. Sarto Ukrainian Dance Club – On Mondays from 7 - 8 pm at the Sarto Hall. Join the Sarto Polevnyi Ukrainian Dance Club for the season! You do not need to be Ukrainian to dance! Boys & girls, ages 3 to adult, no prior experience required! Cost starts at $150/year. Sprague Community Christmas Concert - On Sunday, December 3 at 3 pm at the Sprague Hall. Get into the Christmas Spirit by joining us. Lots of local talent! Lunch to follow. Free to All! Sprague & District Historical Museum - Open by appointment from June – September 30. Explore life as it was in the early days. Free Admission. Donations Accepted. Contact 204-4372210, 204-437-2209 or 204-437-4686. St. Adolphe Christmas Craft & Vendor Sale – On Saturday, November 4 from 9 am – 4 pm at the Pioneer Hall, 345 Adolphe Rd. Paint Party Fundraiser – Monday, November 5, doors open at 1:45 pm, at the St. Adolphe bar, 324 Main St. In support of the Prairies Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre. All supplies & stepby-step instructions included. Tickets $45 each available at Ritchot Senior Services, 457 Main street, 204-883-2880 or call Alice at 204 883-2566. All proceeds going to the Prairies Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre. Old Tyme Dance – On Saturday, November 11 from 7 - 9 pm, Pioneer Hall, 345 Hebert Road. Music with Patty Kusturock. Contact Rae at 204-883-2440. Admission $15 includes lunch. Curling Club Men’s Bonspiel – From Wednesday, November 16 – Sunday, November 19 at the Curling Club. 3 games guarantee, cash prizes, Blind Calcutta, food available throughout the weekend. Entry Fee $160/team. To register contact Dan at 204-612-5801 or curlstadolphe@gmail.com. Breakfast and Skate with Santa – On Sunday, December 3 at the arena. Contact Yvette 204-878-2661. Pickleball - Thursday evenings from 6 -8 pm at St. Adolphe School, 444 la seine street. Get Better Together - Wednesdays starts September 6 from 9:30 am -12 pm at Senior Services, 457 Main Street. The get better together program lets you take control and improve your quality of life! A 6-week program consisting of 2.5-hour sessions and focuses on supporting and teaching you how to control the pain, frustration and fatigue associated with suffering from chronic conditions. Lunch & Bingo - Every Thursday at the Le Club Amical, 344 Main Street. Home cooked meal only $8. Enjoy your meal at the Club or call ahead, pick up your lunch, and enjoy it at home.

C.H.I.L.D program – On Wednesdays from 9:30 - 10:30 am at Ecole St. Adolphe School. Children’s introduction to learning and development. Contact sas@srsd.ca or 204-883-2182. Ritchot Senior Services – Monday - Thursday from 9 am- 2 pm at 457 Main Street. Contact 204 883-2880 or Ritchotseniors@mymts.net. Monthly Activities: Block Therapy - On first Wednesday of month from 6–7 pm. Mood Disorders - Monthly Meeting - On first Thursday of the month at 2:15 pm. Cardio Fit - On Mondays from 9:30 – 10:30 am. Chair Fit - On Mondays from 11 – 11:40 am. Yoga - On Wednesdays from 1 – 2 pm. Muscle Fit - On Thursdays from 9:30- 10:30 am Foot Care Clinic - By appointment. To reserve contact Janice 204-883-2880. Cheryl Palmer, foot care nurse. Art Program - For the beginner artist and the advanced artist for 8 weeks on Mondays September 18, 25, October 2, 16, 23, 30 and November 6, 13 from 7 – 8 pm. Cost $80 all supplies included. Ritchot Senior Services, 457 Main St. Fitness classes - Classes start Monday, September 11 – Thursday, December 14. Cost 10 classes for $40 and receive 1 extra class free, 5 classes for $20 or a $5 drop in fee. Includes cardio, muscle and yoga inspired classes all designed especially for everyone 50+. Ritchot Senior Services, 457 Main St. St. Malo Fall Supper Fundraiser - On Sunday, November 5 from 5 - 7 pm at the Chalet Malouin. Scribblers Coffee House – On Wednesday, November 8 at 7 pm at the Tache Library featuring Keiran Shae singer-songwriter folk-pop artist with the CLC Choir and Band. Open Mic! Admission free with collection. Coffee and goodies. Annual Christmas/Craft Sale – On Saturday, November 25 from 10 am - 3 pm at the Chalet Malouin. Contact Aline 204347-5249 to book a table. Beginner Spanish lessons for adults – On Mondays, from 7 - 9 pm at the Ecole St Malo School Library. Cost $120 for 10 classes. Contact Josie at the Rat River Rec before Monday, September 11, 204-712-7773 or e-mail ratriverrec@hotmail.com to register. Mood Disorders Association of Manitoba - On the last Monday each month at 7 pm at St. Malo Church. For persons experiencing depression, anxiety, stress, bi-polar disorder and other mental health/emotional concerns; individual and support groups. Contact Judy Dunn 204-444-5228. St. Pierre-Jolys The Knights of Columbus - The St-Pierre Carillon Council – On the first Thursday of the month at 482 Jolys Ave. W. Contact 204-433-7633. St. Pierre-Jolys Craft Sale on Saturday, November 4 from 10 am to 3 pm at the ICSP Gym. Rainbow Auction, Kiddies Free Mini Duck Pond, Coffee & Lunch Corner. 60 tables of Crafts, Baking Goods & Products. For info call 204-433-3202 or 204-433-3967. Ste. Agathe Howden Christmas Craft Sale – On Saturday, November 18 from 9 am – 3 pm at Community Centre, 1078 Red River Dr. Walking/Running Club - A walking and running club held on various weekdays at 7 pm, carly.flowers@hotmail.com. Taekwondo - Every Tuesday and Thursday from 6:15 - 7:30 pm at Ecole Sainte Agathe hosted by Kang’s Taekwondo Academy. Cost $40/month. Family rates available. Contact Jason Barnabe, jason.barnabe@gmail.com or 204-802-3458. Ste. Anne Meat Pie for Sale Fundraiser - Deadline to order is Saturday, November 18. For Seine River Services for Seniors. Pies are 1/2 pork and 1/2 beef, $12 for a 9” pie or $6 for a 6” pie. To order, contact Juliette Rowan at 204-424-5285. Pickleball – Calling all active seniors. On Monday, Wednesdays and Fridays at 9:30 am, at the Ste. Anne Tennis Courts (weather permitting). You only need good clean running shoes, sunscreen, water, and a lawn chair (optional). Drop in fee of $3 or register $25 for the season. Contact Erika 204 422-5843. Seine River Services for Seniors – Services and programs for seniors. Income Tax help, Lifeline, mobility equipment, foot care, hair care, transportation, home maintenance, yard maintenance, Telecheck, E.R.I.K. program, puzzles and games. Shopping Trips to Winnipeg’s St.Vital Mall every first Thursday of the month, leaving at 10 am - 3 pm. Cost $15. Steinbach’s Clearspring Centre every last Thursday of the month, from 10 am - 1 pm. Cost $10. Contact Juliette Rowan at 204-424-5285 Community Resource Coordinator for local services or e-mail labseinerss@gmail.com. Ste. Geneviève Library Night - Bibliothèque Taché Library at the Community Centre on the 2nd Tuesday of each month at 6:30 - 8 pm. A large selection of books in both French and English, for children and adults. Special requests can be made to the librarian, e-mail btl@srsd.ca or 204-878-9488 or in person. Come for a visit and see what we are all about. Steinbach Pancake Breakfast – On Saturday, November 4 from 8:30 - 11:30 am. Cost $5/person at Royal Canadian Legion Community Hall, 294 Lumber Ave.

Celebrating 150 years of Immigration – On Thursday, November 9 at 7 pm at the Mennonite Heritage Village Auditorium. An evening of stories, music, and appetizers from many ethnic groups. To help us continue to celebrate Canada’s 150th birthday Cost only $15 and includes admission, entertainment and food. Steinbach & Area Garden Club - On Monday, November 13 at 7 pm at the Mennonite Heritage Village. ‘How to Attract and Identify Backyard Birds’ - through the eyes of award winning wildlife photographer, Dennis Fast. Recognize birds by their songs as Dennis mimics them and receives their replies. Available for you to purchase will be the beautifully illustrated books that Dennis has authored. Everyone welcome. Refreshments. Door prizes. Non-member fee $5. More info at sagardenclub.com. Cribbage Night – On Friday, November 17 at 7 pm at Royal Canadian Legion Community Hall, 294 Lumber Ave. Christmas at the Village – From Friday November 17 to Saturday, November 18 from 9 am - 5 pm at the Mennonite Heritage Village. Christmas market, sleigh rides, bonfire, hot chocolate. Cost $10. Sgt. Wilson Air Force Show – On Friday, December 1 at 7 pm. Back by popular demand, one night only at the Pat Porter Active Living Centre. The original sounds of the 40s and 50s. Tickets $20 each, email or facebook message to reserve your tickets now! Annual Expressions Recovery through Creative Expression – Until Friday, December 1, at the Cultural Arts Centre Hall Gallery, 304 Second St. Drop In Book Club – 2nd Tuesday every month at 7 pm in the Jake Epp Library. We’ll post the book for discussion that month and if you’d like to join us please stop by. If you want to start your own book club instead, you can always take advantage of our Book Club collections. No sign up required. Just read the book and come hang out. Knit-Wits Drop-In Club for Adults - Every 4th Monday of the month, from 6 – 9 pm at the Jake Epp Library. This is for anyone interested in fibre handcrafts such as knitting, crocheting, cross-stitch, needlepoint etc. This is not a class but a casual knitting circle for all skill levels. Please bring your own items/supplies. TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) – On Wednesdays, from 8:45 - 10:30 am at the Royal Canadian Legion. Cost $2/ week. A weight control support group that helps take off pounds sensibly and keep off pounds sensibly. Contact BettyLou Toews at 326-6397. Eastman Immigrant Services - Many events and activities to support and help you make new friends. Volunteer to help at our community events. Every Day English All Levels - Every Wednesday 1 – 3 pm. Reading & Writing – All Levels on Monday and Wednesday from 10 am – 12 pm. Pronunciation All Levels - On Monday and Wednesday from 7 – 9 pm at D4-284 Reimer Ave. Classes are free. Upcoming Events: IELTS in Steinbach, Futsal, every Monday 9 – 11 pm at the EM Church on Main St. Southeast Entry Program Online: Learn about Health Care, Employment and Laws. To register for this 4-week online program, contact Josie@eastmanis.com , 204-346-6609 or email lois@eastmanis.com. Eastman Safety Upcoming Programs - Located at 385 Loewen Blvd. Register online at eastmansafety.ca or contact 1-204371-1595. Mommies Group at Kidzone - On Wednesdays, from 9 am - 1 pm. Come by to meet other moms to chat with and get your kids to make some new friends. Cost $7, free coffee. Creativi-Tea Time - Need to relax? Every second Wednesday of the month, from 6:30 - 8:30 pm at the Jake Epp Library. Come and go as it suits you. We’ll provide basic supplies; feel free to bring your own. Includes tea and coffee. Games Day & Games Night – Every 1st Saturday of the month from 12 – 5 pm and the 3rd Wednesday of the month from 6 – 8:30 pm, at the Jake Epp Library. Come down to play strategy games. Bring a friend, your strategies and games. Test your skills and have fun. Ages 14 and up unless accompanied by an adult. Contact 204-326-6841, programs@ jakeepplibrary.com. Royal Canadian Legion - On 1st Tuesday every month until June at 8 pm and Ladies Auxiliary meets 1st Monday of each month at 7:30 pm at the Steinbach Legion Community Hall, 294 Lumber Ave. Steinbach Girl Guides - Every Tuesday at the United Church of Steinbach, 541 Main St. Registration for girls 5-17. Develop personal values and well-being, self-respect and respect for others; promote fun, friendship, adventure and challenges through new experiences; develop leadership and decisionmaking skills; give service to the community; value the natural environment. The Steinbach Rotary Club - meets every Monday at noon except when Monday falls on a long weekend at the Chicken Chef, 365 Main Street, visitors are welcome. Contact Cornie at 326-3155.


Dawson Trail Dispatch

Mental Health Information and Support sessions - for family and friends of people with mental health issues are held the 2nd Tuesday of every month from 7 – 8:30 pm at the Eden East building, 21 Loewen Blvd. Contact Kim at 371-0824 or email eastmanmss@mts.net MS Monthly Self-Help group meeting - for people living with multiple sclerosis. The group meets on the second Thursday evening of each month from 6 - 7 pm at Fernwood Place apartments. Contact Nadine Konyk, Rural Client Services Coordinator at 1-800-268-7582 or email nadine.konyk@ mssociety.ca. MS Lunch Group- On 4th Thursday of every month, from 12 – 1 pm at All D’s Restaurant 320 Main Street. Contact Stephanie Bevacqua 204-988-0904, Stephanie.Bevacqua@mssociety.ca.

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Province Changes Formula Pushing Sprague Personal Care Home Backwards

November 2017

Mood Disorders Association of Manitoba individual and support groups - Meets on the first Tuesday of each month from 1:30 – 3 pm at The Eden East Office, 21 Loewen Blvd For persons experiencing depression, anxiety, stress, bi-polar disorder and other mental health/emotional concerns. Contact Judy Dunn 204-444-5228. The Bethesda Regional Healthcare Auxiliary - meets on the first Tuesday of every month except for the months of July and August at the Bethesda Hospital. We welcome anyone interested in auxiliary work. Contact Verna Thiessen at 3263028. Steinbach and Area Lions Club - Meets on the second and fourth Wednesdays of every month at the Magnolia Restaurant. Contact 204-326-2313. Carillon Toastmasters - Meetings open to adults who want to improve their leadership and communication skills. Thursdays at 7 pm at the Jake Epp Public Library 255 Elmdale Street, Contact Sheryl at 204-326-7628 or Irene at 204-4245737. Al-Anon Program – Meets on Mondays at 7:30 pm at the Cultural Arts Centre back door, downstairs. Contact Lloyd 204326-4365. Al-Anon 12 Step Recovery Group - Meets on Wednesdays at 7:30 pm at United Church, 541 Main St, front door, ring doorbell. All are welcome. Young moms to be - Bi-weekly support group starts at 4:30 pm at Steinbach Family Resource Centre B-11, Hwy 12N. Contact 204-346-0413. Tolstoi Vita Ducks Fundraiser Social – On Saturday, November 4 at 8 pm – 1 am at the Hall. Fundraiser for a new zamboni and general upgrades to the arena. Social, 50/50, prize raffle and a fun filled night! Purchase tickets $10 from the team. Vassar Annual Fall Supper – On Sunday, November 12 from 4 - 6:30 pm at the Hall. Contact 204-437-3173. Woodridge The Mobile Clinic is onsite on the third Thursday of every month from 9 am – 4 pm at the Community Club. Contact for appointments 1-855-644-3515 or southernhealth.ca. General Free Monthly Bus Trips to the Casinos of Winnipeg- On Tuesday, November 14 and December 12. Join us for a fun filled day. Tour from 8:30 am - 7:15 pm. Begins at 8:30 am, pickups in Steinbach, Ste. Anne and Paradise Village. Must be 18 years of age or older. Prizes and cash giveaways every trip. Bingo played on the bus. Contact Marilyn at 204-326-4939 for information and reserve a seat. Email your community events to editor@dawsontrail.ca for inclusion each month!

The community of Sprague is still hopeful that one day a 20-bed personal care home will be added to the East Borderland Community Housing Senior Housing in Sprague. Photo by Marianne Curtis

By Marianne Curtis Residents waiting for the construction of a 20-bed personal care home in Sprague will have to wait even longer after a recent meeting with the province. According to Elsa Laing, Chairperson for the East Borderland Community Housing, the group recently met with the province and was informed that the funding formula for personal care homes will not change to accommodate their project. “A local community must now cover about 80 percent of the cost and the province may cover about 20 percent,” Laing explained. “The old formula only required a 10 percent community contribution; there is no way that Sprague can afford 80 percent of an $8 million project.” Laing confirmed the group recently sat down with La Verendrye MLA Dennis Smook, hoping that an exception could be made on the project. This request was made after the province approved the construction of 140 beds at Rest Haven Personal Care Home in Steinbach. An additional 118 beds were approved for Carman and Winnipeg. The province also

revealed their new funding formula for personal care homes at the same time. “We were hoping that the MLA would give some exceptions to the formula, but there is no change,” Laing admitted. “It is very discouraging to be pushed aside once again, but we will not give up yet.” Back in 2004, East Borderland Community Housing began working on a project composed of 12 personal care beds, 8 supportive units and 15 community-housing units. After funds were secured through Provincial-Federal grants and fundraising, the community housing units moved forward. They have been occupied since 2012. Once the housing unit opened, the East Borderland Community Housing continued to fundraise for the estimated $2.2 million personal care home part of the project. Today, the 20-bed facility would cost about $8 million. The East Borderland Community Housing has already successfully raised $800,000 for the project through pledges, fundraising and donations.

See the Dawson Trail Dispatch online at www.dawsontrail.ca

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November 2017

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

Dawson Trail Dispatch November 2017  

Southeast Manitoba news and features