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Dawson Trail Dispatch

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

January 2018



Ste. Anne Represented at 2018 Olympics By Marianne Curtis When the eyes of the world focus on women’s hockey during the upcoming Olympic Games, residents in the southeast will pay special attention to the games after two Ste. Anne women were named among a trio of Manitoba representatives for Team Canada. On December 22, Jocelyne Larocque and Bailey Bram were among the only three Manitoba players named to the official 28 member Team Canada Olympic hockey roster. This group of talented women will hit the ice and represent Canada during the Pyeongchang, South Korea Olympics in February. This will be a second Olympic appearance for the twenty-nine year old forward. In 2014, Larocque played defense as a member of Canada’s gold medal winning team during the Sochi Olympics. Larocque was the first female player to play in the Winnipeg High School Boys League, and has been playing with the Canadian National Team since 2009. She has earned six World Championship medals with Canada, as well as the Olympic gold medal of the 2014 Sochi Olympic Games. Joining her on the ice is twenty-seven year old Bram, who is thrilled to be finally playing in her first ever Olympics. She was one of the national team’s last three players cut leading up to the Sochi Olympic Games in 2014, where Canada struck gold. “It means everything, from the time I started playing hockey. My dream was obviously to represent Canada at the Olympics, so to

finally make that dream happen is something I can’t even put into words,” Bram told media. Formerly playing for the Mercyhurst Lakers with her younger sister Shelby, Bram has played for Team Canada in each of the last five Senior World Championships. Bram is currently an assistant captain with the Calgary Inferno team. Though South Korea will be her first Olympic Games, Bram’s speed and a scoring touch is expected to help Canada on its quest for gold in PyeongChang.

In the last decade, a strong American team has been victorious in the majority of their matchups against Canada, but Canada’s women have had the upper hand in 2017. Despite having won just two of the last ten World Championships, the Canadian team has looked unstoppable on the Olympic stage over the years, and are looking to clinch their fifth consecutive Olympic title. The women’s tournament in ice hockey at the 2018 Winter Olympics will be held between February 10 to 22.

Jocelyne Larocque will be making her second Olympic appearance as a member of Canada’s Women Olympic hockey team.

Bailey Bram is looking forward to her upcoming inaugural Olympic appearance. Photos Submitted/Canadian Sport Centre Manitoba




January 2018

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

Judge Fines Two People After 2012 Apartment Fire

Careless smoking was determined to be the cause of a devastating apartment fire in the Town of Ste. Anne that left two dozen residents homeless back in 2012.

By Marianne Curtis Five years after a devastating apartment fire in Ste. Anne, a judge has ordered two people to pay $820,000 in damages after it was found they acted negligently and caused an apartment fire that left two dozen people homeless. The lawsuit stemmed from a March 26, 2012 fire, when an apartment on St. Alphonse Ave. went up in flames. Nearly two dozen residents from twelve suites were evacuated. There were no injuries, but two cats lost their lives. In the lawsuit, the numbered company that owns the building argued its tenant Donna Fontaine, her son Anthony Burton and two others acted negligently when they disposed of their cigarettes in a planter filled with peat moss on the apartment balcony.

“The risk of fire starting from the disposal of a lit cigarette is obvious, notorious and serious. The potential for loss is great,” wrote Justice Candace Grammond in her decision. Prior to making her decision, the Court heard how Fontaine had visitors over, including her son, her son’s partner and her daughter, along with two young grandchildren at the time of the fire. While visiting, the adults all smoked on the balcony around 5:30 pm and disposed of their cigarettes in the planter. After her guests left, Fontaine got her grandchildren ready for bed and then fell asleep. The peat moss, meanwhile, had been smouldering and burst into flame around 11:30 pm.

Copper Wire Theft From September 1, to December 4, 2017 in the area of Nelson River Gravel Pits in the RM of La Broquerie, a substantial amount of copper wire was stolen from a vehicle. If you have any information in regards to the above you are asked to contact the Steinbach RCMP Detachment at (204) 326-4452 or CrimeStoppers at 1-800-2228477 or manitobacrimestoppers. com or text “TIPMAN” plus your message to Crimes (274637).


Dawson Trail Dispatch

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

US Customs Amends Proposed Border Hours

Hours at the Lancaster, Minnesota, Port of Entry south of Tolstoi will be seasonally adjusted beginning January 7.

By Marianne Curtis The US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) are moving ahead with proposed border crossing hour changes at the Lancaster, Minnesota (Tolstoi) and Port of Roseau (South Junction) crossings. Beginning January 7, the Lancaster Port of Entry will implement a seasonal schedule while hours at the Roseau Port of Entry will be reduced by four hours. This change was modified from the proposed change of being closed at 4 pm daily. Michele James, CBP’s Director of Field Operations acknowledged listening to concerns raised by the community in making the decision. “The new hours are based upon current and historical vehicle crossing data and limited CBP resources,” said James. “This slight reduction of hours, will allow staff to be reallocated to nearby ports of entry that have a need for additional staffing during busy times with higher traffic volumes.” Currently the hours at the Port of Lancaster are 8 am to 10 pm daily. The new hours of operation will be 8 am to 6 pm in the winter months and 8 am to 8 pm in the summer.

The summer month schedule will commence on Victoria Long Weekend, and conclude after Labour Day in September. Travelers wishing to cross into the US when the port is closed may cross at the Pembina, North Dakota, Port of Entry, which is open 24 hours and located approximately 30 miles west of Lancaster. The current hours of operation at the Port of Roseau are 8 am to midnight. The new hours of operation will be 8 am to 8 pm year round. Travelers wishing to cross into the US after hours may cross at the Warroad, Minnesota, port that is open 24 hours and located approximately 21 miles east of Roseau. The hours were reviewed after the ports of entry at Lancaster and Roseau were identified for modification of operational hours to realign resources to workload. Town hall meetings took place on the US side of the border where hundreds of concerned residents on both sides spoke out against the proposed changes. Provencher MP Ted Falk supported those concerns. “While there are no plans as of yet to match these changes on the Canadian side of the border, these changes to the hours of operation on the US side will seriously impact Canadian travellers,” stated Falk.

RCMP Search for Stolen ATV On December 19, Steinbach RCMP received a report of a stolen ATV. Between the 17 of November and the 15 of December, a green 2006 Arctic Cat 400 was stolen from a residence in Mitchell. If you have any information in regards to the above you are asked to contact the Steinbach RCMP Detachment at (204) 326-4452 or CrimeStoppers at 1-800-222-8477 or manitobacrimestoppers.com or text “TIPMAN” plus your message to Crimes (274637).

January 2018






January 2018

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Words You Will Hear Too Often in 2018

Words, catch phrases and certain terms crept into the news during the latter part of 2017. In 2018, even an inept fortuneteller can predict that these are going to become the “buzz words” for the new year. “Ethics” (or lack thereof) as relating to the Prime Minister and the Finance Minister. I find it ironic that an organization such as the Ethics Commission utilizes a person whose mandate is to develop an ethical criterion and has set the bar so low it has not been effective. To have a guilty or not guilty verdict depending on whether or not the subject person was a family friend or not to be the determining factor of guilt is complete nonsense. The Ethics Commissioner’s mandate is in need of an upgrade. Further, having the opposition whining continuously on the subject without offering an effective solution is in itself demonstrating an ethically challenged group. The Finance Minister’s summer fiasco was also seen as ethically challenged and he was inept at communicating. When it drags on for two seasons, stupidity is in charge. I would encourage these two to get professional help. “Carbon tax” has become a rallying cry for the Luddites amongst us. If anything, we know that we humans only react to financial pain and in turn, industry reacts to opportunity. Putting off the inevitable is much worst for our grandchildren than putting off deficits. So how are we to change our ways? No suggestions? Well carbon tax it is. “Bilateral and multilateral” consequences when pertaining to trade will have a long lasting effect on citizens of the negotiating regions. Multilateral deals are of course much more difficult to implement as common denominators of all states must come together harnessing faith in themselves and their partners. Bilateral agreements could be subject to increased bullying. Why does President Trump only want bilateral deals? Simple… he is a bully and a one-sided deal for him (America first) is another one in the egocentric win column. History has shown us that civilization moves forward when parties work together to improve all of mankind in a give-and-take scenario. This same story has many sad pages tucked in the mix when bullies enter the fray. We must remember civilization is an act of both humanity and trade working together. This year my hope is that you are surrounded by peace, health and friendship.

Dawson Trail Dispatch

Looking Back on 2017 As we look back on 2017, there is no doubt that this past year had its share of challenges. But in this column, I don’t want to simply focus on the challenges remaining, rather, I would like to take a moment to look back and celebrate a few of the victories from this past year. Earlier this year, Conservatives succeeded in forcing the Liberals to back down on some of the worst aspects of their small business tax hikes. We were proud to be the voice of taxpayers in Parliament, standing with impacted farmers, doctors, and entrepreneurs to reject the unfair changes that would have hurt so many small businesses and their employees in communities’ right across Canada. Conservatives also worked hard this year to hold Justin Trudeau and the Liberal Government to account on various ethical breaches. After repeated questions in the House of Commons, and after sending the matter to the Ethics Commissioner, Prime Minister Trudeau was found to have violated several conflict of interest rules. In fact, he is the first sitting prime minister in Canadian history to officially be cited for violating parliamentary ethics rules. The Liberals of today appear to be the same as the Liberals of yesterday; they simply don’t believe the rules apply to them. Conservatives will continue to hold Justin Trudeau and the Liberals to account going forward. Canadians deserve nothing less. In November, I was very pleased to see the Liberal Government back down from a dangerous proposal in Bill C-51 that would have removed protections for worshippers and clergy attending religious services. Those changes would have had serious implications on religious freedom. However, the Liberals only backed down after Conservative MPs and Canadians from across the country challenged them. This was a huge win for all Canadians as our country’s foundation is built on the principles of the supremacy of God and the rule of law. But now, just before Christmas, the Liberal government has been caught trying to sneak another radical change past Canadians. They’re changing the rules of the Canada Summer Jobs program to require applicants to sign a statement agreeing with the Liberal government’s pro-abortion position or be rejected for government funding. This change is extremely divisive and Canadians should be very skeptical of a government that is basing funding decisions on whether or not you hold the same beliefs as they do. If the Liberals don’t back down as they did with Bill C-51, individuals and groups who hold pro-life and profamily positions will no longer be able to receive funding to help care for the disabled, refugees, or even provide day camps for children in need. We’re talking about the activities of non-profit groups who serve their communities in admirable ways. However, even as the Liberal government attempts to take away our fundamental freedoms one by one, you can be assured that Conservatives will fight for Canadians and for our foundational beliefs every step of the way. Looking forward, the new year will, as always, bring many new challenges. From reckless Liberal spending, to expected tax hikes, to NAFTA negotiations, to issues with the Phoenix pay system, and responding to international conflicts, there are many challenges ahead. As Conservatives, we will continue to work hard to keep the government accountable and we will continue to be the common-sense voice of the Canadian taxpayer and Canadian families. Freedom in the Liberals’ Crosshairs As I briefly mentioned above, the Liberal government has changed the rules of the Canada Summer Jobs Program. This year, in order to be eligible to receive funding, the applicants must now sign a statement agreeing with the Liberal government’s pro-abortion position. The right to freedom of belief and opinion is guaranteed by the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. For all their talk about being the ‘Party of the Charter,’ the Liberals should be the first to recognize that they’re violating the most fundamental principle of the Charter. Not only that, this change also hurts students who are looking for work during the summer months. Instead of limiting job opportunities for students, the Liberals should be encouraging more employers to hire them. If the Liberals are forcing Canadians to pass THEIR ‘values test’ in order to receive Canada Summer Jobs funding, it sets the stage for further discrimination down the road. If you share these concerns, please take a moment to contact the Minister of Employment Patricia Hajdu at patty. Hajdu@parl.gc.ca and Prime Minister Trudeau at pm@pm.gc.ca to let them know that you won’t stand for these dangerous changes. It has been an honour to serve you as the Member of Parliament for Provencher in 2017 and I look forward to continuing to do so in the new year. As always, please feel free to contact my office should you have any questions or concerns of a federal nature. Happy New Year! For more information on this or any issue, please feel free to contact my office toll free at 1-866-333-1933 or at 204-326-9889. Visit me on Facebook at Facebook.com/TedFalkMP. You may also write my office at 76 PTH 12N, Steinbach MB, R5G 1T4, email me at ted.falk.c1@parl.gc.ca or visit my website at tedfalk.ca.

Community Programs in Dawson Trail Get Funding On December 14, Dawson Trail MLA Bob Lagassé announced that eight programs in the constituency will share $71,855 in community development funding from the Government of Manitoba. “Our Progressive Conservative government understands the importance of investing in community development programs that enrich the lives of Manitobans,” said Lagassé. “I am pleased to see our constituency will benefit from this significant province-wide funding.” Local programs that are receiving funding include the Richer Community Club Inc. in Richer ($2,779); Seine River Minor Ball in Ile des Chenes ($41,288); Bibliothéque Ste. Anne in Ste. Anne ($2,738); RM of Ritchot for several projects ($23,050); Affinity Insurance Brokers in Ste. Adolphe for $1,000 and St. Adolphe Pharmacy and Clinic ($1,000). The eight projects are receiving a portion of $2.6 million in grants from the Community Places, Partners 4 Growth, Hometown Manitoba, and Neighbourhoods Alive programs.


Dawson Trail Dispatch

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

A New Year for the Better I would like to start by wishing all Manitobans the very best in the coming year. Hopefully, 2018 will be a positive year for you and your family. This is the time of year when we make New Year’s resolutions to try to change our lives for the better. May your resolutions achieve the results you are looking for. Governments, as well, look back, review the events over the past year, and look forward to the opportunities and challenges ahead. Our Manitoba government is proud of its accomplishments in 2017. Since forming government in 2016, we have been working hard at making Manitoba the most improved province in Canada. We have been changing the unsustainable course that this province was on under the previous government. Manitoba is on a new path with positive change for all of its residents. It is not a government’s role to create jobs; it is a government’s role to create an atmosphere that attracts investment that will create jobs. Manitoba created 10,000 new jobs in 2017, and we now have the second-lowest unemployment rate in the country. New investor optimism has emerged in Manitoba. Health care is important to all Manitobans and our plan to provide better care sooner, is working. The average wait time to access care at a Winnipeg emergency room is down 28 per cent compared to the same time last year. We also made a commitment to Manitobans to improve patient access to diagnostic tests such as MRIs. Just before Christmas, our MLA for Dauphin, Brad Michaleski, along with Health, Seniors and Active Living Minister Kelvin Goertzen made the announcement that the Government of Manitoba will proceed with a new MRI unit in Dauphin at the Dauphin Regional Health Centre. This MRI unit will help lower wait times across the province. In 2017, our government passed bills and made changes to regulations to eliminate red tape, without compromising our commitment to environmental protection and economic development. A lot has been done, and a lot more must be done. But Manitoba is safely on course and headed in the right direction. The new year promises to be exciting. In 2018, we will continue to work on our made-in-Manitoba Climate and Green Plan and prepare for the federal legalization of cannabis, among so many other important issues and initiatives. As always, I look forward to hearing from you with your questions or concerns. I can be reached at my constituency office at 204-424-5406, at my legislature office at 204-945-4339 or at dennis.smook@leg.gov.mb.ca. Dennis Smook, MLA for the constituency of La Verendrye.

Preparing for Major Changes December was such an enjoyable month with so many events celebrating the festive season. One highlight of the month for me was participating in the annual Gingerbread House Decorating, a day program for children in which government leaders interact with youth and children as part of a sweet Christmas tradition. On December 2, the Manitoba Legislature’s Open House was held, as well as the Lorette Christmas parade later in the day. I was happy about the mild weather that brought many families out to enjoy the spectacle. I was also pleased to attend the Keystone Agricultural Producers’ 13th annual Farmer Appreciation Day and Springs Youth Parliament in December. All of this came during the tail end of the busy fall sitting of the legislative session. Our government is working hard toward our goal to become the most improved province. For example, we have introduced legislation to strengthen watershed management by protecting wetlands, improving approval processes and enforcement for drainage projects, and modernizing the province’s conservation districts program. This legislation, the Sustainable Watersheds Act, is a major first step in our made-in-Manitoba Climate and Green Plan. It would become the most comprehensive watershed legislation in Canada, addressing challenges with flood protection while reducing the load of harmful nutrients in our lakes and waterways and improving Manitoba’s overall water quality. This bill has been lauded by the International Institute for Sustainable Development, Ducks Unlimited and Keystone Agricultural Producers. It would bring an effective and balanced approach to environmental and economic protection, and is a strong model for other jurisdictions to follow. Our Manitoba government is also taking another major step in preparing for the Federal legalization of the recreational use of cannabis in July 2018. We have introduced Bill 11, the Safe and Responsible Retail of Cannabis Act, which sets out where and how cannabis will be legally sold in Manitoba with additional measures to protect young Manitobans and to empower municipalities on whether to allow local retail cannabis sales. We remain concerned about the Federal government’s cannabis implementation deadline and the ability to ensure the safety and health of Manitobans and all Canadians by July. In the meantime, we are moving forward responsibly and diligently to prepare for this major change in public policy. Our plan for cannabis regulation, distribution, sales and enforcement allows for safe and responsible use and demonstrates our commitment to safe and healthy communities. I wish everyone in the Dawson Trail constituency and all Manitobans a happy, healthy and prosperous New Year. Stay up to date by following me on Facebook. If you have questions or comments, I can be reached at 204-8074663 or by e-mail at bob.lagasse@leg.gov.mb.ca.

January 2018

Changes Necessary to Improve Health Care System By Marianne Curtis Manitobans can expect more changes on the way as the Provincial government continues its health care system overhaul. This comes after Health Minister Kelvin Goertzen acknowledged receipt on December 20 of the final report on Wait Times Reduction Task Force. The Wait Times Reduction Task Force was established December 2016 to tackle wait time for emergency care as well as priority procedures including hip and knee replacement surgeries, cataract surgeries and diagnostic tests. Their final report, which is a combination of the Peachey Report, EMS System Review and other relevant studies of Manitoba’s health system, will be used as the foundation for clinically informed transformation of Manitoba’s health-care system. “Change is necessary if we are going to improve the services available to Manitobans, but that change must be rooted in clinical planning and evidence-based practices,” stated Goertzen. “This report includes recommendations that will build upon the work already underway by clinical leaders and will inform a provincial plan to improve access to emergency, surgical and diagnostic care in our province.” The report includes observations made at more than 100 consultations held with both members of the public and health system staff. These meetings, as well as online surveys for both public and staff input, looked at the current state of emergency departments, surgery and diagnostic testing across Manitoba. The resulting recommendations for all three categories will further guide the transformation of Manitoba’s healthcare system, added Goertzen. The report emphasized the interdependence of emergency departments (EDs) and emergency medical services (EMS) as well as between EDs and timely access to primary care or family doctors. It found that small EDs with frequent suspensions or closures are essentially serving as primary care sites where staff may feel ill equipped to deal with emergencies requiring specialized skills. The report does not recommend specific changes to rural health facilities, but concludes it is not reasonable for rural residents to memorize the hours of EDs that are not open 247 or are subject to inconsistent service. The report also analyzed the delays for hip and knee replacements, cataract surgery and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and makes recommendations on ways to reduce wait times and improve access. Recommendations focus on implementing and monitoring strategies such as the appropriate ordering of tests, implementing standardized referral processes, increasing capacity, making use of distance communication options such as Telehealth for follow-up appointments, and undertaking analysis to determine the best options for future investments. The Minister noted the findings of the review will support clinical planning work already underway or to be launched in the new year. Goertzern emphasized the government’s commitment to ongoing health transformation, appropriately planned, clinically informed, consistently monitored and confirmed that further changes will be made within a plan that ensures provincial resources and services are organized to provide the best possible patient care and access.






January 2018

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

Province Begins Process to Regulate Cannabis By Marianne Curtis The Manitoba government ended the year with introducing new legislation that would set out where and how legal cannabis may be sold, with additional measures to protect young Manitobans and empower municipal decision-makers. Justice Minister Heather Stephenson recently announced the province wants to put responsible measures in place to respond to cannabis legalization, which includes ensuring the appropriate

safeguards are there for legal retail sales. “This new legislation sets out the regulatory framework, enforcement structures and compliance provisions that will help keep cannabis out of the hands of our youth and away from the black market,” said Stephenson. The Safe and Responsible Retailing of Cannabis Act would amend The Liquor and Gaming Control Act and The Manitoba Liquor and Lotteries Control Act to authorize and regulate the retail sale of cannabis in Manitoba as soon as it is

permitted under Federal law. Once in place, all businesses selling cannabis in storefronts or online must be provincially licensed. The new legislation would also include provisions that would establish the ability of Municipal governments to prohibit retail sales within the boundaries by holding a plebiscite. Association of Manitoba Municipalities (AMM) President and Steinbach Mayor Chris Goertzen told media he was pleased the province is leaving it up to munici-

palities to decide where marijuana shops should be allowed to be located. “Our council has not talked about what these policies might look like,” Goertzen confirmed. “We will gather information and make some decisions in the New Year.” The City of Steinbach’s zoning act already has rules in place for liquor sales and other operations added Goertzen. “Under our Zoning Bylaw we have rules as to where alcohol can be sold, and we have rules for other types of business that we want

to restrict,” Goertzen explained. “This type of business would fall under the same category.” The AMM’s position is that municipalities should be closely consulted throughout the development and implementation of a cannabis legalization framework, tools and resources need to be provided to help municipalities prepare prior to and following the transition to legalization and a fair revenue sharing model that respects municipal authority and recognizes rising policing costs needs to be developed.


Dawson Trail Dispatch

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

January 2018



Provincial Grants Add Up for Community Groups On December 11, the province announced they would be providing more than $2.6 million in grants to projects for non-profit and community-led organizations, community-driven neighbourhood revitalization, and local community development projects, According to Municipal Relations Minister Jeff Wharton, the province has reaffirmed more than $20 million in 2017-18 through existing commitments and the recent single-window intake to support community development. The Community Places program provides funding and planning assistance to build, upgrade, expand or acquire facilities focused on culture, recreation and wellness. This year, 14 community groups from southern Manitoba received grants totalling $195,630. The largest grant for $34,780 went to New Bothwell Recreation Association for green space development. Further south, Sunrise Corner, a joint tourism initiative between the RM of Stuartburn and RM of Piney received $10,000 for marketing through the Partners 4 Growth program. This program provides cost-shared funding for regions to identify and pursue economic development opportunities and assist communities and regions to strengthen or diversify economic activity. A total of 14 projects from $877 to $5,000 were approved in our region through the Hometown Manitoba program for a total of $35,460. This program provides financial support for rural and northern community projects initiated by local communities, organizations, co-operatives and businesses that enhance main street public places and building exteriors. A fourth program called Neighbourhoods Alive!, which supports and encourages revitalization efforts in designated neighbourhoods across Manitoba in a number of key areas was also available but none of the 37 approved projects were from the region. Following thorough consultations and a review, the province revamped its community development programs and created a single portal for application intakes and assessments in 2017. This new process has allowed for better planning and outcomes, which help to sustain community efforts in community revitalization, the minister, noted.

Grande Pointe Resident Appointed to Board A Grande Pointe resident is among a group of people recently named to the Vulnerable Persons Hearing Panel. Cecile Berard, a former financial security advisor and cofounder of Berard Financial Group is one of the three community member appointments for this year. A total of six new appointments, one family member, three community members and two lawyers were made. The hearing panel has members located throughout Manitoba and is made up of relatives of vulnerable people, lawyers and community members. The vulnerable persons’ commissioner appoints these individuals to have legal authority and act for a vulnerable person unable to make certain decisions on their own, in specific areas identified by the commissioner. The Vulnerable Persons Living with a Mental Disability Act defines a vulnerable person as an adult living with a mental disability who is in need of assistance to meet his or her basic needs with regard to personal care or management of his or her property. The act requires at least 20 people be appointed to the Vulnerable Persons Hearing Panel roster and that membership be comprised of relatives of vulnerable people, lawyers and community members from all regions of Manitoba.




January 2018

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

Practicing Gratitude for a Healthier Tomorrow Sharing Our Stories

New process available to register for our Southeast Open Judged Art Exhibit. Calling all local artists! Application deadline January 19, 2018. This exhibit is running 1 month earlier – so submit your registration today through an online application, or come to the office and pay later. For all ages and all mediums, paintings, crafts, sculptures and more. Visit steinbachartscouncil.ca to register. Give the Gift of Creativity – at SAC New for kids and parents – Paint Parties at SAC Canvas & Cabernet is back Join us on Wednesday January 24 and chase away the cold with Artist Arlene Enns. Only $35 for supplies, appies, and beverages. New - Canvas & Colas - Brings Paint Parties for ages 8 - 17. Make it an evening to remember with your parent, guardian, aunt, uncle, grandpa or grandma. Join us on Wednesday, January 24 with Arlene Enns! Only $25 for supplies, snacks and beverage. Treat the Grandkids, 2 kid’s shows for $22. New - Koncertz 4 Kidz Series – PTE – The Good, The Bad and the Munsch. Another highenergy, madcap presentation of the stories of Robert Munsch by Prairie Theatre Exchange. You’ll see five much loved Munsch stories with western flair, Andrew’s Loose Tooth, Pigs, David’s Father, Mmm Cookies and Swamp Water and the amazing Bubbleman. The Bubbleman uses his magical tools to create bubbles as small as a penny or as big as a house. He can even put people inside a bubble. Make sure you are floating upright in case the bubble pops! Thanks to the Koncertz 4 Kidz Community Sponsor Steinbach Credit Union. Kick off the New Year right with virtuosic showpieces, romantic tenor aria, pyrotechnic solos, blazing gypsy showpieces, multi-instrument mastery and a world class accordion champion – The is Quartetto Gelato Mission Potluck. Added Attractions - A Fringed Family Day, Turnip the Music! Concert, The Middle Coast. Winter Program Registration Blitz - Try any class at no cost. Call 204-346-1077 to learn more. Creative Wellness – Pilates, new Power Pilates, Basic Core Pilates, new Pilates Intermediate, On the Ball Pilates, new Zumba Workshops, new Belly Dance, 3 Workshops. Cooking - Creative Cooking, Kids in the Kitchen, new Teen Cuisine, Cake X-Travaganza Workshop and new Couples Cooking Workshops. Languages – Spanish and French.

New! XCOMPANY - 12 Week Dance classes at SAC. No costume fees, fundraising obligations, or competitions, just pure fun. Try Hip Hop, Jazz, and Dance4Tots Creative Movement. Visual Arts – Kids - Hand Building with Clay, Kids Art Adventure, Art X-Travaganza, new Canvas & Colas Paint Parties. Teens - Mixed Art, Pottery Passion, Digital Photography and Cartoon Illustration. New Video Game Programming - Create your own video game. New Resin Workshops. Adults - Beginner Watercolour Painting, Beginner Oil Painting, Abstract Acrylic Painting Beginner and Intermediate, new Contemporary Acrylic, Digital Photography, Intro to the Pottery Wheel and new Canvas & Cabernet Paint Nites at SAC. Fusion Musical Theatre Program – For ages 9 - 14 and 15 – 19 music, dance drama. Register online steinbachartscouncil.ca. New Exhibit - Come and celebrate with the Green Valley School from Grunthal – Arrrrrt Matey! Enjoy their artworks in the Hall Gallery. New Southeast Centre for Music - Nathan Dyck – Guitar, Darryl Friesen- Piano, Hannah Humphries – Violin, Natalie Dawe – Cello, Candice Hamm - Piano & Theory and David Klassen - Voice. Call us if you want to study with some of the best teachers in the southeast at 204-346-1077. New Aboriginal Art Classes starts in 2018 - Moccasin Making with Donna. Make your own moccasins, mukluks, gloves and learn how to bead them yourself. Bannock Making with Helena. Get creative in the kitchen with aboriginal art and learn to make your own bannock on January 27, February 24, from 10 am – 12 pm. Dream Catchers with Roanne Make your own dream catcher and learn about the history behind this craft on January 20, from 10 am – 12 pm. Accepting January Intake Backyard Theatre Company Wants You! Build confidence, ignite creativity and explore your imagination for ages 5 17. New Young Company - Performance troupe in Steinbach directed by Jeremy Plett and Malcolm Roulette for ages 16 +. Accepting January Intake Arts4Tots Preschool Program Montessori-infused. Why are we unique? The most creative way to learn with specialists in dance, music, drama and visual arts! Monday/Wednesday in AM or PM and Tuesday/Thursday in AM or PM for ages 3 - 5. Call 204-346-1077, view events and purchase tickets online steinbachartscouncil.ca.

Gratitude is the quality of being thankful, readiness to show appreciation for and to return kindness. The power of gratitude is really quite extraordinary. We usually show our gratitude to others when we feel indebted toward them, when we have benefited from their action, and when we want to make our feelings towards them known. Gratitude is paramount to our overall well-being, when we experience true gratitude we find appreciation in the abundance of our lives. Author Brene Brown says, “I don’t have to chase extraordinary moments to find happiness, it’s right in front of me if I’m paying attention and practicing gratitude.” One simple way to practice gratitude is by writing in a journal. According to research, journaling gratitude helps us focus on what really matters, lowers stress levels, and helps us learn more about ourselves and we become more self-aware. Try writing down three good things at the end of each day and notice how you feel after a few days. A few other ways to show gratitude everyday could include: - Expressing gratitude in person. - Showing respect for those around you. - Being positive. - Volunteering in your community. Taking a few simple steps to show gratitude, can benefit us in many ways, showing gratitude. - Makes us healthier and happier. - Helps us to feel good. - Relaxes us and deepens our friendships. - Strengthens our emotions and grows our personality. - Increases our goal achievement and productivity. - Makes us more optimistic and increases our energy levels. - Increases our mental strength, self-esteem, self-worth and self-confidence. - Provides positive feelings such as, meaning and purpose, joy, comfort, pleasure and willingness to forgive. Did you know practicing gratitude regularly can help you sleep longer and better, which leads to improvement of our mental and physical health? So what are you waiting for, try practicing gratitude and notice how it impacts your life-satisfaction and happiness toward a healthier tomorrow.

Sunrise Corner Wants Your Winter Photos Sunrise Corner is looking for your winter photos as part of an initiate to collect a database of local pictures that represent the unique qualities of the region for use in promotional and tourism materials. Photos of events, festivals, wildlife, historic buildings and other sights will be used in promotional and tourism materials will be accepted. All photos must be taken within Sunrise Corner, which includes many communities within the RM of Piney and Stuartburn. Sunrise Corner was launched a year ago as a tourism initiative with the RM’s of Stuartburn and Piney along with Eastern Tourism and Tourism Manitoba. Over the past twelve months, the partnership has successfully promoted the communities within each municipality and the area as a whole. Three cash prizes are up for grabs with the first place winner taking $300, second place winner will get $200 and third place winner receives $100 cash. To qualify, each entrant is limited to ten photos and must include a caption that includes the location where the photo was taken. Names must be provided for every person featured in a photo, including appropriate consent. All photos must be in the original digital format taken by the photographer, and no larger than 4MB. Entries will be accepted until February 1, 2018 at 4:30pm at info@sunrisecornermbc.ca.

If the Lights Go Out this Winter Winter is unpredictable and storms can disrupt electrical service without warning. Your power may be off for a few hours or, in extreme cases, a few days. Be prepared in case your power goes out this winter. - Assemble an emergency kit and store it where it will be easy to find in the dark. Include items like a flashlight with extra batteries, candles, matches and a portable radio. - If your power goes out, check if your neighbours have electricity. If they have power, check all fuses or circuit breakers to rule out electricity issues inside your home. - Once you’re sure it’s an outage, report it to Manitoba Hydro at 1-888-MBHYDRO. - If you use a mobile device, you can follow Manitoba Hydro on Twitter to receive power outage updates. - Never use a barbecue or generator while indoors or in a confined space. They can create dangerous levels of toxic carbon monoxide very quickly. This also applies to any other fuel burning equipment that is not connected to a chimney or vent. - Turn off all electrical appliances when your power goes out. Pay special attention to those you may have been using when the power went out – like the stove or oven. - Unplug electronic equipment to protect it from a voltage surge when power is restored. - Keep one light turned on, so you will know when the electricity is back on. - If you see a downed power line, report it to Manitoba Hydro immediately. - Know that in the event of a power outage, emergency crews are working as quickly as possible to restore your electrical service. For more tips on how to prepare for a power outage, visit hydro.mb.ca.


Dawson Trail Dispatch

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

January 2018

Southern Health Launches Used Needle Program By Marianne Curtis Southern Health-Santé Sud, Public Health-Healthy Living is rolling out a Harm Reduction Program to help prevent new Hepatitis C and HIV infections. The program is expected to focus on reducing the harmful consequences of drug use and other behaviours that negatively affect a person’s health. Harm reduction recognizes the difficulties associated with drug addiction and that avoiding drugs may not be realistic for everyone. Access to sterile needles does not eliminate drug use, but does reduce the risk for blood-borne pathogens and drug-related injury. Stephanie Verhoeven, Southern Health-Santé Sud Regional Director - Public Health-Healthy Living explained that the needle and supply distribution program is helpful in modifying many risk-related practices of injection drug use, for example reusing and sharing needles. “This program reduces the spread of blood-borne illnesses such as HIV and hepatitis C,” said Verhoeven. “We’re providing knowledge, skills, resources and supports for individuals who are using drugs to be safer and healthier.” The Sterile Needle & Supply Distribution Program is at regional public health offices including support for sterile needle and supply distribution as well as used-needle drop off. Public health nurses will meet on request with individuals to provide education on infection prevention or to deal with other health ef-

fects of drug use, refer for testing sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBIs) and connect people to health and social services. These offices will be open Monday to Friday from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm, however hours vary from community to community. Confidentiality is assured upon request. Verhoeven strongly encourages people accessing drug-related supplies to safely dispose of needles by returning them to public health offices in a sharps container or to a pharmacy, that accepts used needles. Members of the community who use needles to administer medicine should dispose of them in containers supplied by their pharmacy. If the pharmacy does not offer this service, people can check with their local municipality or town office for specific guidelines on how and where to dispose of full sharps containers, Verhoeven suggested. In the event that a community member finds a discarded needle, they are encouraged to use caution when handling or disposing of the needle into a sealed plastic container and dispose of it properly. If you have questions about the Southern HealthSanté Sud Harm Reduction Program, you may contact your local public health nurse. For more information, visit Southern Health-Santé Sud Public Health-Healthy Living or the Harm Reduction Initiative.

Why is Carbon Monoxide (CO) Dangerous? Carbon monoxide (CO) is an odourless, colourless gas and is sometimes called the “silent killer”. Carbon monoxide is released when heating oil, kerosene, gasoline, diesel, propane, natural gas or wood burns without enough oxygen. Dangerous, even fatal, accumulations of CO can result from a faulty appliance, clogged chimney, inadequate venting, or a build-up of engine exhaust. Dangerous CO levels can cause sudden illness or with extreme exposure, even death. What causes CO build up in a home? In extreme cases, airtight homes or faulty equipment can produce carbon monoxide. Some other causes of CO include a build up of engine exhaust, insufficient combustion air for wood-burning fireplaces, faulty or improperly maintained fuel burning appliances, and blocked chimneys or air vents. Why is CO dangerous? Carbon monoxide (CO) is a toxic gas that can’t be detected by the human senses. You can’t see CO and you can’t smell it. When you breathe in carbon monoxide, it gets into your blood stream and prevents your red blood cells from carrying oxygen. Without oxygen, your body tissue and cells die.

What are typical symptoms of CO poisoning? A low exposure to CO can result in shortness of breath, and slight headache. Higher concentrations can result in a severe headache, dizziness, nausea, mental confusion, difficulty hearing and seeing, fainting, and in extreme cases, death. CO poisoning can be difficult to diagnose because the symptoms are similar to the common flu. What can you do if you suspect CO poisoning? - Call your local emergency services for help. - Open all doors and windows so fresh air can circulate. - Leave the house immediately to get fresh air. - If you suspect equipment malfunction, call Manitoba Hydro for an emergency inspection at 1-888624-9376. A CO detector can help While a CO detector should not be a substitute for properly installed and regular equipment maintenance, it can alert you to the presence of carbon monoxide gas, and help save lives. A CO detector should be installed on all levels of your home, especially near bedrooms. For more tips on CO, visit hydro.mb.ca.

Report Icy Lines to Avoid Outages and Hazards Extreme and changing weather conditions in Manitoba can cause ice to form on power lines. High humidity, below-freezing temperatures and ice storms can all contribute to ice formation and build-up on power lines, which may result in poles breaking, snapping or crumbling under the weight. Manitoba Hydro removes ice from power lines as quickly as possible to prevent equipment breakage and loss of power. Here are some safety tips and reminders to follow if you notice icy power lines in your neighbourhood: - Call Manitoba Hydro at 1-888-624-9376 or 1-888MBHYDRO if you notice an excessive build up of ice on a section of lines.

- Stay clear of low or sagging lines. Travel under or near these lines can be dangerous. - Immediately report downed wires to Manitoba Hydro or to the police. Treat all downed wires as if they are energized and stay clear of them. Make sure that your children do not go anywhere near them, and keep pets inside to ensure their safety. - If you see crews working on ice-laden lines in your community, try to avoid travel near their work area. - Don’t attempt to repair lines or remove limbs from lines. That’s Manitoba Hydro’s job. - In the case of a prolonged power outage, stay tuned to your local radio station for regular updates on the progress of the restoration efforts.

Pat Porter Active Living Centre offers programs, activities, services and volunteer opportunities, striving to promote healthy and active living for mature adults of the southeast region. We invite you to come out (all ages are welcomed) and pay us a visit and consider participating in some of our programs and events. Volunteer Opportunities: We are in immediate need of a few receptionists. All ages are welcome. Please call Lynda at 204-320-4603 for more information. Receptionists work a half-day shift once a week. Rentals: Book your next function/event at our Centre. We can accommodate Birthdays, Anniversaries, Weddings, Christmas Gatherings and Showers (amongst others). Call Lynda 204-320-4600 for more information and to book. Events/Presentations: 50s, 60s and 70s Dance – Friday, January 26, from 7 - 11 pm with live music, The Cracked Egg Shell Band. Advanced ticket $11 Members, $13 Non-Members and $16 at the door. Annual Fundraising Banquet – Monday, January 22, with Quinton Blair. Call Kim at 204-3204602 for more details. Regular Activities: Make sure to check out our quarterly Newsletter. **Please note: Bingo has been permanently cancelled. All Programs have a fee of $2 to participate, unless otherwise stated. - Fitness Class: Tuesdays from 10:45 – 11:45 am. - Dancing Shoes: Will resume Tuesday, January 9. Tuesdays from 7 - 9 pm. - Ho Model Railway Project: Wednesdays 9 am - 4 pm. - Out with Friends: Next outing TBA. - Movie Time: On Monday, January 22 at 1 pm showing “Grumpy Old Men” Rated PG. - Floor Curling/Floor Shuffle: Wednesdays 1:30 – 4 pm. - Pickleball: Monday, Thursday and Fridays 9 - 11:30 am. Tuesdays 9 - 10:30 am. - Drop in Billiards: Monday - Friday 9 am – 4 pm. - Cards: Monday – Canasta; Wednesday – Cribbage. All card games are from 1 - 4 pm.

- Choir: Wednesdays from 10 11:30 am. - Computer Classes: TBA. - Old Time Country Jam: Wednesdays from 7 - 9 pm. - New Connection: 1st Thursday of each month 2 – 3:30 pm. Free Programs: - Crafty Corner: Every Friday from 2 - 3:30 pm. Bring your craft, anything goes knitting, scrapbooking, woodwork, etc and have some good conversation, coffee and share in learning from each other. - Cozy Corner Coffee Time: 10:30 every morning for free coffee, tea, and a cookie. Meet new people and staff in a friendly and inviting atmosphere. - Walking Program: Every Morning from 8:30 - 9 am (Weekdays) in our Auditorium. Free to the public! Enjoy Free Coffee or Tea after! - Buddy Up – This program is designed to touch base daily (short phone call) with a buddy to act as a safety net. If you live alone or spend part of your week alone this would be a program for you! If you are interested, please contact Lynda 204-3204603 for more details. Other Programs/Services Provided/Misc. Information - Noon Meals: Available Monday through Friday. Cost $6. Come join us for lunch. Call Kitchen at 204- 320-4605 the day before or by 9 am that day to reserve your meal. - Foot Care Clinic: Foot care is available the first Tuesday and Wednesday and the third Tuesday and Thursday of every month. Call Reception at 204-320-4600 to book your appointment. All regular program fees will be $2 for members and $4 for non-members. Memberships also give you a discount on other special events, discount on rentals and more! For more information on our programs, activities or volunteer opportunities, drop by the Centre, Monday to Friday 8:30 am to 4 pm. Call Lynda at 204320-4603 or reception desk at 204-320-4600. Fax 204-3209098 or visit our website at patporteralc.com.




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January 2018

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

Keep Your Gas Meter Clear Throughout winter and especially after a storm, keep an eye on your natural gas meter and external vents for snow or ice build up. Snow and ice create a safety hazard because a build up on the gas meter can block the vent and allow excess gas pressure into your home causing an appliance to malfunction. Accumulated snow and ice can put stress on the meter piping and could cause a gas leak. Sidewall external vents are common in high efficiency natural gas furnace and water heating installations. Keep the area around these vents clear year round to ensure safe operation of the equipment. It takes just a few minutes to keep your home safe with these tips: - Check your gas meter, gas piping and vents regularly for snow and ice build-up. - Gently remove snow from your natural gas meter with a broom or your hand. - When shovelling, don’t pile snow against gas equipment or vents. - Clean and repair leaky eavestroughs to prevent ice or melting snow from dripping on the natural gas meter. - Remove large icicles hanging over your meter and appliance vents. - Avoid using a snow blower in the area of your natural gas meter. - Never kick or hit the gas meter or its piping to break off ice or snow. If you have difficulty removing the snow or ice from your gas meter or regulator, call Manitoba Hydro at 1-888-624-9376 (1-888-MBHYDRO).

Rotten Eggs: a Bad Smell for a Good Reason Since natural gas is colourless and odourless, an odorant called Mercaptan is added to give it a rotten egg smell. That way, if there is a natural gas leak from a gas pipeline, it can be easily detected to help avoid a fire hazard or explosion. Do you know what to do if you smell natural gas? Do you know not to use your phone for example? It is important to know how to recognize the warning signs of a natural gas leak both outside and inside your home and take the necessary steps to remain safe. Recognize; React: Report. Recognize the smell of natural gas and other warning signs outside including: - A hissing sound; - Dirt being blown into the air; - Continual bubbling in a ditch, pond or waterway; - Patches of dead vegetation among healthy plants. If you think there may be a natural gas leak, do not use any electrical switches, appliances, telephones, motor vehicles or any other source of ignition such as lighters or matches. React by evacuating the area immediately. If at home, leave the door open as you exit. Stay away from the area until safety officials say it is safe to return. Report the smell of natural gas immediately. Call Manitoba Hydro at (204) 480-5900 or 1888-MBHYDRO (1-888-624-9376) toll free and have the odour investigated. Manitoba Hydro employees are available 24-hours-a-day to respond to natural gas emergencies. For more information about natural gas safety, visit hydro.mb.ca


Dawson Trail Dispatch

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

January 2018

11

AMM Resolutions Send Strong Anti-Bullying Message By Marianne Curtis The passing of two Association of Manitoba Municipalities (AMM) resolutions at the convention last month sends a strong message that rude, belligerent and bullying behaviour by council members will no longer be tolerated. Delegates at last month’s AMM convention overwhelmingly supported two resolutions, which would give municipal leaders recourse if they are subject to harassment or other forms of misconduct by fellow councillors. The matter of bullying on council came to light last spring after for-

mer RM of Ritchot Mayor Jackie Hunt resigned suddenly, then went public about name-calling and other forms of harassing behaviour that took place during meetings. At the time of her resignation, two other councillors also resigned in support of Hunt’s claims, leaving Ritchot without a quorum, triggered a by-election of the entire council in July. RM of Springfield Councillor Heather Erickson personally drafted one of the resolutions as it was presented. “Bullying and harassment of elected representatives and staff, male and female, has become far too common,” Erickson said.

“As elected representatives we need to send a message that there’s zero tolerance for bullying and harassment of colleagues and staff.” It was noted that there have been situations so bad that councillors have had restraining orders against each other, and harassment allegations that are currently being dealt with in lawsuits. One of the resolutions passed calls on the AMM to ask the province to allow complaints about conduct to be heard by the ombudsman. Right now, the Municipal Act requires that councils establish Codes of Conduct but there is no external investigative process to handle com-

RM of Springfield Councillor Heather Erickson speaks in support of one of the resolutions that she drafted when it was debated during the recent AMM convention.

6 Tips to Improve Your Financial Health in 2018 It’s the time of year when we make promises to do better, eat healthier or exercise. Yet, research shows a clear link between the state of our finances and our mental, emotional and physical health. So even if you do nothing else, tuning up your finances may be the ticket to a better year ahead. “The start of the year is the perfect time to take a look at our budget and monthly cash flow to see where we can do better to meet our financial goals,” says David Nicholson, vice president at CIBC. “Make the most of that new year optimism by putting a clear action plan in place to keep you on track throughout the year.” Here are six tips to improve your financial health this year: 1. Know your money. Take a look at your income and expenses and write them down. Having a clear picture of your financial situation can reveal some surprises and get you in the right frame of mind. 2. Get a handle on high-interest debt. Stop carrying a balance on your credit card. Some store credit cards can charge up to 30 per cent interest, so make it a priority to pay off any high-interest debt and/or consolidate your debts into one loan at a lower interest rate. 3. Think twice about spending. Don’t spend money on things you don’t need; rather picture the things you really want and save a little more for them instead. Delaying purchases is another way to reduce spending on non-essentials. 4. Automate your savings. The most effective way to save is to “pay yourself first” by setting up an automated transfer on the day your paycheque is deposited. For an added boost, direct those funds into a TFSA, RESP or RRSP to take advantage of any government grants and tax savings. 5. Start investing now. Whether you have a few thousand saved or you can only afford to sock away your lunch money each week, every dollar you invest can increase your wealth and give you more flexibility in the future. How to invest comes down to your risk tolerance and time horizon. Just remember, the earlier you start, the more you have to gain thanks to the power of compound interest. 6. Get an expert opinion. Most banks offer free financial planning to help you map out your short- and long term goals, project what your desired retirement lifestyle will cost you, and build a plan that’s unique to your financial situation. If you find it tough to stick to your plan or if something changes, be sure to modify your plan and keep yourself on track. Article courtesy www.newscanada.com

plaints. A second resolution calls for AMM to lobby government to include elected representatives in the language of the Workplace Safety

and Health Amendment Act. Elected officials should have the same right as employers and employees to a safe, harassment-free workplace, said Erickson.

Local Business Directory


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January 2018

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

Vita Student Named Tri-Star Athlete

Megan Wiebe, from the Shevchenko Sabres basketball team.

By Marianne Curtis A grade 12 student from the Shevchenko School in Vita has become the most recent athlete from the southeast to be named as Tire Recycle Rural High School Athlete of the Week. On December 19, Megan Wiebe of the Shevchenko Sabres basketball team became the third local student to earn this honour during the 2017-2018 school year. The 5’8” point guard led the Shevchenko Sabres basketball team to two tournament championships. The first consisted of a win in the Shevchenko Sabre (Vita) tournament where she was named tournament MVP. The second came as a result of a win at Steinbach Christian tournament, where she was named one of the All Stars after averaging 20 points per game. According to her Coach Penny Hovorka-Alcock, Wiebe shows top leadership skills with all of her team players and peers. “All of her coaches view her as having a strong positive sportsmanship attitude,” said Hovorka-Alcock. “The coaches consider it being a great privilege to have her as a team player on the Varsity Girls Shevchenko Sabres Basketball, Volleyball and Soccer teams.” While Wiebe’s favourite sport is basketball, she also excels at volleyball and soccer. Hovorka-Alcock noted that Wiebe shows top leadership skills with all of her team players and peers, not only in her favourite sport of basketball but also in volleyball, soccer and as the President of the Shevchenko Student Council.


Dawson Trail Dispatch

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Local Immigrants Celebrate Christmas in Steinbach

Santa paid a visit to all the children during the event.

On December 8, the Eastman Immigrant Services (EIS) hosted their annual Christmas Potluck with local immigrants. One hundred and seventy-four people attended the event, which took place at the Emmanuel Evangelical Free Church in Steinbach. Attendees were encouraged to bring a potluck dish from their country giving everyone in attendance an opportunity to sample food from around the world. Guests attending this year’s Eastman Immigrant Services annual Christmas dinner got to sample dishes from all around the world.

January 2018

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New Livestock Regulations Take Effect January As of January 1, several changes to the Livestock Manure and Mortalities Management Regulation (LMMMR) will come into effect. According to the province, these changes are expected to provide clarity and modernize regulations. “Our government recognizes the important balance of maintaining strict environmental oversight while supporting sustainable growth in the livestock industry,” said Sustainable Development Minister Rochelle Squires. “Following extensive consultations, the Department of Sustainable Development has taken steps to modernize regulations without compromising our commitment to environmental protection.” The changes to the regulations are expected to improve clarity for both producers and department officials, while maintaining some of the country’s strictest regulatory requirements and environmental protection measures for livestock operations. Pig operations will now be subject to the same robust legislation as other livestock sectors. These amendments align with recent changes to The Environment Act under red tape reduction legislation and continues to balance environmental protection with economic development, noted Squires. The changes were after an extensive public and industry consultations. They include giving reduced notification and process steps for permits by allowing front line staff more authority and putting more information on the public registry to increase transparency. Changes have also been made to the setbacks from surface watercourses with the Nutrient Management Regulation, removing in-season nitrate limits and improving variance options to enhance biosecurity measures for industry. The province is also levelling the playing field by clarifying permit requirements for seasonal feeding areas and outdoor confinement areas for small pig operations. The mandatory drinking water sampling process will change as well, with samples only being required based on risk, rather than mandatory samples for all large operations.


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January 2018

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

January The year started with two tragic headlines. On December 20, a snowmobile accident north of Lorette claimed the life of 21-year-old Justin St. Hilaire. RCMP sited extreme cold, low visibility from heavy blowing snow as the leading cause of the incident. Then on December 27, a house fire claimed a 52-year-old woman and three cats in Ile des Chenes. Her partner, who was not home at the time, was unharmed. The Steinbach Arts Council unveiled their dream project for a Performing Arts Centre in Stein¬bach. The information included sharing cost estimates and preliminary plans with a price tag estimated at $24.3 million. The RM of Tache made national headlines after it became public knowledge they hired a company to trap and humanely euthanize an undisclosed number of stray cats in Lorette without considering other options. The City of Steinbach is one of only three communities in the province recognized by Manitoba Community Emergency Preparedness Awards for having an emergency program that exceeded provincial standards.

February Niverville residents came together to improve the safety of the entire community after a 43-year-old man confronted three intruders in his garage. One of culprits used a machete in the attack, which left the homeowner with non-life-threatening injuries. All three men were later apprehended and charged. Residents within the RM of Ritchot also took a proactive stance

The community rallied around a Kleefeld family as they began picking up the pieces after a devastating fire destroyed their house. While the family of fifteen was left homeless, no one was injured in the blaze.

Provencher MP Ted Falk congratulates Natasha Vokey and her parents Bob and Dorothy after she was named Manitoba Special Olympics Female Athlete of the Year for her commitment and skills in curling.

The Grade 6 students at the Dawson Trail School used the news of a recent community wide cat cull as a means to educate themselves and their community on other methods to help the stray cat population in Lorette.

against the ever-increasing crime by forming the Ritchot COPP group to operate within its boundaries. RCMP use a Naloxine Kit for the first time in Manitoba when responding to a possible fentanyl overdose at a residence in an undisclosed location within the southeast corner of the province. Reports indicated that a 20-year-old male was unconscious and not breathing. After receiving the Naloxine, he regained consciousness and survived. Health Minister Kelvin Goertzen

steps in to assist a Sprague man after he is billed over $118,000 for medical treatment he received after a heart attack forced him to seek medical attention in Grand Forks instead of Winnipeg. The RM of La Broquerie launches a new mobile app called “iTown” which allows residents and the municipal office the ability to submit service requests and questions from their smartphones that can be automatically routed to the right department.

The sled dog races were a huge draw when Vita hosted their first winter festival on January 14 and 15 with the help of a $10,000 tourism grant.


Dawson Trail Dispatch

March The community of Ile des Chenes hosted the first annual SnowMan Festival organized by the Ritchot Regional Chamber of Commerce. The one-day event drew families to the TransCanada Centre for a family-friendly snow day. Provencher MP Ted Falk raises concerns about safety and strained local resources after a growing number of refugee claimants start coming across the border from the United States. Later in May, Mavis Otuteye, 57, a citizen of Ghana, died 1 km south of the Manitoba border while attempting to cross; police believe she died of hypothermia.

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

January 2018

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For the first time in almost three generations, Manitobans can say their province has grown faster than the national average. Statistics Canada released the first batch of numbers from the 2016 census, which show a provincial increase of 5.8 per cent. The data shows the RM of Ritchot was one of the fastest growing municipalities in Manitoba’s Capital Region over the past five years. Southern Health officially celebrated the completion of the project, which had become a contentious access issue. The entrance was closed 12 months earlier, after a year of complaints by people having challenges trying to access the region’s largest hospital. The previous entrance was especially challenging for those with disabilities. One of the highlights of the 43rd annual Beaver Days weekend was the Manitoba Mini Sled Racer’s Association (MMSRA) oval track races on Falcon Lake for competitors from ages 4 to 14.

April

Lucy Fouasse founder of Lil’ Steps Miniatures & Wellness Farm in St. Malo, which provides animal assisted counselling and equine facilitated wellness for children and teens with a variety of needs.

Minister of Health Kelvin Goertzen, and Niverville Heritage Board member Gord Daman (right) take a tour of the Open Health Niverville, which is currently under construction in the community. Ste. Anne’s Bailey Bram and Jocelyne Larocque represent Manitoba at the 2017 Women’s World Ice Hockey Championships. A year later, both women earned a spot on Team Canada for the Olympics in Korea.

Demolition crews moved in and began the task of tearing down the historic St. Adolphe Nursing Home. The St. Adolphe Nursing home has been empty since 2013 when the residents were relocated to a brand new facility in Niverville. Initial plans were to renovate the former convent, until asbestos was discovered.

The Piney Chamber of Commerce is officially formed, and a board of directors was elected to represent the local business community. Twentyfive out of about seventy businesses from various communities throughout the municipality signed up. The province announced that a new ninety-space daycare centre has been approved for St. Adolphe. The new facility is part of a proj-

ect proposed by Heritage Holdings to replace the St. Adolphe Nursing home. A Lorette family is homeless but alive after a stubborn fire destroyed a mobile home along Highway 207, a few miles north of Lorette. One person, who was sleeping inside the mobile home when the fire broke out, escaped uninjured.

The students at the Shevchenko School in Vita collected about 720,000 tabs for “Tabs for Wheelchairs”. This collection helped fund the purchase a new wheelchair for Delaney Kolowca of Lorette.


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January 2018

May RM of Ritchot residents were shocked by the sudden resignation of Mayor Jackie Hunt amid speculation of impropriety pertaining to a community hockey rink. She would later accuse a fellow councillor of bullying, which led to AMM support for two resolutions that give municipal leaders recourse if they are subject to harassment or other forms of misconduct by fellow councillors. Former Safety Minister and Provencher MP Vic Toews is being investigated after the Federal Ethics Commissioner ruled he violated

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

conflict of interest rules shortly after leaving politics. The charges are dropped in December. Southern Health Board of Directors appoints Jane Curtis as the new Chief Executive Officer (CEO) following the retirement of Kathy McPhail who has held the position since 2007. Over the past few months, 452 mineral rights claims within the region have been made. The claims are being made by a numbered Alberta company and cover over 120,300 hectares of land covering the RM of Hanover, Tache, Ste. Anne, La Broquerie and Springfield. There is yet to be any official word on what the claims could contain. Elementary school students who attend classes in the three Lorette schools eagerly show off their brand new books donated by the owners of Lorette Home Hardware.

June

The RM of Ste. Anne spent about $115,000 of CDI funding to participate in Manitoba Hydro Solar Energy Program. The project added solar panels next to the new municipal office, which is expected to save the municipality money on utilities, while doubling as a carport for staff.

The City of Steinbach was presented with the Manitoba Community Emergency Preparedness award by Infrastructure Minister Blaine Pedersen (left) responsible for emergency measures, Mayor Chris Goertzen (centre) on behalf of the City of Steinbach.

The province steps in and dissolves the RM of Ritchot council, appoints a provincial administrator and a July 19 by-election is called. When nominations open, former Mayor Jackie Hunt is the first to throw in her hat. Clean Air Commission

hosts hearings in La Broquerie regarding the Manitoba-Minnesota Transmission Project. The Southeast Stakeholders Coalition is a group of landowners who say that Manitoba Hydro is trying to bribe them to overcome opposition to a proposed power line in the area. The coalition represents 120 landowners in the RM’s of Tache, Ste. Anne and La Broquerie. A 19-year-old Grunthal man has been charged after he rear-ended a vehicle stopped for a school bus

with activated lights. There were 20 children on the bus at the time, and no injuries were reported. The National Hockey League’s (NHL), New York Islanders defenseman and St. Malo native Travis Hamonic has been named as a finalist for the NHL Foundation Player Award for the “Hamonic’s D-Partner” Program. The program gives him a chance to connect with youth affected by the loss of a parent.

Despite the valiant efforts of the St. Pierre-Jolys, St. Malo and Niverville Fire Departments, Bergan Hall, the men’s dorm at Providence College was destroyed by fire.


Dawson Trail Dispatch

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

January 2018

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In celebration of the 150th anniversary of Canada, and the 40th anniversary of their own organization, Voyageurs of the La Brigade de la Rivière Rouge made a stop in Ste. Agathe while they recreated a historic paddle along the Red River from St .Jean Baptiste to the Forks.

July The province and Hanover School Division fast track a new 66,700 sq ft school for Niverville based on the urgent need in hopes of having students in the classroom for September 2019. Health Minister Kelvin Goertzen announces a new organization called Shared Health Services Manitoba that has been created to focus on patient-centred planning. Under the new organization, some health care services will be managed centrally.

On July 1, the community of St. Pierre-Jolys opened up a brand new 2,500 square foot splash pad at the Parc Carillon.

Approximately 4,000 hogs perish in a devastating fire that tore through Hespeler Farms south of New Bothwell. Damages are estimated in the millions. Wildlife Haven Rehabilitation Centre’s new education facility in Ile des Chenes received a $125,000 donation through Co-op Community Spaces. The funds go towards the construction of the organization’s new $2.5 million facility in which visitors will learn about the importance of wildlife preservation, conservation and nature. Providence College Coaches Kyle Guenther and Scott Masterson were named Volleyball Manitoba Volunteers of the Year.

August Traditional performances took over the main stage for the day during this year’s annual Gardenton Ukrainian Festival.

The Manitoba government is investing over $2 million out of a $12 million budget in municipal roads throughout the southern corner of the province. A newly elected RM of Ritchot council rolled up their sleeves and worked their way through almost three months worth of concerns and decisions after Chris Ewen was elected the new RM of Ritchot Mayor. He is joined at the table by Shane Pelletier, Ron Mamchuck, Jeannot Robert and Janine Boulanger. The Town of Niverville talks policing after being presented with a petition containing over 500 signatures looking for improvement to safety. As a result, the town implements a community watch program. Christine Wiens of Steinbach was named the winner of the Grand Prize in this year’s Tri-Hospital Dream Lottery. As the winner of the grand prize, Wiens won $1.2 million or one of three luxury home or cottage packages. She took the cash. Fifty strategic, historic spots along the Trans Canada Trail, part of the Crow Wing Trail will be marked with commemorative trees thanks to the Emerson-Franklin municipality initiative. The municipality was one of 150 communities across the coun- The organizers of the St. Labre 200 delivered the goods with another exciting race weekend, which drew hundreds of spectators to a rural farm in support of raising funds for four community non-profit organizations. try awarded a Tree Canada grant.


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January 2018

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

In celebration of Canada’s 150th birthday, the community of Ste. Anne pulled out all the stops for this year’s annual Dawson Trail Days. After the community gathered for a pancake breakfast hosted by the Ste. Anne Fire Department, the historic Dawson Trail was lined with hundreds of people who enjoyed the parade despite the threat of rain.

September For the fifth year in a row, several thousand spectators attended this year’s Richer Rough Stock Rodeo, which is the RM of Ste. Anne’s only community event. The successful community venture would earn the title of Heartland Rodeo Associations Rodeo of the Year for the 4th time. The RM of Tache and the Centre of Canada Committee celebrated the official grand opening marking Canada’s 150th anniversary. The Centre of Canada Park officially sits at 96 degrees, along Highway #1, near Provincial Trunk Road 206 East. Water projects in the RM of Ri-

tchot, De Salaberry and the Town of Niverville, totalling $4.25 million in funding made the approval list when the province announced several new water and wastewater upgrades for Manitoba municipalities. The Town of Niverville announced that it was partnering with a private company, Heritage Holdings to build a new diagnostic centre that would include an MRI machine to help address long wait-lists for scans in the public system. The actions of the Steinbach Fire Department, Steinbach EMS, and a few hundred students will be observed for years to come as part of a distracted driving safety video released by STARS.

Spectators attending this year’s Kleefeld Honey Festival were treated to a special display of speed, skill and bravery when several local fire departments went head to head during the Fire Fighter Challenge.

October The community of Ste. Anne is in mourning after a tragic train accident claimed the life of eleven-year old Kharma Brown while she was cycling home from school. The Traffic Safety board later finds that the

crossing is not designed for cyclist traffic, and the town council commits to improving the site. Southern Health and the entire region celebrated the grand opening of the Bethesda Primary Care Wellness Centre. The new facility provides space for 30 doctors and a pharmacy and is considered a single-stop centre for Primary health. The RM of Stuartburn and the Canada Sheep and Lamb Farms

from Zhoda launch a survey to determine if there is an employee base for a future feedlot and sheep farm. Both the RM of Stuartburn and the RM of Piney see this as a valuable opportunity that will bring 56 jobs to the area. Provencher MP Ted Falk is appointed as Deputy Shadow Minister for Employment, Workforce Development and Labour.

Arleen Pluchinski from Pineland Forest Nursery was one of three recipients of SAFEty Awards presented by Workers Compensation Board (WCB) at the 5th annual SAFE Work Awards event.

La Broquerie Fire Chief Alain Nadeau (second from right) accepted the Volunteer Fire Chief of the Year Award at the Canadian Association of Fire Chiefs event in Vancouver.


Dawson Trail Dispatch

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

January 2018

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Guy Lévesque, (second from right) from Ste. Anne was presented with a Manitoba Council on Aging Recognition Award at the Manitoba Legislature for his volunteer work in many areas.

November The community of Vita is mourning after a single vehicle rollover claimed the life of 88-year-old Denise Pachniowski. A delay in the St. Agathe Fire Hall project due to the Ritchot by-election drove the costs of the project from the municipal board approved $2.25 million to $2.86 million, pushing the project $576.000 over budget. To cover this overage, the municipality has agreed to transfer funds from the municipal gas reserve.

Twenty critically endangered rare ponies known in the Ojibwa language as bebezhigooganzhii and 3 horses found homes with families across Canada and the US after the former owner was forced to sell the animals at the Grunthal Auction as part of a divorce settlement.

The RM of Tache has officially become a member of the Association of Manitoba Bilingual Municipalities (AMBM). The East Borderland Community Housing is disappointed to find out that construction of a 20-bed personal care home in Sprague will have to wait even longer after a recent meeting with the province informed them that new funding formulas for personal care homes will not change to accommodate their project.

December An evening barn blaze claimed about 7,500 pigs when fire broke out in a three-structure complex near Pansy. Damages to the buildings and loss of livestock are estimated at $4.5 million.

Development of Phase 3 in the Riel Industrial Park, St. Agathe began with an official ground breaking ceremony that kicked off development of the $1.8 million project, which will create five highway commercial, and 20 light industrial lots west of the community. Bothwell Cheese took top spots with their 2-Year- Old White

Cheddar and Non-GMO Project Verified Medium White Cheddar cheese at the 90th Annual British Empire Cheese Show held in Toronto, Ontario. A shared social media post about an abandoned dog found in Steinbach led to the return of the pet to his Brooks, Alberta owner after he went missing from the side of an Alberta highway back in September.

Students enthusiastically plant community gardens in front of École Pointe-des-Chênes, as part of a partnership where three local schools grow produce to donate to the Ste. Anne Food Bank. The ribbon is cut to declare that the new 5,000 square foot Open Health Clinic in Niverville is officially open.

Wishing everyone a Safe, Prosperous and Happy New Year!


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January 2018

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

C ommunity E vents Dugald 2-Stick Bonspiel – On Saturday, January 13 at the curling rink. Guaranteed 3 games, maximum 24 teams. Cost $40 per team. Contact Lorna Marr 204-770-1608, sr.marr@ hotmail.com, Springfield Curling rink 204-853-7729. Prairie Voices Toastmasters – On Tuesdays at 6:30 pm in the Springfield Library. Falcon Lake Alcoholics Anonymous - Whiteshell group meets every Wednesday and Saturday at 8 pm in All People’s Church, Falcon Lake. Come and meet with us or call 204-349-2374. We can help. Giroux Bingo - Every Thursday at Giroux Hall. Doors open at 5 pm, Bingo starts at 7 pm. Hall rental information for Socials, weddings, family functions, Meetings and more please call Debbie 204-424-5506 or Mike 204-326-6260. Hadashville Circuit 30 - Mondays and Thursdays at 7 pm, in the Rec Centre .Alternate aerobic and weight exercises, with cool down and stretch exercises. Wear comfortable clothing, clean runners, and bring a bottle of water. Cost $2/class. Contact Wendy 204-348-2433. Tae Kwon Do - Every Wednesday at 6 pm at the Hadashville Community Club (Reynolds Recreational Centre) from 6 years old to adults. Pursue a black belt or learn new skills, great stress release and have an excellent workout at the same time. Cost after registration fee is $40/month per person. Ask about 2 week free trial. Contact Shelly at 204-426-5266 or KSTA. academy@gmail.com. Ile-des-Chênes Taekwondo – On Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:30 – 8 pm at the Ecole Ile Des Chene School. Cost $40/month, family rates available. Contact Kangs.mb.ca, Master Bill Tam 204296-8217. Parent Child Playgroup - On Wednesdays from 10 am – 12 pm at the School, Rm142. Contact idc.mb.playgroup@ gmail.com. Story Time in Pyjamas - Every Thursday evening at the Ritchot Library Ecole Regional Gabrielle-Roy at 6:30 pm. Ages 2-8 however all ages are welcome. Yoga- On Tuesdays and Thursdays at 6:30 - 7:30 pm at the TransCanada Centre. Cost is $15/class or 10 classes/$125. Zumba - On Mondays and Wednesdays, from 7 pm – 8 pm at the TransCanada Centre. 10 classes for $75 or $10 drop in. Contact sarah.abraham@gmail.com. 50+ Programs - At the Trans Canada Centre Indoor Walking - Mondays, Wednesday & Friday 9 – 10 am Yoga - Monday 10 -11 am Coffee Talk - Wednesday 10 - 11 am Block Therapy - Tuesday 10 - 11 am Water Colour Painting – Thursday 10 - 11:30 am Line Dancing - Thursday 7 - 8 pm Floor Curling - Friday 10 am – 12 pm Contact to register Mary Ann vintageclub@transcanadacentre.com, 204-339-6141. Our Lady of the Roses Prayer Group – Meets on the first Saturday of every month, at 6:30 pm to recite the Rosary and learn about Our Lady of the Roses, Mary Help of Mothers and receive Blessed Rose Petals and other Sacramentals from Blessed Mother’s place of miracles. Contact Corinna 204878-4908 or email her at corinnaswetz@hotmail.com for more info and register. Kleefeld Community Playgroup - For parents, caregivers and children up to age 5. Activities include time for playing, stories, songs and snacks. Every 2nd and 4th Thursday of the month at the Kleefeld Rec Centre. Contact Irene Ascough 204-377-5013. La Broquerie Seine River Services for Seniors- Health Centre/Centre de Santé from Monday - Friday 8:30 am - 4 pm. Services and programs for seniors. Income Tax help, Lifeline, mobility equipment, foot care, hair care, transportation, home maintenance, yard maintenance, Telecheck, E.R.I.K. program, puzzles and games. Contact Community Resource Coordinator Juliette Rowan, 204-424-5285 or labseinerss@gmail.com. Shopping Trips to Winnipeg’s St.Vital Mall every first Thursday of the month, leaving at 10 am - 3 pm. Cost $15. Steinbach’s Clearspring Centre every last Thursday of the month, from 10 am - 1 pm. Cost $10. Lorette Storytime and Craft - On Saturday, January 13, 11 am - English, 11:30 am – French at the Tache Library. Lego Club – Starts January 24 and 25, every last Wednesday and Thursday of each month from 6:30 - 7:30 pm at Tache Library. Join us to build, create & explore! Drop-in, no registration required. Contact 204-878-9488, email btl@srsd.ca. Chase the Ace Lottery – Starts January 4, on Thursdays from 6:30 – 8:30 pm., draw at 8:45 pm at Dawson Trail Motor Inn Bar. Jackpot $1,500 plus 40% of Thursday ticket sales. Proceeds towards the library. Your support is needed.

New Horizons Seniors - Play cards, Scrabble and more. Drop in Tuesdays 1 - 5 pm at Foyer Notre Dame Lorette, 12 St. Amant Ave. Contact Iris 204-878-3552.

C.H.I.L.D program – On Wednesdays from 9:30 - 10:30 am at Ecole St. Adolphe School. Children’s introduction to learning and development. Contact sas@srsd.ca or 204-883-2182.

Ritchot Senior Services Foot Care Clinic - On Wednesdays by appointment. To reserve contact Janice 204-883-2880. With Cheryl Palmer, foot care nurse.

Ritchot Senior Services – Monday - Thursday from 9 am- 2 pm at 457 Main Street. Contact 204 883-2880 or Ritchotseniors@mymts.net. Winter Hobbies – From Wednesday, January 10 – Wednesday January 17 and Wednesday January 24h at 9:30 - 11:30 am. Quilters, knitters, people that like to lend a helping hand, join us this winter as we work on two different projects. This year create touch quilts that will be donated to the Alzheimer Society. New this year knitting or crocheting hats and scarves to donate to the Kindred project for women in shelters and the homeless. Wii Games - Club Amical is taking a break from the weekly lunches in January so stop on by Thursdays, January 11 and 18 from 1 – 2 pm for a game of Wii. A little friendly competition to heat things up during the month of January. Coffee talk - On Tuesday, January 16 its time to meet up with friends and catch up on all that has happened over the holidays. Coffee Talk Time to Share - Join us Tuesday January 23, 10 am at the Ecole St. Adolphe for a special coffee talk to connect with students and have them share some knowledge with us. Work one-on-one with a student. Do you have a tablet, iPad, smart phone, PC or laptop and not sure how to use it to its full potential? Or have questions about the internet, Facebook or other social media here is your chance to ask. Register with Janice. Bring your device or sit back and listen while enjoying coffee and snacks. Monthly Activities: Indoor Safe Walking Program - Every Tuesday from 5:30 6:30 pm starting January 9 at St. Adolphe school hallways. No sign up needed. Wear clean indoor shoes for walking. Fitness Program – From Monday January 8 to May 31 every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday includes cardio, muscle and yoga inspired classes all designed especially for everyone 50+ at 457 Main St. Cost: 10 classes for $40 and receive 1 extra class free, 5 classes for $20 or $5 drop in fee. Mood Disorders - Monthly Meeting - On first Thursday of the month at 2:15 pm. Chair Fit - On Mondays from 11 – 11:40 am. Foot Care Clinic - By appointment. To reserve contact Janice 204-883-2880. Cheryl Palmer, foot care nurse.

Niverville Tropical Plant Parti – On Friday, January 19 at 7 pm at the south end of Arena. Cost $40 plus GST. Pre-registration is required for an evening of laughing & indoor gardening; everyone leaves with their very own two plant succulent garden in a glass container! We will build our gardens, decorate them and also learn about how to care for them at home! GriefShare - If you or someone you know has experienced the loss of a loved one we wish to help, you get support and learn about the grieving process. Contact 204-381-1155 to register or go to Nivervillegriefshare.com. Moms N’ Tots Playgroup - Moms with children up to age six. Wednesday mornings from 9:30 - 11:30 am located in the lower level of Fourth Avenue Bible Church (62-4th Avenue S.) Free drop-in program with coffee and snacks provided, along with a large open space for the kids to play while the moms visit. Contact Karen at klenzrpeters@hotmail.com. Paradise Village Paradise Squares Dance Club - On Tuesdays from 7 – 9:30 pm at the Paradise Village Rec. Hall. Modern Square Dancing is fun and a great social activity. Couples and singles are welcome. Contact Larry 204-422-5424. Pinawa Whiteshell Toastmasters – On Tuesdays at 11:30 am at Whiteshell Laboratories, 1 Ara Mooradian Way. Sign in required. Prawda Circuit 30 - Alternate aerobic and weight exercises, with cool down and stretch exercises. Wear comfortable clothing, clean runners, and bring a bottle of water. Cost $2/class, Mondays and Thursdays at 7 pm, in the Reynolds School Gym. Contact Wendy 204-348-2433. Busy Bodies Playgroup – Every Wednesday from 9 - 11 am at the Reynolds School Gym. Free to parents and children. Snacks provided. Contact Cassie 204-793-8290. Richer Richer Community Club Chase the Ace! - Every Saturday at the Richer Inn from 5:30 - 7:45 pm. Tickets only $1 each. Jackpot is growing! Door prizes on random Saturdays ranging from glassware to Jets tickets and jerseys! Bud, Spud and Steak Special and more! Check out and like Richer Community Club Facebook page for updates. LGA License #1392RF. Adult & Teen Challenge Concerned Persons Support Group Join us Thursday evenings at 7 pm, in the Richer Fellowship Church, 50 Southeast Drive. If you have a relationship with someone who has a life-controlling problem, join us for this nine-week Living Free course. Receive encouragement and support in a safe setting, and learn practical ways to best help your loved one. Contact Pastor Ben Funk at 204-326-2254 or phone the church at 204-422-5308. Richer Recovery AA - Group meets Monday from 7:30 - 8:30 pm at LUD Hall in Richer. Contact Paul at 204-422-7673. Monday Night Bingos - To raise funds for Stacey Pchajek Memorial Foundation Inc. The foundation provides scholarships, bursaries and prizes to students graduating grades 8 and 12. Children under 14 must be accompanied by an adult to be on premises and must play bingo. Doors Open at 5:30 pm at the Young at Heart Club, 22 Dawson Rd. MGCC License # BI/BO4164. Contact Doreen Pchajek at 422-5243 or doreen@spmf.ca. Sarto Ukrainian Dance Club – On Mondays from 7 - 8 pm at the Sarto Hall. Join the Sarto Polevnyi Ukrainian Dance Club for the season! You do not need to be Ukrainian to dance! Boys & girls, ages 3 to adult, no prior experience required! Cost starts at $150/year. Sprague Sprague & District Historical Museum - Open by appointment from June – September 30. Explore life as it was in the early days. Free Admission. Donations Accepted. Contact 204-4372210, 204-437-2209 or 204-437-4686. St. Adolphe Winter Carnival - From Friday, January 19 – Sunday, January 21. Kids & Youth Dances, Hawk’s Hockey Day, Dodgeball, Winter Carnival Adult Social, Cribbage Tournament, Family Bingo, Kiddie Carnival, Silent Auction, Taylor Christensen Memorial Game, Curling Fun Spiel and more! Pickleball - Thursday evenings from 6 -8 pm at St. Adolphe School, 444 la seine street. Lunch & Bingo - Every Thursday at the Le Club Amical, 344 Main Street. Home cooked meal only $8. Enjoy your meal at the Club or call ahead, pick up your lunch, and enjoy it at home.

St. Malo Mood Disorders Association of Manitoba - On the last Monday each month at 7 pm at St. Malo Church. For persons experiencing depression, anxiety, stress, bi-polar disorder and other mental health/emotional concerns; individual and support groups. Contact Judy Dunn 204-444-5228. St. Pierre-Jolys The Knights of Columbus - The St-Pierre Carillon Council – On the first Thursday of the month at 482 Jolys Ave. W. Contact 204-433-7633. Ste. Agathe Taekwondo - Every Tuesday and Thursday from 6:15 - 7:30 pm at Ecole Sainte Agathe hosted by Kang’s Taekwondo Academy. Cost $40/month. Family rates available. Contact Jason Barnabe, jason.barnabe@gmail.com or 204-802-3458. Ste. Anne Pickleball – Calling all active seniors. On Monday, Wednesdays and Fridays at 9:30 am, at the Ste. Anne Tennis Courts (weather permitting). You only need good clean running shoes, sunscreen, water, and a lawn chair (optional). Drop in fee of $3 or register $25 for the season. Contact Erika 204 422-5843. Seine River Services for Seniors – Services and programs for seniors. Income Tax help, Lifeline, mobility equipment, foot care, hair care, transportation, home maintenance, yard maintenance, Telecheck, E.R.I.K. program, puzzles and games. Shopping Trips to Winnipeg’s St.Vital Mall every first Thursday of the month, leaving at 10 am - 3 pm. Cost $15. Steinbach’s Clearspring Centre every last Thursday of the month, from 10 am - 1 pm. Cost $10. Contact Juliette Rowan at 204-424-5285 Community Resource Coordinator for local services or e-mail labseinerss@gmail.com. Ste. Geneviève Library Night – Starts Tuesday, January 9 at the Bibliothèque Taché Library Community Centre on the 2nd Tuesday of each month at 6:30 - 8 pm. A large selection of books in both French and English, for children and adults. Special requests can be made to the librarian, e-mail btl@srsd.ca or 204878-9488 or in person. Come for a visit and see what we are all about. Steinbach Family Movie Day - On Friday, January 5 from 1 – 3 pm at the Jake Epp Library. Winter Break Family movie “Ice Age: Collision Course” (rated G). Admission and popcorn are free. Children 12 and under must be accompanied by an adult. Toddler & Me Story Hour - Registration on Monday, January 8 at 10 am at the Jake Epp Library. Classes offered three times a year for a 10-week session in Fall and Winter and a 5-week session in Spring. Classes are free and begin January 17 and 18. Enjoy stories, songs, rhymes, literacy and parenting tips, crafts and snack for parents and their children ages 1-3. Advanced In-person registration is required. Limited space available.

Steinbach & Area Garden Club - On Monday, January 15 at 7 pm, Mennonite Heritage Village. Cacti in the Garden. Learn about the hardy varieties and how to grow them in your garden. Ernie Brown, Dr. Cacti, succulent and cacti aficionado will be assisted by Linda Brown. Come and see the awesome plants. Contact sagardenclub.com for more information.

MS Monthly Self-Help group meeting - for people living with multiple sclerosis. The group meets on the second Thursday evening of each month from 6 - 7 pm at Fernwood Place apartments. Contact Nadine Konyk, Rural Client Services Coordinator at 1-800-268-7582 or email nadine.konyk@ mssociety.ca.

The Good, the Bad and the Munsch – On Friday, January 19 at 6:45 pm. Cost $14 or both concerts kids for only $22. It’s a Pyjama Party with donuts and hot chocolate. Based on stories by Robert Munsch Adapted by Debbie Patterson, presented by Prairie Theatre Exchange Contact 204-346-1077 or online steinbachartscouncil.ca.

MS Lunch Group- On 4th Thursday of every month, from 12 – 1 pm at All D’s Restaurant 320 Main Street. Contact Stephanie Bevacqua 204-988-0904, Stephanie.Bevacqua@mssociety.ca.

Dance - On Friday, January 26 from 7 - 11 pm at the Pat Porter Active Living Centre with The Cracked Egg Shell. Join us for a 50s, 60s, 70s themed dance. Advanced tickets $11 members and $13 non-members. At the door $16. Classic Movie Night – On Friday January 26 from 7 – 9 pm at the Jake Epp Library. Join us for a classic film, admission and popcorn free. Showing “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” starring Audrey Hepburn (rated PG). All children 12 and under must be accompanied by an adult. Drop In Book Club – 2nd Tuesday every month at 7 pm in the Jake Epp Library. We’ll post the book for discussion that month and if you’d like to join us please stop by. If you want to start your own book club instead, you can always take advantage of our Book Club collections. No sign up required. Just read the book and come hang out. Knit-Wits Drop-In Club for Adults - Every 4th Monday of the month, from 6 – 9 pm at the Jake Epp Library. This is for anyone interested in fibre handcrafts such as knitting, crocheting, cross-stitch, needlepoint etc. This is not a class but a casual knitting circle for all skill levels. Please bring your own items/supplies. TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) – On Wednesdays, from 8:45 - 10:30 am at the Royal Canadian Legion. Cost $2/ week. A weight control support group that helps take off pounds sensibly and keep off pounds sensibly. Contact BettyLou Toews at 326-6397. Eastman Immigrant Services - Many events and activities to support and help you make new friends. Volunteer to help at our community events. Every Day English All Levels - Every Wednesday 1 – 3 pm. Reading & Writing – All Levels on Monday and Wednesday from 10 am – 12 pm. Pronunciation All Levels - On Monday and Wednesday from 7 – 9 pm at D4-284 Reimer Ave. Classes are free. Upcoming Events: IELTS in Steinbach, Futsal, every Monday 9 – 11 pm at the EM Church on Main St. Southeast Entry Program Online: Learn about Health Care, Employment and Laws. To register for this 4-week online program, contact Josie@eastmanis.com , 204-346-6609 or email lois@eastmanis.com.

Mood Disorders Association of Manitoba individual and support groups - Meets on the first Tuesday of each month from 1:30 – 3 pm at The Eden East Office, 21 Loewen Blvd For persons experiencing depression, anxiety, stress, bi-polar disorder and other mental health/emotional concerns. Contact Judy Dunn 204-444-5228. The Bethesda Regional Healthcare Auxiliary - meets on the first Tuesday of every month except for the months of July and August at the Bethesda Hospital. We welcome anyone interested in auxiliary work. Contact Verna Thiessen at 3263028. Steinbach and Area Lions Club - Meets on the second and fourth Wednesdays of every month at the Magnolia Restaurant. Contact 204-326-2313. Carillon Toastmasters - Meetings open to adults who want to improve their leadership and communication skills. Thursdays at 7 pm at the Jake Epp Public Library 255 Elmdale Street, Contact Sheryl at 204-326-7628 or Irene at 204-4245737. Al-Anon Program – Meets on Mondays at 7:30 pm at the Cultural Arts Centre back door, downstairs. Contact Lloyd 204326-4365. Al-Anon 12 Step Recovery Group - Meets on Wednesdays at 7:30 pm at United Church, 541 Main St, front door, ring doorbell. All are welcome. Young moms to be - Bi-weekly support group starts at 4:30 pm at Steinbach Family Resource Centre B-11, Hwy 12N. Contact 204-346-0413. Vita Winter Festival – On Saturday, January 13 at 9 am – Sunday, January 14 at 6 pm a family fun two-day event at various locations in the town. Features 6 dog and 10 dog races on both Saturday and Sunday. New this year is skijoring - one and two dog races! Toboggan hill, maple taffy making, bannock making, sleigh rides, vintage snowmobile show n shine, vendor/craft fair, free skating and bingo on Sunday, cribbage tournament, beer gardens on Saturday evening, hockey tournament, curling bonspiel, pancake breakfast Saturday morning, canteens will be open both days, supper and dance Saturday evening, huge fireworks show Saturday evening. Contact Lucie at 204-712-5442.

Eastman Safety Upcoming Programs - Located at 385 Loewen Blvd. Register online at eastmansafety.ca or contact 1-204371-1595.

Beef & Forage Day - On Friday, February 2 from 9 am - 4 pm at the Vita Hall. Admission $10 includes hot lunch. Call 204-425-5050 for more info.

Mommies Group at Kidzone - On Wednesdays, from 9 am - 1 pm. Come by to meet other moms to chat with and get your kids to make some new friends. Cost $7, free coffee.

Whiteshell Wolf Howl – On January 5 from 7 - 9 pm at the Pine Point Trail, Whiteshell Provincial Park. Snowshoe with a Park Interpreter as we trek to the scenic Pine Point Rapids. Along the way, we will howl for wolves and listen for their calls. At the rapids, we’ll warm up in the shelter with hot chocolate by the wood stove. We provide snowshoes, or bring your own. Interpretive events are free for everyone to attend. Please register for this event by calling 204-369-3157 or email Adam. Collicutt@gov.mb.ca.

Creativi-Tea Time - Need to relax? Every second Wednesday of the month, from 6:30 - 8:30 pm at the Jake Epp Library. Come and go as it suits you. We’ll provide basic supplies; feel free to bring your own. Includes tea and coffee. Games Day & Games Night – Every 1st Saturday of the month from 12 – 5 pm and the 3rd Wednesday of the month from 6 – 8:30 pm, at the Jake Epp Library. Come down to play strategy games. Bring a friend, your strategies and games. Test your skills and have fun. Ages 14 and up unless accompanied by an adult. Contact 204-326-6841, programs@ jakeepplibrary.com. Royal Canadian Legion - On 1st Tuesday every month until June at 8 pm and Ladies Auxiliary meets 1st Monday of each month at 7:30 pm at the Steinbach Legion Community Hall, 294 Lumber Ave. Steinbach Girl Guides - Every Tuesday at the United Church of Steinbach, 541 Main St. Registration for girls 5-17. Develop personal values and well-being, self-respect and respect for others; promote fun, friendship, adventure and challenges through new experiences; develop leadership and decisionmaking skills; give service to the community; value the natural environment. The Steinbach Rotary Club - meets every Monday at noon except when Monday falls on a long weekend at the Chicken Chef, 365 Main Street, visitors are welcome. Contact Cornie at 326-3155. Mental Health Information and Support sessions - for family and friends of people with mental health issues are held the 2nd Tuesday of every month from 7 – 8:30 pm at the Eden East building, 21 Loewen Blvd. Contact Kim at 371-0824 or email eastmanmss@mts.net

Woodridge The Mobile Clinic – Is onsite on the third Thursday of every month from 9 am – 4 pm at the Community Club. Contact for appointments 1-855-644-3515 or southernhealth.ca. General Free Monthly Bus Trips to the Casinos of Winnipeg- On Tuesdays, January 9, February 13, March 13, April 10, May 1 and June 12. Join us for a fun filled day. Tour from 8:30 am - 7:15 pm. Begins at 8:30 am, pick-ups in Steinbach, Ste. Anne and Paradise Village. Must be 18 years of age or older. Prizes and cash giveaways every trip. Bingo played on the bus. Contact Marilyn at 204-326-4939 for information and reserve a seat.

Email your community events to us at editor@dawsontrail.ca for inclusion each month!


Dawson Trail Dispatch

Swollen Belly Season

As I sit here and try to write this month’s column, my head is constantly turning to the window next to me. My eyes wander across the snowy expanse and I look for... nothing. I am not looking for anything nor do I expect to find anything and yet... I look. Is it that I want to go outside and enjoy the -25C weather (-38C with wind chill)? Since I was recently outside, I’d have said that I think not. Perhaps I am drawn to gaze upon the unbroken snow like some poet searching for his winter muse? Nope! The patches of unbroken snow are few and far between after my children’s romping about yesterday and add to that the bounding of our dog and there is not a lot of pristineness remaining. What I actually sat down to write about was the gatherings that I attended over the Christmas holidays. Between work, friends and family this year it was a much busier time for my family. I found it quite interesting how at my first gathering my eyes lit up at the sight of all the plates of steaming food that had been prepared. I was able to eat quite a bit of ham, potatoes, stuffing and corn, throw in a few sweets (or maybe too many!) and my belly was stuffed! At the next gathering, I found that my excitement had dwindled but the food was still delicious and I managed to eat my fair share of the meal, and a portion of the desserts. Next came another get-together and yes, more food. Don’t get me wrong, the food was great and I’m very thankful for the hands that made it but after eating such big meals for so many days in a row, well, my belly was more than a little out of sorts. I’m usually more of an eat smaller meals more often kind of guy but with the holidays I do tend to eat overeat with fewer meals but larger portions. This Christmas something happened that has not happened to me in a very long time. I even tried to put it off for as long as I could but in the end, I had to admit defeat and, with trembling hands, I drilled a new hole in my belt! I’m not sure if this is shame on me for eating too much or if it is a compliment to the cooks that they could get me to eat so much. Either way, I think that I may have to join my children and my dog and go romp in the snow for a few hours to help burn off my new “winter weight.” Until next time, take care and keep your world spinning.

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

January 2018

21

Watch for Hazards on the Trail With more than 10,000 km of groomed trails, wonderful scenery and friendly people, Manitoba is a great place to snowmobile. Listen to the weather forecast before starting out, and whether you are going out for an hour, or for several days, watch for hazards on the trail. When out sledding, remember these rules to help you get home safe: - Keep your speed down so you have time to see and react to any obstacles in your path that includes guy wires attached to hydro poles. Sometimes guy wires can be hard to see if they’re buried under the snow or if their reflective markers have been damaged or removed. Darkness, fog or snow can increase the danger; drive according to weather conditions. - Stay off rivers and lakes whenever possible, particularly if there is a generating station or hydro dam in the area. Fluctuating water levels and currents may result in unstable ice conditions. - Don’t drink alcohol and ride. Even a couple of alcoholic drinks can impair your perception and your ability to ride your snowmobile safely.

- Pack a repair kit with items such as a spare belt, spark plugs, tools, and a towrope, in case your snowmobile is stuck or breaks down. A first aid kit, a cell phone and supplies such as a knife, compass, matches, flashlight, whistle, and food can also come in handy in an emergency. - Dress for the elements by wearing full snowmobiling gear every time you go out for a ride. Reflective decals on your back, arms, and helmet are a good idea too, as they make you more visible in dark or foggy conditions. - Keep your sled maintained. - Stay on the trail or in areas where snowmobiling is allowed; do not trespass. Private property and unmarked terrain can contain unexpected hazards. Remember to ride with a friend, and as a safety precaution, always let someone know where you’re planning to ride and what time you will be back. For more information on snowmobile safety, visit hydro.mb.ca/safety.


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January 2018

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

Let the Light Direct Your Steps When we look around us, it seems this world is becoming more dismal and bleak. The troubles seem to multiply one upon another. Is there any hope for humanity? Is there any light at the end of the tunnel? Many years ago the little town of Rjukan, Norway, was established and it thrived by producing hydroelectric power and several chemical products from a factory started there. But it was situated in a valley between two mountains that ran eastwest. This meant that for six months in the winter, when the sun was far in the south, the sun shone on the top of the north mountain but the village was in darkness. In 2005, “The Mirror Project” began and in 2013, it was implemented. Three large mirrors were put on the north mountain and reflected the sun onto the village square all through the winter. Now the inhabitants are encouraged daily with the sunshine and everyone now has the opportunity to enjoy the light. Just as there was a solution for Rjukan’s physical darkness, there is a solution for the spiritual darkness that is all around us. We have just come through the Christmas season when we celebrated the birth of Jesus Christ. John 8:12 says, “Christ came into the world to be the Light of the World.” That means there is no other source of light spiritually. When a person believes that Christ died and shed His blood as total payment for his sins and personally accepts this, then Christ removes the darkness of sin and replaces it with Himself (the Light of the World). This person is now called a Christian. Christ went back to heaven 2,000 years ago after His death, burial and resurrection, but He did not leave the world without spiritual light. Christ is still the Light of the World, but He delivers that light two different ways. He has two mirrors that are to reflect His Light so all men have the privilege to see it and enjoy it. The Word of God is the main source of light. II Peter 1:19 calls the Bible, “A light that shineth in a dark place.” The light of Jesus Christ can be seen reflected from every page of the Bible from Genesis to Revelation. The other source of Jesus Christ’s light is to be reflected through every Christian. When a person gets saved and has the light of Christ in them, they are to share that light with others. Matthew 5:14 says the Christian is, “The light of the world.” When a Christian reads the Bible, he gets more light that not only helps him, but will help all those he reflects that light to. I Peter 3:15 says the, “Christian should always be ready to give an answer of the hope (light) that is in him.” The only hope for this world is Jesus Christ and God has given us two sources of the Light. I trust you will come to the Light, follow it and let it encourage and direct your steps.

New Year’s Resolution: Your Will I’m hoping to convince many of you faithful readers to add one more item to your list of New Year’s Resolutions for 2018. “I will get my Will done!” There are too many of you that do not have a Will (and Power of Attorney and Health Care Directive, but one at a time….) Repeat after me, “I will get my Will completed in 2018.” Now, how hard was that? What is keeping you from getting it done? Cost? Yes it costs money to pay the lawyer to get it done, but it’s cheaper than not having a Will in place and you need to have a Will that has been properly executed (see my article on my website annimarkmann.ca to find out what is a properly executed Will, Your Will: Save Money, Get a Lawyer, from September 2017. Not sure, who should be the executor or your legal representative? Maybe I can help you make a good decision about that. It should be someone who lives in

Manitoba, preferably lives near where you live; it should be someone who has some administrative skills (someone who does not shy away from paperwork, keeps track of everything they do, can contact a lot of organizations during business hours, is proactive and not a procrastinator); and someone who will get along with your beneficiaries, or at least be civil with them. And it should be someone younger than you (especially if you are a senior). If you are still having a tough time coming up with someone appropriate, let’s talk. Not sure, who should be the alternate executor? See the previous question. And yes, you do need one. Not sure, who should be the legal guardians if you have children under 18? We can talk about that too. Often, the legal guardians to your children should be someone who will raise your children, as you would want them to be raised. The executor and the guardian can be

two separate people, and maybe they should be two separate people. If you don’t know why, ask me. If you want to leave some of your estate to a charity, consider using LinkCharity. It’s a way of leaving money to charity, but not having to change your Will each time you change your mind about which charity or how much to leave to specific charities. I can explain it more if you want to look at this option. Add your Will to your list of New Year’s Resolutions. Do not procrastinate about these important legal documents. Most of the time we do not know when we will need them, but we will all need them in our lifetimes or at the end of our life. But once we do need them, it’s often too late to do something about it. If you would like to be contacted on a periodic basis to remind you about getting your Will done, let me know and I can be your “gentle

reminder”; we can come up with a reasonable “deadline”. I’ve been working with some clients who have attended one of our Death Cafés in the past few months and they have been so relieved to have all their legal representatives in place and now have peace of mind to go on living! Please join me at our open house on Saturday, January 20. We would love to see you before it starts to get busy when CRA opens for e-filing on February, 20 2018. Happy New Year! Anni Markmann is a Personal Income Tax Professional and Certified Financial Planner; living, working, and volunteering in our community. Contact us at 204422-6631 or 36 Dawson Road in Ste Anne (near Co-op) or Info@ SteAnneTaxService.ca.


Dawson Trail Dispatch

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

January 2018

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How to Start The New Year

Make 2018 the Year You Budget for Charity It’s the start of a new year, which means it’s time to re-evaluate your annual spending. Have you considered including charitable donations in your budget? Here are five tips to help you get started: 1. Start by figuring out your annual or monthly budget — including how much you need for necessities such as housing, bills and food. Then find out how much you have left over and how much of that you want to put towards charitable giving. 2. Come up with a plan to determine your charitable goals. What causes are most important to you? From here, you can decide if you want to contribute to each charity evenly, or if certain causes mean more to you than others. 3. Look back to previous years to see how often you donated to a friend’s 10k race or bike-a-thon. These are things you will want to keep in mind, especially if peer-to-peer fundraising is something you want to continue contributing towards. Come up with a rough budget based on last year’s gifts so you can know what to expect in 2018. 4. Figure out where you stand on one-time gifts versus monthly. If you’ve budgeted your spending to determine how much you can spend annually, it might be easier to make one-time gifts throughout the year. However, if your budget is done on a monthly basis, you may want to consider joining a charity’s monthly giving program. Most allow you to donate as little or as much as you want. 5. Instead of waiting until the holiday season to give, try to budget gifts throughout the year. That way, come December you won’t feel overwhelmed by your credit card statement and you can spend more time (and money) on family and friends. Article courtesy www.newscanada.com

Psalm 145:1-7 ... 1) I will exalt you, my God the King; I will praise your name forever and ever. 2) Every day I will praise you and extol your name forever and ever. 3) Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise; his greatness no one can fathom. 4) One generation will commend your works to another; they will tell of your mighty acts. 5) They will speak of the glorious splendor of your majesty, and I will meditate on your wonderful works. 6) They will tell of the power of your awesome works, and I will proclaim your great deeds. 7) They will celebrate your abundant goodness and joyfully sing of your righteousness. (NIV1984) I will exalt. I will praise. I will commend. I will tell. I will meditate. I will proclaim, and I will celebrate. What a way to start the New Year. The Psalmist (David) is really energized. He is trying very hard to make a point and I do not think he is happy with just a silent acknowledgment that God is great. I suspect that he wants us to shout it out, maybe even going as far as declaring it openly. How about proclaiming it a song? There is nothing as beautiful as some good old wholesome singing. Perhaps the Holy Spirit moved the psalmist when he calls all creation to praise the mighty works of God. Are we careful, watchful, and cautious of what people see and hear when we are in our unguarded, casual, and careless moments? How important is it? Well if we want to remember something, we will have to observe that which we want to remember. I do not remember what I have never known or seen. Our Scripture verses speak to us this way. If something important happens and we see it takes place, we shall remember that event. If we hear a sermon, the thing that we remember afterward is the point that most forcibly strikes us while we are listening to the sermon. Whether we use a pencil or not memory obeys our wish and records it in our memory bank. That moment in time will return to us unexpectedly. Out of the blue, it comes and sits there to remind us of that event, whether good or bad. Sometimes we are so busy we fail to see the needs of other people. We rush about from place to place working hard to complete our mission. We feel like we are always failing because we do not have enough time to complete whatever it is we are trying to accomplish. When I feel this way, I must be careful not to see people as though they are frustrating or getting in my way. But the truth is that God loves each person we rub shoulders with, even those I might think are not that important. How God interacts with us is very much the same. If I want to remember how great God is, I must allow Him to make an impression on me. That means I must notice it, I will have to consider it, and at my age, I will have to sit back and meditate on it and allow that impression to influence my heart. And when I do that, I shall remember. But it means that I shall always be ready to observe His righteousness. One never comes through life untouched by some bumps and bruises. Somehow, we need those bumps and bruises to learn to praise God. I could wish my whole life to be calm and carefree; free of all troubles. I could desire that nothing might ever again disturb my restful spirit. But were it to be so, I suspect I would seldom experience the merciful loving care of my Heavenly Father. There are many ways of acknowledging the great goodness of God. He has given us the right and the nature of His Son. He has given us complete forgiveness for all our sins. Not only has He forgiven us our sins, but also, He does not remember them anymore, they are gone forever! I must believe that and remember that. One more thing, you and I can come to Him in prayer anytime, night, or day, and He will hear our prayers. We cannot add to God’s glory, but we can certainly make it more widely known by simply stating the truth about Him in many places and many times… To God Be the Glory… All the Best in the New Year. Would you pray with me? “Lord Jesus, come into my heart. Forgive my sins. I want my life to change. My thoughts and my attitude need to change. I do not have peace in my heart, I really want that peace, joy, and happiness that I long for. Please let the Holy Spirit help me be the kind of Christian that will bring honour to Your Name.” Amen.


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January 2018

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

My Life After 50 By Julian DeGrave I sold my business in 1975 and retired. That Fall I left for South Texas and stayed with my uncle, (my mother’s brother). He had 50 acres of citrus trees in the community of McAllen. In the spring I returning to Winnipeg and I stayed for the summer months with my cousin, the Honourable Judge, Wilfred R. DeGraves on Seeking Ave. in Headingly. In the Fall I went back to Texas and stayed once again with my uncle. While there, in January 1977, I met Anna at a dance and we started dating. Things began to get a bit serious with us. I returned to Winnipeg that spring, and began paperwork to live in Texas. The following winter Anna and I were engaged to be married. In the spring of 1978 I spent a couple of months with my family. On August 1, I packed up my belongings and headed to Marshall, MN to a big family reunion and from there I made my big move to Texas. Anna and I we were married on September 1, 1978. Anna kept her job as a seamstress, while I hunted for our new home in McAllen. While Anna worked, I kept house and even learned to cook and clean windows. In my spare time I got involved in picking up aluminum cans for charity. All cans and tabs were the same price, $0.25 per pound and I used to cash them in at Pearl Brewery Distributors. When

I heard that the price was going to increase I began collecting and storing cans and tabs in my in-laws utility shed, as they lived only a few blocks from us. After filling their shed, I also filled mine; the price did increase to $0.35 per pound. I was told by the fellow at Pearl Brewery Distributors that the white bags they gave me would hold 1,500 crushed cans. They were right as you can see by the pictures and the cans were all crushed as if run over by an eighteen-wheeler. My neighbour, Mike Palmer, knew I was collecting cans for charity so he said when I was ready to take them in he would help me load them on his truck and trailer to deliver them for me at no charge. I went to a scrap dealer to check on prices and the fellow said he would pay me $0.35 a pound. I told him that I was donating all the money from the cans to an orphanage in Rio Grande Valley. I also let him know that I probably had a ton, he was shocked and didn’t believe me. When delivery time came the scrap dealer was fair, at first I asked for $0.40 a pound but he said he would give me $0.38. As you look at the truck and trailer load in the picture, there was approx. 2,200 pounds for a little over $800 and that was just the start of can collecting for me in the eight years that I lived in McAllen. I eventually donated over $4,000 to charity on cans alone. Eventually, I moved back to Cana-

da in 1986 to be closer to family and heard talk about a program called “Tabs for Wheelchairs” so Anna and I started saving tabs a little at a time. After moving to Paradise Village in September 2000 we were into saving a lot more. Anna’s brother in McAllen, was a high school teacher and we talked to him about the Tabs for Wheelchair program here at home. He wanted to help us so he talked to his students and got them all involved in helping him collect the tabs. We would pick them up each winter during our stay down there as snowbirds. Every year we received four huge bags. When June Williams was our “Tab Lady” here in Paradise Village, she would always write to Wally and his students a very nice thank you letter. Now Wally has retired so he is unable to get other teachers involved and I myself can’t travel down south anymore because of health issues. As of late we contacted Bob Barrow of Steinbach to come and pickup seven, 25-pound bags of tabs to be delivered to the Holy Cross School for us. Anna got a call from the school thanking us for our efforts and she was surprised that at 91 years old I was still involved. Well now that I have turned 92, I guess it’s time for me to quit. We have contacted all of our friends here in Manitoba who have helped us collect tabs and let them know that we no longer collecting them and that they can continue to col-

DeGrave Can Collection truck and trailer with each load approximately 2,200 lbs.

lect for someone else if they wish. We figured we did our share over the years. P.S. Would you believe that we received a nice call from Joann and Wayne from Ste Anne and

she couldn’t thank us enough for the tabs we gave that will be going towards their granddaughter, Delaney’s wheelchair, who lives in Lorette. We would like to meet Delaney some day.

Dawson Trail Dispatch January 2018  
Dawson Trail Dispatch January 2018  

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