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Dawson Trail Dispatch

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Ste. Agathe Enjoys Cheyenne Summer Fest

Spectators line the streets of St. Agathe for the annual parade.

By Marianne Curtis Families looking for a fun family weekend flocked to Ste. Agathe on July 19 and 20 for this year’s Cheyenne Summer Fest. This year Cheyenne Summer Fest celebrated 30 years. It kicked off with a great parade, delicious pancake breakfast, live musical performances, a family baseball tournament, tons of family fun and kids activities. Friday night was jam packed with laughs and good times as The Chey-

Parade float.

enne Pioneer Games made its reappearance. The night was capped off with fireworks and music with Nic Messner. On Saturday there was a community pancake break-

Submitted photos

fast, followed by tons of children’s and family activities, a chicken BBQ hosted by Lucky Lucs, and a Hawaiian themed social and dance.

August 2019

Piney Woman Survives Four Days Lost in the Bush Mary Byman, 84, from Piney went missing while out picking blueberries with her friend near Menisino on the afternoon of July 24th. Family, friends, volunteers and search and rescue personnel spent four days searching through thick forest and dense brush for Byman. RCMP said planes and helicopters were also used in the search. On Sunday July 28th around 6 pm the Office of the Fire Commissioner officially called off the search and told family they were assuming her deceased. While the majority of the searchers left in disappointment and defeat, one group from Dauphin that had arrived earlier in the day decided to stay to search into the evening. At approximately 9:00 pm, Mary Byman was found in an area approximately 2 kms southwest of where she was reported missing. RCMP said a group of searchers fired a gunshot in the air and heard a faint cry for help in response. They fired again and heard another cry, giving them a direction to search in. After about 40 minutes, they were able to find Byman in thick bush. She was cold, dehydrated and tired but talking with the volunteers and in good spirits. Local firefighters spent more than two hours clearing a path to reach her. She was transported to Steinbach hospital where she was treated for dehydration. Byman’s granddaughter, Rachel Geurts told the media that finding her grandmother was a huge relief, especially after being told the search was over, and that if Byman was found she would likely be deceased. “I saw that my brother was calling, and I wasn’t going to answer, because I was having a hard time dealing with things myself,” said Geurts. “I answered the phone… and he’s crying, and he just says, ‘she’s alive. They found her and she’s alive.’ I just jumped out of bed and I kind of started screaming.” Geurts added that the help searchers received from RCMP and volunteers was invaluable, and urged anyone going through a similar situation to keep pushing forward and to do whatever they can to get the message out there.






August 2019

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

Racing Keeps St. Adolphe Family Together By Marianne Curtis They say that a family, who plays together, stays together and a St. Adolphe family has taken that to a whole new level by creating a dirt track legacy that is exciting to witness.

On Thursday nights, Nick and Chris Audette can be found battling it out on the dirt track oval at Red River Coop Speedway behind the wheels of Midwest Modified race cars. “I started Audette Racing in 2002,

racing in the Street Stock Division,” explained Nick, who runs the #20 car. “I’ve raced in 4 different classes since then including Streets Stocks, 4 Cylinders, Pure Stocks and Midwest Modifieds and raced at eight different race tracks over the years.” Nick currently sits sixth place after twelve features, a mere 137 points below the leader. He has also claimed two feature wins and remained in the top 6 to cross the line each race. His brother is no stranger to the sport after running the last few years in the 4 cylinder class. This is Chris’ rookie year behind the #27 in the Midwest Modified

class. While he can be seen every week tearing it up in the heat races, he has yet to place high enough to appear in a feature. Chris’ class change allowed for the next generation of the Audette family, his daughter Mercedes to fill the vacant racing seat. The 16-year old rookie is currently sitting in third place, and was recently highlighted in her first feature race. After eight races she sits just below Richer native Nicholas Krause with 759 points. “Her confidence is growing in leaps and bounds with every lap,” praised her uncle. With three drivers in the family, running three separate cars, there is a lot to do when it comes to pitting.

This is where Nick and Chris’ Dad Robert steps in as crew chief, along with Nick’s wife and two daughters Taylor and Dylan, Chris’s wife, son and daughter and their mother Aline. “Sometime having a family team can be difficult and at times hectic,” Nick added. “With all the prep and changes we make throughout the race evening. But at the end of the day the love of Racing brings this family together.” The Audette family, along with a number of other local drivers from Richer, Steinbach, St. Malo, Lorette, Grande Pointe, Ile des Chenes and Landmark can be found every Thursday night at Red River Coop Speedway in St. Adolphe.

The Audette family have found a way to have fun as a family by racing dirt track. (l-r) Nick, Mercedes, Chris (sitting) and Rob Audette. Photos by Marianne Curtis

16-year old Mercedes Audette currently sits at 3rd place in her class.

Nick Audette has earned himself two first place feature wins this season so far.


Dawson Trail Dispatch

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Niverville Denies Cannabis Retailer Proposal Following a town hall meeting in the community, the Town of Niverville council has denied a proposal to allow a cannabis retailer to set up shop. On July 23, the Town of Niverville council considered a conditional use application made after Alberta based Canna Cabana Inc. applied for a conditional use proposal for 349 Bronstone Drive. The company was selected by the province of Manitoba earlier this year as a viable candidate to pursue opening a dispensary in Niverville. The application was defeated after a 3-2 vote with Niverville Mayor Myron Dyck who placed the deciding vote at the hearing. “Our community right now has fairly deep convictions on both sides and I think there is just some more due diligence that needs to be done,” Dyck told media. “Perhaps education, perhaps a chance to talk this through a little bit more as a community. I just don’t think we’re ready right now one way or the other.” While council denied the application, there is still an opportunity for either Canna Cabana or another retailer to set up shop. There is no word if they plan to reapply. In July 2018, the province released a request for pre-qualification (RFPQ) seeking potential retailers interested in a future opportunity to operate cannabis retail stores in Manitoba. Retailer locations were selected in seven communities, including Niverville. The selection process consisted of a randomized draw. Each pre-qualified retailer received one ballot per community of interest. One ballot was drawn for each identified community, as well as a second standby ballot, which was won by Red River Cooperative Ltd.

Dr. Rebecca Dielschneider in the lab.

Submitted photo



Conservation District Partnership Aims to Protect Local Watershed In July, a partnership between the Seine Rat River Conservation District (SRRCD) and ALUS Canada, a Weston Family Initiative, the ALUS SRRCD program was launched. The ALUS SRRCD program aims to address important local environmental issues, particularly the protection and enhancement of surface water and groundwater in southeastern Manitoba. The local Partnership Advisory Committee (PAC) is made up of farmers and stakeholders who prioritize projects that remove sensitive, marginal sections of croplands and forage lands from agricultural production, to establish, restore and enhance wetlands, floodplains and additional water-retention areas. SRRCD Manager Jodi Goertzen said, “This is the bold move towards protecting and sustaining the management of our land and water resources that southeastern Manitoba has been waiting years to embark on.” “Right now there is a lot of local anticipation around how incentivizing alternative land use practices in our agricultural community will really become the catalyst to better water quality in Manitoba while generating an

increased understanding to the benefits of ecological goods and services that some producers already provide,” Goertzen explained. Paige Englot, ALUS Canada’s Prairie Hub Manager is excited about the ALUS Seine Rat River partnership. Through their ALUS projects, ALUS SRRCD participants will help to produce cleaner water, cleaner air and more biodiversity, including pollinator habitat, for the benefit of everyone in the community. “The ALUS Seine Rat River program will support farmers and ranchers who produce cleaner water, cleaner air and improved biodiversity,” Englot noted. Joining the ALUS SRRCD is completely voluntary for local agricultural producers and landowners, and is overseen by the committee. The SRRCD is comprised of three sub-watersheds including the Seine River, Rat-Marsh River and Roseau River with all of their respective drains and tributaries such as the Manning Canal, Seine River Diversion, Tourond Creek, Joubert Creek, Angle Drain and Jordan Creek.

Providence Adds Health Science Degree Two years ago, Providence initiated its first Bachelor of Science degree with a three-year General Biology major. This fall the science program is expanding and offering its first four-year degree. The new BSc in Health Science will give students a taste of a variety of health sciences courses and prepare them for further study. “This major is perfect for a student who loves healthcare and the biomedical sciences,” commented Dr. Rebecca Dielschneider. “Its interdisciplinary nature gives students a broad foundation, and helps them narrow in on a career path.” In the new Health Science major, students will take a variety of courses including anatomy, biology, biochemistry, chemistry, genetics, microbiology, physiology, and sociology of health. Students learn a little of everything and gain the entrance requirements needed to apply to a graduate or professional program, whether it be occupational therapy, genetic counselling, physician’s assistant, or medicine. The Health Science major also prepares students to pursue a variety of careers such as laboratory technician, research assistant, technologist, or scientific sales representative. “My goal is to keep growing the science program,” added Dr. Dielschneider. “This is the first four-year Bachelor of Science degree, but will not be the last.” Providence has plans to add more four-year BSc degrees with differing majors in the years to come.

August 2019

Paige Englot, ALUS Canada Prairie Hub Manager, presents to SRRCD members.




August 2019

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

Long-time Liberal Invites Chinese Interference in Canadian Election A high-profile Liberal publicly invited China to interfere in Canada’s upcoming election, yet Justin Trudeau refuses to condemn his comments. Meanwhile, new media reports revealed that his office attempted to muzzle other former ambassadors for commenting on the Liberals’ disastrous handling of the Canada-China relationship. Over the last several months, Canada’s relationship with China has soured over the arrest of Chinese tech executive Meng Wanzhou in Vancouver. Flexing its muscles, the government of China has illegally detained two Canadians and arbitrarily shut their markets to Canadian meat, canola seed, and soy products. China’s actions are unacceptable and they show immense disregard for the rule of law. That’s why it was shocking when long-time Liberal and former Ambassador to China, John McCallum, in an interview with the South China Morning Post, seemingly gave China advice on how to influence the upcoming Canadian election in the Liberals’ favour. “Anything that is more negative against Canada will help the Conservatives, [who] are much less friendly to China than the Liberals,” McCallum stated. In other words, he suggested that China should help the Liberals get re-elected because it will benefit China. Inviting foreign interference into a Canadian election is not how it’s done in

Canada. While Mr. McCallum – a former cabinet minister in the Trudeau government – hardly received a slap on the wrist for his outrageous comments, we recently learned that Justin Trudeau’s office instructed a senior government official to tell other former Canadian ambassadors to China to check in with the government before speaking publicly about the Canada-China relationship. As one of the diplomats noted, discouraging private citizens with expertise in foreign relations from speaking freely is “fundamentally an undemocratic idea.” Many will also remember Justin Trudeau’s infamous public admission of his admiration for China’s “basic dictatorship”. But again, this is just not how things are done in Canada. It is highly inappropriate for the Prime Minister to use the power of his office in an attempt to muzzle respected former diplomats. Unfortunately, like we saw with the SNC-Lavalin corruption scandal, Justin Trudeau has a penchant for silencing those who speak out. If the Liberals are willing to go to such great lengths to avoid further embarrassment from their failures on the world stage, why is it so hard for Justin Trudeau to condemn comments inviting foreign interference into Canada’s election? Where Justin Trudeau shied away from

his responsibility, Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer was clear. “This invitation of foreign interference in the Canadian election - to a regime that has proven itself hostile to Canadian interests - is absolutely reprehensible,” he said. When Liberals invite foreign influence into our elections or attempt to silence their critics, it undermines our democracy. Canadians must have full confidence that the outcome of the coming election will be up to Canadians alone. Justin Trudeau may admire China’s “basic dictatorship”, but it has no place in Canada or our elections. For more information on this or any issue please feel free to contact my office toll free at 1-866-3331933 or at 204-326-9889. Visit me on Facebook at Facebook.com/TedFalkMP. You may also write my office at 76 PTH 12 N, Steinbach MB, R5G 1T4 or visit my website at tedfalk.ca.

Dawson Trail’s Community Organizations Receive Funding I am happy to report that since the beginning of this year, several organizations in the constituency of Dawson Trail have received grants from our Manitoba government. A Green Team grant of $57,853 will be put to use throughout our area, while Bibliothèque Taché Library received $67,232 for operations and the Richer Rough Stock Rodeo and County Fair received $7,092.93 from the Community Festivals and Events Program. As well, a Lagimodiere graphic novel project was given $3,000 through the Heritage Grants Program and Ste. Genevieve Community Centre received $75,000 from the Building Sustainable Communities Program. Several organizations received grants from the Community Support Small Grant Program. These include $13,362.40 for St. Adolphe Community Club, $12,554.87 for St. Adolphe Curling Club, $20,000 for the Gabrielle-Roy Parent Advisory Committee, $20,000 for the St. Adolphe Child Care Centre, $20,000 for the Grande Pointe Homeowners Association, $11,037.84 for Le Club Amical de St. Adolphe, $4,830 for the Lorette Minor Hockey Association, $14,746.50 for the Landmark Recreation Association and $4,168.75 for Ross Community Centre. Recently, two more organizations in Dawson Trail received funding from our government. Richer Community Centre received $75,000 and the Rural Municipality of Taché received $63,906, both under the Building Sustainable Communities Program. Another way that our government has supported not only Dawson Trail residents, but Manitobans in general, is through our reduction of the provincial sales tax from eight per cent to seven per cent. We promised we would reduce the PST rate in our first term, and we did that on July 1. With this PST cut, Manitoba has the lowest sales tax east of Saskatchewan. The PST reduction benefits everyone, and will bring nearly $2 billion in savings for Manitobans by the end of our second term. Manitoba families will save $1 billion over the next six years. Annually, the PST cut will save Manitoba businesses more than $130 million while giving them – and those who invest in them - an important competitive advantage. The PST reduction will also help municipal governments, school divisions, post-secondary institutions, regional health authorities and other such organizations. Due to these savings, local governments and school divisions will find it easier to balance their budgets without having to raise Manitobans’ taxes. Our government is proud to have done so much during this first term to lessen the tax burden on Manitobans while fixing our province’s finances, repairing services, rebuilding the economy and making Manitoba the most improved province in Canada.


Dawson Trail Dispatch

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Refundable Tax Credits Would Help Alleviate Poverty By Wayne Simpson We have entered a new election cycle, and it appears that a discussion about tax policy will consist primarily of bickering and court challenges around the introduction of a carbon tax and the associated Climate Action Incentive Payment. These attitudes toward taxation strategy are unfortunate, because our modern tax system is very efficient at administering a wide variety of taxes and transferring multiple benefits to Canadians. Indeed, the Federal government reported that its Canada Child Benefit had taken 281,000 (29 per cent) of Canadian children out of poverty by 2018, a substantial achievement toward the 21st century goal of eliminating child poverty. Notably, this purported success at alleviating poverty reflects a significant change in tax policy - the reformulation of child benefits into a refundable tax credit that transfers benefits according to taxable family income. The Current State of Tax Credits Regrettably, most existing tax credits in Canada are not refundable, which means that they can only be applied to taxes owed. These include the universal Basic Personal Amount plus a host of targeted credits for the aged, partners, employment income, Employment Insurance and Canada Pension Plan contributions, education, medical expenses, charitable donations, persons with disabilities, caregivers and the like. In 2015, these credits amounted to more than $63 billion, or about six per cent of the after-tax incomes of Canadians. The Basic Personal Amount (BPA) alone accounted for $37 billion, or 3.5 per cent of income, but the benefits of the BPA and other applicable credits elude low-income tax filers with insufficient taxable income to claim against the tax credit. In fact, these non-refundable credits are regressive for low-income tax filers, because the benefit that the credits provide rises with income, from zero for someone with no taxable income to the full value of the credit for someone with taxable income equal to the full amount of the credit. How disadvantageous is the current tax credit system to those with low income? My colleague Harvey Stevens and I found that families below the

poverty line actually receive a smaller proportion of their income from tax credits than families with somewhat higher incomes. When existing non-refundable credits are replaced with refundable credits in a fairly conventional way, consistent with existing Federal tax rates, the effect on low-income families is quite dramatic. Almost all families below the poverty line benefit from refundable credits. Their after-tax income improves by one-third on average, resulting in four out of 10 families moving above the poverty line, even after consideration of work disincentives. Refundable tax credits nearly eradicate poverty among single parents, and cut poverty incidence at least in half for all other family types except non-elderly single individuals. If the provinces came on board with a similar plan, further reductions in poverty would be achieved. Given Canada’s sorry record on poverty and the many social benefits associated with its elimination this would be an important achievement. How the Tax System Evolved British political philosophers of the 18th and 19th century conceived of taxation on the basis of ability to pay, but typically sought to make the system progressive by introducing a modest amount that would be exempt from tax. The introduction of personal income tax in Canada during the First World War followed this historical pattern, with exemptions that were quite substantial from the outset. My student, Evelina Frolenko, and I have calculated that, allowing for inflation, those war year tax exemptions allowed for $1,068 for singles and $2,136 for married persons in 2018 dollars, compared to a Federal benefit of $1,771 for both groups today. In 1988, to limit the benefit for higher income tax payers and to make the tax system more progressive, the personal exemption was converted to a tax credit (the BPA) valued at the lowest Federal tax rate of 15. That meant its benefit (15 per cent of the BPA) was the same for all taxpayers whose income exceeded the BPA. Other tax credits have generally followed the same pattern, taking the form of tax exemptions before 1988 and non-refundable credits at the low-

est tax rate since 1988. But this pattern continues to deny these benefits to those most in need of income support who lack sufficient taxable income to realize the full benefit of the credit. There have been two important exceptions over the first century of Canada’s personal income tax. When the Goods and Services Tax was introduced in 1991, it was accompanied by a modest refundable GST credit that now guarantees a base benefit of $290 paid in quarterly instalments to families with low incomes. And the aforementioned Canada Child Benefit replaced the Universal Child Care Benefit in 2016 to provide greater income support to low-income families with children. It currently provides a monthly base benefit of $541.33 for each eligible child under six and $456.75 for children aged six to 17 for families with net income below $30,450, and is reduced gradually as income increases. Unlike other non-refundable tax credits, the refundable GST credit and Canada Child Benefit provide benefits to all low-income Canadians who file a tax return, even those with little or no taxable income. What Lies Ahead? In the short term, the prospects for extending tax credit refundability seem dim. Yet Canada now has its first official poverty reduction strategy and an explicit method of measuring our success in achieving poverty alleviation goals. What’s missing and will continue to plague the strategy is an effective means of ensuring that the poverty gap, now clearly identified, is addressed for low-income families. In this respect, tax credit refundability remains a compelling option, especially converting the important and universal BPA to a refundable credit to provide significant income support in an efficient way. That is if the bickering, court challenges and electioneering don’t get in the way. Wayne Simpson is a Professor with the Department of Economics, and Research Fellow, University of Calgary School of Public Policy, University of Manitoba. This article was originally published on The Conversation.

Fatal Vehicle-Pedestrian Collision Near Dufresne On July 2 at approximately 11 pm, Steinbach RCMP responded to a motor vehicle-pedestrian collision on PR 207, near Dufresne.

A 17-year-old male from Lorette was driving south on PR 207, when he collided with a pedestrian who was walking on the roadway. Due to the collision a 42-

year-old male from the RM of Armstrong was pronounced deceased on scene. Alcohol and speed do not appear to be factors in the collision.

August 2019

Fortunate to Have Great Hospital and Police Staff in Ste. Anne Dear Editor: I would like to extend my gratitude to the Ste Anne Hospital staff and the Ste Anne Police for their professionalism and compassion. In July, an individual whom I am Power of Attorney for created an uncomfortable situation at the Ste Anne Hospital. The incident was difficult for all of us, but I was fortunate to have a great team of professionals working quickly for the best solution for the individual in question. We are fortunate to have these great professionals in our community. We don’t realize how good they are until we need them. Anni Markmann Ste Anne

Falk Pleased with Health Care Funding Promise Provencher MP Ted Falk is pleased with a promise by Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer’s promise that if elected he would be increasing Federal funding for public health and social programs. According to Falk, Sheer sent a letter to all Provincial and Territorial Premiers that stable Federal funding to support health care, education, social assistance, early learning and child care, and other programs is important. “Stable federal funding for the health and social transfers means Manitobans will benefit from quality health care, education, and other supports we rely on,” said Falk in a release. “Our Conservative team understands how vital these services are for our province and all Canadians and we are committed to ensuring provinces have the resources they need to deliver them.” In the letter, Sheer promised that both the Canada Health Transfer and the Canada Social Transfer will continue to increase by at least 3% every year under his leadership.






August 2019

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

New Track Highlight of St. Labre 200 By Marianne Curtis Organizers of the annual St. Labre 200 kicked things up a few notches this year by unveiling a number of new things during this year’s event. This is the eleventh year that the Grenier family hosted the southern regions signature charity fundraiser within the RM of Piney. This year’s event which took place on July 5 and 6 was a winner from the moment registration opened to allow twenty teams to compete, an increase over other years. The annual St. Labre 200 is a gokart build off competition where teams are challenged to build their own go-karts within 24 hours. Each team is given basic materials along with their own basic framing materials. Teams build go-karts from scratch on the first day and race their new creations the next day in a fast paced nail biting 200-lap race on a quarter mile dirt track. The winner earns the right to hoist the Best Sleep Centre Sparkplug Cup. François Grenier, President of the St. Labre 200 organizing committee is thrilled with the success of the event, which was just nominated for a Manitoba Tourism Innovation Award. “We moved the track to the back of the yard which gives up more room,” Grenier explained. “The track has been measured and will be groomed to the new expanded location. The

An aerial photo of the newly relocated and improved site for St. Labre 200.

committee along with many volunteers and companies have been working long hours in preparing a brand new track for this year’s event.” Over the past ten years, organizers of St. Labre 200 have been able to

The Mighty Oak

give over $75,000 to different local organizations. This year’s funds will be divided up between five non-profit organizations throughout southern Manitoba. These organizations include First

Steps Wellness Centre, Small Town Kids Daycare Inc. in Rosenort, Les Chouettes de Lorette in Lorette, No Limits for Girls, and Steinbach Sunset Riders 4-H group. The St. Labre 200’s many other

weekend activities included excavator and skid steer rodeo, bounce castles, R/C race cars, rubber boot tosses, ax throwing, live bands, fireworks, Manitoba Arm Wrestling Association sanctioned tournament.

Construction Underway on Carrick Playground By Marianne Curtis

This small oak was grown from an acorn of the 700 year old oak tree which was a landmark of the Chortitza Mennonite settlement in South Russia. It grows at the Mennonite museum at Steinbach. Photo by Joan Airey

Provided photo

With Carrick Days only a few weeks away, volunteers have been working diligently towards completing a beautiful new play park in the community. Through a program called “Campaign for Kids”, Rosalie Stelmack, Office Manager and Bertha Shastid, Sales Production Associate/Assistant Property Caretaker at Heavenly Pines have been working with the community to build a new playground on the grounds of the historical Carrick School. “The playground design has been picked out by members of the community of Carrick,” Stelmack confirmed. “We would like to have it in place in time for Carrick Days this summer.” This year’s Carrick Days is taking place August 10 and 11. Proposed by Shastid, who lives in Carrick, the project will provide a much needed play space for children visiting the community. “Providing a play space for the children of Carrick has been important to me since we moved in,” Shastid explained. “The grounds house the historic Carrick school so it would be wonderful to build a playground on the old school grounds,” she added.

The Heavenly Pines Campaign for Kids raised over $5,000 for the playground. The program is part of the Heavenly Pines Pay-It-Forward which is designed to get communi-

ties and businesses within them to be more involved by focusing on the individual people located within their towns and helping to fulfill their immediate needs.

Taylor Stelmack and her father Chris work on the new playhouse at the Carrick Park.


Dawson Trail Dispatch

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

August 2019



Eastman Tourism Invites Manitobans to Explore Their History By Marianne Curtis at the Midwinter Heritage Site in On July 30, Eastman Tourism East Braintree. launched the Wandering Through The project is a result of partnerHistory: Eastern Manitoba Mu- ships with 17 museums in Eastern seum Tour at a special event held Manitoba and the support of the

Province of Manitoba, Heritage Grants Program. Eastman Tourism Executive Director Jenny Dupas was excited to present the 20-page booklet that

Margaret Feilberg, Wayne Ewasko MLA for Lac du Bonnet, Eastman Tourism Executive director Jenny L. Dupas, and Lesley Gaudry celebrate the launch for the Wondering Through History Eastman Manitoba Museum Tour at the Midwinter Heritage Site in East Braintree. Photo by Marianne Curtis

contains a detailed listing of 17 museums and 8 historic stories located in various communities throughout the region. “Embedded in the fabric of Manitoba are some amazing artifacts and stories housed in these museums that will help you to explore our history even deeper,” said Dupas. “Everywhere you go in southern Manitoba there is a history and a heritage.” Dr. Gordon Goldsborough, Manitoba Historical Society, and author of the Abandoned Manitoba series was on hand to congratulate Eastman Tourism for creating the booklet. “The known universe does not end at the Perimeter Hwy. and I am behind anything that encourages people to get out and visit the many museums and historical sites in Manitoba,” said Goldsborough. “I want people to love Manitoba as much as I do.” Lac du Bonnet MLA Wayne Ewasco spoke on behalf of La Verendrye MLA Dennis Smook. He noted that as a former provincial tourism critic, he commended and congratulated Eastman Tourism for being the most effect volunteer tourism organizations in the province. “They have put

Conservatives Propose Green Home Tax Credit Recently Provencher MP Ted Falk highlighted a proposed two-year plan for Green Homes Tax Credit (GHTC). He said under a Conservative government led by Andrew Scheer, Canadian homeowners will be eligible for the new GHTC to make energy efficient home improvements affordable. “We all like the idea of making our homes more energy efficient, but for so many Canadians it’s just too costly,” said Falk. “As part of our comprehensive plan to protect our environ-

ment, a Conservative government will help homeowners make energy-saving renovations.” With the GHTC, Canadian eligible tax payers will receive a 20% refundable credit on their income tax for green improvements to their homes of over $1,000 and up to $20,000. This will allow Canadians to save up to $3,800 on their renovations each year. Green improvements could include installation of high-quality insulation, high-efficiency furnaces, replacement

of doors and windows with more efficient models, upgrades in ventilation, heating and cooling systems and installation of solar panels. “These improvements don’t just save energy, they help families save money through lower home energy costs in the long term,” said Falk. “Conservatives know we can make life more affordable for Canadians while at the same time reducing emissions and strengthening environmental protection.”

their blood, sweat and tears into promoting tourism in Eastman,” Ewasco stated. “We have so many incredible things to check out, and we want to encourage people to come and find out what we have to offer.” The strategic location of the launch in East Braintree was significant on its own. Taking place at the Midwinter Heritage site, the museum is located in the midst of a rich history on its own. Local resident and historian Margaret Feilberg volunteers tirelessly to keep the museum alive. “This is not only a municipal heritage site, its national and that is significant,” Feilberg explained. “We have much to be proud of and display here in East Braintree.” The community is the home of the first provincial prison farm where those responsible for the Great Winnipeg Strike were held, a Red Cross Nurses station, Brookside Quarry, which provided much of the material used for the construction of the Winnipeg aqueduct. The building itself was used as a school, church, dance hall and community centre. It is still used today for community events.




August 2019

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

Richer Man Wins Chase the Ace A Richer man took home $160,928 after the community club hosted the largest Chase the Ace jackpot since its existence. On July 27, Mike Armstrong was the lucky man who correctly selected the Ace of Spades from the last two cards in the deck at the Richer Community Club Chase the Ace. It took 53 weeks of Chase the Ace for a winner to get lucky. Richer Community Club President Laura Zimmerman, said that nearly 1,000 came to buy tickets or witness the winning draw. “It was nice to see a local boy win,” Zimmerman told media. “He has been playing with us since we started the game back in 2016, so it was nice to see.”

The Richer Community Club would like to thank all the people who supported this game and the staff and management at the Richer Inn for allowing them to host the game on their premises. Now that the jackpot has been won, the Richer Community Club is taking a break for the rest of the summer and will resume again in November. The jackpot will start at $25,000. The Richer Community Club has hosted Chase the Ace at the Richer Hotel since 2016 and raised about $100.000. Money raised during the weekly fundraiser goes towards improvements to such things as the Community Park, playground, skating rink and rodeo arena.

Mike Armstrong from Richer took home $160,928 after selecting the Ace of Spades with two cards left during the Richer Chase the Ace. Provided photo

Annual School Supply Drive Launched Join the Steinbach Family Resource Centre (SFRC) in support of its annual Drive to help every student across the Southeast preparing for a new school year. Whether it is a shiny new pencil case, or a brand new backpack, donating school supplies is an easy way to connect with students in the community and have a positive impact on their learning experience. The Annual School Supply Drive in partnership with Staples in Steinbach is providing families with the opportunity to donate new school supplies to families across the Southeast who are unable to purchase the necessary school supplies for their students. Suggested donations include basic such as pens,

pencils, paper and other school tools that help students engage in lessons and improve overall attendance to overcome instability. To help donations can be dropped off at Staples in Steinbach. Monetary donations can be made at the register when you pick up your own school supplies. Or pick up some extra supplies while you shop. Monetary or high quality donations can also be made at Family Resource Centre in Steinbach from Monday to Friday, 9 am - 4:30 pm at 101 North Front Drive on Hwy 52 between MPI and MB Hydro or donate online at steinbachfrc.ca and click the Get Involved tab to donate via Canada Helps. To find out what support students

need pick up a school supply list from SFRC then return your backpack of supplies by August 15. However you choose to support the School Supply Drive, you are eligible to win a brand new bicycle courtesy of Steinbach Canadian Tire. All in-kind (with store receipt) and monetary donations of $20 or more are entered to win, with one entry per person eligible. Families in need of school supplies are asked to stop by the SFRC to fill out an application, or call for more information.or more information on how you can help, or information on how to register, contact at family@steinbachfrc.ca or 204-346-0413.

Falcon Beach RCMP Respond to Fatal Two-Vehicle Collision On July 21 at approximately 11:15 am, Falcon Beach RCMP responded to a two-vehicle collision on Highway 1 near Barren Lake in Whiteshell Provincial Park. The initial investigation has determined that an eastbound vehicle stopped abruptly and a semi-truck also travelling eastbound crossed into the westbound lane in an attempt to avoid colliding with the eastbound vehicle. The eastbound semi collided with a pick-up truck travelling westbound, causing both vehicles to veer off the highway. The driver of the pickup truck, a 54-year-old male, and passenger, a 17-year-old male, both from Dryden, Ontario, were pronounced deceased on scene. The semi-truck driver, a 22-year-old male from Mississauga, Ontario, and passenger, a 28-year-old male from Brampton, Ontario, sustained minor injuries.

Rivard Nominated in Dawson Trail Incumbent PC Dawson Trail constituency candidate Bob Lagassé has his first official challenger after the Manitoba Liberal Party nominated Robert Rivard. On July 3, Rivard, who is the former mayor of the RM of Tache, was named as the official candidate for the Manitoba Liberal Party in the constituency of Dawson Trail for the upcoming provincial election. “Manitobans deserve health care close to home and the Pallister Government is making access to health care more difficult. I will fight to ensure that public health care is protected in Manitoba,” said Rivard. “We also need to properly fund our public education system to ensure our full potential is reached. Manitoba Liberals have the best plan to take the province and the great constituency of Dawson Trail on a new way forward.” Rivard is well known in the region after spending many years as a leader in the community. He was elected as a Seine River School Division Board Trustee member where he sat for nineteen years, a number as financial officer. More recently, he was elected as Mayor for the RM of Tache where he served one term from 2014-2018. Dawson Trail residents are invited to meet Rivard for coffee and questions at his newly opened office in Lorette located at 1300 Dawson Trail.


Dawson Trail Dispatch

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Local Producer Spotlight:

Stoney Brook Creamery

The Appleby family.

Jim Appleby envisions a vibrant, diverse, local food system without chemical inputs. He grew up on a dairy farm, run by his parents, Sam and Anne Appleby near Steinbach. “My parents stopped using chemicals on the farm when I was a kid,” Jim remembers. “After they stopped spraying, we took great joy in seeing the birds, meadowlarks and bobolinks come back.” In order to make his vision of a diverse local food system a reality, he decided to do his part by starting Stoney Brook Creamery, which now offers fresh, unhomogenized, certified organic milk, chocolate milk and

Stoney Brook Creamery products on the shelf.

Submitted photos

cheese curds derived from the milk from his parents’ farm. Though running a small, organic creamery has been very challenging, Appleby is committed to making it work. He’s also committed to providing the best-tasting milk around. That’s why Stoney Brook Creamery milk only comes in glass bottles. He lives with his wife, Angela, and four children, Brenna, Julianne, Jonah and Thomas, on a farm in Woodmore. His father continues to operate the dairy farm, near Steinbach, where he milks about 100 red and white Holsteins. The creamery is situated right on the farm. The Ap-

pleby family knows that producing healthy, organic food is only part of the equation, so they fill their cupboards and fridge with other organic, locally sourced products, as well. All Stoney Brook Creamery products are available at Can-Am Country Corner, as well as Good ‘n’ Natural and Nature’s Farm in Steinbach. See their website for Winnipeg locations. To learn more about Stoney Brook Creamery or to sign up for their newsletter visit stoneybrookcreamery.ca or phone 204-371-6371.

August 2019

Endangered Orchids Hold Farmers Hostage in Stuartburn The RM of Stuartburn is hoping that neighboring municipalities will help lobby to change the Canada’s Species at Risk Act and the Manitoba’s Endangered Species Act to exempt all farming activities on privately owned property to allow farmers relying on best farm practices to make a living and to provide for their families. According to a recent resolution of council, the RM of Stuartburn has launched the campaign in support of local farmers who are unable to work their land due to endangered species located on their property, specifically the Western Prairie Fringed Orchid. “This is affecting the progress and growth of this municipality, as well as others affected with Endangered Species,” states the resolution put forward by councilor Ed Penner. “The Municipality does not have much aerable acreages with 38% of the municipality covered in wooded treed areas, 34% in grasslands, wetlands at 16%, human built structures at 3% leaving 4% for annual crop land and 5 % for forage areas.” The RM of Stuartburn is home to 23 rare plant species, 4 of which are listed as Endangered, Threatened or Special Concern under Canada’s Species at Risk Act and 6 are listed under Manitoba’s Endangered Species Act including the Western Prairie Fringed Orchid. The municipality is also home to 2,200 hectares (5,436 acres) of Tall Grass Prairie Preserve, an endangered ecosystem, where over half (63%) of the Province’s Western Prairie Fringe Orchids occur. The Nature Conservancy of Canada owns approximately 9,585 hectares (23,685 acres), the Manitoba Naturalists Society approximately 358 hectares (885 acres) and the Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corporation approximately 416 hectares (1,036 acres) all of whom promote the protection of Endangered, Threatened or Special Concern Species. The Acts provide legislation on privately owned lands with the presence of the orchid, thereby regulating the activities of farmers trying to provide a livelihood for their families by farming as much aerable acreages as possible. Council noted that while the promotion of the natural areas of Tall Grass Prairie Preserve and all the endangered or threatened species provides seasonal tourism and economic benefit to the municipality, it however does not sustain the future growth and development of the municipality. They further recognized the uniqueness of the endangered ecosystem, plants and animals within the municipality, however with the orchids thriving on many of the ditches, NCC lands, MNS lands and MHHC lands, council feels that the federal and provincial endangered species act should be amended to exclude privately owned farm lands. The RM of Stuartburn council sent letters to several members of the provincial governments requesting that they lobby to help review the Endangered Species Act and the Species at Risk Act to make amendments so private landowners can make a living off of their land farming.

Western Prairie Fringed Orchid




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August 2019

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

Prairie Day at the Manitoba Tall Grass Prairie Preserve The Manitoba Tall Grass Prairie Preserve will be hosting its annual Prairie Day event on Saturday, August 10, at the Prairie Shore Interpretive Trail, located three kilometres east of Tolstoi on Provincial Road 209. Learn about the plants, birds and insects that call the prairie region their home. A feature speaker will highlight their work on the endangered Poweshiek Skipperling. The

animal ambassadors from The Wildlife Haven Rehabilitation Centre will be on hand and showcase their unique features. Borrow one of our bug nets or bring your own and go on a bug hunt with an amazing entomologist or take in a guided walk to learn about the many wildflowers in bloom. Other activities including picking up a roasting stick to enjoy baking your own bannock, children can do a scavenger

hunt, make crafts, go critter catching or take on the Tall Grass Trivia Challenge and you might win a prize. Admission for the day is $5 per adult and no charge for children. Activities will begin at 10 am and wrap up at 3:30 pm. There is an on-site canteen that will be open from 10:30 am until 3 pm. A BBQ lunch will be available from 11:30 am to 2 pm, note, only cash is accepted at this event. Picnic tables and rustic washrooms are also

available on-site. Visitors should bring a lawn chair or blanket, sunscreen and insect repellent. Trail conditions may be wet so rubber boots or a change of footwear is suggested. All Prairie Day activities will take place rain or shine. For more information on this event, contact Christie at the Manitoba Tall Grass Prairie Preserve at 204-425-3229 or tgpphq@ mymts.net. The establishment of the Manitoba Tall Grass Prairie Preserve in 1989 secured some of the largest and highest quality parcels of tall grass prairie remaining in the province. Shortly after securement by Nature Manitoba (formerly Manitoba Naturalist Society) and Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corporation, seasonal Critical Wildlife Habitat Program staff began inventory efforts to document the various floral and faunal species occurring on these acquisitions. With the addi-

tion of the Nature Conservancy of Canada to the Preserve partnership, the Preserve has grown in size to nearly 6,000 hectares. The list of species identified on the Preserve has also increased. To date, nearly 1,000 species have been documented for the area, several of which are considered rare. The Preserve also provides habitat for many provincially rare species, some of which have very limited distributions. Prairie Day was established to give the public an opportunity to experience the diverse and amazing flora and fauna of the tall grass ecosystem. Over the more than 20 years that the event has taken place, topics have ranged from prairie restoration efforts and techniques to survey efforts for specific species (e.g. Breeding Bird Atlas) as well as featuring a particular group of species such as spiders, bats, frogs and bears, to name but a few.

Tall Grass Prairie Preserve in August.

Past Prairie Day event.

Past Prairie Day event.

Submitted photos


Dawson Trail Dispatch

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Ask Your Candidate About Promises We will have two elections in the next few months, Provincially on Tuesday, September 10 and Federally on Monday, October 21. You will be hearing lots of promises. Please challenge our local candidates on the financial promises. If they say they will cut a tax, ask them how they will pay for it? Either they will need to increase the deficit or they have to cut some other spending. (Don’t let them get away with saying the improving economy will bring in more revenue to cover it…. We’ve heard that one way too many times.) If they say they will introduce or increase a service, how will they pay for it? Again, they will either need to increase the deficit (go into more debt) or they will have to cut something else from the budget. Just like family households, if a new expense is introduced to the family budget (cell phones and internet), either we need to cut something else out of the budget (land lines and cable TV), or else savings will decrease or debts will increase or a bit of both. Ask the candidate: What is the purpose of the proposed tax cut? Who will benefit most? And is it a tax cut that you and most voters have been asking for? Or is it a “boutique” tax cut that will only benefit certain individuals? And if there is a tax cut, should it be for everyone like the recent cut in the Provincial Sales Tax from 8% to 7%? Or should it be focused on those that could use a tax break (lower income individuals and families)? Perhaps there should be no tax cuts as long as we continue to have a budget deficit (more expenses than income each year). And then there can be tax increases in disguise: like the reduction in Manitoba Rent Assist during the past few years. Rent Assist is a benefit for low-income Manitobans who rent their own accommodations in the private market. Or they can be living in subsidized rental facilities too. Both of these benefits have decreased in the past few years. Rent-

ers are paying 30% of their income for rent; previously it was 28%, and that was up from 25% two years ago. This is a “tax increase” to those who can least afford it. I think we need to keep this benefit for those who need it most. A couple of years ago, I helped a daughter/executor with her father’s estate. I knew that he was receiving rent assist (it appears on the income tax return), but I was surprised to find out he had more than $60,000 in savings. I don’t think he should have been receiving the Rent Assist; others need it more. Individuals with a certain amount of assets should not be receiving this benefit. There would be more available to those that need it most. Employment and Income Assistance (EIA) is tied to assets and Rent Assist should be too. And increasing the basic tax exemption does not help those who are already not paying any taxes. There are better ways to help lower income Manitobans and Canadians. I was surprised by a recent “promise” to eliminate the probate fees when someone dies. First of all, the fee reduction would benefit those with more assets. Every province has a probate fee as a percentage of the estate assets. Manitoba has some of the lowest fees (0.7% - that’s $700 per $100,000 of assets). There will still need to be some type of administration fee; it does cost the judges and clerks time and money to process. I’m not sure who has been pushing for this tax cut? And who gains the most? And then there was the suggested removal of PST from the cost of having a Will done. I don’t think that is what is keeping you from getting your Will properly written and executed. Last month I wrote about “Why don’t you have a Will?” and challenged you to get it done by August 15. Let me know how you are doing with that challenge. I’ve had an increase in couples and individuals coming to see me in the past few weeks for some “Will counselling”. If you need some motivation to get

your Wills completed, we invite you to an upcoming “Death Café”. We have two in August and two in September. Call to find out the dates and times and to reserve your seat. Federally, there have not been too many financial promises yet; it’s still early. But when they are announced, be sure to ask the candidates about them. How will it be paid for? Both tax cuts and added programs or services cost money! One item that is of interest to me is the idea of the Federal Pharmacare program. The plan is to make it a universal health care program that no one pays (much like doctors and hospitals now). My question is how will it be paid for? If it is a universal health care program, it could be $7.3 Billion! And how are we paying for that? We will need to increase overall taxes to pay for it. Maybe we will still need some type of deductible, but maybe no deductible for the lowest income earners who often cannot afford their medications. And what happens to the private health plans now? Maybe we should focus on those who least can afford their medications now (eliminate the deductible for some). See my article about Manitoba Pharmacare on my website: AnniMarkmann.ca. I hope you will engage the candidates who seek your vote. Ask them questions and challenge them on their promises. It will be an interesting few months! Anni Markmann is a Personal Income Tax Professional and Certified Financial Planner; living, working, and volunteering in our community. Contact Ste Anne Tax Service at 204422-6631 or 36 Dawson Road in Ste Anne (near Clearview Co-op) or info@saTaxes.ca.

August 2019

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Longest Running Postmaster in Region Retires By Marianne Curtis After a four decade long career with Canada Post, Ile des Chenes Postmaster Jacques Trudeau has stamped his last letter and sorted his last package. As of July 3, Trudeau ended a career which made him one of the province’s longest running postmasters. He was only twenty-seven when he was awarded the contract to take over the Ile des Chenes post office, a position previously held by his maternal grandmother, and then his mother. “Thirteen or fourteen other people applied, including my own brother,” he chuckled. “I got the job!” At the time, the post office was located in a little ATCO trailer at the corner of Main and Dumaine Streets in which you, “Cooked in the summer, and froze in the winter.” “There was no running water and an oil furnace. I remember one time it was so cold in there I could not work, but I never closed,” Trudeau recalled. “I

challenged my supervisor to come work in these conditions and he refused.” Not long afterward a deal was negotiated with the Knights of Columbus. They built a building, and the Canada Post lease paid their mortgage. “The Knights could not afford the building by themselves and this was a win-win.” That agreement remains in place today. Over a forty year period, Trudeau has been there through every change Canada Post has made, from a manual system similar to most banks, into the digital age. “There have been a lot of changes; from limited boxes to community mail delivery,” recalled Trudeau. “Now we handle more packages than letters but we are still an essential part of the community.” Trudeau said he will miss many familiar faces; and looks forward to traveling more in retirement. He also looks forward to spending more time as an elected member of the RM of Tache municipal council, where he sits as Ward 2 councillor.

After a forty-year career with Canada Post in Ile des Chenes, Postmaster Jacques Trudeau has retired. Photo by Marianne Curtis


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August 2019

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Dawson Trail Dispatch


Dawson Trail Dispatch

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

August 2019

13

Frog Follies Celebrates 50 Years

The hardworking team behind the planning of this year’s Frog Follies.

By Marianne Curtis For four days in July, the community of St. Pierre-Jolys pulled out all the stops in celebration of their golden anniversary when they hosted this year’s Frog Follies. Running from July 11 to 14 hundreds of people throughout the province gathered in St. Pierre-Jolys for an action packed weekend of fun. While the sports and traditional entertainment attracted visitors from across Canada, the National Frog Jumping Competition was the crowd favourite. This year’s event included a performance of the youth group of the Ensemble folklorique de la Rivière Rouge comprised of passionate young artists that promote the French-Canadian traditions through music and dance. Also on stage were popular bilingual children’s entertainers Madame Diva and LuLu Bell the Clown. Fireworks capped off Friday night, and on Saturday kicked off with a community parade. The highlight of the day was two shows of extreme freestyle FMX Motocross. Free Ride took to

stage on Sunday for three separate tribute shows. Over the weekend, a variety of family entertainment and activities took place including the annual slo-pitch tournament, ultimate Frisbee demo, children’s tent, Family Feud game, Eric the Juggler, Prairie Exotics, sheep shearing demo, cake-eating contest and more. Fifty years ago, the first Frog Follies was organized by a group of residents who decided they wanted to welcome people to the small town to celebrate their rich Francophone heritage during the province’s Centennial. On July 14, 1970, St-Pierre-Jolys welcomed HRH Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Charles for a 20 minute visit to launch the first ever Frog Follies. Many events were held that weekend, including the First Canadian National Frog Jumping Championship. Mayor Fernand Lavergne issued a public challenge to politicians and mayors of other towns. The winner of the first frog jumping contest was Albert Driedger, Reeve of the RM of Hanover, when his frog, Georges, jumped 7 feet 1.25 inches.

This year’s 50th Anniversary Frog Follies in St. Pierre-Jolys was a hit.

Photos by Marianne Curtis


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August 2019

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Dawson Trail Dispatch


Dawson Trail Dispatch

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

August 2019

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August 2019

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Surviving the Family Road Trip

Give your family a chance to get used to being in the car for extended periods of time. This is especially important if you have young children.

Looking to take the family on an exciting road trip this summer? Here are four easy tips from parenting expert Maureen Dennis to help you not just survive the trek, but also ensure everyone has a great time and makes incredible memories together. 1. Plan perfect. Planning can be as simple or complicated as you like. Try a destination-based plan, meaning that each day you pick a target destination. On the first day, everyone is fresh, energized and very excited about getting away. Use this energy to get as far as you can on day one. 2. Explore your own backyard. If you’ve never done a family road trip, start small. Choose a destination two to four hours away and give your family a chance to get used to being in the car for extended periods of time. This is especially important if you have young children.

3. Give the whole family a heads up. Speak to your children ahead of your trip and let them know what to expect. You can talk about what you will see along the way, what they can do in the car to stay busy and about managing their liquids to limit the number of bathroom breaks. 4. Fully charged fun. Though road trips are tons of fun, it can be challenging to keep the littlest members of the family entertained in the car between stops. With the new Hyundai Palisade, parents no longer need to mitigate arguments about device chargers. The SUV houses seven USB chargers so the whole family can be plugged in for the entire road trip. Plus, three rows of seating means that everyone can comfortably spread out and enjoy the ride. Article courtesy of www.newscanada.com

Dawson Trail Dispatch


Dawson Trail Dispatch

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

August 2019

17

Make This Your Summer of Self-Care

Summer is a great time to relax and unwind, focusing on your physical and mental health.

Summer is a great time to relax and unwind, focusing on your physical and mental health. But sometimes the whirlwind of activities and having the kids home can get in the way of making this a time to destress. Get your self-care in check with these tips and ideas: 1. Spend time outside. There’s nothing like enjoying fresh air, sun and nature to make you feel calm and centred. Pick an activity you truly enjoy doing outdoors – whether it’s walking in the park, swimming, gardening, golfing or picking berries. When travelling, check with your local hotel on services they offer. The Westin brand, part of Marriott Bonvoy, offers free bike rentals to guests so you can explore cities and parks. 2. Treat yourself. You don’t need a reason or an excuse to do something nice for yourself, like planning a weekend getaway or a day at the spa. 3. Get organized. Knowing you have a list of things to do can be stressful. Instead of trying to do it all or ignoring it and letting the worry get to you, focus on a few key tasks or projects to chip away at. Whether it’s getting the kids’ school supplies or reorganizing your closet, tackle things one at a time with patience. 4. Recommit to wellness. Between barbecues and days spent lounging in the sun, it’s easy for our health goals to fall by the wayside during the warmer months. But eating well and exercising help us feel our best, so make a commitment to balancing out well-deserved summer indulgences with nutritious, in-season produce and regular physical activity. 5. Diet without dieting. Summer is all about outdoor

events, reconnecting with friends and added office parties. If your calendar is full and you’re worried about overeating, follow this rule: You can have some, but don’t have it all. If you really want that piece of pie at a bbq have it. But skip the other high calorie options like dips, cheese and extra cocktails. 6. Get the kids to unplug. Going on a holiday with the family is about spending time together, not time on the phone or tablet. To help your kids enjoy the moment, try these tips: a) Get a real camera. Everyone wants to take photos of their memories, but you can stay away from the smartphone by going old-school. Older kids will enjoy learning to use a DSLR and feel like photography pros, while younger ones will appreciate the instant gratification of a polaroid. b) Plan something unique. Forget the basic road trip and organize an adventure. Think surf lessons, a Game of Thrones walking tour or white-water rafting. With Marriott Bonvoy, the hotel chain’s loyalty program, you can quickly and easily book your hotel room and once-in-a-lifetime experiences like these while earning points and getting the best rates all through Marriott. com. c) Create a travel book. Your kids will need something to keep them busy during downtime. Instead of screen time playing a game or watching a movie, work on a scrapbook together before leaving where they can sketch what they see, journal about their experiences and eventually stick photos on. Article courtesy of newscanada.com

Long Weekend Mini-Vacation Ideas One of the best parts of our short Canadian summers is the opportunity to enjoy them a little bit extra on long weekends. If you need ideas, check out these creative things to do whether you decide to stay in town or go away. 1. Do a dinner crawl. Pub crawls are fun for couples, friends and also families with older kids. For an exciting twist that stretches your dollars and lets you taste food from several spots before you get too full, try a dinner crawl. Eat apps at one restaurant, mains at another and dessert at another. 2. Go on a mini getaway. You don’t need to go very far to enjoy a vacation – exploring a Canadian city over a summer weekend is great way to treat yourself to a holiday. Whether it’s checking out the museums in Toronto or the parks in Vancouver, there’s some-

thing for everyone. For upgraded benefits, special experiences and the best rates guaranteed, join Marriott Bonvoy and book direct on Marriott.com. 3. Host a potluck. Perfect whether you’re staying at home or going to your cottage, gather friends and family together for some food and fun. A potluck is an easy and affordable way to host a big get-together and lets everyone try something new and swap recipes. Make the festivities extra special with a fireworks potluck, too – ask everyone to bring some fireworks or sparklers and put on a light show. Just be sure to follow local regulations for consumer fireworks. Try to make each long weekend as much of a change from your usual routine as possible so that you feel refreshed when you have to go back to work. Article courtesy of newscanada.com

Check for Electrical Hazards Around Pool As the weather heats up, swimmers are heading out to backyard, community and public pools, hot tubs and spas. When it comes to pool safety, drowning is the first concern that comes to mind, but there is another danger to swimmers: electrocution. Where is the danger? - Faulty underwater pool lighting - Aging electrical wiring that hasn’t been inspected in years - The use of sump pumps, power washers and vacuums that are not grounded - Outdoor lighting, circuits and receptacles not protected by GFCIs - Damaged cords on electrical equipment The best protection is inspection, detection and correction of potential electrical hazards. Have a licensed electrical contractor install and maintain your pool wiring and upgrade protection equipment.

In addition: - Never touch electrical cords, switches, or appliances when you are wet, standing in water or have wet hands. - If an electrical cord or appliance falls into the water do not try to retrieve it until you turn off the power at the main switch. - Never use a damaged cord. - Read and follow the manufacturer’s instructions when using a wet/dry vacuum or pressure washer. - Use Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCIs) on all outdoor outlets. A GFCI is a type of circuit breaker that is designed to prevent serious shock. A GFCI should be used in any area where water may come in contact with electrical products. Enjoy a safe summer. For more information on safety around pools visit hydro.mb.ca.


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August 2019

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

Lean Wholly into a Believing Faith What does it mean to believe? When someone tells you something, you say, “I believe you.” You are accepting what they say as truth. When the Bible talks about a believing faith, what does that mean? In Acts 16:31 Paul told the Philippian jailor, “Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ, and thou shalt be saved.” In the 1800’s, John G. Patton was a missionary to the cannibals of the New Hebrides islands in the South Sea. One of his tasks was to translate the Bible into their language. He struggled trying to find a suitable way to describe faith in terms the people could understand. One day as he was sitting on his kitchen chair, a native came into his house. A new thought entered his mind, so he asked the native what he (John) was doing. The native replied, “You’re sitting down.” Then John pulled his feet up off the floor and rested them on the rung of the chair. He again asked the native what he was doing. The native relied, “You are leaning wholly. You have lifted yourself from every other support.” John now had his answer! To lean on Jesus Christ wholly is surely the true meaning of saving faith and believing in the Person (Christ), His work (He died on the cross to save you from your sins) and His Word (Bible). Christ will save all those who cast themselves totally upon Him and upon Him alone. It’s not Christ plus something else. Colossians 2:10 says, “Ye are complete in him (Christ).” In John 6:47 Christ said, “He that believeth in me hath everlasting life.” Friend, have you believed wholly in Christ for your salvation? If so, then rejoice in the finished transaction that He has done in your life. If you haven’t believed in Christ yet, then why not wholly rest on Him today as your personal Saviour. God bless you as you let these thoughts penetrate your heart and mind.

Hanover Ag Fair Ready to Roll Bring your friends and have some fun at this year’s Hanover Ag Fair when it takes place August 15-18 on the Hanover Ag grounds in Grunthal. Gates open Thursday evening with opening Ceremonies, and Hanover Ag Bull Riders Canada Invitational competition, which continues on Friday. Other weekend highlights include the Saturday morning parade, Grassroots Family Gymkhana, CWHA Horse Show, Redneck Roundup-ATV & Mini-bike Rodeo and helicopter rides. On the Main Stage, Friday kicks off with an outdoor movie. On Saturday afternoon, entertainment begins with School of Rick, Soundwriters’ Round, Seanster & the Monsters, and awards. The night will end with the Backyard Jam. Sunday, a community worship service is taking place, followed by family friendly activities throughout the day.

Grunthal Girls Bring Home Gold Over the weekend of July 20-21, the Grunthal Fusion Girl’s Softball team took Gold at the U19 B Provincials held at John Blumberg Park in Headingley. The team went into Provincials with a record of 15 wins, 1 loss and 1 tie during the regular season. The girls also attended the Fargo tournament and brought home Gold after the Steinbach Storm tournament earlier this season. Coach Jeff Friesen said the win was well earned after the team missed previous attempts to bring home the championship. “I’ve been coaching these girls for the past seven years and we have come close a few times to winning Gold at Provincials and we finally got it done…” stated Friesen proudly. The girls went undefeated during the round robin at Provincials, taking on Nations United, Bonivital West, and Kirkland West Bears. In the semis, they knocked out Bonivital East, which took them into the final against the undefeated Brandon Heat. Brandon led 4-1 at the end of the 4th inning, but Fusion fought their way back, to a 5-4 win, earning them Gold.

Back row (l-r) Jeff Friesen, Kirsten Friesen, Chloe Novak, Shannen Friesen, Gina Broesky, Danica Shilling, Erin Lemay, Dave Hill. Front row: Karlee Friesen, Morgan Driedger, Chanelle Marion, Megan Funk, Jocelyn Hill, Anika Neufeld. Christina Boonstoppel and Hannah Beaudette are missing from the photo. Submitted photo


Dawson Trail Dispatch

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

August 2019

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Petty-Minded Irritations

Minds in Motions Looks for Volunteers By Marianne Curtis Volunteers interested in working with dementia clients in the southeast region are encouraged to help out with Minds in Motion. The Minds in Motion program was brought to the Steinbach area last September by the Alzheimer Society of Manitoba. The program combines functional exercises, socialization and cognitive activities where participants will meet others who are living similar journeys. It is designed for people living with early to moderate symptoms of dementia to attend with a family member or community friend. Jennifer Reimer, Minds in Motion South Eastman Regional Coordinator invites volunteers to step forward to assist with the delivery

of this worthwhile program. “At the Alzheimer Society of Manitoba, we heavily rely on volunteers to help facilitate our programs and educational events,” explained Reimer. “It is a program that combines physical activity, socialization, and cognitive stimulation for people with early to moderate symptoms of dementia to attend with a family member or community friend.” Volunteers working with the program will be encouraged to engage socially with program participants, assist with set-up and clean-up of refreshments, games and activities and assist with program facilitation. The actual Minds in Motion takes place every Tuesday morning for two hours for eight weeks. Three sessions are being offered, fall,

winter and summer. The two main components include 45 to 60 minutes of exercise led by a trained fitness leader, and 45 to 60 minutes of cognitively stimulating activities facilitated by the Minds in Motion program coordinator and volunteers. “If this type of commitment isn’t possible with your schedule, we also have 1-time opportunities that pop up a number of times a year,” Reimer added. Training is provided in one hour sessions that offer a comprehensive overview of the program. Anyone interested in volunteering are encouraged to called 204-326-5771 or visit alzheimer.mb.ca/mindsinmotion to review the Volunteer Facilitator position and register for upcoming training sessions.

Psalm 23:5 . . . You prepare a table before me in the presence of my enemies. You anoint my head with oil; my cup overflows. (NIV) Summertime – here come the flies, the bugs and so many other creepy things. When we take a drive through the countryside during the summer month’s we cannot help see cows, horses, and sheep grazing in the fields, they seem to be everywhere. But we also notice how the animals are bothered by flies. I have heard that sheep farmers smear a compound composed of linseed oil, sulphur and tar, over the sheep’s nose and head; this, they say, will protect the sheep from those pesky nose flies. The farmer also points out, that an incredible transformation takes place among the sheep. Once the oil has been applied there is an immediate change in the sheep’s behaviour. Gone is the fuss and running about, the touchiness and the restlessness. Instead, the sheep will graze quietly again, then soon lie down to rest completely at peace. I wonder if this could be the exact picture of all the irritations in our own lives. How easy it is to have my day ruined by a fly in my own soup, how easy it is to pour cold water on my most lofty spiritual experiences! So often it is the small, petty annoyances that can ruin one’s day. Has it ever happened that you have had a fly in your soup during a lunch break? These small distractions can become burning issues that drive us around the bend or straight up a wall. And if we are not careful, these small things can torment us to the point where we feel totally frustrated. There have been times when my behaviour as a Christian has been tarnished; and later I feel rather ashamed of myself. Just as with sheep, there must be continuous and renewed application of oil to forestall, to prevent the flies in my life. There must be the continuous outpouring of God’s gracious Spirit to counteract the ever-present clashes, those nasty quarrels, those personality conflicts. One application of oil, sulphur, and tar was not enough to keep those annoying flies away for the entire summer. It was a process that had to be repeated. The fresh application was an effective medication. There are those who believe that in the Christian life one need only to have the initial encounter, that one meeting, that one touch of God’s Holy Spirit. Yet the frustrations of all the daily problems we meet up with demonstrate that we need much more than that. We need to have the continuous touch of the Holy Spirit to counter the attacks of one’s tormentors; to bring peace to a troubled mind and heart. When people, circumstances or events beyond our control tend to disturb us, it is possible to be content and satisfied when these outside forces are counteracted by the presence of God’s Spirit in us. It is this daily walk with our Lord that will produce in us a mind that is at rest. As the Bible points out, if we allow God’s Spirit to work in our lives, contentment, love, patience, gentleness, and peace will be produced. What a contrast, what a difference this is to the tempers, frustrations, and irritableness which ruin the daily conduct of so many of God’s children. With my limited understanding, as a mere human being, I cannot always understand how Christ’s unlimited wisdom moulds us into His very own image. Our natural tendencies are to fear, worry and ask why? Somehow most of us just cannot believe, or we assume that Jesus Christ, the very Author of life itself, really does not know what He is doing with us. There are times when I just lose it and run from the very source which supplies me with the power to overcome. I have been known to even go so far as to believe that I can survive on my own. But despite this perverse wayward behaviour, I am so glad God did not give up on me, on us. He did not let us drift helplessly. The only possible motivation is His own love, His care and concern for us as His very own. And despite us doubting Him, despite our wavering about His management of our affairs, He has picked us up and tenderly and lovingly restored our faith in Him. To God be the Glory Great Things He Has Done. Would you pray this prayer with me? “Lord Jesus, come into my heart. Forgive my sins. I want my life to change. My thoughts and my attitude need to change. I do not have peace in my heart, I really want that peace, joy, and happiness that I long for. Please let the Holy Spirit help me be the kind of Christian that will bring honour to Your Name.” Amen.


20

August 2019

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

C ommunity E vents Carrick Carrick Days – from Saturday, August 10 – Sunday, August 11 on Main St. Parade and gate opens at 12 pm. Horseshow tournament, concession stand, silent auction, supper, continuous entertainment, spectacular fireworks at 10 pm. Sunday, breakfast at 10 am and Bean Bag Competition. Dugald Prairie Voices Toastmasters – On Tuesdays at 6:30 pm in the Springfield Library. Falcon Lake Alcoholics Anonymous - Whiteshell group meets every Wednesday and Saturday at 8 pm in All People’s Church, Falcon Lake. Come and meet with us or call 204-3492374. We can help. Grunthal Hanover Ag Fair – From Thursday, August 15 – Sunday, August 18 at the Hanover Ag Exhibition Park. Thursday, August 15 and Friday, August 16 Bull Riders Canada Invitational, Saturday, August 17 Parade, CWHA Horse Show, Supplement King Strongman Competition, Back Porch Jam concert presented by Penn-Co & Fireworks and Sunday, August 18 Cutting Horse Show, Highland Games, Arm Wrestling Competition and Demolition Derby. Contact 204371-1987, info@hanoverag.com, or visit hanoverag.com. Hadashville Reynolds Moms & Tots Playgroup – On Wednesdays until June from 10 am – 5 pm. Crafts, Gym Use, Playroom, Snack, Outdoor Play. Contact Angie Hood 204-295-4010 Ile-des-Chênes Ritchot Senior Services at the TransCanada Centre. Call 204339-6141 for more information. Foot Care Clinic - On Tuesday, September 3. Call for an appointment Janice 204-883-2880. Story Time in Pyjamas - Every Thursday evening at the Ritchot Library Ecole Regional Gabrielle-Roy at 6:30 pm. Ages 2-8 however all ages are welcome. Kleefeld Honey Festival – From Friday August 30 – Sunday, September 1. On Friday begins with a Movie Night in the park. Saturday morning bright and early with our Free Pancake Breakfast from 7 – 9 am and the 5km Kleefeld Honey Run at 7:30 am. Cheer all of the racers on as they compete for local Honey! Then a Parade, stay at the park for a perogy and farmer sausage lunch, free Petting Zoo, family games, kids entertainers, and watch the baseball tournament, Axe Throwing, Archery, Fire Fighters Challenge, Various Vendors, Highland Games tournament and try your hand at the sport. Evening starts with a chicken dinner and a concert in the park. We end Saturday night with the best Fireworks in the area! Community Playgroup - For parents, caregivers and children up to age 5. Activities include time for playing, stories, songs and snacks. Every 2nd and 4th Thursday of the month at the Rec Centre. Contact Irene Ascough 204-377-5013. La Broquerie Chase The Ace – On Wednesdays at 6 pm at The Frantz Inn, Hwy 52. Tickets $1 each, from 6 - 8 pm. Draw takes place at 8:10 pm. If the Ace is not pulled, the winner will take home 10% of that night’s ticket sales and 45% will be added to the next week’s Jackpot. Every week that the Ace of Spades in not pulled, the pot grows larger! Funds raised to support Agape House. Contact 204-326-6062. Seine River Services for Seniors- Health Centre/Centre de Santé from Monday - Friday 8:30 am - 4 pm. Services and programs for seniors. Income Tax help, Lifeline, mobility equipment, foot care, hair care, transportation, home maintenance, yard maintenance, Telecheck, E.R.I.K. program, puzzles and games. Contact Community Resource Coordinator Juliette Rowan, 204-424-5285 or labseinerss@gmail. com. Shopping Trips to Winnipeg’s St.Vital Mall every first Thursday of the month, leaving at 10 am - 3 pm. Cost $15. Steinbach’s Clearspring Centre every last Thursday of the month, from 10 am - 1 pm. Cost $10. Landmark Friendship Festival – On Friday, August 9 at 6 pm - Sunday, August 11 at 2 pm at the Archie Plett Park. Friday events include lawnmower races, horseshoes, bike decorating contest, line dancing. Saturday free pancake breakfast, parade, hot dog lunch, Kids playground, dunk tank, laser tag, Vendor Village, Folklorama Presentation, comedian, BBQ, dance, fireworks. Lorette Ritchot Senior Services Foot Care Clinic – On Wednesday, September 25 at Le Club des Bles D’or with a certified foot care nurse. By appointment only. Call Janice 204-883-2880. Supper - Every Tuesday and Friday at Le Club des Bles D’. Please reserve your meal one day prior, before 6 pm by calling 204-878-2682 and leave a message. TD Summer Reading Club – At the Bibliothèque Taché Library. It’s free and open to kids’ age 0 - 17. On Wednesdays from 10:30 am – 1 pm. A Craft every week and Prizes to be won. Don’t forget to drop off your reading logs before Thursday, August 22 to get your goody bag and qualify for the draw! Winners will be announced in September.

Craft Day – On Wednesday August 14 and 21 from 10:30 am - 1 pm at the Tache Library

Richer Recovery AA - Group meets Monday from 7:30 - 8:30 pm at LUD Hall in Richer. Contact Paul at 204-422-7673.

Lego Club – On Thursday, August 15 from 10:30 - 11:30 am. Drop-in at the Tache Library.

Monday Night Bingos - To raise funds for Stacey Pchajek Memorial Foundation Inc. The foundation provides scholarships, bursaries and prizes to students graduating grades 8 and 12. Children under 14 must be accompanied by an adult to be on premises and must play bingo. Doors Open at 5:30 pm at the Young at Heart Club, 22 Dawson Rd. MGCC License # BI/BO4164. Contact Doreen Pchajek at 422-5243 or doreen@spmf.ca.

WISE Kid-Netic Energy – On Thursday, August 22 at the Tache Library from the Hosted by the University of Manitoba for some science fun. Cost is free. Register as space is limited. CodeMakers JR. (Age 5—8) from 10 - 11 am. This workshop will introduce coding concepts through a bodily kinesthetic activity and a programmable mouse game. Great for students with developing literacy skills. Barn Design (Age 5-11) from 11:15 am - 12:15 pm. A dairy barn must meet the needs of not only milking cows, but also calves, heifers, and more. Try your hand at designing and building a barn that will keep everyone safe and comfortable. Attention Newcomers - Have you purchased a home or condo in the area, over the last year? The Welcome Basket Committee of the LUD of Lorette would be happy to answer questions. We have a free basket of coupons, small gifts, samples, brochures, and business cards which have been generously provided by the businesses and organizations. To arrange a visit please e-mail lorettewelcomebasket@ gmail.com. No strings attached. PTSD Support Group – Every 2nd Thursday of the month at 7 pm at the RM of Tache office, Hwy 206. Volunteer support group meeting for posttraumatic stress disorder support group. Chase the Ace Lottery – On Thursdays from 7 - 9 pm with the draw at 9:15 pm at Dawson Trail Motor Inn Bar. Come, support this very much needed complex, at the same time have the chance to chose the Ace of Spade, and win the grand prize jackpot. Hosted by the Community Complex Fundraising Committee. Junior Youth – Every Wednesday from 7 - 8:45 pm at Seine River Church, 1464 Dawson Rd (east of rink) for ages 9 - 12. Free. No registration required. Non-denominational. Contact lorettejryouth@gmail.com, 204-260-9304. Middlebro Party in the Park – On Sunday, August 25 from 12 – 3 pm at the park. Family games ending with Pots and Pans Baseball live music, market tables, Chili or Hot Dog lunch. Mitchell Seniors’ Breakfasts – Every Tuesday, from 8 - 9:30 am at the Seniors’ Centre, 130 Ash St. Open to all. Cost from $3 to $6. Bring a friend and enjoy the fellowship. Contact Jane Penner, 204-346-2469, jpenner@jantre.com. Niverville GriefShare - If you or someone you know has experienced the loss of a loved one we wish to help, you get support and learn about the grieving process. Contact 204-381-1155 to register or go to Nivervillegriefshare.com. Moms N’ Tots Playgroup - Moms with children up to age six. Wednesday mornings from 9:30 - 11:30 am located in the lower level of Fourth Avenue Bible Church (62-4th Avenue S.) Free drop-in program with coffee and snacks provided, along with a large open space for the kids to play while the moms visit. Contact Karen at klenzrpeters@hotmail.com. Paradise Village Paradise Squares Dance Club - On Tuesdays from 7 – 9:30 pm at the Paradise Village Rec. Hall. Modern Square Dancing is fun and a great social activity. Couples and singles are welcome. Contact Larry 204-422-5424. Pinawa Whiteshell Toastmasters – On Tuesdays at 11:30 am at Whiteshell Laboratories, 1 Ara Mooradian Way. Sign-in required. Prawda Busy Bodies Playgroup – Every Wednesday from 9 - 11 am at the Reynolds School Gym. Free to parents and children. Snacks provided. Contact Cassie 204-793-8290. Richer Richer Rough Stock Rodeo – From Friday, August 9, 2019 – Sunday, August 11, at the Dawson Trail Park. Multiple “Rodeo of the Year” winner. Friday Night Bullnanza! Kids welcome to the 4-H “Horsin’ Around”, Crafts, Games, Horsemanship, RRR Trading Post, Gymkhana registration, Mechanical Bull, Party in the Park Cowboy Social. Saturday Pancake Breakfast at the Young at Heart Club, Chicken scramble, Mutton Busting, Wild Pony Races, Petting zoo and Family Fun zone. Busking Stage featuring a variety of entertainment and a Concert/Social. Sunday Heartland Rodeo! Live music on two stages, lots of activities for the kids and entire family. Giant Trading post with crafts and other goods. Daily to 3-Day passes available. Adult & Teen Challenge Concerned Persons Support Group Join us Thursday evenings at 7 pm, in the Richer Fellowship Church, 50 Southeast Drive. If you have a relationship with someone who has a life-controlling problem, join us for this nine-week Living Free course. Receive encouragement and support in a safe setting, and learn practical ways to best help your loved one. Contact Pastor Ben Funk at 204-3262254 or phone the church at 204-422-5308.

Roseau River 50th Anniversary Picnic – On Sunday, August 25 from 2 pm to dusk at the Park, Hwy 59. Celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Park. $10 admission fee ages 13 and up, 12 yrs and under Free. Horseshoe tournament, slow pitch tournament, kids carnival games, kids bouncer, face painting, henna tattoos, history/reminiscing speeches, chicken BBQ supper (included in $10 admission fee), Heather Bishop and Quinton Blair, anniversary cake, and Fireworks! Bring Lawnchairs. Contact Tammy Derksen 204-427-3054, roseauriverpark@gmail.com. Sarto Ukrainian Dance Club – On Mondays from 7 - 8 pm at the Sarto Hall. Join the Sarto Polevnyi Ukrainian Dance Club for the season! You do not need to be Ukrainian to dance! Boys & girls, ages 3 to adult, no prior experience required! Cost starts at $150/year. South Junction Southeast Farmer’s Market – Every Friday in August from 10 am – 3 pm at the Pine Grove Seniors Club. Contact Jen 204-423-2223 for table rentals or information. Lunch available. Sprague Sprague Fest – On Saturday, August 10 from 7 am - 4 pm at the Community Hall. Fire Department Pancake Breakfast fundraiser, basketball, parade, Kids activities, horseshoes, consignment auction, rainbow auction, live music, bingo, basket ball tournament 3-on-3. Social with Coz 4 Alarm from 8 pm – 1 am, Cost $10. Contact Doris 204-4372210. Show & Shine Car Show – On Saturday, August 17 at the Community Hall. Sprague & District Historical Museum - Open by appointment from June – September 30. Explore life as it was in the early days. Free Admission. Donations Accepted. Contact 204-437-2210, 204-437-2209 or 204-437-4686. St. Adolphe Lunch at the St. Adolphe Drive In – On Thursday, August 15. Summer is quickly coming to an end, it’s time to get together and enjoy an afternoon with friends. If you haven’t tried the new Drive in, now is the perfect time, if you have you already know what you’re ordering. Please call Janice for details 204-883-2880. Sunflowers & Picnic – On Tuesday, August 27 at the A Maze in Corn for their Sunflower Expo. A Maze in Corn has over 40 varieties of sunflowers. We will tour the sunflowers for about an hour and then head over to the shaded picnic shelter. Pack your lunch and we will enjoy a picnic lunch all together. After lunch we will head over to see all the animals in the petting zoo. Don’t forget your camera. Cost $10. You must preregister for this event with Janice 204-883-2880. Foot Care Clinic – On Tuesday, August 6 at 457 Main St. with Ursula Giesbrecht certified foot care nurse. By appointment only. Call Janice 204-883-2880. Club Amical Lunches and Bingo will be starting up again September 19. Pickleball will get started at the St. Adolphe school and Old Time Dance start up September 14 at the Pioneer Hall. Mood Disorders Meeting – On Thursdays at 2:30 pm, 457 Main St. with Tara Brousseau, Executive Director for a support group, with topics on depression, bipolar, recovery, shame, resilience, mindfulness, meditation, coping and self soothing skills, interrelationship skills, seniors’ issues, distress tolerance and peer to peer support. All ages are welcome. C.H.I.L.D program – On Wednesdays from 9:30 - 10:30 am at Ecole St. Adolphe School. Children’s introduction to learning and development. Contact sas@srsd.ca or 204883-2182. St. Pierre-Jolys Army Cadets – Begins in the Fall. Join the 3234-Manitoba Horse RCACC Army Cadets. Leadership, citizenship, community service, sports, orienteering, canoeing, marksmanship, drill, band and more. For all youth aged 12 - 19. Enrollment is Free, No deadline to register. Contact Capt Roxanne Maynard, Commanding Officer 204-324-4034, roxanne. maynard@cadets.gc.ca. Stay and Play Group – Every Monday from 9:30 – 11:30 am at YFC Cinema. Snacks, coffee served, childcare available. The Knights of Columbus - The St-Pierre Carillon Council – On the first Thursday of the month at 482 Jolys Ave. W. Contact 204-433-7633.

Ste. Agathe Seniors Group Card Games – On Tuesdays from 1:30 - 4:30 pm at the Community Centre, 183 Pembina Trail. Cost Membership $10 a year. Bring a friend Day. Contact 204-882-2180. Foot Care Clinic Ritchot Senior Services – Date to be announced with a certified foot care nurse at the Chalet, 431 Ave Bourret. By appointment only please. Call Janice 204883-2880. Taekwondo - Every Tuesday and Thursday from 6:15 - 7:30 pm at Ecole Sainte Agathe hosted by Kang’s Taekwondo Academy. Cost $40/month. Family rates available. Contact Jason Barnabe, jason.barnabe@gmail.com or 204-8023458. Ste. Anne Dawson Trail Days - From Friday, August 30 to Sunday, September 1 at the Arena. Sock Hop with 5050/ draw, silent auction, face painting, DJ music and food on Friday, August 30 from 6 – 10 pm at the curling club. Cost $5, children under 3 free. Saturday, many activities, slo-pitch tournament, music, fireworks, fitness challenge and Craft and Vendor show. Annual Kids Baseball tournament on Sunday September 1. Annual Show and Sale – On Saturday, August 31 from 10 am - 3 pm hosted by the South East Artists at The Club Jovial at 157 Central in Ste Anne. Demonstrations and Sale of Art to enjoy. Used Book Sale - From Saturday, August 31 to Sunday, September 1 at the Curling club. Organized by Accueil Kateri Centre food bank. Proceeds will go towards purchasing new children’s books for the Christmas hampers. Thanks in advance! We are looking for used French or English, fiction, non-fiction and children books. Contact Annette Schewe 204-422-8599, Rachel Mulaire Boisvert 204-422-9042. Piano Lesson - With Josue Beaudoin, on Monday nights at 112 Central Ave. Cost $200/10 lessons payable to the Cultural Committee of Ste. Anne. Contact 201-422-9599, cccsa@mymts.net. Seine River Services for seniors – Services and programs for seniors. Income Tax help, Lifeline, mobility equipment, foot care, hair care, transportation, home maintenance, yard maintenance, Telecheck, E.R.I.K. program, puzzles and games. Shopping Trips to Winnipeg’s St.Vital Mall every first Thursday of the month, leaving at 10 am - 3 pm. Cost $15. Steinbach’s Clearspring Centre every last Thursday of the month, from 10 am - 1 pm. Cost $10. Contact Juliette Rowan at 204-424-5285 Community Resource Coordinator for local services or e-mail labseinerss@gmail.com.

Movie Night at the Library – Every 4th Friday of the month at 6:30 pm at the Jake Epp Library. We alternate between a family movie and a classic movie. Free admission and popcorn are included. Children 12 and under must be accompanied by an adult. Contact Madison Redekopp 204326-6841, programs@jakeepplibrary.com. Breast Feeding Group – On Fridays at 10:30 am at the Steinbach Family Resource Centre for a support group, current information and a variety of presentations. Contact 204-346-0413. Toddler & Me Story Hour - Classes offered three times a year for a 10-week session in Fall and Winter and a 5-week session in Spring. Classes are free. Enjoy stories, songs, rhymes, literacy and parenting tips, crafts and snack for parents and their children ages 1-3. Advanced In-person registration is required. Limited space available. Drop In Book Club – 2nd Tuesday every month at 7 pm in the Jake Epp Library. We’ll post the book for discussion that month and if you’d like to join us please stop by. If you want to start your own book club instead, you can always take advantage of our Book Club collections. No sign up required. Just read the book and come hang out. Knit-Wits Drop-In Club for Adults - Every 4th Monday of the month, from 6 – 9 pm at the Jake Epp Library. This is for anyone interested in fibre handcrafts such as knitting, crocheting, cross-stitch, needlepoint etc. This is not a class but a casual knitting circle for all skill levels. Please bring your own items/supplies. TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) – On Wednesdays, from 8:45 - 10:30 am at the Royal Canadian Legion. Cost $2/week. A weight control support group that helps take off pounds sensibly and keep off pounds sensibly. Contact Betty-Lou Toews at 326-6397. Eastman Immigrant Services - Many events and activities to support and help you make new friends. Volunteer to help at our community events. Southeast Entry Program Online: Learn about Health Care, Employment and Laws. To register for this 4-week online program, contact Josie@eastmanis. com, 204-346-6609 or email lois@eastmanis.com. Eastman Safety Upcoming Programs - Located at 385 Loewen Blvd. Register online at eastmansafety.ca or contact 1-204-371-1595. Creativi-Tea Time Adult Colouring Group - Twice monthly on the 2nd Wednesday from 6:30 - 8:30 pm and on the 2nd Friday from 1 - 3 pm at the Jake Epp Library. Cost Free. Join us for a time of relaxation, tea and colouring. Tea and supplies are provided but you are welcome to bring your own!

Ste. Geneviève Library Night – On 2nd Tuesday every month, at the Community Centre from 6:30 – 7:30 pm. Large selection of books in both French and English, for children and adults. Special requests can be made to the librarian, e-mail btl@ srsd.ca or 204-878-9488 or in person. Come for a visit and see what we are all about.

Games Day & Games Night – Every 1st Saturday of the month from 12 – 5 pm and the 3rd Wednesday of the month from 6 – 8:30 pm, at the Jake Epp Library. Come down to play strategy games. Bring a friend, your strategies and games. Test your skills and have fun. Ages 14 and up unless accompanied by an adult. Contact 204-326-6841, programs@jakeepplibrary.com.

Steinbach Annual Fun Fly – With Diamond Aces RC Flying Club Inc on Saturday, August 17 at 10 am, Clearspring Road, behind concrete Plant. Radio controlled airplane Fun Fly. Food vendor on site at noon, MAAC Sanctioned Event - Pilots require proof of MAAC or AMA, Everyone Welcome, No Parking or Attendance Fees. Contact Lawrence Moore 204-326-2919, larry.moore@mymts.net.

Royal Canadian Legion – Starts up again in the fall. Meets on 1st Tuesday every month at 8 pm until June and Ladies Auxiliary meets 1st Monday of each month at 7:30 pm at the Steinbach Legion Community Hall, 294 Lumber Ave.

Nobody’s Perfect – On September 6, 13, 20, 27, October 4 and 11 from 1 – 3 pm at the Family Resource Centre 101 North Front Dr. Support for moms and dads with children aged 6 and under. Meet with other parents of young children and discuss real life solutions and find positive ways of parenting. To register call 204-346-0413, Maggie@ steinbachfrc.ca. Summer Reading Club – Until Saturday, August 24 with a Wind up Party on Tuesday, August 27 at the Jake Epp Library, 255 Elmdale St. Open to all children Kindergarten up to the Grade 8. Cost free, Library Membership required. The club itself runs from Free craft classes and other events are available for sign up with club sign up. Contact Madison Redekopp 204-326-6841, programs@jakeepplibrary.com. Farmers Market – Every Thursday until October 4 from 3 pm to 6:30 pm in the Clearspring parking lot. Steinbach Alpha Unit - Meet up every Sunday at Clearspring Centre mall from 8 - 10 pm for a truck and car club. Any and all vehicles are welcome to join or if you just want to come down to check it out everyone is welcome. Contact Beau Friesen 204-381-0647, beaufriesen98@hotmail.com. Fung Loy Kok Taoist Tai Chi – On Wednesdays, at 7 pm at the United Church, 541 Main St. Ancient Taoist Tai Chi art develops a strong body, balanced and energetic mind that is calm and clear, creative and dynamic. Join us to learn 108 moves of Taoist Tai Chi and feel the benefits. All of our classes are led by qualified instructors. Contact Veronica Klassen 204-392-6565, Winnipeg@taoist.org. PTSD Support Group- On the last Thursday of each month, at 7 pm at the Steinbach Legion. Volunteer support group meeting for posttraumatic stress disorder.

Steinbach Girl Guides - Every Tuesday at the United Church of Steinbach, 541 Main St. Registration for girls 5 - 17. Develop personal values and well-being, self-respect and respect for others; promote fun, friendship, adventure and challenges through new experiences; develop leadership and decision-making skills; give service to the community; value the natural environment. The Steinbach Rotary Club - meets every Monday at noon except when Monday falls on a long weekend at the Chicken Chef, 365 Main Street, visitors are welcome. Contact Cornie at 326-3155. Mental Health Information and Support sessions - for family and friends of people with mental health issues are held the 2nd Tuesday of every month from 7 – 8:30 pm at the Eden East building, 21 Loewen Blvd. Contact Kim at 371-0824 or email eastmanmss@mts.net Mood Disorders Association of Manitoba individual and support groups - Meets on the first Tuesday of each month from 1:30 – 3 pm at The Eden East Office, 21 Loewen Blvd For persons experiencing depression, anxiety, stress, bi-polar disorder and other mental health/emotional concerns. Contact Judy Dunn 204-444-5228. Steinbach and Area Lions Club - Meets on the second and fourth Tuesday of every month at the Helping Hands. Contact Henry 204-392-7750 if you are interested in attending or joining. Carillon Toastmasters - Every Thursday at 7 pm at the Jake Epp Public Library, 255 Elmdale St. Meetings open to adults who want to improve their leadership and communication skills. Contact Irene at 204-424-5737. Al-Anon Program – Meets on Mondays at 7:30 pm at the Cultural Arts Centre back door, downstairs. Contact Lloyd 204-326-4365.


Dawson Trail Dispatch

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Young moms to be - Bi-weekly support group starts at 4:30 pm at Steinbach Family Resource Centre B-11, Hwy 12N. Contact 204-346-0413.

Vassar Ball Tournament - From Saturday, August 17 to Sunday, August18. Pancake breakfast, silent auction and open air dance. Saturday mixed slo-pitch. Team registration $200. $1,000 prize (16-teams registered). Sunday Men’s Fast Ball. Registration fee $150. Weekend camping $20. Contact Gina 204-437-3182 mommagd63@gmail.com. Outdoor Pool and showers process posted. $4 gate fee per day. Contact to register for ball tournament Duane Boutang 204-437-3173, duane@boutang.ca. Vita Stay and Play – On Tuesday and Thursday mornings from 9:30 - 11:30 am, at the Shevchenko School for children ages 0 - 5 along with their parents/caregivers are welcome to join us for a fun, free, educational learning program. Crafts, snacks, songs, games and story time! Facilitator: Andrea Smith. Contact Penny Horvorka-Alcock 204-4253535. Woodridge The Mobile Clinic – Is onsite on the third Thursday of every month from 9 am – 4 pm at the Community Club. Contact for appointments 1-855-644-3515 or southernhealth.ca. To have your event featured in this listing, please email your events each month to to editor@dawsontrail.ca

Carrick Gears Up for Annual Celebration The 27th Annual Carrick Days is around the corner and the community is inviting everyone to come out to celebrate on August 10 and 11. Carrick is a tiny community that consists of less than a dozen full time residents, yet each year the group manages to throw one of the most successful summer celebrations in the area. Hundreds of people will flock to the hamlet located between Marchand and Woodridge. When the gates open at noon on Saturday, visitors will be treated to a community parade followed by live entertainment Darren Lavallee Band, and Ten@2. The highlight of the weekend is always the Horseshoe Tournament where attendees compete for the coveted Carrick Cup. There will activities for the kids, a community supper and fireworks. On Sunday, everyone is invited for breakfast and a bluegrass gospel concert, followed by a bean bag competition.

21

Falcon Lake Vacation

Al-Anon 12 Step Recovery Group - Meets on Wednesdays at 7:30 pm at United Church, 541 Main St, front door, ring doorbell. All are welcome.

Tolstoi Harvest Festival - On Saturday, August 24 from 9 am11:45 pm. Breakfast Buffet, $8/person, Outdoor Yoga Class, children’s activities, afternoon entertainment, Perogy & Sausage Supper $12/person, Evening Social, $10/person, music by “By Request”, 50/50 Draw, Wildlife Rehab Centre Ambassadors, canteen, BBQ Lunch, Horseshoe Tournament, wagon rides, Historic buildings open for viewing, Guided Heritage Walking Tour at 11 am, Slo-pitch Tournament 100% Payout on Entry Fees ($125 per team). Contact 204-451-1697.

August 2019

Last month, my wife, children and I went camping at Falcon Lake. I’ve never been camping there before so this was a new experience for me. Earlier in the year, we had thought about hauling the camper to a campsite but, after different discussions about it, we finally settled on the idea of renting a small cabin for a week. This was a nice change from our camper. Staying in a cabin is definitely different from staying in our camper. Not only did the cabin

have air conditioning, a full sized fridge and full beds for all of us, it also had a television with satellite. Each day we managed to head to the beach and go swimming. Sure, the first few days were chilly and we would stand shin-deep in the cold water until we could pluck up the courage to just run in and dive headfirst into the water. I found that by diving in it would take a couple attempts before the chill was gone and I could then start to enjoy the water. It is also possible that my body was becoming numb and that was why the water now felt warm. While we didn’t spend too much time watching TV, it was a nice touch for the times that it was raining and for unwinding at the end of a busy day. It was also a treat for us to watch the programs that are on satellite as we don’t have it at home. We

watched some great shows but one of the things that I found the most peculiar was that my children (especially my daughter) enjoyed watching Corner Gas. It’s a great show and is one of my all-time favourites but what I found strange is that we have all the episodes at home and yet here, on vacation, my wife and I are being asked to watch it. Since it is one of my all-time favourites there was no real issue watching it. While camping, we had the traditional wiener and marshmallow roasting and the sitting around the campfire. While we watched the flames dance and the wood turn to ash, we cracked sunflower seeds. Making a bit of a game out of it, we tried to spit out the sunflower shells and get them to land on a certain piece of burning log. Not an exciting game but a great way to just sit back

and relax. One really cool thing that we took the opportunity to do was to use a couple of kayaks that the campground offered to its guests. Since I’ve canoed before, the process of kayaking was not too different although, I found that balancing your body was a lot more important. Once we’d gotten the hang of it, my oldest son, my daughter and I played a game of tag while paddling in the kayaks. Whoever it was would have to chase down another and tap their kayak with a paddle. This person was then it and would have to chase down another. That was a lot of fun! It was really nice to get away for a week without the hubbub of our daily lives getting in the way of a relaxing time. Until next time, take care and keep your world spinning.


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August 2019

Pat Porter Active Living Centre offers programs, activities, services and volunteer opportunities, striving to promote healthy and active living for mature adults of the southeast region. We invite you to come out (all ages are welcomed) and pay us a visit and consider participating in some of our programs and events. Visit our website at patporteralc.com. Memberships: 2019 memberships available for $30 per person. Join now to enjoy our member’s benefits! Check out our New Website and register to receive your newsletter by email. Other Programs and Services: Monday to Friday Full lunch - Cost $6. Soup lunch includes dessert and a biscuit for $3. Call kitchen at 204-320-4605 the day before or before 9am to reserve your meal. Foot Care Clinic - Call reception 204-320-4600 to book your appointment. Belltone Hearing - Call 1-800661-2653 to book an appointment. Community Financial Counselling Services: On Monday, August 19. Call 1-888-573-2383. Cottage Cheese Perogies - For sale. $6 per dozen. Transportation - Need a ride to an appointment or need help with cleaning or yard work? You may qualify for our services. Call Carrie to help arrange this for you 204-320-4604 for a small fee. Equipment Loan Program Wheelchairs and walkers for temporary use available, contact Carrie at 204-320-4604 for more information. Friendly Visitor - Do you want to have someone spend some time with you either at home or out in the community? Do you know someone who is unable to leave their home often but would benefit from a friendly visit? Call Carrie and she will try to match someone up with a friendly visitor. Volunteer Opportunities: All ages welcome to volunteer. Please call Sonja at 204-3204603 for more information. We are looking for Friendly Visitors, Maintenance, Meal Delivery, and Office Support. Specials coming up: Cooking Demo – Thursday, September 26, $6 per person. Check out some tasty seasonal soup recipes. Call to register Pancake breakfast - Third Thursday of every month. $5 per person, 9 am – 12 pm. Family Barbecue – Thursday, August 22, $5 per person, 5 – 7 pm. Alzheimer Journey – On Wednesdays, August 21, September 18, October 9, November 20 at 2 pm. Cost is free.

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Regular Programs and Activities: Check out the Newsletter on our website for more information. Activities may be cancelled due to other events on short notice. Please check with the Centre. All of the programs, activities and events are open to any age. Our programs are aimed for seniors but we welcome and encourage all to be a part of what we have to offer. All programs and activities are $2 for Members and $4 for Non-Members unless otherwise stated. Drop-in: Tai Chi – Returns Monday, September 9. Perogy Bee – Monday, September 2. Call if you want to help out with making perogies. Exercise Classes – Tuesdays from 12:30 - 1:30 pm, August 13, 27 and, Thursday 1 – 2 pm. Computer Classes - Wednesdays from 9 am – 2 pm, one-on-one 1 hour appointments. HO Model Railway Project Wednesdays and Fridays 10 am - 3:30 pm. Movie Time Potluck - “Breakthrough” Monday, August 26 at noon. Bring a small lunch dish and enjoy a movie and fellowship. Floor Curling/Floor Shuffle Wednesdays 1:30 – 4 pm. Advanced Pickle Ball - Monday to Friday 9 - 11:30 am. Beginners Pickleball - Mondays and Fridays 1 – 3 pm. Billiards – Monday – Friday 9 am -3:30 pm. Cards - All card games run from 1 – 4 pm. Monday – Canasta, Tuesday – Euchre, Wednesday – Cribbage, Thursday –Whist. Crokinole - Friday 1:30 – 4 pm. Book Club – Every Tuesday from 11 am – 12 pm, ‘Tuesdays with Morrie’ Old Time Country Jam – Returns Wednesday, September 11. Out with Friends - Friday, August 16, 7 – 10 pm, bring a snack and play board/card games, and enjoy the evening together. Potluck – Thursday, September 12, 6 - 9 pm, $6 per person.

Dawson Trail Dispatch

SAC Day Camp “Science and Slime” Week a Huge Success Steinbach Arts Council (SAC) is running day camps all summer. One of the new themes was Science and Slime and it was a huge success. Over one week young people met scientists and engineers who came in to show all different kinds of experiments that included paper mache volcanoes, exploding and textured slime. There are three more themed weeks left with Animal Planet, Hollywood and Around the World in 5 days. Every day is filled with field trips, crafts, cooking, experiments and so much more. Every Friday afternoon is spent at the Steinbach Aquatic Center. During SAC’s Science and Slime Week young people got a chance to make their own slime.

Local Attraction and Event Up for Tourism Awards When Manitoba Tourism gathers in September for their annual awards presentations, St. Labre 200 and Amazing Snow are up for recognition. Every year, the Manitoba Tourism Awards, recognizes outstanding contributions to the provincial tourism industry, including promoting Manitoba as a quality destination, ensuring an exceptional visitor experience and fostering a professional tourism industry. St. Labre 200 has been nominated for the Innovation Award. The recipient of this award will be a business or organization that demonstrates initiative and creativity in developing Manitoba’s tourism products and addressed a need/void for identifiable tourism markets. In the category of Marketing Excellence, St. Adolphe’s Amazing Snow is up for recognition. The winner of the Marketing Excellence will be a tradition, online or social media campaign that converts campaign expenditures into an interest in Manitoba’s tourism products and visitation and attracts a significant amount of public/media awareness of Manitoba. This past winter, the family operated business which is normally known for their Amazing Corn event drew in thousands by creating a Guinness Record Breaking snow maze. The Manitoba Tourism Award is taking place on September 19, in Winnipeg. Awards will be handed out in nine categories with three businesses, persons or events nominated in each category.

Free Programs: Walking – 8:30 – 9 am and Noon1 pm, Monday to Friday. Crafty Corner - Every Friday 2 - 3:30 pm. Cozy Corner Coffee – Every day 10:30 am. Enjoy a complimentary coffee an occasional treat and some great conversation.

La Broquerie Hosts La Brise MétisFest

Rentals: We accommodate birthdays, anniversaries, weddings, showers, meetings, family gatherings and much more. Call Sonja at 204-320-4603 for more information and to book.

On July 31, the community of La Broquerie hosted the inaugural 1st annual La Brise MetisFest, at the Hylife Centre. The event included a ceremonial smudge and drumming session to commemorate the Métis in La Broquerie led by two Métis women. It also featured an oxcart that symbolized the arrival of Métis families in the area, over 150 years ago. The Festival included events such as the Prairie Tipi des prairie, Ox Cart demonstration, archery, and farmers market. There was also a Kidzone and lacrosse. For those who just wanted to sit back and enjoy the day, there was a variety of live traditional music provided by three local entertainers including E-Mineurs, Alexandre Tétrault & Nic Dubois; and the 3èm Génération-3G. A community contest was held to select a name and logo for the inaugural La Brise MetisFest. The winners of the logo and naming contest were Mélanie Tetrault and Gabriel Gagnon.

For more information on our programs, activities or volunteer opportunities please drop by the Centre Monday to Friday 8:30 am to 4:00 pm.


Dawson Trail Dispatch

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

August 2019

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RCMP FILES Attempted Theft at Canadian Tire On June 28 at approximately 10:40 am, an unknown male was caught by Canadian Tire staff in the back warehouse attempting to steal several Dyson Vacuums using the back door. The vacuums were recovered by staff and the suspect was seen leaving in a grey SUV with no licence plate. The vehicle described had been involved in a previous theft at Canadian Tire several weeks before involving different people and is believed to have been involved in a similar theft at Superstore in Steinbach. If you have any information in regards to the above you are asked to contact the Steinbach RCMP Detachment at 204-326-4452 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 or manitobacrimestoppers.com.

Recycling Building Set on Fire On July 12 Steinbach RCMP received a call that the recycling building behind the Richer Husky was on fire. Police attended the scene and the Richer Fire Department was already in the process of extinguishing the fire. The Steinbach RCMP are currently investigating this as Arson. The fire may have started at midnight on July 12. If you have any information in regards to the above you are asked to contact the Steinbach RCMP Detachment at 204-326-4452 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 or manitobacrimestoppers.com.

RCMP Search for Mitchell Arsonist On Sunday morning, July 21 at 7 am, Steinbach RCMP were dispatched to two fires near Mitchell. The first fire was noted to be a structure fire just east of Road 30 East on Road 37 North. A shed had been lit and burned to the ground. The second fire was just east of road 30 East on Road 39 North. The bridge at this location was also set on fire. Although most of the bridge is still standing, it is a total loss. If you have any information in regards to the above you are asked to contact the Steinbach RCMP Detachment at 204-326-4452 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 or manitobacrimestoppers.com.

Morris RCMP Respond to Single-Vehicle Fatal Collision On July 28, 2019, at approximately 5:30 am, officers from the Morris RCMP responded to a singlevehicle collision that occurred on Provincial Road 422, located two kilometres north of Highway 23, in the RM of Morris. Investigators have determined that a pickup truck, being driven by a 21-year-old male from Rosenort, was travelling northbound on Provincial Road 422 when the pickup truck left the roadway and entered the ditch and rolled. The driver of the pickup truck, who was not wearing his seatbelt, was pronounced deceased at the scene. Speed may be a factor in the collision. Officers from the Morris RCMP along with a Forensic Collision Reconstructionist continue to investigate.

Sign up for Summer Arts Day Camps Online! Don’t Miss Out on Your Spot! Come for a week – or Drop In for a Day! 2 separate camps! Ages 5-8 and Ages 9-11. Each week is jam-packed with creativity – art, dance, music, drama, recreation, community field trips, swimming. - NEW! Animal Planet - 4 Day Camp! (Aug 6 - 9) - Get wild this week! Learn about different animal through games, art and exploration. - NEW! Hollywood Week – (Aug 12 – 16) - For our Hollywood week, you will be in the Director’s chair. Learning the ropes of the movie industry, you will have a chance to be a star. Learn the moves of being a stunt double! Refine your skills as an award-winning actor; make your mark on the Steinbach Walk of Fame - NEW! Around the World in 5 days (August 19-23) - Travel the world in 5 days without leaving Steinbach! You’re Invited! Double Artist Exhibit! Landscapes and Seascapes – Wayne Letkeman Paul’s Pics – Paul Reimer Opening Night: Wednesday, August 21 | 7:00pm. Support our local artists. Exhibit Runs: Aug 21 – Sep 27 Sign Up for Fall – 10% off from August 19 to August 26th – Register Online or call us – 204-346-1077. The Steinbach Arts Council is working on a great line-up of programs starting this fall! CREATIVE WELLNESS: Prop It Pilates, Intro to Pilates, Core Intermediate, Pilates on the Ball B.O.S.S. DANCE ACADEMY: NEW Lil Ballerinas 3-5, Hip Hop 3-5, Hip Hop 6-9, Hip Hop 10+ CULINARY ARTS: Kids in the Kitchen, Couples Cooking LANGUAGES: French, Spanish and German VISUAL ARTS: Kids: Hand Building with Clay (Beginner & Advanced), Art Adventures, Art X-travaganza Teens: Mixed Art, Pottery Passion, Cartoon Illustration Adults: Digital Photography, Acrylic & Watercolor Painting, Intro to the Pottery Wheel Great Resume Builder - Students & Adults! Join the fun! Volunteer for our Summer Arts Day Camps for an hour, day, week or all summer long and get a great reference! Or help with Administrative work in the office, delivering brochures, and so on…. get perks on tickets, programs, and more! Call Randi 204-346-1077. Southeast Centre for Music Study with some of the premiere teachers in the southeast! Guitar - Brandon Post; Piano/Theory - Candace Hamm; Piano - Jordan Martens, Hally Friesen; Voice - Alyssa Hildebrand, David Klassen; Violin-Peter Jo; Cello - Natalie Dawe; Musical Theatre for kids with Gabriela Gallo, and NEW for 2019/2020 - Steinbach Youth Chorus is back, also under the direction of Gabriela Gallo! For teacher info/details email scm@steinbachartscounil.ca or call 204-346-1077! Become a Season Ticket Holder! A stellar lineup! Our 40th Anniversary concert series includes favorites like the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra, Manitoba Theatre Centre, ‘The Music Man’ community musical and so much more! You won’t want to miss this season – call now to book your seats - makes perfect gift! Check out our new Centre! Thanks to Co-op Community Spaces grant, we have renovated our entrances, restrooms and Hallway Gallery….and there’s more to come! Stop in today. The new SAC Brochure is here! Watch for it at local businesses, schools, and at your door. Volunteers from across the southeast are needed to drop these brochures to your neighborhoods…if you love to walk and meet your neighbors, this is the perfect job for you! And you are giving back to your community! Backyard Theatre Company Wants YOU! Discover the process of preparing for a play, character building, practicing scripts, and final stage production at the SRSS Theatre. Acting classes for ages 5-17. Arts4Tots Preschool Program – Montessori-Infused Curriculum! The most creative way to learn for ages 3-5 with specialists in dance, music, drama, and visual arts. Mon/Wed or Tues/Thu, AM or PM Rentals at LOW prices! If you are looking for space – meetings, church, parties, cotillions…we have it! Call today. View events and purchase tickets online:www.steinbachartscouncil.ca


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August 2019

Celebrating Over 20 Years of Service to Our Communities!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

Lorette Taekwondo Company Expands to Steinbach

The very first class of students to take Taekwondo classes at the newly opened Steinbach branch of Spirit 1 Taekwondo. Submitted photo

On July 3, the first Taekwondo class hosted by Spirit 1 Taekwondo Academy from Lorette was held in Steinbach at the Clearspring Centre. According to Instructor Lionel Bernier, the first Steinbach class was a compliment of black and coloured belts from the Winnipeg and Lorette branches. Eleven students came out to participate at the opening event. “From humble beginnings will come greatness and Spirit 1 Taekwondo Academy is looking forward to the day when these students participate in their first promotion test,” stated Bernier. Under the instruction of newly named instructor, sixteen year old Knight Marasigan who is a 1st Degree Black Belt. She was named to this position in June, making her the second youngest instructor to teach at the academy. Marasigan was named to this position by Master Michael Tam in June, after the Victory Cup Invitational Taekwondo Tournament. This was later followed by a lengthy referee seminar given by Master Robert Quon, Referee-in-Chief for Taekwondo Manitoba, where both young ladies were certified as Taekwondo referees. This was put into practice at their first ever official tournament in May at the Community Challenge Invitational Tournament. In four months, Marasigan has climbed from a black belt student of Taekwondo, to officiate at sanctioned events. She was then named as an academy instructor. Marasigan is now teaching white belt students in the Steinbach Branch where she will be working with chief instructor Master Tam. For further details on how to join any of the classes visit Spirit 1 Taekwondo at spirit1taekwondo.ca or contact Master Michael Tam at 204-997-0261.

Senior on Scooter Involved in Collision On July 18 at approximately 11 am, police came across a collision at the cross walk at Kroeker and Main Street in Steinbach. Upon further investigation it was learned that a 94-year old female from Steinbach on a motorized scooter had been crossing Main Street at the Kroeker cross walk when a westbound vehicle struck the scooter causing it to tip over. The injuries to her head and arm were reported to be minor. She was transported to hospital via ambulance for further medical attention. The cross walk lights had not been activated at the time and the westbound vehicle’s view had been obstructed by another vehicle. The driver of the Ford Focus, a 54 year old female from the area, did apply the brakes, however could not avoid colliding with the scooter. Alcohol was not a factor. Police would like to thank all those that rendered assistance. Police are reminding everyone that the cross walk lights need to be activated before crossing the street.

Profile for The Dawson Trail Dispatch

Dawson Trail Dispatch August 2019  

Southeast Manitoba news and features

Dawson Trail Dispatch August 2019  

Southeast Manitoba news and features

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