__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

A PARENT'S GUIDE F O R A L L A G E S .

DISCOVER UTAH FALL 2020

SOCIAL STEWARDSHIP

miNdfulness Road Trippin' Scenic byway 12 DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE.COM


Free Video Versions!!! The Land of... Children’s Books® are now on YouTube! After you and your family have enjoyed the stories, download our free Activity Kits for each books so you can keep the journey going.

Go to www.LandofChildrensBooks.com/videos

In what is being called, “A modern day Dr. Seuss with a contemporary twist and an important message for kids,” these journeys are sure to help us all navigate life’s terrain!

Learn more about these great books, and fun adventures at

www.LandofChildrensBooks.com

DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE.COM 3


VOL. 4 / NO. 3 / ISSUE 12

14

PUBLISHER/EDITOR Monique Beeley COPY EDITOR Katie Mullaly , Distillation INK ART DIRECTOR Michelle Rayner CONTRIBUTORS Heidi O’Donoghue, Lulu Georgi, Katelin Hansen, Ashley Kinney, Stephen Lengel, Patrick Morrison, and Kya Schwab

ON THE COVER

Breana Wright and Adriana Gunn / Cahob Canyon / Capitol Reef National Park PHOTO BY Monique Beeley

We want to hear from you. Send your rants, raves, and story ideas to Mo@DiscoverUtahMagazine.com Advertising inquires for Discover Utah Kids and DiscoverUtahMagazine.com can be sent to info@DiscoverUtahMagazine.com SUBSCRIPTIONS - Never miss an issue again. Get this quarterly magazine delivered directly to your mailbox for $15 annually. Go to DiscoverUtahMagazine.com to sign up!! Connect with us @DiscoverUtahKids Discover Utah Kids is published quarterly by Discover Utah Magazine, LLC. P.O. Box 2336, Park City, UT. 435-640-6549 © 2020 by Discover Utah Magazine LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without permission from the publisher.

4 DISCOVER UTAH KIDS


22 30

{

}

contents FALL

8

Explore Your Backyard

26 Health

Hit the Trail This Fall

28 Insider's Guide Richfield

14 Roadtrippin’

20

8

Scenic Byway 12 (part 1)

19 Map 20 Athlete Profile 22 Southern Utah State Park Round-Up

30 Nonprofit Girl and Her Backpack 32 Educational Social Stewardship

i am at home among the trees. - J.R.R. Tolkien

DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE.COM 5


LETTER FROM THE

PUBLISHER

Happy Fall Y’all… 2020 is certainly keeping us on our toes…right?! This year

we have experienced things that I never thought would or could happen. All of these challenges, changes, and pivots have made, and will make us stronger in ways that may or may not be known to us as this point. I don’t know what the next 3 months, 6 months, year, or 5 years will bring, but I do know that I will hold certain things close to my heart and allow gratitude to overpower the unsettled flurries that plague me at times. Placing time and connection with my daughter above my need to do it all, slow down and be present in my relationships, go outside and just be… feel the breeze, the sun, smell the leaves of fall, enjoy the colorful scenes of the season, and be thankful that we, as UTAHANS have such amazing and abundant outdoor spaces.

high in the amount of litter and vandalization during a time when many land managing agency budgets have been cut leading to closures of facilities like bathrooms and trash bins. The word is out, UTAH is the best place for outdoor recreation. We are a public land state with 75% (35 million acres) of our land managed by the government. We need to do better, and we need to teach our kids to value and understand why these public lands are so very important. I reached out to the Utah Office of Outdoor Recreation (OOR) to get their insight on this issue. How can we as stewardship advocates lead by example? Many of us are seasoned outdoor people who can help those who are less experienced in the outdoor adventuring world. Check out the Social Stewardship article (page 32) contributed by Patrick Morrison with the OOR highlighting some relevant tips for making the outdoor spaces more welcoming and inclusive. Fall is the time to explore Utah’s organic kaleidoscope of colors; whether it’s the vibrant fall colors on the mountain trails of the Wasatch Back and along Logan Canyon National Scenic Byway, or the red rock landscapes of Capitol Reef National Park, or the high elevation red rock fusion found in the Dixie National Forest. The trails are calling … and you must go exploring. We have highlighted 10 trails in this issue’s Explore Your Backyard (page 8) from around the state that should be included in your fall calendar. Thank you for choosing to read this issue and I hope it inspires you to get outside and have some epic experiences with your kids in this amazing place called UTAH!! Be safe and have some fun this fall

The unfortunate effects of more people outside and more people staying closer to home is that our public lands are taking a beating. We are seeing an all-time

Shop in Utah is a grant program to help support local businesses and provide discounts to customers. This is a COVID-19 Impacted Business Grant Program that is funded by federal CARES Act monies. When making your Utah travel plans this fall be sure to look for specific deals throughout the state. Many of these offers are tourism related, some hotels could be offering 2 for 1 lodging and some local outfitters are offering 50% for guided adventures. At this time all of these offers are only good through the end of the year. So if you need a little nudge, in the form of a discount, to try a new adventure or explore a new town…here ya go. The best way to find the deals is online at Business.utah.go/shop-in-utah-offers. Deals are searchable by location and as of October 1st there is a total of 819 deals. FYI there some amazing deals in Moab, St. George, Cedar City, Kanab, Park City and Logan.

6 DISCOVER UTAH KIDS


Fall Wonder at Every Turn

LET WONDER BE YOUR GUIDE VisitCedarCity.com

DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE.COM 7


GET O

THERUT E

> back EXPLORE YOUR

yard HIT THE TRAIL THIS FALL BY MONIQUE BEELEY

NORTHERN UTAH > lImber pine 1 Miles – 1.3 (loop) Rating – Easy Elevation Gain – 177’ Hiking Time – 1 hour Trailhead Facilities – Paved parking area and pit toilets Located in the heart of the Logan Canyon National Scenic Byway, the Limber Pine trail is a family-favorite. Located 32 miles from Logan, just before reaching the 7,800’ summit of the canyon. This trail is named after the what was once believed to be the oldest and largest living limber pine tree, however recent scientific discovers now know this to be five separate trees that have grown together over the last 560 years. Be sure to check out the interpretive signs along the route to learn more unique facts about this area. ExploreLogan.com

Numbers correspond with the MAP on page 19 DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE.COM 9


> The Grotto in Hornet Canyon 2 Miles – 2.4 (roundtrip) Rating – Moderate Elevation Gain – 580’ Hiking Time – 2 hours Trailhead Facilities – None

Located in the Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest in Farmington Canyon this hike leads to a cool waterfall and a shady weeping-rock grotto. There is a bit of exposure and a couple of steep rocky sections, I would not recommend this hike for children under 6. The first 0.5 mile is on the Bonneville Shoreline Trail, which at this point is a service road. Once you cross the creek, look for a trail sign for Steed Creek and some stairs on the northern hillside. PlayInDavis.com

> Daly Canyon 3

Miles – 3.8 (roundtrip) Rating – Moderate Hiking Time – 2 hours Trailhead Facilities – Trail kiosk and parking area Daly Canyon in Park City is a great location for amazing fall colors and for exploring some remnants of Park City’s mining history. The canyon is named after John Daly who founded the Daly Mining Company in 1885. My favorite route here is connecting Trapper’s Gate/Ontario Bypass/ Empire Link and then back on the Daly Canyon dirt road.

> Quarry Mountain 3

Miles – 2.2 (roundtrip) Rating – Moderate Elevation Gain – 740’ Hiking Time – 1.5 hours Trailhead Facilities – Paved parking lot and trailhead kiosk. Bathrooms and picnic area located at the McPolin Barn accessed via the tunnel under HWY 224 Quarry Mountain is one of Park City’s “hiking only” trails and is a great place to check out the fall colors. This trail was recently updated in the spring of 2020 by the Mountain Trails Foundation and now is in prime

10 DISCOVER UTAH KIDS


condition. The trail is accessed from the Farm Trailhead located along HWY 224, directly across from the McPolin Barn. The hike is a steady climb that provides amazing views of Park City. VisitParkCity.com

> Cascade Springs 4

Miles – 1.25 (roundtrip) Rating – Easy Trail Type – Paved, natural surface, and boardwalk Hiking Time – 1-2 hours Trailhead Facilities – Bathrooms, drinking water, and picnic area Located in the Uinta National Forest, Cascade Springs can be accessed from Midway or American Fork Canyon. The road from Midway just reopened in September 2020. Cascade Springs is a collection of wonderful artesian springs with colorful naturally-terraced cascades and pools. Over seven million gallons of water flow through the springs every day. This area is ideal for families and kids of all ages, many of the trails are stroller and handicap-accessible. There are many interpretive signs along the route to learn about the unique flora and fauna found here. GoHeberValley.com

DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE.COM 11


SOUTHERN UTAH > Gordon Creek Falls 5 Miles – 2.2 (out-and-back) Rating – Moderate Elevation Gain – 232’ Hiking Time – 2 hours Trailhead Facilities – None

Gordon Creek Falls, located near Price, is a great off-the -beaten-path hike. The route is a combination of double track road and single track. Access to this trail is 3.3 miles on a dirt road, and limited parking is located on the side of road. This dirt road is well graded but use caution if conditions are muddy. The lower falls is located 1 mile from the Trestle road along Gordon Creek trail. For those looking for additional miles, head to the upper falls that are 1.5 miles past the lower falls. Be sure to check the weather prior to hiking as Gordon Creek is located in a flash flooding area.

section that follows the lake along the north side. The main trailhead is on the western side of the lake, about a mile past Navajo Lake Lodge. Nearby camping options are: TE-AH, Spruces, and Navajo Lake. All three provide great trail access.

CarbonCorridor.com

> Cohab Canyon 6

> Cascade Falls 7

Miles – 3 roundtrip) Rating – Moderate Hiking Time – 2 hours

Miles – 1.2 (out and back) Rating – Moderate Hiking Time – 1 hour Trailhead Facilities – Pit-toilets

Cohab Canyon is one of our favorite hikes in Capitol Reef National Park and is highlighted on the cover. The route begins near the campground with a steady climb of several switchbacks for the first 0.3 mile. When you get into the canyon, it levels out for the rest. Be sure to keep an eye out for the mini-slot canyon on the right side at 0.6 mile. For amazing views connect with the Fruita Overlook trail at the 1-mile intersection.

Located in the Dixie National Forest, Cascade Falls is a scenic trail that ends at a unique water fall that flows out of the cliff. The water comes from sink holes in Navajo Lake a couple miles away, and flows underground through a lava tube then reappears creating Cascade Falls and the North Fork of the Virgin River. The trail provides amazing views of Zion National Park and the headwaters of the Virgin River.

CapitolReef.org

VisitCedarCity.com

> Navajo Lake Loop 7

> Toadstools 8

Miles – 8.6 (loop) Rating – Moderate Trail Type – Single-track Hiking Time – 2-4 hours Trailhead Facilities – Pit-toilets

Located 28 miles east of Cedar City in the Dixie National Forest, the Navajo Lake Loop is a beautiful single-track trail that circumnavigates Navajo Lake. The trail has a few different access points offering a variety of options. This is a great intermediate mountain bike ride, so if you are a biking family be sure to bring the bikes. The most scenic and easiest section of this trail is the 4-mile

12 DISCOVER UTAH KIDS

Miles – 1.8 (out-and-back) Rating – Easy Hiking Time – 1-2 hour Trailhead Facilities – None The Toadstools hike in the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument is 40 miles east of Kanab. This short hike is a family favorite and a great place for the kids to run and explore. Toadstools are unique geologic features that have a cap made of hard rock that sits on top of a sandstone tower that has eroded over time. VisitSouthernUtah.com


See it.

Experience it.

Live it.

BryceCanyonCountry.com/DUK DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE.COM 13


road trippin’ BYWAY

12

(PART 1) BY MONIQUE BEELEY

14

DISCOVER UTAH KIDS


Road trips are about the most All-American vacation there is; you, your family, the highway, and some favorite tunes. A vacation where time isn’t measured by mile

markers but by moments. And Utah’s Scenic Byway 12, is the best adventure road trip highway on the planet, passing through Red Canyon, Bryce Canyon National Park, Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Boulder Mountain, and Capitol Reef National Park. Few highways in the world offer as much jaw-dropping scenery and adventure in 120 miles. We begin our Scenic Byway 12 adventure on the southern end, just outside Panguitch. Our first stop, just 2 miles from the intersection with HWY 89, is Red Canyon (7,400’ elevation). This beautiful area is often thought of as a mini Bryce because of the red rock hoodoos that fill the landscapes. For the biking family the Red Canyon Bike Path is a must-do. This is an epic 24-mile paved path that travels through the alpine forest and majestic red rock hoodoos of Red Canyon, Dixie National Forest, and Bryce Canyon National Park. The best access point for the trail is the Thunder Mountain trailhead located at the entrance of Red Canyon. No article highlighting Red Canyon would be complete without mentioning Thunder Mountain, which is a personal favorite and one of the most scenic mountain bike trails in Utah. The trail is best done as a 15-mile loop beginning here, with 5 miles on the paved path, 2 miles on the Coyote Hollow dirt road, and then 8 miles of epic single-track flowing through amazing scenery. This trail is rated advanced and is not recommend for beginner riders. So if your family has a variety of ages and abilities, this trailhead is a great option where the younger ones can explore the paved path, while mom (or dad) hits the singletrack with the older more experienced riders on the epic Thunder Mountain loop. Next up is one of Utah’s Mighty Five: Bryce Canyon National Park (8,000-9,000’ elevation). The hiking trails in Bryce are rated easy to strenuous but be aware that they all begin at the rim and descend into the canyon. The Rim Trail is a total of 5.5 miles (one-way) and connects all of the scenic overlooks along the rim, from Fairyland Point to Bryce Point. The 0.5-mile paved section between Sunrise and Sunset points provides amazing views and is the best option for strollers and young hikers. The Navajo Loop (1.4-mile loop) beginning at Sunrise Point is a great route to see some of the Park’s iconic hoodoo formations: Thor’s Hammer, Twin Bridge, and Wall Street. The Queen’s Garden Trail (1.8-mile out-and-back) is a short trail that descends 320 feet below the canyon rim. This can be done as an out-and-back or combined with the Navajo Loop for a 2.9-mile loop. A family-favorite in Bryce is the Mossy Cave, which is located along HWY 12, 7 miles outside the main part of the park. The trail is an easy 0.4 mile (one-way) that follows a stream and ends at Mossy Cave. The stream here was originally created by early pioneers who needed an irrigation source. If you are looking for a new adventure, Ruby’s Inn offers both half-day and full-day horseback riding adventures in Bryce, as well as a couple of options in the Red Canyon area.

DRY FORK NARROWS

15

DISCOVER UTAH KIDS

On the road again, our next stop is Kodachrome Basin State Park (5,800’ elevation) that is located 12 miles south of HWY 12, near the small town of Cannonville. This park is filled with sandstone spires, hoodoos, and sand pipes. If you are not familiar with sand pipes, that may be because they are DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE.COM

15


"...one of the most scenic mountain bike trails in Utah."

unique to Kodachrome Basin, and it is believed that this is the only location on earth where you can find these unique geologic formations. There is a total of 67 sand pipes ranging from 6 to 170 feet tall. The tallest sandpipe is Chimney Rock, which can be accessed from the gravel road on the east of the park. There are five trails in the park,: three trails are hiking only; and two are open to bikes, horses, and hikers. The Nature Trail is an easy 0.5-mile loop that has interpretative signs along the route. Angel’s Palace is a moderate 1.5-mile (out-and-back), and the Panorama Trail can be done as a 3-mile or 6-mile loop, and winds through the west side of the park, and offers many amazing views and unique geologic features. A fun option for families to explore more miles is on a horseback riding tour with Red Canyon Trail Rides. This local outfitter offers 1 to 2-hour tours along the Panorama Trail. Next up is exploring some backcountry adventure favorites in the Grand-Staircase Escalante National Monument along the Hole in the Rock Road, located 4.5-miles east of Escalante. This 55-mile dirt road is packed with adventuring options for all ability levels. Before venturing off the pavement and leaving the familiarity and comfort of the highway, let’s discuss a few know before you go tips for exploring this backcountry area. Yes, this is a National Monument that is frequently visited, but keep in mind there is no cell service, no water fill-up areas, no trash cans, limited bathrooms

16 DISCOVER UTAH KIDS

(pit-toilets are located at Devil’s Garden, Upper & Lower Dry Fork Trailheads, and Dance Hall Rock), and conditions of the dirt road vary depending on weather and usage. • First, on the know before you go list is to call, or better yet stop by the Escalante Interagency Visitor Center located at 775 W. Main Street in Escalante (435-826-5499). In addition to finding out the latest road and trail conditions this is a great educational stop for kids. •

Second is to be prepared. Be sure you have enough water and food. Adequate clothing and footwear are also critical for adventuring in the variable and sometimes extreme elements of the desert. Trails here are not paved or well-worn paths like they are in some of our National and State Parks. You will need more than flip-flops and a 12 oz water bottle because the sights here are not the drive-by or 5-minute walk to the overlook variety. They involve hiking through variable terrain, sand, and slickrock.

Third is communication. Be sure to let someone outside of your current travel partners know where you are going and when you will be back. Also, carrying a Personal Locator Beacon or Satellite Messenger is key when you are in backcounty areas where cell service is limited.


THUNDER MOUNTAIN

KODACHROME BASIN

METATE ARCH - DEVILS GARDEN

Now that you are better prepared to explore this area, lets highlight some favorites on the Hole in the Rock Road. Devil’s Garden (easy). This is located at mile 12. This is by far the best stop for families with young kids that does not involve much hiking. There are picnic tables and pit toilets, but no trash cans so please be prepared to pack everything out with you. Metate Arch is the highlight here, along with many cool and unique towering rock formation to explore. Twenty Mile Dinosaur Trackway (moderate - 1.2 miles). The turn off is located at mile 14, then there is an additional 11 miles on a dirt road to get to the trailhead. This location has over 350 dinosaur tracks and is a 1.2 mile (out-and-back) moderate hike. Peek-a-Boo and Spooky Slot Canyon (moderate - 4.7 miles). The trailhead is located on the Dry Fork Road, which is at mile 26. This area has become very popular and the BLM has recently added two (upper and lower) new parking areas both with pit-toilets and trail kiosks. Both trailheads access Peek-a-Boo and Spooky. The location of the new parking areas has increased the mileage of this hike, it is now a 4.7 mile/3 to 4-hour roundtrip hike. The hike from the Upper Dry Creek trailhead is the least steep and will take you into the beautiful narrows of Dry Fork Canyon. The BLM also has new maps for this area. Please stop by the aforementioned Escalante Interagency Visitor Center

for specific details. The BLM is also asking that hikers explore these two slots canyons in one direction: up Peek-a-Boo and down Spooky, making a clockwise loop. This will help with social distancing and reduce congestion. Dogs are strongly discouraged in this area due to tight spaces and crowding in the canyon. At this point in the article we have only scratched the surface and explored 60 miles of this epic adventure-filled Scenic Byway 12 route. But, we are out of space so we need to say, TO BE CONTINUED.” We will highlight the other half … Escalante to Capitol Reef National Park in the Spring 2021 issue. BryceCanyonCountry.com Photo: Adam17 Barker DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE.COM


Salt Lake

St. George

Come Find Your Trail SevierUtah www.

.net

RIVER TERRACE G r e e n R i v e r, U t a h TM

Castle Country’s Most Luxurious Lodging Quality, Comfort and Outstanding Service • Free Full Breakfast • Outdoor Pool • Large, Spacious Rooms

• Private Balcony or Patios overlooking the Green River

TripAdvisor Ranking #1 of 11 hotels in Green River

River-terrace.com 435-564-3401

1740 East Main St.

18 DISCOVER UTAH KIDS

Green River, UT

• 71 Spacious King and Double Queen Rooms • 8 Studio Suites • Serta Pillow Top Beds • Interior Entrance • Secure Bike Storage • Dish TV

• • • • • • • •

43” Flat Screen TV’s 80 + Channels Free WIFI Breakfast Included Fitness Center Outdoor Pool & Hot Tub Guest Laundry 24 Hour Business Center

For Online Reservations visit www.hamptoninn.com or call 1-800-Hampton 488 N. Main Street Moab, UT 84532 435-259-3030 • Fax 435-259-3035


PAGE 9

15

84

1

91

89

GARDEN CITY Bear Lake

30

PAGE 14

LOGAN

23

SCENIC BYWAY 12 HOLE IN THE ROCK ROAD (dirt road)

RANDOLPH 16

165

30 Golden Spike National Historice Site

Numbers correspond with EXPLORE YOUR BACKYARD

BRIGHAM CITY

39

15

PAGE 22

Letters correspond with STATE PARK ROUNDUP

OGDEN Great Salt Lake

2

84

89

80

MANILA Flaming Gorge National Recreation Area

SALT LAKE CITY 80

WENDOVER

PARK 3KAMAS CITY KAMAS

201 215

4

TOOELE

Dinosaur National Monument

HEBER CITY 35

196 199

191 40

191

89

6

89

Green

5

PRICE 31

15 28

89

50

50

River

96

6

125

29

MANTI

6

CASTLE DALE

6

45

88

DUCHESNE

68

154

40

208

PROVO

Utah Lake

149

VERNAL

Timpanogos Cave National Monument

73

36

191

150

100

191

10

FILLMORE

257

70

GREEN RIVER

70

RICHFIELD

Arches National Park

191

24

24

E

313 25 89

62

BEAVER

6

TORREY

24

62

95

14

219

Cedar Breaks National Monument

C

Zion National Park 89

A

9

ST. GEORGE ST. GEORGE B 59

ve r Ri Co lo ra d

12

276 Glen Canyon National Recreation Area

Bryce Canyon National Park Kodachrome Basin State Park

Natural Bridges National Monument

276 261

Grand Staircase - Escalante National Monument

89

8

San J uan R iver

Lake Powell

Rainbow Bridge National Monument

491

191

95

BLANDING

95

SPRINGDALE KANAB

MONTICELLO

ESCALANTE

143

7

18

211

15

CEDAR CITY

46

12

89

PAROWAN PANGUITCH

56

Canyonlands National Park

o

20

130

MOAB MOAB

D

Capitol Reef National Park

21

128

MEXICAN HAT Monument Valley

Bears Ear National Monument

163

Hovenweep National Monument

BLUFF 191

DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE.COM

Four Corners Area

19


LOCAL ATHLETE

LULU

AGE: 16 School: Silver Summit Academy

GEORGI I’ve been mountain biking since I was three-years-old, but I have been on the team and competing for two years so far. I joined the South Summit Mountain Bike Team because the head coach of the Junior Devos (Rolf Peterson) invited me and my family to go to an end of the year banquet to see what the bike team is like. We all thought that the team would be a good fit and we decided to try it out, and we’ve loved the team and mountain biking ever since. Some of my favorite mountain bike trails are Radke at High Star and Black Forest at Park City Mountain Resort. Radke is amazing because it has huge dips that are super steep on the way down and then they are super steep on the way back up. It’s almost like you're on a roller coaster! It also has a lot of fun technical rock gardens and drops. Black Forest is absolutely my all-time favorite trail. I love it because it’s so different from any trail I have ridden. It gets you out of your comfort zone and makes you want to go for it. It’s the steepest trail I have been on. I like it so much because I learn how to be loose on my bike and sit really far back in the seat. It has a few drops and tight technical turns. Some people think I’m crazy to think this is fun and not scary, but I am like “OMG I wanna do it again!!!!” My favorite thing about mountain biking is that I can inspire more girls to get involved in mountain biking through programs like GRiT (Girls Riding Together). GRiT is an organization that gets more girls to join mountain biking. They are always at NICA races, and have activities just for girls at their tent that helps more girls to want to bike. NICA is an organization for 7th-12th grades, and teams race in five race courses. Mountain biking is not like any other sport. With most sports, you set goals that involve the entire team, with mountain biking you set personal goals. When you're mountain biking on a trail you can forget about everything that surrounds you, except mountain biking.

20 DISCOVER UTAH KIDS

Grade: 10th SPORT: Mountain Biking TEAM: South Summit Favorite Trail:

Black Forest in Park City

When you bike you always have to be in the zone – if not, you might crash. You can never look out at a beautiful view. You better stop and do that instead – especially if you're doing downhill. Being on the South Summit Mountain Bike Team is really special; it’s my number one favorite thing about biking. I am so happy to have found a sport that I want to have with me for the rest of my life. Racing at the NICA races makes me realize it even more. I am happy that my team always cheers on and encourages everyone. For example, last year at Powder Mountain I started out with a great mass start and ended up being pushed into a rock garden by a rider from another team when she passed me. I tried stopping myself but couldn’t because my shoe wouldn’t come out of my pedal, so I fell and hit my head on a rock. I was lucky I didn’t get a bad concussion and I was able to get back on my bike. When I went to do my second lap, I was told I couldn’t finish my race because I had run out of time. After hearing that, I was mad and also sad, and started crying. I couldn’t believe that that had happened. My team was extremely supportive. They surrounded me and gave me a group hug. I really appreciate the Green Group that I ride with. They push me to my limit and give me the confidence to try harder. Every once in a while, they crack me up because sometimes they mess with me, which I think is funny. They even come up with ideas that aren’t always the greatest, and that makes me laugh. I especially want to point out my teammate Oliver who is a huge inspiration and always treats me equal, regardless of my gender in this sport. He just always tells you the truth, which helps during mountain biking (nothing like keeping it real)! I am happy to have a friend like Oliver. Another fantastic inspiration is Reece (2019 State Champion). When my sister and I joined the bike team, Reece helped us learn the mechanics of a bike. He also taught us some important biking skills. Reece is an AWESOME bike


mechanic and friend. He’s always willing to help me with my bike. Without Reece’s willingness to share his talents and abilities, I wouldn’t be where I am now. Being on the South Summit Mountain Bike Team is also astonishing because I have the best coaches in the world!!! I LOVE how every coach gives each athlete their attention and talks about their individual goals. The coaches work hard to make sure we all achieve our goals. I want to point out my Head Couch Leif Cox. I couldn't have asked for a better coach. What makes Leif so special is that he tries his hardest to understand each athlete's ability and how to help them grow in

ways they didn't think possible. Leif inspires me to try my hardest because sometimes it seems like he’s not human. Leif can make it up these gnarly hills that no one else can, he bikes in the most insane weather, and rides in races that are 50 miles long. I can’t believe he’s able to do that! I love having a head coach like Leif. The thing I like best about my team and coaches is that we're not about winning. We’re about having the mindset to start racing! Thanks to the support of all of our incredible coaches and athletes, we’ve learned we can do hard things by pushing ourselves and each other to constantly do our best.

Teens, we want to hear from you! Nominate a friend to be featured in the next issue. Mo@DiscoverUtahMagazine.com DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE.COM

21


DE

AD

HO RS

SA QUAIL CREEK GE • STAT

EO R

N

A

ND FLATS RECREA • SA TI O

AR E

southern utah state park round-up

K PAR

EP AR

K

E AT ST

G ST.

E T IN

N D

LOCK STATE PAR • GUN K

PO

O H

O LL

W

AT ST

ARK EP

Letters correspond with the MAP on page 19

22 DISCOVER UTAH KIDS


On the Water

WATER CARPET AT QUAIL CREEK

When you think about fall road trips, playing in the water may not be the first thing that comes to mind. Yes, the temps are cooler, but the water doesn’t cool down as quickly (most of the time), making fall the perfect time for some Southern Utah paddling adventures. St. George is a hot spot for paddling in the cooler months of fall with three epic and uniquely different state park reservoirs, all less than 20 minutes from downtown. The average temps in October and even November are in the 70s and the water temps are typically in the 50-60s.

A Quail Creek State Park (3,300’ elevation) is located 9 miles west of Hurricane and 13 miles northeast of St George. Filled from the Virgin River, the waters here are the warmest in Utah. The 600-acre reservoir is surrounded by unique geology that creates some amazingly colorful rock layers in the surrounding cliffs. The reservoir lies in the eroded core of the Virgin Anticline, which is a long up-warp of folded rock that is 30 miles long. + Rentals – Dig Paddlesports: kayaks, paddle boards, and water carpets, Digpaddlesports.com 435-467-9988 + Fees – $15/day-use + Camping – 24 campsites, full hookup to primitive + Day-use amenities – Day-use area with picnic tables and restrooms + Outside the park – Hiking Red Reef Trail in the Red Cliffs Desert Reserve. Located just 3 miles west of the park, Red Reef is an easy 2-mile (roundtrip) family-friendly hike leading to a waterfall.

B Sand Hollow State Park (3,000’ elevation) is located 12 miles east of St. George, 8 miles south of Quail Creek, and 9 miles southwest of Hurricane. The 1,322-acre reservoir is nearly twice the size of the neighboring Quail Creek, and the surrounding landscapes here are red rock and red sand beaches. The red sand beaches on the southwest corner are ideal for sand castle building and have shallow water, perfect for young swimmers and paddlers. In addition to water recreation, this park has 15,000 acres of sand dunes for the OHV enthusiast. + Rentals – B.A.S.H. – The Beach at Sand Hollow: kayaks, paddleboards, boats, jet skis and OHV. + Fees – $15/day-use + Camping – 71 sites, full hookup to primitive

23

DISCOVER UTAH KIDS

DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE.COM

23


+ Amenities – Day-use area with picnic tables and restrooms + Outside the park – Visit Grandpa’s Pond Park. Grandpa’s Pond is a city park located in Hurricane just 5 miles north of Sand Hollow. The park features both a paved (0.7-mile) trail and dirt (1-mile) trail, a fishing pond, playground, picnic tables, and restrooms.

C Gunlock State Park (3,600’ elevation) is located 15 miles northwest of St. George and 36 northwest of Sand Hollow. This 240-acre reservoir is the smallest of the three St. George waterholes, is the least visited, and has a different landscape scene as well. The landscapes surrounding the water are a combination of sandstone, lava rock, and sagebrush. This state park is a primitive area, which means there are no running water facilities or RV hook-ups, the restrooms here are pit-toilets. + Camping – 5 primitive sites - $20 per night + Fees – $10/day-use + Amenities – Pit-toilets + Outside the park – Hiking to the Vortex. Located less than 5 miles from the park, the Lower Sand Cove Trail is a moderate 2-mile (roundtrip) hike that leads to amazing views and a unique 60-foot deep sandstone bowl that features a cool swirling pattern. StateParks.utah.gov

On the Trail Fall is the perfect time to hit the trails in Moab. Whether by foot, bicycle, or OHV this outdoor mecca has numerous options for exploring.

D Dead Horse Point State Park (5,900’ elevation) is home to 17 miles of mountain biking trails, 7 miles of hiking trails, and amazing landscapes. The sheer cliffs

24

DISCOVER UTAH KIDS

surrounding the park have a vertical drop of 2,000’ to the Colorado River below. The many overlooks provide unparalleled panoramic views of the colorful sculpted canyons and buttes of Canyonlands National Park, the La Sal Mountains, and the greater Moab area. For the beginner mountain biker, combining the Intrepid and Raven Roll trails as an out-and-back is a flowy and fun 4-mile ride. The next step up is the Great Pyramid and Raven Roll 4-mile loop. Dogs are allowed on leash in most areas of the park, except for the mountain bike trails. The 7miles of hiking trails follow along the rim connecting to 8 different view points. The most popular and shortest are the 0.15-mile Nature Trail from the Visitor Center, and the Dead Horse Point Overlook Trail. Dead Horse Point State Park is an International Dark Sky Park and one of the best and most accessible areas near Moab for stargazing. The high plateau location and distance from the mountains and city yield a nearly full view of the celestial sphere. The park offers many stargazer programs and full moon walks throughout the year. + Camping – 9 yurts ($120-140 nightly/sleeps 6) and 55 camp sites + Fees – $20/day-use (valid for 3 consecutive days) + Amenities – Visitor Center, gift shop, day-use picnic area, and restrooms.

E Sand Flats Recreation Area (4,690’ elevation) is not a state park, but we included it here because it is an epic


FINS & THINGS

"Dead Horse Point State Park is an International Dark Sky Park and one of the best and most accessible areas near Moab for stargazing."

outdoor recreation playground. This 9,000-acre recreation area is managed through a partnership between Grand County and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) that was developed in 1995. User fees collected stay directly within the recreation area. Trails options here are both motorized and non-motorized. The famous Slickrock Trail was one of the first trails built in this mountain biking mecca. It was originally built for motorcycles in 1969 and started gaining popularity in the early 1980s by mountain bikers. The Slickrock Trail is rated difficult, has many areas of exposure, and should not be ridden by beginner riders. The 1.7-mile practice loop, also rated difficult, is the best place to test your skills before heading out on the 10.5-mile main loop.

choicehotels.com

Fins & Things is a 9.4-mile OHV trail that is recommended only for experienced drivers. The route is one-way only, takes about 2-3 hours, and leads to several epic overlooks. For those wanting to explore by foot, check out the Primitive Hiking Loop (1 mile/easy) and the Porcupine Rim to Castle Valley Overlook (4 miles/moderate). The Slickrock Practice Loop is also a great hiking option.

Stay two nights get one FREE - call for details 435.355.0909

+ Camping – 120 sites in 9 campgrounds all sites are first come, first serve. + Fees – $5/day use, $10/7-day pass, or $25 annual pass. Camping fees are an additional $15 per night + Amenities – Pit-toilets DiscoverMoab.com StateParks.utah.gov

435.355.0910

• • • •

56 rooms with full kitchens Outdoor pool & hot tub Free Wi-Fi Complimentary breakfast

356 N Main Street Moab,Utah 84532 DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE.COM

25


Mindfulness for Healthy Teens BY HEIDI O’DONOGHUE

Do you have a teen that could use some tools to feel more centered, present, and joyful?

26 DISCOVER UTAH KIDS


TODAY, MORE THAN EVER, TEENAGERS ARE DRAWN IN MANY DIRECTIONS. Teens encounter a barrage of demands from school, family, society, and social media. They face a unique set of stressors and many teens are more stressed than adults realize. Many stress-related health issues are on the rise in teens, including anxiety and depression. Life is coming at them fast and the pace doesn’t seem to be slowing down. The good news is that there are some ways to help teens feel balanced and resilient. One way that teens can tap into their inner strength is to practice Mindfulness. Mindfulness can be a powerful tool in helping teens cultivate healthy coping skills.

What is mindfulness?

Mindfulness is an ancient practice that’s becoming popular in modern times as a way to bring more clarity and ease to our lives. Jon Kabat-Zinn, a teacher who has helped matriculate mindfulness into the mainstream, defines mindfulness as paying attention to the present moment, on purpose, and without judgment. This is pretty simple, but not always easy. Our minds are busy, and our lives can be demanding. By paying more attention to the present moment we can get better at coping with life’s challenges and recognize all the positive aspects of life as well.

breath doesn’t need to be any different then it is right now. Do this practice several times throughout the day.

a

MINDFUL OBSERVATION: Pause, take a moment to come to your senses, what is right here in regard to sight, sound, touch, taste, and smell. Take a couple minutes to observe your surroundings. Do this practice several times throughout the day.

a

MINDFUL OF SELF: Take a moment to check-in with yourself. Ask yourself, "How am I feeling right now in body, mind and emotions?" Listen to hear your answer.

Practicing mindfulness can help teens bolster their ability to recognize when they are run down physically, emotionally, and mentally. And it can help them to make better choices to support their overall health and wellbeing.

How to Practice Mindfulness

We can bring mindfulness into our lives and the lives of our teens in simple and practical ways. The following list will help infuse mindfulness practices into everyday life and allow for more connection to the present moment.

a

MINDFUL BREATHING: We can use the breath as a powerful ally to bring us right to the present moment. Pause, take three mindful breaths, paying close attention to the entire length of the inhale and the entire length of the exhale. The

27

DISCOVER UTAH KIDS

Heidi teaches Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and Learning to Breathe (a mindfulness course for teens) in Salt Lake and Park City. She holds an adjunct faculty position at Salt Lake Community College where she teaches Meditation/Mindfulness courses. Heidi also offers group and private yoga classes on an on-going basis in Salt Lake. Heidiodonoghue.com DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE.COM 27


INSIDER'S GUIDE:

RICHFIELD BY KATELIN HANSEN

... a clump of trees right above the Lake that is in the shape of a heart and it turns red for just a short time.

28 DISCOVER UTAH KIDS


Sevier County in the fall is one of my favorite times of the year. As soon as the cooler weather hits, it feels like that feeling you get when you start a new chapter of a favorite book. You know it’s going to be good and you anticipate all the “fall things!” I’m talking about jacket weather, corn mazes, pumpkin picking, leaves changing, warm drinks, and rides up on the mountain! If you’re looking for something unique to do this fall, you must check out Fish Lake, Utah! It is one of my favorite places to visit and it’s just a short 40-minute drive up the mountain from Richfield, Utah. Fish Lake is known to have one of the world’s largest living organisms – Pando, a big family of Aspen Trees that all share identical genetic markers! You can drive around the beautiful area, enjoy all the immaculate colors of the trees changing, and experience a world wonder! I “fall” in love every time I see those pretty reds, golds, and orange tones of the Aspen Trees. Something also really unique to Fish Lake is the Aspen Heart. It is a clump of trees right above the Lake that is in the shape of a heart and it turns red for just a short time. It’s a little more tricky to see because it seems to change color before the other trees turn, so if you visit too late in the season you’ll likely miss it! Be sure to plan accordingly. While you’re up at Fish Lake, you can take a walk down the new boardwalk that follows Twin Creeks, a natural spring creek that feeds into the lake, and if the timing is right, you can catch the Kokanee Salmon spawning up the creek! I have yet to see this, but it is definitely on my bucket list this fall.

PATH OF POSITIVITY

Most towns and cities have a community bike path for walking, biking, running, and simple family fun. Our small town of Richfield is no exception and the bike path is heavily used and enjoyed! However, in the past few years our community has faced devastating losses due to suicide and other tragedies. Because of this I have felt inspired to make a difference somehow... So the Path of Positivity was created! Inspired by the Inspiration Trail in Southern Utah, I was able to get permission to place painted rocks all along the bike path in Richfield. It is now covered in colorful, uplifting, funny, special, and happy rocks. It is now a place to feel inspired, and everyone is invited to paint their own rock and place it on the trail. Also known as Made By Kate, Katelin is a mama to two little girls and makes a living as an artist and independent contractor for Sevier County. Her happy place is in the mountains. She finds joy spending time with her family and also by creating. She is a maker! She loves all things colorful, bright, and happy. @MadeByKate_

DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE.COM 29


NONPROFIT

highlight BY ASHLEY KINNEY

GIRL & HER BACKPACK IS A 501(C)3 NONPROFIT IN SALT LAKE CITY, UT. The organization utilizes outdoor learning to tear down barriers in Utah that prevent girls ages 12-17, across all backgrounds, from forming meaningful relationships, building confidence, and acquiring leadership skills. The Girl & Her Backpack team aims to: 1. Make the outdoors more accessible and inclusive of girls, specifically BIPOC girls and girls of non-traditional backgrounds; 2. Provide girls with resources to live a healthier lifestyle and build rewarding relationships outside of the program; 3. Tear down barriers in Utah that may prevent girls from building supportive, diverse, and inclusive friendships; and 4.

30 DISCOVER UTAH KIDS

Help girls realize their full potential and unique abilities by increasing confidence and leadership skills. While the nonprofit is relatively new to Utah (est. 2020), the Girl & Her Backpack team estimates to serve 60+ girls in their first year of launching and more than 125 girls in their second year of operation. The team hosts free monthly hikes for girls ages 12-17 in Salt Lake and Utah Counties, quarterly day trips, and summer camps where girls learn beginning to intermediate backpacking skills and wilderness safety. “Going through the motions of packing, each girl


“After just one hike, both of my girls came home full of inspiring ideas and stories. The activities themselves encourage appropriate risk-taking, connecting to self, others and nature, critical thinking, self-love, and healthy body movement. What the team of G&HBP are doing for these girls at a potentially challenging time of growing up, is a true gift.” - Sydnee Hancock, A Girl & Her Backpack Participant Parent

seemed a tad bit nervous and shy—who wouldn’t be when you don’t know anyone! However, as soon as we started the radio, each girl began dancing, singing, and talking like they had known each other for a life-time. It was magical.” - G&HBP Founder, Ashley Kinney, describing friendships being built during their 2020 backpacking trip During Girl & Her Backpack’s 2020 beginner’s backpacking trip, participants learned how to pack their backpacks, read a map, use a compass, use a SAT phone, set up camp, build a fire, create an emergency litter out of duct tape, listen and self-reflect all while experiencing the joys of building new friendships. In a blog post on the experience, Girl & Her Backpack leaders described camp participants as “kind and insightful.” As a result of their programs, participants are confident, empathetic, and inclusive. Girls of color are represented and engaged in the outdoors, and participants recognize how their unique abilities and backgrounds make them better leaders. These girls feel less isolated and have the tools to be intentional about the community they are building.

Ashley Kinney grew up in San Diego, CA and currently resides in Salt Lake City, UT with her husband, Chris. She graduated from the University of Utah with a B.S. in Communications where her coursework focused on interpersonal and family communication. Ashley founded Girl & Her Backpack in memory of her close friend, Carlie Wilson, to provide a safe space for girls to build community and feel empowered by getting outside. GirlAndHerBackpack.com

DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE.COM 31


E D U C AT I O N A L

SOCIAL STEWARDSHIP IN THE OUTDOORS BY PATRICK MORRISON

THE STEWARDSHIP MODEL FOR ENGAGING ETHICALLY WITH THE OUTDOORS, “TAKE ONLY PHOTOS, LEAVE ONLY FOOTPRINTS,” REMAINS RELEVANT IN THESE TURBULENT TIMES. In this crucial formula, we remain separate from the land but connected to its health and preservation. Now, as a pandemic inspired a new class of eager recreators to seek refuge in our natural spaces, we must be conscious of extending this focus of stewardship beyond the land and to the people. While it is understandable to find frustration in busier trailheads and parking lots, our public lands’ shining quality is that they are public. The more they are enjoyed together, the more they benefit our communities in health and closeness. If approached correctly, their growing embrace will lead to a future

32

DISCOVER UTAH KIDS

where these lands are protected, supported, and celebrated. As we identify qualities for how to be stewards to each other, it is clear that these forms of interaction should be given to all recreators we encounter. By adhering to social stewardship principles, we can not only build a friendlier outdoors for the most experienced, but also work to build a more inclusive and accepting environment for those who are just now creating their connection. Keep these reminders front-of-mind when recreating outdoors: •

Smile and share excitement. It is a simple gesture with a powerful effect and an immediate show of acceptance. Celebrate nature together by smiling and rejoicing with fellow recreators in recognition of the gift of this shared space.


who have the right of way, stop and let quicker hikers pass, hike single file when meeting a group on a trail going in the opposite direction. By making encounters in these shared spaces more graceful, the experience is enriched for everyone.

Learn to correct behavior with kindness. It is natural to feel strong respect and connection to the land, and for many, this relationship may have taken years to develop. This development likely included plenty of missteps along the way. As we spread a respectful manner of interacting with nature, an easy phrase to begin with is, “I don’t know if you’re aware but...there is a fire restriction, this is a protected watershed, camping isn’t allowed this close to the lake, etc.” Don’t assume ill intent when unawareness could be the culprit.

Don’t transfer the mistakes of one to all the others. It is easy to get frustrated at the sight of a carved aspen, a littered campsite, or fishing line strewn along a riverbank. The unfortunate truth is that these acts are performed by recreators of all ages and all experience levels. However, if new recreators are welcomed with a generous ethic of mutual stewardship, we can see a future where increased use does not translate to increased negative impact.

Many outdoor activities are mentor-dependent. We lean on others to learn how to tie climbing knots, cast a fly rod, or rig up a raft. While not as direct, a new kind of mentorship should be given to our newest recreators. While the above principles take place outdoors, even before you’ve arrived at a trailhead, you can invite friends and families to enjoy the refuge of nature.

Never make assumptions. We all come to the outdoors for different reasons. Some to get away, some to get to a destination. Skill levels vary, knowledge varies, backgrounds vary. Recognize we all experience nature differently.

Before helping or offering advice, kindly ask if it’s needed. For high-consequence mistakes, like a climbing rope that is not tied correctly, there is an exception. Respect other’s journey of learning, and that it may happen without you.

Model appropriate behavior. While most understood ethics, like not littering in the outdoors, should be clear, many more nuanced behaviors are unknown to those fresh to the outdoors. Using a simple day hike as an example, make an effort to yield to those

The benefits of outdoor recreation spread throughout a community, boosting physical and mental health. With more focus given to these natural spaces, and with it a nurtured social ethic for enjoying the outdoors together, their longevity, access, and protection become more likely than ever.

Patrick Morrison is a Program Specialist at the Utah Office of Outdoor Recreation. He previously acted as Trails Director for the Cottonwood Canyons Foundation, an environmental stewardship nonprofit based in Salt Lake City. He is a Utah native and outdoor enthusiast, splitting his time between climbing, fly fishing, and backpacking through Utah’s public lands. Business.Utah.Gov/outdoor @UtahOOR

DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE.COM 33


Utah State Parks

Tƒ k e t h e R o ƒ d

Less Trƒveled. Wayne County, UT | CapitolReef.org

34

DISCOVER UTAH KIDS


MOUNTAINS SCENERY adventure

You’re on the right trail. Family adventure means something different to all of us. Maybe you like watching a sunrise while floating in a hot-air balloon or a sunset full of fall colors. Are you looking to hike to a scenic mountaintop or to wander through a charming historic town? Maybe all of it. Whatever you’re looking for – in Park City, Utah – you’re on the right trail to a rewarding family getaway. Start your adventure at VisitParkCity.com

WINTER’S FAVORITE TOWN.

36

DISCOVER UTAH KIDS

Profile for Discover Utah Magazine

DISCOVER UTAH KIDS - FALL 2020  

IN THIS ISSUE; ROAD TRIPPIN' SCENIC BYWAY 12, SOUTHERN UTAH STATE PARK ROUND-UP, INSIDER'S GUIDE TO RICHFIELD, SOCIAL STEWARDSHIP AND BEST F...

DISCOVER UTAH KIDS - FALL 2020  

IN THIS ISSUE; ROAD TRIPPIN' SCENIC BYWAY 12, SOUTHERN UTAH STATE PARK ROUND-UP, INSIDER'S GUIDE TO RICHFIELD, SOCIAL STEWARDSHIP AND BEST F...