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INSPIRE. EDUCATE. EXPLORE. A L L A G E S .

DISCOVER UTAH SUMMER 2019

PARK CITY

Stay cool this summer

guided adventure

EVERY KID OUTDOOR'S INITIATIVE DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE.COM


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Less Trƒveled. Wayne County, UT | CapitolReef.org


ENDL ESS A DV EN T UR ES. UNL I M I T ED SM I L ES. ON E CH A R M I NG T OW N. Discover a family destination where summer fun comes naturally. Where you can fill your kid’s days with hiking, biking and limitless other mountain activities. Then fill the evenings in town with a variety of dining, outdoor concerts and exciting events. Yes. All that. Only in Park City, Utah. Plan your trip at VisitParkCity.com.

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24 24 PUBLISHER / EDITOR Monique Beeley COPY EDITOR Katie Mullaly ART DIRECTOR Michelle Rayner CONTRIBUTORS Arika Bauer, Julia Geisler, Greg Scothern, Sophie Scothern, Jessie Sindelar, Rose Smith, and Whitney Thompson

ON THE COVER

Cataract Canyon / Colorado River PHOTO BY Monique Beeley

We want to hear from you. Send your rants, raves, and story ideas to Mo@DiscoverUtahMagazine.com Advertising inquires for Discover Utah Kids and DiscoverUtahMagazine.com can be sent to info@DiscoverUtahMagazine.com SUBSCRIPTIONS - Never miss an issue again. Get this quarterly magazine delivered directly to your mailbox for $15 annually. Sign up online at DiscoverUtahMagazine.com Connect with us @DiscoverUtahKids Discover Utah Kids is published quarterly by Discover Utah Magazine, LLC. P.O. Box 2336, Park City, UT. 435-640-6549 © 2019 by Discover Utah Magazine LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without permission from the publisher.

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10

38

{

}

contents summer

30

10 Guided Adventure

28 Nonprofit Highlight

Inclusive Family Summer Adventures

Families That Play, Stay Together

16 Healthy Kids

30 Road Trippin' Mountains of

Utah’s Every Kid Outdoors Initiative

18 Insider's Guide

34 Explore Your Backyard Summer on The Slopes

Park City

23 Map 24 How To

18

Southwestern Utah

Stay Cool This Summer

38 Adventure Awaits In the Heber Valley 40 Sustainability …Because Happens

live in the sunshine DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE.COM 5


LETTER FROM THE

PUBLISHER

YEAH… SUMMER IS FINALLY HERE, AFTER THE EPIC WINTER AND THE ABUNDANTLY WET SPRING… I’m sure

we are all very ready for some fun-in-the-sun. One of the many benefits of a higher than normal snow year is that our rivers will be running mighty and our reservoirs and lakes will be filled to new heights. Making it the perfect time for a family river adventure or exploring a new H2O destination. On page 24 we highlight some high elevation H20 destinations to add to your summer to-do list. My goal with this publication is to inspire and educate families to get outside and explore Utah’s amazingly awesome backyard. Not just when your kids are young, but also as they grow and mature into teenagers and then young adults. On page 10, we have two young adults sharing their personal stories of adventuring with their families: Sophie Scothern, who shares her story of an amazing multi-day river adventure with her family before heading off to college, and Jessie Sindelar, who at 22, came back home to Utah for a summer canyoneering trip with his parents and older sister. As we all know making family memories doesn’t just stop when our kids reach a certain age and leave the nest. These types of trips so important in keeping the family bond strong.

Summertime and camping go hand-in-hand for sure. And if you are planning to pitch your tent in a dispersed or backcounty site, be sure to check out the article on page 40, highlighting tips for a new happens. I’m sure we’ve all plan because… noticed the increase in use of many areas and we all need to educate ourselves on how we can be better stewards of the landscapes we all love to explore. Have you heard of Utah’s Every Kid Outdoors (EKO) Initiative? Officially launching in June, EKO, passed the 2019 legislative session and was the brainchild of Utah’s Office of Outdoor Recreation. I am very fortunate and grateful to have been on the committee to help move this forward. See page 16 for all the details on EKO. Now get out there and make some memories with you kids, because as we all know time just keeps flying by and this time with our kids in the outdoors is truly THE BEST!!

Photo: Arika Bauer

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VisitCedarCity.com DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE.COM 9


GUIDED ADVENTURE

"Families that play together, stay together."

IT’S A WELL-WORN CLICHÉ. But like all tired clichés, they get that way by having a great deal of truth behind the words. When most folks hear that phrase, they probably envision a family with young children engaged in some sort of outdoor activity. It’s likely they almost never envision a family with young adult children, but when you stop to think about it, that’s when playing as a family really gets fun – and perhaps even more critical to reinforcing the bonds that keep families strong as the kids grow up and leave the nest. In this segment we’re thrilled to introduce you to two families who are doing just that – as written from the perspectives of their young adult children. Both families spent time recently adventuring in the outstanding backcountry near Moab. First, we have Jesse Sindelar, who, with his parents and older sister, spent a day canyoneering in the spectacular La Sal Mountains above Moab. At 22, Jesse is just finishing up college, making adventures like his very special as his family ages and the dynamic changes. Then we have 19-year-old Sophie Scothern, who shares her experience while on a river trip through Cataract Canyon with her parents, younger brother, and good friends. This was Sophie’s last family adventure before leaving for college, which made the trip uniquely special for her family. While each of these families is experiencing dramatic changes, these young writers show us there’s just no better way to bring a family closer than to get completely off the grid together in a beautiful, wild place. No phones…no interruptions…just tons of laughter, great conversation, and fond memories. Families that play together do indeed stay together.


"My parents are a year or so out from retiring, and my sister lives on the East coast while I finish up college on the West coast, so we make sure to appreciate the dwindling opportunities we have to explore the outdoors as a family."

BY JESSIE SINDELAR THE LACK OF AIR CONDITIONING IS PALPABLE. As we pile out of our rental, the hot and dry air smacks you right in the face, a sharp contrast to the conditioned comfort of the car. My mom is talking to our canyoneering guide inside the Desert Highlights shop while my dad fills up yet another water bottle, as my sister, her boyfriend and I are trying on harnesses, and everyone is sweating. While summer temperatures in Moab regularly reach into the 100s, that doesn’t stop the waves of tourists from braving the hot weather, and it wasn’t going to stop us either; we had a plan to beat the heat. The La Sal mountains are a mere 20 miles south of town. Towering at an elevation of nearly 13,000 feet, the heights transform the scenery into an alpine haven and lush forestry, but most importantly, the temperature is about 25 degrees cooler. While the mountains have numerous hiking and mountain biking trails, our plan was to rappel down Pleiades Canyon, a cluster of windy red-rock crevasses hidden in the mountain. After arriving at the trailhead, we pile out of the van driven by Melissa, our guide for the day. The extra height of the La Sal mountains gives you an amazing view of the southern Utah red rock below, shimmering like a mirage from the powerful heat of the sun. Melissa corrals us towards the trailhead, and we start the brief hike to the first rappel site. With a cliff reaching down to the red rock below on one side and a bright green meadow with aspens stretching seemingly forever on the other, we hike the line between the two different biomes. Following a small trek, the path gives way to an open gully, where a dried riverbed directs us to our first rappel. As we descend the gully, you can see the mark that the river has made on the bed, gnarled trees with thick trunks tossed around like toothpicks, rocks the size of cars scattered chaotically. After some negotiating through the natural obstacle course of the dried riverbed, we are forced to hike around our first rappel, due to a sizeable wasp nest precariously near the rappel anchor. A quick scramble up a hill and a little farther downriver brings us to the second

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DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE.COM 11


rappel, a narrow hallway between two rocks the size of houses. This is the first rappel in a series of four that travels down through the canyon, created by a massive movement of these incomprehensibly large rocks. Our rope down into the cavern is slow and steady as we are belayed one by one into the shade below. The chutes that we are navigating generally contain a number of small rushing waterfalls, seven for the seven sisters of Pleiades, yet Melissa informs us that the lack of waterfalls this year was a first in 20 years. She also mentions that although the water is a good relief from the sun, rappelers who have to descend through the icy water to move on generally end up cold rather than cooled off. Luckily the rocks are just cool to the touch as we use them to steady our descent. The cavern deepens and slightly narrows as our feet touch down on the ground below us. It’s not actually the ground though; it's a rock the size of a sedan that gravity has forcefully wedged against the walls of the canyon, creating a suspended shelf from which the second rappel in the series starts. The shelf holds up a few big rocks of its own from the generational cascade of smaller boulders from above, sturdy in everything but appearance. Sturdy enough, as we hook up to the anchor embedded in the shelf and rappel down into the space precariously below. We have descended a few hundred feet at this point and looking back up through the chute reveals the pure tonnage of rock that this shelf actually consists of. Standing beneath, gazing up at this massive blockage forces a humbling appreciation of the awesome scale of

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Mother Nature, until Melissa refocuses our attention to the final two rappels. The first one snakes down through a very narrow and windy part of the canyon, and the winding rock walls are smooth like ceramics, shaped by the occasional water flow over millennia into soft bends and a polished texture. This rappel takes some maneuvering of bodies and rope through the twist and turns, especially for my older folks, but we all securely make it down to a small carved out landing. One side of the cavern walls have begun to open as we near the bottom and the final rappel anchor. The traces of sunlight that begin to grace our carved-out landing create a crisp natural lighting that instigates a flurry of photo taking, and a brief warm relief from the shade of the canyon. My parents are a year or so out from retiring, and my sister lives on the East coast while I finish up college on the West coast, so we make sure to appreciate the dwindling opportunities we have to explore the outdoors as a family. Our final rappel is drenched in sun, as well as the sputtering of a baby waterfall that has followed us down the crevasse. The narrow rock walls have opened up into a wooded area similar to where we started, and we finally descend onto real ground, with a breathtaking upward view of the carved water chute we just navigated. We beat the heat, but the sun is welcomed after a few hours of shade, and we pull out lunch, set to enjoy the fruits and sandwiches of our labor. The rappels were good, but the company was better, which let us create a wonderful family memory to cherish as time changes us and the rocks.


"As the river calmed, the stillness returned, and our time on the Colorado (as well as a chapter of my life) came to a close, I was left with an experience that would have a lasting impact on the chapters to come."

BY SOPHIE SCOTHERN THE VIEW OF SNOWCAPPED PEAKS IN THE LA SALS tempted me with whispers of legendary backcountry skiing —and temperatures lower than 95 degrees— as we drove into the melt of red rock that encompasses highway 191 on its path through summertime in Moab. The transformation that Utah takes from the jagged peaks of the Wasatch in the north to the sandstone layers of the south dominated my mind as my family drove towards our final adventure together before I left for college in the month to come. The drive is one that we’d done year after year together, but the realization of the distance I’d soon be from both southern Utah and my family brought a new gratitude for the many gifts the desert had provided over the years; soft red sand in between my toes, falling asleep under a night sky so vivid you feel like you can reach out and collect the stars, and sunrise smiles that precede long days of laughter in a vast landscape being a few. The stoke levels took a dramatic increase as we pulled up to the headquarters of Sheri Griffith Expeditions to begin our five day Cataract Canyon rafting trip on the Colorado River. The bright faces and billowing Hawaiian shirts of our guides Ben, Riah, and Luigi greeted us as we loaded our belongings into the stacked yellow oarboat rafts that would carry us through the water, sand, and sun of Canyonlands National Park. We loaded into the van that would shuttle us to the river, and I prepared myself to discover what Sheri Griffith describes as an “Adventure with a Touch of Class.” What I would come to experience on those five days was absolutely an adventure, and it was classy in all of the right ways, but it was also so much more. Growing up in Utah, the Colorado has always been a river that I’ve been close to, both in proximity and in the extensive resources it provides to my home and the Colorado River Basin. It wasn’t until the first day of the trip, however, that I truly saw the river. The beauty within the stillness and gentility of the moving water juxtaposed with its power of carving canyons and serving as a lifeline for the West hit me as we motored past a sign informing us

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that we were entering Canyonlands. The group huddled as Riah and Ben prepared our first meal on the river. Perhaps it was the intensity of the sun and the sudden realization of how hungry I was after being caught up in the landscape that made those chicken salad wraps so unbelievably good, or perhaps it was that Riah was the best chef the Colorado had ever seen. After careful consideration, I think it was the latter. The history of the river and the canyons we were traveling through unfolded as we stopped to hike to ruins nestled in the rock above us. Our guides led us past the art and standing granaries from the peoples of the past, and as our time grew walking the same steps as those 800 years before us did, so did our awe of the landscape before us. The sun was peeking through Liberty Bell Arch as we approached our camp for the first night. After unloading the rafts, my brother and I were quick to discover the magical multi-use nature of the Paco Pad – a burly high density foam sleeping pad that doubles as a flotation device – as we were advised by Luigi to walk up the river and ride the pads back down to camp. The swiftness of the river was immediate and powerful as our laughter

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echoed off the canyon walls and our skills of guiding foam pads down the Colorado were quickly illustrated to be nonexistent. Sweet lullabies of crickets and frogs sang the setting sun to sleep as we gathered to exchange stories and smiles with our guides and fellow guests. While each of us differed in age, background, and life experience, we were all alongside each other in pursuit of the adventure and joy that rivers and evening light on red rock strike deep within – the same adventure and joy that had brought John Wesley Powell down the identical river path to explore Cataract Canyon 150 years ago, and thousands more since. The heat cooled and the stars emerged as the tale of Buzz Holmstrom and the first solo trip down the Colorado from Wyoming to Hoover Dam was told to eager ears and tired eyes. Each bend of the river brings a new view of Canyonlands, and with each turn our eyes were drawn up towards the massive canyon walls that enclosed us. The smallest of rapids hinted at the roaring water to come, but for the first two days of the trip, excitement was drawn from Great Blue Herons swooping in front of the rafts and resting on shores, the calls of peregrine


AUTHOR BIOS Jesse Sindelar recently graduated from Whitman College in Walla Walla, Washington. He was born and raised in Salt Lake City and is an avid skier and hiker, as well as being completely obsessed with soccer and basketball.

falcons piercing through the quiet canyons, jumping off the boats to cool hot skin and wash the sweat and sand that the day had brought, and drinking the best La Croix money could buy. We rounded yet another bend, and the red muddy water of the Colorado met the Green River in a dramatic contrast that marked the confluence. For a fleeting moment, we were in two rivers at once, and our whoops and hollers traveled down the canyon as it opened, green and red water melting and swirling into one. The Colorado River continued on. All notions of a river running with stillness and gentility that we had experienced on the first three days of the trip were lost on me as the sound of chaotic moving water approached and we stopped at a – very – comforting and large sign that reads “DANGER – CATARACT CANYON – HAZARDOUS RAPIDS 2½ MILES” freshly painted in red. My fear was (mostly) subsided, however, when the guides provided an in-depth safety briefing and I witnessed their excitement for getting to run and take our group down some of the most legendary rapids in the West. We loaded into the rafts, Ben yelled a triumphant, “Whitewater!” and for the next 2 ½ miles we were drenched in water and exhilaration as our guides skillfully maneuvered the river. Cataract Canyon rapids can range from class three to class five depending on water flow levels, but as the cubic feet per second of water was low during our trip, Eloise (a fellow guest on the trip) and I were able to much less skillfully maneuver down the low intensity sections of Cataract on a small inflatable kayak called a ducky. When we reached our final camp, the ducky had seen better days, but as I looked around at my family and the friends who had been strangers only days before, I had not. As the river calmed, the stillness returned, and our time on the Colorado (as well as a chapter of my life) came to a close, I was left with an experience that would have a lasting impact on the chapters to come. DiscoverMoab.com

Sophie Scothern is from Ogden and is a sophomore at Montana State University studying conservation biology and film. She is a lover of Mother Nature, music, mountain biking, backcountry skiing and climbing. She is passionate about writing and sharing stories about connecting with the natural world.

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healthykids

UTAH'S EVERY KID OUTDOORS (EKO) INITIATIVE BY ROSE SMITH HOW MANY HOURS DO YOU AND YOUR CHILDREN SPEND IN FRONT OF A SCREEN EVERY DAY? Believe it or not, the average child spends over 7.5 hours a day (53 hours a week) in front of a screen! This lifestyle has huge consequences for our health—especially for children, whose brains and bodies are still developing. This can cause serious physical, social, and emotional health concerns (think asthma, bone, and joint problems, risk factors for heart disease, obesity, diabetes, bullying, social isolation, depression, low self-esteem, and behavioral problems). Doctors warn that this generation of children will die before their parents due to chronic disease. Now guess how much time the average child spends outside—it’s only 30 minutes a week on average! A recent UK study found that prison inmates spend more time outside than children. So what can parents do about this problem; what is the missing piece? Research shows mixing in some active time in nature as a family has resounding health benefits for children and parents alike.

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Time in nature has positive physical, mental, social, and behavioral health outcomes for both children and adults. Studies show it lowers stress levels and blood pressure, engages less fit children, and reduces the gap in gender differences in physical activity more than organized sports do. It has also been shown to decrease attention problems and aggressive behavior, increase positive emotions and social development, and contribute to higher levels of flourishing and vitality. Basically it's the secret sauce to feeling good. Our mission at the Office of Outdoor Recreation (OOR) is to ensure that Utahns live a healthy and active lifestyle through outdoor recreation. We recently passed Utah’s Every Kid Outdoors Initiative (EKO) in the 2019 legislative session thanks to the support of the Governor, Rep. Arent, Sen. Fillmore, and many others. This list of 10 free or low-cost outdoor recreation activities that can be done by a child from any background or ability whether in a city park, your backyard, or the thousands of acres of public lands in Utah.

The 10 activities are: 1. Observe nature and wildlife in Utah 2. Explore Utah’s parks, public lands, and wild places 3. Experience the Greatest Snow on Earth 4. Gaze at the starry sky 5. Bring along a friend to nearby nature 6. Splash in Utah’s rivers, lakes, and streams 7. Follow a trail 8. Plant a seed 9. Play on Utah’s rocks and mountains 10. Be a steward and take care of Utah’s outdoor places

environments and nature-based opportunities here in Utah. We are also launching the Utah Children’s Outdoor Recreation & Education Grant (UCORE) in fall 2019. This grant will award $100,000 to local youth programs that have a nature-based or outdoor recreation aspect to their programming. What if we could increase the amount of time our families spend in nature and magnify those benefits while decreasing their screen time and health problems? Every bit helps for both us and our children, and we think that EKO and UCORE can be a foundation for change. Visit our website this summer for more information, our EKO Explorer Activity Passport and more: www.business.utah.gov/outdoor/eko

Rose Smith is currently the program specialist and event coordinator for the Utah Office of Outdoor Recreation. Her graduate work at the University of Utah included researching and creating Utah’s Every Kid Outdoors Initiative, which passed as a bill (HCR 4) in the 2019 Utah Legislative Session. She also works on policy, the Utah Outdoor Recreation Summit, the Utah Outdoor Recreation Grant, and inspiring Utahns to get active and healthy through outdoor recreation. She loves climbing, hiking, and biking around Utah.

EKO encourages kids and families to get outside, be active, and try new things, showcasing unique

Utah’s Every Kid Outdoors (EKO) Initiative (1) Observe nature and wildlife in Utah; (2) Explore Utah's parks, public lands, and wildplaces; (3) Experience The Greatest Snow on Earth; (4) Gaze at the starry sky; (5) Bring along a friend to discover nearby nature; .

(6) splash in Utah's rivers, lakes, and streams; (7) follow a trail; (8) plant a seed; (9) play on Utah's rocks and mountains; and (10) be a steward and take care of Utah's outdoor places DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE.COM 17


INSIDER'S GUIDE:

PARK CITY

BY MONIQUE BEELEY

PARK CITY, ONCE KNOWN AS JUST A “ONE SEASON WONDER” aka the booming winter season, has now matured into a year-round destination that has something for everyone in the family to enjoy in every season.

IRON CANYON

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First let’s take a look at a Park City summer by numbers;

Elevation = 7000’ /10000’

Average Temps = 47 /80 degrees

Restaurants = 150

Trails = 400 Miles

Lodging options = 100+

Paved Paths = 43 Miles

Festivals + Events = 100+

Ok now that we know the stats, let’s dive into some of my Park City favorites, in no particular order…well…the first one might just be my favorite activity. Mountain biking is king in this cool mountain town. With over 400 miles of trails there is no shortage of places to keep the tires rolling, even for the groms. The top family-friendly options are: Trailside Mountain Bike Park , Round Valley – Practice Loop and then PorcUclimb to Downward Dog ,Utah Olympic Park – RTS , and Free Mason/Lost Prospector . For those new to the biking scene, check out the beginner guided options at Deer Valley Resort and with All Seasons Adventures. If cruising on a paved path is more your speed, then try these pedal-to-park options. Prospector Park to City Park via the Rail Trail (4-miles roundtrip). This section is only slightly uphill but “bookended” with a park on either end, which will surely entice the kids to keep pedaling. Another great pedal-to-park option is Creekside Park to Willow Creek Park via McLeod Creek (7-miles roundtrip). Be sure to stop by the Copper Moose Farm Stand along the route for a sweet treat.

Outdoor Concerts = 100+

Park Silly Sunday’s = 14

Mountain Resorts = 2

Days of Summer = 93 / 13.25 weeks

Royal Street Café. Or, start with brunch on the deck at the Stein Eriksen Lodge followed by an out-and-back hike on the epic Mid Mountain Trail . For those super ambitious adventurers, the Mid Mountain Trail continues from here for 20 miles! The Park City Mountain summer vibe is all about fun, with the resort’s Mountain Coaster, Alpine Slide, and Zip Line topping the charts. Both the Mountain and Canyons Village base areas are home to weekly concerts and outdoor dining. The Utah Olympic Park is not to be missed for the thrill-seeking family. Summer attractions include ziplines, alpine slide, extreme tubing, ropes courses, and summer bobsled rides. Also, be sure to attend one of the Flying Ace All-Stars Freestyle Shows happening every weekend June 22nd – Sept 1st. TRAILSIDE MOUNTAIN BIKE PARK

Mountain Resorts aren’t just hopping during the winter months. When the snow melts these locales are family-friendly hot-spots. Deer Valley doesn’t just roll out the red carpet, for the winter season, they do a top-notch job for the summer season as well. A couple of recommends are: scenic lift ride to the top of Bald Mountain and hike to the scenic overlook and then hop back on chairlift, or hike down via Ontario Canyon Trail (2 miles) . Then enjoy lunch on the deck of the DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE.COM 19


BALD MOUNTAIN DEER VALLEY

UTAH OLMPYIC PARK

For a local sweet treat:

Java Cow

Auntie Em’s

Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory

Treats and Eats. There is no shortage of dining options in this cool mountain town. Many even offer dining deals so be sure to check our local newspaper, The Park Record or parkcityrestaurants.com and historicparkcityutah.com for summer dining specials. A few of our family friendly dining favs are Versante, Red Banjo Pizza, Squatters, Maxwell’s, Deer Valley Grocery Café, and El Chabasco.

If a scenic hike is more your style, our top options are Farm Trail/McLeod Creek , Rob’s Trail , Lost Prospector , and Iron Canyon .

For a local sweet treat: Java Cow's ice cream, Auntie Em’s pies, and Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory's carmel apples.

Looking to reach new heights? Then head east to Kamas for an adventure along the Mirror Lake Scenic Byway. This 42-mile route peaks at 10,687 feet at Bald Mountain Pass providing outstanding high mountain vistas and endless recreational opportunities.

And finally, if you needed just one more reason to add Park City to your summer agenda, let’s talk about Deals for Days. Whether you call it budget-wise, thrifty, value, discount, deals, or even a blue light special. Park City is the iDEAL summer destination, with many lodging properties offering up to 75% off their peak-season rates.

The calendar of summer events in Park City is pretty colossal, almost every day throughout the season there is something fantabulous happening. One not-to-miss event is the Park Silly Sunday Market, this eco-friendly open-air street festival takes over lower Main Street for 14 Sunday’s throughout the summer.

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Now…you really have no excuse for not checking out this COOL MOUNTAIN TOWN this summer! Visit ParkCity.com


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PAGE 24 1. Bear Lake 2. Flaming Gorge National Recreation Area 3. Joe's Valley Reservoir 4. Fish Lake 5. Lower Bowns Reservoir

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MANILA Flaming Gorge National Recreation Area

SALT LAKE CITY 80

201

KAMAS

PARK CITY

215

TOOELE

Dinosaur National Monument

HEBER CITY 35

196

73

36

191

Utah Lake

40

191

89

6

89

96

PRICE

6

15

125

31

3. 28

89

50

50

29

MANTI

6

CASTLE DALE

6

100

191

10

FILLMORE

257

45

88

DUCHESNE

68

154

40

208

PROVO

River

199

149

VERNAL

Timpanogos Cave National Monument

Green

WENDOVER

191

150

RICHFIELD 24

70

GREEN RIVER

70

Arches National Park

191

24

4.

128 313

MOAB

25 Capitol Reef National Park

21 89

24

62

BEAVER 62

95 Ri ve r or ad

15

6.PAROWAN PANGUITCH

56

219

14

Cedar Breaks National Monument Zion National Park

9

ST. GEORGE

12

59

95

Glen Canyon National Recreation Area

Natural Bridges National Monument

276 261

Grand Staircase - Escalante National Monument San J uan R iver

89

Lake Powell

BLANDING

95

SPRINGDALE KANAB

491

191

276

Bryce Canyon National Park

89

18

MONTICELLO

ESCALANTE

143

CEDAR CITY

211

12

89

o

20

46

Co l

130

Canyonlands National Park

5.

TORREY

Rainbow Bridge National Monument

MEXICAN HAT Monument Valley

Bears Ear National Monument

163

Hovenweep National Monument

BLUFF 191

Four Corners Area

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HOW

TO

Stay cool this summer 24 DISCOVER UTAH KIDS

BLOOMINGTON LAKE


BEAR LAKE

FLAMING GORGE

Here is a list of some of our favorite high elevation H2O locales to cool off as the summer heats up.

To make it easy, we have pinpointed these locales on our MAP on page 23 Topping our H20 list as well as the state, is Bear Lake. Often referred to as “The Caribbean of the Rockies� due to its aqua-blue color. This natural freshwater lake gets it blue color from limestone minerals suspended in the waters. Bear Lake is often a week-long destination for families as a multitude of water activities abound including boating, water skiing, standup paddle boarding, fishing and more. Cisco Beach is known for its steep, rocky scuba diving adventures in summer, along with midwinter Bonneville Cisco fishing. The sandy beaches on the northern side are family favorites. Access depends on water level, and with the recent big snow year, many of the beaches may be limited. Rendezvous Beach State Park on the south end offers day use, water recreation rentals and camping. Near Bear Lake on the Utah/Idaho border are the Minnetonka Caves, which are the largest limestone rock caves in the area. In the heat of the summer, this cool, cavernous spot is the perfect hour-long respite from summer heat. Tours involve a fully guided walk and are suitable for most families. Just down the road, Bloomington Lake, is a great place for an afternoon of swimming, fishing, and hiking. This high-elevation (8,200 ft), crystal-clear, glacier-fed lake is the perfect spot to cool off mid-summer. The hike is under a mile, and winds through meadows of wildflowers and around a smaller lake before reaching the final destination. BearLake.org

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BEAR LAKE

DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE.COM 25

JOE'S VALLEY


Next on the list is the Flaming Gorge National Recreation Area which is managed by the Ashley National Forest and includes the section of the Green River below Flaming Gorge Dam. This epic wildland stretches from high deserts to the alpine forested slopes of Utah's Uinta Mountains. The 91-mile-long Flaming Gorge Reservoir is an adventure hub, with more than 360 miles of shoreline, boat ramps, full-service lodges, and marinas. Hiking and backpacking, canoeing, SUP and kayaking, horseback riding, mountain biking, rock climbing, river running, scenic byways, and wildlife viewing can all be found. Flaming Gorge Reservoir boasts world-record German Browns, Utah state record lake trout, and rainbow. In addition, the reservoir holds numerous trophy fish: kokanee salmon, tiger trout, smallmouth, and largemouth bass. The Green River below the dam is one of the most renowned trout fisheries in the world. The flow is regulated to maintain an optimum temperature. Its crystal clear, emerald waters support a large population of trout, with rainbows below the dam, and browns downstream. FlamingGorgeCountry.com Fish Lake, located 45 miles from Richfield, is Utah’s largest natural lake. Sitting at 8,800 feet in elevation, this beautiful alpine setting offers an abundance of high elevation summer fun. Lakeside Resort Marina, Fish Lake Lodge Marina and Bowery Haven Marina all provide access for launching boats as well as offering a variety of rentals. Surrounded by mountains on all sides, Fish Lake becomes a hiking and mountain biking paradise. The 17-mile Lakeshore National Recreation Trail has numerous access points around the lake offering a variety of

26 DISCOVER UTAH KIDS

JOE'S VALLEY


If you plan to visit Fish Lake be sure to check out the Pando, (aka the trembling giant) ...

FISH LAKE Photo: Kreig Rasmussen

FLAMING GORGE

terrain and skill level. If you plan to visit Fish Lake be sure to check out the Pando, (aka the trembling giant). This a clonal quaking aspen stand that is thought to be the oldest (80,000 years) and largest (106 acres, 13 million pounds) organism on Earth. This natural wonder is located one-mile southwest of Fish Lake on U-25. SevierUtah.net Joe's Valley Reservoir is located about 45 miles southwest of Price and sits at 7,000 feet in elevation high on the Wasatch Plateau. Fishing is the primary activity, however, boating, water skiing, camping, swimming, and paddling are popular water activities. Off the water, adventure options are extensive: climbing, bouldering, mountain biking, and hiking. The expansive Arapeen OHV Trail System can be accessed just west of the reservoir and has more than 350 miles of designated, well-maintained multi-use trails suitable for all riding levels. EmeryCounty.com Lower Bowns Reservoir is located on the east side of Boulder Mountain and sits at 7,450 feet in elevation. This is an awesome off-the-beaten path locale to enjoy boating, fishing, camping, hiking, and swimming and also makes a perfect high-elevation base camp for exploring Capitol Reef National Park, which is 45 minutes away. For those looking for an awesome backcountry or mountain biking adventure check out Tantalus Flats. This 15-mile route starts at an elevation of 8,600 feet at the Rosebud Trailhead and then connects to the Scenic Drive in Capitol Reef National Park. A number of primitive camp and picnic sites are available as well as a few pit toilets. CapitolReef.org

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LOWER BOWNS RESERVOIR

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DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE.COM 27


NONPROFIT

highlight

INCLUSIVE Family Summer Adventures BY WHITNEY THOMPSON

THOSE OF US WHO LOVE UTAH, know that its backyard is home to more outdoor adventures than one family can squeeze into a single summer. And for families who include someone with a disability, the season’s potential for thrilling experiences, bonding memories, and just plain fun is greater than ever before. Backed up to Park City’s Round Valley trail system is a non-profit organization working to open those outdoor experiences to people all abilities and their families. From river rafting in Southern Utah or camping in Moab and the Uintas, to mountain biking, rock climbing, cycling, archery, challenge course, paddle boarding, and more, the National Ability Center adapts to make

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outdoor family time accessible for families that include someone with paralysis, limb difference, a visual impairment, Cerebral Palsy, Autism Spectrum Disorder, or any other disability. Additionally, veterans, active duty, and reserve service members from all branches of the military can join in any of the National Ability Center’s programs. One of the organization’s driving principals is that outdoor activities like rock climbing, cycling, camping, and rafting are powerful tools to build confidence, lifetime skills, self-esteem, and strong families. So all activities are inclusive – meaning that no one sits on the sidelines.


Photos courtesy of National Ability Center

Through lessons, camps, expeditions, and more, the National Ability Center (NAC) has been helping those with physical, developmental, and cognitive (dis)abilities discovering Utah’s outdoors since the 1980s. Now, the organization has grown to one of the largest providers of adaptive outdoor recreation and adventures in the nation. The options for getting outside with the National Ability Center this summer are expansive. Here are just a few. To sign up or volunteer, visit discovernac.org.

FISHER TOWERS DAILY RAFTING TRIPS Your date of choice, May - September The National Ability Center’s Splore adventure programs have been adapting river trips since the 1970s. So whether your family includes a wheelchair user, someone with MS, or any other ability, their guides can make the river accessible. This rafting trip can be scheduled any day from May – September and runs the Fisher Towers/Moab Daily section of the Colorado River. This adventure starts just outside of Moab, and is mainly a scenic float, but also offers a friendly introduction to small rapids. Available to rafters ages 6+.

MOUNTAIN BIKE SESSION LESSONS: Student’s progress their skills through a series of weekly mountain bike lessons on Park City’s Round Valley trail system. The National Ability Center offers a wide variety of recumbent, prone, and stand-up up bikes. They draw from a variety of teaching techniques so that a those with a range of physical and developmental disabilities can learn to ride alongside their friends and family members. Available to riders ages 8+.

ATAXIA RAFTING RETREAT August 20 – 24 This amazing 5-day, 4-night trip on the Ruby/Horsethief and Westwater sections of the Colorado River is for individuals with any form of ataxia. Wind through awesome scenery, wildlife habitats, and whitewater. Available to rafters ages 13+.

Summer Session 2: All Mountain Tuesdays, July 9 – August 6, 5:30 – 7:30PM

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Summer Session 1: Cross-Country Tuesdays, June 11 – July 2 5:30 – 7:30PM

FULL MOON & OPEN CHALLENGE COURSE CLIMBS: Climbers push beyond their perceived limits while having a blast and building teamwork with family or friends on the NAC’s high ropes challenge course in Park City. On July 27 and September 27, the NAC lights up the challenge course for a full moon climb. An experience not to be missed. Available to climbers ages 8+. July 27 – Full Moon August 17 September 27 - Full Moon Discovernac.org

Summer Session 3: Cross-Country Tuesdays, Aug – July 2 5:30 – 7:30PM

DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE.COM 29


road trippin’ SOUTH

ERN

UT

MOUNTAINS OF SOUTHWESTERN UTAH

BY ARIKA BAUER

30 DISCOVER DISCOVER UTAH UTAH KIDS KIDS


IF THE SUMMER HEAT IS STARTING TO CRAMP YOUR ADVENTURE-LOVING STYLE, THEN WHY NOT PLAN A ROAD TRIP TO THE MOUNTAINS?

With average summer temps in the 80s, a wide range of spectacular terrain, and an endless assortment of outdoor adventures, the mountains of southwestern Utah are the perfect place to cool off. Many are surprised to find that there is a lot more to southwestern Utah than red rock, sand dunes, and cholla cacti. Head to higher elevation where you’ll find aspen, willows, pinyon pine-junipers ,and spruce, as well as countless streams and alpine lakes. Here is a list of our top destinations along the Markagunt Plateau, which is an 800-square-mile plateau located between I-15 and U.S. 89 in southwestern Utah. (See map on page 23) Panguitch Lake (elevation 8,209 feet) Hang out on the beach or jump in a boat for some fishing. Panguitch Lake is known for its great fishing. The word “Panguitch” comes from the local Native American Indians and means “Big Fish.” If you spend much time on the lake, chances are pretty good you will catch a rainbow, brook, cutthroat, or brown trout. Not into fishing? Panguitch Lake offers a wide range of outdoor recreation like camping, canoeing, kayaking, hiking, biking, horseback riding, and over 300 miles of OHV routes on the Markagunt OHV System. Duck Creek Village (elevation 8,507 feet) Once a favorite spot for local sheepherders, Duck Creek is now a thriving community with shops and restaurants, lodges, inns, cabin rentals, and a campground. Sitting at the edge of a large mountain meadow this is a popular summer destination for the outdoor enthusiast offering hiking, fishing, camping, horseback riding, and OHV trails. This also serves as a great gateway to nearby national parks, monuments, and state parks. A hike you don't want to miss when visiting Duck Creek is Cascade Falls. This one-mile out-and-back trail will take you to a 100-foot beautiful waterfall fed by Navajo Lake. Along this well-maintained family-friendly trail you will see several varieties of plant life and incredible views of the Zion/Kolob Terrace.

Photo: Arika Bauer

Cedar Breaks National Monument (elevation 10,000 feet) Often referred to as a “mini Bryce Canyon,” Cedar Breaks features a huge amphitheater with red rock spires, arches, pinnacles, and intricate canyons. Because of the incredible snow year we've had, the seasonal road may open later than usual so be sure to check online prior to visiting. The visitor center is open from mid-June to mid-September. Be sure to stop by and check out the Junior Ranger Program or learn more about the monument on a ranger-guided hike. In 2017, Cedar Breaks National Monument was officially designated as an International Dark Sky Park. This designation recognizes Cedar Breaks as a night sky sanctuary, the first of its kind in southwestern Utah.

HIKING TO CASCADE FALLS

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DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE.COM 31


CEDAR BREAKS

Mammoth Cave (elevation 8,050 feet) Mammoth Cave is a popular and fascinating area for exploring. The cave is a lava tube that was formed by cooling lava and water less than 2,000 years ago and has four chambers with over 2,200 feet of passage and is about a quarter mile long. At the end of the largest tunnel, it narrows to a small opening that can be used as an exit. Heights of the cave range from standing-up-comfortably to crawl-on-yourbelly. If you are planning to hike and explore Mammoth Cave, make sure to bring a light jacket, flashlight, good hiking shoes, and beware that water can be found in some portions of the cave.

Not to be missed is the Wildflower Festival, the first week of July. The festival celebrates the park’s spectacular display of wildflowers. Join a specialist on a guided hike and learn all about the different wildflowers or pick up a wildflower checklist and go on a self-guided walk. Brian Head (elevation 9,800 feet) Brian Head Resort is not just for winter sports, it's also a premier high elevation summer destination. Filled to the brim with activities like mountain biking, hiking, a climbing wall, bungee trampoline, zip lining, archery, tubing, and ATV riding, Brian Head has something for everyone. Photo: Arika Bauer

Join in for a complimentary mountain bike tour at Brain Head Resort or if you are new to mountain biking take a lesson for beginners. Whether you’re looking for spectacular scenery with a scenic chairlift ride or extreme adventure, this is a great spot for everyone. Brian Head Peak (elevation 11,306 feet) is the highest peak in the Markagunt Plateau and offers the best views in the area.

Virgin River Rim TraiL (elevation 8,200 – 9,800 feet) The Virgin River Rim trail is a stunning trail that offers unbelievable views of the Virgin River headwaters and the breathtaking geology of Zion National Park below. This truly epic non-motorized singletrack trail totals 32 miles and is perfect for hikers, mountain bikers, and equestrians. There are many access points to the trail and it is common to break it up into shorter rides or do an outand-back. The most popular of these shorter trails is the climb from the west end of Navajo Lake to Navajo Peak. The trail is fairly well-maintained considering its remoteness and is mostly hard-pack dirt, but there are a lot of rough rocky sections. There are trail markers at most trail and road intersections, but it's important to pay attention because it is possible to get lost after the trail temporarily joins a dirt road.

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NAVAJO LAKE

MAMMOTH CREEK

Photo: Arika Bauer

Arika Bauer is a Southern Utah local, born and raised, and the owner of Zion Adventure Photog, a photography business dedicated to photographing outdoor lovers in one of the most beautiful settings in the world. She has made it her mission to explore all of the hidden, and not-so-hidden gems of Southern Utah, with her three kids. @ZionAdventurePhotog

NAVAJO LAKE LOOP

Navajo Lake (elevation 9,045 feet) Navajo Lake was originally known to the Paiute Indians as “Pa-Cu-Ay,” meaning “Cloud Lake” and was formed when an ancient lava flow dammed the eastern side of the lake valley. This stunning alpine lake is filled with activities like trout fishing, boating, canoeing, hiking, and mountain biking. Navajo Lake is a popular camping destination, but If camping isn't your thing, you can book a cozy cabin just steps from the water at Navajo Lake Lodge. The lodge also offers rentals for pontoon boats, motor boats, canoes, kayaks, and paddle boards. For mountain bikers, the Navajo Lake Loop is a stunning 12-mile beginner/intermediate single-track loop that is great for families. Staying at a constant elevation, this flowy singletrack rolls through pines and aspen forests, lush wildflower meadows, and lava fields.

Here are a few helpful links for the area. VisitCedarCity.com VisitSouthernUtah.com BryceCanyonCountry.com

Located at the heart of Zion National Park, Bryce Canyon, and the North Rim of the Grand Canyon, Coral Pink Sand Dunes, Grand Staircase Escalante, Lake Powell, and many more! Complimentary Express Start Breakfast Indoor swimming pool and hot tub High speed WIFI Pet Friendly rooms available 24-hour guest laundry 24-hour gym

RESERVE YOUR ROOM TODAY! 435-644-3100 Kanab, UT

DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE.COM

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STEWART FALLS / SUNDANCE

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GET O

THERUT E

>back EXPLORE YOUR

yard SUMMER ON THE SLOPES BY MONIQUE BEELEY

UTAH BOASTS A GLOBAL REPUTATION FOR THE FINEST WINTER RECREATION ON THE PLANET. But when The Greatest Snow on Earth® melts, it reveals lush meadows full of wildflowers and miles of scenic trails waiting to be explored. With such easy access, there’s no better way to beat the heat of summer than a quick trip to the mountains. Summer is magical at Utah’s ski resorts, and whether you’re in to mountain biking, hiking, camping, live music, great food, or scenic lift rides, there is something for everyone.

> SNOWBASIN Snowbasin offers lift-served mountain biking, hiking, disc golf, scenic lift rides, and much more. The Blues, Brews and BBQ free concert series on Sundays starts June 9 and is a great time to relax on the grass and enjoy outstanding live music and good food in the cool mountain air. The Free Movie on the Mountain Series on Mondays kicks off July 1 with the ‘90s classic Space Jam. The Kids Adventure Zone and the Wildflower Mini Golf course will all be open prior to the movie starting at 6 pm.

> SUNDANCE Sundance delivers some of the most brilliant alpine scenery in the world. Nestled below the stunning grandeur of Mount Timpanogos, every experience at Sundance is breathtaking. Music is an integral part of Sundance’s soul, as evidenced by their renowned Bluebird Cafe Concert Series. Each year, Sundance partners with the original Bluebird Cafe in Nashville to bring renowned singers, songwriters, and musicians to a unique, quaint mountain setting. Visitors will also enjoy art studio classes, excellent mountain biking, ziplines, hiking, and some of the most scenic lift rides and hikes imaginable. Not to be missed is the Sundance Summer Theatre, which will feature a family favorite: "Mamma Mia” > SNOWBIRD Snowbird is another full-service resort that makes summer vacations a breeze. Located in Little Cottonwood Canyon, Snowbird’s family-oriented summer offerings are extensive with mountain biking, gemstone mining, mountain coaster, alpine slide, zipline, rope course, climbing wall, bungee trampolines, scenic rides on the Aerial Tram, and much more. Fall gets even better at DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE.COM

35


ALTA

BRIGHTON

... Albion Basin is the best place to enjoy the wildflowers and hiking to Cecret Lake is a must.

SNOWBASIN

Snowbird with their perennial Oktoberfest, running every Saturday and Sunday from mid-August to mid-October, Oktoberfest attracts over 60,000 visitors and has grown to become one of the largest festivals in Utah.

> ATLA Summer at Alta is nothing short of epic. Albion Basin is the best place to enjoy the wildflowers and hiking to Cecret Lake is a must. The meadows come alive with a

kaleidoscope of colors as the fields of wildflowers peak in mid-summer. This 1.6-mile hike meanders through lush forests and flower covered meadows and ends at one of the most beautiful alpine lakes in Utah. The Environmental Center hosts events throughout the summer, including Hawk Watch Live Bird Show with Cottonwood Canyons Hike (monthly July - September), The Wildflower Festival, Saturday July 20 and August 9 is The Kid’s Day event.

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> BRIGHTON The Brighton Lakes Trail is the go-to family-friendly hike at Brighton. This awesome 3.5-mile hike leads to three majestic mountain lakes: Mary, Martha, and Catherine. Be sure to head to Milly Chalet for après hike snacks and beverages. New for summer 2019 is Camp Brighton. This adventure-filled day camp is for kids 8-16 and runs 9am-4:30pm. For more mountain resort summer happenings check out SkiUtah.com

Your Pass to Summer Fun in Salt Lake.

> SNOWBIRD

ADVENTURE. ELEVATED.

16 Attractions. One Pass. One Awesome Price.

PA R K C I T Y, U TA H

With the Visit Salt Lake Connect Pass, you don’t have to pick and choose what to do. For one low price, you get admission to 16 of Salt Lake’s best kid-friendly attractions using secure and convenient mobile tickets. Plus, you get to take advantage of exclusive perks and discounts.

Save 10% when you purchase in advance online!

• Ride the aerial tram at Snowbird • See the dinosaurs at the Natural History Museum of Utah • Explore the gardens and museums at Thanksgiving Point • And more!

Gold Passes include unlimited day use on Extreme Tubing, Airbag Jumps, Extreme and Freestyle Ziplines, Adventure Ropes Courses, Drop Tower, Scenic Chairlift Rides and more!

visitsaltlake.com/connectpass UTAHOLYMPICLEGACY.ORG

n

435.658.4200 DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE.COM

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adventure

awaits

in the Heber Valley BY MONIQUE BEELEY

The Heber Valley is a summer paradise for family-friendly outdoor adventures. The list of options is long and guarantees to put smiles on all the little (and big) faces in your crew. Whether high flying ziplining is your thing or kicking back on the beach‌Heber has you covered.

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HERE IS JUST A SMALL SAMPLING OF THE ADVENTURE OPTIONS AVAILABLE IN THIS FAMILY-FRIENDLY OUTDOOR ADVENTURE MECCA. For the thrill seekers in the family the Utah Zipline is not to be missed. The epic Screaming Falcon is a one-ofa-kind adventure and is the world’s longest continuous zipline over water. Located along the shoreline of Deer Creek State Park, the majestic Mt. Timpanogos serves as the backdrop Worry not, if your crew is not up for the EPIC ride, they offer five different tour packages for all ability levels. Next, let’s grab the bikes and helmets and discover the two-wheeled options in this little adventure town. The trails at Dutch Hollow offer options for all level of riders. For beginners, the Sage Loop and the Cottontail to Lower Barrell trails are perfect. For the intermediate riders the Burnt Ridge Overlook Trail offers so of the best views of the valley. All aboard…let’s hop on the train. Taking in sights of the valley with an afternoon train ride on the Historic Heber Valley Railroad is sure to please train aficionados of all ages. This historic railroad is reminiscent of the “Golden Years” of U.S. railroading from the earlier 1900s, where shortline railroads were common throughout rural America.

Mountain, Deer Creek and Jordanelle, all providing many hours (or days) of recreational fun both in and out of the water. Launch into the cool water at the Aqua X Zone located at the Jordanelle. Camp in one of the log cabins at Wasatch Mountain, or just enjoy a day on the beach at Deer Creek. A river runs through it…Twelve-miles of the Provo River meander through the Heber Valley and provide outstanding recreational opportunities. This local section is known as the Middle Provo and is the spot where fly-fishing enthusiasts flock in hopes of catching the perfect wily rainbow trout on this world-class BlueRibbon fishing destination. The mighty Provo River is also popular for river rafting and tubing, which is an awesome way to cool off and enjoy the scenery. The best option here, is to rely on the local experts. Midway Adventure Company and High Country Adventures are local companies that provide awesome river rafting adventures.

Swim, soak or even try stand-up paddleboard yoga in the Midway Crater. This 95-degree geothermal hot springs is hidden in a beehive shaped limestone cave.

Again, this is just a small sampling of the adventure options available in this family-friendly outdoor adventure mecca. Now, the next step is to load up the car, the kids, and set your Goggle Maps for the quickest route to the Heber Valley, where an unforgettable family adventure awaits.

Heber has three awesome Utah State Parks: Wasatch

Gohebervalley.com DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE.COM

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Sustainability: Make a new plan for your next outdoor adventure… because

happens. BY JULIA GEISLER

Ten minutes later, you’re setting up the tent and your dog bounds back with a smear of something brown spread across her back. First thinking maybe it’s animal , but then you realize that it’s far worse that… it’s the human variety… OMG…She’s licking her lips; kids squealing as she tries to lick theirs. The dog is quickly loaded into the car, noses held as you head to the river to clean her off. The next morning, as usual, nature calls and off you go to dig a cat hole. You walk a few minutes from camp, skeptical of large rocks by desert plants with bits of toilet paper poking out from under them. You forgot the shovel, but you decide that a heavy rock with a shallow hole will suffice. Then the rest of your family does the same.

"Even more essential is teaching our children to be good stewards of land. " FINALLY, THE KIDS SCHEDULES HAVE ALL ALIGNED FOR A QUICK CAMPING WEEKEND WITH THE FAMILY. The car is packed, your destination selected, and the grocery shopping complete. It’s early summer and you’re headed to the south; along with everyone else. Reserve America online shows that all established campgrounds within a half hour drive of your destination are booked, so your plan is to head back to a dispersed camp site that you all love.

The weekend is over and before you leave you talk to your kids quickly about Leave No Trace, and have them check for any micro trash around camp prior to loading into the car. As you drive off you take a quick look in the rearview mirror and in the distance you see a bit of toilet paper blowing in the wind that is partly hidden under a rock. In that moment you realize that something needs to change.

You get to the spot. It’s a bit crowded already, but you think you can make it work and squeeze in next to another family. Car doors open and your family pours out – the dog first, who runs goes over to greet the neighbors.

OK…let’s just say the above story is not fun, and talking about is not glamourous, but this IS a reality in many areas around Utah and we all must make some changes in our camping habits. Even more essential is teaching our children to be good stewards of land.

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Here are some tips to help with your new

#1 RULE: pack out all poop and toilet paper and dispose of it properly.

Cat holes are no longer acceptable. A cat hole is a hole dug six inches down into the ground where one is meant to . This is what most first time campers were taught to do a few generations ago. The great outdoors is simply too popular now and cat holes are no longer acceptable. Especially our dry climate where it takes a very long time for human waste to decompose and can threaten the quality of drinking water.

Pack an ample amount of W.A.G. Bags for when you are out adventuring. You can purchase these in bulk online or from most gear shops. W.A.G. Bag stands for Waste Activation Gel and they help solidify pee and . According to RESTOP, the polymers in the bags actually change the composition of the waste (containing it and encapsulating it) so that it becomes safe for depositing it in the trash can (similar to baby diaper disposal).

Plan further ahead to camp in campgrounds where your impact on the natural landscape is more centralized, and the plan is made easier.

Teach your kids about public engagement when you get home and become advocates for the great outdoors. Write your Representatives with pleas to better fund land agencies so that they can manage human use of public lands and be able to provide for basic human services. Tell them your story. Advocate for W.A.G. bag stations and educational materials surrounding how to poop responsibly in the outdoors.

plan

Bring a Portable Commode (or make one yourself).

Consider a collapsible tent for privacy.

HOW TO MAKE A PORTABLE COMMODE YOURSELF: 1. Five-gallon bucket with a screw on lid and line the bucket with a bag (consider compostable). 2. Poo Powder – polymers and enzymes that break down the to be able to dispose of it in a dumpster. Tip: Have a designated pee spot next to the bucket. You don’t want liquid in the bucket. 3. After in the bucket, sprinkle the recommended amount of Poo Powder and some kitty litter to

soak up the liquid and mask the smell. Put your toilet paper in the bucket. Tip: Don’t screw the lid on too tight and leave the bucket in the sun as the methane may build up and explode. Put the bucket in the shade well-armored from dogs and animals. 4. Dispose of the bag of in a dumpster (you need the Poo Powder in the bag to be able to dispose of this safely in the dumpster).

Rent a groover, an eco-safe toilet used mostly on river trips that you can rent from most rafting companies and dispose human waste at RV dumping stations after.

Julia Geisler is the owner of a small guide outfitter business, Park City Yoga Adventures, and Executive Director of a local non-profit rock-climbing advocacy organization, the Salt Lake Climbers Alliance. She enjoys being in nature rock climbing, backcountry splitboarding, and mountain biking and grew up downhill skiing at Wisp Resort in Deep Creek Lake, Maryland. Her mission is to protect the places we play.

DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE.COM

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ABRA KANABRA Get off the beaten path on your next Lake Powell road trip and explore the unspoiled landscapes of Kanab. Hike red rock trails, slot canyons, and high mountain forests or explore any of the nearby national parks, then unwind with delicious food and comfortable accommodations your whole family can enjoy. Plan to make Kanab your basecamp for Southern Utah adventure. For more information on lodging, dining, and attractions, go to:

VisitSouthernUtah.com

HIKING DISTANCE

DISTANCE from Kanab

Lake Powell/glen canyon rec area

73 miles (117 km)

SAND CAVES

coral pink sand dunes

23 miles (37 km)

Dinosaur Tracks

Zion national park

40 miles (64 kM)

wire pass

2 miles round trip

Bryce canyon nATIONAL PARK

77 miles (124 kM)

toadstools

2 miles round trip

grand canyon north rim

78 miles (126 kM)

bunting trail

3 miles round trip

Grand staircase-escalante national monument

15 miles (24 km)

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1/2 mile round trip 1 mile round trip


heber

va l l e y

list

d i k approved!

SURROUNDED BY ENDLESS OFFROAD TRAILS, THREE STATE PARKS, WATER RESERVOIR PLAYGROUNDS AND ACTIVITIES FOR ALL AGES MIXED IN BETWEEN, YOUR FAMILY WILL FIND A BUCKET-LIST OF ADVENTURES TO ACCOMPLISH THIS SUMMER IN THE HEBER VALLEY.

GOHEBERVALLEY.COM/PLAY

44

Heber, UT 84032 • Main,KIDS DISCOVER 475 NorthUTAH

435.654.3666 • GoHe

berValley.com/play

Profile for Discover Utah Magazine

Discover Utah Kids - Summer 2019  

Highlights of the summer issue include... An Insider's Guide to Park City, High Elevation Destinations, Guided Adventures in Moab, Adventuri...

Discover Utah Kids - Summer 2019  

Highlights of the summer issue include... An Insider's Guide to Park City, High Elevation Destinations, Guided Adventures in Moab, Adventuri...