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THE A-LIST: MUST SEE DESTINATIONS

BIKING > NATIONAL PARKS > FOOD > FLY FISHING MOUNTAIN RESORTS > URBAN > STARGAZING > ROCK ART DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE .COM 1

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U TA H’S PER FEC T MOUN TA I N T OW N.

With over 400 miles of hiking and mountain biking trails, escaping in Park City is recommended. Hitch a ride on a chairlift for breathtaking views at 9,000 feet, or roam through stunning aspen groves and historic relics of our silver mining past on horseback. To get your heart racing, try the Alpine Coaster, take a zip line tour, or experience the bobsled ride at Utah Olympic Park. When you’re done, you’re a stone’s throw away from lakes, rivers and reservoirs filled with fun and fly-fishing. On Historic Main Street you can enjoy dozens of awardwinning restaurants, pubs serving local beers and spirits, shops, galleries, and the Park Silly Sunday Market. And don’t miss the full line-up of outdoor concerts, exciting events and one-of-a-kind festivals. In Park City, you’ll find everything you need for the perfect weekend getaway or a weeklong summer escape. Yes. All That. Only in Park City, Utah. Plan your trip at VisitParkCity.com.


TEAM P E E K

WORK.

P L AY.

R E P E AT.

Park City Mountain

Sundance Mountain Resort Deer Valley® Resort

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Deer Creek State Park

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Park City Park City

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Wasatch State Park

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Midway

Hideout Heber

Red Ledges

Jordanelle State Park

US 40

Tuhaye

To high Uinta wilderness area

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248

SR 32

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Recreational opportunities out your front door! Come see why the Park City area is the ultimate place to live for outdoor enthusiasts. Team Peek is one of the most respected real estate groups in Park City. Tom and Kevin have been helping clients find great places to live and play in the Park City area for almost 30 years. Through the years, we have enjoyed providing a unique perspective and greater insight to a truly unique marketplace. If you want to have a great experience buying or selling real estate, please call us. We would love to help!

T O M PEEK 435.645.5811 | Tom@TomPeekParkCity.com

KEVI N M URRAY 435.659.5526 | Kevin@ParkCityRealEstatePros.com

PA R K C I T Y R E A L E S TAT E P R O S . C O M © 2017 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently owned and operated franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.® Equal Housing Opportunity. Information not verified or guaranteed.


There’s ‘nightlife’ and then there’s

N i g h t l i f e at the gates of Bryce {Exclusively at Ruby’s Inn}

The closest lodging to Bryce Canyon

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4:30 PM Bike to Red Canyon Tunnels

11:30 AM Hike Birdseye Trail

9:30 AM Breakfast in Panguitch

BryceCanyonCountry.com | 800.444.6689 4

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For Online Reservations visit www.hamptoninn.com or call 1-800-Hampton 488 N. Main Street Moab, UT 84532 435-259-3030 • Fax 435-259-3035


[ CONTRIBUTORS ] ANN WHITTAKER is a published writer and photographer traveling the world researching natural, social, and language ecologies. She explores landscapes and the cultures they create. Ann lives in Salt Lake City, and is currently working on a book with Jennifer Pritchard, "Paradox and Polarity: telling stories of light and dark through desert landscapes." DEBRA VAGO is a mountain mama, nature lover and film enthusiast. Currently residing in Salt Lake City, having relocated from London, England, her interests include writing, yoga and traveling the world with her family.

Making Memories that Last Forever!

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photo by MIKE SCHIRF

SCOTT HOUSE is an aspiring rad dad and gentleman explorer who spends as many days as he can in the mountains with his son, Callum, and wife, Lane. A resident of the Wasatch Back, he a living as a Communications Specialist, Avalanche Educator, and as a ski and mountain bike guide in the Wasatch and Uinta mountains.

Antelope Point Marina, Lake Powell, AZ Callville Bay Marina, Lake Mead, NV Cottonwood Cove Marina, Lake Mohave, NV

800.255.5561 Lodging

Grand Canyon Lodge – North Rim, AZ Parry Lodge / Denny’s Wigwam, UT The Lodge at Bryce Canyon, UT

877.386.4383 Rafting / Activities

Forever Adventure Tours, UT

435.644.5700 AMBER BOROWSKI JOHNSON was a former publicist for SkiUtah & Snowbird and also a travel writer for Outdoor Sports Guide Magazine and Outdoor Utah. She spent several years in Colorado as a columnist for The Denver Post and built Colorado's largest social media community for moms. She recently relocated to Midway. @lifeElevatedMom

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800.455.3490

Mad River Boat Trips, WY 800.458.7238 Scenic Safaris, WY 888.734.8898

ForeverResorts.com facebook.com/travelforeverresorts

Forever Resorts is an authorized Concessioner of the USDA Forest Service, the National Park Service and the Department of Interior to serve the public in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area. Antelope Point Marina is owned and operated by Antelope Point Holdings L.L.C., an authorized Concessioner of the National Park Service, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area.

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PUBLISHER Monique Beeley EDITOR Greg Scothern CREATIVE DIRECTOR Michelle Rayner CONTENT MANAGER Breana Wright CONTROLLER Nicole Lengel BUSINESS MANAGER Mike Beeley WRITERS - Scott House, Amber Borowski Johnson, Greg Knell, Shane Osguthorpe, Pat Ronneburg, Sarah Toller, Debra Vago, Ann Whittaker PHOTOGRAPHERS - Monique Beeley, Mike Bradley, Kevin Dilley, Steve Greenwood, Matt Hage, Ryan Kelly, Taylor Noel, Emily Sargent and Breana Wright Advertising inquires for Discover Utah Magazine, Discover Utah Kids and DiscoverUtahMagazine.com can be directed to Mo@DiscoverUtahMagazine.com

@DiscoverUtahKids @DiscoverUtahMagazine

ON THE COVER THE MAZE – Canyonlands National Park By Monique Beeley

Tƒ k e t h e R o ƒ d

Less Trƒveled Wayne County, UT | CapitolReef.org 6

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Discover Utah Magazine is published annually by Adventure Utah Media, LLC. The entire contents of the 2017 Discover Utah Magazine are copyrighted and may not be reproduced without expressed written consent from of the publisher. P.O. Box 2336 Park City, UT 84060


[ LETTER FROM THE PUBLISHER ] In this issue, we dedicated 8 pages to our A-List photo spreads (page 14 & 36) showcasing the diverse and epic landscapes from around the state. Some are well known locales; others are hidden gems. Take a look, get inspired and plan a trip or two.

Moab

Being a native Utahan, my passion and knowledge run deep. I’m often asked what is my favorite place in Utah, and my answer is always the same: it depends on the “who, what and when.” Camping with my 8-year old daughter, adventuring with a group looking for a new challenge, ladies’ spa/hiking getaways, culture seeking, food tasting, mountain biking, rock climbing, river running, backpacking, motorcycle touring…*deep breath*...the list goes on and on. All, are my favorites; how can I pick just one? From the majestic rugged mountains of the north, to the chiseled and sculpted red rock landscapes of the south, there’s no shortage of breathtaking and unique landscapes. 5 National Parks, 8 National Monuments, 2 National Recreation Areas, 43 State Parks and 7 National Forests… Wow that’s a lot of places for exploring and each offers something just a bit different.

Broken Spur Inn & Steakhouse

• 50 rooms and 8 Conestoga sleeping wagons • Free breakfast and on-site steakhouse • Indoor pool and hot tub • Free wi-fi and conference room • On-site laundry, playground and gift shop

The Saddlery - Family-friendly, lunch and dinner buffet with live music and line dancing on weekends. The Skyridge Inn B&B - Six rooms each themed separately. Private hot tubs in some rooms and outdoor hot tub on back patio. Breakfast provided each morning.

The Wasatch Front is Utah’s urban core with 75% of the state’s population. We highlight 3 of these cities in the Urban Core Section (page 48) – Provo, Salt Lake City and Ogden. Each has its own unique vibe, culture and history. Film in Utah is a booming business; check out page 10 for the reasons why. For the foodies, Ann Whittaker’s article (page 12) on how Utah’s Food Scene Has Grown Up, will stimulate the palate to try some local fare. One of my other passions is mountain biking, and Utah is king of the hill in this arena. From the IMBA Gold Level Ride Center in Park City (page 46) to the EPIC riding opportunities in southern Utah, we have thousands of miles of trails to explore. UTOPIA Perfected highlights 7 locales for keeping the tires rollin’…and for those Roadies out there, check out Greg’s article (page 24) for some amazingly scenic routes. Cheers to your epic Utah adventure,

Monique Beeley

OUR BACKYARD ...

CAPITOL REEF NATIONAL PARK www.brokenspurinn.com www.skyridgeinn.com 435-425-3775 or 1-888-741-1002 955 E SR-24, Torrey, Utah

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FEATURES

10

12

Get a glimpse into Utah’s impressive film production industry. by DEBRA VAGO

The low-down on Utah’s finest palate-pleasers.

THE STORY IS UTAH

south >

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THE 2017 A LIST SOUTHERN UTAH

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HOW TO MOAB IN THE OFF SEASON

Same incredible experience, just a bit cooler and a lot quieter.

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28

Step back in time with these easy-to-find relics.

Some of the darkest night skies are in Southern Utah; here’s how to find them.

36

44

54

JEWELS OF WEST DESERT

Find solitude and wideopen spaces with these remote, hidden gems. by BREANA WRIGHT

DISCOVER UTAH MAGAZINE

ROUTES FOR THE ROADIES Pedal along some of the most scenic road rides of your life. by GREG SCOTHERN

STAR GAZING

by ANN WHITTAKER

Must-see destinations in unforgettable Northern Utah.

24

by MONIQUE BEELEY

by PAT RONNEBURG

THE 2017 A LIST NORTHERN UTAH

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by ANN WHITTAKER

Must-see destinations in unforgettable Southern Utah.

ROCK ART AND WHERE TO FIND IT

north >

UTAH FOOD SCENE

MOUNTAIN TOWN MECCA

Park City has a global reputation for a reason; here’s a glimpse into why.

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PARK CITY'S GOLD LEVEL RIDING

by MONIQUE BEELEY

Take IMBA’s word for it…the riding really doesn’t get any better than this. by SCOTT HOUSE

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58

FLY FISHING 411 QUICK PICKS

Wet your fly with this guide to Utah’s abundant Blue Ribbon Fisheries. by PAT RONNEBURG

HEBER VALLEY Lose yourself in the charm of this deliciously quaint mountain town. by AMBER BOROWSKI JOHNSON


DEPARTMENTS Antelope Island State Park

20 URBAN CORE SOUTHERN

CEDAR CITY - Check out one of Utah’s most adventurous towns on the rise.

22 TOP BIKE RIDES

UTOPIA PERFECTED If you thought Southern Utah’s world-class riding was limited to Moab…think again.

by ANN WHITTAKER

by MONIQUE BEELEY

40 SUMMER ON THE SLOPES

48 URBAN CORE NORTHERN

Beat the heat at Utah’s ski resorts. by GREG SCOTHERN

WASATCH FRONT Simply the best from the Wasatch Front’s three metro hubs, Provo, Salt Lake City and Ogden.

30 GATEWAY TO THE PARK

SPRINGDALE - On the gates of Zion, this spiritual and eclectic town is a destination in and of itself. by GREG KNELL

IN EVERY ISSUE 34 State Map 62 Guided Adventures 65 Dining 66 Capturing the Last Light

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photos courtesy of UTAH FILM COMMISSION

THE STORY IS

by DEBRA VAGO

TOM HANKS as a bearded Forrest Gump running through the valley, Dumb and Dumber’s Lloyd and Harry ‘going west’ on their Vespa, and Thelma and Louise speeding through the desert in a Ford Thunderbird. What do these iconic moments of film have in common? ALL OF THESE CRITICALLY ACCLAIMED PRODUCTIONS WERE FILMED IN UTAH.

Locals and visitors alike are surprised to hear that Utah has deep roots in the entertainment industry, but with more than 1000 productions shot in state, there is an undeniably lasting commitment to film. Dating back to the 1920s, early westerns took advantage of southern Utah’s spectacular landscape, with The Covered Wagon filmed on Antelope Island, The Deadwood Coach in Cedar City and The Searchers in Monument Valley. And as our desert spaces became synonymous with the wild west, the rest of the state also began to spark interest. CBS series Touched by an Angel filmed nine seasons in the late 90s, and 2005 saw the first of three High School Musical films shot for Disney Channel, all in Salt Lake City. So, why Utah? You don’t have to look much further than a tourism advertisement for the state. From desert lands and mountain grandeur, to urban streetscapes and charming towns, the sheer diversity continues to lure filmmakers. A production’s backdrop is its backbone, setting the scene in every shot; it gives actors and audiences a chance to truly live the story. As James Marsden, star of HBO’s popular Westworld told the Salt Lake Tribune: “Shooting in Moab, it honestly felt a little bit like I was actually getting to be a guest at Westworld. It was all very real”. 10

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Shooting in Moab, it honestly felt a little bit like I was actually getting to be a guest at Westworld. It was all very real. - James Marsden, star of HBO’s popular Westworld

With the help of the Film Commission, Utah remains a powerful force in the filmmaking industry. Clearly, Utah’s biggest draw is its varied landscapes, but acknowledging that location is not the only driving factor is key to understanding the industry. Utah’s Motion Picture Incentive Program was founded in 2011, offering a post-performance tax credit where productions can get up to 25 percent tax credit on Utah spend. Since the program’s creation, an estimated $226 million has been spent in state by studios such as Fox, Disney, DreamWorks and ABC. Park City, Utah, is home to the internationally acclaimed Sundance Film Festival, which continues to be utilized as one of the state’s creative assets. “Having such an influential platform in our backyard is a huge card for us," says Utah Film Commission Director, Virginia Pearce. “Knowing how to take advantage of all Sundance has to offer is key. It gives us the invaluable opportunity to meet with producers and directors.” Another asset is the privately owned Park City Film Studios. Since its 2015 opening, the state-of-the-art space has unlocked new options and reopened doors for larger productions to film in Utah. More and more, we are seeing filmmakers come to Utah with the lure of competitive state incentives, unique and accessible locations, and experienced and professional crews.

In 2016 alone, the film industry brought an estimated $55 million and over 1700 jobs to Utah. Looking ahead, Virginia Pearce says: ”We are focused on enhancing the wider creative industry to reflect everything our state has to offer - from film, animation and post production, to game design and virtual reality." The future is bright and Utah’s story looks to have many more chapters. DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE .COM

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Handle Salt Lake City

If Utah cuisine makes you think about mayonnaise-based casseroles, Diet Coke, and smorgasbord food buffets, you’re so right–it’s all true. But, and this is a huge but, Utah’s food scene has truly grown up as world-renowned chefs and savvy foodies have discovered Utah’s friendly cost of living and killer access to the outdoors–it’s a lifestyle that the most creative and innovative minds have made home for business and family.

UTAH’S FOOD SCENE HAS

Bistro H

by ANN WHITTAKER

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DISCOVER UTAH MAGAZINE

Handle Salt Lake City

Grown Up

Hell's Backbone Grill


Boulder, Utah is the restaurant that feels better than home–they welcome you like one of the family, feed you a meal that’s so good you’ll shed a tear at first bite. We recommend you start with: local lamb meatballs, farm veggie delight, spicy cowgal chipotle meatloaf, the dinner jenchilada, brown butter carrot cake.

SALT LAKE CITY & THE WASATCH FRONT HSL: Handle Salt Lake City Locally-sourced American Cuisine HSL serves up seasonal dishes with interesting wines and cocktails–not to mention the elegant design of the restaurant itself. Feel fancy as you order up some of our favorites: Chicories + Broccoli, Duck Liver Mousse, Fruit Wood Roasted Mushroom, Fried Chicken, Honey Cake. Sweet Lake Biscuits & Limeade Breakfast & Lunch Comfort Food This charming restaurant got its start with fresh lime juice, natural sugar, mint, and lots of lovin’ shakes in a mason jar to make a darn refreshing summer drink for hot desert days. A passion for homemade biscuits with interesting flavors, of course, followed shortly. First time at Sweet Lake? Try these: Mint Limeade, Habanero Limeade, Hoss (biscuit, fried chicken, egg, bacon, cheddar, sausage gravy, green onions), Cubano (slow-roasted pulled pork, ham, habanero-marinated chuck, swiss, sweet hot mustard, YeeHaw spicy pickles, Harmon’s bakery sourdough). La Cai Noodle House Vietnamese & Chinese Cuisine

High West Distillery

on charming Historic 25th Street in Ogden, Tona has been awarded the prestigious “Best of State” award five years in a row, and has become the standard all other sushi restaurants are judged by. Order anything on the menu…you really can’t go wrong. Owners Tina and Tony are so dedicated to their craft, they work every business day of the year–save one week when they close up shop for a much-deserved vacation.

Worth Mentioning

Avenues Bistro • Beer Bar • Eva • Pago • Pallet Bistro • East Liberty Tap House • The Garage • Laziz Kitchen • Yoko Ramen • Takashi • La Barba Coffee • Publik Coffee • Blue Copper Coffee • Roosters Brewing Co

SALT LAKE & PARK CITY DISTILLERIES

No, Utah distillery is not an oxymoron. Utah is reaping the benefits of an underdog complex– there are certainly some tricky local alcohol laws, but that just makes the locals more creative and more determined to bring locals and tourists artisanal and well-crafted spirits. These distilleries are reclaiming the old west with class. Try: Mazza > High West Distillery, Park City Middle Eastern Cuisine > Dented Brick, Salt Lake City > Beehive Distillery, Salt Lake City Choose from two locations: a cozy 15th and 15th neighborhood atmosphere, or the 9th and > New World Distillery, Eden > Ogden’s Own Distillery, Ogden 9th slightly-more-glamorous location. Either way, you’ll be happy with authentic falafel, kababs, muhammara, labneh, mutabbak, and everything else on the menu. You can’t go UTAH’S SMALL wrong–owner, Olli, wouldn’t lead you astray. Pho. It’s the best thing on the menu, and it’s the real deal. Start with the Rare Beef Pho, and if you want to try something different, ask for the mushroom broth. This place packs up during lunch hours, and you might have to wait up to twenty minutes for a table.

9 East: Springdale, Zion National Park Italian/Mediterranean Cuisine This new restaurant is next door to one of Springdale’s finest hotels, The Desert Pearl Inn. The whole property sits below the magnificent red rock cliffs of the park, and the food is more than worthy of a long day spent on the trails. Try the pizza first, and then you’ll be hooked all evening so come hungry. Magnolia’s Street Food Truck: Prominently sitting outside the Anasazi Museum State Park in Boulder, this one-ofa- kind dining experience is the perfect stop while traveling Scenic Byway 12; sit under the shade of the cottonwood trees and let the kids run around on the grass. Open daily 9-4 through November, the Truck offers daily seasonal locally grown specials. The Highway Man Breakfast Burrito and the Sweet Magnolia Veggie Tacos are recommended options.

Worth Mentioning

Love Muffin, Moab Circle D Eatery, Escalante Rocking V Café, Kanab George’s Corner Restaurant, St. George The Rim Rock, Torrey The Peace Tree, Monticello Bistro H, Springdale Kiva Koffeehouse, Escalante Burr Trail Grill, Boulder Whiptail Grill, Springdale Eklecticafe, Moab Desert Bistro, Moab Taco Truck, Green River Slacker’s Burgers, Torrey Stan’s Drive-in, Hanksville

TOWN GEMS

Tona Sushi and Japanese Cuisine Good sushi in Utah? You better believe it. Tona’s sushi rivals that of the best found in various big cities across the country. Located

Hell’s Backbone Grill: Boulder, Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument Farm-to-table Seasonal Cuisine, > Semifinalist James Beard Award 2017 There’s no question, Hell’s Backbone Grill in Magnolia's Street Food Truck DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE .COM

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MOAB P. 18

CEDAR CITY P. 20

MOUNTAIN BIKING P. 22

ROAD CYCLING P. 24

ROCK ART P. 26

STAR GAZING P. 28

SPRINGDALE P. 30


Exploring White Pockets with Photo Action Tours, Kanab. photo by DAVID SWINDLER

SOUTHERN

LIST 2017

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MULTI-DAY WESTWATER TRIP - COLORADO RIVER

BRYCE CANYON NATIONAL PARK - ANNUAL WINTER FESTIVAL

SNOW CANYON STATE PARK - ST. GEORGE


CEDAR BREAKS NATIONAL MONUMENT

GUIDED CANYONEERING GRAND STAIRCASE ESCALANTE NATIONAL MONUMENT MONUMENT VALLEY NAVAJO TRIBAL PARK

SUP LAKE POWELL 17

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Moab is the ultimate outdoor playground, and truly does offer something for everyone. From the high adventure mountain biking on the infamous Portal Trail, to an afternoon stroll in the park, Moab is the epicenter for “all things adventure.” Some of the best mountain bike trails, national parks, hikes, climbs, OHV trails, photography, landscapes….and the list just keeps going …are all found here.

HOW TO ...

MOAB in the OFF SEASON by MONIQUE BEELEY

Windows, Arches National Park

Moab has evolved into one of the most popular vacation destinations in the West, and for good reason: there's simply no other place that comes close to offering the diversity of scenery, adventure, and unique experiences Moab has to offer. Moab is truly in a class of its own, and the mystic has spread far and wide. Every year visitors are coming from around the globe in hopes of seeing what all the hype is about, and they usually leave with just a glimpse of the wonders of this magical desert oasis…already planning their next Moab adventure trip. While Moab is phenomenal any time of year, visiting during the off-season is a fantastic way to experience more during your stay. Here are some of our favorite ways to Moab… if you are looking for a bit less of the hustle and bustle of the high-season. 18

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Corona Arch

WINTERING

When you think of winter in Utah, images of skiing the deep powder of The Greatest Snow on Earth™ may come to mind. But consider for a minute: the pure magic of a white layer of glistening snow accenting the vibrant colors of the desert. It is a beautiful sight to see. The off-season (Nov-Feb) in this outdoor paradise offers a unique and slower paced retreat. The average daytime high temps during these months are close to 50 degrees. The top winter friendly hikes in Arches National Park are Windows, Park Avenue and Devil’s Garden. Delicate Arch is stunning this time of year with the snowcovered Lasal Mountains in the background, but this hike can be icy and it is recommended to check in with the park rangers to get updated trail conditions. One of Canyonlands National Park’s most iconic vistas, Mesa Arch, is a must see and even more breath taking during the winter months. This incredible arch is on the bucket list of photographers around the world for consistently-amazing sunrise shots. The trail is fairly flat and just a half mile, and be sure to pack a camera on this one.

Did you know that many of Moab’s biking trails can be ridden year-round? Depending on the temps

and snowfall, there are almost always a few good options for riding during winter. The locals may not like us sharing this secret as it’s their time to be out riding, and it’s always a good idea to check in with the local bike shops for trail updates this time of year. Portal Overlook

ARCHES NATIONAL PARK

OUT OF THE PARK HIKES WE LOVE INCLUDE:

At 140-feet tall, Corona Arch is a massive beauty that is a must-see. The hike is 3 miles round-trip and easily accessed. Longbow Arch trail is 2.5 miles roundtrip, and be sure to look for the dinosaur tracks and petroglyphs along the way. The Grandstaff Trail is 4 miles round-trip and leads to the towering, 243-foot long Morning Glory Natural Bridge. Fisher Towers is 4 miles round-trip and winds through amazing red rock fins, pinnacles and spires. The Portal Overlook trail is 4 miles roundtrip offering unparalleled views of the Moab Valley. Hidden Valley is 4 miles round-trip and leads to a beautiful meadows and petroglyphs.

DOWNTOWN MOAB

TRAVELER’S ALERT:

Crews are working on park roads at night through Nov. 30, 2017. Roads close at 7 pm Sunday through Thursday; last entrance is 6:30 pm and you must be out of the park by 7 pm on those nights. Roads reopen at 7 am.

THE CAMPGROUND IS CLOSED THROUGH NOVEMBER.

• 94 spacious suites • Hot buffet Breakfast • State of the Art Fitness Center

• Heated pool and hot tub • Hi speed WIFI • Cloud 9 bedding • Business center

Visit choicehotels.com/utah/moab/comfort-suites-hotels/ut172 or call directly at 435-259-5455 to book now! Ask us about our newly designed Choice Privilege program! DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE .COM

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URBAN

CORE

insiders guide to

CEDAR CiTy by ANN WHITTAKER

Cedar City is no longer just a pitstop along I-15 on your way to St. George or Zion National Park, and hasn’t been for years. Cedar City is a robust and diverse destination with its Shakespeare Festival, bomber mountain biking trails for endless miles, access to jaw-dropping hiking trails, and a food scene that has everything from Peruvian to Thai to Mexican cuisine that no small town should be expected to contain. But Cedar City consistently goes above and beyond expectations. Be prepared to fall in love with your new favorite southern Utah town.

Kanarraville Falls Slot Canyon


Iron Hills Lava Flow Trail

UTAH SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL Founded in 1961, this festival has received a Tony, an Emmy, and dozens of other awards over the decades as the world continues to recognize this exceptional theater production. Every year from June - October you can spend an evening watching Shakespeare plays that will make you forget you’re in small town, Utah, and not in Central Park, NYC or Elizabethan England (minus the rats, in both cases). And now you can watch it all in an open-air space in the new and very pretty Engelstad Shakespeare Theater that is part of the $39 million Beverly Center for the Arts–an investment for the festival that is testament to its quality and contribution to the community over the years. Join over 110,000 other theater goers to view one of 300 performances each year. OUTDOOR ENTHUSIASTS REJOICE! There’s a reason Utah is attracting more and more people to its majestic and weird landscapes–there’s nothing like it, but sometimes those trails at the national parks can feel a little bit overcrowded, especially during summer months. And that’s where Cedar City and the surrounding areas come to your solitude rescue.

Iron Hills: The Iron Hills Trail System was started in 2015 with plans for over 50 miles of trails. The first of the trails to be completed are Lichen It (easy) and Lava Flow (upper-intermediate). The trails are on the mountain slopes just east of town, and will soon be a destination in and of itself. HIKING Zion National Park: Middle Fork Taylor Creek, 5.2 miles roundtrip: Yes, you can get to The Kolob Canyons section of Zion National Park in 20 minutes to hike a trail that doesn’t get nearly as much traffic as the main canyon in the park. The trail has lots of vegetation, a river, and fun terrain to play on as you practice your birding and botanical taxonomy. Kanarraville: Spring Creek, 4.9 miles roundtrip:This moderate slot canyon is a trail for those who want a little more solitude than what Zion National Park can offer. It’s pretty, it’s easy, and it gets you into red rock scenery that any person with a soul will swoon over.

You will also enjoy: Kanarraville Falls Slot Canyon, Kolob Arch, Vista Trail, Vermillion Castle Trail, Timber Creek Overlook, and Coal Creek Walking Trail.

MOUNTAIN BIKING Brian Head Resort: Brian Head is for stoked skiers in winter and mountain bikers in the summer. A quick and pretty 40 minutes will get you from Cedar City to terrain that will have you whoopin-and-a-hollerin’ like a kid with a new puppy dog to love and squeeze and hold forever more. There’s over 100 miles for you to jump, drop, and sail over for just $29 dollars a day to ride the lifts or take The Utah Shakespeare Festival runs June to October. the shuttles.

DOWNTOWN & FOOD Downtown Cedar City is just what a charming small western town should be: it’s a place where you can take Grandma to catch up over a cup of coffee with a pastry she wishes she could replicate, or you can congregate with your entire mountain biking crew after a long day of shredding it like it’s 1999… except it’s not. Then there’s the great little local shops that you’ll be happy to spend some cash in. Go ahead, mosey along Main Street, and experience pleasant surprise after pleasant surprise. Then there's the food: you have options–so many good options that you’ll leave town before you can try it all, so you’ll just have to come back again and again and again just to make sure you properly survey the culinary lay of the land. Start with Centro Woodfired Pizza. Just do it. It will set the stage for all the other good food you’ll consume throughout your stay. Then you’ve got to try Cedar City’s Peruvian gem, Pisco, as well as Tacos El Jefe because they’ll both have you, yes you, taking photos of your food to text your BFF’s that Cedar City has darn good food that they should all know about.

Worth trying: Thai Basil, The French Shop, Grind Coffee, The Pizza Cart

SOUTHERN UTAH UNIVERSITY Southern Utah University earned the title “The Most Outdoorsy School in the Nation” because, well, just look around at the access and then you’ll know why the university takes full advantage of its surroundings to give its students experiences and tools to appreciate and promote an outdoor lifestyle. While you’re in Cedar City, check out the university’s art museum, tour the beautiful campus, and check out hundreds of performing arts opportunities. VisitCedarCity.com DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE .COM

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TOP BIKE RIDES

UTOPIA PERFECTED by MONIQUE BEELEY

Utah is truly a mountain bikers’s UTOPIA... From the cool temps in the high elevation locations to the red rock vistas of the desert, our trails won’t disappoint. HERE ARE SOME OF OUR FAVORITE RIDES DOWN SOUTH >


OPPOSITE PAGE > LEFT TO RIGHT > CLOCKWISE: 1> The Abajo’s – Robertson Pasture, Elevation 10,500’: not too many people have heard of this place…until recently (hint…it rhymes with “hairs ears”). 2> Thunder Mountain – This is a MUST do for the unparalleled scenery: imagine riding through the red rock hoodoos of Bryce National Park. 3> Good Water Rim – 15 miles of gorgeous singletrack that hugs the rim of Good Water Canyon in the San Rafael Swell. 4> The Maze District of Canyonlands National Park – Fully supported multi-day mountain biking trip: all you do is pedal & pedal, while enjoying the breathtaking scenery. 5> Lava Flow – New Iron Hills Trail System in Cedar City: Currently 10 miles, with plans for 40 more miles with easy access off 1-15. 6> Moab – 150 miles of non-motorized singletrack: be sure to check out the new Rodeo Trail, completed May 2017. 7> Navajo Lake – Elevation 9,000’: part of the EPIC 33-mile Virgin River Rim Trail.

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S E T U O R R THE S E FO I D A RO RE

by G

N

HER

OT G SC

U

t tah’s incredible scenery is about as diverse as it gets. From the lush, high-alpine scenery of Northern Utah to the stunning red-rock formations and desert vistas of Southern Utah, there’s no shortage of unique scenery to immerse yourself in – and there’s no better way to do it than on a bicycle. Fortunately, Utah is loaded with thousands of miles of scenic byways to explore on a bike. From multi-day tours to afternoon cruises, the riding options are endless. Following are some of our favorite road rides from across the state. SCENIC BYWAY 12: options for up to 124 miles one way If you could choose only one bucket-list riding experience in Utah, this would be it. Highway 12 packs more diverse, jaw-dropping scenery into 124 miles than perhaps any other road on the planet. Traveling west to east and starting in Panguitch, this stunning stretch of pave24

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ment passes through the iconic hoodoos of Red Canyon and Bryce Canyon National Park, through the striking vistas and sandstone formations of Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument, through the charming town of Boulder, up and over the lush aspen and fir forests of Boulder Mountain, and finally terminates at the gates of Capitol Reef National Park in Torrey. This is truly some of the most magical road riding in the world, and it’s equally pleasing in either direction. This could be the most scenic ride of your life, so plan well and do it right. Take a few days to get this one done, and as a bonus, add on the 30-or-so miles for a scenic tour through Capitol Reef. You won’t regret those extra miles! ST. GEORGE TO ZION: options for up to 64 miles one way Tucked in the southwest corner of Utah, St. George is a cycling haven with over 30 miles of paved bike paths and views galore. But the marquis road tour here is to


photo by STEVE GREENWOOD

HIGHWAY 12 PACKS MORE DIVERSE, JAW-DROPPING SCENERY INTO 124 MILES THAN PERHAPS ANY OTHER ROAD ON THE PLANET. Mirror Lake Highway

photo courtesy of UTAH OFFICE OF TOURISM Capitol Reef National Park

pedal from St. George to nearby Zion National Park. The route will take you along miles of pristine, red-rock desert scenery, passing through the towns of Hurricane, Toquerville, Virgin, and Rockville before ending in Springdale at the gates of Zion National Park, where cyclists are rewarded with breathtaking views of the tallest sandstone cliffs in the world. As a bonus, the incredibly beautiful 15 miles of Zion Canyon inside the park are closed to cars between Easter and Thanksgiving, making it ideal for cyclists to travel through the canyon safely and impossible to pass up. Your legs may be tired, but the little bit of extra mileage is so worth the effort. CANYONLANDS TO MOAB ON STATE ROAD 313: options for up to 61 miles one way Moab is world-famous for epic mountain biking trails, but the road riding here is equally spectacular. One of the finest options in the Moab area is to shuttle out to the end of State Road 313, which takes you to Grand

Scenic Byway 12

View Point, the highest overlooking point in breathtaking Canyonlands National Park. Spend some time soaking up the enormous views of Canyonlands and the spectacular La Sal Mountains before you get in a hurry to throw a leg over your bike – you’ll be glad you did. When you are about 19 miles into your ride, don’t miss the short spur out to Dead Horse Point State Park, which offers outstanding views of the area from a slightly different perspective. Enjoy this gently descending route, and be sure to stop at the many scenic viewpoints along the way. When you reach the junction with U.S. 191 to head back to town, leave that busy highway for the cars and instead ride the fantastic paved bike trail that takes you straight back to town. SCENIC BYWAY 150 (MIRROR LAKE HIGHWAY): options for up to 56 miles one way Stretching from the Utah/Wyoming border to the charming town of Kamas, this Scenic Byway meanders through the majestic scenery of the Uinta Mountains (Utah’s highest). Enjoy the thick aroma of pine trees as you pass stunning 13,000-foot peaks, lush, wildflower-filled meadows, and dozens of crystal-clear high-alpine lakes. MOUNT NEBO NATIONAL SCENIC BYWAY: 32 miles one way Mount Nebo is the southernmost and highest peak in the Wasatch, reaching 11,928 feet. This outstanding ride is challenging with some stout climbing, but extremely rewarding with some of the finest alpine scenery in the state. Starting in the town of Payson and ending in Nephi, this gorgeous route weaves through thick stands of pine and aspen as it skirts the flanks of massive Mount Nebo. Autumn colors are absolutely brilliant along this route, making Fall the best time to ride. DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE .COM

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Baseball Man Panel

UTAH

ROCK ART

& WHERE TO FIND IT!

by PAT RONNEBURG

Utah is home to thousands of archaeological sites that provide a glimpse into the lives of ancient Native Americans. The most abundant forms of this rich history are petroglyphs and pictographs – otherwise known as “rock art.” Petroglyphs are chiseled into the rock’s surface, whereas pictographs are painted onto the rock surface. Fortunately, most of these sites can be explored if you know where to look.

>

HERE ARE A FEW SUGGESTED ROCK ART SITES THAT ARE EASY TO FIND:

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NEAR THE JUNCTION OF I-70 AND I-15:

Fremont Indian State Park and Museum. This is a good place to start! Lots of information, self-guiding walks, and signage to help you understand what you are seeing.

PAROWAN AREA:

Parowan Gap. Much has been written about the Gap, so do a little reading before you go so that you understand a bit of what you are seeing.

MOAB AREA AND NEWSPAPER ROCK:

There are so many sites here, they can’t be listed. If you are going to Moab, be sure to select some sites to visit before you go. If you are in a hurry, be sure to at least see the panel at the Golf Course.

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VERNAL/JENSEN AREA:

Dinosaur National Monument and McConkie Site in Dry Fork Canyon. Stop in at the Visitor Center to get a map and self guided tour of the rock art sites. The McConkie Ranch site is on private property and a donation for maintenance is requested. These petroglyphs are stylistically very different from the sites in Southern Utah as they are thought to be Fremont.

FOUR CORNERS AREA:

Again, the sites are too numerous to list. Advance research is recommended. This is where Hovenweep National Monument, Edge of the Cedars National Monument, Butler Wash, Comb Wash, and others are to be found. So much to see and do! Where to begin?


check out Range Creek in the Book Cliffs. This trip requires permits so it must be researched and signed up in advance for available dates through the University of Utah Natural History Museum

>

ST GEORGE AREA:

Anasazi Ridge at Santa Clara Reserve; indicative of Virgin Anasazi occupation. Limited signage here. There are so many sites in and around St George that it is impossible to list them all. Keep your eyes open when you are hiking or biking and you may be surprised to find something on your own.

PRICE/WELLINGTON AREA:

Nine Mile Canyon. Check in at the Visitor Center in Price for information and maps about the area because this rock art is mostly on private property. Go all the way to the end of the pavement to see the “Hunter Panel.” If you are interested in a backcountry adventure,

SOME THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: These sites are fragile and protected by law no matter where they are! They are hundreds of years old and have existed through all conditions for a very long time. However, they won’t last for long if you stand on them, chalk them to get a better photograph, take something from the ground, paint them with graffiti, or trace them with your fingers and leave your body oil on them. Look long and hard, but leave no trace of your visit and take nothing but photos from the sites. Keep in mind that many of the sites are considered to be sacred, so show some respect for the ancient people who left whatever you may find for the rest of us to enjoy and ponder. In 1906, President Theodore Roosevelt wrote the Antiquities Act to protect these sites; in 1979 ARPA (Archaeological Resources Protection Act) was passed to further enhance these protections and codify penalties that can go up to felony charges for violations. In 1990, NAGPRA (Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act) was enacted to further protect the sites and return all items “taken” to the indigenous people to whom they belong. Further reading: House of Rain, by Craig Childs; The Rock Art of Utah, by Polly Schaafsma; Guide to Utah’s Publicly Accessible Rock Art Sites, by Troy Scotter, Utah Rock Art Research Association; Rock Art along the Way, by Janet Farnsworth and Bernadette Heath; Bureau of Land Management Field Offices in locale you are visiting for maps, books, advice about road conditions, etc.

So much to do

for kids,

big & small

They’ll be talking about this vacation for a long time.

Day trips. Kid friendly hikes & activities. Hands-on, Family friendly fun.

Utah’s Canyon Country

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5

Best Star Gazing Places in Utah by ANN WHITTAKER

Dark skies are as rare as a happy political discussion for most of us urban- and suburban-dwelling citizens, but, lucky for you, Utah’s star gazing access is as quick as an hour away or as a much-needed 4-hour road trip away. Utah is kind that way–she likes to hand out cosmic extravaganzas night after night after night. Wherever you station yourself in the state, you can hop in a car and get away from the light pollution of your neighborhood like a proper luddite should.

FOR ALL YOUR STARRY INTENTIONS, HERE ARE UTAH’S FIVE BEST

PLACES TO SEE HEAVENLY BODIES:

01.

CHARMING SMALL NORTHERN UTAH TOWN: OAKLEY Take a scenic drive east of Salt Lake City and Park City to the good ol’ town of Oakley where the 4th of July rodeo is legendary and the demolition derby is epic. This horse town is at the foot of the Uinta Mountains and has some of the best fishing in the west on the Weber River. You could easily make it a full day’s outing, ending with star gazing and a milkshake or cup of hot cocoa from the local diners: Polar King or Road Island Diner. CONSTELLATIONS TO LOOK FOR:

Ursa Major (summer); Perseus (winter) BEST VIEW POINT: Recreation Complex, 4300 North SR 32 CAMPING: Smith & Morehouse Reservoir up Weber Canyon AVERAGE NIGHT TIME TEMP:

48°F (summer); 13°F (winter)

02.

FAMILY TRADITION: BRYCE CANYON ANNUAL ASTRONOMY FESTIVAL Every year Bryce Canyon hosts an Astronomy Festival near the summer solstice in June with the national park’s astronomy rangers and local astronomical societies. The festival lasts for three days, and you can view the dark sky certified park’s dazzling cosmos with experts to help you locate constellations and other features like nebulae, clusters, and shooting stars. CONSTELLATIONS TO LOOK FOR:

The Milky Way (summer) BEST VIEW POINT: Mossy Cave Trail CAMPING: North Campsite or Sunset

Campsite AVERAGE NIGHT TIME TEMP:

50°F (summer); 17°F (winter)


04.

CROWD-FREE NATIONAL PARK: CAPITOL REEF Capitol Reef National Park is Utah’s national park darling: it’s grand and you won’t have to wait for an hour just to get into the park. And there’s fruit orchards for picking fresh fruit as well. Best of all, of course, is this park is Dark Sky certified and the rangers have their telescopes set up throughout the summer. CONSTELLATIONS TO LOOK FOR:

03.

REMOTE OFF-ROADING: HOLE IN THE ROCK ROAD, GRAND STAIRCASEESCALANTE NATIONAL MONUMENT It doesn’t get more remote than driving down this well-groomed dirt road in one of Utah’s most remote landscapes. You might as well grab a camping permit from the visitor center in Escalante because you’re going to want to stay out all night. The sky is teeming with so many stars you might even have a hard time finding the Big Dipper, but you won’t miss the Milky Way. And hike some gorgeous slot canyons while you’re at it. CONSTELLATIONS TO LOOK FOR:

Sagittarius (summer); Taurus (winter) BEST VIEW POINT: Devils Garden CAMPING: Dispersed camping allowed–make sure to get a permit AVERAGE NIGHT TIME TEMP:

55°F (summer); 17°F (winter) 29

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Bootes (summer); Orion (winter) BEST VIEW POINT: Cohab Canyon CAMPING: Backcountry camping with a permit AVERAGE NIGHT TIME TEMP:

62°F (summer); 20°F (winter)

05.

THE BEST OF ALL THE GAME: NATURAL BRIDGES NATIONAL MONUMENT If you’re lucky, you might see 500 stars throughout a night in your urban/suburban home town. Interested in seeing 15,000 stars throughout the night sky? Then Natural Bridges National Monument is where you want to find yourself. It’s remote, geologically mind-blowing, and accompanied by the soothing song of crickets. CONSTELLATIONS TO LOOK FOR:

Virgo (summer); Canis Major (winter) BEST VIEW POINT: Owachomo Bridge CAMPING: campground with 13 sites or you can camp on BLM land AVERAGE NIGHT TIME TEMP:

55°F (summer); 17°F (winter


gateway to the park

Springdale by GREG KNELL

W

ith a map of the State of Utah spread on a surface in front of you, could you locate the city of Springdale? If your answer is no, don’t beat yourself up. The truth is that no one will hold it against you if the name doesn’t sound familiar. This particular Southern Utah locale has a population of only 529; not exactly a metropolis. But what if you were told that almost 5 million tourists visit this place every year? Would you believe it? You should, because chances are you’ve probably been there before. The quaint yet spectacular city of Springdale, UT is quite literally the home of none other than Zion National Park. Located approximately 50 miles east of St. George, this gorgeous gateway community is the most extraordinary place that you’ve ever forgotten about. 30

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You may now be saying, “Oh yeah, I remember Springdale!” If Zion National Park was your backyard, you wouldn’t blame guests for briskly going through the house to get to it. But therein lies the oftmade mistake. Springdale, in and of itself, is a bonafide heavyweight contender in the arena of North American destination locations, and the truth is that people are catching on. Hotel ledgers in 2016 recorded more multiple-night stays in Springdale than in any previous year. Tourists and travelers around the world are finally speaking Springdale and Zion National Park in the same breath; and rightfully so because, well, they are one and the same and always have been. The allure of this area is truly unique. The mention of the name Zion evokes immense size and grandeur, whereas Springdale’s connota-


Guided Canyoneering in Snake Alley

they’re used to. Park headliners such as Angel’s Landing, Observation Point, Emerald Pools, Riverside Walk, and Canyon Overlook Trail are available to the public year round. Perhaps it’s taken a while for folks to realize this because when much of the world thinks of Utah, they (unsurprisingly) think of snow. The fact that this particular characteristic doesn’t apply to the desert regions of Southern Utah is yet another reason that makes the area so enticing to trip planners everywhere.

Zion National Park

tions are more arcane and intimate. It’s a wonderful dichotomy that lays the framework for a perfect vacation collaboration. Among many reasons, one of the most attractive draws of this location is its perennial availability. The breathtaking beauty of Springdale and Zion Canyon can be seen all year round. Even the weather during what are considered winter months almost always yield pleasant temperatures. Coming to Zion during the shoulder season used to be a well-kept secret shared only between the most dedicated and loyal annual visitors. That secret appears to be getting out somewhat as more and more people realize that they can avoid large hiking crowds, restaurant wait times, and ‘no vacancy’ notices by coming during the shoulder season and still experience the same Zion

Avoiding the high season also presents uninhibited access to a host of fantastic activity options in Springdale and the surrounding area, such as: - Renting a Polaris Slingshot from the Visitor Center and cruising Zion-Mt. Carmel Highway sans roof or doors. - Booking an ATV, UTV, or Jeep tour with one of the many local adventure outfits and exploring sand dunes and forested backcountry. - Hiring Zion Helicopter for a breathtaking aerial view of landscapes inside and around the Park. Springdale is also home to renown restaurant and hotel circuits, all of which are open year round and none of which have wait times during the shoulder season. These include 5-star dining establishments and many exclusive world-class resorts and spas, not to mention several fine-art galleries, designated campsites, pubs, local dining favorites, live concerts, and a variety of other attractions and events. DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE .COM

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know before you go:

Springdale and Zion Canyon have so much to offer, more perhaps than many people realize, even for seasoned travelers. The next time you visit, do more and stay longer during the shoulder season rather than the traditional peak season and experience all the perks that come as a reward for doing so. Soon you’ll be in on the Springdale “secret,”of which you then have full permission to disclose to everyone you know.

VisitStGeorge.com ZionNationalPark.com

1. PLAN ON WAKING UP EARLY

i

FOR PEAK SEASON VISITORS If you’re coming during the summer, here is a short list of things to remember before getting here:

The earlier you rise to head into the Park, the easier time you’ll have finding a parking spot while also diminishing the number of tourists encountered.

2.

ADD AN EXTRA DAY TO YOUR ITINERARY No one wants to end their trip with regrets. There is so much to see and do here, so give yourself that additional 24 hours (or more). You’ll be happy you did.

3.

VENTURE OUTSIDE THE MAIN CANYON Don’t forget about the Kolob Section of the Park as well as surrounding cities like Hurricane, La Verkin, and St. George, all of which have incredible appeal for tourists. Take in the whole area as much as possible on your Zion vacation.

November in The Narrows, Zion National Park

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! s e n i L e h t e d i s t u O r o l Co

If you want great outdoor adventure. If you want something different. If you want plenty of variety. And maybe something colorful. We have it right here. GET OU T S ID E THE LIN E S ! !


[ MAP ] Utah is home to 5 National Parks, 8 National Monuments, 2 National Recreation Areas, 43 State Parks and 7 National Forests.

[A] [ A ] CORAL PINK SAND DUNES STATE PARK located just outside of Kanab, this

is a paradise of vibrantly colourful sand dunes. Sculpted by wind and weather, these mountains of sand can move as much as 50 feet per year and are formed by the erosion of Navajo sandstone. Enjoy designated areas for both OHV and ATV enthusiasts, as well as hiking trails, sightseeing and camping.

[B] [ B ] DINOSAUR NATIONAL MONUMENT – Take a step back in time;

the unique rock formations in this area provide a geologic record of earth history covering billions of years. Dinosaurs once roamed here and their remains are still visibly embedded in the rocks. Hiking, guided tours, camping and river rafting on the Green and Yampa Rivers are some of the adventures found here.

[C] [ C ] YUBA STATE PARK located 110 miles south of Salt Lake City and just off of 1-15. The Yuba reservoir lures visitors with its warm waters, sand beaches and awesome camping. Be sure to make time for a zip line adventure and call 435-7582611 for advanced booking. Developed and primitive camping are available, as well as cabins for those who didn’t pack camping gear.

StateParks.utah.gov

IN AUGUST 2017, UTAH SYMPHONY/ UTAH OPERA WILL EMBARK UPON A “GREAT AMERICAN ROAD TRIP” to perform free outdoor classical music concerts in rural populations of our state, forging connections with communities through great live music and celebrating Utah’s natural resources and rich cultural heritage. This exciting collaboration with the Utah Office of Tourism and the Natural History Museum of Utah will take music outside of the four walls of the concert hall into the breathtaking landscapes of our state. The tour will highlight the natural elements through song, classical repertoire and storytelling and exciting outreach opportunities and events. Three free outdoor concerts featuring the full Utah Symphony, opera singers and music by Native American composer/musician Brent Michael Davids. Two free chamber music concerts against the stunning red rock of southern Utah. One magical week.

[D]

For more information and to register for free tickets, visit:

www.utahsymphony.org/tours/gart

photo courtesy of UTAH SYMPHONY. O.C. Tanner Amphitheater/Springdale 34

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3.

15

84

[ MAP ]

91

Urban Core – page 48 1. Salt Flats – page 54 2. Mirror Lake – page 36 3. Tony Grove – page 36 4. Antelope Island – page 4

Bear Lake

89

30

LOGAN

23

RANDOLPH 16

165

30 Golden Spike National Historice Site

NORTH

GARDEN CITY

BRIGHAM CITY

SOUTH

39

5. Cedar City - page 20 6. Abajo’s - page 22 7. Good Water Rim – page 22 8. Maze – Cover image

15

OGDEN

OGDEN Great Salt Lake

4.

84

89

80

MANILA Flaming Gorge National Recreation Area

SALT LAKE LAKE CITY SALT CITY 80

201

1.

2.

KAMAS

PARK CITY

215

TOOELE

HEBER CITY

[B]

35

196

73

36

191 40

191

89

6

89

96

PRICE

6

[C]

50

50

6

31

15

125

28

7.

89

29

MANTI

6

CASTLE DALE

100

191

10

FILLMORE

257

45

88

DUCHESNE

68

154

40

208

PROVO PROVO

Utah Lake

149

VERNAL

Timpanogos Cave National Monument

River

199

Dinosaur National Monument

Green

WENDOVER

191

150

70

GREEN RIVER

70

RICHFIELD

Arches National Park

191

24

24

128 313

MOAB

25 Capitol Reef National Park

21 89

24

62

BEAVER 62

CEDAR CITY

219

14

PAROWAN PANGUITCH 12

Cedar Breaks National Monument

9

ST. GEORGE

59

[D]

SPRINGDALE KANAB

276

[A]

95

Glen Canyon National Recreation Area

Bryce Canyon National Park

89

MONTICELLO

6.

ESCALANTE

143

Zion National Park

18

Co lo ra d

15

5.

56

211 Ri ve r

130

8.

95 12

89

46

o

20

Canyonlands National Park

TORREY

Natural Bridges National Monument

Hovenweep National Monument

276 261 San J uan R iver

Lake Powell

191

BLANDING

95

Grand Staircase - Escalante National Monument

89

491

Rainbow Bridge National Monument

MEXICAN HAT Monument Valley

163

BLUFF 191

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Four Corners Area

35


SUMMER ON THE SLOPES P. 40

PARK CITY P. 44

PROVO P. 48

SALT LAKE CITY P. 50

OGDEN P. 52

WEST DESERT P. 54

FLY FISHING P. 56

HEBER P. 58


W.O.W. - AKA WASATCH OVER WASATCH - EPIC COLORS DURING THE FALL

NORTHERN

LIST 2017

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RED FLEET STATE PARK - VERNAL ON SITE KAYAK AND SUP RENTALS

STEWART FALLS SUNDANCE MOUNTAIN RESORT

GREAT SALT LAKE SUNSET PADDLE FROM ANTELOPE ISLAND


GATES OF LODORE, GREEN RIVER 5 DAY GUIDED RIVER TRIP

MT. NEBO - HIGHEST PEAK IN THE WASATCH 11,929'

MIRROR LAKE - HIKE, FISH, PADDLE, PICNIC & CAMP

TONY GROVE / LOGAN CANYON


Summer — ON THE SLOPES —

Snowbird Resort

Utah boasts a global reputation for the finest winter recreation on the planet. But when The Greatest Snow on Earth™ melts, it reveals lush meadows full of wildflowers and miles of scenic trail to be explored. With such easy access, there’s no better way to beat the heat of summer than a quick trip to the mountains. Summer is magical at Utah’s ski resorts, and whether you’re in to mountain biking, hiking, camping, live music, great food, or scenic lift rides, there is something for everyone. by GREG SCOTHERN

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NORDIC VALLEY This affordable family favorite located in scenic Ogden Valley offers lift-served mountain biking, hiking, disc golf, and bungie trampolines. Work up a sweat then cool off with something quite unique: a 400-foot slip-n-slide that’s sure to delight the entire family. nordicvalley.com SNOWBASIN RESORT Home of the 2002 Winter Olympic Downhill and Super G skiing events, Snowbasin’s world-class pedigree extends to its summer activities as well. Snowbasin offers lift-served mountain biking, hiking, disc golf, scenic lift rides, and much more. Snowbasin’s weekly Blues, Brews, and BBQ draws thousands from the Wasatch Front to relax on the grass and enjoy outstanding live music and great food in the cool mountain air. For you foodies out there, Snowbasin is renowned for its excellent cuisine and offers several special culinary events throughout the summer as well. snowbasin.com

Clockwise from top: Powder Mountain Resort; Brian Head Resort; Deer Valley Resort

BEAVER MOUNTAIN RESORT “The Beav” as locals call it, sits in the heart of beautiful Logan. In addition to abundant mountain biking and hiking options, Beaver Mountain hosts the multi-day Beaver Mountain Music Festival in mid-August, featuring 13 bands including nationally touring acts. The event includes a children’s learning village with hands-on music, art, and nature education, as well as a DJ, hip-hop & spoken word lounge, and mountain bike races. Camping is easy with several tent and RV sites, and lodge or yurt rentals are also available. skithebeav.com CHERRY PEAK RESORT New to the scene and located just minutes north of Logan, Cherry Peak is in its second year of operations but is already offering one of the best summer concert series in the state, featuring national artists like Andrew

McMahon, Maddie Wilson, and Scotty McCreery, to name a few. Open Saturdays throughout summer, Cherry Peak also offers lift-served mountain biking, waterslides, hiking, and horseback riding. skicherrypeak.com POWDER MOUNTAIN RESORT While lift-served mountain biking is not currently offered, Powder Mountain has invested heavily in world-class mountain biking trails, creating over 15 miles of fast, flowy singletrack that’s among the very best in Northern Utah. Bike rentals are available at the Hidden Lake Bike Shop, where you can also refuel with tasty street tacos and an ice-cold PBR. Future plans at Powder Mountain include lift-served gravity parks and many, many more miles of brilliant cross-country singletrack. powdermountain.com

PARK CITY MOUNTAIN RESORT Few towns in the West can match the year-round outdoor recreation that Park City has to offer, and Park City Mountain certainly does its part to keep summer hopping. With activities like one of the world’s longest alpine slides, a 4,000-foot alpine coaster, multiple zipline adventures, bike parks, lift-served mountain biking, and the Canyons Golf Course and miniature golf – all in addition to hundreds of miles of adjacent hiking and mountain biking terrain – it’s virtually impossible to get bored in Park City. As a bonus, the Resort also offers activities specifically for children weighing between 30 – 100 lbs, like the Kid’s Zipline, rope course, and tubing, making it the ideal summer destination for families. parkcitymountain.com DEER VALLEY RESORT Also in Park City, Deer Valley is becoming one of the premier lift-served mountain biking destinations in Utah, investing heavily in world-class, precision-built flow and gravity-oriented trails that rival any in the West. Deer DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE .COM

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Valley also offers their highly-acclaimed outdoor concert series, featuring numerous national acts from all genres ranging from symphony to classic rock. Pack some wine, roll out the blanket, and enjoy award-winning music under the stars at Deer Valley’s legendary Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater. deervalley.com

Snowbasin Resort

SOLITUDE MOUNTAIN RESORT Big Cottonwood Canyon is home to Solitude Mountain Resort, which currently offers full-service mountain biking with over 20 miles of outstanding alpine single track, as well hiking, scenic rides, and disc golf. Quick access and great lodging options make this resort ideal for easy weekend getaways. skisolitude.com SNOWBIRD Snowbird is another full-service resort that makes summer vacations a breeze. Located in Little Cottonwood Canyon, Snowbird’s family-oriented summer offerings are extensive with mountain biking, gemstone mining, mountain coaster, alpine slide, zipline, rope course, climbing wall, bungee trampolines, scenic rides on the Aerial Tram, and much more. Fall gets even better at Snowbird with their perennial Oktoberfest, voted one of America’s 10 Best by Men’s Journal Magazine. Running every Saturday and Sunday from mid-August to mid-October, Oktoberfest attracts over 60,000 visitors and has grown to become one of the largest festivals in Utah. snowbird.com SUNDANCE RESORT Sundance delivers some of the most brilliant alpine scenery in the world. Nestled below the stunning grandeur of Mount Timpanogos, every experience at Sundance is breathtaking. Music is an integral part of Sundance’s soul, as evidenced by their renowned Bluebird Cafe Concert Series. Each year, Sundance partners with the original Bluebird Cafe in Nashville to bring renowned singers, songwriters, and musicians to a unique, quaint mountain setting. Visitors will also enjoy excellent mountain biking, ziplines, and some of the most scenic lift rides 42

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and hikes imaginable. Outstanding lodging, shops, and eateries complete Sundance’s impressive summer résumé. sundanceresort.com EAGLE POINT Eagle Point sits high in the majestic 12,000-foot Tushar Mountains of Central Utah, making it the ideal place to enjoy incredible scenery and miles of excellent alpine mountain biking, hiking, and ATV trails that are completely free of crowds. Full rental and retail services are available in addition to great lodging and restaurant options. If you are looking for a quiet, intimate mountain escape and stunning scenery in one of Utah’s lesser-known mountain ranges, Eagle Point is a sure bet. eaglepointresort.com BRIAN HEAD RESORT Utah’s southernmost resort is also its highest incorporated city: Brian Head Town rests at 10,000 feet, offering a cool mountain reprieve from the blazing Southern Utah deserts in summer

months. Brian Head is a true mountain biking destination, with miles and miles of buttery alpine singletrack, full service shops, lodging, restaurants, and mind-blowing scenery. Cedar Breaks National Monument is directly adjacent and offers brilliant hiking with unique, eye-popping views and stunning vistas that you have to see to believe. Brian Head also offers an archery range, zipline course, tubing, and a climbing wall. brianhead.com

Worth Mentioning

Two of Utah’s ski resorts, Alta and Brighton, do not offer commercial summer activities, but that’s not to say they aren’t worth visiting. Nestled high in the Cottowood Canyons, these resorts feature several high-alpine lakes, cirques, and gorgeous wildflower-filled meadows that are accessible via Forest Service trails. If a peaceful, scenic hike in a wilderness setting is more your speed, Alta and Brighton are the answer. SkiUtah.com


FIND YOUR PLACE IN THE SUN. Then, go back often.

Deer Valley Resort is nestled in the Wasatch Mountains of Utah, just 36 miles east of Salt Lake City, in the historic mining town of Park City. The resort revolutionized the ski industry by being the first North American resort to provide the first-class service one would experience at a fine hotel. Now a year-round resort, Deer Valley® offers an incredible variety of activities for all guests during both the winter and summer seasons. Deer Valley is consistently ranked #1 in guest service, dining, grooming, lodging and on-mountain food by the readers of SKI Magazine. The resort features luxurious amenities such as uniformed ski valets, complimentary Mountain Host tours and overnight ski storage, parking lot shuttles, groomed-to-perfection slopes, limited lift ticket sales along with gourmet dining in three elegant day lodges. Deer Valley Resort provides a complete vacation experience with customized lodging in resort managed properties, an award-winning ski school, convenient access via interstate highways, an on-site, state-licensed child care facility, and the bounty of 300 annual inches of powder snow backed by state-of-the-art snowmaking. As the snow melts, the slopes transform to provide guests with numerous activities such as lift-served mountain biking and hiking, scenic chairlift rides, Summer Adventure Camp for children and music-filled evenings at the Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater. The resort offers award-winning cuisine served on the outdoor decks of Royal Street Café and Deer Valley Grocery~Café as well as Deer Valley-inspired brick oven cuisine at their newest restaurant, The Brass Tag. Enjoy a custom Gourmet Picnic Basket or Bag during one of the many evening concerts and don’t miss the Silver Lake Snack Shack for a quick bite on the hill. Deer Valley proudly brings the same commitment to guest service to their summer activities as they do during the winter season, featuring an all-inclusive operation with on-site mountain bike rentals, instruction and guided biking and hiking tours. Be sure to visit Deer Valley Resort and discover your #deervalleymoment.

DISCOVER A WHOLE NEW SEASON deervalley.com | 435-649-1000 | #DeerValleyMoment


mountain town mecca

PARK CITY by MONIQUE BEELEY

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inters are booming; visitors from around the globe are flocking to this mountain town mecca, in hopes of skiing the “Greatest Snow on Earth” on the picturesque blue bird day, stargazing during the annual Sundance Film Festival or just cruising the scene of Historic Main Street’s shops, galleries and restaurants. The vibe of the winter season is a must for all to experience. With the snowmelt comes the quieter side of this mountain town, but the word is out and now the streets that were once vacant during the “mud season” (the term the locals use to describe the time between being able to ski and when the trails dry out enough for summer pursuits) are now bustling with action. With average summer temps in the 80’s, zero humidity and a town that sits at nearly 7,000 feet in elevation, this is the perfect summer getaway. Bring the family for a quick weekend or stay for an entire week. Either way, the options are endless and ageless. Hit the alpine coaster at Park City Mountain, the ropes course at the Utah

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Photo courtesy of VISIT PARK CITY

Olympic Park, rent cruiser bikes to pedal the many miles of paved paths, jump on a scenic chairlift ride at Deer Valley Resort, go bird watching at the 1,200 acre Swaner Preserve & EcoCenter, book an afternoon whitewater river trip on the nearby Weber River, check out the local scene at the weekly farmer’s market every Wednesday, try stand-up paddle-boarding from Pebble Beach (yes, there is even a beach in this cool mountain town), spend the day at the Park Silly Sunday Market (Sundays June 4 – Sept 17th), and… if you still need more...head to one of the local outdoor concert venues for a free evening of music. This is a family vacation made easy! …OR take some much-deserved us time and leave the kids, dogs and friends at home and enjoy a little (or a lot of) quality time with your significant other to reconnect and just relax. Summertime is the time for deals in Park City…think luxury lodging minus the luxury rates of the winter season. Also, many restaurants offer summer dining deals. Be sure to pick up the local newspaper, The Park Record, for more information.


Park Silly Sunday Market

Park City Mountain

SUP - Jordanelle State Park

A few recommendations: Brunch on the deck of the STEIN ERIKSEN LODGE followed by hiking the Mid-Mountain Trail. Utah Olympic Park

HIKE THE SPIRO TRAIL at Park City Mountain then head to Silver Star Café for après’ on the patio. Breakfast on the deck at the Deer Valley Grocery Café followed by SUP AT NEIGHBORING PEBBLE BEACH. Hike the Lost Prospector Trail then head to the BLIND DOG RESTAURANT for nightly happy-hour sushi specials. Mountain bike in Round Valley and then head to Maxwell’s for pizza on the patio & the FREE OUTDOOR CONCERT ON THURSDAYS.

photo by MATT HAGE

Most evenings throughout summer you are likely to find a free outdoor concert, so grab a picnic basket, your favorite beverage, a blanket and enjoy a cool summer night grooving to the soulful beat of music. Check out MountainTownMusic.org for a full list of free summer concerts. Whether you pack your hiking boots or your mountain bikes, this mecca and its beloved 400-miles of trails will allow you to earn your vacation overindulgence at one of the many fine-dining locales.

VisitParkCity.com HistoricParkCityUtah.com ParkCityRestaurants.com NewparkTownCentre.com DeerValley.com ParkCityMountain.com ParkSillySundayMarket.com DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE .COM

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1. For The Beginners and Kids KIDS- Start your ride at Trailside Bike Park with a skills session on Unga Bunga, followed by a lap or two on Yabba Dabba Doo. This location is a Park City favorite. Check out basinrecreation.org for a map of the Park. The Round Valley trail system is ideal for beginners and intermediate riders, offering many fun and fast loops. From the Silver Summit Parkway head to the east and catch the RV Connector to the Silver Quinn Trail, then hang a right on Round Valley Express. You’ll come to Cammy’s Trail where you’ll take a left and then merge onto the Matt’s Flat Trail. Stay left until you see the Matt’s Flat singletrack and jump on it. After a short while on Matt’s Flat singletrack you’ll come to an intersection with Somewhere Elks and The Practice Loops, hang a right downhill on The Practice Loop. At the bottom you’ll run into Ability Way, take a left and connect back with the Silver Quinn Trail behind the ice rink. This will take you all the way back to the Trailside Bike Park on a cruisy bike path.

For the Climbing Averse There are more than a few of us who like the down more than the up, and there are plenty of options that don’t require a shuttle or lift ticket. Start by catching the Empire Pass bus and get off at the Montage Hotel stop. Pedal up the Guardsman Pass Road where you’ll reach the Mid-Mountain Trail. Head west and stay on Mid Mountain it until you reach Tommy’s Two Step. This short(ish) climb will bring you to the yurt at Park City Mountain and the start of the Mojave Trail. Head down the Mojave Trail until it intersects the Mid Mountain Trail and continue downhill (left). Eventually you’ll come to a road, and the Intersection with the Crescent Mine Grade Trail (CMG). CMG will take you all the way to the base of Park City Mountain.

2.

Park City’s Gold Level Riding by SCOTT HOUSE

With over 400 miles

of trail in Park City it can be a bit overwhelming to pick a ride, let alone pick an appropriate ride for you, your family or friends. With summer officially here, now is the perfect time to highlight some rides in the Park City area that may help you plan your next adventure. With such a vast amount of trail and so many options for ability, distance, scenery, etc., it can be hard to single out SCOTT HOUSE just a few trails, but the rides listed belowby should be great options to get you started.


For the Views For stunning views, it’s hard to beat the Wasatch Crest Trail. If you like to climb you can access the “Crest” by climbing the Armstrong Trail to Pinecone Ridge. It’s a long climb, but well-built and not overly steep. Plan on a couple hours in the saddle going up if you choose this option. If you fall into the above category (climbing averse), you can book a shuttle to the top of Guardsman Pass. Once you’ve reached the top of the aptly named “Puke Hill,” head west on the doubletrack road towards the radio towers. You’ll quickly reach a Forest Service sign and the official start of the Wasatch Crest singletrack. Do your best to keep your eyes on the trail as there are some technical sections that will demand your attention. Keep right on the Wasatch Crest Trail until you reach the Ridge Connector. Ride the Ridge Connector to the Mid Mountain Trail and hang a left hand turn. You have a couple options for getting down from the Mid Mountain Trail; you can take the Ambush Trail to Holly’s if you like things a bit more sporty/technical, or you can cruise the Rob’s Trail to Rosebud Heaven (make a left on the road at the bottom). Both options will bring you to the Canyons Village at Park City Mountain where you can have a car waiting or catch the bus back into Old Town Park City.

Now all that’s left is packing up your car and heading for the first IMBA Gold Level Ride Center in the West, Park City, UT! Make sure you pick up a map from the Mountain Trails Foundation (mountaintrails.org) when you arrive at one of the local shops. Remember, this is just a quick primer to get you started and there is plenty more adventure waiting for you in the mountains of Park City. big shout out to Basin Recreation and Mountain Trails for our amazinG trails.

3.

Corvair, Deer Valley

S.NET

CYCLE TORM S 0 2 00-91 435-2

PARK CITY’S CYCLING EXPERTS ROAD, MOUNTAIN, FAT, COMFORT AND KIDS BIKES GEAR, DEMOS, FULL-SERVICE REPAIR & MAINTENANCE

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Round Valley

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PROVO A REVIVED DOWNTOWN by SARAH TOLLER

T

he food scene in Downtown Provo is booming. Downtown Provo has over 60 non-chain restaurants, giving plenty of options for any palate. From the humble burger shack, Tommy’s Burgers, to the awarding winning Communal, you can find something to fit your taste and wallet. Looking for something healthy? Good Thyme serves up farm to table dishes, while Ivie Juice Bar offers juice and acai bowls. Downtown Provo also features global cuisines like Brazilian, Japanese, El Salvadorian and Persian. Provo has also become a hub for the clean comedy scene. ComedySportz is a good old show down between Team Red vs. Team Blue as they compete for the most laughs. Dry Bar Comedy is Provo’s first professional standup comedy venue with renowned comics performing their funniest bits. The Mercury Theatre’s comic group, the Cinematics, perform a 45 minute skit on the fly. Their shows

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are one weekend a month. ImprovBroadway has several shows a week but their improv has a musical twist. At nearby BYU, you can attend student-run comedy shows like Divine Comedy and Humor U for cheap. If you’re lucky, you can even catch a live filming of the popular clean comedy show Studio C. Provo has an up-and-coming music scene. Provo music veterans that have made it big include Imagine Dragons, Neon Trees and The National Parks. Many of these bands started their careers performing at the Velour. You can still catch a concert there several nights a week. And who knows? You might be listening to the next hottest band in music! During the summer, Provo City throws free outdoor concerts known as the Rooftop Concert series featuring local bands. Past performers include Kascade, Aqua Bats, and Foreign Figures. Along with the music there are food trucks and vendors so there’s plenty to entertain you.

photos by TAYLOR NOEL

In the early 2000s, Downtown Provo had become a forgotten remnant of an exciting and illustrious past. But in the past decade, Downtown Provo has seen a renaissance with new restaurants, community events and fun attractions. In fact, it was recently named one of the coolest downtowns in America by Expedia. So what makes Downtown Provo so cool?


The Rooftop Concert Series is the first Friday of the month from May through August. But the concerts aren’t the only cool events going on in Downtown Provo. Join the locals at one of Downtown Provo’s community events. The Pasifika Festival on Memorial Day celebrates all things Polynesian. Every Saturday through the summer, there is a farmer’s market in Pioneer Park at the west end of Downtown Provo. For the Fourth of July, Downtown Provo becomes the center of the Freedom Festival with hot air balloons, a carnival and a grand parade.

The Provo Recreation Center features an indoor and outdoor pool with slides and water playgrounds. Grab your skateboard and check out the skateboard park. Calling all art lovers! There are several art galleries in Downtown Provo including the Terra Nova Gallery and the Covey Center for the Arts. On the first Friday of every month there is an Art Stroll in Downtown Provo where businesses and restaurants become galleries showcasing local art. The BYU Museum of Art is only a 5-minute drive away and has rotating exhibits. During the fall and winter months, the BYU Museum of Art throws an Art After Dark event with music and food to highlight one of their current exhibits. 15 minutes south of Downtown Provo is the Springville Museum of Art, the oldest art museum in Utah. Located in a southwestern, mission-inspired building, the Springville Museum of Art houses one of the largest collections of Russian art in the country.

Another contributor to the revitalization of Downtown Provo is the Provo Recreation Center. The Provo Rec Center features an indoor and outdoor pool with slides and water playgrounds. Grab your skateboard and check out the skateboard park. You can also take cooking classes there and learn how to cook cuisines from all over the world. The Provo Recreation Center is a hub for fun and community life. Downtown Provo is once again a happening place. Come to Downtown Provo to experience for yourself the mix of historic buildings, delicious restaurants and exciting vibes. UtahValley.com DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE .COM

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CORE

by ANN WHITTAKER

photo by EMILY SARGENT

SALT LAKE CITY Wasatch Front’s Urban Heartbeat Dear Adventurous Traveler, Allow us to introduce you to a mini metropolis that thrives with the good life at the base of canyons with mountains that soar above 11,000 feet: Salt Lake City – population 190,884 in the city proper; 1,153,340 people living in the greater SLC metro area.

You’ll drive 15 minutes from the international airport for immediate access to hundreds of the prettiest and raddest trails, cuisine and cocktails from big-city chefs who relocated to SLC for quality-of-life purposes, a symphony orchestra that will remind you that humanity makes remarkable music, art from both locals and global visionaries in every nook and cranny, live music that will make hipsters jealous, and a craft brew scene that you’d never expect but it will knock your socks off. Perhaps this is why Thrillest has named Salt Lake City “The American City Where Your Best Life is Outrageously Cheap.” Come. And play a while.

ART & CULTURE NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM of UTAH If you like nature, be prepared to get sucked in for hours and hours to Utah’s gorgeously designed and built Natural History Museum of Utah. You must go. Because you’ll learn about The Cave That Holds a Million Bones, walk through curated research by classically trained natural historians, bug exhibits that citizen scientists (that’s you) will win over even the most nervous, and events like the Chocolate 50

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& Cheese Festival or Navajo Rug Sales. And, best of all, it sits in the foothills overlooking the entire valley, and hiking and biking trails are literally right outside its doors.

THE LEONARDO Want more science and cool stuff to see when the afternoons get a little too hot? The Leonardo. Go and see science in action with exhibits that make adults and children alike beam with delight. WHERE THE LOCALS GET THEIR ART & CULTURE FIX • Utah Symphony • Ballet West • Music at The Cathedral of the Madeleine • Salt Lake Choral Artists • Utah Museum of Fine Art • Utah Museum of Contemporary Art • Phillips Gallery • The State Room (live music) • Kingsbury Hall • Jazz SLC

OUTDOOR RECREATION I know and you know that SLC is all about the outdoor access. You’ve heard it at least a bajillion times because it’s true and worth talking about a bajillion times. Why? Because you can walk from the center of downtown to City Creek canyon to instantaneous nature nirvana; because the Bonneville Shoreline Trail is a few minutes’ drive from downtown for you to enjoy on foot or bike; because Snowbird Mountain Resort is for skiers and hikers and eaters and spa-goers who are snobs about the view; because Big Cottonwood Canyon is full of a life-time’s alpine trails that change their scenery daily.


DINING & BARS Where can you get a good meal and a good beverage? Lucky for you, Salt Lake City is going gangbusters with a glorious artisan food and drink extravaganza that’s getting international attention. LOCALS’ FAVORITE RESTAURANTS • HSL • Pallet Bistro • Copper Onion • Avenues Bistro • Takashi • Pago • Laziz Kitchen • Mazza • Rye • Yoko Ramen • Eva •Current BARS YOU’LL LOVE • Under Current • Beer Bar • The Rest Speakeasy • Lake Effect • Copper Common

Bonneville Shoreline Trail

options for what you need: historic and charming B&B’s, grand hotels with pools and spas for luxurious vacays, or house rentals to test out your relocation fantasies. Because you’re going to end up living here. It’s that good.

COFFEE HOUSE OASIS – Locally Roasted Heaven • La Barba • Blue Copper • Publik • Three Pines

GETTING AROUND SLC is on the biking bandwagon and has implemented a green biking program that is making it easier and easier to get around town–ride your own bike or rent one of the city’s green bikes anywhere in town. And then there’s TRAX–the super duper easy metro train that will get you from shopping to gallery strolling to historic sites.

WHERE TO STAY Depending on what you’re looking for, there’s more than enough

The Visit Salt Lake Connect Pass puts 13 of Salt Lake’s most popular urban and mountain adventures in the palm of your hand, as cutting-edge technology allows users to purchase, share and redeem their Connect Pass from the convenience of their smartphone. And by bundling some of the area’s top attractions, this all-in- one activity pass offers incredible value saving up to 57% on regular admission. VisitSaltLake.com

See One. See Them All.

15 Attractions. One Pass. One Awesome Price.

visitsaltlake.com/connectpass

With the Visit Salt Lake Connect Pass, you don’t have to pick and choose. For one low price, you get admission to 15 of the city’s best attractions using secure and convenient mobile tickets. Plus, you get to take advantage of exclusive perks and discounts. From $32.

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OGDEN CORE

by SHANE OSGUTHORPE

From the days when it served as “Junction City” and transcontinental railroad passengers filled the streets, to its days as a venue for the Olympic Winter Games, Ogden has always had a diversity and a vibe that led the New York Post to proclaim it, “The OTHER Utah.”

Bonneville Shoreline Trail

Even today, its historic downtown is devoid of big box stores and chain restaurants while bustling with dozens of independent restaurants, bars, galleries, shops and brewpubs. In fact, Ogden’s trademarked tagline is “Notoriously Independent,” and it delivers on its promise with absolute authenticity.

The marathon traces the winding path of the Ogden River along its south fork, through scenic Ogden Valley and down stunning Ogden Canyon before entering historic downtown Ogden City. High flows invite experienced kayakers, and runners will pass several of the area’s popular trailheads that access hundreds of miles of single-track trails.

photo courtesy of GOAL FOUNDATION

Nestled right against the stunning Wasatch range, Ogden offers one of the most unique “mountain-to-metro” experiences found anywhere in the world. The warming temperatures of late spring and early summer force the nearby resorts of Nordic Valley, Powder Mountain and Snowbasin to let go of their winter snowpack, triggering Utah’s spring run-off…and “Utah’s Spring Run-Off.” The mid-May event is the Beehive State’s largest one-day running event, consisting of the Ogden Marathon, half-marathon, 5k and Kids K races, as well as the newly added Sunrise Bike Ride down the closed course ahead of the races. From that point on, Ogden’s “notoriously eventful” year gets underway.


As runners cross the finish line at Grant Avenue and Historic 25th Street, they’re standing at the epicenter of all things Ogden. Every Thursday in June, the Ogden Amphitheater hosts the Twilight Concert Series where music lovers have the opportunity to see the top touring names in progressive music. This year’s line-up includes The Shins, OK Go, Mike Snow, Oh Land and more. Complete information is available at ogdentwilight.com. Just a few blocks west of downtown, Historic Fort Buenaventura hosts the Ogden Friends of Acoustic Music (OFOAM) Festival. This annual 3-day festival puts top bluegrass & acoustic musical talent from around the country on the main stage and also hosts the Utah State Instrument Championships, clinics, campfire jam sessions and more. More information is available at ofoam.org. June also kicks off the Ogden Farmers Market which takes place every Saturday morning through the end of September. In addition to produce, coffee, baked goods and other food items, local artists and artisans offer a myriad of crafts, live music and more. A newly added “Fall Market” continues through October to take advantage of the autumn harvest of great local produce. Find out more about the market at farmersmarketogden.com. August welcomes back top-tier athletic events such as a Tour of Utah finish at nearby Snowbasin Resort, the Utah Super Spartan race at Nordic Valley, and a stop on the Rocky Mountain Wake Surf Open tour at Pineview. These events provide the perfect ramp-up to the XTERRA Pan-Am Championships in September where off-road

photo by VISIT OGDEN/KEVIN DILLEY

triathletes from around the world compete in their final chance to earn their spot at the World Championships in Maui. September also offers the “Mountain-to-Metro” trail run in conjunction with the Harvest Moon Celebration on Historic 25th Street as well as the final shows of the season for Snowbasin’s “Blues, Brews and Barbecues” free concerts. Of course, this is only a sampling of Ogden’s “Notoriously Eventful” summer calendar. Check out visitogden.com for a complete event calendar as well as information on trails, lodging, dining, attractions and more. visitogden.com

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JEWELS WEST DESERT O T F H E

by BREANA WRIGHT

Spiral Jetty, The Great Salt Lake. photo by ERIC SCHRAMM

VENTURE OFF THE BEATEN PATH, WHERE YOUR CHANCES OF FINDING SOLITUDE ARE AS HIGH AS THE CHANCES YOU’LL FIND SOMETHING UNIQUELY BEAUTIFUL. 54

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A popular location for many movies, the Salt Flats is also where the first land speed record was accomplished.

Bonneville Salt Flats. photo by MIKE BRADLEY

SPIRAL JETTY – Located on the northeastern shore of The Great Salt Lake is an art piece constructed entirely of mud, salt crystals, and basalt rocks. Created in 1970 by the sculptor Robert Smithson, this one-of-a-kind “Earth Art” is 1,500 feet long, 15 feet wide, and forms a spiral rock jetty. Be sure to explore around the shores of The Great Salt Lake, where you may find pink foam, capture a beautiful reflection or catch one of the best sunsets you’ve ever seen. Depending on rainfall and snowmelt the Jetty sometimes is submerged, so it’s a good idea to check water levels before you go. Don’t forget to stop at the nearby Golden Spike National Historic Site, where you will experience stories of the people and settings that define the completion of the first Transcontinental Railroad.

The Great Salt Lake

BONNEVILLE SALT FLATS – The Bonneville Salt Flats is the largest of many salt flats located west of the Great Salt Lake. This is a popular location for many movies, and is also where the first land speed record was accomplished. A few times a year, racing takes place at the Bonneville Speedway which welcomes cars, trucks, and motorcycles. You are allowed to drive in and explore on the salt flats, and camping is allowed anywhere along the adjacent mud flats (but not on the salt), so you can really make this your own adventure. SUN TUNNELS – Just west of the Bonneville Salt Flats you will find the Sun Tunnels, a unique art project completed in 1976 by the artist Nancy Holt. Her vision for the tunnels was to bring the

sky down to earth, with the dazzling effect of light bouncing through the tubes. The work consists of four massive concrete tunnels (18 feet long and nine feet in diameter), which are arranged in an “X” configuration. Two of the tunnels align with the rising and setting sun during the summer solstice and two line up during the winter solstice. The four tunnels are concrete tubes with holes drilled into them to match the constellations of Draco, Perseus, Columbia, and Capricorn.

IBEX – Ibex is mainly known as a world class bouldering area by climbers. With its unique landscape, solid quartzite rock, mild winter temperatures and rural location, Ibex is an amazing destination for climbers looking to experience something unique and beautiful. Due to its location, Summer is typically too hot for climbing in Ibex. Bonus: there is rock art in the area, so do some research and be sure to check out these ancient pictographs. PONY EXPRESS – Take a step back in history and hop on The Pony Express Trail National Backcountry Byway, which begins near Fairfield and ends at Ibapah, Utah. Along the route, you can enjoy history and a variety of recreation opportunities. The Pony Express trail is interpreted at these locations: Camp Floyd, Simpson Springs Station, Boyd Station and Canyon Station. THE GREAT SALT LAKE – The Great Salt Lake is the largest salt water lake in the Western Hemisphere. The lake is the largest remnant of Lake Bonneville, a prehistoric pluvial lake that once covered much of western Utah. Today the Great Salt Lake is home to both fresh- and salt-water wetlands along its eastern and northern edges, which provide critical habitat for millions of migratory shorebirds and waterfowl in western North America. Make your way over to Antelope Island State Park, which is home to free-ranging bison, mule deer, bighorn sheep, antelope, and many other desert animals. Hike or mountain bike the island’s many trails for spectacular views of the lake and island scenery. DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE .COM

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FLY FISH ING 411 QUICK PICKS

Utah is the second driest state in the US, but in spite of that the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources has done a terrific job of providing both still water and moving water public fisheries. Many fishing opportunities revolve around reservoirs and the tailwaters that flow from them. Section "A" - Green River 56

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by PAT RONNEBURG


I

n the northern part of the state, Strawberry Reservoir in Wasatch County is widely recognized throughout the West as a premiere trophy rainbow and cutthroat trout fishery. Strawberry is best fished from a boat, personal pontoon, kayak, canoe, or kickboat. This is big windy water, so a motor is recommended. At certain times of year, fish can be caught on the surface, but the most productive method of fishing here is trawling deep with a streamer. It’s up to the fisherman to figure out how deep! Strawberry has many public access points, boat ramps, a resort, great campgrounds, and a Division of Wildlife Resources office on site along with a hatchery that is open to the public for tours. In the fall, the Division holds the Kokanee Festival where you can witness the brilliant orange kokanee salmon moving up into the gravelly bottoms of the Strawberry River to spawn. Also in the northern part of the state, extending to the east from the Wasatch are the Uinta Mountains. There are literally hundreds of lakes in the Uintas, many of which are stocked. If you are a seeker of solitude, even in the middle of the crowded summer vacation months, the high Uinta lakes are a likely spot for you. Just be sure you are prepared to take a walk at altitude. There are many lakes that are right on the scenic highway, some a short walk from the road, and others that are downright remote. The Uintas host many campgrounds and public facilities. All the lakes on the south end of the Uintas can be fished from the bank or from a pontoon, kickboat, or canoe – but no motors are allowed here. Two of the most widely renowned and easily accessed rivers in Utah flow out of the Uintas: the Weber River and the Provo River. The Weber River is the smaller of the two. The most popular fly fishing stretch is between Rockport and Echo Reservoirs. The river is not entirely open to the public in this stretch, but there is good public access nonetheless. Check with a local fly shop to find out where it's best to access the river. The Provo River between Jordanelle and Deer Creek Reservoirs is the Sportsman’s Mitigation portion of the Central Utah Project. There is a corridor of 100 feet on both sides of the river that is now and will always be set aside as public land, and the corridor is used by many people for many reasons! Most of the folks you meet are fly fishing. Some are “birding,” while others are just out for a pleasant walk along the banks. The Lower Provo (below Deer Creek) is also prime fishing water.

Provo River

At the farthest east end of the Uintas is the fabled Green River. The Green originates north in the Wind River Mountains of Wyoming. The river section that is most fished in Utah is the tailwater below the dam at Flaming Gorge. There are several fly shops there and some of the best fishing outfitters I have fished with over the years – head and shoulders above the rest! The tailwater below the dam is broken into three sections, punctuated by ramp and road access. All three sections also have public walk/wade access points and trails, but the most popular way to fish is from a drift boat. Check with one of the fly shops at the Gorge or Dutch John to determine when conditions are right for you. Conditions change, depending on power generation and other needs, but fishing usually remains good despite fluctuating water levels. Flaming Gorge Reservoir is home to trophy lake trout, brown and rainbow trout, carp, kokanee, burbot, and small mouth bass. At certain times of the year, some of these species can be fished from the banks. In general, however, a boat is recommended and there are some super guides for lake fishing as well. All of these fisheries and many more in other parts of the State are described in detail online at the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources Blue Ribbon Fisheries pages. Finally, for those who crave a less managed fishing experience, check out the Division’s Cutt Slam. There are 4 species of Cutthroat Trout that are wild and native to the State of Utah: Bonneville, Colorado River, Yellowstone, and Bear River. The cost to participate in the Cutt Slam is minimal – only $20 – but the fun of it is travelling to the various locations in the state where the fish can be found. Your $20 will go toward restoring and increasing habitat for the native cutthroat. Check out the fishing regulations, fees, the Blue Ribbon Fisheries list, and the Cutt Slam program at wildlife.utah.gov.

Green River photo by RYAN KELLY

Good luck and tight lines! DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE .COM

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HEBER VALLEY: AN INSIDER’S GUIDE TO

UTAH’S SWITZERLAND My 10-year-old son Bode raced across the zipline’s platform and launched himself toward Provo Canyon’s forested abyss, surrendering to the distinct sound of the rig’s trolley rapidly racing across the steel cables. “I believe I can fly!” he shouted as the wind hit his face. We’ve been living the dream since we ditched city life eight months ago and moved to the Heber Valley, an outdoor playground with bubbling hot pots, bucolic farmlands, five golf courses, three Utah State Parks, 2002 Olympic Nordic skiing venue Soldier Hollow, three sparkling reservoirs and a Swiss-themed mountain hamlet. The valley is chiseled by the Provo River, a blue-ribbon fly-fishing destination with easy access to the Wasatch and Uinta Mountains. All of this is less than 50 minutes from the Salt Lake International Airport and a stone’s throw away from Park City. From land to water 58

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to air, the Heber Valley has something for everyone. LAND With 200 miles of trails suitable for hiking, mountain biking and ATVing, this valley is the modern-day Land of Milk and Honey. HIKING Mount Timpanogos is the crowning achievement of the valley’s landscape with two strenuous routes up the mountain. For a more leisurely excursion, don’t miss the half-mile nature trail at Cascade Springs, a refreshing oasis of verdant vegetation, cascading waterfalls and inviting pools. Memorial Hill is a popular 1-mile circuitous jaunt in Midway that offers a 360-degree view of the valley with monuments honoring U.S. servicemen and women at the summit.


“I though t we were just going

to do a few ziplines and call it good.

By AMBER BOROWSKI JOHNSON

But that? That was something.”

Top of Memorial Hill

BIKING Wasatch Mountain State Park preserves nearly 23,000 acres for mountain biking, hiking, camping, golfing, ATVing and fishing. The Dutch Hollow Trail System has almost 20 miles of singletrack while the WOW (Wasatch Over Wasatch) Trail is a more strenuous ride that extends 9.2 miles from Wasatch Mountain State Park to Hardy Lake near Deer Valley. For a more kid-friendly outing, the Deer Creek Trail runs 9 miles along the western hillside above the shores of Deer Creek Reservoir. Insider’s Tip: If you pass through Midway on a Monday evening, don’t be surprised if you encounter a swarm of locals of all ages happily buzzing through this pastoral mountain village on their bikes. Welcome to the Monday Midway Cruiser Cruise, a grassroots “slow ride” that runs May through September. Locals meet behind Midway Town Hall at 7 p.m. and casually wind through the town’s backstreets. For additional local charms, be sure to indulge in cheese samples at Heber Valley Artisan Cheese, and Süss Cookie Company regularly serves up fresh treats and delicious community classes. WATER From reservoirs to a geothermal crater, adventures in the Heber Valley are not just limited to land. Jordanelle State Park: One of Utah’s most popular state parks, Jordanelle State Park has camping, boating, swimming, kayaking and fishing. The Aqua x Zone is an inflatable watersports park that allows up to 65 people to run, jump, swing and swim on a variety of obstacles like The Curve, a 20-foot-long raceway. For a unique camping adventure, Floating Campgrounds recently opened their new two-level dock for a boat-in camping experience with a private bathroom, gas fire pit and a top level deck for sunbathing and sleeping. Homestead Crater: One of the Heber Valley’s most famous features is the Homestead Crater, a 95-degree geothermal hot springs covertly ensconced in a natural cave. Upon entering the tunnel you’ll swear you’ve been teleported to the Caribbean’s azure-blue waters where you can take a therapeutic soak or a SUP yoga class. The 65-foot-deep crater also offers PADI Open Water certifications. DISCOVERUTAHMAGAZINE .COM

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Play More. Save More. The Others: Deer Creek is a medium-sized reservoir that offers excellent boating and fishing, not to mention the area’s best view of Mount Timpanogos. If you want to try kiteboarding, Uinta Kiting is the only Kiteboarding School permitted to teach in a Utah State Park. On the east side of the Heber Valley, Strawberry Reservoir is renowned as an excellent trout fishery, and be sure to try your hand (or rod) in The Middle Provo, one of the most popular fly-fishing streams in the State of Utah. AIR Your wings may be secured with a harness, but the Heber Valley’s two zipline courses are about as close as you’ll get to flying. Or, if you really want to fly, there’s an option for that too. Soar Utah: Take a thrilling glider ride for a true bird’s eye view of the entire Heber Valley. Nothing quite compares to the peaceful exhilaration of gliding, soaring gracefully with only the sound of the wind rushing over the wings. The views alone are worth it. Operating out of the Heber City Airport, Soar Utah offers scenic glider rides May through October. Provo Canyon Adventures: Rocky Mountain Outfitters, known for their horseback riding and guided fly-fishing services, recently acquired this canopy zipline tour nestled in Provo Canyon. Your adventure starts with a Ranger UTV ride to the top of the course, followed by a series of five action-packed ziplines overlooking the Provo River. This is the perfect course for families or those who don’t want something physically demanding but still offers plenty of excitement. Zipline Utah: The Screaming Falcon is the longest continuous zipline over water in the world and the second longest in the lower 48. “This is not an easy ‘Disneyland’ experience where your guides do all the work; it’s an adventure zipline course,” said owner Jon Johnson. There are a few à la carte tour options ranging from 1 to 3 hours; my daughter and I had an exhaustingly fun time on Kingfisher, the second largest course with 7 ziplines and 2 aerial bridges. Our biggest thrill was adding on the Screaming Falcon at the end. Soaked in Deer Creek’s blue waters and beaming sunlight, we careened down that 3,900-foot zipline in an extended moment of sheer euphoria. As we were driving home, Hadley commented, “I thought we were just going to do a few ziplines and call it good. But that? That was something.” Rest assured, so is the rest of the Heber Valley. GoHeberValley.com 60

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FREE GOLF

Take advantage of the 2017 Summer Long Bounce Back! GOLF ONE ROUND OF 18 HOLES at Crater Springs Golf Course at the Homestead Resort, and your

NEXT ROUND IS FREE!*

*Must be accompanied by an additional paying golfer. Subject to availability.

Cool temperatures. Unbelievable scenery. GolfHeberValley.com


WE SWEAT THE SMALL STUFF. Because we know why you’re here. You’d rather spend time on the trail than deal with the details. With properties at Tuhaye, Westgate, The Chateaux, and other incredible places in the Park City Area, we have the the right options to make your perfect home happen. While you’re out living.

Chateaux Realty

Deer Valley • Park City • Canyons

Meet Sara Werbelow, Principal Broker and President, Park City Board of Realtors and Melissa Band, Associate Broker, ABR, RSPS, SRS. They bring impeccable expertise, service, and savvy to the table. Their process is so seamless, you can savor what you really come here to do. ChateauxRealtyParkCity.com | 435.940.3100


GUIDED ADVENTURE

There is no better way to try something new, different or even out of your comfort zone, than on a guided trip. Whether it’s a ½ day mountain biking, climbing, hiking, canyoneering excursion, or a multi-day family river or backpacking trip, going with a guide is the way to go. Let the professionals take care of the logistics, gear, packing, food prep and maps, so you can just enjoy the experience.


MOUNTAIN VISTA TOURING Located in beautiful Park City, UT, we are a boutique guiding Mountain Vista touring service. With over 400 miles of trails at our fingertips, we will put you on the right trail for your ability, ensuring a positive, successful experience. Stand Up Paddleboarding, Paddleboard Yoga, Hiking, Biking and Corporate Team Building are all experiences we'd love to share with you. Whether fast or slow, high or low, you deserve an adventure and we'll take you there! Contact us today! (435) 640-2979 www.parkcityhiking.com PARK CITY SUP Park City SUP demos, lessons, SUP fitness classes, sales and rentals. We have teamed up with Deer Valley Resort to bring you SUP in the heart of Park City at Pebble Beach. We also offer tours and lessons at Jordanelle State Park. (801) 558-9878 • parkcitysup.com ZION MOUNTAIN SCHOOL Private guided trips and customized courses. Rock Climbing - Canyoneering - Ice Climbing - Narrows Rentals Gear Shop - Guide & Instruct Beginners to Big Wall Ascents. (435) 633-1783 GuidesinZion.com

SLOT CANYONEERING TOURS GEAR • FOOTWEAR ESPRESSO

LOCAL: 435.826.4714 TOLL FREE: 1.800.U.EXPLOR

rimtours.com 435-259-5223

Daily Guided Rides in Moab SHERI GRIFFITH RIVER EXPEDITIONS - Moab Since 1971, Sheri Griffith River Expeditions has been the premier whitewater rafting outfitter in Moab. We offer "A Touch of Class" on all of our Colorado River, Green River and Yampa River trips. We offer a variety of specialty trips; Luxury, Family, Charter and Kosher expeditions. (800) 332-2439 GriffithExp.com RED CANYON LODGE Discover one of Utah's hidden treasures - Red Canyon Lodge in Flaming Gorge National Recreation Area. Cowboy up with daily summer horseback rides but don't miss the fishing & boating on our serene private lake. Afterwords, enjoy our award winning dining and rest easy in our handcrafted log cabins. (435) 889-3759 RedCanyonLodge.com

GUIDED ADVENTURE CANYONLANDS BY NIGHT AND DAY We are a multi-faceted tour company on the banks on the Colorado River. As a family owned company you'll feel the difference with the quality of service and friendly guides. Voted "Best Boat Tours" in Utah two consecutive years! Join us for our Dinner And Boat tour, the Sound and Light Show. Offering scenic trips around Moab, Hummer Tours, White Water Rafting, ATV and scenic air tours. (425) 259-5261 CanyonlandsByNight.com MOAB DESERT ADVENTURES Rock Climbing - Canyoneering Desert Towers Indian Creek. We are Moab's oldest, friendliest and most professional guide service for rock climbing. With AMGA training and over 100 years of experience. (804) 814-3872 MoabDesertAdventures.com MOAB CLIFFS AND CANYONS Choose from over 20 different slot canyons adventures, dry or wet, from half-day to multi-day. Climb the sandstone spires of the Castle Valley and Fishers Towers or learn desert climbing techniques in Indian Creek or Wall Street. (877) 641-5271 CliffsandCanyons.com

Trip Advisor Rating

www.escalantetours.com NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY

Bigmake Adventures lifetime memories! 800-624-6323 • www.BikeRaft.com

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DISCOVER UTAH KIDS is a semi-annual magazine to inspire and educate families on the “how, what and where” involved with getting your family active and healthy in the great outdoors. Utah is home to 5 National Parks, 8 National Monuments, 2 National Recreation Areas, 43 States Parks, 14 Ski/Snowboard Resorts and 7 National Forests. MAKING IT ONE OF THE WORLD’S IDEAL OUTDOOR RECREATION PLAYGROUNDS.

UTAH DISCOVER WINT ER 16/17

DISCOVER

UTAH SPRING /SUMM

ER 2017

CK RO RED wint er escape list cket the White Rim 2017 bu win a trip on

k ld sPEa deals C ocolATe cOu best local ski IF hot Ch tripin’ road Byway 12 Scenic

E. CATE . EXP LOR INSP IRE. EDU

E.COM AHMAGAZIN DISCOVERUT

OOL UTAH HIGH SCH G LEAGUE CYCLINsOnB ikes #MoreKid

rolyundup Trip fami rivt'ser best for your Wha

E. CATE . EXP LOR INSP IRE. EDU

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Follow us and tag us in your family adventures @DiscoverUtahKids

heRe aRe sOme higHligHts From the sumMer IssuE

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Available online at DiscoverUtahMagazine.com

ROAD TRIPPIN’ HWY 12 EXPLORING LOGAN CANYON

RIVER TRIP ROUND UP


DINING

CENTRO WOODFIRED PIZZERIA

HELL’S BACKBONE GRILL & FARM

PEACE TREE JUICE CAFE

Here at Centro Woodfired Pizzeria we are passionate about pizza. In fact, some would say we are obsessed and for that we say “thank you”. Our mission is to provide our customers (our friends) with casual and fun dining experience with exceptional customer service and homemade, fresh and creative food.

An organic-farm-to-table restaurant in Boulder Utah, serving regionally-based cuisine: a blend of Western Range, Pueblo Indian & Southwestern flavors. Our menu changes weekly to reflect seasonal availability. Featuring locally raised and natural meats, handmade breads, jams and preserves, pickles and hot sauce.

Peace Tree Juice Cafe is a restaurant in Moab with a sister one in Monticello, Utah. It is our goal to provide healthy, flavorful sustenance to our customers, natural, organic and farm to table when possible. We believe in the strength of our community, striving to offer top-quality food and products that are locally grown and made.

50 W Center Street Cedar City, UT 84720 435.867.8123 centropizzeria.com

N. 20 North Highway 12 Boulder, UT 84716 435.335.7464 hellsbackbonegrill.com

516 N. Main Street, Monticello 435.587.5803 20 S. Main Street, Moab 435.259.0101 PeaceTreeCafe.com

ROOSTERS BREWING COMPANY

BISTRO H

DEER VALLEY GROCERY-CAFÉ

Located in a 117 year-old building on Historic 25th Street, Roosters Brewing Company is a brewpub that serves delicious and fresh food in an upbeat, friendly and energetic gathering space. Roosters employees live the outdoor lifestyle. The food, brews and patio dining are unmatched and a “must enjoy” when you are in downtown Ogden or Layton.

A small and charming Patio Cafe located at the Cliffrose Lodge and Garden. Offering a dining scene with wonderful views of Zion National Park. Featuring hand crafted burgers, Havana Shrimp Tacos, Steak, Salmon, Pasta and more. Full liquor, wine, and beer menu featuring a variety of Specialty Cocktails.

Deer Valley Grocery~Café features outdoor deck dining and is open daily year-round, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., and until 8:30 p.m. from June 16 through Labor Day, September 4, 2017. Take-away items include gourmet grocery items, entrées and pizzas. Wine, beer and liquor are available.

253 Historic 25th Street Ogden, UT 84401 801.627.6171 roostersbrewingco.com

281 Zion Park Blvd Springdale, UT 84767 435.772.0276 cliffroselodge.com

1375 Deer Valley Drive Park City, UT 84060 435.615.2400 deervalley.com/ deervalleygrocerycafe


CA PT U RIN G T HE LAST LIG HT ...

AT B E AR L AK E The Stage is Set FOR

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NOT UNCHARTED. JUST UNSPOILED. Nestled amidst an array of state parks, national parks, and national monuments, Kanab and surrounding Kane County is a magical land filled with an innumerable combination of world-famous landmarks and stunning spaces that are still largely unexplored. And the best part? It’s spectacular any time of the year. Plan to make Kanab your basecamp for Southern Utah adventure at VisitSouthernUtah.com

DISTANCE from Kanab

DISTANCE from Kanab

Zion national park

40 miles (64 kM)

Salt lake city Airport

317 miles (510 km)

Bryce canyon nATIONAL PARK

77 miles (124 kM)

las vegas airport

209 miles (336 kM)

grand canyon north rim

78 miles (126 kM)

phoenix airport

350 miles (563 kM)

coral pink sand dunes

23 miles (37 km)

Grand staircase-escalante national monument Lake Powell/glen canyon rec area

5 miles (8 km) 73 miles (117 km)


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Five national parks One iconic American road trip VisitUtah.com

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Discover Utah Magazine  

Featuring our Must See A-List Photo Spreads of the Top Destinations for 2017, Mountain Biking, National Parks, Fly Fishing, Mountain Resorts...

Discover Utah Magazine  

Featuring our Must See A-List Photo Spreads of the Top Destinations for 2017, Mountain Biking, National Parks, Fly Fishing, Mountain Resorts...