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DISCOVER the

phoenix region JUNE - NOVEMBER 2012

inside:

LINCOLN KENNEDY LIFE AFTER THE NFL

raising HEALTHIER

KIDS The Harp Foundation

Living Well Into

Century Two phoenix HIKING

GUIDE

THE ART OF SUSTAINABLE

DESIGN

TM


Coordinated Care When it Matters Most Every cancer diagnosis comes with questions that need answers, treatments to consider, and uncertainty on how to navigate the healthcare system. Our Cancer Care Coordinators are ready to help you and your family — at no cost to you. These masters’ prepared registered nurses have advanced expertise in oncology. They are knowledgeable about cancer and the resources available to fight it. For example, the Cancer Care Coordinators can:

• Provide referrals to physicians, treatment services and support programs

• Help you understand your treatment plan

• Help you formulate questions to ask your physician

• Educate you on how to navigate today’s healthcare system

• Share strategies for being your own healthcare advocate

• Give ongoing support and guidance

For more information, call 480-323-1255 or email ccc@shc.org Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center

SCOTTSDALE HEALTHCARE shc.org/cancer


LIVING WELL INTO CENTURY TWO

The Harp Foundation celebrates Significant Women of Arizona’s Centennial

In This Issue

30

THE AESTHETICS OF SUSTAINABLE DESIGN

The benefits of sustainably designed interiors are plentiful.

42

GOING, GOING, GONE INDIE

DISCOVER the

phoenix region

TM

JUNE - NOVEMBER 2012

18

inside:

LINCOLN KENNEDY

Loose and natural-fibered clothing are back— time to borrow the boyfriend’s wardrobe! With oversized t-shirts, t-shirt dresses, and boyfriend shirts in style, we wonder why we haven’t thought about raiding his closet sooner.

LIFE AFTER THE NFL

raising HEALTHIER

KIDS

50 You can listen to the young reporters on kfnx 1100 am from 4-5 pm every second and fourth saturday of the month, and the 40th street group the first and third saturdays of the month, same channel, same time.

The Harp Foundation

Living Well Into

Century Two phoenix HIKING

GUIDE

THE ART OF SUSTAINABLE

DESIGN

magazineissue5.2.indd 1

On the cover:

What Does The Future Hold After The NFL page 38

4

June 2012 Discover The Phoenix Region

LIFESTYLE

08 Kicking ADHD Out Of The Picture

46 Aesthetics Of Sustainable Design

12 Raising Healthier Kids

50 The Young reporters

16 The Roots Of Character

52 Relocation Guide

EVENTS & ATTRACTIONS

BUSINESS

55 Attractions Map

22 Kicks For Kids Of All Ages

56 Scenic By Day

24 Your Best Advantage Is

6/14/12 7:59 AM

Photography by: Serafine Photography Location: Westwood High School, Mesa, AZ Location Scout: Steve Holden Retouching and Layout by:

Cover Spread:

HEALTH & WELLNESS

58 Events Calendar 62 Racing In Arizona

As Close As Your Pillow

26 Social Media, A Virtue Or A Responsibility

60 Hiking Guide

28 Executive Profile

FOOD & DINING

FASHION

42 Gourmet Food Trucks

18 Going, Going, Gone Indie


Purchase with Purpose.

By using your MidFirst Bank Pink VisaÂŽ Check Card* you will be helping win the fight against breast cancer by supporting the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center. 602-801-5000 midfirst.com/pink

Member FDIC

*MidFirst Bank will donate $0.05 per transaction to Scottsdale Healthcare, Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center when you use your Pink Card at least six times per month. Pink Card affiliate is subject to change. Pink Card is not available on eChecking accounts.

Pink_Card_Discover_the_Region_AZ.indd 1

4/17/12 9:55 AM

JOIN THE FUN! Luncheon, Cards & Other Games Monday, November 5, 2012 Troon Country Club

Golf

Monday, November 12, 2012 Gainey Ranch Golf Club

BeneďŹ ting the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center and the Cancer Care Coordinator Program For additional information, please call 480.882.4505 an activity of Scottsdale Healthcare Foundation www.shc.org/playing4time


FROM THE EDITOR IN CHIEF

Discover The Phoenix Region m a g a z i n e Jodie Wilson Editor in Chief/Publisher

Publication Layout/Design

Eboni Lacey Intern/Graphics Design

Marc Bigelow Director of Photography Assistant Photographer Ricardo Galvez

Nikki Causer

MAKE NEW FRIENDS, BUT KEEP THE OLD; O N E I S S I LV E R A N D T H E OT H E R G O L D . Discover the Phoenix Region is celebrating our second anniversary with the distribution of our fifth print magazine. Over the past four issues we have met some incredible Arizonians. We are sharing and celebrating their amazing accomplishments with you on page 7, “Shout Out.” In this issue, you will find a story about some of Discover the Phoenix Region’s new friends and legendary football players who call Arizona home. Discover the contributions they are making within our communities. “What does the future hold after the NFL” is on pages 38-41. The Harp Foundation chose our magazine to spotlight five amazing women trailblazers whose tireless work and love for Arizona has changed life as we know it today. These women were honored at The Harp Foundation’s event “Celebrating Significant Women of the Centennial” that was held at The State Capital on May 20th, 2012. You will find their story on pages 30-37. In January, we introduced our monthly digital magazine, “The Focus.” We publish articles from a number of experts who are leaders in their fields, on subjects such as health and wellness, fashion, coaching and family living. If you would like to receive our monthly digital magazine “The Focus,” go to: discovertheregion.com, click the subscribe button and get registered.

JodieWilson

Discover the Phoenix Region is growing with every issue, by keeping our friends and making new ones along the way. Thank you to everyone! To view any of our past issues on your smartphone scan the tag and click on the cover. Get the free mobile app at

Regional Sales Director

Editor in Chief

http:/ / gettag.mobi

Dr. Bret Wilson Health & Wellness Editor

Jeff Heisner Bottomline Media Coaching

Elizabeth Zulema Rodriguez Freelance Writer

Cathy Droz

Dr. Bret Wilson Bell West Chiropractic

Dick Kemp Freelance Writer

Dr. Nanette Bowles Life Quest Training

Cathy Burford Freelance Writer

Clarissa Burt Haleigh Hoffmanner Clarissa Burt International

Liane MacNeil DIRTT Environmental Solutions

Marketing & P.R. Two For The Road www.twofortheroadusa.com

Eve Georgiou Advisor/Consultant President, G & F Media print and digital communications Agri in Ohio, Discover the Dayton Region, Manufacturing in Ohio, Ohio Medical Review, Discover the Cincinnati Region Discover the NE Ohio Region

Jacqui Higgins-Dailey Freelance Writer Cynthia Richmond Dream Power

Steven Feaster Advisor/Consultant CEO, G & F Media print and digital communications Aerospace & Defense Discover the Phoenix Region Magazine Volume 3 Issue 1 For Advertising / Subscription inquiries; contact: info@discovertheregion.com or call Office: 623.249.4220 website: www.discovertheregion.org/shopping www.discovertheregion.org

Kail Poolier Student StarShine Academy Steve Gerhart Arizona Scenic Tours Marc Bigelow Freelance Writer

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Marc Bigelow, Jodie Porumb Wilson, Ricardo Galvez, , Damain Serafini of Serafini Photography, Michael Goodman of Charity Photos, & Lynne Ericksson of Lynne Ericksson Photography

SPECIAL THANKS

Contributions and Submissions Materials must be accompanied by a self- addressed stamped envelope for correspondence purposes. Any submissions become property of Discover the Phoenix Region Magazine and credits will be properly provided of a submission is utilized.

Eve Georgiou and Steven Feaster, Turf Paradise Horse Racing , Two for the Road, The Young Reporters, 40th Street Group, Sara O’Meara, Yvonne Fedderson, Former Football Players, Lincoln Kennedy, Glendale CVB, The Harp Foundation, Westwood High School Mesa, Az and Steve Holden, Bob Fishman, Arizona Highways, Sky Harbor International Airport, Dr. Peggy Marshall, Jodie Heisner Bottomline Media Coaching, Clarissa Burt and her incredible staff for our fashion section. Nancy McCutcheon, Virginia G Piper Cancer Treatment Center, Pat O’Daniel, Bruce St. James,

All Materials Copyright 2011 Discover the Region.com LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction in part or in full is strictly prohibited. Discover the Region.com LLC, assumes no responsibility for claims or content of advertisements.

I also want to thank all of our expert writers for the content they submit for the monthly digital magazine “The Focus”. To the staff, our friends and family thank you for your support.

6

June 2012 Discover The Phoenix Region


Feature Story June 2011 Get your Motor Running Michael works at Trask performance and built a bike for Paul Tracy Indy Car Racer, that was entered in Arizona 2012 Bike week and took 1st place.

SHOUT OUTS

M I C H A E L P O RU M B

K AT H RY N H E N N E M A N

R AC H E L I S S A N LOW E N S T E I N June 2010-May 2012 Internship with Discover the Phoenix Region magazine: Creative Director/Style Editor Other Internship: Intern to the Senior Market Director at Marie Claire Magazine in NYC Degrees: B.A. in French and B.S. in Business Marketing, both with honors from Barrett Honors College at ASU. “Interning at Discover the Region gave me valuable hands on experience in editorial fashion. I was able to take a leadership position while still being in a position to learn from our editor-inchief about publishing. From helping on photo shoots to establishing connections with top fashion leaders in the Phoenix area, Discover the Region helped me make those connections to get me where I am today in New York!”

ELIZABETH ZULEMA RO D R I G U E Z Model December 2010 Cover / Photo Spread June 2011 Currently studying Pre Med at U of A and is a contributing writer for this issue See her story Social Media: A virtue or a responsibility?

PA U L B L U E Executive Profile June 2011 Former Acting Director Economic Development The City of Phoenix Now appointed to Chief of Staff Mayor-Elect Greg Stanton at City of Phoenix.

N I C K KO E S T E R Model December 2010 Cover / Photo Spread June 2011 Signed with Ford Modeling Agency Nick has worked with MAC MakeUp, Thomas Pink Antigua who works with licensing NFL apparel, Phoenix Fashion Week, Arizona’s Finest Weddings, Reebok for their global brand conference for their 2013 line.

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Feature Stories June 2011 & December 2011 Art Exhibit “Diary” Thursday October 4th, 2012 Northern Trust Bank 5-7pm

7


K

icking

ADHD

out of the picture BY J E F F H E I S N E R

w w w. b o t t o m l i n e m e d i a c o a c h i n g . c o m

Joel Harpenau loves cruising his Scottsdale neighborhood on his bike alongside his Dad, John. The exercise is great, the views are nice, but not surprisingly the best part of the bike ride for the 8-year-old is a stop they make along the way. Before heading home the father and son pause to enjoy a Drumstick, the delicious ice cream cone dessert topped with chocolate and nuts. Along with playing soccer, this is one of Joel’s favorite things to do after school, however it is another after school activity making a big difference in Joel’s life. In many ways Joel is your typical 2nd grader, but his ADHD is anything but typical. Joel has boundless energy and according to John constantly needs to know why. He struggled to keep his focus in school. John has tried numerous ways of keeping it under control, but a summer camp that included an introduction to karate really seemed to help his son. “I don’t know what Sensei Poage has,” John said, “ but it works.” Joel is continuing his karate and is enrolled in ME, the Mental and Martial Enrichment program at the Peaceful Warrior Martial Arts and Healing Center. Richard Poage and Tiffany

Richards are co-owners of the Scottsdale dojo and started the program with the help of Scottsdale Psychologist Dr. Dan Short to help kids and families affected by ADD and ADHD. The programs’ goals are to develop mental focus and clarity, build self control, improve school performance, eliminate negative attention seeking behaviors and maintain healthy relationships with peers, family members and others. “He’s got a better focus and attention span,” John said of his son, “and he’s doing better in school.” John calls Joel’s progress remarkable. Richards said, “Parents are noticing it’s making a difference.” Harpenau is not the only parent who has noticed a difference since the ME program started. Juawana Gaddis’ son Sebastion has learned, “how to be a good

8

June 2012 Discover The Phoenix Region


“He’s an awesome kid,” Poage describes. “He’s got a ton of energy.” Sebastian spends 3 hours a day at Peaceful Warrior on weekdays, studying his homework and his karate. Sebastian enjoys the karate and the many lessons he has learned over the past year including, how to make friends.

Seeing the progress and hearing about it from the parents prompted Poage to dig deeper into ADD and ADHD. After researching how kids with the disorder are currently treated and medicated Poage recalled, “I genuinely got upset by the side-effects of the ADHD medicine.”

Juawana has entrusted Richard and Tiffany to the point where she asked their advice on whether it is ok for her son to play football or would it interfere with with the karate class and ME program.

The FDA has warned people about the side effects of many of the ADD and ADHD drugs. Most of the effects are minor, but include decreased appetite, sleep problems, stomachaches and headaches. There some cases of children developing a sudden tic and even rare cases the medication-related psychiatric problems.

Parents are not dropping their kids off at class and then picking them up an hour later in the ME program. They are as much a part of the program as their children. “We require the parents are involved and it’s required of parents to take it home,” Richards said. With a lengthy questionnaire for parents and their school teachers to fill out on their kids, Richards, Poage and Dr Short, tailor the class to each specific kid based on their needs. Dr Short said, “Each exercise has been crafted to increase the child’s capacity for concentration, impulse control, emotional

“Most parents understand the danger of drugs and do not want their child to become dependent on stimulant medication, yet they do not know what else to do. These children need more than symptom suppression,” Dr. Short said. “They need help with brain growth. Unfortunately, the drugs that are currently prescribed are not curative.” The ME program is still in its first session, but the results being seen are dramatic. Families like Joel’s say it’s helping make more positive family memories, like that neighborhood bike ride, possible.

discovertheregion.com 06/11

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self-regulation, and executive control with a greater awareness of long-term consequences.”

HEALTH & WELLNESS

loser how to be a good winner,” Gaddis said. “It’s taught him to focus.” The dojo is Sebastian’s home away from home.

9


A Guide to Valley Hospitals  East Valley

Scottsdale

Banner Heart Hospital 6750 E. Baywood Ave.  Mesa, Arizona 480-854-5000  bannerhealth.com/bannerheart 

*Arizona Regional  Medical Center  2050 W. Southern Ave.  Apache Junction, Arizona 480-237-3200 

Arizona Orthopedic Surgical Hospital  2905 W. Warner Rd.   Chandler, Arizona 480-603-9000 

myarmc.com 

azosh.com

Warner Park  Surgery Center 604 W. Warner Rd.  Bld. A Chandler, Arizona 480-899-2571

Banner Canyon Springs Surgery Center 2940 E. Banner Gateway Dr. Suite 100  Gilbert, Arizona 480-641-9292

warnerparksurgerycenter.com

bannerhealth.com

*Gilbert Hospital  5656 S. Power Rd. Gilbert, Arizona 480-984-2000

*Mercy Gilbert Medical Center  3555 S. Val Vista Dr. Gilbert, Arizona 480-728-8000 

Surgery Center of Gilbert 2450 E. Guadalupe Rd.  Suite 101 Gilbert, Arizona 480-588-7541 

mercygilbert.org

gilbert-sc.com 

*Arizona Regional  Medical Center  515 N. Mesa Dr.  Mesa, Arizona 480-898-3333 

Arizona Spine and  Joint Hospital 4620 E. Baseline Rd.  Mesa, Arizona 480-832-4770 

Banner Baywood Medical Center 6644 E. Baywood Ave.  Mesa, Arizona 480-321-2000 

myarmc.com 

azspineandjoint.com 

bannerhealth.com/baywood 

*Banner Desert  Medical Center  1400 S. Dobson Rd..  Mesa, Arizona 480-412-3000

Banner Desert  Surgery Center 1500 S. Dobson Rd.  Suite 101  Mesa, Arizona 480-412-3590

Cardon Children’s Medical Center 1400 S. Dobson Rd.  Mesa, Arizona 480-412-KIDS 

gilbertter.com

bannerhealth.com/desert 

HealthSouth  East Valley Rehabilition Hospital 5652 E. Baseline Rd.  Mesa, Arizona 480-567-0350 

aurorabehavioral.com/tempe 

chandlerregional.org

*Banner Gateway  Medical Center 1900 N. Higley Rd.   Gilbert, Arizona 480-543-2000 bannerhealth.com/gateway 

bannerhealth.com 

bannerhealth.com/ cardonchildresns

*Banner Ironwood Medical Center 37000 N. Gantzel Rd.  Queen Creek, Arizona 480-394-4000

*Mountain Vista  Medical Center 1301 S. Crismon Rd.  Mesa, Arizona 877-924-WELL 

bannerhealth.com/ironwood 

mvmedicalcenter.com  arizonaer.com

bannersoutheastvalley.com 

Aurora Behavoirlal  Healthcare-Tempe 6350 S. Maple Ave.  Tempe, Arizona 480-345-5400 

*Chandler Regional   Medical Center  475 S. Dobson Rd.  Chandler, Arizona 480-728-3000

 Photograph by Jim Christy Studio

Banner Behavioral  Health Hospital-  Scottsdale  7575 E Earll Dr.  Scottsdale, Arizona  800-254-HELP

Greenbaum Surgical  HealthSouth Scottsdale Speciality Hospital   Rehabilitation Hospital 9630 E. Shea Blvd.  3535 N. Scottsdale Rd.   Scotssdale, Arizona Scottsdale, Arizona 480-551-5400 480-822-4958  shc.org

healthsouthscottsdale.com

Mayo Clinic Hospital  5777 E. Mayo Blvd.  Scottsdale, Arizona  480-515-6296

Mayo Clinic  Outpatient Facility 13400 E. Shea Blvd. Scottsdale, Arizona 480-301-8000 mayoclinic.org  

bannerhealth.com 

Kindred Hospital Arizona Scottsdale 11250 N. 92nd St. Scotsdale, Arizona 480-391-4040

mayoclinic.org

khscottsdale.com

North Valley  Surigical Center  9522 E. San  Savlador Dr. Suite 100 Scottsdale, Arizona 480-767-2100 northvalleysc.com

Scottsdale  Healthcare Osborn Medical  Center  7400 E. Osborn Rd. Scottsdale, Arizona 480-882-4000 

*Scottsdale  Healthcare Shea  Medical Center  9003 E. Shea Blvd.   Scottsdale, Arizona 480-323-3000  shc.org

shc.org

Scottsdale Healthcare  Thompson Peak  Hospital  7400 E. Thompson Peak Pkwy   Scottsdale, Arizona 480-324-7000  sch.org

Physicans Surgery  *Tempe St. Luke’s Hospital Centers of Tempe 1500 S. Mill Ave. 1940 E. Southern Ave.  Tempe, Arizona Tempe, Arizona 877-351-WELL tempestlukehospital.com  480-820-7101  tempesc.com 

The Virginia G.  Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare 10460 N. 92nd St. Scottsdale, Arizona 480-323-1255  shc.org

arizonaer.com

* Indicates that the hospital offers emergency services 

Surgery Center  of Scottsdale 8962 E. Desert Cove Rd.  Scottsdale, Arizona 480-661-5232  scottsdale-sc.com  


Central Valley 

azdhs.gov/azsh

Banner Good  Samaritian  Medical CTR 1111 E. McDowell Phoenix, Arizona 602-839-2000

Biltmore Surgical Center 2222 E.Highland Ave.  Suite 100 Phoenix, Arizona 602-490-3661

bannerhealth.com/goodsam

biltmoresurgical.net

Hacienda Intermediate  Hacienda Skilled  Care Facility  Nursing Facility 1402 E. South Mountain Ave.  1402 E. South Mountain Ave. Phoenix, Arizona  Phoenix, Arizona 602-243-4231 602-243-4231 haciendahealthcare.org

haciendahealthcare.org

John C Lincoln  North Mountain  Hospital  250 E. Dunlap Ave. Phoenix, Arizona 602-943-2381 

*Banner Estrella Medical Center     9201 W. Thomas Dr. Phoenix, Arizona 623-327-4000 bannerhealth.com/estrella

Surigical Elite 10815 W. McDowell  Rd. Suite 101 Avondale, Arizona 623-433-0110

*Arrowhead Hospital 18701 N. 67th Ave.  Glendale, Arizona 623-561-1000 arrowheadhospital.com

Aurora Behavioral  Healthcare System llc  6015 W. Peoria Ave.  Glendale, Arizona  623-344-4400 aurorabehavioral.com/glendale

Banner Thurderbird Medical Center 5555 W. Thunderbird Rd. Glendale, Arizona 602-865-5555 bannerhealth.com/thunderbird

Banner Thunderbird Surgery Center  5555 W. Thunderbird Rd. Bld. B. Glendale, Arizona 602-865-5475

HealthSouth Valley of the Sun Rehab  Hospital 13460 N. 67th Ave. Glendale, Arizona 623-878-8800 

bannerhealth.com

healthvalleyofthesun.com

jcl.com

Kindred Hospital  Arizona-Phoenix  40 E. Indianola Ave.   Phoenix, Arizona 602-280-7000 

Los Ninos Hospital  2303 E. Thomas Rd. Phoenix, Arizona 602-954-7311

*Maricopa Integrated  Health System  2601 E. Roosevelt St. Phoenix, Arizona 602-344-5011

haciendahealthcare.org

khphoenix.com

mihs.org

Maryvale Hospital  5102 W. Campbell Ave.  Phoenix, Arizona 623-848-5000 

Metro Surgical Center  3131 W. Peoria Ave. Phoenix, Arizona 602-375-1083

maryvalehospital.com

phoenixmetrosc.com

*Paradise Valley Hospital  3929 E. Bell Rd. Phoenix, Arizona 602-923-5000  paradisevalleyhospital.com

Phoenix Children’s *Phoenix Baptist  Center for Pediatric  Hospital 2000 W. Bethany Home Rd.   Orthopedic Surgery 1641 E. Osborn Rd. Suite 6 Phoenix, Arizona Phoenix, Arizona 602-249-0212  phoenixbaptisthospital.com 602-241-0276 phoenixchildrens.com

*Phoenix Children’s Surgical Center 1920 E. Cambridge Ave.  Bld. E.   Phoenix, Arizona 602-604-9400

Phoenix Children’s  Hospital 1919 E. Thomas Rd. Phoenix, Arizona 602-546-1000 phoenixchildrens.com

Phoenix Indian  Medical Center 4212 N. 16th St. Phoenix, Arizona 602-263-1200

Phoenix VA  Healthcare Center 650 E. Indian School Rd. Phoenix, Arizona 800-554-7174

http://www.ihs.gov/

phoenix.va.gov

Union Hills Surgery Cancer Treatment Center  Centers of America  18301 N. 79th Ave Suite 150.  14200 W. Fillmore St. Glendale, Arizona Goodyear, Arizona 623-487-7500 623-207-3000 bannerhealth.com

Banner Boswell  Medical Center/ Sun City 10401 W. Thunderbird Rd.   Sun City, Arizona 623-977-7211 bannerhealth.com/boswell

St. Luke’s Behavioral Health Center 1800 E. Van Buren St. Phoenix, Arizona 602-251-8535

*St. Luke’s  Medical Center 1800 E. Van Buren Phoenix, Arizona 877-351-WELL

stjosephs-phx.org

stlukesmedicalcenter.com azer.com

stlukesbehavioralhealth.com

Surgicenter 1040 E. McDowell Rd.  Phoenix, Arizona 602-258-1521

Surgical Speciality  Hospital of America 6501 N. 19th Ave.   Phoenix, Arizona 602-795-6020

University Medical  Center Transplant Medical 926 E. McDowell Rd. Phoenix, Arizona 800-542-4779

sshaz.com

umcarizona.org

bannerhealth.com

wvhospital.com

Banner Estrella  Surgical Center  9301 W. Thomas Dr.  Phoenix, Arizona 623-388-5700 bannerhealth.com

khphoenixnw.com

phoenixchildrens.com

*St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center 350 W. Thomas Rd.   Phoenix, Arizona 602-406-3000

West Valley Hospital  13677 W. McDowell Rd.  Goodyear, Arizona 623-882-1500 

cancercenter.com/western-hospital.cfm

Kindred Hospital Surgery Center  Arizona-Phoenix  of Peoria  Northwest  13260 N. 94th Dr. Suite 301 13216 N. Plaza del Rio Blvd.  Peoria, Arizona Peoria, Arizona 602-933-2900 peoriasc.com 623-974-5463 

* Indicates that the hospital offers emergency services 

|

azhearthospital.com

 Arizona State Hospital 501 N. 24th St.  Phoenix, Arizona 602-244-1331

West Valley 

*John C Lincoln Deer Valley  Hospital  19829 N. 27th Ave. Phoenix, AZ 623-879-6100 jcl.com

*Arizona Heart Hospital   1930 E. Thomas Rd.   Phoenix, Arizona 602-532-1000

HEALTH & WELLNESS

A Guide to Valley Hospitals 

*Banner Del E Webb  Hospital/ Sun City West 14502 W. Meeker Blvd.  Sun City West, Arizona 623-214-4000 bannerhealht.com/webb

11


S

tate

of Motion raising healthier kids BY D R . B R E T W I L S O N w w w. d r b r e t w i l s o n . c o m

KIDS AND FITNESS

As a child I remember being in a constant state of motion. I walked to school, rode my bike, played sports and games. I do not remember thinking about it as exercise, but of course it was. Now forty plus years later, the world for our children has changed. There are more and more reasons that our kids (and ourselves) are more sedentary. Cities and towns are less accessible by foot, requiring vehicle transportation instead of human locomotion to get to school, work and recreational activities. The television with 100 + channels, computers, smart phones, tablets provide full multimedia stimulation and no need to move from the couch. Many schools no longer have gym class and physical education as part of the core curriculum. There has been a significant increase child obesity and associated diseases of diabetes, and increases the risk of other chronic conditions that will effect them as adults.

It takes effort and planning to

help our children pursue fitness and incorporate healthy habits into their lifestyle. The benefits will provide a healthy return on the investment.

12 22

June 2012 Discover The Phoenix Region Region June 2011 Discover The Phoenix


HEALTH & WELLNESS

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G E T U P A N D M OV E The human species is designed to move to stimulate mind and body. Encourage walking to the neighbors, school or the playground. Walk along for safety and your own good health. Play games with your children that provide opportunities to run, jump, throw, balance, bend and reach. If an organized sport is of interest, by all means try baseball, soccer, football. But consider gymnastics, dance, running, yoga or martial arts. Activities such as gardening, building a play house or taking a nature hike provide physical activity and develop the body mind connection. Find an activity that holds the child’s interest and matches their ability and fitness level. Expose them to a variety of activities to help them find their passion. The ultimate goal is to help them achieve fitness and an appreciation of an active lifestyle.


tive care and proper rehabilitation after injury is also important. Open and honest communication with your child about their recreational activities should build a better relationship between parent and child and between the child and his sport. Proper equipment, properly fitted can also make the activity safer. Helmets are important in contact sports, bike riding, and horseback riding. Reduce facial and dental injuries with a proper mouth guard. Eye protection can prevent scratches to the eye or worse. Proper rest allows for recovery and recovery is crucial to performance. Proper nutrition and hydration provides fuel the body needs to perform. The appropriate mental focus and desire to participate also helps prevent injury.

FITNESS AND FUN Help your child choose activities that are appropriate for their age and level of ability. Initiate activities with the idea of fun and stimulation. Try not to push your expectations on your child, allow them to find their own interests. Rely on the concept of interest, fitness, and physical skills, and apply these to sports or activities. Fitness and sustainable physical activity should be the goal. A balance of cardiovascular, strength, balance, flexibility and coordination will help performance and reduce injury risk. S A F E T Y, I N J U RY P R E V E N T I O N Proper coaching, instruction and practice are helpful in safety and injury prevention. You the parent should start and stay connected to the process. Then as interest and skills advance, then specific instruction and coaching can improve skills and provide additional training. Parents should be cautious of overtraining children a sport-specific manner from an early age, monopolizing their “free-time”, and pushing them to “suck it up” when they tell you that they’re hurting. Overuse injuries are all too common in young children. Seek professional advice and physician care to properly evaluate the child’s condition. Appropriate diagnosis and treatment is important for recovery and prevention of future injury. Pallia-

Concussions are an injury to the brain, a serious condition; most do not involve a loss of consciousness. Youth age 5-24 years old are among the high risk groups for concussion. Sports and recreational injuries are among the leading causes of mild traumatic brain injury. The good news is with early recognition and proper treatment the majority of traumatic brain injuries are limited and patients fully recover. It is important to recognize the signs and symptoms of possible concussion, suspend participation in sports and recreational activity until examination and release by health professionals. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has informational tools for parents, coaches, and athletes available at: http://www.cdc.gov/concussion/index.html or http://www.cdc.gov/concussion/pdf/parents_Eng.pdf. E M OT I O N A L , S O C I A L & AC A D E M I C B E N E F I T S Exercise reduces the risk of depression and ADD. Regular exercise improves mood and memory. Exercise has shown to improve critical thinking and problem solving. Physical fitness inspires discipline, self- confidence and motivation. Shared activities can improve relationships between parent and child. Social relationships naturally evolve around physical activities. Participating in team sports develop social, communication and leadership skills. Providing your child with the benefits of an active lifestyle equips them for a life time of better health. Encourage them to find physical and recreational activities they can enjoy as a child and appreciate as an adult. Family relationships can be strengthen form shared experiences and healthy habits. Get out and move together as a family, you will all be better for it.

14 22

June 2012 Discover The Phoenix Region Region June 2011 Discover The Phoenix


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R the

oots

of character BY D R . N A N E T T E B OW L E S

w w w. l i f e q u e s t t r a i n i n g . c o m

Have you ever experienced times when you felt like a bare tree…dried up and lifeless? Then, just when you think there’s no hope, a glimmer of possibility emerges like the tiny shoot of a new leaf breaking through the tips of its branches. Most of us experience seasons or cycles at different times in our lives. Recognizing that this is a natural part of the human experience can help us, especially when we go through times when we feel dormant, bare, and dried up. A seemingly lifeless tree will eventually show signs of life with beautiful fresh leaves if cared for properly during dormant cy-

S U P P O RT, WAT E R A N D E N C O U R A G E M E N T

cles. In our lives, during these times, it’s important that we also

As we are growing, we need extra support around us the way

continue to take care of ourselves; maybe do some “pruning”

a tree needs stakes in the ground to help provide stability. Dur-

and recharging to help us get through. It’s helpful to not over-

ing critical times of growth, trees need more water. Steady slow

react to these natural cycles, but recognize these times help

drips are most effective in seeping down to the deepest roots.

deepen the roots of our character.

Steady “drips” of encouragement seep down into our soul and help us stay strong in times of drought.

In many ways, there are parallels between our lives and trees. S U N A N D C O N S T R U C T I V E F E E D B AC K Along with water, sunlight is important to the growth of a tree. The balance of warmth and light is also critical…not too much and not too little. Life’s early years are filled with trial and error. Too much constructive feedback, in the way of criticism, can 16 22

June 2012 Discover The Phoenix Region Region June 2011 Discover The Phoenix


If two trees of the same kind are planted at the same time, the tree that is carefully pruned throughout its life will ultimately be the stronger and healthier tree that produces more fruit. Even during this process, there are times when the early fruit needs to be removed so the remaining fruit has room and resources to grow. Occasionally, some fruit needs to be sacrificed to save a limb from snapping and breaking or perhaps even destroying

HEALTH & WELLNESS

PRUNING AND CLEANING HOUSE

the entire tree. The process of “pruning” in our lives in not pleasant! It’s easy to get bogged down with too much stuff, too much to do, too

|

much dysfunction.......or even too much good stuff. Cleaning

17

house can include eliminating unhealthy habits, relationships, and stuff that stifles us, saps all our strength and/or can cause us to snap. This can be a painful process. Just assessing when to prune…where it’s most needed…and how to accomplish this effectively is half the battle. You will feel stronger and healthier when you’re done. F R U I T A N D G I V I N G B AC K Trees that bear fruit or blooms can take many years to start showing any signs of this natural process.

Impa-

tient planters may become discouraged at the length of time required to start reaping their harvest. Steady care of a tree can eventually lead to an abundance of fruit that will last a lifetime. We produce “fruit” when we give back to others. We can give back by sharing our time, wisdom, love, encouragement and resources. Steady self-care and giving to others can eventually lead to an abundance of wisdom and victory that helps multiply lead to a spirit that feels dry and brittle. At the same time, it is

our own fruit in due time.

difficult to really grow and learn without feedback. Constructive feedback will help us grow stronger, and help us weather

RO OT S A N D C H A R AC T E R

the storms of life.

Trees that receive a combination of sunlight, water, wind and support produce roots that continue to grow deeper and

WIND AND CHALLENGES

stronger. These, in turn, make the tree sturdier and better pre-

Trees and their roots actually become stronger with the force of

pared to handle times of heavy winds or drought. In the same

the wind. Tree’s roots reach down deeper, gripping and holding

way, balance in our lives is so critical.

on. A certain degree of steady, but light wind is most common; yet there are also times of strong winds. There are times of

A healthy combination of constructive feedback, encourage-

calm in our lives, but it’s the times of challenge that can cause

ment, pruning and even challenges, with support, help us grow

the most significant growth. Having a stabilizing support system,

stronger, and build a sturdy foundation for our Roots of Char-

during these times,can help us bend without breaking.

acter.


G

oing

going, gone indie P H OTO G R A P H Y B Y T E S S A B A RTO N

BY C L A R I S S A B U RT & HALEIGH HOFFMANNER w w w. c l a r i s s a b u r t . c o m

Caution, Arizona Valley citizens: The intense summer heat is almost here. In response, the fashion sense of Phoenix is going back to the 1970’s—keep your floral prints a little longer. Some fashion bloggers say that the return of the free spirited movement in fashion started Spring 2011 and has been in full force ever since. This season features flower power and high dosages of color blocking even more than previous trends have. With a modern eye, one can see that this trend is more than just the 1970’s hippie look; it is something I like to call the Indie fashion sense. Indie is a unique way of dressing created by independence from major fashion retailers. The Valley is made up of urban city hipsters who take what they see on the runway and make it their own through great finds and simple accessories. They are trendsetters. In fact, we all can be. The Indie look is seemingly effortless, making it easy for anyone to pull off, yet flawlessly put together. What better look to flaunt this summer in Arizona’s heat? There are no rules on how to dress Indie and in-style this summer, but we have some simple guideline categories to help you find what you are looking for.

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June 2012 Discover The Phoenix Region

C O M F Y , C A S U A L T - S H I RT S & S T O N E J E W E R LY Loose and natural-fibered clothing are back—time to borrow the boyfriend’s wardrobe! With oversized t-shirts, t-shirt dresses, and boyfriend shirts in style, we wonder why we haven’t thought about raiding his closet sooner. The trick this season is to add chunky stone jewelry to these flowy shirts so you can still flaunt the Indie vibe. Oversized shirts will allow your skin to breathe in the heat while that chunky jewelry keeps you looking fashionable. My favorite place to rock the stone jewelry is on the fingers. A small detail such as wearing three rings on each hand is a delicate addition to any outfit. Most people will not notice the rings at first but as soon as they do, they will acknowledge how expertly your outfit is put together. Stone jewelry represents the Indie fashion trend because the best pieces are found outside of


FASHION

| 19

malls and brand name stores. To find the most unique jewelry head to exchange clothing stores where you will find great deals on one of a kind pieces. With the inescapable 70’s color palette of orange, purple, and salmon at every clothing store, finding jewelry of bright turquoise color will make the best accessory. In addition, since stones tend to be bulky, a long chained stone necklace can beautifully weigh down an outfit if placed on a chain that dangles right below the chest. Just because oversized t-shirts are back in, it doesn’t mean they have to be boring. One signature Indie look is the fringed Tshirt. This is very easy to do yourself on an old T-shirt. Just make horizontal cuts into the bottom of the shirt. The goal is to have the style that isn’t “store bought” but independent. Adding triangle designs gives the effect of the color blocking, which is another runway trend featured for Summer 2012. Add any stone jewelry with this top to own the look of returning

back to nature This outfit will urge all your friends to take out their phones and Instagram about how down to earth you look and feel. HEAD WRAPS AND HAIR ACCESSORIES As every Indie girl knows, an outfit is not complete unless you have the perfect head wrap. Society has taken a much-needed time off from head wraps since the 1970’s but we are happy to say they are back. A head wrap is different than a headband because it is a long strip of cloth wound horizontally around the head, not a band placed vertically behind the ears. Head wraps tend to evoke either a love or hate reaction. How do they look so bohemian chic on some and so awful on others? Before buying your head wrap, think about the following factors.


Thick or Thin? The thick head wraps are bold and face framing, while thin head wraps are most similar to what the fun, loving hippies would wear. The difference is the dramatic look or the easy-going look. Head shape will play an important role in this decision as well. Bulky or Flat? The material and texture of the head wrap can either make it lie flat on your forehead or project outwards a little. Some different styles to try on are braided, double braid, rhinestones, scarf material, gems, or even elastic. Typically the head wrap that lays flatter to your face will hold hair in place and the bulkier ones require a little more maintenance. Forehead or Hairline? Where you place the head wrap will make all the difference. By placing it back an inch or two from your hairline, your ears and hair no longer stick out or look funny. Hairpins might be required to hold your head wrap in place here. If you are placing it around your forehead you do not want it to be too tight. If it is, your hair will create a muffin top! Look for fabric bow and knot bow head wraps that allow you to adjust them. This way, you will be sure that the head wrap fits your head just right. Plain or Pattern? Though we love patterns this season, (floral,

20

June 2012 Discover The Phoenix Region

lace, zigzag, stripes, embroidered, cheetah, blocked), your decision to use or lose them should depend on the way it works with your outfit. We love head wraps since they showcase your hair and highlight your face. They make a bold fashion statement since head wraps are most often related to the turbans of the Middle East and the altruistic movement of the 1970’s. Not everyone finds the look captivating, however when we are dealing with the Indie fashion sense, it doesn’t always have to be liked by others to be worn. Self- expression and individuality was what the 1970’s movement was all about. Instead of repeating it this summer, make it all our own. By making smart choices on what oversized t-shirts, stone jewelry, and head wraps to wear this summer you will find yourself going, going, gone Indie.


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K

icks for kids of all ages

BY J AC Q U I H I G G I N S - DA I L E Y

Building a community begins with its people- friends, neighbors, and families. The right combination can create symbiotic partnerships, and grow a strong base from the grassroots. That’s exactly what the four women of Discover the Phoenix Region Magazine and Two for the Road Marketing and PR have aimed to do with Kicks for Kids – expose how valuable small business is for the overall community, and how building local business and a strong community go hand in hand. Jodie Wilson, Nikki Causer, Cathy Droz and Cathy Burford, the foundation that form Discover the Phoenix Region, are women with drastically different backgrounds. Putting together their various expertise – from public relations, sales and marketing, and corporate knowledge – they have created an outlet for small business and local nonprofits, where strong business influence strong philanthropic ventures and piggyback each other to build and maintain a strong community. The Kicks for Kids event, to be held July 22 from 1-4pm at the Athletic Republic on Bell Road, will feature family-friendly activities and benefits the Arizona Youth Sports Foundation and Phoenix Former Players Chapter (Retired NFL players). The

22

June 2012 Discover The Phoenix Region

Foundation aims to provide an opportunity for young people to participate in healthy, safe, confidence-building activities – benefiting young people both on and off the field. Sports are more than just games. Jordan Causer, co-marketer for local business PowerCleatz and sponsor for the Kicks for Kids event, says sports are an important growth opportunity for kids. “What I have experienced with these kids over the years is that sports teach a child structure, discipline and ambition,” Causer say. “They are striving to achieve something – to achieve a goal. You are allowing a player to work as hard as that player can to achieve a goal – that’s life. It’s a fun athletic way to teach a child to succeed in life. Its ingrained in humans – we have to work together to grow and be happy. That’s what’s important.” PowerCleatz is an excellent example of how local business can harness the power of the collective and serve the community while gaining a strong foothold in the market. PowerCleatz is a product invented by Mark Hanna, a former National Football League (NFL) kicker, and was aimed to give kickers more power in their kick. Over the years, Hanna redesigned the product to appeal specifically for soccer players. Essentially, it’s a protective strap that fastens over the player’s cleat to give players an even surface and flat springboard to kick from, Causer says. “The shape of your soccer cleat is uneven. You can tie it tighter and it will change the shape of the cleat. Power Cleatz keep the same shape,” Causer says. “It gives soccer players more power in their kick and more control over the ball to put spin on or take spin off.” This innovative product has gone through myriad testing with soccer clubs throughout the world, but Causer, and his partner Zach Fuller, decided on a unique approach to market the product – take it local. Both designed and manufactured in Tempe, Causer and Fuller knew that PowerCleatz had the potential to make a positive impact within the local soccer community – and they figured they could benefit from this impact as well. Rather than going to the big stores with their product, Causer and Fuller market Hanna’s PowerCleatz through local soccer clubs. They cut out their margin. “By going through the clubs, we can give back to the soccer community and provide them a product they would already buy,” Fuller says. “Soccer teams and clubs are always struggling with fees and dues – and this program helps offset that a little.” Causer has been in the valley for over 10 years and said the


“We can help these clubs financially ,” Causer says. “We have a product that they need anyway. The kids win because they have access to the product – and the organizations can raise capitol and learn how this structure can work for them. And for us, we are building product awareness. Everyone involved benefits from it.” By getting involved with Kicks for Kids, Causer and Fuller are able to spread the word about their product, how they impact the community and build a successful business, and act as a model for other businesses. The overall impact is synergistic relationships that have ripple benefits throughout the com-

Ultimately, the health of any community can be gauged by the health of its business community, Fuller says. If small business and local non-profit organizations can team up, only positive outcomes result. “I think local business in any community is vital – that’s why we have organizations like the Chamber of Commerce, because you have to create employment,” Fuller says. “The health of the community is dictated by the employment. We are lucky in the valley – Forbes rated us as one of the top five in the country for employment growth over the next five years.”

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Causer and fuller want to keep the business fairly simple and they want to keep it local.

munity. By thinking of business as a community tool – small companies that may not have corporate dollars are able to team up with the local community and have a corporate effect. Another example of harmonious collaborations benefiting local non-profit organizations is the involvement of the Phoenix Former Players Chapter, who agreed to participate not only to help support the community event, but also to support Hanna as a former player. Some of the local retired players will be at the event shaking hands and signing autographs.

BUSINESS

southwest region of the US has a very prominent soccer community. They wanted to use the clubs and the teams that are already established and start distributing through those mediums. “We want to continue with our structure – what we call and advocate program,” Causer says. “The clubs we are involved with will be an advocate of our product. We want to continue to develop that program and reach out to more organizations outside of the Arizona community. We want to use this as a stepping stone to take this to California, Nevada and Texas to continue to give back to communities even outside of Arizona.

23


B your

est Advantage is as close as your pillou

BY C Y N T H I A R I C H M O N D w w w. d r e a m p ow e r. n e t

What do Paul McCartney, Billy Joel, Salvador Dali, Leonardo DiVinci, Albert Einstein, and Thomas Edison have in common? They all relied on their dreams to advance their careers. We may not remember all of our dreams, but we can learn to, and our nightly dreams can and do light the way toward living our best, most successful lives. We dream about what we are involved with on a daily basis; our beliefs, concerns and our relationships, as well as fantasies of past and future times. Do you remember the old adage, “Why don’t you sleep on it?” This good advice is often given when a big decision is needed. Our nocturnal dramas can give

construction site, Her boss was operating a large tractor, mov-

us the opportunity to gain perspective on a situation, or see

ing big batches of soil from a pit to a near-by pile. Suddenly

things from a different angle. In fact one of the reasons we

the tractor lurched backwards out of control and the dirt in the

dream is for stress management. Dreaming allows us to work

shovel portion was released right onto her boss’s head. Marcia

through things that are out of balance in our waking life.

woke up laughing. Later that day at the office, she remembered her dream when her boss came by and smiled to herself. The dream completely diffused her anxiety and she worked easily

Marcia had a boss who she felt was overly demanding. She was

and efficiently.

often judged harshly for little mistakes and grew so nervous around this superior that she made even more errors. One

Marshall was considering enlarging his Italian restaurant and ca-

night she had a dream that she was a contractor supervising a

tering company. He had a good-sized, loyal, local clientele and attracted visitors as well. There was a 45-minute wait most Friday and Saturday nights. Many of his regulars actually engaged

24 22

June 2012 Discover The Phoenix Region Region June 2011 Discover The Phoenix


over there with no down time, adding a take-out menu. He

ing for their tables. Additionally, the retail space next door had

also advertised a New Business Party, with a coupon for a free

become available to lease. However, Marshall wasn’t sure it was

serving of take-out spaghetti, no purchase necessary. His busi-

the right decision. Remodeling would be expensive, plus there

ness flourished. He realized that expanding the restaurant space

would be more rent to pay and the whole operation would

(open air beach stage) would change the cozy, friendly, atmos-

have to be shut down, even with the best plan and workers,

phere and ambiance that is a tangible asset to the restaurant.

for at least 3 weeks. That would be at least 3 weeks without

He chose to increase that feeling by offering free plates of br-

income. He believed that most of his customers would come

uschetta, at very little cost to him, family style on the bar tables

back after the remodel, but what if some experimented with

to make ordering cocktails and socializing even more appealing.

another Italian restaurant and preferred it? Marshall decided to

His dream took him in a different direction than the one he had

check in with his inner wisdom via his dreams. He wrote these

thought of and his decisions were a big success.

|

questions in his dream journal: Is it the right time to expand

BUSINESS

with other patrons over a cocktail or glass of wine while wait-

the restaurant? What will be the outcome if I do?” In his dream

Why not give it a try? If you don’t know specifically what to ask,

Marshall was at the beach, there was a stage set up and a sign

just state it this way: What is in my highest and best interest,

for a dance contest. There was a bar at one end of the stage

regarding my career/job/business at this time? What chang-

with a dozen or so bar stools. The bar tender was looking at

es should I make? Remind yourself to remember your dream,

his watch, the music sounded great and there were big prizes

knowing that it will easily come to mind when you wake. Then

advertised for the winners. But the dance floor was empty and

join the leagues of others who have benefited from this nightly

so was the bar except for Marshall. In his dream Marshall, took

gift of guidance.

out a black Sharpe pen and wrote “Free Beer” on a sign. People played on the beach running in and out of the water, but no

Cynthia Richmond is a Life Coach and author. Her books,

one came to the dance contest.

Dream Power, How To Use Your Night Dreams To Change Your Life, and The Dream Power Journal, A System For Organizing

Marshall decided not to expand the restaurant. Instead, he did

Your Dreams To Enhance Your Life are available on Amazon.

take the storefront next door, moving the catering company

com She can be reached at: Cynthia@DreamPower.net

25


S

ocial Media

A Virtue Or A Responsibility?

Facebook, blogs, and trending on Twitter. This influential video was made to target the social networking generation, students and young adults, to spread the word. It struck many people very deeply. However, a little research on Koney, Invisible Children Inc., and The Lord’s Resistance Army, Koney’s guerilla group, created some concerning questions. I came across many articles and statements skeptical on the validity of the documentary and what these donations are actually funding. One piece was written by Michael Kirkpatrick, an “Independent Global Citizen,” who has traveled to Uganda on various occasions in the past fourteen years.

BY E L I Z A B E T H Z U L E M A RO D R I G U E Z

Kirkpatrick says, “The region of northern Uganda has been free of LRA rebel activity for over five years, now.”

How much of what we see online can we really trust? It seems

If Uganda has been free of this activity for years, is this video

social networking generation has taken over our cyber lives.

outdated? Were the statements made in the video worded so

Politics, music, fashion, religion, and morals are discussed daily

we would believe this problem still hasn’t been solved? If my

on applications like Facebook, Tumblr, and Twitter. How much

peers were to do some research, they might see that donating

of what our peers say can we actually believe? This is an era of

ten dollars to a foundation fighting an outdated war wouldn’t

ever-increasing technology, from the continuous advancements

save Africa. They would learn there are other parts of the world

in medical expertise to establishing social connections around

in need, and other wars for peace to be fought and won. The

the world. With a couple of typed words and a click, one per-

empowerment, unsettling feeling, unity, and passion that this

son’s ideas and opinions are read by thousands. An idea trans-

video arose in us should not be erased just because this one or-

formed into a “trending topic” on Twitter spreads worldwide in

ganization was untrustworthy. It should be used towards helping

a matter of minutes. Is this simplicity a virtue or a responsibility?

the rest of Africa, the world, and ourselves.

In past generations, it took weeks for information and news to

As a young adult, student, and woman, I have learned to con-

spread. Now, it only takes hours. Invisible Children Inc. Foun-

stantly question what I am told. One question will lead to a

dation created a viral video informing the world of Ugandan

plethora of answers – and other questions. It only takes one

guerrilla group leader, Joseph Koney’s, unspeakable acts. The

moment for clarity. This generation has gotten so accustomed

video spread across the globe in just a couple of days. Viewers

to a world of simplicity that laziness has taken over not only our

were engulfed in a passion to stop a man from kidnapping chil-

bodies, but also our minds. When did we begin to believe every-

dren. All it took was a compelling thirty-minute video posted on

thing we hear instead of demanding truth? Past generations had time to wait for letters and news, time to establish authenticity. We lost patience and time, and with that, we lost authenticity.

26 22

June 2012 Discover The Phoenix Region Region June 2011 Discover The Phoenix


BUSINESS

We lost our depth in this superficial mindset; the ideas of romanticism, truth, curiosity, and respect have changed. When I say “we,” I am speaking about the youth of today – students and young adults. A dependency of any sort is a weakness, however considering our technological dependency a weakness would be an overstatement. We don’t want to picture today’s children with a blue screen constantly lighting up their faces, but maybe there

|

is a method to their madness. Social networking does not only

27

consist of false advertisement. Today’s youth have the world and all its substances literally at their fingertips. As quick as false information can spread, is as quick as it is corrected. Through the Internet, we find the courage to question what is fed to us, and all it takes is one eyebrow-raise to lead to a new clarifying discussion. What we must remember is word-of-mouth can be deceiving. Research what you read, and be above the hype. Reference www.blackstarnews.com/news/122/ARTICLE/6586/2010-06-02.html

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E

xecutive Profile LO R R A I N E P I N O

Some might say Lorraine Pino is the face of Glendale and the West Valley. Others might say she’s the region’s voice. Truth is she’s both. The manager of the Glendale Convention & Visitors Bureau, Pino is the West Valley’s biggest tourism cheerleader. During her decade-long tenure with the city of Glendale, Pino has championed for the city’s downtown business community as a major tourism draw; exposed sports fans coming to Glendale from around the world to the many shopping, dining and lifestyle amenities the region boasts; and has helped form the West Valley’s first convention and visitors bureau, bringing together the tourism power of 14 West Valley cities “It’s a dream come true and an amazing honor to share this city and region that I grew up in, raised my children in and plan to spend the rest of my days in with visitors from all over the world,” Pino says Born in Chicago, Pino moved to Glendale with her family in 1972. After raising a family and spending more than 15 years working with the Peoria Unified School District, she decided to turn her passion for her hometown into a career. She joined the Glendale Visitor Center in 2000 as a tourism coordinator. In July 2010, she took on the role of CVB manager, launching the Glendale CVB. Now boasting more than 100 members from throughout the West Valley, including sporting venues, attractions, hotels and more, the Glendale CVB is the only CVB serving the West Valley cities of the metropolitan Phoenix area. Most recently, Pino was appointed to Arizona’s Tourism Advisory Council. “When I walked through those doors of the Glendale Visitor Center the first time, the space was still under construction,” Pino recalls. “It is exciting to see what it has become now. To think that back then it was only the beginning. And while I’m excited to see how far we’ve come, I’m even more excited about how far we are going to go.” Pino has seen tremendous growth in Glendale and the West Valley during her tenure. What was once a sprawling bedroom community with a unique historic downtown has grown into a sports and entertainment Mecca that is gearing up to host its second Super Bowl in 2015. The shops and one-of-a-kind boutiques that first put Glendale on the destination map are still there, but now visitors can also take in an NFL or college football championship game. There’s also the NHL Coyotes who play hockey at the award-winning Jobing.com Arena and Spring Training baseball at the Dodgers and White Sox home away from home—Camelback Ranch. Move beyond Glendale, and visitors discover even more Spring Training ballparks, plus the thrill of NASCAR at Phoenix International Raceway, challenging golf courses, outdoor recreation, shopping, unique dining and more. Pino and her staff, which includes 10 volunteers, are often the starting point for visitors who have travelled to the West Valley. They have greeted more than 125,000 visitors from all states and nearly 50 countries. Those who stop in at the Glendale Visitor Center are welcomed to an astounding amount of information—from hundreds of brochures and helpful maps to full-color travel guides and a quick-stop Internet station to make sure everything is at a visitor’s fingertips. While it’s the resources that might first bring people to the Glendale CVB, it’s usually the warm hospitality and top-notch customer service delivered by Pino and her staff that makes them come back. And it’s making sure visitors want to keep coming to the region that is at the core of all Pino does. “We provide one-on-one customer service, and not just because it sounds good to make that your policy,” Pino says. “We help visitors one at a time because we don’t want to just meet their expectations, we want to exceed them.”

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June 2012 Discover The Phoenix Region Region June 2011 Discover The Phoenix

Where to Find Lorraine: Glendale Visitor Center Home of the Glendale CVB 5800 W. Glenn Drive, Suite 140 Glendale, Arizona 85301 Just Ask Lorraine Pino also answers visitor questions online, through the Glendale CVB’s official website www.visitglendale.com. Simply click on ‘contact us’ to get to the ‘Just Ask Lorraine’ link and send your travel question in. If Pino doesn’t know the answer, she makes it her mission to find someone who does. Find the Glendale CVB online at: www.visitglendale.com Twitter-@GlendaleCVB Facebook-GlendaleCVB YouTube-YouTube.com/MyGlendale11

______________________________________

“Lorraine is a dedicated, passionate, and caring person – a true professional.” “As a leader in the community, Lorraine is always willing to promote our events; more importantly Lorraine is a great advocate for the entire West Valley.” Jim Foss Senior Vice President & General Manager Jobing.com Arena

“Lorraine Pino understands the importance of connecting with diverse communities. She is a staunch ally of the LGBT community and we are lucky to call her friend.” Angela Hughey ONE Community

“I have worked with Lorraine for many years and I have always appreciated her dedication and commitment to the Arizona tourism industry. Through her efforts, Lorraine has accomplished incredible things for the city of Glendale regarding tourism activities and events. Lorraine is a valued member of the Governor’s Tourism Advisory Council and understands the importance of attracting visitors not only to Glendale, but to the state of Arizona.” Sherry Henry Arizona Office of Tourism


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ivingintoWell Century Two B Y LY N N E E R I C K S S O N & D I C K K E M P

P R E S E N TS F I V E S I G N I F I C A N T WO M E N O F T H E C E N T E N N I A L

The Honorable Sandra Day O’Connor

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June 2012 Discover The Phoenix Region

Governor Rose Mof ford

Maxine Lakin

Stevie Eller

Patti Simmons


LIVING WELL INTO CENTURY TWO

LET’S GO DO IT! Arizona has come so far in its first century, it seems almost impossible to match that progress for the next 100 years. Who will leave the legacies? Who will match the milestones? This issue honors five significant women of our first century, all still vibrant and productive, all ideal civic models. One of them, Rose Mofford, says “It’s the people who made this state what it is.” Another three, Stevie Eller, Patty Simmons and Maxine Lakin by themselves and teaming with their husbands have made tremendous civic contributions.

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The fifth, Sandra Day O’Connor, once offered some timeless advise. When chaos arose in a hallway from too many lawyers offering advise on a new court procedure, Sandra pointed to a meeting room and firmly said: “Let’s go do it!”

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Simply put, that’s how Arizona leaders have met the challenges of building a state that is the envy of many. They issued a challenge to others and themselves:

“Let’s Go Do It.” Not Bad Advice For Our Second Century. THE HONORABLE

S A N D R A D AY O ’ C O N N O R F O R M E R S U P R E M E C O U RT J U S T I C E THE SPIRIT OF CIVIC RESPONSIBILIT Y

Federal Court Judge Robert Broomfield tells the story with relish: “It was 1977. I was presiding judge of the Superior Court. We were asked to recommend a new way to set court calendars as a national model. The day we requested recommendations from Arizona lawyers, far more showed than expected. “Sandra was one of four judges involved. As we debated on input procedure, and order was turning to chaos, she stood up, pointed to a meeting room and said: “Let’s go do it.” With just those firm four words, calm prevailed. A major court change was created that is still in effect.” Sandra was raised on an Arizona ranch. With no schools nearby, she lived with her grandmother in El Paso, TX to complete grades 1 through 12. Summers were spent on her parent’s ranch, where many valuable life lessons were learned, she says. At Stanford University she graduated third in her class. There she met John J. O’Connor III. They were married on the Day ranch. After he served in the military overseas, they moved to Phoenix. She joined a small law firm, and he joined a larger Phoenix law firm, which later included his name. She took a break to raise their three sons, and during that time joined the Republican party and the Junior League, which she served as president. Sandra was appointed to the Arizona Senate in 1969, then elected to two terms. She became the senate’s first female Majority Leader, later serving as a judge on Arizona’s Superior Court and Court of Appeals. In 1981 she was nominated and approved as the first female member of the U.S. Supreme Court. After serving there for 24 years, being the swing vote on many important cases, she retired to live in Phoenix. Her many local, state and national honors include the Presidential Medal of Freedom, highest civilian award.


On May 20th, 2012, The Harp Foundation presented awards to The Honorable Sandra Day O’Connor, Governor Rose Mofford, Stevie Eller, Maxine Lakin, and Patty Simmons. Each woman has made a significant contribution to the growth and well-being of Arizona and the nation. They truly represent the Mind, Body, and Spirit of Arizona during our 2012 Centennial. The Arizona Centennial’s Vision was “to appreciate our state’s rich past, celebrate the present and together create a vibrant and self-sustainable future. Our honorees have lived collectively in Arizona for over 400 years! Their hearts, their energy, their spirit and their visions resonate throughout our valley and state. They represent the best of Arizona’s “can do” attitude of the past century, reminding us that we have a foundation to “live well into Century Two.”

At the state capitol for Celebrating Significant Women of the Centennial, Stevie Eller, Judge Broomfield, Joyce Buekers (left to right)

Arizona Capitol Museum

Connecting people to Arizona Government Past and Present Discover how Arizona became a state in the building where it actually happened! 1700 W. Washington Phoenix, AZ 86007

602-926-3620 www.azlibrary.gov/museum Free Admission Open Monday - Friday Exhibits: 9:00 am - 4:00 pm Visit our Museum Store: 9:30 am - 4:00 pm

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June 2012 Discover The Phoenix Region Region June 2011 Discover The Phoenix


F O R M E R A R I ZO N A G OV E R N O R & S E C R E TA R Y O F S TAT E

P U B L I C S E R V I C E F R O M T H E H E A RT

Though she can claim a number of “firsts” in 51 years of service to Arizona, former Gov. Rose Mofford is most proud of “never discriminating in race, color or creed.” Close behind is pride in her charity work—“helping those who couldn’t help themselves.” After succeeding impeached Gov. Evan Mecham, her first move was to write 30,000 state employees, asking for cooperation “No one can do anything alone,” she says. These and other actions—like answering her own phone and mail-- earned her a title: “The healing governor.” During her rise to first female governor, Rose Mofford served in Arizona’s Revenue and Treasury departments. She was the first female Secretary of State, serving four terms. During those years, Rose says she is “proud to have worked with 12 of the state’s 17 governors.”

In Phoenix she earned additional All-America honors on the Cantaloupe Queens softball team, and was later inducted into Arizona’s Softball Hall of Fame. Several ball fields and sports complexes carry her name. Other honors include being named one of America’s Best Loved Women, and Outstanding Woman of the Year by Valley Leadership. In addition to considerable charity work, three other achievements she is proud to be part of: 1 - Collecting 48 tons of food for Mother Theresa’s Arizona visit. 2 - The Pope’s visit to Phoenix 3 - Bringing more Cactus League teams to Arizona Is there any goal she wanted but didn’t achieve? “Yes,” she responds with the always present twinkle in the eye, “I always wanted to be good in music and ice skating. Neither worked out.”

MAXINE L AKIN P H O E N I X M O U N TA I N P R E S E R VAT I O N A R I ZO N A T R A I L S

Maxine Lakin’s life can be defined in many ways--wife, mother of four daughters and major backer of the Phoenix Mountain Preserve system, are only several. While serving on at least 11 major Valley boards and councils, many as president, she is best known and highly regarded as a behind- the- scenes motivator. Most of her activities involve environmental stewardship. When asked what prompted such an interest, she pauses: “It’s probably because as an only child growing up in California, I spent lots of time with my parents in the state’s most beautiful parks.” She is quicker in naming her first major Valley “green “involvement: “It was Save Camelback Mountain. Barry Goldwater led the fight to buy property on its upper slopes. “I was on the Phoenix Union school board at the time (serving as first female board president). We helped rally students to preserve Camelback, and received pennies, nickels and dimes from all over the state.” Maxine earned a business degree from the University of Arizona (whose School of Agriculture later bestowed a Lifetime Award for environmental stewardship activities}. After graduation, she taught school five years in Florence, AZ. Reflecting on husband Chuck’s farming-ranching vocation and community involvement, Maxine belongs to the Arizona AgriBusiness Council, Arizona Farm Bureau and American Quarter Horse Assn. Recently, in their Central Phoenix home, reminiscing on her decades of service, Chuck pointed to his wife’s Pioneer of Open Space trophy from the Arizona Parks & Recreation Assn. Asked which of Maxine’s awards he is most proud, Chuck said: “Probably the Woman of the Year, from the Phoenix Ad Club.” Noting that Chuck himself has a long record of serving or heading agricultural and civic groups, Maxine was asked the secret to a very busy life while raising four children: “You could say it was giving each other room to grow and follow each other’s interests, while gathering the family most nights for a home cooked dinner.”

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She was born Rose Perica in Globe, Az., and became the first female Globe H.S. class president. Being valedictorian demonstrated her academic prowess. Though selected an AllAmerican softball player, it was her basketball skills that earned a professional offer from the All American Red Heads, “which I turned down on advise of my father.”

LIVING WELL INTO CENTURY TWO

ROSE MOFFORD

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Fandango Arizona Celebrating 100 Years of Statehood February 14, 2012 is described “as a night that is designed for the history books.� The Harp Foundation was highlighted at the VIP reception and set a beautiful tone for the evening.

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June 2012 Discover The Phoenix Region Region June 2011 Discover The Phoenix


P AT T Y S I M M O N S COMMUNITY LEADER H E A RT O F P H I L A N T H R O P Y

Patty Simmons, with Stevie Eller, co-chaired the Arizona Centennial’s capital campaign and Feb. 12 celebration, The Arizona Fandango. She was recently asked: “How do you motivate others to emulate the social responsibility that brought Arizona to its amazing 100th birthday”? “It’s not difficult to sell others on something you believe in, and act on,” she answered. She and husband Jim have lived that corporate partnership and social responsibility philosophy for decades. A member of a prominent Phoenix business family, Patty fondly recalls an early community outreach effort…“selling WW II savings bonds with Rose Mofford.”

“You could say my first lesson in helping others was as a member of the Girl Scouts,” she smiles. Reflecting on her life, Patty says three of her proudest moments are:

• When Barry Goldwater ran for president in 1964, and put Arizona “on the map.” • When John Rhodes and Barry Goldwater told President Nixon to resign. • When Sandra Day O’Connor was nominated and confirmed as a Supreme Court Justice in 1981. As a native Phoenician, in addition to her “giving back” philosophy, Patty has a special love for Arizona. She hopes future generations will too. She says: “We must preserve our beautiful state, and the magic is the part of the continent—from the pristine Sonoran desert to the Mongollon Rim, and beyond.”

STEVIE ELLER A R I ZO N A H I S TO RY M A K E R E N T R E P R E N E U R & H U M A N I TA R I A N

Stevie Eller’s philosophy mirrors a guideline from husband Karl’s book: INTERGRITY IS ALL YOU’VE GOT. Under a subtitle, The Joy of Giving, it is: “When you give time and money to a cause beyond yourself, when you make it one of your priorities, you simply live a more fulfilling life.” Even a quick look at Stevie Eller’s activities proves she lives that philosophy. Her interests range from A to Z—Arizona Heart Association to Zoo Auxiliary. Those activities show breadth as well…from home-base Phoenix to the Kennedy Center to the University of Arizona. The Eller’s continued UA support is evident in funding of and scholarships donated to the Eller College of Management and the School of Dance, “now rated in competition above Julliard,” says Stevie proudly. Her interest in dance stems from lessons in Paxton, IL, where she was born and raised. “I liked everything except ballet,” she smiles. Her many recognitions for University of Arizona support includes the Outstanding Service to Higher Education Award by the Board of Regents. Stevie also is active on her alma mater’s Foundation Board. Stevie’s time and talent contributions include these boards or trustees: Barrows Neurological Institute, Herberger Theater, and Achievement Awards for College Scientists, American Cancer Society, Multiple Sclerosis, Phoenix Human Relations Council, Children’s Science Museum, Harrington Arthritis Research Center, Hon Kachina Awards and the Phoenix Art Museum At Gov. Jan Brewer’s request, she co-chaired the Arizona Centennial’s capital campaign including raising funds for a new Arizona capitol museum. While the Eller’s have the means to contribute generously, Stevie and Karl agree: “…even the poorest person can acquire real wealth—the power of helping others.”

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Through the years she has served on many boards, several as president. These include the Junior League, which she says opened her eyes to community needs; the Barrow Neurological Institute and the Board of Visitors—oldest Valley charitable organization, founded to serve the health needs of children and the elderly.

LIVING WELL INTO CENTURY TWO

LET’S GO DO IT!

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A B O U T T H E H A R P F O U N D AT I O N ?

before

after

Development, Sales, Leasing & Management of Commercial Real Estate 1450 E. Indian School Road, Suite 104 Phoenix, AZ 85014

(602) 280-1010 Visit www.mpbrealty.net for more information

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June 2012 Discover The Phoenix Region

The Harp Foundation is among the first of its kind in the United States to offer live therapeutic harp music to enhance and support the quality of life for people of all ages in need of comfort and support. At The Harp Foundation, services are provided by a team of committed and caring harpists, staff and volunteers. The Harp Foundation evolved through the collaboration of healthcare, senior services and religious provider. Our Harp to Heart Program brings live harp music to the bedside of terminally ill patients and their families. When we cannot be there in person, our CDs are available. In addition, the soft mellow strings of the harp provide a beautiful background during Celebration of Life Services. Additional programs, include the Angel Song Program which offer live harp music to children and individuals in hospital settings. The music helps children transition from a place of fear to one of comfort and peace. Harps in the Schools enriches the academic world for students.


The mission of The Harp Foundation is to promote individual and community wellness by providing unique instrumental harp music in therapeutic settings to enable and accelerate healing; to build alliances with other organizations providing healing, and to create links among healthcare and educational providers. The Harp Foundation provides live harp music in hospitals: research with neonatal babies; in hospice settings, and on an individual basis. Therapeutic harpists teach instrumental harp to children in at-risk schools;

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as well as to train harpists in providing therapeutic harp music”.

LIVING WELL INTO CENTURY TWO

VISION FOR THE FUTURE

37 The Harp Foundation is providing Century Two Initiatives in healthcare, education and the arts while promoting models for Corporate Partnerships with Social Responsibility!

“Let’s Go Do It!”

A R I Z O N A C E L E B R AT E S L I F E Expectant mothers have three choices when deciding what to do with their baby’s umbilical cord blood: privately bank it, donate it, or throw it away. This is made possible by a new company in Gilbert called The Celebration Stem Cell Centre, Arizona’s first public and private cord blood bank. Stem cells are currently being investigated to treat several conditions such as: leukemia, cancers, brain injury, spinal cord injury, cerebral palsy and heart disease to name just a few. The FDA has recently approved the first umbilical cord blood product for use in stem cell transplantation procedures in patients with disorders affecting the hematopoietic (blood forming) system of the body. For several years, mothers have had the option to choose private banking, also known as “family banking”. These stem cells are a perfect genetic match for your child and significantly increases the likelihood of having a match for a sibling. The Celebration Stem Cell Centre is unique because the cord blood is processed according to the higher quality standards of a public donation bank. The Celebration Stem Cell Centre also offers a free donation option. The donated stem cells are available to medical community around the world for patient therapy or research. If the family decides to donate the baby’s cord blood, then they no longer have exclusive rights to the cord blood, but it might still be available to the donor if they need it. The preserved stem cells may remain viable for over twenty years. Donations are especially needed from ethnic communities such as: African American, American Indian, Asian, Latino and mixed ethnicities. The Celebration Stem Cell Centre has joined a worldwide initiative to increase donations to help make cell therapy possible to people from all ethnicities. Mothers can call 480-722-9963 or enroll online at www.CelebrationStemCellCenter.com to donate or privately bank their baby’s cord blood. EVERY LIFE IS PRECIOUS! PRIVATELY BANK OR DONATE YOUR BABY’S CORD BLOOD, JUST DON’T THROW IT AWAY. 480.722.9963 • Toll-Free: 877.522.2355 • Info@CelebrationStemCellCentre.Com • 3495 South Mercy Road, Gilbert, Az 85297


W

A F T E R YO U TA K E O F F YO U R C L E AT S … A N D T H E S P OT L I G H T I S T U R N E D O F F,

hat does the future hold after the NFL B Y C AT H Y B U R F O R D

Lincoln Kennedy is an NFL former player whose life after the gridiron is as full as his NFL years were. As a young man whose first love was music, the arts, and theater, he didn’t grow up dreaming of achieving glory on the football field. In fact, his entrance into a football career happened much like a ‘Forrest Gump’ moment; he was literally plucked from marching band practice by his high school’s football coach in his sophomore year. It didn’t take much convincing to see the advantage of letting football pave the way for a free college education. At the tender age of 16 ½ he had the credits to graduate from high school and head out into the adult world. And oh, the places he went…He played football for the University of Washington, making the All-American team twice; took 3 trips to the Rose Bowl while earning his bachelor’s degree in arts with a minor in communications. He was drafted in the first round (8th pick) in 1993 to the Atlanta Falcons (93-95), was traded to the Oakland Raiders in 96, and played 7 seasons with them, retiring in 2004. During his time with the Raiders he reached football’s pinnacle, when he played in Super Bowl XXXVII.

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LINCOLN KENNEDY


FEATURE STORY

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Photography by: CharityPhoto.us

Make no mistake, Lincoln Kennedy is a mountain of a man. Shake hands with him and your hand will disappear. Perfectly suited to his role on the offensive line, he readily admits that “with a helmet on I am a different person.” In other words, this affable man with such an easy smile is not the man you would have met on the football field as an opponent. On the field he had a job to do, and that job was to protect his teammates. Of all the lessons learned in his football career, he stated that this ‘team’ aspect is the most important. Without it, it is nearly impossible to be a success in business, charity work, mentoring, or even family life. Lincoln chose Arizona as his home 6 years ago, citing the affordability, good schools, parks, family-friendly atmosphere, and cosmopolitan feel with great amenities. He and his wife determined after several trips here that it would be a great place to raise their young family. The fact that Arizona is teeming with over 300 former players is also a perk. Lincoln set himself up financially to walk away from the game, but he’s hardly been sitting around! He is the busy owner/CEO of a Farmers Insurance Agency, he has two shows on foxsportsradio.com that he co-hosts; Saturdays at 6-10am Arizona time, and Sundays at 4-7pm. Throw in five sons, three teens and two active little boys, aged 5 and 3. His many speaking engagements with local


high schools, his work with the Boys and Girls Club of the East Valley and the Red Cross, and his responsibilities as President of the Former Players Association, Phoenix Chapter, and you have one jam-packed life. It is a life that was made possible by hard work, planning, and being fortunate to have retired healthy after a 12-year NFL career. Not all the Former Players have been able to walk away from football without life-changing injuries, or a well-planned roadmap for the post-NFL years. The Former Players Association, Phoenix Chapter serves a myriad of functions for its members. With 42 currently active members, and hundreds of dues-paying members, the association helps ‘fill the gaps’ between the NFL and retirement. Some of the Phoenix members retired decades ago, when the NFL stressed community involvement, but didn’t take an active role in preparing young players for life after the game. That has all changed now, with the NFL acting more like a parent to the young rookies, attempting to impart to them the skills, both financial and personal, that will be needed when the big paychecks and the limelight comes to an end. It can be a very difficult transition back to the world the rest of us live in, but the NFL and Former Players work hard to support each other after the game, just as they did on the field. According to Lincoln Kennedy, that guy with the unforgettable name, the most gratifying aspect of being a former player is being able to touch people in a way that he wouldn’t have been able to without the NFL. In that role he is able to get kid’s attention, and pass along the lessons he has learned. The message is powerful in its simplicity; never stop learning, be versatile, absorb life’s lessons, trust in your teammates, look within yourself, then follow your heart to find happiness in what you do. To contact the Former Players Association: jtaylor2727@yahoo.com

Dan Manucci is a household name here in Arizona, as a product of McClintock HS, and his daily radio show on azsportstalk.com, KDUS 1060 from3-6 pm. You may have even met him at one of the many local events he emcee’s around the valley. What you may not know is his coaching & mentoring efforts over the past 25+ years; training quarterbacks from grade 5 through college. With special interest in those all-important years from 5th to 8th grades, Dan enjoys his role as a former NFL player who can help young people learn the value of hard training, teamwork, and even sacrificing to attain your personal goals. While very few will make it to the pro level, Dan feels that football, as in no other sport, will prepare these young people to be successful in life. Doing the job that you have trained for is critical to the success of your team, and your life. And getting back up after you’ve been knocked down repeatedly is perDAN MANUCCI haps the most important life lesson of all. QB Kansas State Buffalo Bills

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CB San Jose State • AZ Cardinals Kansas City Chiefs

Robert Tate has a message for the youth of Arizona, ‘you can do anything if you work hard’. A ten year veteran of the NFL, Robert works diligently to help young people stay focused, stay in school, and overcome their struggles to succeed. Robert had his share of challenges to overcome, growing up in a rough neighborhood, losing his dad at a young age, and being diagnosed with dyslexia. His foundation; roberttatenow.org , helps youths aged 12-18 with free classes, camps, outings, and mentoring. Supported entirely by donations, his foundation is funded by numerous local businesses and individuals, providing scholarships for students with learning disabilities, and for higher education. To help prepare his program kids for success in the future, they must meet qualifications by having a 3.5 GPA or having a learning disability. His book ‘Former NFL Veteran Robert Tate Reveals how he made it from R O B E RT TAT E Little League to the NFL’ tells his inspirational account WR/CB • University of Cincinnati of overcoming obstacles, and it can be purchased on Minnesota Vikings • Baltimore Ravens his website. Arizona Cardinals

J. D. Hill is a man who radiates pure joy. The energy level is transformed when he walks into the Phoenix Dream Center, affecting all he encounters with the power of his faith, and his ability to change lives in a very profound way. According to JD, the thrill of his football days can’t come close to the fulfillment from his work with Catch the Vision, the organization he founded 25 years ago to help young people make ‘right choices’, and lead them toward productive lives. J.D. is a man who knows what it is like to have achieved incredible fame, only to almost lose it all, when he sank into the abyss of substance abuse. Now through his work with Catch the Vision, he is helping countless others become productive and dignified participants in the community. Along with Catch the Vision’s strategic partners, they are helping people to ‘get up one more time than you fall down’, and give them a second chance for a J.D. HILL successful life. To volunteer, donate, or learn more, visit W R ASU • Buffalo Bills www.jdhill.org Detroit Lions

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Photography by: CharityPhoto.us

Jay Taylor is another former NFL player whose name should be familiar here in the valley. As a former Cardinal, since retirement he has kept busy doing color commentary on ESPN3 and on Channel 12 for the past seven years in ‘Jay’s Corner’. Jay is also the secretary of the Arizona Chapter of the Former Players Association. In that role, he is responsible for putting out the ‘all calls’ when there is a need for assistance from one of the player’s charities, or from a third party. All are ready to answer the call, whether it is to visit a children’s burn center, assist with football camps for kids, participate in a charity golf tournament, or speak to high school students. Jay says “the piece of being part of professional sports that never leaves you is that you are only there because of the fans- the fans help you and you need to help them, to impart something that makes a difference in a young fan’s life”. J A Y TA Y L O R

Sydney Justin has his roots in both music and sports. When his NFL days were behind him due to a neck injury, his post-NFL career took him on a musical journey. He was a member of Shalamar, and later replaced Smokey Robinson after Smokey retired from The Miracles. Still a member of that famed group, you can check Sydney and his band-mates out at www.themiraclesmusic. com. Sydney has continued singing, songwriting, and producing in the music industry, but also enjoys his time helping the Former Players Association by mentoring high school athletes, participating in charity competitions between local High School faculty and the retired players, and visiting young patients in local hospitals to lift their spirits. In addition, he coaches football and golf. Inspired to action by the film ‘Waiting on Superman’, he is launching his latest charitable venture in partnership with his wife Mari, named Building SYDNEY JUSTIN Kids for Tomorrow. This non-profit will provide 2 yearly DB Long Beach State • LA Rams scholarships for Arizona students to attend either colBaltimore Colts lege or trade schools.

FEATURE STORY

Steve Holden is a tireless volunteer in youth sports in the Valley of the Sun. He has coached both football and track, and has helped guide kids toward college in his 13 years of volunteering with the Mesa School District and the YMCA. As the treasurer and events coordinator for the Phoenix Former Players Association, he recruits members for athletic camps, golf tournaments, and coaching/mentoring opportunities in the Phoenix area. Annually he organizes the Friday Night Lights 2-day football camp in conjunction with the YMCA. The message for these kids is to give your all in sports, but to remember that sports is only a short window in their lives and to be prepared for their future after sports. As a multi-sport athlete (baseball, track and football) who grew up in Watts with a single mother, he has proven that hard work, along with your God-given talent, can take you to the top. He inspires our youth to STEVE HOLDEN set goals, get their education, and prepare themselves WR ASU • Cleveland Browns for a successful life. Cincinnati Bengals

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C

hefs

around the nation

are using trucks to bring high-end food to the masses at drive-through prices.

In Arizona, Festivals, Street fairs, and Outdoor markets abound with cotton candy, greasy fries, foot long hotdogs, all of which can give you heartburn with just the smell swirling in the air. Food trucks or Roach coaches have lined the streets for decades for all to indulge in their tasteful treats while enjoying the sights for the day. These days, with Americans wanting healthier choices these rolling gourmet kitchens are upping the quality of food at fast food prices. This epicurean truck mania is crossing into the mainstream, and here are some options to tickle your taste buds while you are enjoying local festivities.

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Web Address

Aji Mobile Foods

Latin American

www.ajimobilefoods.com

All Star Catering

Lobster on a Roll, New England Clam Chowder, Fish & Chips

allstarcatering21.weebly.com

AZ Barbeque

Full Barbeque Menu

www.azbarbeque.com

Café Con Leche

Cuban Cuisine

www.cafeconleche.com

Cosmo’s Kettle Corn

Kettle Corn

www.cosmoskettlecorn.com

Desert Snow Shaved Ice

Shaved Ice

www.desertsnowshavedice.com

Devilicious

Lobster Grilled Cheese & Shrimp Po’Boy

www.deviliciousfoodtruck.com

East Meets West

Southern Italian Style Sandwiches

www.eastmeetswestps.com

Epic Hot Dogs

20 Varieties of Hot Dogs

www.epichotdogs.com

Jamburritos

Jambalaya Wrapped in a Burrito

www.jamburritos.com

Luncha Libre

Arizona Inspired Food

www.lunchalibreaz.com

Mamma Toledo’s

4 oz. Desert Bites

www.mammatoledo.com

MisterSoftee

Sundaes, Shakes, Cones

www.mistersoftee.com

Pizza People

Specialty Pizzas

www.pizzapeopleaz.com

Shine Coffee

Coffee Drinks

www.shinecoffee.com

Sky’s Gourmet Tacos

Gourmet Tacos

www.skygourmettacos.com

SuperFarm

Build Your Burgers, Sandwiches, & Omelets

www.superstitionfarm.com

Taste Rite

Multicultural Inspired Cuisine

www.ritewaycatering.com

T-Licious

Mexican Infused With Classical French Cuisine

www.t-licious.com

Tom’s Bbq Pig Rig

Bbq Pork, Chicken, Beef Brisket, Ribs

www.tomspigrig.com

Udder Delights

Ice Cream

www.superstitionfarmtours.com

Sweet Republic

Artisan Ice Cream

www.sweetrepublic.com

Sunshine and Spice

Asian Taco Fusion

sunshineandspice.com

Taco Chicks

Gourmet Tacos

www.carteblanchegourmet.com

|

Type of Cuisine

FOOD AND DINING

Food Truck

43


A R I Z ON A  B R E WP U BS AND MICROBREWERIES

Information provided by Arizona Brewpubs and Microbreweries references 

18

FLAGSTAFF

PRESCOTT

17

9

16

11

12

13

14

15

10 19 20 21

22

23 TUCSON

Get the free mobile app at

http:/ / gettag.mobi

For more locations visit: beer100.com

24

Tweet your favorite brew and location to our Executive Editor at @JodieWilson #favoriteAZbrew


P H OE N I X

1. Black Mountain Brewing  - Brewpub  6245 East Cave Creek Road Cave Creek, AZ 85331  Phone 800.228.9742

8. Rock Bottom Brewery  - Brewpub  14205 South 50th Street Phoenix, AZ 85044 Phone 480.598.1300 www.rockbottom.com

C H ANDLER

3. Copper Canyon Brewing &  Alehouse - Brewpub  5945 West Ray Road Chandler, AZ 85226 Phone 602.705.9700 www.coppercanyongrill.com

F L AGS TAFF 4. Beaver Street Brewery  - Brewpub  11 S. Beaver St. Flagstaff, AZ 86001  Phone 520.779.0079  www.beaverstreetbrewery.com 5. Flagstaff Brewing  - Brewpub  16 E. Route 66 Flagstaff, AZ 86001 Phone 520.773.1442 www.flagbrew.com 6. Mogollon Brewing  Company - Microbrewery  15 N. Agassiz Flagstaff, AZ 86001 Phone 520.773.8950  www.mogollonbrewing.com

G L E NDALE 7. Rock Bottom - Brewpub  7640 West Bell Road Glendale, AZ 85308 Ph 623.878.7343 www.rockbottom.com

9. Sonora Brewhouse - Brewpub 322 E. Camelback Road Phoenix, AZ 85012  Ph 602.279.8909 www.sonorabrewhouse.com

P R E S COT T 10. Prescott Brewing Company  - Brewpub  130 W. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ Phone 520.771.2795

N O RT H  S COT TS DA L E 11. Rock Bottom - Brewpub  8668 East Shea Boulevard North Scottsdale, AZ 85260 Ph. 602-998-7777 www.rockbottom.com

S COT TS DA L E 12. Four Peaks - Brewpub  15730 North Pima Rd. Scottsdale, AZ 85260 Phone 480.991-1795 www.fourpeaks.com

17. Unlikely Cowboy Restaurant  Brewery - Brewpub  20751 North Pima #100 Scottsdale, AZ 85255 Ph 480.502.5557 www.unlikelycowboybrewery.com 18. Uptown Brewery No. 2  - Brewpub  6910 E. Shea Blvd. Scottsdale, AZ Phone 602.905.5200  www.uptownbrewery.com

TEMPE 19. Four Peaks Brewing Company  - Microbrewery  1340 E. Eighth St. Tempe, AZ Phone 602.303.9967 www.fourpeaks.com 20. Gordon Biersch Brewing  Company - Brewpub  420 South Mill Tempe, AZ Phone 602.736.0033  www.gordonbiersch.com  21. Rio Salado Brewing  - Microbrewery  1520 West Mineral Rd. Tempe, AZ 85283  Phone 602.755.1590

13. Oggi's Pizza and Brewing  8763 East Bell Road #101 Scottsdale, AZ 85260  Phone 480.699.7604

T U C S ON

14. Papago Brewing -  7107 East McDowell Road Scottsdale, AZ 85257 Ph 480.425.7439 www.papagobrewing.com

22. Gentle Ben's - Brewpub  865 E. University Blvd. Tucson, AZ 85719 Phone 520.624.4177 www.gentlebens.com

15. Pinnacle Peak Brewery  - Brewpub  10426 E. Jomax Road Scottsdale, AZ Phone 480.563.5133 www.pppatio.com 

23. Nimbus Brewing  - Microbrewery  3850 East 44th Street #138 Tucson, AZ 85713  Phone 520.745.9175 24. Thunder Canyon Brewery  - Brewpub  7401 N. LaCholla Blvd. Tucson, AZ Phone 520.797.2652

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2. BJ's Pizza, Grill, and  Brewery - Brewpub  3155 West Chandler Boulevard Chandler, AZ 85226 Ph 480.917.0631 www.bjsbrewhouse.com

16. Rock Bottom - Brewpub  21001 North Tatum Boulevard Scottsdale, AZ 85050 Ph 480.513.9125 www.rockbottom.com

FOOD AND DINING

C AV E CREEK

45


A the

esthetics

of sustainable design BY L I A N E M AC N E I L

The benefits of sustainably designed interiors are plentiful, and not just for the potential tax benefits, future flexibility, or peace of mind for those embracing an environmentally-conscious outlook. Building sustainably is a cost-effective solution that delivers the aesthetics and performance needed in a space, along with infinite design possibility. Conventionally built commercial interiors—those made with drywall—are a key culprit behind construction waste in landfills. This is thanks to a continuous cycle of build, renovate and demolish. For each square foot of drywall created on a build, roughly one pound of waste ends up in a landfill. Sustainability can be achieved with an agile interior solution, and it’s one that will help drastically reduce the amount of material wasted while offering a visually pleasing, high performance result. Agility is made possible through the use of modular wall systems, plug and play power and data, custom millwork and more, with added sustainability contributed by renewable energy sources. Modular elements are pre-manufactured pieces that join together in different configurations to form a complete space. Think of modular elements as Lego for construction –

46

June 2012 Discover The Phoenix Region


LIFESTYLE

| 47

“MANY MODULAr WALLS OFFEr ACCESSIBLE INNEr CAVITIES THAT ALLOW FOr TECHNOLOGY INTEGrATION AND IN-WALL PLUG AND PLAY POWEr, DATA, AND PLUMBING. FLAT SCREEN TELEVISIONS, TABLET DOCKING STATIONS AND USB PORTALS CAN BE INTEGRATED WITHIN THE WALL, KEEPING TECHNOLOGY SECURE WHILE REMAINING ACCESSIBLE WHENEVER NEEDED.”


small parts are used in different configurations to create a larger whole. Modular walls can intersect with any older base building, so heritage can be preserved. Existing buildings can be renovated in the future without changing expensive infrastructure, and because all modular elements are prefabricated in a controlled manufacturing environment, consistent quality and a faster move-in schedule is ensured. The more custom design and performance needed in an interior, the more a sustainable agile solution becomes evident as the smartest choice. For example, a modular provider should manufacture elements (such as walls) parametrically specifically for the space being designed, in both the material and the finish desired. Any aesthetic imagined can be built, whether the design is created with a traditional wood feel or more a streamlined minimalist look featuring plenty of clean lines and glass. Plus, modular interior manufacturers implementing true green practices will use UV-cured, non-toxic, water-based finishes 48

June 2012 Discover The Phoenix Region


an exciting and vibrant look at a fraction of the cost of a tradi-

help to maintain air quality.

tional hydroponic system.

Design and manufacturing software is behind the design free-

Arizona’s City of Chandler City Hall received accolades for the

dom available from a modular interior. DIRTT Environmental

sustainable practices applied during its recent building design

Solutions, for example, is a leading North American manufac-

and construction. A portion of the complex used a modular

turer of agile interiors and it uses ICE® software for an intel-

wall solution to accommodate future change. Officials anticipate

ligent 3D design experience. ICE gives architects and designers

the building will earn LEED gold-level certification.

LIFESTYLE

that are easier on the environment than traditional finishes, and

the ability to create custom wall solutions for any space, on a Java platform. The software creates an interactive 3D environ-

LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Green

ment that lets users experience the layout and look of a new

Building Rating System® is an internationally recognized certifi-

space as they would in real life. Advanced technologies allow

cation system that rates the design, construction and operation

|

modification to the architectural elements during the design

of green buildings. Points are awarded for sustainable practices

49

stage in 3D (such as structure, colors, shapes and sizes) while

within several categories, including in the areas of energy ef-

simultaneously keeping track of updated pricing and parts lists

ficiency, materials selection, sustainable site development and

and finally generating manufacturing data. Programs such as this

more. Though LEED currently focuses on both the act of re-

are what make parametric engineering possible. Visual commu-

cycling and on using recycled material, it’s important to first

nication saves resources, time and money while promoting sus-

reduce and reuse materials rather than creating more stuff with

tainability throughout the design process by drastically reducing

recycled materials.

re-work and allowing all parts and pieces to be cut exactly to size, so materials don’t have to be cut on site.

Cost of sustainable solutions may sometimes be higher than conventional methods initially, but the investment pays off quickly.

Many modular walls offer accessible inner cavities that allow

Labor will almost always cost less on a modular build, and the

for technology integration and in-wall plug-and-play power, data

move-in generally happens much faster, meaning more savings.

and plumbing. Flat screen televisions, tablet docking stations

Modular pre-fabricated elements arrive on site when required

and USB portals can be integrated within the wall, keeping tech-

and already manufactured to the size and shape needed to fit

nology secure while remaining accessible whenever needed.

design. In conventional construction, raw materials brought to

This integration gives a streamlined look and lets businesses stay

site have to be stored until installation and then cut by skilled

on top of their technology needs, with little to no disruption to

labor to the proper size, leaving pounds of waste for the landfill.

the rest of the structure when something needs to be changed

The ready-to-go nature of a modular solution means a faster

or upgraded. Other agile design elements such as modular living

move-in with less labor, consistent quality, a tidier construction

walls can give vertical plant life to virtually any space, providing

site with less material waste and lower dumping fees. Sustainably building practices don’t mean compromising on aesthetics, function or cost. When built as an agile space with modular elements, the interiors easily integrate with new and existing buildings, act as a rapid approach to construction, are created custom for each project and ensure consistent quality. The result is a beautiful, highly functional and flexible interior. All Photos are owned by DIRTT Enviromental Solutions 836 East University Dr Phoenix, Az 85034 www.dirtt.net


Y the

oung reporters BY K A I L P O O L E R

S T U D E N T S TA R S H I N E A C A D E M Y

V I C E P R E S I D E N T O F S T. J O H N S S T U D E N T C O U N C I L R A D I O H O S T F O R “ T H E YO U N G R E P O RT E R S ”

The Young Reporters – not only a program to give kids a voice, but it’s a life-changing experience; an experience like no other. The Young Reporters is a radio show, which began as an unbelievable situation. It started as a program to make kid’s voices heard, but turned into something much, much more than that. Something alive, growing, and beautiful. Everything started in a classroom at the StarShine Academy. A man named Bob Fishman, who the kids had never met, never heard of, and didn’t know to trust or not, came in and changed their lives. By following a precise, step-by-step, yet extremely interactive program, Mr. Fishman transformed kids who had no speaking experience, a lot of whom had stuttering issues, into radio personalities, avid conversationalists, and role models. When I was speaking with Dana Bell, an active member of The Young Reporters, she had told me some very deep, personal things that Bob has not only helped her overcome, but he’s helped her form herself into the person she wants to be. “Bob Fishman is an amazing man. Before I took this class, I was too shy to even order food at a restaurant. But now; now I have the world at my fingertips.” In return, I asked her what some of the things he’s done for her,

50 22

June 2012 Discover The Phoenix Region Region June 2011 Discover The Phoenix

YOU CAN LISTEN TO THE YOUNG REPORTERS ON KFNX 1100 AM FROM 4-5 PM EVERY SECOND AND FOURTH SATURDAY OF THE MONTH, AND THE 40TH STREET GROUP THE FIRST AND THIRD SATURDAYS OF THE MONTH, SAME CHANNEL, SAME TIME. other than relieving her of her shyness. “Many different things,” She told me. “Being an aspiring actress and model, Bob saw that as not only a great career choice for me, but he’s done much more than encourage. He got it set up for me to air on Cox Network in an interview; he’s given me the opportunity to be part of an acting agency, and a lot more.” I asked Makayla O’Bannon , another part of the team, as well as the youngest member ever (5th Grade), about her experience


LIFESTYLE

As a long-time member of The Young Reporters (you didn’t see that coming; did you?), I feel that Mr. Fishman, who gave us the honor of letting us call him Bob, has done very much for not just me, but for us as a team. Without Mr. Fishman, and the help he gave us, I wouldn’t have written this paper, and I you, whoever you may be, wouldn’t be reading it.

The Young Reporters is affiliated with StarShine Academy, the school that all of the Young Reporters learn at and enjoy going to. I personally believe, however, that StarShine wouldn’t be the same without Communications class. It makes it unique, and it gives me a reason to really look forward to my weekly Wednesday class. The Young Reporters is also affiliated with The 40th Street Group, which is the radio show for Mr. Fishman and Cathy Droz, the two people who founded the show and made everything happen for us.

in The Young Reporters. More in specifically about what made her want to join. “A teacher at our school, Mr. Klunk, made me want to join. He told me what they were doing, and the way that he put it, I just couldn’t resist giving it a shot. I tried it, and I’ve never looked back.” When I asked her how Communications has helped her, she came responded to me with this: “I’ve always wanted to be in sports reporting, ever since I was a little girl. I’m an extreme fan of baseball, and I know that this class is bringing me closer to that dream every day.” The last question I asked her was how she felt about her relationship with Mr. Fishman. She gave me an answer that really touched my heart. “I feel— I know that Mr. Fishman and I are great friends. He’s always supported me and had my back, no matter where I go or what I do. And I know for a fact that he always will.”

This program is something indescribable, something that can never be replaced perfectly. Mr. Fishman and Cathy Droz have made something beautiful, and they’ve created not just a radio show, not just a Communications class; they created a family. FOR MORE INFORMATION REGARDING THIS PROGRAM PLEASE CALL BOB FISHMAN AT (480) 570-8233.

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Mr. Fishman has supported me in everything I’ve done. He’s a great man, with amazing intentions, and a voice that we, as a team, couldn’t have gotten this far without.

51


R

elocation

THE

52 22

GUIDE

TO

Guide

A

June 2012 Discover The Phoenix Region Region June 2011 Discover The Phoenix

HASSLE

FREE

MOVE


• • • • • •

• • • • •

• • • • •

• Secure

telephone director y and a city map. Arrange for ser vices at new home (utilities, newspaper, mail). Transfer auto titles, plates and drivers license. • Check school schedules and student enrollment requirements. • No tif y the post of f ice that you are moving. An online Change of Address form is available on the United States Postal Ser vice Web site. • Prepare a list of friends, relatives, business f irms and o thers who should be no tif ied of your move.

|

Get estimates from several moving or truck rental companies. Inquire about the amount of insurance coverage the moving company provides. Plan your travel itinerar y and make lodging reser vations in advance. Obtain records from doctors (including dental x-rays, eyeglass prescriptions and vaccinations). Request children’s school records and pet records. Pay existing bills and close out local charge accounts. Transfer insurance policies or arrange new ones. Ask for professional referrals (doctor, insur ance, and accountant). Decide what will be moved, sold, given away. Have a garage sale. Cancel newspaper and utilities ser vices. Gi ve change of address no tice to post of f ice, charge accounts, magazine subscriptions, relatives, friends, organizations, church, catalo gs, past employer (for W-2 form). Make arrangements for transpor ting plants and pets. Pack special or irreplaceable items yourself and label. Draw up a f loor plan of where furniture should be placed in new residence. Se r vice car before trip. Have cash on hand for emergencies.

FOR YOUR NEW LOCATION

LIFESTYLE

BEFORE YOU LEAVE

SETTING UP NEW ACCOUNTS N AT U R A L G A S

• • • • •

Southwest Gas Arizona Public Service Salt River Project Black Mountain Gas (Cave Creek/Carefree) Mesa City

602.861.1999 602.371.7171 602.236.8888 480.488.3402 480.644.2221

TELEPHONE

Qwest

602.490.2355

WA T E R

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

American Water Avondale Buckeye Carefree Cave Creek Chandler El Mirage Fountain Hills Glendale Goodyear Litchf ield Park Mesa Peoria Phoenix Scottsdale Sun City West Surprise & Youngtown Tempe Tolleson Wickenburg

888.300.3569 623.478.3230 623.349.6800 480.488.9100 602.358.4211 480.782.2280 877.671.0348 480.837.3411 623.930.3190 623.932.3015 623.932.3015 480.644.2221 623.773.7160 602.262.6251 480.312.2461 623.974.2521 888.300.3569 480.350.8361 623.936.7111 928.684.2761

53


PERSONAL ACCOUNTS

ELEC TRICITY

Pharmacy

Supplier for electric is based on the city you are moving to.

Dry Cleaner

• APS

Lawn Service

Arizona Public Service 602.371.7171 Services Avondale, Buckeye, Carefree/Cave Creek, Chandler, Gilbert, Goodyear, Litchfield Park, Peoria, Sun City West, Tempe, Glendale, Paradise Valley, Phoenix, Scottsdale and Sun City.

• SRP

Bank/Finance Companies Credit Card Companies Laundry Service

Salt River Project 602.236.8888

Auto Finance Company

• Mesa

electric is supplied by the City of Mesa 480.644.2221

The Arizona Department of Environmental Quality maintains a recycle hot line. To f ind out why recycling is important, what can be recycled and where, also pick up conservation tips. Call 480.782.3430. CABLE

• Cable America 480.461.0715 • Cable Plus 602.956.7040 • Cox Communications 602.277.1000 • Sun Lakes Cable 480.895.8084 • Wander Cable 800.626.0297 OT H E R N U M B E R S

• Poison Control 602.253.3334 or 1.800.362.0101 • Crime Stop Phoenix Police Department 602.262.6151

• Suicide Prevention Center Hotline 480.784.1500 • Arizona Highway Patrol 602.223.2000

MOVING CHECKLIST

R E C YC L I N G

Health Club

PUBLICATIONS Newspapers Magazines Newsletters Professional Journals

PERSONAL SERVICES Doctor(s) Dentist Accountant Lawyer BROKER INSURANCE AGENCY

GOVERNMENT OFFICES

VOT E R R E G I S T R AT I O N

Department of Motor Vehicles

You must be at least 18 years of age or older, a citizen of the United States and a resident of Arizona. To vote in local and national elections, you must register 29 days prior to the election.

Social Security Administration

Registration can be done at a number of locations:

Veterans Administration

• The • • • • •

Maricopa County Department of elections 602.506.1511 League of Women Voters 602.997.5218 Political Party Off ices All City Clerk off ices Drivers License (MVD) Special mail in forms at all locations above and can also be found at any Post Off ice and some local Libraries.

State/Federal Tax Bureaus City/County Tax Assessor

UTILITIES Electric Gas Water Telephone Sewer District Trash Cable/Satellite Fuel (Oil/Propane)

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June 2012 Discover The Phoenix Region Region June 2011 Discover The Phoenix


AREA ATTRACTIONS

A

Anthem

|

ttractions Map

55

5

Cave  Creek

Scottsdale 9

303

Phoenix Peoria

60

10 13

Surprise

101

Sun C i t y 101

7

101

     E l M i rag e

13 4

Scottsdale I - 17

4

303

Pa r a d i s e   Va l l e y 11

5 1

Glendale

51

I - 10

6

Fountain Hills

12 7 11

10 8 2

3

3 6

14 3

Mesa

202 Te m p e

1

101

9

2

60

Phoenix

Gilbert I - 10

12

Chandler

202

8

Sporting venues & parks

museums & other attractions

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

Cardinals stadium chase feild U.S. Airways Center west world of scottsdale jobing.com arena phoenix international raceway turf paradise race course firebird international raceway lake pleasant regional park mcdowell mountain park camelback mountain south mountain park adobe dam regional park

arizona museum for youth arizona museum of natural history arizona science center the bead museum cave creek museum children's museum of phoenix desert botanical garden heard museum mesa contemporary arts phoenix art museum phoenix zoo scottsdale museum of contemporary art taliesin west frank lloyd wright


S

cenic

by Day BY S T E V E G E R H A RT OW N E R

A R I ZO N A S C E N I C TO U R S , L LC W W W. A R I ZO N A S C E N I C TO U R S . C O M

A P A C H E T R A I L TO U R This day trip ventures east of the Phoenix valley into the rocky volcanic beauty of the Superstition Mountains. One of the best representations of the Sonoran Desert landscape, the Apache Trail is full of incredible desert flora and fauna. The 90 minute nature cruise on Canyon Lake puts the volcanic cliffs and wildlife on display for all to see. Tortilla Flat is a one-of-a-kind watering hole for a saloon-style lunch and prickly pear ice cream to boot.

W I C K E N B U R G & P R E S C OT T

Be sure to bring a camera and binoculars for this scenic journey. Sunscreen and a hat would also be a good idea. This is some of

Get a real feel for the old west and early pioneer days of Ari-

the best sightseeing that Arizona has to offer, plus there is the

zona Territory on this trip through the mineral rich hills of Wick-

Superstition Mountain Museum and Goldfield Ghost Town to

enburg and Prescott. Silver and gold mining brought people to

visit along the way. This day tour is approximately 7 to 8 hours

Arizona Territory and these two towns were once bustling with

in length and the perfect glimpse into the nature, cuisine and

growth and fortune because of it. The Vulture Mine offers a

history of our surrounding desert areas.

unique view of mining, and you’ll get up close and personal on this walking tour through the grounds. Historic downtown offers the small town feel we all yearn for, complete with an old-time ice cream parlor. The drive between Wickenburg and Prescott ventures through beautiful ranch country before going up and over the mountains into the Prescott Valley. Whiskey

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June 2012 Discover The Phoenix Region Region June 2011 Discover The Phoenix


giving a realistic glimpse at what a little weathering can do. In

oriented during the daytime hours and a great place for some

the afternoon, discover yet another Arizona treasure. The wine

grub! The Sharlot Hall Museum is a must see to put all of the

country of Sonoita and Elgin is sure to please. There are numer-

day’s history into perspective. Comfortable walking shoes and

ous vineyards to choose from for tastings in this classic setting.

sun protection are necessary for this trip, especially for the Vul-

Comfortable shoes are helpful to navigate the missions and Tu-

ture Mine explorations. This sightseeing tour has a unique feel

bac streets. A day of relaxation is in store on this very cultural

of participating in the mining and dining of the old west. This

day trip of about 10 hours.

AREA ATTRACTIONS

Row is chock full of Saloons and western shops. It is family

journey will take about 9 to 10 hours to complete, so plan on a day to remember!

|

TO M B S TO N E & B I S B E E B & B

57 Nestled in the Southeastern hills of Arizona are the mile-high city of Bisbee and the “town too tough to die”, Tombstone. These old towns are rich in history, grit and character. Take to the dirt streets of Tombstone and witness re-enactments of the famous OK Corral gunfight. Visit those that came looking for fortunes and found only their own tombstone at the Boothill Graveyard. There is ghostly activity at the Birdcage Theater and certainly some interesting folks and live music at the local saloons. An overnight stay in one of Bisbee’s Bed and Breakfast spots is a must. On the second day, roam the Bisbee streets, as they are lined with antique shops and café-style restaurants. The Queen Mine Tour is the best in the state, onboard a mining train going deep into the cool depths where ringtails, Arizona’s state mammal, were used to keep the shafts clear of critters. Bring along a strong taste for adventure and a clean palate for this two day excursion. Dust off the cowboy boots for this one! A light jacket is a good idea as well. The tour is two full days of scenic beauty, old west character and plenty of everything in between. M I S S I O N S A N D V I N E YA R D S Southern Arizona possesses many hidden gems in addition to its turquoise and amethyst. Centuries ago, beautiful missions were founded and constructed by Jesuit and Franciscan missionaries. Today, two of these can be visited just south of Tucson. San Xavier del Bac is a functioning mission to this day and offers an unmatched view into mission life. Amazing artwork adorns the interior walls of this solemn place. About 20 miles south, a presidio was built in the town of Tubac to protect the missions. Today, this village is full of art galleries, restaurants and fantastic culture. A second mission at Tumacacori is a bit more worn,


GLENDALE CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

We’d love to tell you where to go.

Shopping, dining, pro sports, festivals, concerts and live entertainment. Let us help you plan your next West Valley adventure. Bring this ad to the Glendale CVB and pick up your earth-friendly tote* to fill with all your great finds from Glendale and the West Valley. *While supplies last


The West Valley is famous for its festivals. From signature events, to hometown favorites, your calendar will be filled with all the great happenings!

For all the latest information, contact the Glendale Convention & Visitors Bureau at 623-930-4500 or go to VisitGlendale.com.

June

September

June 7, 14, 21, 28 46th Annual Glendale Summer Band Concerts Historic Downtown Glendale 8-9 p.m. VisitGlendale.com

September 1 Fiesta Septiembre Historic Downtown Wickenburg Wickenburgchamber.com

October 27 Goodyear’s “Field of Scream’s” Goodyear Ball Park 5-8:30 p.m. Goodyearaz.gov

July July 3 Family Fun & Fireworks “Out Wickenburg Way” Wickenburg Wickenburgchamber.com July 4th Celebrations Litchfield Park Litchfield-park.org Surprise Recreation Campus Surpriseaz.com/specialevents Peoria Sports Complex Peoriasportscomplex.com Wet ‘n’ Wild Phoenix wetnwildphoenix.com July 5, 12, 19, 26 46th Annual Glendale Summer Band Concerts Historic Downtown Glendale 8-9 p.m. VisitGlendale.com July 21 Christmas in July Historic Downtown Glendale 10 a.m.-4 p.m. VisitGlendale.com

August August 4 Dog Days of Summer Historic Downtown Glendale 6-9 p.m. VisitGlendale.com Aug. Fridays, Goodyear’s “Dry Heat Comedy Night” 8 p.m. Goodyearaz.gov

September 8 Teddy Bear Day Historic Downtown Glendale 10 a.m.-4 p.m. VisitGlendale.com

October October 6 Artwerks First Saturdays & Open Air Market Historic Downtown Glendale 9 a.m.-4 p.m. VisitGlendale.com Fire Prevention Day & Parade Historic Downtown Glendale 9 a.m.-1 p.m. VisitGlendale.com 18th Annual Wickenburg Fly-In & Classic Car Show Wickenburg Municipal Airport 7:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Wickenburgchamber.com October 20 18th Annual Front Porch Festival & Old Towne Marketplace Historic Downtown Glendale 10 a.m.-4 p.m. VisitGlendale.com October 20-21 Buckeye Heritage Days Heritage Park 623-349-6000 buckeyeaz.gov October 27-28 Mission to Mars Fall Festival Challenger Space Center azchallenger.org

October 28 Halloween Monster Bash & Balloon Illumination Peoria Sports Complex 5-9 p.m. peoriasportscomplex.com

November November 3 Artwerks First Saturdays & Open Air Market Historic Downtown Glendale 9 a.m.-4 p.m. VisitGlendale.com November 10 Holiday Open House Historic Downtown Glendale 10 a.m.-5 p.m. VisitGlendale.com November 17 Fall Demolition Derby Helzapoppin’ Rodeo Arena Buckeye 7-10 p.m. Buckeyevalleychamber.org November 22 Arizona Road Racers Thanksgiving Day Classic Peoria Sports Complex 6:30 a.m. Peoriasportscomplex.com

December November 30, December 1, 7, 8, 14, 15, 21, 22 Glendale Glitters Holiday Weekends Historic Downtown Glendale 6-10 p.m. VisitGlendale.com December 1 Artwerks First Saturdays & Open Air Market Historic Downtown Glendale 9 a.m.-4 p.m. VisitGlendale.com City of Peoria’s Old Town Holiday Festival Osuna Park, Peoria 5-9 p.m. Peoriaaz.gov/specialevents December 1-2 City of Surprise Party Surprise Recreation Campus Supriseaz.gov December 7 17th Annual Christmas Parade of Lights Historic Downtown Wickenburg 6:30 p.m. Wickenburgchamber.com

Although event dates were correct at time of publication, it’s a good idea to call ahead and make sure no one has rained on your parade. For a comprehensive listing of events, check out VisitGlendale.com Twitter.com/GlendaleCVB Facebook.com/GlendaleCVB Flickr.com/VisitGlendale Youtube.com/MyGlendale11

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June 2 Family Farm Day Tolmachoff Farms tolmachoff-farms.com

September 1-2 Labor Day Weekend BBQ & Fireworks Show Wet ‘n’ Wild Phoenix wetnwildphoenix.com

November 23-24 Glendale Glitters Spectacular Weekend Historic Downtown Glendale 5-10 p.m. VisitGlendale.com

AREA ATTRACTIONS

West Valley Events - 2012

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H

iking in Arizona

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June 2012 Discover The Phoenix Region Region June 2011 Discover The Phoenix


A Z - 51 T R A I L - P H X 5.2 miles The AZ-51 Trail parallels Arizona Route 51/Piestewa Freeway on a paved route between Reach 11 Recreation Area and the golf course at E. Cactus Road near N. 42nd Street. The trail provides access to surrounding communities, county government facilities, schools, neighborhoods, hospitals and numerous parks and businesses. A PA C H E R A I L R O A D TRAIL 19 miles The entire trail follows an historic railroad route offering gentle trail grades and beautiful scenery. Formerly the railroad hauled logs from various parts of the Apache National Forest and the White Mountain Apache Reservation and later hauled tourists from McNary on a tour of the White Mountains. It has been unused for 3 decades. A R R OY O T R A I L .3 miles The Arroyo Trail is a short trail from the Pine Knoll Trail at Pine Knoll Dr. to the north side of I-40 in Flagstaff.

ARIZONA TR AIL 817 miles The Arizona Trail stretches 817 miles across the state of Arizona (north– south), from the Arizona–Utah border west of Lake Powell to the Arizona– Mexico border west of Bisbee. The trail traverses a wide diversity of terrain, passing among canyons, desert, mountains and forests and linking wilderness areas, towns and cities, historic sites and points of interest. L I T C H F I E L D PA R K G O O DY E A R T R A I L 3.3 miles This trail serves to connect the communities of Litchfield Park and Goodyear, just outside of Phoenix. This utilitarianstyle path parallels Indian School Rd. and Litchfield Rd., passing parks, business, and residences along the way. QUEEN CREEK WA S H T R A I L 2.3 miles This trail has a more rural feel than other trails in the Phoenix metropolitan area. Located within the community of Queen Creek, and following the banks of Queen Creek Wash, this trail passes open space, farmland, and some smaller residential communities.

ROUTE 66 TR AIL 4.2 miles The Route 66 Trail in Flagstaff begins in the heart of the beautiful historic downtown district right next to the picturesque Flagstaff Train Depot. Parking is available right along historic Route 66 at the visitor center adjacent to the trailhead. S A LT R I V E R T R A I L 2.2 miles This trail runs along the south bank of the Salt River in Tempe. The trail connects the Arizona State University Tempe Campus with a number of parks. The trail offers a nice recreational respite of residence of the metropolitan area. S H E A B O U L E VA R D TRAIL 3.5 miles This trail runs parallel to Shea Boulevard in Scottsdale. The trail consists of two disconnected segments. The western segment has a much more suburban feel than the eastern segment, which is more rural. This trail provides a useful transportation and recreation corridor for the surrounding communities. TEMPE CANAL TRAIL 7.4 miles This trail parallels the Tempe Canal between Tempe and Mesa. The trail consists of two disconnected segments, both of which serve a large number of residents, businesses and public facilities.

F O R M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N ON AREA TRAILS VISIT W W W. T R A I L L I N K . C O M

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67 T H AV E N U E T R A I L .5 miles This short trail parallels N 67th Avenue in Glendale, along a portion of the Thunderbird Recreation Area. The trail provides a connection between nearby residences and educational facilities. Crossing 67th Avenue gives users access to the Hillcrest Ranch Trail.

AZ CANAL TRAIL 16 miles The Arizona Canal Trail is one of the longer multi-use trails in Maricopa County. This trail runs for 16 miles between Phoenix and Peoria along the Arizona Canal, one of the counties vital waterways. The trail is largely continuous along a number of parallel pathsways adjacent to the concrete-lined channel. It provides access to a large number of residences, commercial centers, schools and other recreational opportunities.

AREA ATTRACTIONS

48TH STREET TRAIL 2 miles This trail is a 2 mile multi-use path that runs parallel to N. 48th St. in Phoenix. It is a useful resource for the community, connecting nearby residences to schools, recreation facilities & shopping.

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R

acing in Arizona BY M A RC B I G E LOW

Whether a Competitor or a Spectator Arizona has it all. We have a run down some of the racing events that hit the Valley. So Ready, Set, put on your shoes, get out your lawn chair, support a charity or be a competitor and GO!

Running in the USA website allows you to locate races by Date, Race, and Location. You also have the option to list an event you are planning. While running thru the site I found a NUN Run in Tempe, AZ, A Kiss me I’m Irish Run, A Plunge-and-Run. www.runningintheusa.com Tough Mudder event comes to Arizona once a year and brings out the competitors of all ages. Tough Mudder has already challenged half a million inspiring participants worldwide and raised more than $2 million dollars for the Wounded Warrior Project. Tough Mudder is more than an event; it’s a way of thinking. Spectators beware; this event can be a challenge, keeping up with your Tough Mudder is a work out too! toughmudder.com Phoenix International Raceway is home of the Kobalt Tools 500 and the Subway Fit 500. PIR resurfaced the race track and was

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June 2012 Discover The Phoenix Region Region June 2011 Discover The Phoenix Photography by: Marc Bigelow


AREA ATTRACTIONS

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Photography by: Turf Paradise

ready for the fall season. New pavement enhances the grip immediately, and that typically means faster speeds. So all you auto racing fans, Start your engines! http://www.phoenixraceway.com Bondurant pushes you to be your best—with the finest facility, the most up-to-date cars and equipment, the most qualified staff, the best training methods, and the highest standards in order to help you reach your goals - whatever they may be www.bondurant.com Boat Racing by motor, by sail, by paddle, or swimming Arizona’s waters is home to some amazing events if water is what you like. www.arizonayachtclub.org www.adbaracing.com www.azdba.com

Photography by: Ricardo Galvez


Triathlon Races in Arizona and more This website allows you to search by location, gender, age, sport interest. It has it all at your fingertips. www.trifind.com/az.html Motorcycle Madness is everywhere in Arizona Photography by: Marc Bigelow

smoothest racing surfaces you’ll find anywhere, meticulously maintained by the Black Mountain Crew. This family environment contributes to ensuring a fun time. Black Mountain BMX Racing www.blackmountainbmx.com Horse Turf Paradise Season October 1-May 6 www.turfparadise.com Speedworld Park This multi – use entertainment Facility is for all ages from BMX, Motocross, Off Road, RC Flyers, Drag Strips, Sand drags and Mud Bogs Just off Route 60 just past Surprise. www.racespeedworld.com Bruce St. James- Radio Talk Show host KTAR and Sprint Car Driver “Nobody starts at Daytona, everyone works their way up” Pat O’Daniel- 3 World Championships in motorcycle drag racing & flat track motorcycles in Open Pro/Pro 450/ Senior classes “One of life’s definitions is the sequence of physical and mental experiences that make up the existence of an individual. For me, that’s motorcycle dirt track racing!”

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June 2012 Discover The Phoenix Region Region June 2011 Discover The Phoenix

Canyon Motocross, www.canyonmotocross.com ET Motopark, www.etmotopark.com Firebird, www.firebirdraceway.com

Photography by: Marc Bigelow

Bicycle Black Mountain BMX track has one of the

Arizona Cycle Park, www.arizonacyclepark.com/version2


Cabin Rentals

Vineyards Skull Valley, Arizona

Winery & Tasting Room

Wedding/Special Event Venue 10080 Tough Country Trail Skull Valley, AZ 86338 Live the dream on this historic 41-acre compound just 12 miles from downtown Prescott, AZ with multiple income streams: winery, vineyard, cabin rentals, wedding/group event venue & horse boarding. Surrounded by a million acres of National Forest with a rich water supply, it can grow as a business enterprise or serve as the ultimate private gentleman's ranch w/main house, tasting room, rock well house, hay barn, 4 cabins & out buildings. Offered at $1,500,000. MLS # 957398.

To learn more snap here or visit www.abbieroses.com

Denise Satterlee 928-710-2094 denise.satterlee@nextagerp.com Abbie Roses 928-713-8850 aroses@abbieroses.com

Horse Boarding


This November 10th At The Arizona Biltmore’s Adobe Golf Course,

G o l f Wi t h Yo u r Fa vo r i te

FOOTBALL LEGENDS

to arrange your access to this very special event contact drozadgal@aol.com

Get the free mobile app at

http:/ / gettag.mobi


Discover the Phoenix Region Magazine Volume 3 Issue 1