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2014

ON THE COVER: EMPOWERING WOMEN BY THE THOUSANDS

S I S T E R S O N T H E F LY

2014 USA $4.95 discover theregion.com

the

phoenix region


ordinated Care When it Matters Most

y cancer diagnosis comes with questions that need answers, treatments to consider, and uncertainty ow to navigate the healthcare system.

Cancer Care Coordinators are ready to help you and your family — at no cost to you.

Coordinated Care When it Matters Most

e masters’ prepared registered nurses have advanced expertise in oncology. They are knowledgeable t cancer and the resources available to fight it.

xample, the Cancer Care Coordinators can:

Provide referrals to physicians, treatment services and support programs Every cancer diagnosis comes with questions that need answers, treatments to consider, and uncertainty

Help you understand your treatment plan on how to navigate the healthcare system.

Help you formulate questions to ask your physician

Our Cancer Care Coordinators are ready to help you and your family — at no cost to you.

Educate you on how to navigate today’s healthcare system

Coordinated Care They When it Matters Most These masters’ prepared registered nurses have advanced expertise in oncology. are knowledgeable about cancer and the resources available to fight it. Every cancer diagnosis comes with questions that need answers, treatments to consider, and uncertainty

Share strategies for being your own healthcare advocate

Give ongoing support and guidance

on how to navigate the healthcare system. Our Cancer Care Coordinators are ready to help you and your family — at no cost to you.

For more information, call 480-323-1255 orprepared email These masters’ registeredccc@shc.org nurses have advanced expertise in oncology. They are knowledgeable For more information, call 480-323-1255 or email ccc@shc.org about cancer and the resources available to fight it. For example, the Cancer Care Coordinators can:

Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center • Provide referrals to physicians, treatment services and support programs

SCOTTSDALE HEALTHCARE shc.org/cancer

SCOTTSDALE HEALTHCARE

• Help you understand your treatment plan

• Help you formulate questions to ask your physician

• Educate you on how to navigate today’s healthcare system

• Share strategies for being your own healthcare advocate

• Give ongoing support and guidance

shc.org/cancer

For more information, call 480-323-1255 or email ccc@shc.org

Purchase with Purpose.

Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center

SCOTTSDALE HEALTHCARE shc.org/cancer

By using your MidFirst Bank Pink Visa® Check Card* you will be helping win the fight against breast cancer by supporting the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center. 602-801-5000 midfirst.com/pink Pink_Card_Discover_the_Region_AZ.indd 1

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Bronze: 360 Vantage | Boeing | Phoenix Business Journal | Harkins Theatres | Intel | Midwestern University | Wells Fargo PADT | AT&T | MJS Designs | SRP | Arizona Family College Savings Program – Bank Plan | KJZZ | Nextiva | Texas Instruments Walton Sustainability Solutions Initiatives | Arizona Virtual Academy | University of Advancing Technology Arizona Sports – KTAR – The Peak | In the Zona Copper:

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TM

2014

the

phoenix region

2014

In This Issue On the cover: Photography by: Marc Bigelow Retouching and Creative by:

Cover Story:

Sisters On The Fly page 42

THE

e d i u G s l a c Lo 08

GLENDALE & THE WEST VALLEY

For the best spots, tastes, treasures and experiences, take the advice of those of us who know this region like the back of our hands.Guide We’re sharing all of our secrets. The Locals Start your with theand list below! To plans Glendale

The West Valley

Hand-Made Folk Art

Burning Rubber

Outrageous Fortune

Find the Southwest’s largest selection of hand-made dolls from award-winning artist Greta Chirco, who has been recognized by the American Folk Art Museum, at downtown Glendale store The Country Maiden, 7146 N. 58th Ave.

The West Valley is the proud home to one of the fastest tracks in the West—Phoenix International Raceway. Marked by its unique tri-oval, low-banked loop, the track hosts two NASCAR race weekends each year. But you can get your speed demon thrills in between races thanks to the West Valley’s Speedworld drag-strip outdoor-racing facility, 19421 W. Jomax Road, or Speed Street Indoor Racetrack, an indoor 1/3-mile track where you can go as fast as 50 miles per hour. 6542 W. Bell Road

Get a glimpse at your future or find the answers you seek with a visit to The Astrology Store in downtown Glendale. With one of the largest selections of tarot cards at his disposal, Dave Campbell, a certified research, psychic medium and astrologer, can also read the aura of your four-legged friend. 5735 W. Glendale Ave.

Beat the Heat - Get Wet, Get Wild! Wet ‘n’ Wild theme park boasts Arizona’s biggest, and most daring, collection of water slides and water-themed attractions. Take the plunge down one of 30 thrilling slides, float your cares away on the lazy river or challenge the waves under the sun in the giant wave pool. Don’t forget to check out the world’s only pair of dueling, gravity-defying water coasters. 4243 W. Pinnacle Peak Road.

28

Tennis Legends Check out legendary players, such as John McEnroe on the hard courts of the Surprise Tennis & Racquet Complex as it hosts the Cancer Treatment Centers of America Tennis Championships every fall. 15960 N. Bullard Ave.

Trail Blazers

RAW: an independent arts organization,Intofor artists, the Wild! west to the by artists Head Wildlife World

Walk and see for miles on any of the thousands of miles that make up the various local, county and state trail systems that wind through the West Valley’s majestic mountain ranges. Head out to the Estrella Mountain, White Tank, Thunderbird Conservation and North Mountain regional parks, which all surround the West Valley, to get some fresh air and experience the splendor of the Sonoran Desert by foot or pedal. Go to visitglendale.com for directions and links to more info.

Zoo & Aquarium, a magical zoo sprawling over several acres. The privately owned zoo showcases many firsts in Arizona, including the state’s first white tiger, aquarium and saltwater crocodile. Plus, this is the only place in Arizona where you can get a glimpse of the rare albino alligator. Call it a day with dinner at Dillon’s BBQ, where you can come eye-to-eye with black tip reef sharks while you dine! 16501 W. Northern Ave.

Relocation Guide The Guide To A Baseball Fever Lift Off Deals and Steals! Hassle Free Move The West Valley boasts more MLB baseball 46 Only in Arizona can you fly hot air balloons Tanger Outlets Westgate is open for per square mile than any other spot on the globe. Sunshine, Crackerjacks and a cold one make a day with any of the West Valley’s nine Major League Spring Training teams the best day of your year—or better yet, make a week of it! Go to visitglendale.com for a complete list of ballparks and links to team schedules.

year round! Top off your top flight with a sit-down breakfast out in the desert upon landing. Flights from Hot Air Expeditions happening daily in the Northwest Valley. Check out hotairexpeditions.com for more info.

business, and serious shoppers are lining up for these great deals that can only be found in the West Valley! Check out the more than 80 high-end stores, including Coach, Hilfiger, Polo, Michael Kors, H&M and more! Glendale Avenue and Loop 101

Historic Brunch

No Charlie, It’s a Chocolate Factory!

First you’ll delight and then you’ll devour the homemade rolls served up at The Spicery in Our 1895 Home restaurant in Historic Downtown Glendale. And yes, you read that right—1895! Dine in one of the oldest original homes in Glendale for an authentic experience only to be found here. 7141 N. 59th Ave.

See the magic behind the candy with a tour of the West Valley’s hometown chocolate factory, Cerreta’s! Free guided tours are offered Monday through Friday at 10 a.m. and 1p.m. Plus, they give samples! Come hungry, leave happy. 5345 W. Glendale Ave.

48

4

2014 Discover The Phoenix Region

Phoenix Area Sporting Arenas Museums, Parks and Attractions

Best Place to Let Loose Your Inner

Where to Let the Kids Run Wild

horseback riding in the White Tanks or Wickenburg.

rides and games at Castles ‘n’ Coa I-17 and Peoria Ave.

See the peacocks, walk amid cent Cowboy/Cowgirl Decoding Annie Saddle up forParker some practice runs on the bull10farm houses and explore the acre grounds at Sahuaro Ranch Park at at Saddle Ranch Chop House in Glendale, Joyce D’Souza 59th Ave. Still got energy? Try the then, when you’re ready, take on some real

12Favorite Sporting Event Health Is Our Greatest Wealth Best Place to Watch the Sun Set When it comes to professional sp Settle in atop Thunderbird Mountain at Dr. Bret Wilson West Valley really has cornered th 59th Avenue north of Loop 101.

But ask any local and they’ll tell yo deal to be found is a grass seat, pi ket and hot dog in the outfield at West Valley’s five spring training b

Best Place to Catch the Sunrise

Girls Rule Pack a breakfast picnic and hike up the east 14 face of the White Tank Mountains in the far Clarissa Burt & Kylie Jenkins West Valley.

Best Local Festival

Best Place to Indulge in Sweets Plenty to satisfy the sweet tooth in the West Valley, including Cerreta’s Candy Company, Papa Ed’s Ice Cream and Shelley’s Specialty Desserts in downtown Glendale; and Ground Control in Goodyear, 4860 North Litchfield Road.

Desert Landscapes Kevin Mengus

There are lots to choose from for take a look at our events listing o visitglendale.com). But, when it co hometown festival fun, chocolate be king. Mark your calendar for th Chocolate Affaire in Historic Dow Glendale every February (Feb. 7-9

16

Phoenix Fashion Week 19Where to Capture the Essential A Where to Grab a Frosty Beverage Clarissa Burt Karyssa Get a & tall one (or a blue oneWilhelm or a salted one) Photo Op at Margaritaville at Westgate Entertainment Center. Or, Oktoberfest is on all year long at Haus Murphy’s in downtown Glendale. For a more low key high-end, check out Flemings Prime Steakhouse and Wine Bar in Peoria at Northern and Loop 101.

White Tank Mountain Regional Pa only boasts sweeping views of the West Valley, in the spring the wild will dazzle you with their colorful and the wildlife to be spotted yea is awe-inspiring.

Making Change Last Dr. Peggy Marshall

20

Sweet Swingin’ Sammi & Mad Dog Madison

22a few local favorites, try these on

Sedona Women Stacy Friedman Moore

36

Best Mexican Food

The debate on this one is endless

(and bring your appetite): Chicken at Bitzee-Mama’s, enchiladas at La and chimichangas at Pedro’s Mexi Check visitglendale.com for more listings.


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Featured In American Bagger June, October & December 2012

Build Awards Arizona Bike Week, Sturgis, Las Vegas

SPECIALIZING IN AMERICAN V-TWIN

Engine Rebuild & Performance Full Custom Builds Custom Fabrication Custom Machining

• • •

Dyno Tune Service


F R O M Jodie Wilson Editor in Chief/Publisher

Publication Creative / Layout / Design

Marc Bigelow Director of Photography

Health & Wellness Editor www.drbretwilson.com

Cathy Droz Marketing & P.R. Two For The Road USA www.twofortheroadusa.com Discover the Phoenix Region Magazine Volume 5 Issue 1 For Advertising / Subscription inquiries; contact: info@discovertheregion.com or call Office: 623.249.4220 website: www.discovertheregion.org Contributions and Submissions Materials must be accompanied by a self- addressed stamped envelope for correspondence purposes. Any submissions become property of Discover the Phoenix Region Magazine and credits will be properly provided if a submission is utilized. All Materials Copyright 2014 Discover the Region.com LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction in part or in full is strictly prohibited. Discover the Region.com LLC, assumes no responsibility for claims or content of advertisemers.

App Store

E D I T O R

I N

C H I E F

Discover the Region (Phoenix) celebrates its 5th year! With this year’s milestone we decided it was time to give the website a makeover. The site holds all of the print and digital publications with easy access and simple social media posting. Discover the region has also expanded our product line to include the launch of Discover the Region magazines APP. This APP was approved and is available in the Apple and Android play stores. It is FREE! Download the App and have our business directory listings and magazines at your fingertips. Discover the Region 2nd NEW product line launched this year was expanding our Print and Digital publications to other businesses. Helping business express their products in beautiful full page color layouts utilizing our staff, outsourcing collaborators and web-platforms allows for our pricing to be competitive and affordable. See page 11 for more details.

Dr. Bret Wilson

Available on the

T H E

On the personal side of my celebrations for 2013, I was honored by my home town high school and humbly accepted induction into the Northridge Hall of Fame for being a positive role model. In October, I went back to Dayton, Ohio for a weekend full of events that started with speaking to the kids K-12 about staying positive, working hard and never; never giving up. I enjoyed a fabulous lunch with the other inductees at the high school, sharing favorite stories from our days at Northridge. The day ended with dinner with the Kiwanis. Friday brought the awards dinner, where I was surrounded by my family, life-long friends and teachers. This was special gift to me for so many reasons. Little did I know at that time that it would be the last time I would see my Grandfather LaVon Anson. He passed 12/9/2013 at the Dayton VA Hospice. As part of my tribute I was able to honor the people in my life who made me the person I am today and Grandpa LaVon is one who has been there with me all the way. The weekend included the homecoming football game and post-game celebrations at a favorite hangout for Northridge, Marion’s Pizza. Saturday the alumni gathered at the Legion Hall for some good old Rock N Roll performed by a reunion band of fellow alumni, dancing the night away to the sounds of our youth. Sunday was the local parade and yes, I did the princess wave. What a gift, privilege and honor to celebrate with my school, home town, family and friends!

JodieWilson

So what is in store for 2014? More working hard, sharing, collaborating with businesses, growing Discover the Region to the next level and striving to be the best I can be. I look forward to serving you in 2014.

Available on

Google Play

Editor in Chief

Get the free at Asmobile many app of you

know the stock of wheat by my signature is in remembrance of my brother Chuck. I have also inhttp:/ / gettag.mobi cluded a 4 leaf clover for my Grandfather, who could spot them a mile away. He said they brought him luck. Having him in my life, brought me Luck! You will be missed but not forgotten!

PRIMARY CONTRIBUTORS

Clarissa Burt, Kylie Jenkins, Karyssa Wilhelm, Joyce D’Souza, Kevin Mengus, Dr. Peggy Marshall, Pete Peters, Stacy Friedman Moore, Laura Fisher, Cathy Burford, Cathy Droz, Deborah Brown

SPECIAL THANKS

Eve Georgiou and Steven Feaster, Local First Arizona, Kimber Lanning, Phoenix Fashion Week, Brian Hill, Lauren Pfingstag, Lorraine Pino, Glendale CVB Staff, Two for the Road USA, Dr. Peggy Marshall, Clarissa Burt and her incredible staff for our fashion section. Nancy McCutcheon, Virginia G Piper Cancer Treatment Center, Joyce D’Souza, RAW: Natural Born Artists, Laura Fisher, Damon Wilson, Jeramie Campbell, Amber Lillie, Freddie Paul, Robert Gentile, Brittany Boysel, Jessica Lake, Ivana Kat, Jeremy McMurtry, Dylan Raines, Alicia Spillias, Aura Baltrusaitis, Brock Vowell, Candice Domme, Sarah Price, Katie Grinstead, Michelle Cantor, Delora Fuglem, Deanna Harbottle, Taylor Divine, The Hunted, The Claredon Hotel, Kismit Design, Treasure Eutopia, VSLZ Fashun Group, Sonia Robertson, Kathie Hale, Bar Smith, The Art Institute of Phoenix, Laura L Sand, The Northridge Hall of Fame Committee, including Kiwanis, teachers, administrators, family, & lifetime friends. I also want to thank all of our expert writers for the content they submit for the monthly digital magazine “The Focus”. To the staff, our friends and family, thank you for your support.

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Marc Bigelow, Jodie Porumb Wilson, Dan Tabar, Jim Boomer, Kevin Mengus, Mike Mescher, Rick Rome

6

2014 Discover The Phoenix Region


With so much to see and do in Glendale & the West Valley, you might want to plan your vacation in

Alphabetical Order.

Antiquing

Breweries

Cowboys

Dodgers Spring Training

Events & Festivals

Football - AZ Cardinals

Golfing

Hockey - Coyotes

In - Flight

Jet Skiing

Kayaking

Lodging

Music & Concerts

Nightlife

Outstanding Culture

Quiet Nights

Reds Spring Training

Shopping

Theatre

Waterpark

Xeriscape Garden

Yummy

Poolside 2013

GLENDALE, ARIZONA

Your Guide to Glendale & Arizona’s West Valley

MAKIN

C

Charming

G GR

EAT MEM

THE

RI

ES

pg. 13

O

Locals Guide

ONLY IN THE

West Valley

Urban Excitement

Visitor Guide 100’s of Listings of Events, Restaurants, Shops & More

pg. 12

Give us a long weekend or a week-long vacation and we’ll fill it with non-stop fun. Call or visit us online and we’ll help you plan the perfect vacation from

A toZ. Bring this

ad to the Glendale CVB and pick up your earth-friendly tote* to fill with all your great finds from Glendale and the West Valley.

Zoo

Glendale Convention & Visitors Bureau 5800 W. Glenn Dr., Suite 140, Glendale, AZ 85301 623.930.4500 • visitglendale.com *While supplies last


THE

e d i u G Locals

GLENDALE & THE WEST VALLEY

For the best spots, tastes, treasures and experiences, take the advice of those of us who know this region like the back of our hands.We’re sharing all of our secrets. Start your plans with the list below!

Hand-Made Folk Art

Burning Rubber

Outrageous Fortune

Find the Southwest’s largest selection of hand-made dolls from award-winning artist Greta Chirco, who has been recognized by the American Folk Art Museum, at downtown Glendale store The Country Maiden, 7146 N. 58th Ave.

The West Valley is the proud home to one of the fastest tracks in the West—Phoenix International Raceway. Marked by its unique tri-oval, low-banked loop, the track hosts two NASCAR race weekends each year. But you can get your speed demon thrills in between races thanks to the West Valley’s Speedworld drag-strip outdoor-racing facility, 19421 W. Jomax Road, or Speed Street Indoor Racetrack, an indoor 1/3-mile track where you can go as fast as 50 miles per hour. 6542 W. Bell Road

Get a glimpse at your future or find the answers you seek with a visit to The Astrology Store in downtown Glendale. With one of the largest selections of tarot cards at his disposal, Dave Campbell, a certified research, psychic medium and astrologer, can also read the aura of your four-legged friend. 5735 W. Glendale Ave.

Beat the Heat - Get Wet, Get Wild! Wet ‘n’ Wild theme park boasts Arizona’s biggest, and most daring, collection of water slides and water-themed attractions. Take the plunge down one of 30 thrilling slides, float your cares away on the lazy river or challenge the waves under the sun in the giant wave pool. Don’t forget to check out the world’s only pair of dueling, gravity-defying water coasters. 4243 W. Pinnacle Peak Road.

Into the Wild!

Check out legendary players, such as John McEnroe on the hard courts of the Surprise Tennis & Racquet Complex as it hosts the Cancer Treatment Centers of America Tennis Championships every fall. 15960 N. Bullard Ave.

Walk and see for miles on any of the thousands of miles that make up the various local, county and state trail systems that wind through the West Valley’s majestic mountain ranges. Head out to the Estrella Mountain, White Tank, Thunderbird Conservation and North Mountain regional parks, which all surround the West Valley, to get some fresh air and experience the splendor of the Sonoran Desert by foot or pedal. Go to visitglendale.com for directions and links to more info.

Head west to the Wildlife World Zoo & Aquarium, a magical zoo sprawling over several acres. The privately owned zoo showcases many firsts in Arizona, including the state’s first white tiger, aquarium and saltwater crocodile. Plus, this is the only place in Arizona where you can get a glimpse of the rare albino alligator. Call it a day with dinner at Dillon’s BBQ, where you can come eye-to-eye with black tip reef sharks while you dine! 16501 W. Northern Ave.

Baseball Fever

Lift Off

Deals and Steals!

The West Valley boasts more MLB baseball per square mile than any other spot on the globe. Sunshine, Crackerjacks and a cold one make a day with any of the West Valley’s nine Major League Spring Training teams the best day of your year—or better yet, make a week of it! Go to visitglendale.com for a complete list of ballparks and links to team schedules.

Only in Arizona can you fly hot air balloons year round! Top off your top flight with a sit-down breakfast out in the desert upon landing. Flights from Hot Air Expeditions happening daily in the Northwest Valley. Check out hotairexpeditions.com for more info.

Tanger Outlets Westgate is open for business, and serious shoppers are lining up for these great deals that can only be found in the West Valley! Check out the more than 80 high-end stores, including Coach, Hilfiger, Polo, Michael Kors, H&M and more! Glendale Avenue and Loop 101

Historic Brunch

No Charlie, It’s a Chocolate Factory!

First you’ll delight and then you’ll devour the homemade rolls served up at The Spicery in Our 1895 Home restaurant in Historic Downtown Glendale. And yes, you read that right—1895! Dine in one of the oldest original homes in Glendale for an authentic experience only to be found here. 7141 N. 59th Ave.

See the magic behind the candy with a tour of the West Valley’s hometown chocolate factory, Cerreta’s! Free guided tours are offered Monday through Friday at 10 a.m. and 1p.m. Plus, they give samples! Come hungry, leave happy. 5345 W. Glendale Ave.

Tennis Legends

Trail Blazers


Best Place to Let Loose Your Inner Cowboy/Cowgirl

Where to Let the Kids Run Wild

Best Authentic Chicago Dog House

Saddle up for some practice runs on the bull at Saddle Ranch Chop House in Glendale, then, when you’re ready, take on some real horseback riding in the White Tanks or Wickenburg.

See the peacocks, walk amid century-old farm houses and explore the acres of grounds at Sahuaro Ranch Park at 9802 N. 59th Ave. Still got energy? Try the mini golf, rides and games at Castles ‘n’ Coasters at I-17 and Peoria Ave.

Dazzo’s takes the cake – and save room for their handmade Italian ice! 6143 W. Glendale Ave.

Best Place to Watch the Sun Set

Favorite Sporting Event

Settle in atop Thunderbird Mountain at 59th Avenue north of Loop 101.

Best Place to Catch the Sunrise Pack a breakfast picnic and hike up the east face of the White Tank Mountains in the far West Valley.

Best Place to Indulge in Sweets Plenty to satisfy the sweet tooth in the West Valley, including Cerreta’s Candy Company, Papa Ed’s Ice Cream and Shelley’s Specialty Desserts in downtown Glendale; and Ground Control in Goodyear, 4860 North Litchfield Road.

Where to Grab a Frosty Beverage Get a tall one (or a blue one or a salted one) at Margaritaville at Westgate Entertainment Center. Or, Oktoberfest is on all year long at Haus Murphy’s in downtown Glendale. For a more low key high-end, check out Flemings Prime Steakhouse and Wine Bar in Peoria at Northern and Loop 101.

When it comes to professional sports, the West Valley really has cornered the market. But ask any local and they’ll tell you the best deal to be found is a grass seat, picnic blanket and hot dog in the outfield at any of the West Valley’s five spring training ballparks.

Best Local Festival There are lots to choose from for sure (just take a look at our events listing online at visitglendale.com). But, when it comes to hometown festival fun, chocolate seems to be king. Mark your calendar for the Glendale Chocolate Affaire in Historic Downtown Glendale every February (Feb. 7-9 in 2014).

Where to Capture the Essential Arizona Photo Op White Tank Mountain Regional Park not only boasts sweeping views of the entire West Valley, in the spring the wildflowers will dazzle you with their colorful display, and the wildlife to be spotted year round is awe-inspiring.

Best Mexican Food The debate on this one is endless, but for a few local favorites, try these on for size (and bring your appetite): Chicken tacos at Bitzee-Mama’s, enchiladas at La Perla and chimichangas at Pedro’s Mexican Food. Check visitglendale.com for more detailed listings.

Best Place to Experience a Staycation Book a weekend at the historic Wigwam Resort in Litchfield Park. The 80-year-old Hacienda-style resort will sweep you away amid its 440 lush acres. And we hear the golf is pretty great, too!

Insider Tips for Stargazing The Challenger Space Center in Peoria boasts special night-sky programs with experts on hand to tell you just what it is you’re looking at.

Where to Catch the Big One There’s a reason fishermen flock to Lake Pleasant Regional Park. Just keep it down when you find the perfect cove—the fish are biting!

IDEAS, INSPIRATION & ITINERARIES

For more local tips, travel ideas and things to do, check out visitglendale.com or stop in at the Glendale Visitor Center, 5800 W. Glenn Drive, Suite 140.

Sweet Treats


efore age 50

10460 N. 92nd St., Ste 202, Scottsdale, AZ 85258 480-323-1231 1-866-553-6789

have a family member who has had multiple cancers

am of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry nd have a family history of breast or varian cancer

have a personal and/or family istory of rare cancers (such as male reast cancer or childhood sarcoma)

ecoding Annie Parker BY Joyce D’Souza, RN, MSN, OCN Genetic Cancer Nurse

SPECIAL ADVERTORIAL

The movie was written and directed by Steven Bernstein. 480-323-1231 It is about the story of a young woman who survived orbreast visitcancer shc.org/geneticrisk twice and ovarian cancer. It is also a story of a young woman’s family history littered with breast cancer. Despite losing her mother and sister to cancer and experiencing multiple cancers herself, the story sends a wonderful message of hope and triumph over adversity. The film brings awareness that certain cancers do have a genetic predisposition. In this case, Annie Parker was one of the first women in Canada who had undergone BRCA testing and was found to carry an alteration that contributes to the high risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer. In the film festival, director Steven Bernstein and the real Annie Parker were able to answer questions from moviegoers who themselves might have had cancer and have been identified to have a BRCA alteration. Ms. Parker mentioned that knowing her BRCA alteration was empowering and if provided to men and women before cancer is diagnosed could be used to make informed decisions in pursuing aggressive cancer screenings and/or risk reduction surgeries. Lastly, the film would inspire women, men, and families with hereditary predisposition that they are not alone. Ms. Parker’s story could provide the starting point of discussion to address the fear of cancer, survival, and bringing people together.

10 22

2014 The Phoenix Region JuneDiscover 2011 Discover The Phoenix Region

Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center

SCOTTSDALE HEALTHCARE shc.org/cancer

7971 11/12

For more information about the Cancer and Annie Parker, Last Genetic October 4,Risk 2013,Assessment the movie Decoding Cancer Prevention Program, call: was shown at the Scottsdale International Film Festival.


Build A Powerful Marketing Strategy

Corporate Identity

Brochures & Business Cards

Magazines & Catalogs

Online Marketing & Digital Magazines

Smartphone Apps

Branding

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the

phoenix region

At Discover the Phoenix Region we can help you with your next print project. We have experienced graphic artists, set designers, photographers, writers and printers, all in one place & available at a low cost. www.discoverthephoenixregion.com

(623) 249-4220


H

ealth Is Our

Greatest Wealth BY D r. B r e t W i l s o n w w w. d r b r e t w i l s o n . c o m

Health is our greatest wealth. Regular investments in your well-being pay dividends in the form of more years to your life and more life to your years. Health is not the absence of disease or a symptom, but fullest expression of the mind, body, organs, tissues and cells functioning at the highest level possible. Health is a very individual expression and perception. Health is constantly evolving. The single greatest determining factor of your health is you and the choices you make. The investment in your health also has a more practical economic impact. The daily headlines remind us of the rising cost of detecting treating illness with testing, surgical procedures and medications. Health insurance premiums continue to rise despite higher deductibles, co-pays for less coverage with increased out of pocket expense. Solutions such as the Affordable Healthcare Act are increasing expenditures and costs with no real promise of improving our nation’s or individual health. More than half of all personal bankruptcies were related to illness or injury and the associated healthcare costs. According to the study most of these people had health insurance at the time of the injury. These factors reveal a fundamental f law in our approach. We are investing more in sick care and less in health. We are limiting our options to insurance companies, pharmaceutical companies, physicians and the US government. We need more Americans willing to take control of their own health. The most important area to improve is the place where most health care occurs, and that is the patient themselves and how they are able to provide self-care, prevention and maintenance of their own health and that of their family.

12 22

2014 The Phoenix Region JuneDiscover 2011 Discover The Phoenix Region

To receive to Dr. Bret Wilson’s monthly articles on Health & Wellness visit discovertheregion.com and click subscribe from the top menu.


The six leading chronic diseases that create a significant part of medical expenditures and nine of the leading causes of death are largely based on lifestyle choices and actively reducing risk factors. The chronic conditions include: cardiovascular disease and stroke, cancer, smoking, diabetes, arthritis and obesity. These conditions will continue to increase with the rise in Americans 65 years and older. Mickey Mantle is attributed with the quote, “If I knew I was going to live this long, I would have taken better care of myself ”. Take better care of yourself; don’t wait for disease to strike and the same realization to hit you. People already effected by one of these chronic conditions, can modify choices and restore positive adaptation, enhancing appropriate health care interventions, and moving to a higher degree of health.

| There are six areas of health maintenance that I urge you to learn more about and make better choices for you.

“Without deviation

from the norm,

progress is not possible.”

-Frank Zappa

• Movement - Humans are genetically designed to be hunter gatherers, the ability to move with intention and achieve results. Sedentary lifestyles lead to disease and disability. • Sound Nervous System - Be mindful of the importance of maintaining good communication between the brain, the body and the functional connection of the two. • Nutrition - Feed the body and mind with regular nutrient dense fuel and proper hydration. • Rest – Allow for proper and adequate rest, both physical and mental to restore and renew. • Detoxify -Maintain a clean and healthy body from the inside and out by limiting our exposure to toxins both physical and mental. • Attitude - Nurture a healthy mental attitude of gratitude, faith, service and connection. Cura te ipsum The Latin injunction “take care of your own self ” and the biblical proverb “physician heal thyself ” are pronouncements that we are each our own best doctor and the body does the healing in response to the choices that are made. An active pursuit of a healthier you, even if you are not “sick” should be a lifelong endeavor. By practicing and maintaining a healthier you, you can learn to take the best care of this wonder gift of life and honor it with a healthy body and mind. . Invest in your health, be proactive, take steps to improve your health now and learn ways to maintain vitality.

www.drbretwilson.com phone:

623-556-2335

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irls rule

Being Brilliant, Beautiful, and Bold: The Girls Rule Foundation Teaches Young Women To Be All Three Brilliant! Beautiful! Bold! The triple threat. It’s what every girl should be, no? If the Girls Rule Foundation has its way, every girl will realize that she already is. The Girls Rule Foundation, based in Phoenix, Arizona, has made it its mission since 2008 to empower girls from 12 to18 years old, instilling in them not only the confidence to believe they can make their dreams come true, but also the skills to make those dreams reality.

BY C l a r i s s a B u r t & K y l i e J e n k i n s

It’s not a new problem for girls to feel less than capable of pursuing their dreams. Patton and the other founders felt that theirs was the first generation of girls who were actually told they could be whatever they wanted. What was lacking was the knowledge of how to make those dreams come true. Nowadays, with the staggering availability of information and resources that technology provides, girls have more to work with, she says. But they still need repeated encouragement to find the inner strength to pursue their dreams.

One of the original cofounders of The Girls Rule Foundation, Dena Patton, explains that the main reason the foundation was created was to “empower girls with the tools and ideas and resources and things they need to have a bright future.” It was hard enough to find your way a generation ago, and Patton thinks that in today’s world, girls are even more distracted by the prevalence of media and other outside inf luences. Dena and the other founders saw a desperate need for a force to inspire girls about their future, and thus the foundation was born. Dena notes that the future can mean many different things for each girl and the foundation includes every dream out there, whether it’s to be a doctor, a businesswoman, or a stay-at-home mother. “Girls need the right tools and encouragement and skill-sets to make that future happen,” says Patton, no matter what that future may be.

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Girls Rule typically holds workshops for schools, groups and other organizations that teach the foundation’s four core principles: building self-esteem and confidence, making wise choices, learning leaderships skills to set and achieve goals, and mapping a plan to make their dreams come true with the necessary resources. Each principle is crucial for a girl to have that “Oh my gosh!” moment when she realizes that she can do anything she sets her mind to, says Patton.


Not everyone realizes that the path towards future successes starts right now, even if these girls might just be high school freshmen. “The biggest thing to realize is that this is all right now,” Patton says. “Right now is our biggest message.” The choices girls make, such as who they date, what they post online, the parties they attend, the grades they make in school, are everyday decisions that can make or break their chances of success. Being aware of every choice as early as possible is a necessity Patton can’t emphasize enough.

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The Girls Rule website, found at girlsrulefoundation.org, boasts over seventy testimonials of girls who participated in these workshops. They rave about their newfound positive attitude, confidence and realization of their full potential. Moms are likewise thrilled with what Girls Rule has done for their daughters and are amazed that the organization so successfully teaches their children what they’ve been trying to for years. Sometimes it’s just better to hear it from a stranger, Patton says.

Fine Foods & Gift Baskets

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Girls Rule is still a f ledgling organization that recently acquired its 501(c)(3) status and survives off donations and grants. For a $10 donation, a donor will receive three Brilliant, Beautiful, and Bold bracelets for a girl to give to two of her friends and create her own empowerment circle. Additionally, Girls Rule is hosting its annual “Teen & Women Summit” at U.S. Airways Arena on September 21st, 2013. The foundation could always use help and Patton recommends visiting their website to sign up as a volunteer, sponsor, or to make a donation. Ultimately, it is the sensation of helping girls to “shine their brightest light” that is at the heart of Girls Rule. To even make one girl realize that she is capable of achieving her dreams and to gift her with specific resources to make that dream come true is priceless. Patton envisions a whole generation of girls who are similarly empowered. One day, the world will be full of brilliant, beautiful, and bold girls who have the courage to transform themselves into whoever they want to be.

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•Medical grade injections, pills or drops (not available without a prescription)•Diet Plan •Printed instructions • Office Orientation and visit at the end of the program to provide guidance in transitioning off your diet and maintaining your weight loss•Visit at the halfway point (if necessary)•B12 injections to help with metabolism are available for $10 each during the HCG program •Shorter programs are available *email us at admin@thenaturopathicessentials.com


esert Landscapes Kevin Mengus is a photography student at The Art Institute of Phoenix. He was assigned as a project to photograph desert landscapes throughout the Sonora. We hope you will enjoy his work as much as we do.

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hoenix Fashion Week

2 0 13 E m e r g i n g D e s i g n e r s & M o d e l s

Phoenix Fashion Week Phoenix Fashion Week was a hit this year with its ninth annual show taking place in the beginning of October at the glamorous Talking Stick Resort in Scottsdale. The mission of the show is to bridge local and national designers with buyers, boutiques and fashion-lovers alike. And with 28 designers showcasing their collections over four days of fashion, Phoenix Fashion Week is proving that the Southwest has style. Designer of the Year The Phoenix Fashion Week team is always on the hunt for the next big thing, and they scour America to find it. The team handpicks 12 designers from 8 cities to be featured in their Emerging Designer Program. The designers are then presented with various challenges in the months leading up to the shows, culminating in the announcement of the Emerging Designer winner on the last night of Phoenix Fashion Week. This year’s winner was Dolcessa Swimwear, designed by Katya Leoncio. Dolcessa offers luxury swimsuits that f latter the body with unique cuts and colors. Some suits come with ruff les and fringe at the bust, while others like the one pieces are eye-catching with their corset-like ties. The suits have been featured in “People,” “Maxim,” and most famously, the “Sports Illustrated Swimsuit” edition for the last three years. Katya Leoncio’s fine craftsmanship on Dolcessa earned her the coveted title of Emerging Designer and a $10,000 prize. Their ideology behind the brand is, “Luxury Swimwear for the confident woman,“ and it could not have been more apparent while models dawned the sexy swimwear and strutted down the runway.

Model of the Year Phoenix Fashion Week also hosts a Model of the Year Contest. The local models go through a rigorous process to be accepted into the top 40 group. The chosen models are then given various challenges to excel in, like posing for headshots and print ads. After walking the catwalk at the shows, the winners are announced on the final night. This year’s champions were Madison Farrell and Denis Danicic who were awarded with a modeling contract with The Agency Arizona.

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By Clarissa Bur t with Karyssa Wilhelm

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aking esert Landscapes Change Last

What Matters Most

BY D r. Pe g g y M a r s h a l l

BY Ke v i n M a g n u s

w w w.imagoper for mance.com

w w w. w e b s i t e . c o m

Re a d y f o r C h a n g e

It’s easy to begin the year with a list of changes we want to personally make in our lives. It is a time of new beginnings and we are looking forward to new opportunities and endless possibilities. It is important to align the opportunities with what matters most. Narrowing the list of changes to three-five opportunities could guide the identification of what matters most and also alleviate the potential for losing focus. Getting in touch with what matters most allows for greater alignment with mission and purpose. What is the one thing that done differently could make a huge difference in your life? What could you change that will take you closer to what you are most passionate about? What do you want to be known for?

Being ready for change is a critical ingredient to sustained change. Having both the willingness and courage to change means acknowledging that something is amiss or an issue needs to be resolved and we are ready to move into action. Once again, the will and courage for change is something that comes from deep inside of us, not from outside pressure. Next, once the desired behavior is identified, people have to ensure that they have the tools and resources to make and sustain the change. This tends to be the step that many people overlook. There is excitement about new behaviors along with the positive envisioning of desired outcomes which sometimes results in a miss on identifying the tools and resources necessary to make the change. Without these tools and resources, there is a greater risk of not succeeding.

M a k i n g C h a n g e Yo u r s

S e t G o a l s - Ta ke A c t i o n

What’s most important about change is that the desire for change belongs to you! When you are completely honest with yourself, do you want to make a change or is it something that family or others want for you? Sometimes others see qualities in us that would make us “good” at something or see opportunities for us so they encourage us to move in that direction. Caution: it may not be your direction. You must have the heart for the change in order to sustain it. Believe it or not, making change takes considerable energy and focus. Making sacrifices will be part of the change process, so the change has to have high desirability.

Setting SMART goals allows people to take the right actions at the right time in order to reach goals. The acronym SMART represents; Specific, Measureable, Attainable, Relevant, and Timely. Specific goals are clear, direct and focus on the desired behavior not simply a broad aim or good intention. Including words such as what; where; and when helps to surface the expected outcome. Being able to put a number with the specifics of the goal leads them to being measureable. Measurable goals answer the question “What does success look like?” Attainable goals are within our reach. Nothing is more demoralizing than a goal that is unattainable. When our goals seem unattainable we lose momentum quickly and go back to doing what we have always done. Relevant goals align focus with what matters most and map back to the “why”

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Tr a c k i n g a n d M e a s u r e m e n t Every successful change effort begins with tracking and measurement. This process provides for an understanding of current state-what is currently happening and lays out the pathway to success. A good practice is to track progress at least weekly. It’s great feedback and keeps the momentum going. Tracking can also identify distractions, challenges and minor setbacks so that when they do arise, they can be addressed quickly and successfully in order to avoid long-term consequences.

Re w a r d s a n d C e l e b r a t i o n s

of the change. Having a time-frame for accomplishing goals provides a sense of urgency to accomplishing them. Choosing 30, 60 or 90 day timeframes for achieving goals is the ideal. A potential issue arises when the time frames are extended out too far as there is a tendency to delay action.

I n t e n t i o n - At t e n t i o n The intention to change needs attention to be successful. What is focused on gets stronger and that which is not focused on becomes weaker. It’s a simple principle yet extremely important to the process of change. New consistent behaviors will need to focus on desired outcomes. These consistent behaviors reinforce and support goals on a daily basis. Secondarily, what competes for attention must not distract from ultimate success. Sometimes these distractions may not even be known prior to engaging in change efforts, rather they emerge in the process. Having a plan for dealing with distractions and competing commitments as they surface will definitely serve to mitigate them. Additionally, in trying to anticipate what might become a distraction, negotiating with others before the change process begins can minimize the impact of the distractions.

Why is it so important to celebrate success? Celebration is a form of gratitude. Recognizing the wonderful experiences and successes we have in our lives serves to create more of them. In addition, one of the best ways to create our future is to leverage what we know about our past successes. Finally, these celebrations can help to rewire our brains so that our focus is on what led to success rather than what is missing. The process of change is a journey that is fraught with challenges and minor set-backs. Change is the one constant in our lives and yet at times it can feel overwhelming. However, when we can harness our energy and actually take charge of the change we want in our lives we become empowered and can live into all that is possible for us.

Dr. Peggy Marshall is the Principal of Imago Performance Consulting Group and can be reached at www.imagoperformance.com.

To receive to Dr. Peggy Marshall’s monthly articles visit discovertheregion.com and click subscribe from the top menu.

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Rewards increase motivation, buy-in, and a sense of accomplishment. High achieving individuals tend to delay rewarding behaviors until the final goal is met. Rewarding short-term accomplishments can serve to reinforce new behaviors and actually lead to sustainment of those behaviors. Thinking beyond simple monetary rewards can also result in more satisfaction with goal attainment.

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weet Swingin’ Sammi & Mad Dog Madison BY Pe t e Pe t e r s w w w. s t r a i g h t d ow n t h e m i d d l e s h ow. c o m

Sweet Swingin’ Sammi and Mad Dog Madison The Future of Women’s Golf Those who don’t play golf often have a hard time envisioning why those who do are so adamant about the game. If you‘ve heard about the book A Good Walk Spoiled by John Feinstein and never read it, you may think that’s all golf is. After all, who in their right mind would waste four to five hours walking around chasing a little white sphere with a bunch of sticks? The ridiculous part is, once you have found the elusive object, you take one of your sticks and hit it away from yourself only to go look for it again. Assuming you find it, you proceed to repeat the activity using different sticks (that you carry in a bag with other assorted paraphernalia) until you put the ball in a hole. Once the ball is in the hole, you take it out and repeat the process until you have put the ball into 18 holes and taken it out 18 times. It’s easy to see why the uninitiated would see this as a misspent use of time and energy that has no redeeming features. Golf can afford a multitude of life lessons for any player, as well as economic advantages for the young player that might not be available in the major sports. If a youngster acquires a like, dare I say love, of the game, it is possible that golf could reward them with an education beyond high school. It is indeed the case that high school graduates who can play golf and have done

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so at an organized level may have the basis for a “free ride” to any number of schools across this great land. This holds true for talented young men, but is most definitely the case for the young female athlete that takes a shine to the game of golf. This was pointed out to me by Mike Haddow, Golf Coach at Emery Riddle University in Prescott, Arizona. He said that the field of golf scholarships for women is virtually untapped. I met him at the Arizona State Championships for Division I and II, boys and girls. He was there recruiting for both the men’s and women’s teams. Coach Haddow explained that because of Title IX funding, the number of unclaimed scholarships for women far outreaches the number of players available. So for that reason, the watch phrase for the young female athletes is “play golf.”


I can’t think of another sport besides golf that can offer the opportunity for a college scholarship without consideration for size and strength. It is a skill development activity. If a young lady’s skills are such that she can shoot 80 or better for 18 holes, chances are good she can score a scholarship, according to Coach Haddow. The best way to develop the skills? Start early. Oh, and mom and dad, if you don’t play, now is a good time to start. Learn the game with your youngsters. It’s not too late for you.

One is Madison Kerr from Surprise Arizona. Madison is a nine-year-old young lady who has been playing the game since age four. She plays in the U.S. Kid’s Golf program where she travels around the state with her dad to tournaments in Tucson, Scottsdale, Mesa and other locations in Arizona. She plays in events most weekends.

After the first round, Thunderbird was leading the tournament. One of her teammates was disqualified for signing an incorrect scorecard, which scrapped his great score of 73. That caused Samantha’s score of 78 to be used in its place, which pushed the team five strokes behind the new leaders and into second place. I’ll have Samantha finish that story later. I visited with Madison and Samantha on the patio at Sun City Country Club on a chilly Saturday morning. Here are excerpts from that conversation I published on my golf program, Straight Down the Middle Show (SDTM). SDTM: Good morning ladies. I’m glad to see we all have our jackets on this morning. The first question is how old were you when you first picked up a golf club? MADISON: I was 4 years old. I would go to the driving range with my Dad.

I first met her at The Wigwam driving range where she

Samantha

was getting ready to play an event. She has a powerful swing for a youngster and she can make good contact on a regular basis. If she continues to enjoy and work at the game she just might have the future she wants to have. Samantha Sandland is a sixteen-year-old who plays her golf for the Thunderbird High School boys’ golf team. T-Bird doesn’t have a girl’s team.

Madison

SAMANTHA: About the same age 4-5. I would go to the driving range with my Dad and I picked up a club and I took to it like a duck to water. I really liked it. SDTM: When was the first time you played on a golf course and how many holes did you play?

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In keeping with that thought, what follows is an interview with two young female golfers that have promising futures and a desire to compete. Both started young and have continued to excel. They both have every intention to succeed in golf.

I first met Samantha when her team won the Fall Preview Tournament held at Alta Mesa Country Club in August. The next time I saw her was at the Arizona State High School Championships held at Aguilla Golf Course in Phoenix.

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MADISON: I was about 4 and I played three holes. SAMANTHA: I was about five and I played about three or four holes and just hit balls around them. SDTM: Can you remember your thoughts when you came of the course that first time? Was it love at first sight? MADISON: It was love at first sight. I couldn’t stop playing golf. I would take plastic balls and hit them at home for fun. I just wanted to play. It was so much fun. SAMANTHA: I started to like it even more when my Dad took me and my younger (by three years) brother to the course and we would make up games and then go for ice cream afterward. SDTM: At this point do you take part in any other sports? MADISON: I play soccer. It gets me pumped up for golf. I score a lot of goals and I’m pumped up for golf the next day. I also do gymnastics which, stretches me out for golf and gets me loosened up. SAMANTHA: I’m just focusing on golf. I practice every day and try to get better. That’s my goal.

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SDTM: Would you consider yourself a grinder? SAMANTHA: Yeah. I practice and play every day. I practice 75% of my time on the short game for 100 to 50 yards. I hit different shots with my 52, 56 and 60 degree wedges. I hit low checkers, pitches, and f lop shots from different lies. The other 25% of my practice is on ball striking. SDTM: How’s your putting? Are you a good patter?

SDTM: Maybe you should use your 8 iron to putt with because it’s your favorite? MADISON: I’ve tried that before. I’ve putted with my Driver, Hybrid, 8 iron sand wedge; I’ve used every club in my bag. SDTM: Sam, Putter only? SAMANTHA: Yeah. I’m stable from inside 6-10 feet. I’m a decent putter.

SDTM: What do you do if things aren’t going well in a tournament? SAMANTHA: If I get frustrated I take a breather, I calm down and I stop myself. I walk slower so I can think more. I imagine I’m three over and how I can get it back. SDTM: Tell me about the State Championship. After the first round, Thunderbird was leading the tournament. One of your teammates was disqualified for signing an incorrect scorecard. That caused your score of 78 to be used and further caused the team to fall to five strokes behind the new leaders and into second place. Tell me about the 78. SAMANTHA: I wasn’t really pleased but I couldn’t do anything to change it.

SDTM: How many tournaments do you play in?

SDTM: That set up a need for a second day rally for your Thunderbird team. What were you thinking as you were fashioning your 2 under par 70.

MADISON: I practice a few days a week and Saturday and play tournaments on Sunday.

SAMANTHA: I wasn’t thinking about it. I was just trying to play the golf course and have fun.

SAMANTHA: I play tournaments for fun. AJGA, JGAA and PGA SW Section events. There is a tournament pretty much every week or two. The rest of the time I practice and get in a full round every day.

SDTM: I suppose the most fun came when you found out your team had won and you were eighth best medalist and you beat all the boys that final day. SAMANTHA: Yeah.

SDTM: You’re both in school. How are the grades? SDTM: Do either of you have a nickname? MADISON: I get really good grades. I got all A’s and I was surprised. I was the only one to get that. SAMANTHA: I’m doing good. I have a 3.5 average. I go in early every morning to catch up on school work. SDTM: What do you see for yourself in golf ? MADISON: I want to keep playing, get better and be on the LPGA Tour.

MADISON: My Dad calls me “Mad Dog” because I’m so tough on the golf course. SAMANTHA: I don’t have one. SDTM: I have one for you. “Sweet Swingin’ Sammi Sandland” OK? SAMANTHA: (Laughing) OK!

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MADISON: I’m pretty good. I’ve had 30footer and about 40-footer go in. Sometimes I hit some pretty bad putts and I get frustrated and then in another tournament I hit some really good putts.

SAMANTHA: I’d love to play for a university. I’m going to start doing some college visits when I’m playing AJGA events. That should be fun the next couple of years. Who knows where I can take the game. I practice every day trying to get in my 10,000 hours by graduation. I have 6,000 in now. There are plenty of careers in golf but playing on the LPGA is my dream.

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SDTM: You are only six years apart in age. Maybe several years from now you could be coming down the stretch in the U.S. Women’s Open together battling for the championship. Now wouldn’t that be fun? BOTH: (Laughing) Yes. SDTM: Thank you ladies. Play well and keep it Straight Down the Middle!

About the Author H. B. “Pete” Peters is the Producer and Host of the “Straight Down the Middle Show” which is dedicated to “Covering Golf in Arizona like Cactus Covers the Desert.” The show has become the “Voice of Arizona High School Golf ” by covering the High School golf events, interviewing the coaches and their players, as well as discussing the Junior Golf scene. “Straight Down the Middle” can be heard twice a week at www. straightdownthemiddleshow.com. The Tuesday 6:30 PM show (Arizona Time) is dedicated to high school and the juniors and the Thursday 9AM show (Arizona Time) is dedicated to the business of golf. Pete has been in advertising and marketing for over 40 years. Pete has been a consultant to newspapers and magazines and has owned and operated a monthly golf newspaper. He has developed fundraisers, led community events, and served on boards of directors for several non-prof it organizations. Pete has been the organizing force behind golf tournaments, walk-a-thons, youth activities and special events. Pete has undertaken several entrepreneurial ventures, including operation of a catering business; production of a dinner theater; organizing of golf tournaments; speaking engagements and seminars; newspaper publisher; promotional products business ; business consultant and business opportunity specialist. He is responsible for 65 Entrepreneurs starting their own promotional products business.

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F

eatured Person Stacy Friedman Moore

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A native Floridian, Stacy Friedman Moore is a former newspaper reporter, public relations specialist and business owner. She is currently completing a book on her intriguing life, focusing on mid-life revelations entitled “Journey of My Heart” Leaving the perfect man for the perfect woman, which will be available in the Spring. She has lived in Sedona, Arizona for six years and her interests include travel, hiking in the beautiful red rocks, swimming, tennis and writing. She is the mother of three notable adult children and two “furries”, dogs she and her partner rescued.

“I had been married for nearly twenty eight year to my husband, my best friend. But Claudette had taken me to where my body and spirit had always wanted to go. We talk about how we must have been lovers in a past life and somehow were never able to consummate our love. We have been lost souls searching for each other and now we were overjoyed to be reunited.” from: Journey of My Heart by: Stacy Friedman Moore

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R

aw

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models: Marissa Christina Candelaria Freddie Paull photographer: Damon Wilson makeup: Meagan Boen hair: Kathie Hale accessories Denise Rodriguez location: Meta19 Studio

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BY

Laura Fischer

RAW: natural born artists is an independent arts organization, for artists, by artists.
 
We’re an international community made up of creative individuals across the globe.
 
Our mission is to provide independent artists within the first 10 years of their career with the tools, resources and exposure needed to inspire and cultivate creativity.
 
We welcome all genres of art including independent film, fashion, music, visual art, performing art, hairstylists, makeup artists and more.
 
We encourage the creative success of the many visionaries and storytellers of our generation.


RAW Directors hand-pick and spotlight local artistic talents. The categories include film, fashion, music, visual art, hair & makeup artistry, and performance art. With artists from all genres in each showcase, RAW events come together to form an amazing one-night circus of creativity. These showcases occur every other month in each city location. Our Phoenix RAW showcases are held at The Monarch Theatre in Downtown Phoenix. You can learn more at RAWartists.org/phoenix.

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A number of artists from the RAW/Phoenix worked together to show their talents through the camera lens of Jeramie Campbell and Damon Wilson. The photos showcase the talents of many of the genres listed above. RAW provides a platform for the local community to see, hear and love the artists that are living and working in their own back yard! Raw hope you enjoy the visual journey!

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artist: Jesse Perry photographer: Damon Wilson location: Meta19 Studio


photographer: Jeramie Campbell model: Dylan Raines (from the band The Hunted) location: Clarendon Hotel

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photographer: Jeramie Campbell models: Taylor Divine, Deanna Harbottle, Michelle Cantor, Katie Grinstead clothing & accessories by: Delora Fuglem / Kismit Design makeup: Jennifer Lynn of Photojennic Beauty hair: Chelsea Bruce location: Clarendon Hotel

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photographer: Damon Wilson models: Ivana Kat, Brittany Boysel, clothing & accessories: Delora Fuglem / Kismit Design Jessica Lake / Treasure Eutopia Amber Lillie / VSLZ Fashun Group makeup: Sonia Robertson hair: Kathie Hale location: Bar Smith

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edona Women BY S t a c y F r i e d m a n M o o r e

Sedona, Arizona is known for its beautiful Red Rocks, its mild four seasons, its myriad of outdoor activities and its many talented artists. But what isn’t widely publicized is the people who are self lessly giving of themselves to make a difference in not only the local community but globally. I had the privilege of interviewing six amazing women in Sedona, all over the age of 50, who could be sitting back enjoying the good life Sedona offers to those who live here. However, they are continuing to share their special skills and talents in many ways. Each of these women is unique but what they have in common is their unwavering passion and their strong leadership skills. It was an honor to spend time with them. And it was interesting to learn how they came to live in Sedona.

Martha Mayho o d M e r t z I met Martha Mayhood Mertz several years ago in a writing class given by another one of the six amazing Sedona women, Cynthia Richmond. Martha went on to publish her book, “Becoming Athena: Eight Principles of Enlightened Leadership.” In this book she offers eight principles that are the building blocks for leaders of both genders.

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Throughout her life, Martha saw women denied recognition and opportunities for leadership. So in 1982 she launched the Athena Award, named for the strong, enlightened goddess. The award recognizes women who excel at their profession, give back to their community and help raise up other leaders, especially women. Now more than a quarter-century later, Athena International is a global movement that is in more than 500 U.S. cities and six foreign countries and has more than 6,000 Athena Award recipients that have come from United States, Canada, Russia, The United Arab Emirates and the United Kingdom. A non-profit organization, it supports, develops and honors women leaders, inspiring them to reach their full potential and create balance in leadership worldwide. Besides being the founder of Athena International, Martha is also a speaker, author and successful owner of the Michiganbased firm Mayhood/Mertz Investments, Inc. What she has found from her travels worldwide with Athena International is that women everywhere share the same fundamental hopes and the same strengths. And that leadership is not about position, a title or a destination. It’s about a journey, a measure of a person and how to lead from what is learned. It’s the soul made visible. And since 2011, Martha has taken Athena a step further. After a speaking engagement in Tempe, Sue Ellen, a vivacious red-head who had just been released after sixteen months in prison approached her. She had read Martha’s book and it inspired her to want to take it back to women in prison. So “Gina’s Team” Lead from Within (named after Sue Ellen’s cell mate who tragically passed away) embracing the Athena

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Leadership Model and promoting education, not incarceration evolved at Perryville Womens Prison, which is fifteen minutes west of Phoenix. It meets once a week for six weeks and is offered three times a year. To date, 227 have graduated from the program with ninety-seven being released from prison. Of those, only two (one was mentally ill) have returned. The statistic for returning prisoners is normally sixty percent. Martha has helped these women in many ways with her leadership principles - live authentically, learn constantly, advocate fiercely, act courageously, foster collaboration, build relationships, give back and celebrate. Martha would come to Sedona to visit her two sisters and fell in love with the area like many do. But by the time she and her husband built their house, both sisters moved away. Most people who know Martha would be surprised to learn she used to be glossophobia - terrified to speak in public. She said she was paralyzed with fear and had no confidence going back to thinking her ideas were of no value. But she was so passionate in what she believed she began to like it and overcame it. In all that she has done and continues to do, Martha considers her three children to be her greatest accomplishment and to her they are her greatest teachers.

Terrie Frankel Terrie Frankel is a producer, performer, film-maker, screen writer and composer. But most people remember her and her twin sister, Jennie, for being the “Doublemint Twins” and for singing the the original Doublemint jingle, “Double your pleasure, Double your fun,with double good, double good Doublemint gum!” that made the gum famous. They even have a Doublemint room filled with memorabilia in La Posada Hotel in Winslow, Arizona. I met Terrie several years ago at one of Cynthia Richmond’s writers workshops when she and her sister spoke to our group about their New York Times best seller, “You’ll Never Make Love in This Town Again” that they had written. I remember her being the more timid of the two. But since her sister passed away five years ago, Terrie, as she says, could have gone into a shell or be true to her feelings and be authentic. That is the Terrie she has evolved into, becoming very involved in the political scene in Sedona and actively supporting Veterans. She has taken on some of her sister’s best qualities and has become “fearless.” Landing the Doublemint gig at age seventeen led to the girls auditioning for the USO and going over to Vietnam the next year to perform, which Terrie says was a life altering experience. This catapulted their Hollywood career. And to this day, Terrie is a supporter of Veterans and Veterans causes. She has spoken at various Veterans events and has a bench dedicated to her and her sister at The Sedona Military Park. She is also involved with the Marine Corps League. Terrie used her filmmaking skills to produce a tribute to both her twin and those who served in all wars. Originally Terrie Boyd from Hammond, Indiana, most people would be surprised to learn she is f luent in both Cantonese and Mandarin. She studied at the the University of Hong Kong and taught English to Chinese immigrants in China Town in Los Angeles. She also brings a Chinese contingent every year to the Sedona Film Festival - another pet project of hers. Terrie happens to live in one of Sedona’s most talked about houses. Nestled up on a hill overlooking Schnebly Hill and Tlaquepaque bridge, the house is known as the “Lucy” house. As you drive by a mannequin of Lucy stands waving off a wraparound balcony. Terrie believes someone in the Ball family originally owned it. Lucy’s nephew, Geoffrey Ball, is an architect in Cottonwood and her brother Fred, owned the View Motel in Cottonwood before he passed away. Built in 1978, it is called the House of Seven Arches and Terrie fell in love with Sedona and the house when she first visited the area with her sister. And with many Sedona stories, it has a serendipity ending. Terrie became acquainted with the owner and ended up marrying him.

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“You can give of yourself in whatever area of passion you have and you will get 1,000 percent in return in ways you’ve never imagined,” Martha said.

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I got to experience the house first hand when I went to interview Terrie. I was amazed at it’s size - two levels that could be two complete houses - and 4,000 square feet. Her walls are adorned with accolades and celebrity pictures. But it’s Terrie’s presence that makes the house feel like a home. One of her philosophies is “give something to everyone you meet whether it’s a smile or a compliment.” The other is “treat a king like he is a pauper and treat a pauper like he is a king.”

Fran Elliott Fran Elliott is an avid art collector and an appraiser of personal property and since 1995, the founder of The Hairy Angel Foundation. Quite by accident, Fran discovered that her Golden Retrievers were the perfect Assistance Dogs for children with autism. Her neighbor’s child, who had never communicated using speech had talked to her dog, Pandorable,while playing in the yard. Prior to that time, having been a breeder for thirty years, she had given dogs to a group that trained them to be sold as Guide Dogs. The Hairy Angel Foundation became the first volunteer organization in the country to provide service dogs for Autism. Since its inception, The Hairy Angel Foundation has placed 300 service dogs. Based on the possibility of a special connection between her dogs and autistic children, Fran went to Phoenix to hear Temple Grandin, a doctor of animal science and professor at Colorado State University. Grandin is a best selling author, autistic activist and consultant on animal behavior for the livestock industry and who herself was diagnosed with autism at the age of two. She realized from listening to Temple Grandin that her Golden Retrievers were a perfect match for autistic children, who are super sensitive to all senses as are the dogs. Goldens are a natural according to Fran. They give the kids a purpose and constant repetition, which is something autistic kids love. They are velcro dogs, very loyal and they have a great sense of danger. They are nonjudgmental and give unconditional love. Fran is lucky to have dedicated volunteers who raise these puppies for at least nine months. These “puppy raisers” take the pups regularly to a professional trainer, Gary DeGeronimo who has been working with Fran since 2001. He is a therapy and service dog consultant and continues to provide private and group obedience classes including behavior modification. While living with the volunteer, all vet bills are paid for and expenses are tax-deductible. One perk if you decide to be a puppy raiser is that you will receive a free forever dog from the next litter. Without such generous and devoted volunteers, the organization wouldn’t be able to place the dogs for free. Most families don’t have $25,000 that it costs to place service dogs. Fran and her husband Ed’s property is a permanent home for currently nine Golden Retrievers, a retired race horse, three cats and a Mammoth donkey. There are no kennels, the dogs run free around the property although they do have their own room inside the house. The Hairy Angel Foundation held it’s first annual “Valuation Day” in Sedona this past November. For a fee of twenty dollars per item, you received a verbal valuation on things such as pottery, glassware, silver and gold, jewelry, coins, textiles, books and art. The organization does no other fund-raising besides and occasional rummage sale. They are always looking for loving homes to help with “puppy raising” and you can follow The Hairy Angel Foundation on Facebook. Her other passion is art and she is a vigorous advocate for recognizing women artists, especially in Arizona. Fran was instrumental in finding every single woman who painted in Arizona before 1945 that went into the book “Arizona’s Pioneering Women Artists”. The book pays tribute to the adventurous and often independent women who came from big cities and settled in Arizona during its Territorial Period. These women artists painted professionally and trained like men but they had no place to exhibit their work. Even today in the art world, women artists are not valued like men and there is not a single female artist in the Top 100 Artists.

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Fran is also owner of the world’s largest collection of Legendware of Sedona pottery created by Valenty Zaharek, who was a very good sculptor as well as pottery designer and she has the first commercial pottery ever produced by him. That is something many people don’t know. She also is a curator on modish.net, which celebrates all things modern. Fran Elliott’s particular area of expertise as a qualified Fine Arts appraiser is in regional Arizona artwork, especially by early women artists (1900 - 1950). She has been published in the Museum of Northern Arizona “Plateau Journal” in 2003 and has been asked to speak on the subject to many museums and groups throughout the Southwest. She is also the founder and chairperson of the Arizona Chapter of the National Museum of Women in the Arts, (www.aznmwa.org), and her personal collection of early Arizona women artists represents the largest one of its kind. Fran came to Sedona after living with her husband, Ed, in Nairobi, Kenya for five years. People there lived in slums, there were civil wars and Islamic militants. It was a very dangerous place to live. And after Ed’s business partner was murdered they decided to leave. She had only ever been to Phoenix and didn’t really like it but all it took was a drive up Highway 179. Once she saw the red rocks of Sedona they had a house within a week and have never left.

Barbara Litrel l Barbara Litrell, like Martha Mertz and Fran Elliott, has done a lot to advocate women’s issues and promote the importance of empowering women. Most locals in Sedona know Barbara from being on the Sedona City Council where she brings more than forty years of knowledge in education, business, nonprofit and community volunteer experience. She grew up in New York and spent twenty eight years in advertising sales and management with the New York Times and as a publisher of national magazines including McCall’s, Working Woman and Working Mother reaching out to more than fifty eight million women. In 2000 she formed B. Litrell Communications Corp. and had her own business for four years. Barbara came to Sedona after winning a timeshare week at a silent auction during a golf tournament in New York. After trying to figure out where to go with her busy schedule, a girl in her office visited Sedona and brought her back “Vortex in a Can” and said golf was great there. An avid golfer, Barbara decided that was the place to go. So with her husband, Michael, they arrived at 10 pm and when they awoke they did the “Oh My God, look at the red rocks” epiphany so many visitors have and tried to experience everything they could in Sedona by foot, air and car. They bought a time share that first trip and began visiting every six months and by the time they retired, Red Rock fever hit hard and they bought their first house in Verde Santa Fe where Barbara planned to play golf every day. Her dad moved down and lived next door. But she soon found herself wanting to get involved in the community, first getting immersed in water issues which parlayed into other equally important stands such as the aging population, the lack of diversity in businesses and the health care system. She also sold real estate for several years. Barbara has been President of Keep Sedona Beautiful, dedicated to preserving the wonder of Sedona; Executive Director of Verde Valley Caregivers Coalition; a board member of the National Association of Women Business Owners launching the Annual Entrepreneurial Excellence Awards Program spotlighting women business owners in Sedona and the Verde Valley. She has been on the Sedona City Council since 2008. For the past seven years, Barbara has organized and co-chaired Mitzvah (Good Deed) Day- the largest one day of volunteer service activities benefiting organizations and individuals throughout Sedona and the Verde Valley. And for ten years, she has run an annual Mary Magdalene Celebration in Sedona with the goal of empowering women spiritually and socially. One of her inspirations is Sister Joan Chittister, a Benediction nun, author and speaker who writes and speaks on women in the church and society, promoting human rights, peace and justice. People who accomplish and inspire others, like the pioneer women who had the courage to make major moves and Hillary Clinton who as a wife, mother and public figure is smart and competent are an inf luence on Barbara.

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Fran continues to work hard on her two projects. Getting Arizona history to recognize women can paint and continuing her Hairy Angel Foundation are two huge endeavors that some people can only dream about.

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Barbara is also involved in the first Annual World Peace Dance coming in February 2014. A week of workshops in various topics to teach real hands-on skills for peaceful living, it will culminate with a dance celebration showcasing dances of conf lict and pain, followed by healing and peace. She loves to cook, never trying out a recipe before making it but her secret is to always include mashed potatoes so no

Cynthia Richmond Cynthia Richmond is an author, editor, behavioral therapist, dream expert, television and radio host, columnist and speaker. I met Cynthia five years ago at one of her weekend writer’s workshops and immediately became hooked on her writing classes. Richmond came to Sedona originally to start a business with a couple of friends. Her daughter was in college and it felt like the right time to make the move from Northern California. When she arrived in the Red Rocks she realized that they each had different ideas on how to run the business and it wasn’t going to work out. But she fell in love with the area and the people, especially the women. She said she’s never had as many wonderful friends as she has here in Sedona. So she walked the labyrinth at the Lodge of Sedona, known as a moving meditation and asked the question, “how can I use the skills, talents and abilities that I already have to be of service to this community and make a living?” When she got to the center of the labyrinth she saw a vision of herself sitting at someone’s bedside writing his life story, when she exited the walk the title “The Story of Your Life Workshop” came to mind. Since that time she has helped more than 440 people write their stories in a safe and nurturing environment so that their histories and stories can live on. Cynthia’s passion is to help make people’s dreams come true and their lives better. One frequent aspect is overcoming fear, something she herself has addressed straight on. One of her fears was water so she learned to swim, snorkel, water-ski and even go white water rafting. She has soloed an airplane and taken flying lessons. She backpacked the Grand Canyon and went mountain repelling. Overcoming her own fears gave her the determination to write and self-publish her first book, “How to Be Happy.” She then hired a publicist who cost $3,000 a month and required a four-month contract to help her promote the book pre-internet. With just $6,000 in her bank account, Cynthia knew it would be a gamble but it paid off. She appeared on Sally Jesse Rafael, her first national television program in month one and has since appeared on nearly every talk show on TV including Oprah, Dr. Phil and Dr. Oz. She had a dream column in the Los Angeles Times and another in the Arizona Republic and hosted her own daily national television show called “State of Mind,” which aired on the NBC cable network. The show helped people address their problems so they could lead a more fulfilling life. One day dreams were discussed on the show and the subject was so popular that it became a weekly topic. Dreams became such a popular subject that Cynthia was soon in demand on national television and radio shows. Today she Skypes and Facetimes with clients all over the world who record their dreams and share them with her so she can help them realize the value nightly dreams deliver. Her book, Dream Power, How to Use Your Night Dreams to Change Your Life Simon & Schuster, helps readers to remember and interpret their dreams and use them to make life-goals a reality. Montaque Ullman, M.D. one of the modern Father’s of dream work endorsed Cynthia’s work in 2005 and they corresponded for a while. It was pivotal in her career. “There are always naysayers in areas of research that is not deemed concrete, Monty’s endorsement was my stamp of approval.” Cynthia’s current book, The Dream Power Journal is available on Amazon.com and is based on reading more than 55,000 dreams. Cynthia continues to lead workshops and classes as well as individual sessions helping people to empower their lives. Besides conducting her writing classes and dream consultations, Cynthia conducts weekly Salons where people come and discuss various philosophical topics and share food and drink; this satisfies her home chef hobby. What people would be surprised to learn about Cynthia is that although appearing quite confident she has “white-knuckled” her way through life with a lot of fear but has met it head on. Inspired by her grandmothers who both went through the Great Depression and were very resourceful and by her own daughter, who she says is the love of her life, Cynthia now finds her greatest accomplishment is being healthy, fit and feeling grateful and open to what each day brings.

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Cynthia is currently writing an e-book on the sacred language of dreams and how to get the best sleep possible. I expect we will hear a lot more from Cynthia in years to come. She says she will never retire because she loves what she is doing.

Dott ie Webster ( B u b b l e s ) one leaves hungry! And still obsessed with golf, Barbara has plans to someday play everyday. Dottie Webster or “Bubbles” as her grandchildren call her, enjoys the adventure of new things, something that began back when she joined the Girl Scouts at the age of ten. She loves variety in life and describes herself as potpourri.

Involved in various organizations such as the Junior League, Dottie was one of the first advocates of canvas grocery bags back in the 1980s. Calling them BYOB (Bring Your Own Bag), she gave all the profits in her first canvas bag venture to The Nature Conservancy. Dottie was instrumental in bringing canvas bags to Sedona where they were used for the first Art Festival called the Apple Fest. She brought her back-stock from Indiana and got Beverly’s, the first organic grocery store in Sedona to sell them. Dottie was a founding member of The Sedona Women, “Dames Who Make A Difference” which was started in 2000. They are dedicated to making a positive and lasting impact on the community by providing opportunities for women to build relationships, to learn about the community, to support community needs and to enhance the natural beauty and distinctive character of Sedona. Sedona was introduced to Dottie via “Arizona Highways” magazine which mysteriously showed up at her house one day back in 1981. It was years later that she discovered her insurance man had sent the magazine as a gift. Like most people who visit Sedona, she and her husband fell in love with the area and bought a vacation home. A few years later they bought a lot which they held on to for thirteen years before building and moving to Sedona full time in 1997. Her inspirations are Georgia O’Keefe, widely recognized as The Mother of American Modernism and Jennie Jerome Churchill, the mother of Winston Churchill and the daughter of Leonard Jerome who founded Jerome, Arizona. Dottie loves their feistiness and independence. She loves gardening, traveling, hiking, photography and began in Cynthia Richmond’s Sedona Dream Group ten years ago. Dottie is the author of two books - “A Window on Sedona, Living in the Red Rocks (a beautiful coffee table book) and “A Recipe Reminder,” her first book that sold more than 10,000 copies in Indiana. It is categorized by recipe, source and has room for comments. It is the perfect dinner party record indexing menu, guests and what the host/hostess wore. Dottie is a firm believer in alternative medicine and is fully certified in Thought Field Therapy. Thought Field Therapy, or TFT for short, uses a tapping sequence in the form of a healing code, balancing the body’s energy system and allowing you to eliminate most negative emotions within minutes, while promoting the body’s own healing ability. Founded by Dr. Roger Callahan, Dottie’s husband was cured of a terrible time anxiety using TFT. And she went for nine days after Hurricane Katrina to use this therapy on the hospital trauma staff members. She has also used TFT at a Rwanda orphanage, spending five weeks at a time there. Dottie goes every year to the Annual Energy Psychology Conference which integrates science, psychotherapy and the healing arts. Most people would be surprised to learn that Dottie looks at Tina Turner as her alter ego. She loves her amazing strength as a woman. Besides all of her other accolades, Dottie is also Yoga certified and a private pilot. Her greatest accomplishments though are her children and grandchildren. Dottie truly believes in giving back. She feels she is blessed with a nice life and financial security so she wants to be able to share. And that she does by also being a member of the Sedona Film Festival and being on the Chamber Music Advisory Board.

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Hailing from Indiana where she lived for twenty three years, Dottie was the first female on the school board and began a “great books program” with trained volunteers working once a week with sixty fourth and fifth grade students hand-picked by teachers to inspire them to think outside the box.

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S

isters On The Fly E M P OW E R I N G WO M E N BY T H E T H O U S A N D S BY C a t hy B u r f o r d & C a t hy D r oz

It all started with the simple realization that the wonderful experience enjoyed by two sisters was too good not to share with others. Real-life sisters Maurrie Sussman and Becky Clarke were enjoying a day of f ly-fishing, celebrating a great catch with a glass of wine, and ref lecting on how ‘it just doesn’t get any better than this’. Out of a desire to let other ‘sisters’ in on the pure pleasure of having a grand time in the great outdoors, Maurrie and Becky hatched the idea that lead to ‘Sisters On The Fly’ in 1999. Fast forward to 2013, and you will find the ranks of ‘sisters’ has swelled to over 4,000 members in the US and Canada, extending even to members in England and Australia! The emphasis has always been on fun; their motto ‘We have more fun than anyone’ rings loud and true. But don’t let this image of fun-loving gals just out for a good time fool you – there is so much more to being a ‘Sister’.

The rules are straightforward; ‘No men, No pets, No kids, Be nice.’ Actually, there are some events where the men and grandkids are invited to participate, but mainly it’s about getting together & having fun with your ‘sisters’ from all walks of life! While the largest majority of sisters choose to travel to sister events with their vintage trailers, having a trailer is not a requirement. The very concept of NOT having requirements is what is so appealing to members. A more diverse group of women is hard to find anywhere! While some organizations tend to attract members of similar mindsets, SOTF prides itself on being chock-full of independent and adventurous women. When asked to describe the group I always say “We have everything from an ex-playboy bunny to a retired prison warden”.

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Just as all the members are varied, so are their reasons for joining. Some of us join because we have friends who are ‘sisters’, and we want to be a part of such a highspirited group; some join because they want to expand their horizons and re-invent themselves into the bold and adventurous soul they want to be; some join because they saw a ‘Cowgirl Caravan’ of vintage trailers on the road & they want to be a part of it; and others join because they find the magnet of ‘sisterhood’ too hard to resist. Whatever the individual reasons are for joining, members will find a group that is short on criticism and long on camaraderie. As the name implies, f ly-fishing is a favorite activity for ‘sisters’. However, being an expert caster or f ly-tier isn’t a pre-requisite. Since this is a national organization, if you love to f ly fish you will find lots of opportunities to join up with other sisters and practice this mesmerizing art form. Rarely do you have to worry about what to do with the lunker that you catch, as most of the trips are catch-and-release. While fish-frys aren’t always on the menu, cast-iron cooking has served up some epic culinary masterpieces. Irene Rawlings has penned two books on Sisters On The Fly; the newest one is titled ’Cast-Iron

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Kristin Manas (Sister # 29) states, “I am proud to be a member of such a diverse group; all are welcome at SOTF, we don’t discriminate. And as far as being involved, you can do as much, or as little as you want. In fact, some in the group are widows who never thought they would be able to camp again after they lost their husbands. The Sisters gives them a chance to do what they love doing.” Perhaps most of all the sisters are always there for each other. Kristin states that once a sister received news that her mother had passed while she was on a sisters trip, “ and she felt that she was better off staying with her ‘sisters’ to heal and come to terms with the loss before she returned home.” There are many other examples of sisters relying on each other in times of stress or loss, times when sisters’ emotional and physical lives were saved. Out of a desire to comfort sisters who are experiencing trying times, the Traveling Quilt Project was born. Quilts have been purchased, created, restored, and are sent to sisters as a way to remind them that their ‘sisters’ are thinking of them during their struggles. These quilts are then returned to be sent on to the next sister in need. It is just one of many ways in which the ‘sisterhood’ contributes. And yes, quilts have even been sent to husbands, sons, and brothers of sisters, as everyone can appreciate and benefit from the warmth of a ‘group hug’.

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Cooking with Sisters On The Fly’. Inside these volumes you will find tasty recipes to prepare in the great outdoors, or in your kitchen at home. Great food and equally great presentation is always a major component of any ‘sisters’ event! The occasions that the sisters organize and participate in are as varied as the group itself; Cowgirl College where you learn all of the basics of being a ‘real’ cowgirl, Fish the Fish in beautiful Whitefish, Montana, Kayaking at Canyon Lake, Grand Canyon, Christmas in July, and the list goes on and on. Various groups of sisters from all over the country organize themed events and simple get-togethers, any excuse for a fun time. A big part of these events is the FUNraising to benefit our chosen charity ‘Casting for Recovery’. Silent auctions, live auctions, raff les, anything goes when it creates funds for this wonderful organization that provides f ly fishing trips and support for breast cancer patients. To date for 2013 Sisters on the Fly has raised over $90,000 for Casting for Recovery, a whopping 300% of our annual goal for donations! Any mention of SOTF would be remiss in overlooking the enticement of vintage trailer ownership. Most of us in Arizona have seen caravans of them travelling down the byways of our beautiful state. Your eye catches them from a distance and just like a moth to a f lame, you either speed up or slow down to get next to them for a closer look. Sister # 94, Vicky Kimling, owns the bordello-themed ‘Miss Floozy’ that was my first SOTF trailer encounter. Perfectly adorned outside and in, it sure made me want to have a trailer of my own! Which brings me to a very important fact of trailer ownership, decorating your trailer is often the most important aspect of it. . . While it is necessary to make sure that your trailer is roadworthy, this pales by comparison to the necessity of making the trailer ‘uniquely yours’. These vintage remnants of the heyday of family camping in the 40’s-60’s are so unique, in fact, that they can be quite a phenomenon when traveling together in a caravan. Several years back a particularly large group of sisters planned a trip from Mesa, AZ to Tombstone, with approximately 100 sisters in all. DPS had other ideas though, asking that the collection of vintage awesomeness split up into groups of 10-20 trailers maximum, leave plenty of space between trailers, and take different routes to create safety for said ‘spectacle’. Vicky fondly remembers this trip with a chuckle at the stares, honks, and thumbs-up she received as she towed Miss Floozy down the road wearing her rhinestone sunglasses, and pink feather boa f lapping in the breeze like Isadora Duncan. Kay Bates, Sister # 133, has a logical explanation for the

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number of trailers created during the mid-forties to 1960’s; up to that point in history so many of our resources were diverted to the war effort that gasoline, tires, and dependable automobiles were non-existent. It wasn’t until after WW II that our attention could be turned toward leisure pursuits, and trailer camping became incredibly popular and affordable. Now SOTF is searching out these gems and bringing them back to life in ways that the original owners likely never imagined! The pursuit of vintage trailers can become quite addictive, and some sisters have several to their names; all with varying themes, naturally.

Sisterhood is open to all from ages 21-100; and as Maurrie, Sister #1 once said, “Age doesn’t matter, it’s about whatever you have courage enough to try.” Many start out as guests to see if ‘Sisterhood’ is for them. Known as a ‘Sister On The Try’, you will come away feeling very much ‘at home’ and welcomed. These women are friendly, fun-loving, resourceful, talented, giving, caring, and who wouldn’t want thousands of sisters like that? So the next time you pass a ‘Cowgirl Caravan’ rolling down the highway, know that each trailer’s occupant was once like you with a gigantic case of vintage trailer envy.

www.sistersonthef ly.com

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Some sisters use their trailers for other purposes; some camp in them with their husbands, daughters, sisters, grandchildren; some strike out on their own for artistic pursuits. Take Karen McLain, Sister #1843 for example; she travels in her trailer to paint from life in the great outdoors, creating landscapes and capturing the majestic wonder of our American wild horses. She is resourceful and has learned to be remarkably self-sufficient and comfortable while she pursues her calling in the beauty of the West. Somehow she still finds the time to attend sister events.

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photo courtesy of One Lexington

elocation Guide T H E G U I D E TO A H A S S L E F R E E M OV E

BEFORE YOU LEAVE • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • •

Get est i m a t e s f ro m s eve ra l m ov i n g o r t r uc k rental c o m p a n i e s . Inquire a b o u t t h e a m o u n t o f i n s u ra n c e c ove ra g e the mov i n g c o m p a ny p rov i d e s . Plan yo u r t rave l i t i n e ra r y a n d m a ke l o d g i n g reser va t i o n s i n a d va n c e . Obtain re c o rd s f ro m d o c t o r s ( i n c l u d i n g d e n t a l x-rays, eye g l a s s p re s c r i p t i o n s a n d va c c i na t i o n s ) . Request c h i l d re n ’ s s c h o o l re c o rd s a n d p e t records . Pay exi s t i n g b i l l s a n d c l o s e o u t l o c a l c h a rg e account s . Transfer i n s u ra n c e p o l i c i e s o r a r ra n g e n ew ones. Ask for p ro fe s s i o n a l re fe r ra l s ( d o c t o r, i n s u rance, an d a c c o u n t a n t ) . Decide w h a t w i l l b e m ove d , s o l d , g i ve n away. Have a g a ra g e s a l e . Cancel n ew s p a p e r a n d u t i l i t i e s s e r v i c e s . Give ch a n g e o f a d d re s s n o t i c e t o p o s t o f f i c e , charge a c c o u n t s , m a g a z i n e subscriptions, relatives, friends, organizations, church, c a t a l o g s , p a s t e m p l oye r ( fo r W - 2 form). Make ar ra n g e m e n t s fo r t ra n s p o r t i n g p l a n t s a n d pets. Pack spe c i a l o r i r re p l a c e a b l e i t e m s yo u r s e l f a n d label. Draw up a f l o o r p l a n o f w h e re f u r n i t u re s h o u l d be place d i n n ew re s i d e n c e . Ser vice c a r b e fo re t r i p . Have ca s h o n h a n d fo r e m e rg e n c i e s .

FOR YOUR NEW LOCATION • S e c u re

t e l e p h o n e d i re c t o r y a n d a c i t y m a p . A r ra n g e fo r s e r v i c e s a t n ew h o m e ( u t i l i t i e s , n ew s p a p e r, m a i l ) . Tra n s fe r a u t o t i t l e s , p l a t e s a n d d r i ve r s l i c e n s e . • C h e c k s c h o o l s c h e d u l e s a n d s t u d e n t e n ro l l m e n t re q u i re m e n t s . • N o t i f y t h e p o s t o f f i c e t h a t yo u a re m ov i n g . A n o n l i n e C h a n g e o f Ad d re s s fo r m i s ava i l a b l e o n t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s Po s t a l S e r v i c e We b s i t e . • P re p a re a l i s t o f f r i e n d s , re l a t i ve s , b u s i n e s s f i r m s a n d o t h e r s w h o s h o u l d b e n o t i f i e d o f yo u r m ove .

SETTING UP NEW ACCOUNTS N AT U R A L G A S

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2014 The Phoenix Region JuneDiscover 2011 Discover The Phoenix Region

602.861.1999 602.371.7171 602.236.8888 480.488.3402 480.644.2221

TELEPHONE

Qwest

602.490.2355

WAT E R

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 46 22

Southwest Gas Arizona Public Service Salt River Project Black Mountain Gas (Cave Creek/Carefree) Mesa City

American Water Avondale Buckeye Carefree Cave Creek Chandler El Mirage Fountain Hills Glendale Goodyear Litchf ield Park Mesa Peoria Phoenix Scottsdale Sun City West Surprise & Youngtown Tempe Tolleson Wickenburg

888.300.3569 623.478.3230 623.349.6800 480.488.9100 602.358.4211 480.782.2280 877.671.0348 480.837.3411 623.930.3190 623.932.3015 623.932.3015 480.644.2221 623.773.7160 602.262.6251 480.312.2461 623.974.2521 888.300.3569 480.350.8361 623.936.7111 928.684.2761


PERSONAL ACCOUNTS Pharmacy Dry Cleaner Lawn Service ELECTRICITY

Bank/Finance Companies

Supplier for electric is based on the city you are moving to.

Credit Card Companies Laundry Service

• APS Arizona Public Service 602.371.7171 Services Avondale, Buckeye, Carefree/Cave Creek, Chandler, Gilbert, Goodyear, Litchfield Park, Peoria, Sun City West, Tempe, Glendale, Paradise Valley, Phoenix, Scottsdale and Sun City.

R E C YC L I N G The Arizona Department of Environmental Quality maintains a recycle hot line. To f ind out why recycling is important, what can be recycled and where, also pick up conservation tips. Call 480.782.3430. CABLE • • • • •

Cable America 480.461.0715 Cable Plus 602.956.7040 Cox Communications 602.277.1000 Sun Lakes Cable 480.895.8084 Wander Cable 800.626.0297

OT H E R N U M B E R S • Poison Control 602.253.3334 or 1.800.362.0101 • Crime Stop Phoenix Police Department 602.262.6151 • Suicide Prevention Center Hotline 480.784.1500 • Arizona Highway Patrol 602.223.2000 VOT E R R E G I S T R AT I O N You must be at least 18 years of age or older, a citizen of the United States and a resident of Arizona. To vote in local and national elections, you must register 29 days prior to the election. Registration can be done at a number of locations: • The Maricopa County Department of elections 602.506.1511 • League of Women Voters 602.997.5218 • Political Party Off ices • All City Clerk off ices • Drivers License (MVD) • Special mail in forms at all locations above and can also be found at any Post Off ice and some local Libraries.

PUBLICATIONS Newspapers Magazines Newsletters Professional Journals

PERSONAL SERVICES Doctor(s) Dentist Accountant Lawyer BROKER INSURANCE AGENCY

GOVERNMENT OFFICES Department of Motor Vehicles Social Security Administration State/Federal Tax Bureaus City/County Tax Assessor Veterans Administration

UTILITIES Electric Gas Water Telephone Sewer District Trash Cable/Satellite Fuel (Oil/Propane)

|

• Mesa electric is supplied by the City of Mesa 480.644.2221

Health Club

MOVING CHECKLIST

• SRP Salt River Project 602.236.8888

Auto Finance Company

47


egional Attractions Anthem

5

Cave Creek

Scottsdale 9

303

Phoenix Peoria

60

10 13

Surprise

101

Sun C i t y 101

7

101

   E l M i rag e

I - 17

6

11

51

I - 10

12 7 11

10 8 2

3

3 6

14 3

museums & other attractions

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

arizona museum for youth arizona museum of natural history arizona science center the bead museum cave creek museum children's museum of phoenix desert botanical garden heard museum mesa contemporary arts phoenix art museum phoenix zoo scottsdale museum of contemporary art taliesin west frank lloyd wright

Mesa

202 Te m p e

Sporting venues & parks

Fountain Hills

Pa r a d i s e Va l l e y

5 1

Glendale

Cardinals stadium chase feild U.S. Airways Center west world of scottsdale jobing.com arena phoenix international raceway turf paradise race course firebird international raceway lake pleasant regional park mcdowell mountain park camelback mountain south mountain park adobe dam regional park

4

Scottsdale 4

303

13

1

101

9

2

60

Phoenix

Gilbert I - 10

12

Chandler 8

202


Child abuse is reported every 10 seconds

The Childhelp National Child Abuse Hotline serves as a resource to at-risk youth, and adults and children in crisis. If you need help, please call us.

1-800-4-A-CHILD速 Donate I Advocate I Save a Life Childhelp.org/ChildHelper

Discover The Phoenix Region Vol 5 Issue 1  

Discover the Phoenix Region is a publication resource for the Phoenix Arizona Region. It includes maps, hotspots, local stories, and everyt...

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