Issuu on Google+

FREE

Maine’s History Magazine

Volume 10 | Issue 7 | 2013

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

Western Lakes and Mountains Region

Emerson At Waterville

Famous poet gives lecture at Waterville College

Hebron Academy’s Bob Legendre The athlete with movie star looks

The Sandy River Valley’s Augustus Stinchfield Mayo Clinic Co-founder

www.DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

1


B

Inside This Edition

2

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

3

It Makes No Never Mind James Nalley

7

Spalding Gray “Everything is fin ” James Nalley

10 Bridgton’s Robert Andrews A quiet hero Charles Francis 13 Hebron Academy’s Bob Legendre The athelete with movie star looks Charles Francis 17 Norway’s George Beal The colonel knew “shoddy” when he saw it Brian Swartz 26 What Did Lewis Millett Really Do In Korea? Western Maine’s Medal of Honor recipient Robert Kanehl 32 Bethel Attorney Lobbied For An Officer’s Commissi Adapted from Maine At War Brian Swartz 36 The Loneliest Preacher Universalism’s founder, Thomas Barnes Charles Francis

Maine’s History Magazine

Western Lakes and Mountains Region

Publisher Jim Burch

Designer & Editor Liana Merdan Editorial Assistant Kelly Merdan

Advertising & Sales Manager Tim Maxfiel

Advertising & Sales Barry Buck Dennis Burch Tim Churchill Chris Girouard Ryan Leonard Tim Maxfiel

Office Manag

Liana Merdan

41 Emerson At Waterville Famous poet gives lecture at Waterville College Charles Francis

Field Representatives

46 Camp And The Summer Of ‘67 A writer’s memoir Wayne J. Forbus

Sherwood Anderson Wayne J. Forbus Charles Francis | fundy67@yahoo.ca Robert Kanehl James Nalley Brian Swartz

50 The Genealogy Corner Descendant charting Charles Francis 54 A Dirty Old Cook And The Lousy Cookee

Songs of the lousy logging camp cook Charles Francis

58 The Metamorphosis Of Dorcas Doyen The mysterious murdered girl Charles Francis 64 Mary Towne Easty Of The Salem Trials She kept the faith at the cost of her life Sherwood Anderson 71 Andover’s Henry V. Poor The man who gave us Standard & Poor’s Charles Francis 75 The Sandy River Valley’s Augustus Stinchfiel Mayo Clinic co-founder Charles Francis 79 How Bingham Got Its Name Town took its name from a Pennyslvania banker Brian Swartz 82 Mining For Heirlooms Treasures from the past Charles Francis

George Tatro

Contributing Writers

Published Annually by CreMark, Inc. 10 Exchange Street, Suite 208 Portland, Maine 04101 Ph (207) 874-7720 info@discovermainemagazine.com www.discovermainemagazine.com Discover Maine Magazine is distributed to town offices, chambers of commerce, fraternal organizations, shopping centers, libraries, newsstands, grocery and convenience stores, hardware stores, lumber companies, motels, restaurants and other locations throughout this part of Maine. NO PART of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from CreMark, Inc. | Copyright © 2013, CreMark, Inc.

SubSCRIPTION FORMS ON PAg ES 31 &33

Front Cover Photo:

Man and two horses plowing a field in Waterville #70142 from the Eastern Illustrating & Publishing Co. Collection and www.PenobscotMarineMuseum.org All photos in Discover Maine’s Western Lakes & Mountains edition show Maine as it used to be, and many are from local citizens who love this part of Maine. Photos are also provided from our collaboration with the Maine Historical Society and the Penobscot Marine Museum.


d |

BEGIN 3

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

It Makes No Never Mind

by James Nalley

A

side from the spectacular Atlantic coastline of Maine, known for its rocky coastline and succulent lobsters, there is an equally beautiful side of Maine: the Western Lakes and Mountains region. If you are lucky enough (or patient enough) to take the long and curvy drive out to western Maine, then you will be rewarded with breathtaking mountain ranges, small historic communities, and hundreds of lakes that serve as a four-season paradise for outdoor enthusiasts. But it is the lakes in particular that have a colorful history. During the late 1880s, the concept of the summer camp was something new that was limited to boys from wealthy families. However, innovative entrepreneurs decided to market the idea for children of the working class. With tuition as low as $5 per week, hundreds of camps began to dot the coastlines of these lakes with each serving as an extension of the year-round plan to keep boys out of trouble and mold them into future “upstanding citizens.” With names such Wildmere, Wawenock, Wohelo, and Takajo, the sum-

mer camp even transformed into retreats for health-conscious adults who wished to be healed both mentally and physically by nature itself. By the 1950s, the summer camps even included the word “luxury” in which tents were replaced by cabins with amenities such as high-quality bedding, wide porches, and delicious food. Today, and fortunately for many parents, the Lakes Region still includes a wide array of summer camps that teach everything from music and dance to sports and outdoor recreation. As a former “summer camper” myself, one of the most important memories was making friends while cooking hotdogs on a stick, and bonding through simple activities such as playing in the rain or building a good fire without burning down the entire camp. But no matter if the camp was five days or two months in length, the message was always the same: respect others, enjoy nature, and take everything you learn and somehow apply it to everyday life. Perhaps this should be a motto for everyone regardless of whether they attended a summer camp or not. So, before you head to your camp/retreat

this summer, remember to take this edition of Discover Maine and enjoy it as you refuel for whatever life throws at you. As expected, I will now close with the following: Sherlock Holmes and Watson went on a camping trip to a beautiful lake in western Maine. After a good meal, they climbed into their sleeping bags and fell asleep. Several hours later, Holmes awoke, nudged his friend, and said, “Watson, look up and tell me what you see.” Watson replied, “I see a fantastic panorama of countless stars.” Holmes asked, “And what does that tell you?” Watson pondered the question and said, “Well, astronomically, it tells me that there are millions of galaxies. Astrologically, it tells me that Saturn is in Leo. Horologically, it tells me that it is approximately 3 a.m. Theologically, it tells me that God is all powerful. Meteorologically, it tells me that tomorrow will be beautiful.” He then turned to Holmes and asked, “What does it tell you?” Holmes remained silent for a moment and said, “Someone has stolen our tent.”

SEPTIC TANK CLEANING

CMS

Central Maine Septic & Portable Toilet Rentals

• Group Neighbor Rates • Senior Discounts • We Locate & Dig Tank • Freeze Ups SEPTIC SYSTEMS

Repaired • Serviced • Installed • Camera Inspections Baffl e Replacements • Holding Tanks • Steam Jetting Serving Central and Western Maine Grease Traps • Sewer Pump Installation & Repair Drainfield Treatments • Covers & Risers • Portable Toilet Rentals toll free

1-866-WIL-PUMP (945-7867)

~ DEP Licensed & Commercially Insured ~

YEAR ROUND SERVICE!

For photos, helpful info: www.centralmaineseptic.com


BEGIN 4

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

Water view in Cornish. Item #105105 from the Eastern Illustrating & Publishing Co. Collection and www.PenobscotMarineMuseum.org

Robert W. Libby & Sons, Inc. RESPONSIBLE TIMBER HARVESTING

Hydraulic Hose & Assembly of Gorham

ANTIQUES MALL

(207) 625-8285 www.libbylogging.com

MEETING THE TOUGH STANDARDS OF THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

(207) 453-4100

Logging & Chipping Land and Timber Management Selective Cutting and Harvesting Plans Land Purchaser and Timber Buyer

FAIRFIELD Route 201 - Fairfield, Maine 2.5 miles north of I-95 exit 133 on Route 201-Skowhegan Road

FIVE FLOORS of Great Antiques & Collectibles displayed by the FINEST ANTIQUE DEALERS in the State of Maine

483 Old Meetinghouse Road Porter, Maine

FIREWOOD AVAILABLE - Call for Prices

ROBERT LIBBY PRESIDENT CELL 207-284-3668

RUSSELL HUGHES LICENSED FORESTER CELL 207-229-7073

AUTHORIZED SALES AND SERVICE FOR

Associate Distributors Wanted • IN THE SHOP OR IN THE FIELD Save money in time and labor, make your own OEM-Quality custom hose assemblies.

&

Parts for most makes of Saws, Lawn & Garden Equipment

A Unique and Fun Way to Shop! (something for everyone under one big roof)

Come In and See For Yourself!

• 30-Day Lay-away • FREE Coffee and Donuts • Gift Certificates • Plenty of Free Parking • All Major Credit/Debit Cards Accepted • We Replace Curved Glass Open 363 Days A Year, 8:30 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Closed Thanksgiving and Christmas Day Only

www.fairfieldantiquesmall.com

Mike Hase, Owner

562-4930

244 Tower Road 2 miles off Worthley Pond in East Peru Hours: Mon. Tue. Wed. & Fri. 7am-5pm Sat. 6:30am-noon • Closed Thurs. & Sun. Closed noon-1pm daily for lunch

HOSE SOLD BY THE INCH OR MILE.

854-3702 OR 800-540-3702 639 Main Street, (Rt. 25) Gorham, ME


BEGIN 5

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

Railroad station in Cornish, ca. 1924. Item #105089 from the Eastern Illustrating & Publishing Co. Collection and www.PenobscotMarineMuseum.org

NORTHWOOD BUILDERS

— Jeff Murphy — • Residential & Commercial • A Full Service Construction Company ~ Since 1976 ~ ~ Free Estimates • Fully Insured ~

684-3354 Strong, Maine

One Great Institution Open House Saturday Oct. 19th 9a-12p

1250 Turner Street • Auburn, ME (207) 755-5273

Two Great Locations

Offering career, technical and transfer programs. Quality education at an affordable price. enroll@cmcc.edu • www.cmcc.edu

232 Main Street • South Paris, Maine (207) 743-9322 ext. 204 or (207) 212-0550


BEGIN 6

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

Do You Enjoy Writing? Do You Love Maine? Do You Love History? If so, give us a call. We Are Always Looking for History writers to Contribute to our Magazine!

Discover Maine Magazine (207) 874-7720 • 1-800-753-8684

Fryeburg Fair, Clifford “Butch” Lane of Errol, N.H. Item #21609 from the Boutilier Collection and www.PenobscotMarineMuseum.org

Hungry Hollow Country Store Someplace Special ~ Someplace Different

Full Bakery ~ Heat & Eat Entrees Our Specialty is Chicken Pie! Stop In & Browse Around!

Unique Maine Gifts ~ Wheel Cheese ~ Jams ~ Maple Syrup Green Mountain Coffee ~ Gourmet Tea ~ Gift Baskets Natural & Organic Foods ~ Wheat & Gluten-Free Foods

Route 26 • West Paris, Maine • 207-674-3012 MC/Visa/Discover Open daily 7-5, Friday Until 6pm, Sunday 10-5:30pm

Andrew Ames

- LOGGING Specialized Selective Cutting Certified Professional

207-583-6343 ~ Fully Insured ~

Waterford, Maine

STEVENS

24 HR

ELECTRIC & PUMP SERVICE INC In Business Since 2002

Residential ~ Commercial Pumps & Controls Sales & Installations 24 Hour Service Confined Space Entry Certified Maintenance Contracts Available 11 Berry Rd, Monmouth, ME . . . 933-9638


7

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

Spalding Gray “Everything is fine.” by James Nalley

I

n the 1980s, the New York theater scene saw the rise of the staged and somewhat experimental monologue. Among its influential leaders was an eccentric man born in Rhode Island who graduated from the Fryeburg Academy in Fryeburg, Maine. Describing the distinctiveness of the play-monologue, theater director Mark Russell stated: He broke it all down to a table, a glass of water, a spiral notebook and a mic. Poor theater – a man and an audience and a story. Spalding sitting at that table, speaking into the mic, calling forth the script of his life from his memory and those notebooks…One man piecing his life back together, one

memory, one true thing at a time. As interesting and truthful as these monologues were, one aspect was apparent: they unveiled details of a genius with a troubled life. Spalding Rockwell Gray was born in Providence, Rhode Island on June 5, 1941. He was the second of three sons born to Rockwell Gray Sr., a treasurer at Brown & Sharpe, one of the most influential firms in the mechanical tool industry. Spalding was raised in Barrington, Rhode Island, and spent summers at his grandmother’s house in Newport. His childhood was rather peaceful, which was due to his family’s comfortable income. He attended and graduated from the Fryeburg Academy

E.R. Palmer

WE GOT STUFF

Lumber Co.

JACKMAN HARDWARE & SPORTING GOODS Largest Sporting Goods Store Around • Extensive Inventory • Heritage Ice Fishing Traps • Live Bait • Snowshoes • Ice Augers • Hunting, Fishing • Guns, Ammo, Boots Everything you can think of!

OPEN 7 DAYS

“Family Owned & Operated Since 1947”

Rolling to Your Door to Meet ALL Your Auto  Home Business Security Needs

USDA, FDA to EPA Listed Analysis for: • Drinking & Waste Water $5.00 OFF • Radon Air & Water FULL WATER TEST • Mold & Indoor Air Quality with this ad • Food Analysis Order your kit today! www.nelabservices. • Solid & Hazardous Waste

Courier Service & Field Sampling

207-668-5151

598 MAIN ST. • JACKMAN, ME

in Fryeburg, Maine, and was accepted at Emerson College in Boston, Massachusetts, where he earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in poetry in 1963. In 1965, Gray moved to California after accepting a position as a poetry teacher at the Esalen Institute. Two years later, while Gray was spending a well-earned vacation in Mexico City, he received the devastating news that his mother had committed suicide. Shortly after, Gray gave up his teaching position and moved to New York City. According to The New York Times article dated Oct. 6, 2011, “He lived with his girlfriend, Elizabeth LeCompte, in an apartment on Sixth Street on the Lower East Side. To make ends meet, (Continued on page 8)

(207) 873-7711

227 China Road • Winslow, ME

www.nelabservices.com

• Manufacturers of Lumber Products & Hardwood BUYING Specialties from our HARDWOOD LOGS plant in Sangerville • Hardwood slabs for firewood

876-2725

Sangerville, Maine

Est. Maine Roofing Service 1977

Specialty Metal & Copper Roofing Asphalt Shingles

1-800-924-6353 873-6353

email: roofing@dhpinnette.com www.dhpinnette.com PO Box 307, Oakland, ME 04963


BEGIN / Sec. 2 8

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

(Continued from page 7) Gray occasionally worked as a stock boy, while LeCompte sold postcards at the Guggenheim. But mostly they were finding their places in New York’s avant-garde theater world.” Within a year, both Gray and LeCompte had become members of an experimental-theater group led by Richard Schechner. As recalled by Schechner, “I came across Gray’s head shot and saw a young man staring out with eyes so far apart – he wasn’t trying to look pretty, he wasn’t trying to do anything.” The peculiar naturalness of Gray had given him the break that he was looking for. The 1970s was an intense and exhilarating period for Gray, which saw the end of his relationship with LeCompte and the beginning of the mental issues (including a nervous breakdown) that would plague him for his remaining years. An interesting side note is that LeCompte had begun a relationship

with a 23-year-old actor from Wisconsin named Willem Dafoe, who joined the stage group in 1978. Despite LeCompte’s continued involvement with Schechner’s performance group, Gray continuously honed the performance skills that led him to his groundbreaking monologues. According to The New York Times article about Gray, “He increasingly mined his own life for material and simultaneously grew adept at keeping parts of himself private, shaving just the top layer of a secret and offering it up as a convincing whole.” After landing some supporting actor roles, including the award-winning 1984 film, The Killing Fields, Gray received national prominence with his play Swimming to Cambodia in 1985. The monologue was based entirely on his experiences in Southeast Asia during the filming of The Killing Fields. His play received critical acclaim and

Gray was awarded the prestigious Guggenheim Fellowship as well as the National Book Award. At the same time, Gray was the founding member of “The Wooster Group,” an experimental theater company that produced a large number of plays. There, he continued to shine. According to journalist Roger Rosenblatt, “Gray was a storyteller… mystical, hilarious, self-exposed, professionally puzzled, scared, and brave.” In 1992, Gray published his first and only novel titled Impossible Vacation, which was strongly based on his own life experiences ranging from his upbringing as a Christian Scientist to his mother’s suicide. He subsequently created a staged monologue of the book strangely titled, Monster in a Box. During a 1997 interview, Gray commented on his experience with his Monster in a Box, which showed his off-the-wall personality:

J.T. REID’S GUN SHOP Buying small & large firearms collections! We will travel to appraise your collection! Monthly Handgun Safety Courses Major Credit Cards Accepted 9-5 Mon-Fri • 9-1 Sat • John Reid, Owner 86 Court St., Auburn, ME

777-3579

jtreidsgunshop.com 268 STATE ST. AUGUSTA 623-1971 55 GROVE ST. DEXTER 924-3704 ROUTES 2 & 4, FARMINGTON 778-5166 103 MAIN ST. LIVERMORE FALLS 897-5771

MAIN ST. MADISON 696-5329 36 MAIN ST. MEXICO 364-3781 203 MADISON AVE. SKOWHEGAN 474-3327 232 COLLEGE AVE. WATERVILLE 873-4286

Motor Supply Co.

“Your Maine Source For Auto Parts”

motorsupplyautoparts.com

Ellis Pond Variety & Cabins ~ Eat In or Take Out ~

RIGHT ON ATV & SNOWMOBILE TRAILS

~ Self Service Gasoline ~

Groceries • Meats • Cold Beer Wine & Soda • Pizza Full Breakfast Served Daily Lobster Subs • Hot & Cold Sandwiches Free Park & Ride • Fishing Bait & Gear

Now open 6am-9pm 7 DAYS A WEEK Route 120 West

545-2713

Roxbury


, f l e d r … ” d , n o e a y s s

SEC 2 9

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

“My insides are not what my outsides are. I’m not who I appear to be. I appear to be a WASP, but I’m really a sort of a neurotic, New York Jew. When I was performing one year ago in Israel, a review came out in Hebrew about Monster in a Box. It read, ‘Spalding Gray is funny, sometimes hilarious, and wonderfully neurotic for a non-Jew.’ Only the Jews can say something like ‘wonderfully neurotic.’ ” In June 2001, Gray was on vacation in Ireland when he was involved in a head-on crash with another automobile. In the crash, Gray suffered a shattered hip that left his right leg almost paralyzed, and a skull fracture that forced surgeons to removed dozens of bone fragments from his brain. Gray suffered not only from ongoing depression, but the subsequent months saw him enduring every type of experimental therapy imaginable. During the next several

years, Gray sought treatment with wellknown neurologists and psychologists with no avail. According to his neurologist Oliver Sacks, “On several occasions he talked about what he called ‘a creative suicide.’ I mentioned that he would be much more creative alive than dead.” In October 2002, Gray jumped from a bridge near his home on Long Island but was unsuccessful. On Jan. 11, 2004, Gray, suffering from deep episodes of clinical depression,walked out of his apartment in Lower Manhattan and simply vanished. When he was officially declared missing, his photos were seen on the local news as well as the popular television show America’s Most Wanted. On March 7, approximately two months after he was declared missing, Gray’s body was discovered by two men who pulled him from the East River. His body was confirmed with the help of

medical x-rays and dental records. It was believed that Gray jumped off the side of the Staten Island Ferry. It was reported that Gray was working on his latest monologue at the time of his death. The night before his disappearance, Gray took a break and went to see Tim Burton’s latest film Big Fish. Strangely enough, the film concludes with the line, “A man tells a story over and over so many times he becomes the story. In that way, he is immortal.” According to Gray’s widow, “You know, Spalding cried after he saw that movie. I just think it gave him permission. I think it gave him permission to die.”

Den’s Automotive Services

FRYEBURG

❦ Other businesses from this area are featured in the color section.

Seamless A-1Gutters, Inc. ~ Dave J. Roy ~

Custom made at your home in a variety of colors Guaranteed Professional Installation Over 50 Colors Available Fully Insured • Free Estimates

946-4999 • 1-877-375-4888 Email: dave@a1gutters.me

www.a1seamlessguttersmaine.com

S.W. Daye

Tree Services • Tree Cutting • Chipping • Tree Climbing “Serving Western Maine for 15 years” Fully Insured • Free Estimates

207-256-0439

65 Old County Road • Porter, Maine

For all your Automotive Needs State Inspections • Brakes • Exhaust Major & Minor Repairs • Oil Changes

207-935-3883 399 Main Street Fryeburg, Maine

GLASS “We Keep it Simple”

Complete Auto & Home Glass Services Replacement Windows Shower Doors • Mirrors • Screens Custom Work & More! Gary & Kim Cassily

207-935-1158

326 Bridgton Rd. • Fryeburg, ME


SEC 2 10

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

Bridgton’s Robert Andrews A quiet hero

F

by Charles Francis

or much of his life Robert Andrews was known as “leftenant.” (As the years progressed the adjective ‘old’ was affixed to the title.) There is a bit of humor here. One wonders if once it was intended, or merely happenstance. Lieutenant Robert Andrews, the “old leftenant,” was an officer of the Bridgton Light Infantry, a militia company. Andrews’ rank meant he was second in command. The company commander was Captain Isiah Ingalls. The Bridgton Light Infantry was formed up in 1792. The company’s officers each swore a long oath of allegiance to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. It was a complicated oath. Perhaps because 1792 was still very

much post-Revolutionary the oath emphasized the negative rather than the positive. It wasn’t so much an oath of loyalty but rather of renunciation. The oath taker was called upon to adjure “all allegiance, subjection and obedience to the King, Queen or Government of Great Britain (as the case may be), and every other foreign power whatsoever, and that no foreign prince, person, prelate, State or potentate hath or ought to have any jurisdiction, superiority, preeminence, authority dispensing or other power in any matters civil, ecclesiastical or spiritual within this Commonwealth.” In short, the oath was decidedly anti-British and antimonarchical. Given the time period, one would expect this. But then we have the

Fryeburg Health Care Center Fryeburg Health Care Center is licensed by the State of Maine as a 74 bed multi-level facility. We have 30 dual certified skilled nursing home beds and 44 assisted living level beds. Services Offered: Payment Accepted From 70 Fairview Drive • Skilled/Rehab Level • Medicare Fryeburg, ME 04037 • Long Term Care Level • Medicaid (MaineCare) 207.935.3351 • Assisted Living Level • Private Insurance fhcc@roadrunner.com • Respite Care • Private Funds • Long-term Friendly & Knowledgeable Staff We are part of the Hicks Family Services whose facilities • Close to Town in Rural Neighborhood have provided the finest in long-term and assisted living • Maine Traditional Dietary services to their neighbors and friends throughout • Group & Individual Activities Southwestern Maine for three generations. • Local Transportation • Private & Semi-Private Rooms

fryeburghealthcarecenter.com

LOGAN

HOME BUILDERS No Job Too Big or Too Small

General Repairs • Remodeling Roofing • New Construction Interior / Exterior Painting Mike Logan Over 15 Years Experience / Fully Insured

Cell: 207-212-9769 • Fax: 207-452-2675

620 W. Main Street, Denmark, ME 04022

“old leftenant.” If one takes the spelling of “leftenant” at face value, if one considers its phonetic implications, it can only be taken as a joke. “Leftenant” can only be taken as a deliberate replication of the British version of lieutenant. Lieutenant as pronounced in the United States is an Americanization of the Anglo-phonic equivalent of the military rank. The Oxford English Dictionary says “Pronunciation of lieutenant is generally split between the forms of lef-tenant and lieu-tenant, with the former generally associated with the United Kingdom, Ireland and Commonwealth countries, and the latter generally associated with the United States. It was Eva Shorey who popularized

SOJOURNER

Cleanout Services & Scrap Metal

JOHN CARAVALHO Jack of All Trades

207-485-1126 jcaravalho@townisp.com

Denmark, ME


s e e e t n c t d y , , h

d

SEC 2 11

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

the story of the “old leftenant.” She did it in her 1915 tribute to Andrews, Robert Andrews: A Hero of Bunker Hill. There is no hint of humor in her choice of military title, though. There is no hint of irony in Robert Andrews’ military rank being given a decidedly British flavor. Eva L. Shorey was variously a reporter for and part owner of the Bridgton News. Her father was the paper’s founder. She also wrote for Portland newspapers. Her work on Robert Andrews appeared in the 1916 The Trail of the Maine Pioneer. The book was put out by the Maine Federation of Women’s Club. Robert Andrews was a Revolutionary War hero. He was at Lexington and Concord and he was at Bunker Hill. Andrews was one of the early settlers of Bridgton and he was one of the founding fathers of the town. The latter term ‘father’, takes on added significance

given that Andrews was childless. This fact is not surprising, but what is relates to the others named for him, his “cow relations.” Robert Andrews lived in a large stately home at Adams Pond. In fact, he owned most of the land around the pond. Because of this there are those who felt or feel that the pond should have been named Andrews Pond. It is often said that the man who never marries will live a lonely and desolate life. Robert Andrews did not, however. His home was filled with relatives and friends. Sisters and nieces and others were his housekeepers. None, however, stayed long. The ladies must have been desirable, perhaps beautiful. It seems that almost as soon as they began their housekeeping chores they were being courted. Soon the courting was followed by marriage. It is said to have been something of a local joke. Nevertheless, Andrews added to his

“Meet Me At The Highlands” Bridgton Highlands Country Club

Snow’s Excavation, Inc.

• 18 Hole Championship Golf Course • Scenic Views of Mt. Washington and the Lakes Region • Newly Renovated Tennis Courts • Full Bar, Snack Bar and Sandwich Menu • Pro Shop • Membership and Instruction Available • Call for Special Rates

Look For Specials! BridgtonHighlands.com

207-647-3491

Highland Road • Bridgton, Maine

home with an el. He felt he needed more room for long-term guests. The Cleaves family were such guests. They lived in the el for some years. One of the younger members of that family went on to become governor of Maine. This was Henry Cleaves. This brings us back to the “old leftenant’s” “cow relations.” It seems Robert Andrews was a generous man. At least he was willing to help those who were willing to help themselves and needed just a bit of a hand. Andrews is described as being “kind to those less fortunate than himself.” In like manner he was willing to help out the very young as they began their journey along life’s road, especially if they were named Robert or Robert Andrews. Those youngsters named for him were gifted with a cow from the Andrews’ herd. This is the origin of the euphemism “cow relations.” To call Robert Andrews a hero of (Continued on page 12) Est. 1996

Commercial & Residential

QUALITY WORK AT COMPETITIVE PRICES Complete Site Work Septic Systems • Foundations Septic Tank Pumping Gravel Driveways & Paving Sand • Loam • Gravel Lot Clearing • Landscaping

207-647-2697

Cell: 207-699-7133 Denmark Road, Rte. 117, Bridgton, ME FULLY INSURED • FREE ESTIMATES

Serving the towns of: Bridgton, Brownfield, Casco, Denmark, Fryeburg, Harrison, Lovell, Naples, Raymond, Sebago, Stow, Sweden & Waterford

(207) 647-3472Fax (207) 647-8372 www.mainelakeschamber.com E-mail info@mainelakeschamber.com P.O. Box 236, Bridgton, Maine 04009

Burt Holt

204 Wilson Pond Rd. N. Monmouth, ME 04265

207-933-4805

Custom Outdoor/Indoor Furniture Picnic Tables • Well Houses Adirondack Chairs • Settees All Types of Pine Furniture Tables • Bookcases • Storage Cubbies

Lake Region Auto Supply

®

Auto Parts

Parts & Supplies For: ATVs • Cars Dianne • Trucks • Motorcycles Portland Rd. Hoses Marine 229 • Tractors • Hydraulic

Bridgton, ME

SALES 647-8737

207-647-2687 Route 302 • Bridgton, Maine ____________________ Russ/Linda

Open282 7 Days a Week Rt. 202

Greene, ME

SALES • SHOWROOM


12

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

(Continued from page 11) the Revolution is a bit of an understatement. There are those who are called hero who answered to the call to arms for Lexington and Concord and then quietly faded away never to take up arms again. Then there are those like Andrews, who, after each enlistment ended, enlisted again. Eva Shorey speaks of Robert Andrews being at Ticonderoga. This is the fort where Ethan Allen supposedly uttered his famous demand that the doors be opened “In the name of the Great Jehovah and the Continental Congress.” Shorey says Andrews was “among those who suffered hunger, cold and nakedness during the bitter winter in camp.” One has the distinct impression that Robert Andrews was never the braggart. That he did not dwell on the past. In this sense he can be called a “quiet hero,” a quiet man. Perhaps that ex-

plains why his neighbors felt comfortable calling him the “leftenant.” One senses it to be a term of endearment as well as one of respect. Eva Shorey wrote her tribute to Robert Andrews some seventy years after his death. There were those that still remembered him then. They had been children in that now long-ago time period. One of those one-time children, a woman named Ruthana, remembered how the “old leftenant” called her Ruthey. She recalled Andrews had a sister and a niece named Ruth. Is there a hint of loneliness here? Perhaps. Some might say Robert Andrews was an eccentric. One tale has it that he preferred to sleep in a bunk rather than in a comfortable big bed. Perhaps, in this anecdote we have a reason for why the “old leftenant” never married. Bunks are single beds.

Maine Survey Consultants, Inc.

DID YOU KNOW?

The town of Bridgton was incorporated on Feb. 7, 1794.

˜

Riverbend Campground Leeds, Maine

Fun Family Camping!! Excellent Fishing

Land Surveying

Over 10,000 retired surveyors records on file

Boat Ramp Area, Large Waterfront Sites, Weekend Entertainment, Activities and MORE!!

~ Delmore A. Maxfield Jr., PLS ~

Tel 207.583.6159 Fax 207.583.2334 6 Smith Street • Harrison, Maine 04040

www.mainesurveyconsultants.com

www.riverbendcampgroundmaine.com

207-524-5711

Windows • Siding • Fully Insured Add up the savings... 2+2 =4 and 2+2+2 =6 2 Certified Pedorthists On Staff

call

224-2226

cell: Owner: Eric Brown

www.g3ÿ rearms.com

754-1701

Leeds, ME

Roofing • Decks • New Construction • Remodeling


13

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

Hebron Academy’s Bob Legendre

The athlete with movie star looks by Charles Francis n May of 1922 The New York Times ran a story that Robert Legendre would give up track and field for the silver screen. Legendre was due to graduate Georgetown University that June. He was a two-time national pentathlon champion. If he gave up competing in track and field his loss would be a distinct disappointment for American hopes in the 1924 Olympic pentathlon. The Times article was something of a scoop. The information that Legendre would forgo his chances of Olympic glory was supposedly “leaked” by the athlete’s close friends. The article stated “Legendre was said to have turned down a number of ‘movie’ offers at the

I

SMILE AGAIN DENTURES, INC. Now Accepting New Patients! Quality, Customized Dental Work by a Licensed Denturist

FREE CONSULTATIONS! Poorly fit or broken dentures On-site, same day service (in most cases) Affordable Dentures Assistance with Dental Insurance Forms We’ll Give You Something To Smile About!

514-0660 • 801 Webster Street, Lewiston Joe Adkins, Licensed Denturist • Mon-Thur 8-4

˛˝ ˙ˆ ˇ ˇˆ ˘ ountry sˇ orˆ &

Old Mill Stream Ice Cream Shoppe

Food • Gas • Groceries • Gifts Hard & Soft Serve Ice Cream Agency Liquor Store Convenient Hours

685-3611

1916 Main St., Fayette, ME

close of the last college year in order to complete his studies and to have decided to accept a repeated offer at this time.” Bob Legendre was a good-looking young man. His looks were of movie star quality. The few pictures of him from his college years that are in the public domain show someone who would have been a natural as a Hollywood heartthrob. He didn’t become a movie star, though. He did compete in the 1924 Olympics. He won a bronze medal. Along the way he set an unofficial world record in the long jump. There is a good chance the story of Legendre giving up on the 1924 Olympics was a college prank. The

Times article mentions that Legendre was sharing “ the secret” with “close friends.”Leaking a secret like that to a paper of the stature of the Times and getting it into print would have been good college fun. Bob Legendre is one of but a handful of Maine athletes to have competed in the Olympics. That he was a twotime Olympian places him in an even more elite grouping. From that era, the name Andrew Sockalexis is one of the few to come to mind that accomplished a similar feat. Sockalexis was the Penobscot marathon runner from Indian Island in Old Town. Bob Legendre was a three-sport athlete at Lewiston High School and (Continued on page 14)

Lakeside ° Antiques °

Hoyt

Chiropractic Center Dr. Michael A. Hoyt, Director Dr. Lacaya Hoyt “Our Goal is Healthier Families in a Healthier World.”

Two Floors of Fine Antiques 40 Dealers Display

Best Priced Shop Around! Open for 27 years! ~ Juliette Piper ~

• Thorough & Personalized Care • Office Hours by Appointment

377-2151 1354 US Route 202 • Winthrop, Maine 04364

377-2616

Rte 202 #2541 • East Winthrop, ME

Kramers Inc.

Full Line Of Equipment, Parts, Service & Accessories Route 104, Downtown Sidney

547-3345

www.kramersinc.com


SEC 4 14

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

(Continued from page 13) Hebron Academy. Today the javelin Legendre threw at the 1920 Olympic games can be viewed at the latter institution. Hebron regards Legendre as one of its great scholar/athletes. Pierre Robert Lucien Legendre was born in Lewiston in 1898. Tragically he died all too young, in 1931. He did leave a legacy beyond his athletic accomplishments. He had one child. There are Legendre grandchildren in the Lewiston area today. Bob Legendre left a place in the record books. It isn’t just that he was an Olympian and won a bronze medal. Sports buffs love pouring over past records. What some find most fascinating is the progression of sports records, progressions in time, distance and weight. Bob Legendre’s name is a part of the long jump progression. Back when Legendre was competing, the long jump was the broad jump

or running broad jump. It doesn’t make any difference, though. What makes a difference in Legendre’s case is the fact that he set a long jump record while competing in an Olympic Pentathlon. That was enough for his accomplishment to be regarded as unofficial. Legendre set his long jump record at the 1924 Olympics. He jumped 25'5''. The day was July 7. The mark was not eclipsed until Jesse Owens jumped 26'2'' at the Berlin Olympics of 1936. It should be noted that it takes a bit of searching in the record books to find Bob Legendre. When the Maine Sports Hall of Fame named Legendre to its inaugural listing of great Maine athletes it used the name Pierre. Most other record books list him as either Robert or Bob. Hebron Academy is one of the few places where his full name is used. Georgetown University lists him as Robert L. for its Hall of Fame.

BRC Carpentry Inc.

SLATTERY’S STABLES

Established 1982 Benjamin Clough, Owner • Custom Building

Horses Boarded Carriage Rides

• Complete Home Building Services • Lots Available • Construction Loans Available

966-3686 868 Paris Road ☐ Hebron, ME

207.756.9072 207.966.3903 Audrey Slattery 51 Patten Hill Rd. • Hebron, ME aslattery@megalink.net

POLLY’S VARIETY “No more crackers, Polly wants pizza!” Friendly Service Sandwiches • Subs Homemade Salads

Homemade Specials Great Pizza Slices We offer a wide variety of groceries, snacks, homemade cakes & cookies Please stop by! Call ahead for faster service!

539-8254

115 King St. • Oxford, Maine

In some cases the last name is given as Le Gendre or as LeGendre. This writer believes Legendre to be the proper spelling. Legendre’s two Olympics were abroad, Antwerp and Paris. He wasn’t a neophyte to foreign competition when he got off the ship in Europe to compete in Belgium, though. In 1919 Legendre competed in the inter-allied track and field meet in Pershing Stadium in Paris. He won the pentathlon that year and because of the win was considered as a potential Olympian. In 1919 Legendre had just completed his sophomore year at Georgetown. Bob Legendre jumped to national track and field attention in April of 1919 when he won the Penn Relays Pentathlon, defeating the the defending champion Johnny Bartels of the University of Pennsylvania by a wide margin. At that point Legendre was dubbed (Continued on page 16)

Major’s Heating Services Colby Major 68 Ledge Hill Rd. Hebron, ME 04238

(207) 966-3428 Home (207) 212-4002 Cell We Clean Oil Tanks!

Service • New Installations • System Upgrades

24 Hr. Emergency Service • Gas & Oil Master Licensed & Insured ~ SERVING WESTERN MAINE ~

Record Building Supply, Inc. Quality & Service Since 1996 Complete Line Of Building Materials Featuring Muralo Paints

(207) 539-4219 623 Main Street, Oxford, ME recordbuildingsupply.com


SEC 4 15

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

s r

e a n e e d d a e r

f s g d

Multi-talented: Robert Legendre’s giant leap at the 1924 Olympics in Paris.

ERCOVER FLEA MARKET UND IBLES & ANTIQUES COLLECT Always Buying

Featuring 114 Vendors

VISIT “The Book Nook” for ONE STOP shopping! ALL PAPERBACKS $1/ea.

Over 55,000 Pre-read Books & Cookbooks Pre-Read Books arriving daily

20% OFF all Books on Tape 50% OFF Cookbooks

Select Hard Covers $3.50 at “The Book Nook” only

Come to Oxford’s only original indoor flea market! Open 7 days a week, 9am-5pm year round for your shopping!

960 Main Street Oxford, Maine 539-4149 Collectibles, Coins, Glassware, Sports Cards, Furniture, Beanie Babies, Advertising Items, Cassettes, Jewelry, CD’s, Videos, Antiques & Lots More! Inventory Reduction now in progress

20% - 50% OFF

We honor: M/C, DEBIT, ATM, VISA, AMEX and DISCOVER Cards

KNOPP CHIROPRACTIC Dr. Barry E. Knopp 39 Paris Street Norway, Maine (207) 743-2866

Daddy O’s

A drug-free, non-surgical health care alternative offering motion x-ray studies and computerized spinal analysis and treatment.

www.knoppchiropractic.com

• Breakfast served all day • Desserts are home-made Mon.-Sat. 6am-2pm • Sun. 6am-Noon

901 Main St. • Oxford, ME

207-539-8100

STETSON’S AUTO SERVICE Over 30 years experience

Work on all Makes & Models State Inspections

John Stetson, Owner

743-2886 258 Fore Street, Oxford


SEC 4 16

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

(Continued from page 14) the “Georgetown Flyer.” Legendre’s accomplishment on Philadelphia’s famed Franklin Field in 1919 was of national consequence in the track and field world of that era. During the early decades of the twentieth century there were no NCAA championships. The Penn Relays were ‘the’ national competition. Placing in the top three of a Penn Relays event essentially guaranteed being named to or at least being seriously considered for a place on a U.S. team bound for international competition. Bob Legendre was fourth in the 1920 Olympic Pentathlon at Antwerp. His best event was the 200 meters where he tied for first with two others. Legendre was eleventh in the discus and fifth in the long jump. His fourth place finish came directly behind a Finn, Hugo Lahtinen. He would finish behind Lahtinen four years later at the Paris Olympics.

Today the Paris Olympics are famous because of the movie Chariots of Fire. If Bob Legendre had been British, he would have been a natural inclusion in the movie. His long jump would or could have been the climactic event of the film. Legendre’s Paris Pentathlon was almost a mirror image of his performance at Antwerp. Again he tied for first in the 200. For the second time he was eleventh in the discus. A movie director would place the long jump at the end of the Pentathlon for effect. It came first, however, and that Bob Legendre loved track and field goes without saying. He was a young man at the time of his passing and a member of the Newark Track and Field Club. Sport had more of a claim on Robert Legendre than Hollywood ever could.

Hebron Academy’s Bob Legendre ❦ Other businesses from this area are featured in the color section.

Smedberg’s Crystal Spring Farm

Gift Certificates Christmas Trees & Wreaths

Farm Fresh Produce Jam ~ Honey Our Own Maple Syrup Home-Baked Pies All Natural Home-Grown Beef, Pork & Lamb Organic Milk Produce in Season “Everything in its Season” Open Year-Round

207-743-6723

Route 26, Oxford, ME All Natural Home-Grown Beef

Good Drink!

Good Food!

Good Friends!

Oxford Hills

Taxi • Delivery • Airport Service • Long & Short Fares • 7 Day Service • 6 Seat Mini Van

743-7963 Owner: Terri Dunham

• Full service dining and bar on Norway Lake • Gorgeous view for all seasons • Come by boat or sled Prime Ribeye Steak • Haddock • Scallops Pasta • Salads • Burgers • Pizza • Subs • Happy hour 2-5 Weekdays • Open Mon. - Sat. 11-Close Sunday Noon - Close

Our Own Famous BBQ Pork Family Owned & Operated since 1982 Norway Lake Road, Norway

743-8434


SEC 4 17

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

Norway’s George Beal The Colonel knew “shoddy” when he saw it by Brian Swartz

eorge Beal could not define “shoddy,” but he knew “shoddy” when he saw it. And he was definitely looking at “shoddy” as he penned an angry letter on Tuesday, November 12, 1861. Hailing from Norway, the patriotic Beal belonged to the Norway Light Infantry, whose members elected him their captain prior to April 1861. When Gov. Israel Washburn called for volunteers to defend the Union, Beal marched his Norway lads into the local lore as Co. G, 1st Maine Infantry Regiment. That outfit served three months and mustered out before Bull Run. Beal liked the taste of Army life; by fall he returned to service as Col. Beal, commander of the 10th Maine Infantry.

And in that capacity Beal furiously wrote E.K. Harding, Maine’s assistant quartermaster general. He sat at a desk in the Relay House, a Baltimore & Ohio Railroad hotel near the Thomas Viaduct, a bridge that spanned the Patapsco River north of Washington, D.C. The B & O was the only railroad connecting the nation’s capital to the rest of the country; Confederate troops repeatedly raided the line during the war. The 10th Maine boys “are guarding the Rail Road from here to Annapolis Junction,” Beal wrote Harding. Five companies guarded other sites along the line, and five companies camped at the Relay House, then Beal’s headquarters. Beal was livid. With winter ap-

proaching, Harding had equipped the 10th Maine with blankets to ward off the chill. The blankets had arrived; Beal fairly frothed as he described their quality. Referring to the blankets as “those miserable thing[s] you furnished us,” he informed Harding that “H.J. Libby & Co. furnished them (blankets) and they ought to suffer as it is damnable in having men suffer these cold nights [while] sleeping in tents with such blankets as those we have. Harding evidently knew about the problem. Apparently referring to an earlier letter, Beal stressed that “we understood at the time you was to give the men two blankets so as to make the poor ones good. (Continued on page 18)

T R & H Inc.

RUSSELL & SONS TOWING

Wiles Body Shop

G

Welding & Fabrication

• Machine Design & Manufacturing • General Machine Work Nearly 50 Years of Experience

1-800-499-8981 743-8981 • 186 Ashton Road, Norway

Lake Store

The

24 Hour Emergency Service Breakdowns • Lockouts • Tire Change Out of Gas • Junk Car Removal Ramp Truck Wheel Lift Capabilities

207-890-4851 Norway, ME

3 Generations of Excellence ~ Kevin Wiles, Owner ~ • State Inspections • Auto Body Repair & Refinishing • Front End Alignment • Suspension Work • Quality Used Vehicles • Full Service

743-8482

246 Main Street, Norway

BESSEY MOTOR SALES

_________________________________________________________

“60 years at the same location”

Visit our grocery store and museum today!

• Great collection of Coke memorabilia, one of the best in Maine! • Oxford Hills’ only super convenience store • Local Agency Liquor Store Junctions of Rte. 117 & 118, By The Lake, Norway

743-6562

209 Main Street, South Paris, Maine 04281, Toll Free 1-800-339-6341 Phone: 207-743-6341, Fax: 207-743-6812 www.besseymotors.com / www.chrysler.com / www.jeep.com/ www.dodge.com

_________________________________________________________

Info@BesseyMotorSales.com


SEC 4 18

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

(Continued from page 17) “But like everything else promised the 10th Maine, they did not come so to keep our men from freezing I made a requisition on the government,” he informed Harding. Beal took a sample blanket to Union Gen. John Dix and “other U.S. officials,” who expressed their disgust with its quality. Dix immediately signed a requisition form. “We have this day received 500 blankets from the government which we shall give to our men to make good” the blankets woven in Maine, Beal wrote. “I suppose you have charged the Reg. with a full set of 1,000 blankets we shall recognize only the good ones as he have,” he growled. The 10th Maine quartermaster had sent a requisition to Augusta “about 4 weeks ago” for winter clothing, plus

more blankets, “those things we are suffering for” as winter cold settled in Maryland, Beal reminded Harding. “If we are to have them we should like to know it, as you must be aware that it is very annoying not to know anything about the matter.” While Augusta had not yet shipped winter clothing to the 10th Maine, other clothing had arrived. “More blouses,” Beal sarcastically referred to the light shirts suitable for warm weather wear. “What splendid things & those are for men in November.” He refused to let the issue die. “We shall represent the case to the powers that be and see if we can get anything out of them (the summertime clothing) as we have whole companies who have no change of clothing. In that first fall of the war, Washington expected the states to supply their

respective units with all a soldier’s amenities, including clothing and firearms. No military-industrial complex existed; private companies bid on hastily written government contracts to manufacture clothing, shoes, and blankets. Too many unscrupulous contractors earned a hefty profit by producing inferior goods and selling them to the War Department and the respective state governments for high prices. Now Beal glared at an example of such “shoddy” workmanship. No, he could define “shoddy,” but he knew that he was looking at it. In fact, the Civil War made “shoddy” a household word. In textile manufacturing, the term referred to using scraps of material — felt, leather, and wool, for example — to make a hat, shoes, uniform, or blanket. Inferior to the original material

Martin’s Building and Remodeling

Wilson

~ Serving Western Maine for over 30 years ~ Ebay Trading Assistant Packing • Shipping Mailbox Rental • Fax Service Copies • Office Supplies • Much More! Go to the Ebay Store at Goin’ Postal

231 Main Street • Norway Tel: 744-0099/Fax: 744-0100

KARL’S

AUTO REPAIR Auto Body & Mechanical Repair Auto Detailing by appointment Karl Furtado

207-928-3132 207-890-7882

Fully Insured Free Estimates Joel K. Martin

Excavating, Inc. (207) 583-4632 Richard - 890-8722

joekm_55@yahoo.com

207-515-1214

226 Bisbee Town Rd. • Waterford, ME

Complete Residential & Commercial Site Work Road Building Lot Clearing Certified Septic System Installer For all your excavating needs. Family Business Since 1968

444 Bisbee Town Road Waterford, ME


. ; -

s r e l ”

t n a

m — — l

SEC 5 19

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

from which it was trimmed, “shoddy” encompassed all such materials thrown together to make something that could not last. Throughout the war, soldiers complained in letters home about shoes (called “brogans”) that fell apart after the wearer’s first long march. Close inspection often revealed shoes made from cardboard, an inappropriate material. Writing in the New York Times’ Opinionator.blogs, Ron Soodalter cited “Brooks Brothers,” which while “facing a paucity of wool … glued together shredded, often decaying rags, pressed them into a semblance of cloth, and sewed the pieces into uniforms. “Far from protecting the soldiers from inclement weather, these uniforms would fall apart in the first rain,” he wrote.

In their letters and diaries, other soldiers complained about wool kepis or Hardee hats that literally dissolved when moistened by rain. Soldiers also paid the price when their firearms failed to function as expected. Men already exposed to disease and enemy shells suffered serious malnutrition — and sometimes scurvy — as profit-enhancing, corrupt manufacturers produced poor quality food. George Beal had already tossed aside 500 “shoddy” blankets, and the war was only seven months old. He was as angry as a dedicated colonel could be — and his men loved him for it. He led them up and down the Shenandoah Valley the next spring while chasing Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson — or vice versa, as circumstances dictated. Wounded at Antietam in September

Cliff Gray Located on Route 2 Just Minutes Away From Sunday River

~ Indoor Pool ~

(207) 824-2808 888-224-8413

www.riverviewresort.com 357 Mayville Road, Bethel, Maine

WEST PARIS

~ GENERAL STORE ~ * Under

New Management *

“Serving West Paris For Over 75 Years”

674-2211

~ Open 7 Days a Week ~ Breakfast Served All Day Daily Specials • Meats • Deli Grocery • Pizza • Subs 1 Church Street • West Paris, Maine

DID YOU KNOW? The town of Mexico’s name was inspired by local sympathy for Mexico’s 1810–1821 fight for independence from Spain

❦ Other businesses from this area are featured in the color section.

A local alternative to higher prices

“Spacious Suites”

1862, Beal remained on active duty. Most original members of the 10th Maine went home when the regiment mustered out in early May 1863. For some reason, Beal decided to raise a new regiment, later designated the 29th Maine Infantry. Many 10th Maine veterans joined the 29th upon learning its commander was their tough and fair-minded George Beal. They knew he would not treat them shoddily.

Cremation ~ Funeral Services LLC 60 Andrews Road Bryant Pond, ME 04219

Tel: 461-6050/674-2208

E-Mail: cliffmimigray@gmail.com

KEITH HADLEY We INC Deliver!

Hadley’s

Serving Western Maine for over 50 years!

Sand • Loam • Gravel Backhoe • Dozer Work • Trucking Septic Systems • Road Building “Where Quality Never Goes Out Of Style”

Auto Sales • New Truck & Car Shop Rt. 26 • W. Paris, ME

674-2466 • 592-6755


SEC 5 20

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

Main St. in Mexico (featuring signs for Lorillard’s Good Smoke Tobacco, Coca-Cola & Pippins Cigar) Item # 101391 from the Eastern Illustrating & Publishing Co. Collection and www.PenobscotMarineMuseum.org

W. SKIDGELL EXCAVATION

Sand ~ Gravel ~ Loam Septic Systems ~ Wells “No job too big or too small” 562-8567 357-8466 (Cell) P.O. Box 428 • Dixfield, ME 04224

e ob W

AJ

Whirlpool Kitchenaid Maytag • Amana

ne ll Do

Sales & Service

Experience Small Town Maine

Gateway to the Western Mountains

Refrigerators • Ranges • Washers • Dryers Freezers • Dishwashers • Microwaves Mon-Fri 8AM - 5PM Sat 9AM - Noon, or by appointment

364-7062 Family Owned & Operated for over 50 Years

ELECTRIC 13 Main Street, Mexico

Town of Mexico

mexicomaine.net

134 Main Street, Mexico, Maine 04257

(207) 364-7971

Your full service convenience store! Mon - Sat 4:30am - 9:30pm Sun. 6:30am - 7pm

Propane Refill Station & Full Service Gas Every Day 7am - 7pm

207-364-8984

Owners: Judy & Kenny Gill 876 Route 2, Rumford, ME


21

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

FOR THOSE

IN PERIL

Shipwrecks, Memorials , and Rescues May 28 to October 20, 2013

4 0

E . M ai n S t. , S ears p ort, M ai ne

207-548-2529 • 800-268-8030 w w w . P eno bsc o tM arineM u seu m. o rg


Begin/2 Color 22

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

Main St. in Cornish including Brackett Co., Ice Cream Parlor, Parker & Sons Drugs, Progressive Headquarters and Pendexter Brothers. Item #100437 from the Eastern Illustrating & Publishing Co. Collection and www.PenobscotMarineMuseum.org

FEEDS & needs

Old Fashioned Maine Values & Ethics Serving Maine and New Hampshire

Trees • Shrubs • Perennials Firewood

Cell: 207-289-6272

Fall Bulbs Are In!

207-625-4279

Chris Boucher ~ Master Electrician wickedgoodelectric@yahoo.com 55 Main Street • Cornish, ME 04020

Heart & Hand Inc.

Landscape • Excavation • Construction Retail Center Poulin Grain, Pet Supplies, Black Gold Soil, Garden Supplies

˜

Log Works by Heart & Hand, Inc.

Specializing in Log Homes All aspects of new construction, remodeling, rot repair, cleaning, staining & caulking

(207)935-1125

109 Main St • Brownÿ eld, ME

heartandhandlandscape.com

GALLERY

&

STUDIO

UNIQUE GIFTS • BEADS • SUPPLIES SILVERSMITHING LESSONS • BEADING JEWELRY • SILK PAINTING CLASSES

207 935 7455 7 Portland Street • Fryeburg monday–saturday • 10:00–6:00 www.watersedgeme.com

207-625-4994

218 Maple Street • Cornish, Maine

C


Color Sec 2 23

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

Fryeburg Fair cross cut saw contest. Item #21625 from the Boutilier Collection and www.PenobscotMarineMuseum.org

September 29-October 6, 2013

Hall Farms Maple Products “Eight Generations of Agricultural Excellence”

U IN SEE YO L L ’ E USE W ARHO G U S THE E 2013 AT TH IR RG FA U B E Y 6 FR 9-OCT SEPT 2

www.HallFarms.com 207-645-2862

US Rt 2, PO Box 72 East Dixfield, ME 04227

K.S. WHITNEY ______________________ EXCAVATION SITE WORK • FOUNDATIONS DRIVEWAYS • ROADS GRADED SEPTIC SYSTEMS DELIVERIES: STONE, GRAVEL, SAND & LOAM

www.FryeburgFair.org

Phone: 647-3824 • Cell: 838-2923

Denmark, Maine


24

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

Post Office in South Bridgton. Item #102490 from the Eastern Illustrating & Publishing Co. Collection and www.PenobscotMarineMuseum.org

Kiesman Drywall Inc ©

Maine-Ly Foam

Drywall • Skimcoast Plaster ▶ Spray Foam Installation ◀

452-2930

kiesmandrywall.com mainelyfoam.com

No. Bridgton Rd. (Rt. 117) Bridgton, ME

207-647-3776

~A Casual Dining Spot in the Heart of the Lakes Region An Hour’s Drive from Portland~ Serving Lunch, Dinner and Sunday Brunch Featuring Fresh Seafood, Black Angus Steaks and Burgers, Ribs, Chicken and Pasta Dishes Homemade Soups-Desserts and Daily Specials Temperature Controlled Wine Closet Celebrating Famous Spicy Bloody Marys 25 Years House-made Drink Infusions Open Monday-Saturday from 11:00 • Sunday Brunch 10-3, Dinner from 3pm

Located on Route 302 • Bridgton 647-5300

www.theblackhorsetavern.com


25

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

High School building in Bridgton. Item #104461 from the Eastern Illustrating & Publishing Co. Collection and www.PenobscotMarineMuseum.org

DYER

Septic Service LAKESIDE LODGING & CONFERENCE CENTER

22 Rooms with Lake Views

Septic Tank Pumping Septic Systems Installed Locator Available System Inspections Pump Repair & Installations Emergency Service

Harrison, Maine 583-4546 Toll Free 877-250-4546 Serving the Oxford Hills and Lakes Regions for over 30 years.

115 N. High St., Bridgton, Maine

207-647-5301 Clean. Comfortable. Friendly. Affordable.

1-800-797-5301 www.HighlandLakeResort.com

Bridgton, ME


SEC 2 color 26

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

What Did Lewis Millett Really Do In Korea? Western Maine’s Medal of Honor recipient by Robert Kanehl

A

small picture of an army plaque hangs in Mechanic Falls’ Town Hall. The plaque located on Hill #180 in South Korea tells the following tale: “On this site, Company E of the 27th Infantry Regiment was pinned down and surrounded by 300 enemy soldiers. Out of ammunition, Captain Lewis Millet (sic) led the remainder of Company E on a bayonet charge, killing 47 and wounding 61 enemy soldiers, regaining control of the hill. Captain Millet (sic) received the Medal of Honor for heroism. It was one of the fiercest battles of the Korean War.” The plaque is attached to a rock on the top of the hill, and each year at the site a memori-

al service is held by both American and South Korean officials. The wording leads the reader to picture a parallel in history to another Mainer, Joshua Chamberlain, and his actions in the charge of the 20th Maine at Gettysburg. One can almost see the 6-foot slim Millett (actually spelled Millett) surrounded by dead and wounded comrades, faced with the desperate situation, jumping in front of his men, and shouting “Fix Bayonets – Charge!”, echoing the actions and words of 90 years earlier on Little Round Top. This, however, is far from the truth.

APPRAISAL, INC. 566 Portland Road • Route 302 Bridgton, Maine 04009

FRED PACKARD

ME certified #232 • NH certified #475

(207) 647-2172 • (800) 640-8507

L &W

CONSTRUCTION “No Job Too Big or Too Small”

Lewis Millett was born in Mechanic Falls, December 15, 1920, and spent his childhood traveling throughout New England. Despite this relocation there was always a weak spot in his heart for the small community west of Auburn. Here he was raised on tales of his Uncle Roland Ranlett, who had served in the First World War. In fact, one of his early memories is being taken to Fort Devens, Massachusetts to see his Uncle dressed as a soldier. “I always worshiped him,” Millett recalled. “And so I joined the National Guard as soon as I could.” His love for the military life was further enhanced by Civil War

Warren’s Florist Fresh Flowers For All Occasions Mon-Fri 9-5, Sat 9-4

A full-service florist serving you for over 15 years New Construction • Remodels Over 25 Years Experience Free Estimates Leroy Osgood:

647-5777

Bridgton, Maine

We Serve Bridgton • Harrison • Denmark Naples • Casco • Sebago • The Waterfords

647-8441

39 DEPOT ST, BRIDGTON • TOLL FREE 1-800-834-8407

Bridgton Urgent Care ...for Your Little Emergencies Colds, Flu, Sore Throat, Allergies, Hay Fever, etc. NOW OPEN MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY, 5PM-9PM and SATURDAY 8AM-1PM!

207-647-6166 at Bridgton Hospital

www.bridgtonhospital.org


27

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

stories of his great grandfather Lewis Millett. These ancestors guided Lewis toward becoming one of the nation’s most decorated soldiers. Graduating from high school in 1940, he enlisted in the Air Corps, but his desire to see real action caused the young man to skip to Canada, already at war with Germany. Lewis saw action in England as an anti-aircraft gunner. When Pearl Harbor brought America into the war, it also brought Lewis back to the United States. His AWOL was overlooked because of the experience he brought, and he was shipped out to North Africa to begin a long eventful life in the front lines. From 1942 to 1945, Millett was wounded, and received both the Silver and Bronze Stars for heroism. He was even recommended for the Medal of Honor in a foreshadow of Korea, but it was denied. His amazing record is only blemished by a

court-martial for AWOL, made necessary to earn a battlefield commission. After the war, Millett returned to Mechanic Falls and attended Bates College in Lewiston, but military life still enticed him. He reentered the service in 1949 to fulfill his destiny. The next phase started when the North Koreans poured over the border in 1950. Millett was one of the first rushed in to plug the hole in the Iron Curtain. Bloody see-sawed fighting in the Asian peninsula filled a year and a half of Lewis’ life, finally bringing him to command of Company E in February 1951. This unit was spearheading a drive to recapture Seoul from the Chinese at the time. This is where history gets foggy. Informed of the proudly displayed picture in Mechanic Falls’ Town Hall, Lewis laughed. “The hill I took (not defended), was twenty miles north of there.” He explained that the army had

located a Hill #180 on the map, but it was the wrong hill. The plaque also misspelled his last name. None of this matters to Lewis as long as the men of his company are remembered, especially those who fell February 7, 1951. On that day, Millett’s command was moving in the Soam-ni area along a road flanked by high ground. Enemy fire from an estimated 200 to 300 Chinese soldiers pinned down a third of Lewis’ men. Millett noted that he was neither surrounded nor out of ammunition. Instead, he was maneuvering the rest of his men to seize the high ground to eliminate the enemy fire. Somehow the Chinese had managed to create a series of covered fox holes in the frozen ground. From these catacombs the enemy jumped up, fired and then disappeared below ground before the Americans could return fire. Millett watched the sweeping slope for a moment. “I (Continued on page 28)

cliff roderick, inc. general contractor

Owner: Walter Connell

Scrap Metal & Auto Removal Used Parts & Tires

Custom Log Homes Conventional Homes Small or Large Jobs

Over 150 Classic Cars!

M-F: 8a-5p • Sat: 7a-12p • Closed Sundays

18 Spring House Rd., Harrison

Builder of

TRUCKING • SEPTIC SYSTEMS FOUNDATIONS & SLABS

207-647-8058 cell: 207-632-5183 bridgton, me

Since 1988

225-5337 • 754-6543

Owner Operator Todd Harlow

Turner, ME

Worry-Free Assisted Living Retirement Community Services available include: Transportation Meal Plans Housekeeping Laundry Activities Medication Administration Personal Care Month to Month Rate For more information call

207-786-7149

MONTELLO HEIGHTS

Retirement Community

550 College Street, Lewiston

www.montelloheights.org


color SEC 2 28

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

(Continued from page 27) could see him (the forward most Chinese soldier) jumping up and throwing a hand grenade. I knew that if I could see him, I could run and get into the hole with him.” Without a word, Millett pulled out the cold steel bayonet, and fixed it into his carbine rifle. Springing to his feet, he screamed like a banshee as he charged. “I was unafraid because I’m arrogant,” Millett explained. “You get so busy or so angry that you don’t have time to be afraid.” Many people called this courage, but Millett simply called it a soldier’s attitude. “You see,” he rationalized, “I don’t consider myself a hero. The heroes are the ones that die for their country. I just did what I had to do.” His solo charge, filled with terror and super-human effort, inspired the rest of his men. Bayonets flashed in the Korean sun and clicked onto the American

The Crawling Craftsman Residential / Commercial

Professional Installation/Sales of:

Carpet - Vinyl - VCT Hardwood - Laminate Ceramic - Porcelain - Stone Rubber - Dura-Cote ~ Fully Insured ~

Rick “Quiver” Cummings 8 Bow Street Otisfield, Maine

Cell: 207-446-2622 Home: 207-744-0410 Quiver51167@aol.com

Ralph Libby Chain Saws

rifles. The rest of his company swept up the hill behind him, shouting like wild men and firing their weapons. Millett, meanwhile, raced well ahead, over the barren, ice-covered hillside, and jumped in on the Chinese soldier. As Millett bayoneted the soldier, another fired a sub-machine gun at him. Millett responded by again jumping to his feet and racing toward his adversary. This second Chinese soldier was also bayoneted by Millett. Another followed, and another, until soon Company E had wrested the hilltop from the enemy, killing 47 and wounding 61. The action was one of the last bayonet charges in U.S. Army history, and cost 9 American lives. Among the many wounded was Millett himself, who refused to leave until the area was secured. Confusion about the incident started immediately, as the wounded returned to the American lines after dark. Here

JCZ Yard Care & Tree Service

they told fantastic tales of the attack, all zeroing in on the man who led them – Lewis Millett. Millett was awarded the Medal of Honor for his courage in leading the attack, but then Mainers have always had the courage to lead. After all, the state’s motto is “Dirigo, I lead.” Lewis continued his military career after this incident. Serving with additional distinction in Korea, and then in Vietnam where he won the Legion of Merit. He would retire in 1985 having spent over ten years of his life in combat. All the nation’s major combat decorations for bravery hung around his neck, as well as a handful of medals from other nations. This quiet Mainer then allowed his fame to graciously fade. His last residence was in California, surrounded by trees that, “remind me of Maine.” He died on Saturday November 14, 2009.

Inc.

Jeffrey S. Craig, Owner

SALES • SERVICE • INSTALLATION

~ Commercial & Residential ~

Propane • Oil • Well Systems

All Seasons Property Maintenance

Tree Removal • Licensed Arborist • Lot Clearing Difficult Take Downs • Storm Damage Tractor Services • Landscaping & Design Competitive Rates ~ Fully Insured & Free Estimates ~

Call (207) 837-4277

Ken Gilbert

207-225-2551 207-713-8733 Turner, ME

Western Maine Towing & Recovery

Josh Koback 207.743.9799 Cell: 207.595.3799

M-F 12-7 Sat. 8-1 Sun. 9-1

336-2079 294 Jordan Rd Buckÿ eld

AAA Roadside Assistance Local & Long Distance 24/7 Flatbed Towing Oxford, Maine


29

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

Main St. in Mechanic Falls, ca. 1926. Item #101376 from the Eastern Illustrating & Publishing Co. Collection and www.PenobscotMarineMuseum.org

SHAMROCK

STONEWORKS & LANDSCAPING, INC. “We Build Your Dreamscapes” Paver Patios Walkways Poolscapes & Driveways ICPI Certified Installer

Mulching Planting Techno-Pro Installer Licensed Landscape Arborist

207-242-7983 or 207-685-4480

www.shamrockstoneworks.com 9 Kentwood Drive

Kents Hill, Maine 04351

Stevens P & A Forest Products Mechanics

Low Impact Logging - Cut To Length

Truck & Heavy Equipment Repair Metal Welding & Fabricating Hydraulics • Small Engines PETE ADAMS

547-3840 Philbrick Road • Sidney

Alan Stevens: 215-8752

207-838-3692

51 Patten Hill Road • Hebron, ME

THE

Christmas Barn GIFTS & HOME BAKERY

Pies, cookies, breads, scones, fudge, cakes for all occasions, and much more! All food items are homemade from scratch

˜

Ornaments, candles, jewelry, goat milk soap, hand crocheted gifts

423 Main St., Oxford • 207-539-8920 thechristmasbarn@roadrunner.com


30

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

Main Gems and Wiseman Farms in Norway. Item #111287 from the Eastern Illustrating & Publishing Co. Collection and www.PenobscotMarineMuseum.org

Drake & Son Contractor, Inc. ~ Over 30 years of experience ~

Jim Drake

Excavation • Lot Clearing Septic & Wells • Snow Plowing Gravel

Cell: 207-576-6496 Home: 207-966-1125 280 Hebron Center Rd. Hebron, ME 109 Main Street South Paris, ME

Enjoy delicious continental cuisine in an elegant country atmosphere, at affordable prices! Luncheon Served 11:00-1:30 Dinner served from 4:00p Closed Monday, Open Saturday at 4:00p & Sunday 11a-2:00p

743-2532

www.mauricerestaurant.com

Smoke-Free Dining • Reservations Recommended

MIND, BODY & SOUL Meditations ✴ Aura Cleansing Reiki Crystal Healing Psychic Guidance & Readings Crystal Jewelry & Mountain T-Shirts Michelle Eppinger ~ Reiki Master & Teacher ~

207-743-5015

518 E. Oxford Rd., Oxford, ME

Reach Buyers Across the State Advertise In Discover Maine Magazine

1-800-753-8684

www.discovermainemagazine.com


31

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

Cemetery in West Bethel. Item #102920 from the Eastern Illustrating & Publishing Co. Collection and www.PenobscotMarineMuseum.org

BIG DAWG

CONCRETE

For All Your Concrete Needs Fully Insured 890-2424 • 674-2103

COOPER FARMS Take a drive in the country and bring home...

Mouthwatering Homemade Pies and Baked Goods Fresh Fruits & Vegetables • Apples Maple Syrup • Sweet Cider

674-2200 Route 26 West Paris, ME

FULLY INSURED

FREE ESTIMATES

Complete Site Work Septic Systems Driveways • Foundations Miguel Ibarguen

207-578-0411


32

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

Bethel Attorney Lobbied For An Officer’s Commission Adapted from “Maine at War”

by Brian Swartz

O

’Neill W. Robinson Jr. wanted an officer's commission — any commission — so badly in autumn 1861 that he asked his friends to lobby Governor Israel Washburn on his behalf. And write the good governor they did, en masse. With the Civil War still in its infancy that fall, ambitious and not-always-so-talented Maine men sought commissions in the infantry regiments being raised for duty on far-off battlefields. An attorney in Bethel, the 37-year-old Robinson wanted to fight, preferably with an officer’s shoulder straps sewn to his uniform.

Washburn and Maine Adjutant General John Hodgdon played critical roles in determining who received which commission 152 years ago. Being a faithful Republican helped, but not enough wanted to fight, so a patriotic Democrat could suffice. Writing to Washburn, Sidney Pinkham stated that “Mr. Robinson has all the requisite qualifications for an efficient officer … should he undertake to enlist the men for a Battery, I have no doubt he would succeed.” On Monday, Oct. 7, Benjamin Freeman informed Washburn that Robinson, “a lawyer and a gentleman of wealth & mind and also a Jamesin (sic) Demo-

crat, is desirous of serving his country on the tented field.” Freeman referred to the so-called “Jameson Democrats,” Maine Democrats who supported the war and took their name from Charles Jameson, former 2nd Maine Infantry commander and an 1861 gubernatorial candidate. The Republican Washburn would understand that Robinson was a Union loyalist despite being a Democrat. Robinson had a particular goal in mind; he asked Freeman “to inquire if the places of Lieutanant Colonel or Major for the eleventh infantry regiment was filled.” If other men already held those slots, then Robinson would

At the Mollyockett Motel Dining in a casual atmosphere with a touch of elegance Family style fare with steak, seafood & vegetarian dishes

_______________________________

Our conference center seats 60-100 people and is ideal for: •Business seminars/conferences •Church retreats •Wedding receptions •Family reunions/gatherings Kitchenette & family rooms available • Clean, friendly & relaxed Indoor heated pool, sauna, & hot tub. • WiFi Available Open 24 hours year round. • Rt. 26 in Woodstock, Maine GPS address: 1132 South Main St., Woodstock, ME 04219

www.mollyockettmotel.com

207-674-2345

_______________________________

Gather with friends around a beautiful fireplace featuring minerals from Oxford County’s 300 mines.We offer tours for rockhounding and wildlife viewing. Join us for an evening of dining or an afternoon of family fun.

Woodstock, Maine

207-674-2392


33

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

gladly accept a similar rank with “one of the Regts. yet to be formed from this state.” Writing with a shaky hand on Tuesday, Nov. 12, R.K. Goodenow of Paris told Washburn that “I have known” Robinson “for the period of ten or fifteen years.” A Bowdoin College graduate and “a lawyer of good standing in this Oxford county,” Robinson would be successful “in getting up a company, if the command of one of the batteries … should be tendered him.” As had Freeman, Goodenow reminded the Republican Washburn that while Robinson “was always a democrat,” he was “a high minded & honorable one.” Robinson had “supported heartily & energetically the ticket headed by Col. Jameson at our last September 1861 election. “He is a man of great physical power & of endurance, & would fight like a tiger,” Goodenow wrote.

“Having been personally acquainted with Mr. Robinson it gives me great pleasure to say that he possesses all the necessary qualifications for the position he desires & I trust he will receive it,” John I. Perry assured Washburn from Paris on Thursday, Nov. 14. “His social position is such that I think men would as readily enlist under him as any man in Maine,” C.W. Walton wrote Washburn about Robinson from Paris on Monday, Nov. 18. Robinson got his wish: Washburn appointed him a captain and tapped him to command the 4th Maine Battery. Robinson recruited men for his new command; joining him in those recruiting efforts were Matthew Coffin from Skowhegan, Hamlin Eaton from Kent’s Hill, the Rev. Lucius M.S. Haynes from Augusta, and Charles White from Skowhegan. For their efforts, these four men also received lieutenants’ commissions

from Washburn. Unfortunately for another wouldbe officer, the 4th Maine Battery slots were full. Writing from North Anson on Monday, Sept. 30, 1861, George C. Getchell had informed Washburn that “Oren O. Vittum of Concord … is anxious to obtain an appointment as an officer in some of the military companies now organizing. “I have been long acquainted with Mr. Vittum and consider that he would be well qualified … and I shall be much gratified if you will please to give him an appointment,” Getchell wrote. Washburn appointed Vittum as sergeant for the 4th Maine Battery’s First Section, comprising a cannon, Vittum, two corporals, and 13 enlisted men. This section went to war with the battery, which fought at Cedar Mountain in August 1862. Not many months passed before officer vacancies opened in the 4th (Continued on page 34)

Give someone a special gift that will be enjoyed all year long...

Western Maine Flooring Steve Nokes Specializing in Wood Floors

Wood Flooring • Installation Sanding • Refinishing Free Estimates

207-357-7544 snokes@roadrunner.com

98 Harlow Rd. • Peru, ME 04290

A subscription to Discover Maine Magazine!

You’ll find our subscription form on page 30 of this issue.


34

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

(Continued from page 33) Maine Battery. Haynes was honorably discharged for disability on Sept. 23, 1862; writing Washburn from Maryland Heights near Harpers Ferry on Oct. 9, Robinson sought “to urge upon your excellency the promotion of Lts. Hamlin F. Eaton, Charles W. White, and Mathew B. Coffin, each of whom has well earned the promotion asked for.” With these officers promoted “up” a rank, “there is now one vacancy in the number of Lieuts. in this battery,” Robinson wrote Washburn on Oct. 13. Robinson recommended that Sgt. Melville C. Kimball, the battery’s quartermaster, should be promoted to junior lieutenant. A Bethel resident, Kimball “is a very likely young man, smart and ambitious,” John Lynch lobbied Washburn from Portland on Oct. 14. “From my personal knowledge of his character

and the representations of his Captain I take pleasure in recommending him to the favorable consideration of your excellency.” And so the self-promotion to gain promotion continued throughout the war. Kimball worked his way up to senior second lieutenant before resigning from the 4th Maine Battery on Dec. 21, 1864. O’Neil W. Robinson Jr. remained a captain. He led the battery for almost three years until he fell ill. Sent home to recuperate, he died at Waterford on Sunday, July 17, 1864.

JAKE’S GARAGE AUTO REPAIRS EXHAUST SPECIALIST PIPE BENDING

207-369-0791 207-364-3763

REALTY GROUP “Here To Serve You”

Robert Riggs

LOCATION. LOCATION. LOCATION.

It’s like having a branch wherever you go!

Home of Maine’s Premier Seafood Buffet First Friday of Every Month Available for Banquets, Luncheons & Receptions

897-2117

Route 4 • Jay, Maine

REALTOR® 207-357-2626 Cell 207-897-4315 O° ce 207-897-4318 Fax 54 Main Street Livermore Falls, ME 04254 riggs_robert@rocketmail.com

www.leavittrealty.net

529 Prospect Ave. • Rumford, Maine

La Fleur’s Restaurant

The Livermore Falls area was once part of the Abenaki Indian territory called Rockemeka,meaning “great corn place.”

WHITTEMORE

“Take it to Jake!”

Jake & Tina Pellerin - Owners

DID YOU KNOW?

155 Branches in Maine Oxford Federal Credit Union participates in S h ar e d B r an c h i n g , w h e r e y o u c an c o m p l e t e a range of transactions at over 155 credit unions in Maine, just like at home.

let’s grow together 2 2 5 R i v e r R o da . M e x i c o , M E 5 4 F ai r S t r e e t . N o r w ya , M E

1 .8 0 0 .9 9 1 .9 2 1 9 o fc u .o r g

JOHNNY

WOODLOTS WANTED BUYER OF STANDING TIMBER SELECTIVE CUTTING ROAD & HOUSE LOTS CLEARED FIREWOOD • CHIPPING • TREE REMOVAL

897-5945 Livermore, Maine

LICENSED ARBORIST


T

35

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

The downtown of Livermore Falls along Main Street in 1937 (sign on left is for Rexall Drug Store). Item #198 from the collections of the Maine Historical Society and www.VintageMaineImages.com

HOWIE’S WELDING & FABRICATION, INC. Structural Steel Fabricators

~ Casual Family Dining ~ Open Daily for Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner 1 Mill Street • Jay, ME MILL-ST-CAFE.COM Swimming Pool Repair Aleece Martin-Kaulback 207-779-7192 amart25@yahoo.com

• Stairs • Railings • Industrial Supplies

645-2581

1148 Main Street • Jay, Maine howieswelding.com

@ Home Electric Serving You Since 1978

Steven H. Mallen, Master Electrician

Commercial/Residential Electrical Installations 24 Hour Emergency Service

Scuba Diving Services and Retrieval Dayl Kaulback 207-779-7147 p_diddy_dayl@yahoo.com

Fully Licensed & Insured

Cell: 242-2227 293-2140 Mt. Vernon, ME

Jim’s

Small Engine Service James Howes, owner

Lawnmowers Chippers • Tillers Snowblowers Tune-ups • Repairs Pick-up & Delivery

320-2208

Cell: 446-0819 10 Dilman Lane Livermore Falls

Jean Castonguay Excavating • Sand • Loam • Gravel • Septic Systems • Brush Chipping • Lots Cleared

897-4283

or call Adam 491-8128

Livermore Falls, Maine


36

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

The Loneliest Preacher

c M t

Universalism’s founder, Thomas Barnes by Charles Francis

Rodney Ellis Jr.

Construction New Homes Garages Camps Barns Additions

for this piece to me. Grant Mallett lives in a house that once belonged to members of the Barnes family. It is an old house dating back to before the time of the Civil War. Grant says there are ghosts there. Maybe it has something to do with the fact that an adjoining property is the site of an old Indian burial ground. Joshua Chamberlain once visited the site to see the burial ground for himself. This was after one of the Barnes family plowed it up. There could be other reasons why there are ghosts in Grant Mallet's house, though. Grant lived in Gettysburg for a time. He says, “Perhaps I brought them [the ghosts] back from Gettysburg after living there for three years. Of course, the

MID-MAINE

Equine & Canine Therapeutics & Wind Swept Acres Arabians Massage Therapy Rehabilitation Dog Grooming Doggie Daycare/Board Riding Lessons & Training Trisha J. Davis

Fully Insured ~ Free Estimates

ESTM-CMT Certified Massage Therapist

293-2364

539 Townhouse Road, Vienna

539 Townhouse Rd • Vienna, ME 04360

491-0410 • 293-3003

EXCAVATION Farmington, ME Reasonable Prices and Service You Can Count On!

info@loonridge.com 1339 Augusta Rd. • Belgrade, ME

www.LoonRidge.com

Licensed & Insured Commercial/Residential New Homes/Remodels/Repairs Hourly or Flat-Rate Pricing

Mike Wainer Plumbing & Heating 169 Rome Rd. Rome, ME 04963

(207) 397-4475 Cell: (207) 692-3153

windswept-arabians.com ezequinetraining.com

ORR

207-495-2294

ghosts could be members of the Barnes family. Thomas Barnes would be a likely candidate. He preached in the area. This was back around the time Barnes was the only Universalism preacher in Maine. The Reverend Thomas Barnes lived much of his life in Poland. Barnes is viewed as the founder of Universalism in the Pine Tree State. When Thomas Barnes came to Maine he “was a lone preacher, in a lone society, in a lone house.” That was in 1799. Some fifty years later there were seventy-seven preachers, one hundred and seventeen societies, eighty-nine meeting houses, and thirty free churches. Almost all of the Universalist societies, meeting houses and

Roads • Driveways • Cellar Holes Septic Systems • Drainage & Ditching Excavation & Grading • Culverts House Lot Clearing Sand • Gravel • Stone • Loam

~Over 10 years experience~ Free Estimates Jason: 491-0540 orrexcavation.com

mwainerph@yahoo.com

DON’S AUTO BODY Mobile Low Cost Rust Repair Sand Blasting Special Zinc Galvanized Rust Protection

T

his is the story of Thomas Barnes, a legendary figure of the lakes region of western Maine. It would not have been written were it not for Grant Mallett. Grant knows a good deal about western Maine. Grant’s full name is Wilbert Grant Mallett. Those who know anything about western Maine and in particular Farmington should know Grant Mallett’s grandfather and namesake. Mallett Hall on the campus of the University of Maine at Farmington is named for the elder Mallett. The elder Mallett brought Farmington Normal School, as the University was once known, into the twentieth century. This point having been made, it is now time to specifically credit Grant Mallett’s contributions in suggesting the subject

20% Off with Coupon Farmington and Surrounding Areas

207-491-7243 donpillsbury@yahoo.com

a l O “

o r w p t a t 1 t w r f

a


s . s n

d s

o a t r , , y d

37

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

churches were to be found in western Maine. Reverend Barnes never ventured to eastern Maine. One of the communities Thomas Barnes preached in during his earliest years was what is now Oakland. Oakland is sometimes referred to as “the key to the seven lakes.” Thomas Barnes was a familiar figure in towns of the seven lakes, the Belgrade Lakes region. Back when Barnes visited what would become Oakland, it was the west parish of Waterville. Barnes preached there in 1802. It wasn’t until 1833 that a Universalism Society was established there. Twice, however, before this, in 1810 and 1813, the annual meeting of the Eastern Universalism Association was held here. In 1893 a door-to-door religious census found 129 Universalist families in Oakland, It has been said that “The history of a church begins not with the erection of

the church building; not with the organization of a group, but with the birth of a movement.” If this is so, then one might add that giving birth to a movement can be a lonely affair. At least it was for Thomas Barnes. That’s why Barnes can be described as “the loneliest preacher.” Thomas Barnes was not born a Universalist. In fact, there was no Universalism as such when Barnes was born. Barnes is identified by some authorities as one of the first four Universalist ministers. Today Universalism and Unitarians are generally viewed as united. There is a Unitarian Universalism Association. It came into existence in 1961. Universalism as an American sect was born in the Boston area in the late 1700s. There it was ministered to by the Reverend John Murray. While Murray did accept the doctrine of the Trini-

ty, he saw God as one “indivisible first cause.” The society sometimes went by the name Independent Christian Universalism. It is not the intent here to discuss theology. Therefore, one point only will be made about the nature of Universalism. It is a key point, though. In this instant it is taken from the sermons of Thomas Barnes. It it the principle of universal salvation. Thomas Barnes believed in salvation for all, that all mankind were inherently good. In this Barnes saw himself as being in direct opposition to such faiths as the Baptists and the Methodists. Barnes saw himself as opposed to the doctrines of any faith following the principles of Calvinism. Thomas Barnes was born in Merrimac, New Hampshire in 1749. He was brought up a Baptist. His intent as a youth was to become a doctor. In fact, he studied medicine for a time under a (Continued on page 38)

~Celebrating 30 Years~

www.harrisrealestate.net Celebrating UMF’s 150th Anniversary

Sandy River Farms LARGE 10-ACRE

MT. BLUE DRUG Free Delivery to the Farmington/Wilton Area

CORN MAZE

Registered Pharmacists

September 28 - October 27, 10-4 Daily

Hours: Mon.- Fri. 8:00a to 6:00p • Sat. 8:00a to 2:00p

Visit our local store on premises with 98% local produce and much more!

207-778-5419

U.S. Rte. 2 & 27, South of Farmington

624 Wilton Road • Farmington, ME 04938

5 weekends of fun for all ages!

www.sandyriverfarms.com

Jason A. Pratt Kevin R. Holland

Fax: 207-778-5983

www.mtbluedrug.com


38

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

(Continued from page 37) practicing physician. In 1883, Barnes was living in Jaffrey, New Hampshire. He had a wife and children. He was a farmer. That year he chanced to attend a service conducted by the Reverend Caleb Rich, a believer in the principle of universal salvation and goodness. The idea struck a chord with Barnes. He became a convert. Within a few months he was publicly advocating universal salvation. Barnes ministered to various groups of Universalism in New Hampshire, Vermont and Connecticut following his conversion. 1798 found him in Gloucester, Massachusetts. 1798 is also the year a large number of Gloucester residents, many of them communicants of Barnes’ church, moved to Maine. They moved to what would become New Gloucester and Poland. Barnes visited New Gloucester at the request

Plumbing • Heating • Cooling GEOTHERMAL • SOLID FUEL • SOLAR • COMFORT CONTROLS

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL

207-645-2711

of his former church members in late 1798. In 1799 he moved to Poland at the request of Universalists there. Thomas Barnes was never a one church or single church minister. One Sunday a month he would journey to one town, the next Sunday to another, and so on for the rest of the month. He served Norway and Paris in this manner. If there was a fifth Sunday in a month, it was held open for the odd request. In this manner Barnes covered an exceptionally large area of western Maine. Thomas Barnes appealed to people. From this day and age his appeal is probably one that is hard to appreciate. I find one story particularly intriguing, though. It involves a minister named Merritt who challenged the doctrine of universal salvation and goodness. Barnes' response was “Good was ap-

Printing WareHouse Inc.

Copy Center & Print Shop Fax Service • Laminating Nostalgic Placemats & Matted Prints of Maine Towns Visit Our Ebay Store: Joey’s Emporium

Wilton, ME

207-645-2805

~ Austin Foss ~ Brian Drumm ~ Terry Smith ~

471 US Route 2 East Wilton, ME 04294

www.abtmech.com

STEVE WOOD Degree: Residential Construction

New Construction, Homes, Roofs, Siding, Decks, Garages, General Carpentry, Renovations, Snow Plowing Cell: 491-6543 Home: 778-0156

INSURED New Sharon, ME

swbuilders@myfairpoint.net

plied to God, and also to vegetables which were perishable.” It is an allusion that makes one think and ponder. Grant Mallett says that ghosts haunting his home is an attested fact. His home was built by Skolfield shipwrights from the Skolfield Shipyard. One of the early owners of the house was George Barnes. It was George’s brother Henry, who lived across the street, who plowed up the old Indian burial ground. Another member of this particular branch of the Barnes family was named Thomas Skolfield Barnes. Tradition has it he was named for the Reverend Thomas Barnes.

Hot & Cold Sandwiches pizza • salads grilled & fried foods fresh Homemade desserts daily catering available

645-4100

1339 Main St., East Wilton

Ray Ray’s Cafe & Sweet Treats

Unique Items Area Group Shop Tues-Sat 10-4 • Sun 12-4

645-9000

207-645-2556

Downtown Wilton, Maine

471 Route 2 East Wilton, Maine


39

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

s -

s . . e s e n s y . e

Russels Novelty Works in Farmington. Item #100747 from the Eastern Illustrating & Publishing Co. Collection and www.PenobscotMarineMuseum.org

DECKER-SIMMONS

AMERICAN LEGION POST 51

Serving Smithÿ eld & surrounding areas for over 30 years!

Wilson & Son Logging Cameron Wilson - Owner/Operator

Buying Stumpage

“Serving Oakland’s Veterans and the Community since 1926”

Banquet Hall available for rent

Please call 465-2446 Oakland, Maine

207-313-2863

Licensed Arborist • Fully Insured 292 Ross Hill Rd., Smithfield, ME


40

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

Hillcrest Tearoom and Filling Station on Oakland Road in Waterville. Item #102875 from the Eastern Illustrating & Publishing Co. Collection and www.PenobscotMarineMuseum.org

“Caring For The Ones Who Cared For Us”

PROMOTING INDEPENDENCE AT HOME In-Home Nursing • Personal Care Services Homemakers • Emergency Response Systems Transportation Services

State Registered Personal Care And Homemaker Agency

Apollo Salon and Spa

For More Information:

www.maine-lyeldercare.com

Ming Lee Chinese Restaurant

° e area’s ÿ nest Szechuan & Mandarin dishes

Luncheon Specials Dinner Combos Take Out • Dine-In Mon 9-4, Tue-Fri 8-7, Sat 8-3 $5.00 O˜ Any Service for New Clients!

872-2242

91 Silver Street • Waterville, ME

465-3249

28 Center Street • Oakland, ME 04963 • denise@maine-lyeldercare.com

Weekdays: 11-8:30 Weekends: 11-9:30

207-873-2828

Pine Tree Square, 365 Main St. Waterville, ME www.mingleerestaurant.com


41

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

Emerson At Waterville

Famous poet gives lecture at Waterville College by Charles Francis

I

n August of 1841 Ralph Waldo Emerson left his Concord home for Waterville, Maine. He was travelling at the invitation of the Society of the Adelphi of Waterville College. Emerson was to give a society lecture. The lecture Emerson presented before the Society of the Adelphi, “The Method of Nature,” took the form of an essay. The format was a departure for Emerson. Prior to the Waterville appearance Emerson generally used the lecture format to hone his essays. His essays — like the famous “Self-Reliance”— were refined and polished from lectures. “The Method of Nature” was written specifically for the Waterville College presentation. It was not a

work in progress but a finished product. Emerson’s presentation took place on August 11. The reception was less than felicitous. In fact, it was a failure. At least that is how it is often described, and that is surprising, as Emerson’s fame during his lifetime rested on his lectures. If “The Method of Nature” was a failure, it is an interesting failure. It is interesting in terms of context, not so much the context in which it was presented, although that is a part of it, but in the context of Emerson’s personal development. In the summer of 1841 Emerson made a major adjustment in his thinking and the student members of the Society of Adelphi and their

guests were the first to be exposed to it. “The Method of Nature” is not just about nature. It is about the relation of man and nature. Some critics say it is about ecstasy, others that it is about peak experience. Most often it is the religious or literary critic that says “The Method of Nature” is about ecstasy; those that use the term peak experience most often have backgrounds in psychology. About a month before he was scheduled to give his Waterville lecture, Emerson took a solitary trip to Nantasket Beach. He went there in hopes of experiencing a moment of visionary intensity. For someone who had written of the peace and rewards to be found in (Continued on page 42)

Eric’s

RESTAURANT • SPIRITS • BANQUETS • Daily Features • Fresh Baked Bread • Everything Made Fresh Daily • Gift Certificates Available • Business Meetings, Parties, Receptions

Check out our bountiful omelettes!

Open Mon.-Sat. 6am-2pm • Sunday 7am-2pm

105 College Avenue, Waterville • 859-8761

Managing properties throughout mid-Maine since 1982

www.perkinsmanagement.net A division of Carroll Perkins Associates. Est. 1972

873-0751

63 Silver St., Waterville, ME 04901

For Extraordinary Custom Framing

46 Main Street • Downtown Waterville www.theframemakers.com 207-872-8927 Monday-Friday 8:30am-5pm, Saturday 8:30am-4pm

Rehabilitation and Nursing Care • Newly Expanded & Renovated • Physical, Occupational & Speech Therapy • Long Term Care • Dementia Unit • Short Term Rehabilitation • Recreational Activity Program • Medicare and Medicaid Certified

˜ e Independent Professional Helping People Just Like You!

1-800-877-9450

Securities offered through investors Capitol Corp. Member FINRA/SIPC. Advisory services offered through investors Capitol Advisory. 6 Kimball Lane, Lynnfield MA 01940

873-5125

220 Kennedy Memorial Drive Waterville, Maine 04901

lakewoodcare.org


42

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

(Continued from page 41) woodland settings Emerson had a curiously ambivalent attitude toward the sea. He considered seascapes “vulgarized.” This changed at Nantasket. He wrote of finding the ocean “satiating to the eye.” For the first time the ocean satisfied something in him. Waterville College was founded as the Maine Literary and Theological Institute. It was a Baptist school. Today Waterville College is Colby College. In the 1840s Waterville College was experiencing an upwelling of reform minded thinking. Antislavery sentiment was one example of the trend. The Society of the Adelphi was another. In the early 1800s, the somewhat secretive Adelphi societies could be found scattered about the northeast. Loosely based on the Italian Adelphi Society, which opposed Napoleon’s rise to power, the American societies supported

reform in areas such as education, labor laws and religion. Emerson came to Waterville when the controversy brought about by his Harvard Divinity School address was at its height. It is doubtful that the Waterville Society of the Adelphi expected the type of lecture that they heard that long ago August day. In “The Method of Nature” Emerson speaks of quitting the society of his fellows “as if they were thieves” for a natural setting, “some desert cliff of mount Katahdin, some unvisited recess in Moosehead Lake, to bewail [one’s] innocence and to recover it.” The Maine references may have been intended as a bow to his hosts, as Emerson was always conscious to whom he spoke. Accepting this as the case, we must then take into consideration the fact that Emerson’s aunt, Mary Moody

Emerson, was in the audience. She travelled to Waterville from Waterford to hear her nephew. Mary Moody Emerson was a major influence in the life of Ralph Waldo Emerson. She helped raise him from childhood and directed much of his early reading and general education. She was as much an intellect as her nephew. Mary Moody Emerson had expressed displeasure in what she considered her nephew’s independent streak and non theistic leanings. Ralph Waldo Emerson wanted his aunt to hear how his thinking had changed. Prior to the Waterville address, Emerson’s mature works dealt with man’s moral progress, that the individual should think for himself, that he should “go alone, refuse the good models” models such as those of the established churches of contemporary society. The

Debra

Achramowicz C E R T I F I E D

CPA, PA P U B L I C

A C C O U N T A N T

873-7100

Serving small businesses & individuals 155 Silver Street Waterville, ME www.az-cpa.com

376

Hemphill, llc Western clothing for the whole family BOOTS • HATS • BELTS

Horses, Cattle, Saddlery, Fencing ARIAT • DAN POST • DINGO DOUBLE H • DURANGO

Horses Available for Sale & Winter Lease ~ Open Year Round • Mon-Sat 8am-5:30pm ~

207-872-7964

577 Oak Grove Rd., North Vassalboro 10 miles north of Augusta • 5 miles south of Winslow

B & F Fresh Vegetables Vegetables Flowers Lobsters • Clams Christmas Trees & Wreaths

Open 7 Days A Week 7am-7pm ~ Year Round Mark & Teddi Blakney, proprietors

873-4345

327 China Road, Winslow, Maine


43

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

sentiments are those of a reformer, of a revolutionary. “The Method of Nature” may be viewed as revolutionary and as reform minded but not in the specific manner that drew the attention of Emerson’s earlier work. The essay has as its subject the mental state of the individual vis a vie nature. Emerson speaks of nature as “Supreme Presence” the “doctrine” of which “is a cry of joy and exultation.” Mystics and those of a particular religious bent speak of an ecstatic union with the divine. Psychologists like Abraham Maslow speak of peak experiences, of oceanic or sylvan experiences where one is acutely attuned to his or her immediate surroundings. For Emerson these happenings occur just a few times in life. They occur when one is unified with everything he or she faces. It is an amazing experience, combining

24-Hour Emergency Service

Compressor Distributor Pumps, Parts, Service, Rental & Sales

both peace and ecstasy. For the Emerson of the summer of 1841, “... ecstasy [sic] is the law and cause of nature.” He asks “Does the sunset landscape seem to you the palace of Friendship...?” His answer is “It is that. All other meanings which base men have put on it are conjectural and false.” “Self-Reliance” may be Emerson's most famous essay but his greatest is “Experience.” It will be written three years after the Sage of Concord speaks in Waterville. The seeds of this greatest of American essays may be found in Emerson’s address to the Society of the Adelphi. “Experience” is one of the “Conduct of Life” essays. These essays and “Experience” in particular are concerned with the duty of the individual, which is composed of one’s character. “Experience” deals with the greatest of

man’s tasks, the daily management of life. The duty of the individual is not to achieve success but to achieve order and tranquility in conducting the daily routine. In “The Method of Nature” Emerson speaks of “the waste abyss of possibility.” When we bemoan lost opportunities, advantages we may have had but did not follow up on, we must consign those feelings to the “abyss.” We can’t stop life from continuing on, just as “the rushing stream will not stop to be observed.” That is part of the message contained in Emerson’s failed Waterville lecture. Maybe what Emerson was saying to his listeners was as simple as “Don’t cry over spilt milk,” nature doesn’t, it just continues on. Be one with nature.

Great Food • Fresh Deli Beverages • Sandwiches Meat Packages Household Items Lottery Tickets Megabucks and much more...

AMERICAN LEGION POST 14

KARAOKE AND DANCING

AGENCY LIQUOR STORE

Bill Bickford: 207-877-5179 Rick Lower: 207-877-5049

BANQUET HALL RENTAL AVAILABLE

Open 7 Days a Week • Mon-Sat 8a-8p • Sun 9a-8p

wdbmachine@hughes.net

86 Main Street • Fairfield, ME 04937

Fairfield, Maine

Every Friday Night 7pm to 12am

453-2567

We Accept Credit Cards and Food Stamps

453-7500

95 Main Street • Fairfield

www.villagemarketfairfield.com

WOODLAWN REHAB & NURSING CENTER

Plum Creek Growing Value From Exceptional Resources Bingham Office 672-5512

Fairfield Office 453-2527

Greenville Office 695-2241

Marshall Yard Office 663-4406

Physician Directed Rehabilitation Program Long-Term Care  Skilled Care Respite Care Secure Care Protection

474-9300

donwoodlawn@firsta tla ntic . c o m

59 W. Front St.

Skowhegan


44

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

Station Bridge during the flood of March 1936 in Cornish. Townspeople had organized sandbagging operations on the approaches to the bridge and were watching to see if the bridge would hold. The water did not cover the bridge or its approaches. Item #7226 from the collections of Cornish Historical Society, courtesy of Maine Historical Society and www.VintageMaineImages.com

M. THAI

Specializing in Maine Gems, Maine Tourmaline & Amethyst

Restaurant Authentic Thai Cuisine

Lunch Specials

Beer & Wine

Dine In or Take Out

Open 7 Days A Week: 11am-9pm

207-474-5064 105 Water Street • Downtown Skowhegan

~ 20% Off ~ Dine In Only - Food Only Expires October 31, 2013

Gifts for Every Occasion • Diamonds • Rings • Pendants • Earrings • Stone Setting • Jewelry Repair • Ring Sizings Rick & Scott Sanborn - Jewelers

R & R Estate, Inc. Route 25, Cornish, ME • 207-625-8958

Reach Buyers CARRABASSET GROUP Across the SPACEHOLDER State Advertise In Discover Maine Magazine

1-800-753-8684

www.discovermainemagazine.com


45

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

Cornish, Maine Our Downtown Cornish Village has become a destination. We have great restaurants and our shops are eclectic with art galleries, boutiques, gifts, owers and exceptional antiques. Hope to see you soon! The

Come and Explore your next cherished memory! www.cornish-maine.org/visit

Smith Co. Specializing in Country Store Fixtures & Memorabilia

Buying & Selling Antiques & Collectibles Steven P. Smith

625-6030

Route 25 Cornish Village, ME

& Bead Emporium Beads  Supplies  Tools  Workshops

One of a kind art created by local artists!! Think of Full Circle Gallery for the “Gift of the Arts” as your first place to select that extraordinary gift for that special someone.

fullcirclegalleryandemporium.com 12 Main Street Cornish, Maine 04020

Lily’s

FINE FLOWERS AND ANTIQUES Lisa C. Trombly 207-625-2366

39 Maple St., Cornish, ME • 625-8777 a collaborative offering clinical services

Acr oss the

Route 25, Cornish, ME

www.lilysfineflowers.com

Custom Curtains By Linda Heilig

River

All types of sewing for the home. 30 yrs. exp.

19 RIVER ROAD, P.O. BOX 318 CORNISH, ME 04020

Also dealer in blinds, shades and shutters

Counseling & Wellness 207-625-3100 www.acrosstherivercounseling.com

207-625-7517

Uptown Boutique at Brazier Place

krista’s restaurant

A Eclectic Shop The “Old Port” of Cornish

˜ is shop is perfect for those FASHIONISTAS. We are a designer inspired specialty clothing store. We have all your needs of attire, formal and casual.

207-625-2400 26 Main Street Cornish, ME 04020

The Midway Country Lodging 207-625-8835

midway.lodging@gmail.com www.mainemidwaylodging.com

2 main street cornish village, maine 207 625 3600 kristasrestaurant.com kristasrestaurant@gmail.com


46

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

Camp And The Summer of ‘67 A writer’s memoir by Wayne J. Forbus

T

he Summer of ’67 saw me exiting from eighth grade and readying myself for my freshman year of high school. Most summers were spent at my aunts’ and uncles’ camp on Lake Wesserunsett in East Madison. Leaving the main road you enter Fire Lane Three in all its rocky and rutted glory. The smell of pine mixes with the smell of dandelions, petunias, forest ferns, and the stagnant water full of frogs and mosquitoes. Dusty roads lead us to a series of camps along the east shore of the lake. The nameplate says Cody’s Camp, but many last names could very well fit there. My Uncle Hugh is a large robust

man of forty-nine years. He stands about five feet eleven and weighs about three hundred and fifty pounds. I never knew a kinder man than he, except my own father. His soft brown eyes belied a quality of person I could only guess at. My Uncle Hugh’s best quality bar none was his sense of humor. Having a bad day?...see Uncle Hugh for relief. As we pull into the driveway at camp one can only imagine what kind of fun we would have. Although small in size the camp always met our needs. From two to twenty two we all fit in. At one time or another, the place was full of people. No one was denied his or her time there. I open the door and all those won-

derful memories come flooding back to me. In nineteen sixty five my aunts and uncle bought the camp for fifty-five hundred dollars. We kids worked our tails off to go out to swim. We removed glass from in front of camp so no one would cut their feet on it. It was very time consuming but necessary for our safety. And we worked on constructing a rock wall at the camp. This year would be easier and more fun. When the work was done it was time to fish in the lake. My uncle’s next best quality, and one you had to experience to believe, was his fishing. I didn’t know that people cursed the fish they were trying to catch until I went fishing

Blanchet

Builders, L.L.C.

Custom Built Homes

• New Home Construction • Light Commercial Construction

474-8459

34 Willys Way • Skowhegan, Maine

MARSHALL’S

AUTOMOTIVE MACHINE INC. Custom Engine Rebuilding Complete Line Of In Stock Engines 4 Year 40,000 Warranty

FREE DELIVERY

ENGINE INSTALLATION New rship Owne

474-0794 800-282-0794 16 York St. • Skowhegan

L&C

LOBSTER POUND AND CLAMS

LOOK FOR THE BIG RED LOBSTER

7 Days A Week 6am-10pm

Located 4 Miles from Skowhegan

474-2348 431-1118 309 Beckwith Rd. (Rt. 150) Cornville, ME

Over


47

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

with my Uncle Hugh. Just to be with him I would row all over the lake. I rowed for hours around that foolish lake, but boy could he catch fish. It was on such a day that we were bass fishing and he announced rather angrily that there were no damn fish in this part of the lake. So off we rowed to another of his favorite spots. This meant that once in his lifetime he had caught a fish there, and so it was a favored spot to fish. About half an hour later we were basking in the sun, which is an educated way of saying we were quite sunburned and dry, when all of a sudden a huge bass hit the plug my uncle had on his line. With a bellow somewhat like a bull he started winding in line. The process usually takes about five to fifteen minutes to land a fish. My uncle had the fish almost to the boat when he decided in his usual voice that the fish had not fought long enough.

“The fish has to fight hard to get in my boat, Butch.” Butch was his favorite name for me. “Get going you scaly low life.” Off came the bail and, thinking its freedom was at hand, the fish took off like it was shot out of a cannon. At the hundred yard mark my uncle decided it was time to bring home the fish. BOING! The line went as taut as if it were strung on a bow. My uncle wrestled in the poor fish, which by now looked more than ready to offer up its life just to get in the boat. Sitting there quite happy with himself he stated that it was a fine fish and would taste quite good for supper. We fished for a few more hours until it became very dark and ominous. Rain was eminent. He and I swapped positions. I watched as he began to row towards camp. With every dip of the oak oars he threw his back and shoulders into full reverse. We sped along quite

dionne & son builders general contracting architectural woodworking

stephen P. dionne 96 blue Heron lane skowhegan, Maine 04976

oakpondmill@207me.com

207-474-5290 office 207-858-5117 cell

nicely until it started to rain. At times of stress rowing faster does not mean you’re rowing better. With the oars coming half out of the water and then sideways we began to experience what one can only call the rollercoaster effect in our boat. Up the swell, down the swell, through the swell, and the ever present swear at the swell. By now my uncle is bent over towards the center of the boat. It is pouring out; it is my first torrential downpour, which would be great if I had only known what the word torrential meant. I swear to the rain gods if I lived, I would buy a dictionary and look up the accursed word. What’s this? Is camp coming into view? We’re going to make it. As I bail water from the boat with an empty can I know why people have bilge pumps in their boats. We reach shore and literally jump out of the boat. Tying it to the nearest tree I turn and (Continued on page 48)

The Pickup Cafe We use all local ingredients supporting over 40 area farmers!

207-474-0708 Friday & Saturday Dinner 4p-9p, serving local beer & wine Saturday and Sunday Brunch 7a-2p Wednesday Wood-Fired Pizza 3p-6p

42 Court Street, Skowhegan

www.thepickupcsa.com

CANAAN MOTEL Your Hosts: Gary & Liz French

• Night downhill skiing within 3 miles • Snowmobile trails to & from motel • Hot tub open year round • Pool • Convenient to ATV trails

• Wireless internet • Spacious rooms, TVs, phones • Reasonable rates • Beaches, boating, hunting, fishing nearby • Restaurant, groceries within walking distance • Horseshoe pits • Outdoor barbecue grill

205 Main Street (U.S. Route 2) • PO Box 297 • Canaan, ME 04924

(207) 474-3600 www.canaan-motel.com

Complete Automotive Service Competitive Labor Rates

10% Off

if you mention this ad

207-314-3755

307 Waterville Road (Rt.139) • Norridgewock


48

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

(Continued from page 47) run into camp. My uncle grabs the fish, emits a verbal curse to all weathermen in the state of Maine. With a resounding, “Damn fool weather,” on his lips my uncle steps over the side of the boat shin deep in the water. My mom, dad, all my sisters, aunts, and uncles, start to laugh out loud. Puzzled, I turn to look. To my amazement there is a band of dry sweatshirt on a man who is literally soaked to the bone. Not containing my laughter any better I join in. Looking down my uncle is almost apologetic; “Well I tried to keep dry,” he says. Smiling ear to ear we both walk into camp where we change into dry clothes, clean the fish and prepare for supper. “So, Butch, did you have a good time with your crazy uncle?” Loving

Dirigo Timberlands 207-635-2099

my uncle the way I do I cannot help beaming at him with pride and admiration in my eyes. We spent the next day swimming in the lake. The lake is so low this summer we take turns writing our names on a huge ledge in front of the camp with a rock. Lunch today is hot dogs, hamburgers, macaroni salad, soda, chips and more of my uncle’s endless humor. What a great day we are having. Noticing me at the table with my third hot dog and second helping of salad he remarks loud at my prowess in climbing into the back of the pick-up truck they used for trash and making trips into town for fresh water. I remember the trip well. “You know Butch, if you swing your leg a little higher you might just

RICK’S GARAGE Owned & Operated by the Spooner Family

P.O. Box 481 North Anson, ME Forest Management Planning • Tree Growth Plans Timber Harvesting • Stumpage Forest Inventory Cruising & Analysis Road/Bridge Design & Construction Wildlife Habitat & Recreation Management

www.dirigotimberlands.com

get it over the tailgate this time.” It is my second attempt at getting into the truck. Wide-eyed I jump back off the truck. “Damn, boy, there ain’t no sky hook to grab onto. Throw yourself up and over preferably today, okay.” Somewhat embarrassed and not just a little angry I launch myself up and over the tailgate into the truck on the next try. “Gee, Butch, that was swell, now did you also want the groceries at camp as well?” This is too much. I finally get in the truck and what do I do…forget the food? I jump out angrily, pick up the food, arrange it in the truck and jump back in. Heading back to camp I can only admire what kind of day it is. The sun is out, birds are singing, flowers are full

~ Complete Diagnostic & Repair ~ Route 201A

696-8183

North Anson

207-491-2838 396 Main Street Kingfield, Maine

A tradition of Maine’s outdoor enthusiasts

Fishing Canoeing Kayaking Family Vacations

Since 1904 Guides Available

PO Box 124 • North New Portland, ME 04961

Summer: 207.628.2819 Winter: 207.628.3612

ars 25 Ye ence ri Expe

Custom Built Homes Siding • Roofing • Stone Work Finish Work • Pressure Washing

299-0231 / 265-2125

Kurt Rolbiecki - Owner • kurolb1166@yahoo.com

1465 Middle Road • New Portland, ME


49

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

bloomed, and I’m at camp. Boy, what a great day. That afternoon after lunch we waited impatiently the mandatory hour. We didn’t want those deadly cramps we are warned about so often. Actually, no one has ever died from stomach cramps in the family. No one wants to chance it. It was almost time to leave the camp for another week. Unhappy? Not really; we had a great time and we can come back next weekend and do it all over again. Loading everything up I look one more time at the little clapboard camp. The ride home is quiet. We are all tired out. I think tomorrow I’ll play baseball, or maybe go fishing in Jones Brook. I only have to fill up five days and Saturday and Sunday will take care of themselves.

Little did I know it would be the last summer I would hear my uncle’s crusty voice. No more fishing on the lake him. No more auctions, trips to the ocean, or days at the fair. I will always remember him for as long as my memory holds fast to the past. I only hope that someday my own son will know a man like my uncle. His memory is bittersweet to me and always shall be.

Rangeley is named after Englishman Squire James Rangeley, who inherited the land from his father in 1796.

Forest Products • Trucking Sand • Loam • Gravel • Firewood Low-bed Services • Complete House Lots Ponds • Rock Walls • Ditching and Road Construction

For all your plumbing and heating needs Fully Insured Free Estimates

Mobile 778-1451 Home 684-4024

rlhenterprise@tds.net

Rangeley Electric 207-864-3686 207-670-5088

ME/NH Master Electrician

• Residential • Commercial • Solar Electric Systems • Wind Turbines

Wes Dugan duganwa@myfairpoint.net Rangeley, Maine

DID YOU KNOW?

Geothermal & Solar Energy Systems Fully licensed and insured Proudly serving Rangeley and surrounding areas

p “S

ecia

lizing in Happy Custome rs”

C&C

Sprayfoam Up to 40% In Energy Savings! Fully Insured • Free Estimates Brian Currie - Owner

314-1023 Clinton, ME

currierjr@msn.com www.cncsprayfoam.com


50

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

The Genealogy Corner Descendant charting by Charles Francis

M

ost of us are familiar with the common family tree that starts with an individual (perhaps you or your parents) and works backward into the past. In working backward each ancestor is paired with their mate or spouse, two by two. Every generation, of course, doubles. Many view this method of charting as the simplest approach to creating a family tree. There are, however, alternative methods of drawing up the family record. One of these is descendant charting. Descendant charting is done by reversing the flow of the generations. The chart begins with a particular person – parents or grandparents or someone

even further back – and works forward. Descendant charts have to be continually updated every time there is a birth, death or marriage. Like most genealogy charts descendant charts include space for information such as date of birth, marriage and death. Place of birth is also included. The chief way the descendant chart differs from the pedigree or ascendant chart is the inclusion of collateral or branching lines. In other words, the descendant chart serves as a master outline of a family’s history from a particular point in the past. They are most useful in that they reveal gaps in the genealogy record at a glance.

What follows is an example as to how a descendant chart can be used to link seeming disparate members of the same family. The starting point is one Roger Eastman who was born Wales in 1611. Roger came to the New World in 1638. He was one of the founding fathers of Salisbury, Massachusetts. The example centers on the Eastman family of Strong in Franklin County. The name Eastman is not all that an uncommon one. There are some famous people named Eastman. George Eastman of Eastman Kodak camera is one. He was a descendant of Roger Eastman. So, too, was Benjamin “Blazin’ Ben” Eastman, the Olympic middle

TOWN & LAKE

MOTEL & LAKEFRONT COTTAGES Snowmobile & ATV Location Trails From Your Door

Deluxe Housekeeping Cottages Offering 2 Bedrooms and Fireplaces Rooms with Kitchenettes Available Plenty of Parking!

PRIVATE BEACH FOR ALL GUESTS

• Open Year Round • Docking Available • Cable Color TV • Pets Allowed Joey and Sheryl Morton, owners

MAIN STREET • RANGELEY, MAINE

207-864-3755

RANGELEYTOWNANDLAKE.COM


k e e n

y

e a

e

51

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com distance runner. Blazin’ Ben held the world record in both the 400 and 800 meters. Most any large phone book will have the name Eastman in it, many of whom are descended from Roger. There are a number of towns bearing the Eastman name. There is an Eastman in Quebec. There is one in Georgia and one in Wisconsin. There is an Eastmanville in Michigan. All of these towns with the name Eastman have something in common: the people they were named for were descended from Roger Eastman of Wales. The Eastman in Wisconsin was named for one of Roger’s descendants who just happens to have been born in Strong. This Eastman was another Benjamin, Benjamin Charles or Ben C.. Ben C.’s cousin William Pitt Eastman is memorialized in the town of Eastman, Georgia. William Pitt Eastman had ties to Maine like Ben C. He was named for his cousin William Pitt Fessenden. William Pitt Fessenden, a Civil

Cozy Accommodations at Reasonable Rates

• Free Internet Access • Luxury Queen Size Beds • Flat Screen TVs and Cable • Heated Indoor Pool & Jacuzzi • Pet Friendly • Located on ITS 84/89 • 40 Well Appointed Rooms

(Continued on page 52)

Mountain View Motel Your hosts: Mark & Cindy Rollins

4755 Carrabassett Road Stratton, ME 04982

(207) 246-2033 mountainviewmotelmaine.com

Reach Buyers Across the State Advertise In Discover Maine Magazine

1-800-753-8684

www.discovermainemagazine.com


52

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

(Continued from page 51) War Senator and Secretary of the Treasury during the Lincoln administration, is one of the most famous Maine political figures of the nineteenth century. He was descended of Roger Eastman. Ben C. Eastman, the Eastman who gave his name to the town in Wisconsin, was the son of Samuel and Jane (Hitchcock) Eastman. Samuel was born in Mt. Vernon in Kennebec County in 1784. Jane was from Strong. Samuel’s father Benjamin Franklin Eastman was one of Strong’s earliest settlers. He was a colonel in the Maine Militia, a Maine State Senator and a founding father of the Maine Republican Party. In fact, the Maine Republican Party traces its origins to Strong. Benjamin Franklin Eastman was a close associate of Hannibal Hamlin and James G. Blaine. Samuel and Jane Eastman are buried in the Strong Village Cemetery.

In 1840 Ben C. Eastman and his brother Harry moved to Wisconsin. Harry made his home in Green Bay while Ben moved on to Platteville, establishing a law practice there. He served as Secretary of the Legislature of the Wisconsin Territory and was a two-term Wisconsin representative to Congress. Eastman, Wisconsin keeps his memory alive. The above brief examples indicate just how complicated it is to create a meaningful working chart of one’s family history. If all you want is a simple chart of your immediate ancestors then you will be happy sticking with an ascendant chart. However, if you want to know just where those ‘famous’ relatives fit and what your relationship is to them, then you want to use a descendant chart. Standard descendant charts that are

SOLON SUPERETTE

R&B’s Home Source

Pizza • Hot & Cold Sandwiches Cold Cuts • Groceries On ITS 87

Sales and Service

available at stores catering to the genealogy buff and family historian are extremely useful in that they serve as an outline letting you see just where you have gaps in your knowledge of a particular person or event. This explains why descendant charts often appear in the appendix of historical novels and history texts. They are essential in untangling the myriad connections of royal or noble families. On a more mundane note, the descendant chart is useful in keeping one’s own family straight, especially if one has a lot of cousins. Descendant charts are especially useful at large family gatherings like family reunions or the sorts of gatherings that are held for the descendants of one particular individual or couple. Having one at a family gathering honoring a great-grandparent or great-great

Renee Bristow - proprietor Appliances • Furniture • Bedding Lawn & Garden

Push And Rider Mowers

Snowmobile & ATV Accessible

Main Street, Solon

643-2500

207-672-3614

29 Main Street • Bingham, ME www.randbshomesource.com

LACROIX

Plumbing & Heating Serving Waterville, Solon, Farmington and surrounding areas

Kevin D. Lacroix kdlacroix@roadrunner.com

Over 30 years experience

Free Estimates Fully Licensed & Insured New Construction & Remodeling

207-643-2474 cell: 207-446-2474

61 North Main Street • Solon, ME

Snowmobiles & ATV’s Sales & Service (207) 668-4442

1-800-287-SNOW

www.jackmanpowersports.com 549 Main Street, Jackman, ME


53

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

grandparent as a centerpiece makes for a wonderful focal point. The descendants of Roger Eastman had hundreds of offspring. How would one keep them all straight if they wished? The simplest way is by using a descendant chart. The same is true of anyone who is a member of a large family with a number of siblings, uncles and aunts with attendant first cousins who in turn have their own children. Here a descendant chart is a perfect way for keeping the children of one’s first cousins and their children straight.

Office building at Crocker Lake Camps in Jackman. Item #101096 from the Eastern Illustrating & Publishing Co. Collection and www.PenobscotMarineMuseum.org

Jackman Auto Parts Jason Nadeau & Sons Excavation and Plowing Jason A. Nadeau - Owner

Office: 207-668-9217

Quality Automotive Products Great Customer Service

Cell: 207-399-1100

207-668-5351

36 Sandy Stream Rd., Dennistown, ME

414 Main St., Jackman, ME

dennistown@live.com

3generationexcavation.com

A Maine Tradition for more than 90 years

Open year round with bungalow-style cabins accommodating up to 6 people. We offer 7 fully-equipped efficiency cabins Fish house rentals available Dining room open from May to mid-October.

Child friendly environment. Convenient to ITS 86. Home of record Moosehead Lake Trout!

Maynard’s in Maine

P.O. Box 220, Rockwood, ME 04478

(207) 534-7703 (888) 518-2055 www.maynardsinmaine.com


54

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

A Dirty Old Cook And The Lousy Cookee Songs of the lousy logging camp cook by Charles Francis

W

ho was the most important individual in a deep woods logging camp? Anyone in the know will tell you it was the cook. Some logging operations — mainly the big ones — went out of their way to get the best cooks possible. These were the cooks who made pies, cakes and donuts on a daily basis. Any good logging operation understood that to keep its crews happy there had to be good food. Not all operations were this way, though. If an operation didn’t come up with a good cook the word quickly got around. It got around by word of mouth, in stories and in songs. The story of a crew boss named either Billy Williams or Mell Whitten is a good example. I give the

name of the crew boss as either Williams or Whitten because it depends on the version as to the boss’s name. Billy William was from Bangor — or maybe not. He could have been an Englishman. It appears Mell Whitten was from Bangor. Bangor is where most of the logging crews came from anyway. Williams or Whitten crews worked inland of the head of Moosehead. The upper Moosehead region is the area this piece is about, the upper Moosehead region in the general area of Northwest Carry and beyond. Now back to Billy Williams or Mell Whitten. What Williams or Whitten did was to, as they say, “scare up a crew.” Crew

HANSON

Harris Drug Store

LANDWORKS

Serving the Moosehead Lake Area since 1896

FULL PRESCRIPTION SERVICE

Let it Snow  Let it Snow DRIVEWAYS • ROADS COMPLETE SITE WORK LAND CLEARING SEPTIC SYSTEMS COMPLETE WATER SERVICE

From Well to House w/Master Plumber Fully Insured • References Available SHIRLEY, MAINE

695-2216 or 280-2277

THE BLACK FROG MOOSEHEAD LAKE

BEER • BOOZE • BURGERS BATHROOMS • BARGE What more could you ask for!

207-695-1100

17 Pritham Ave. • Greenville, ME

www.theblackfrog.com

here means lumberjacks. Williams or Whitten also hired a cook and an assistant for the cook, a cookee. The cook and cookee were awful at preparing meals. They were so bad they got written up in a song. The cook is described as “the dirty old cook” and the cookee as “the lousy cookee.” Dirty is clear enough; lousy here means louse infested. There couldn’t be two worse adjectives applied to the most important men in a logging camp. Now it seems that the song of the dirty old cook and lousy cookee achieved a bit of notoriety. It spread and it was saved in print. It spread among loggers as a warning never to sign on with

Weekend Entertainment Pool Tables • Arcade Foosball • Air Hockey

Delicious Bar Menu

Registered Pharmacists:

Michael J. Harris Harold W. Harris

2 Industrial Park Rd., Greenville Jct.

Soda Fountain • Magazines • Sundries Film • Greeting Cards

Open Thurs., Fri., & Sat. 4pm-Close

10 Pritham Ave. • Greenville

695-2488

207-695-2921

Abbot Village Bakery Home of the Skidder Tire Donut Homemade Breads Chicken Pies Sandwiches Baked Sweets Jay & Angie Spack - Owners

876-4243

106 Main Road • Abbot Village, ME


e

55

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

Billy Williams or Mell Whitten. It was saved to print in places far away from Moosehead and in a Maine publication of around the turn of the century that took it upon itself to save lumberjack songs. A Nova Scotia collector picked up a version of the song there. In Maine a magazine known as the Sportsman or Maine Sportsman published a version. There are other versions, too. All, however, refer to Williams and the dirty old cook. Not all mention Whitten. Most reference the lousy cookee. The point is that the song pretty well wrecked Billy Williams as a logging boss, the same with the Whitten versions that cite his name. Now on to the piece itself. The song’s title is not the title of this piece, A Dirty Old Cook and the Lousy Cookee. The Sportsman gives Mell Whitten as the title. Mell Whitten’s name is not

mentioned in all of the song versions. The Nova Scotia version doesn’t mention Whitten. It has In the Month of October as the title. Here are the opening lines of the Nova Scotia version and the Sportsman version. First the Nova Scotia version: In the month of October eighteen-eighty two, Billy Williams from Bangor, he scared up a crew Now the Sportsman version: In the month of October eighteen-eighty two, Mell Whitten from Bangor, he started a crew The Nova Scotia version was collected by Helen Creighton. It appears in Songs and Ballads from Nova Scotia. Creighton doesn’t speculate as to how a Maine lumberjack made its way to Nova Scotia. However, a lot of Nova Scotia men made their way to Maine to work in the woods.

The Sportsman version is also found in Roland Palmer Gray’s Songs and Ballads of the Maine Lumberjacks with other Songs from Maine. Gray cites a secondary source as learning it from a third. Now for the song itself. It seems logical to assume that the title was Mell Whitten. That is, it seems logical if you accept that the purpose of the song was to warn ‘jacks about signing on with someone who would hire a dirty old cook and a lousy cookee. However, it was common for lumbering songs to have the title appear in the first line. The Month of October follows this scheme. This is a detail, though. Folk song details vary. For example, the cook, who is never named, is variously from Bangor and Orneville. The song of the dirty old cook and lousy cookee is memorable. It’s memorable (Continued on page 56)

Kick up your feet, relax, talk to old friends or make new ones. The Way Life Should Be.... Stress Free Serving Food Until 10PM

695-3100 • 65 Moosehead Lake Rd., Greenville, Maine

Still Going Strong!

R.A. THOMAS LOGGING

Residential • Commercial • Industrial • Building Roads • Excavation • Driveways

• Sand & Gravel • Septic Systems • Screened Loam

FREE ESTIMATES • FULLY INSURED Office: (207) 564-8534 Cell: (207) 279-0087

629 Sebec Village Rd. • Sebec, Maine

Master Logger

Specializing in Environmentally Friendly Cut to Length Logging Buyer of Pulpwood, Logs, Stumpage & Land Fully Insured • References Available ° omas Douglass

876-2722 • Cell: 313-1394

Guilford, Maine • Email: rtmasterlogger@myfairpoint.net


56

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

(Continued from page 55) because it’s funny. What makes it funny is its doggerel. Doggerel is a term usually applied to bad verse, bad poetry. This song was never intended to be recited. Every collected version is song. It’s song but it’s still bad verse, so bad it’s funny. Take the following four lines: They hired a cook, from Orneville came he, And a dirtier old cook you never did see. Raw beans and cold dough he would give us to eat, And about once a week a big feed of corned beef. There are more verses in this crudely humorous vein. They make a point though, a point any ‘jack would appreciate; this was an operation to stay away from. There is a point to this little narrative, one that has nothing to do with the story of the dirty cook and the lousy cookee. Folk songs and ballads like the above capture a way of life now long gone

JOHNSON FOUNDATIONS

Serving the area since 1946

Enjoy Our Magazine? Call Us Today To Subscribe! Subscription Cost: $40

• Specialty Concrete • Floors, Walls, Slabs • Full Foundations • Residential Sites • Crane Services • Pool Areas/Walkways

Receive all 8 editions we publish this year!

1-800-753-8684

(207) 564-8617 Cell: (207) 717-5570

191 E. Main St, Dover-Foxcroft, ME 04426

202 Shaw Road • Dover-Foxcroft, ME RICH JOHNSON, President

~ Designing & Installing Kitchens Throughout New England! ~ Kitchen Showroom & Home Center

Custom Cabinets, Counters, Lighting & Flooring MON-FRI 10-4 Call for Saturday hrs

“Custom” doesn’t have to mean “expensive.” It means custom-designed & personalized service!

695-4663

Rt. 15, Shirley, Maine 04485

Moosehead Trail

Home & Hearth Wood, Pellet & Propane Stoves

- Now Your Woodmaster Dealer -

We also carry everything you need for Camp: Skeeter Vacs Propane Appliances & Service Gas Refrigerators • Generac Generators Gas Lights • Wood Pellets & Furnaces and Pellet Boilers, too!

(207) 876-2322

42 Elm St. • Guilford, ME mooseheadtrailhomeandhearth.com


57

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com from the Maine woods. If there are any who still know a song like this it is because they have been passed down from generation to generation. They are few and far between. Helen Creighton collected her song version of In the Month of October in the late 1920s. Roland Palmer Gray dates his Mell Whitten as 1916. I have seen one issue of the Sportsman. Searching reveals just two more issues, in library collections. Loss of sources like the Sportsman closes a door forever on the past. Are there more out there? To discover some would be a real find.

❦ Other businesses from this area are featured in the color section.

Roger Whitehouse voted Realtor of the Year 2013 by The Mountain Council of Realtors

Rumford Falls Sulphite Mill, ca. 1890. Located on the Androscoggin River in Rumford Falls, this sulfite mill was completed in 1895. The river fostered several mills in the area because dams created a powerful falls known as the “Niagara of New England.” Item #1445 from the collections of the Maine Historical Society and www.VintageMaineImages.com

River Valley Grill Breakfast Served ALL DAY ! Every Day

• Daily Specials • Home Cooked Foods • Fresh Made Desserts

Mon. - Fri. 6am-7pm, Sat. 8am-1pm Closed Sunday. Your hosts: Bob & Kathy Knowles 39 Exchange St., Rumford • 369-0810

“The people pleasing agency. Serving all your real estate needs!”

Buying or selling property in the western mountains of Maine?

Call or visit us today! Residential, Commercial, Vacation Property

207-369-0100

of Maine “From Our Forest to Final Form”

AUTHORIZED SALES CENTER New Equipment Sales & Service Ross Clair, Manager/Sawyer

152 River Road (Route 2) Mexico, Maine 04257

(207) 645-2072

www.riversiderealty.org

541 Borough Rd., Chesterville, ME


Section 6 58

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

The Metamorphosis of Dorcas Doyen The mysterious murdered girl by Charles Francis

E

arly on the morning of April 10, 1836, Rosina Townsend, the madam of an upscale New York City brothel, discovered one of her girls was hors de combat. In fact, the girl was beyond being unable to function; she was dead. Her body, with the head bashed in, was lying on her smoldering, smoke-engulfed bed. The name of the dead girl was first given as Helen Jewett. The brothel where she plied her trade was in lower Manhattan, not far from City Hall. The brothel was owned by Robert Livingston, a New York Blue Blood. Its clientele was middle and upper class and included writers and actors.

Rosina Townsend and her house of ill repute conjure up images of Los Angeles madam Heidi Fliess. This in part may help explain why the murder of a nineteenth century prostitute has captured the attention of writers, historians and readers of the current era. When the press of the day picked up on the murder, it began referring to Jewett variously as “the prostitute who read Sir Walter Scott,” “the most beautiful girl in New York” and as “the girl in green.” (Jewett was famous for wearing green satin and silk to the theater.) Then it came out that Jewett was in fact Dorcas Doyen and that she had once worked in Augusta, Maine in the house

of Nathan Weston, Chief Justice of the Maine Supreme Judicial Court.Since the long ago murder of Dorcas Doyen, University of California at Santa Barbara history professor Patricia Cohen has written The Murder of Helen Jewett, a bestselling nonfiction book about the life and times of Doyen AKA Helen Jewett. An MIT professor named Janet Murray has taken Cohen to task for producing a less than satisfying “sanitized construction of prostitution as ‘sex work’.” The University of Texas Law School has produced a monograph on the trial and background of the murderer and the period in which he lived. The crime has also been analyzed in re-

McAllister Accounting And Tax Services Serving your business and personal tax planning and preparation needs for over 30 years.

Ronald E. McAllister Marcus E. McAllister

897-5667

404 Main Street • Jay, ME

170 Main Street Jay ME Established in 1954

Serving Franklin County and the local communities

897-0900 • 800-848-3688 www.otisfcu.coop


e e , n t n t r s s h . -

Section 6 59

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com lation to works by Poe and Hawthorne. There is even a reprise of the murder by a minister and genealogist named Conrad Wilcox who discovered that Dorcas Doyen occupied a branch of his family tree.Then there is the question of Dorcas Doyen herself. She was born in Hallowell or Augusta or Farmington or Temple. And there are the inevitable questions as to why Doyen chose her particular path in life. The most referenced primary resource on the murder of Dorcas Doyen has a Maine tie. It is James Gordon Bennett, editor and publisher of the New York Herald and most important influence in the founding of the Associated Press. One of Bennett’s first jobs was as a teacher at Narraguagas. He also spent a good deal of time down east when the first connections for the Associated Press were being established. In addition, he was acquainted with Chief Justice Na-

than Weston. This makes him a source for Doyen’s early life in the Weston home as a servant and for the fact that her parents have come to be described as “notorious ne’er-do-wells.” Bennett may also be the source for the statement that Doyen became “sexually aggressive” while working for the Westons as well as for her birthplace being either Hallowell or Augusta. Bennett is credited with questioning the guilt of the alleged murderer, one Richard Robinson.Dorcas Doyen was born in neither Hallowell or Augusta. Nor was she born in Farmington. She was born in Temple in 1813. Her parents were John and Sally (Tuck) Doyen. John was born in Temple and Sally in Fayette. John Doyen was the son of Jacob and Mercy (Cribbs) Doyen. The last mentioned Doyen was from Pembroke, New Hampshire. There is no question that Dorcas Doyen was employed in

MOTORCYCLES • CUSTOM BIKES

“Service you can trust” Complete Car Care Tires - Shocks - Brakes Exhaust System - State Inspection Computerized Alignment

897-6195 17 French Falls Road • Jay, ME

• Polishing

HI-PERFORMANCE

• Gold Plating • Nitrous Oxide Systems & Refills • Turbo Chargers

N. JAY, ME

645-9537

Over 30 Years Experience Maureen & Victor Brescia

207-293-1003 Lois & Jack Brace

443 Bartlett Road • Mount Vernon, ME

dreamonastreamalpacas.com

SNOWMOBILES

autobahn

• Powder Coating

A Maine-Based Business

We also have angora bunnies and a gift shop

(Continued on page 60)

ATV’S

Atlantic Horse Transport Huacaya and Suri ~ on Belgrade Stream ~

the home of Nathan Weston. She left there at eighteen and went to Portland and then Boston before finally settling on New York. In making these moves she was like many young farm girls of the time who dreamed of life in the city. Unfortunately, like many farm girls who moved to urban environs, Doyen resorted to prostitution. The most common depiction of Doyen by contemporary writers portray her as being possessed of exceptional beauty. Then there are the connections to Poe and Hawthorne. The Poe connection is to the short story The Murder of Marie Roget. Marie Roget was supposedly based on the murder of Mary Rogers in New York in 1841. As the murder of Dorcas Doyen took place barely five years earlier, contemporary theorists have postulated a connection here. Then there is the purported Hawthorne

“Horse transport by horse people for horse people” 207-293-4948 Cells: 207-590-7510 • 207-907-5435

Fax: 207-293-4193 • Email: horsemover@gmail.com Mount Vernon, Maine

• Crankshaft Rebuilding • Cylinder Boring • Custom Engine Work

Mild to Wild, We Sell and Service It ALL!

LOGGING

FIREWOOD Select Cutting • Harvesting Whole Tree Chipping

Kevin Hawes General Contracting Belgrade

495-3412 or 242-0636

Complete Excavation Services Foundations • Septic Systems Wells & Walkways


60

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

(Continued from page 59) connection.Horatio Bridge of Augusta was a classmate of Hawthorne at Bowdoin. The two were close friends and corresponded all their lives. Bridge, who was a regular visitor in the Weston home, knew Dorcas Doyen. Bridge and Hawthorne corresponded about the murder. Contemporary students of the Doyen murder have tried to draw parallels between Doyen and Hester Prynne in The Scarlet Letter. The latter was written in 1850. Ironically, the surge of interest in the murder of Dorcas Doyen came shortly after Caleb Carr published his phenomenally successful novel on a nineteenth century serial killer in The Alienist. Perhaps that work best explains the metamorphosis of Dorcas Doyen, the little girl from Temple, Maine who chose the wrong path to follow in life. ❦ Other businesses from this area are featured in the color section.

HAVE YOU BEEN IN BUSINESS SINCE 1963? OR WAS YOUR BUSINESS ESTABLISHED BEFORE 1963?

We can present to our readers a very special full page ad at a very special price..... You are part of Maine History ~ Put our writers to work for you! Call or Email Us Today for details

207-874-7720

info@discovermainemagazine.com

B’s Home Service Barbara Russell

Award-winning fine dining and distinctive lodging

~ Fall & Winter Specials ~ Cakes & Catering

 495-2400 www.wingshillinn.com

Home, Business Camp, Yard & Garden Fall, Spring or Weekly Cleaning Wallpapering • Painting Remodeling

207-397-2007 brussell123@hotmail.com

Rome, Maine

WINDOWMAN LLC

New Construction Replacement Windows Call for free estimate today!

446-2084 or 778-9463 16,000 and counting

TOWN TAXI 24/7

Service

Serving All Bus Stations & Airports

~ Please Call Ahead For Best Service ~

207-860-8646 Fax: 207-778-3788

Farmington, ME

•APPLIANCES•

HEATING & COOLING

106 Anson Street, Farmington, Maine

207-778-2755

www.countyseatrealty.com

Sales & Service

778-3375 • 1-800-756-3375 Clayton & Joyce King: Owners

TITCOMB HILL ROAD • FARMINGTON


61

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

Waterville basketball team, ca. 1943-44. Item #3874 from the Boutilier Collection and www.PenobscotMarineMuseum.org

FARMINGTON FARMERS UNION “Celebrating 100 Years of Serving the Area’s Agricultural Needs”

“˜ e Heart of Maine’s Lakes & Mountains”

We offer a complete line of plumbing, hardware, paint, farming supplies, and livestock needs

~ Tool Rentals Available ~

615 Wilton Road, Route 4 Farmington, Maine 207-778-4215 • Fax 207-778-2438

~ 244 Front St., Farmington, ME • 778-4520 ~ 778-5674

www.franklincountymaine.org info@franklincountymaine.org

RDM ELECTRIC Ryan Morgan Master Electrician Fully Licensed & Insured

~ A Veteran Owned Maine Company ~ West Farmington, Maine

207-778-2452 (Home) 207-491-7314 (Cell)


62

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

Street view in New Sharon. Courtesy of the Eastern Illustrating & Publishing Co. Collection and www.PenobscotMarineMuseum.org

ol

Lots of co stuff!

Knowledge, Selection & Service Farmington’s Independent Bookstore since 1991

(207) 778-3454

Discount Beverages and Tobacco Agency Liquor Store • Lotto Pizza • Deli • Snacks

Jon & Lois Bubier, Owners 144 Franklin and High Streets Farmington • 778-3344

conlogue’s

Decks • Additions • Remodeling • Siding

577-5905 cell

INTERIOR & EXTERIOR FINISH Fully Insured

We Keep the Glow in your light

Mercer, Maine

William Scott Conlogue

W. Farmington, ME email: gloember@gwi.net

193 Broadway, Farmington, ME 04938

www.ddgbooks.com For all your Fabric Needs

Building & Property Management Electrical • Maintenance • Management Carpentry • Plumbing & Heating Security Systems • Cable • Phone Fire Alarms

Mon-Wed 10-5, Thurs 10-5:30 Fri 10-6:30, Sat 9-5, Sun 12-3 Email: info@ddgbooks.com

207•313•3604

 Home  Tote Bags Decorating  Custom Work Fabrics Cushions, Curtains  Yarn  Used Furniture  Polar Fleece & Household Items  Maine-made Largest Selection Products 3 Floors!  Gift Certificates

imeldasfabric.com

207-778-0665  888-446-3532 5 Starks Rd.  New Sharon


63

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

Franklin County Memorial Hospital in Farmington. Item #100750 from the Eastern Illustrating & Publishing Co. Collection and www.PenobscotMarineMuseum.org

Franklin Health Dermatology

Central Maine’s Newest Dermatology Practice

Nightingale CARPENTRY

“Serving Western Maine for over 10 years” Matt Nightingale - Owner

New Construction • Renovations Free Estimates • Fully Insured

207-491-6992

nightingalecarpentry1@yahoo.com Wilton, ME Dr. Joshua Sparling is board-certified and a Fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Complete skin examinations • Treatment of skin infections Biopsies of moles or growths • Treatment of pre-cancerous lesions Removal of skin cancer and benign growths • Skin patch testing Narrow band ultraviolet light therapy Cryosurgery and electrocautery • Steroid injections • and more!

207-779-2410

WHITEWATER FARM MARKET Russ Dodge, Jr.

All Natural Meats Natural and Organic Livestock Feed Hay ~ Straw ~ Shavings ~ Pet Food ~ Gift Certificates ~

Franklin Health Medical Arts Center | 111 Franklin Health Commons | Farmington www.fchn.org/franklin-health

U.S. Route 2, New Sharon, ME

A Program of Franklin Memorial Hospital

Mon. - Fri. 8-6 • Sat. 8-4

(207) 778-4748


64

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

Mary Towne Easty Of The Salem Trials She kept the faith at the cost of her life by Sherwood Anderson

T

hree hundred twenty years ago, on a damp and drear Thursday, September 22 in Salem, Massachusetts, the hangman carried Mary Towne Easty, 58, up the ladder to a rope tied to a branch. He pulled its noose over her neck, then dropped her to her death. It need not have been so. One of her accusers, Mary Herrick, aged about 17, alleged Mary Easty “appeared” to her just before she was executed, and said, “I am going upon the Ladder to be hanged for a Witch, but I am innocent, and before a 12 Month be past you shall believe it.” “Said girl said she speak not of this before be-

cause she believed she was Guilty . . but now she believeth it is all a Delusion of the Devil.” Judge Samuel Sewell, one of the magistrates at Mary Towne Easty’s trial, made public apology five years later for his part in her condemnation. He fasted Thursdays thereafter as penance. In 1711 the legislature compensated Isaac Easty twenty pounds for the wrongful execution of Mary, his wife. Mary Towne Easty could have saved herself. Accused who confessed to the crime of witchcraft were spared the noose, particularly if they testified against other witches.

There is a graveyard in Franklin County’s New Vineyard just off Barker Road, where Easty Voter was buried in1856. The headstone is missing, but the footstone, with “E.V.” engraved, still marks the place. The use of Easty as his baptismal name may have been taken from Mary Towne Easty, his great-great grandmother, and my research confirms the lineage. The Franklin County reunion of the Voter family, held each July in the Town of Strong for descendants of Easty Voter, is aware of the relationship. Few of Mary Easty’s descendants bear the Easty surname, fewer still a Voter surname, yet thou-

J.R.’s Trading & Pawn INSTANT CASH LOANS We Buy & Sell Everything (Almost) 222 College Ave 135 Waldo Ave. Waterville, Maine Belfast, Maine 207-872-5602 207-338-5160 Now serving Unity, Thorndike & Belfast

www.kswfcu.org

BUYING GOLD & SILVER Highest Prices Paid! GUNS BOUGHT-SOLD-PAWNED

~ Serving the Greater Waterville Area since 1991 ~

877-7105

100 ELM STREET • WATERVILLE JRSTRADINGANDPAWN.COM

Give someone a special gift that will be enjoyed all year long... A subscription to Discover Maine Magazine! You’ll find our subscription forms on pages 31 & 33 of this issue.

Gallant

Funeral Home,Inc.

Funeral Prearrangement Specialists Waterville’s Only Independent & Locally Operated Funeral Home John O. Gallant, Director

873-3393 10 Elm Street, Waterville

Accessible to the Handicapped


65

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com sands have descended from her in these 320 years. Mary Towne Easty was the mother of eight sons and three daughters, and had at least 22 grandsons and daughters. How many of her descendants, and the children of their in-laws, know they had a great-grandmother who kept her Puritan faith rather than her life, and pleaded with her judges that “no other innocent blood be shed?” Her judges were not swayed and her life was taken, but the court condemned no one thereafter. Few if any in New England have been executed for witchcraft since that bleak Thursday so long ago. In Europe thousands and thousands had been accused of witchcraft, tortured, tried, condemned and burned at the stake or hanged. In Scotland alone 4,000 were executed. In Salem the number was 20. There were no burnings at the stake in Salem, and no accused was tortured save Giles Corey.

Officials could not bring him to trial because he refused to plead at all, neither innocent or guilty. They pressed him beneath weights to force a plea without success. He suffered three days before death came, his last words being, “More weight.” Since Giles Corey was never tried, much less found guilty, the sheriff could not seize his “goods and chattels.” His property went to his heirs. Witches in Europe had been hunted for centuries. In Salem the witch hunt began and ended in 1692, though about two dozen had been executed in various New England places in the 50 years preceding, but few if any thereafter. The clergy of Boston, among the most respected and educated class in the colony, believed witchcraft was real and dangerous. According to the Hebrew scriptures it was the Lord who said to Moses, “Thou shall not suffer a witch to live.”

BAY STREET REDEMPTION

Larsen’s Jewelry

We‛re Fast, Accurate & Friendly! 10% extra on order with this ad - Limit one per customer -

207-873-2008 120 China Road Winslow, ME

MacCrillis Rousseau

~ Serving You Since 1962 ~

“Our Customers Come First!”

The diagnosis of witchcraft was first made in Salem by the doctor who attended the minister’s teenage daughter. Finding no physical cause for her malady, he pronounced its cause to be witchcraft. Massachusetts was a colony of England, its people subjects of King William and Queen Mary, and governed by English law, which for a century or more had ruled that witchcraft was a crime punishable by death and forfeiture of the “goods and chattels” of the felon. Salem’s troubles, initiated by the accusations of several hysterical and histrionic adolescent girls, were compounded by family jealousies, economic envies and fear of disease and death. What caused these evils? Who caused them? How could the colony be purged of them? They practiced the age-old solution: lay blame and punish the blamed. It was legal, and it was convenient. (Continued on page 66)

Somerset Propeller Boat Propeller Reconditioning and Balancing “Boat propeller is my specialty. I also buy and sell used propellers”

Watches • Diamonds Expert Watch Repair Stonesetting • Goldsmithing

Chris Mott

207-872-6301 1-800-697-1874

57 Main Street • Waterville, ME larsensjewelers.com

VFW Post #8835

BINGO - Tuesdays at 6:30pm and Sundays at 6pm SUPER BINGO - 1st Sunday of every month Pays State Maximum plus Winner Take All Doors open at 3pm • Hot and Cold food Available Packages that include all games start at $12 For more info call: 873-1908

Banquet Facility ~ Able to accomodate up to 330 people

Weddings • Dances • Reunions • Family Gatherings • Trade Shows and more! Call: 872-9850

175 Veteran Drive, Winslow, ME 04901

Propeller Technician

Cell: 207-313-7922 102 Mercer Road • Norridgewock, ME

The

FLATLANDA‛ DINER THEY DON‛T MAKE FOOD LIKE THEY USED TO...BUT WE DO!

207-238-9300

Open 7 Days A Week • 7a-2p Route 201 224 Skowhegan Road • Fairÿ eld, ME


66

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

(Continued from page 65) Mary Easty believed witchcraft to be real and evil. So did the clergy. So did the Salem magistrates. So did the populace in Europe and America. Mary Easty knew only that she was not a witch. She knew others had been falsely accused. She knew the “afflicted girls” “belied” themselves. She urged her judges to examine these girls separately, and also to question the “confessed” witches individually. Were that done, their “wiles and subtleties” would be exposed. They have since been exposed, but too late for Mary. Mary Easty’s petition, not necessarily by her own hand, is kept in the Essex County Court House in Salem. It is paraphrased here, using today’s English. “The petition of Mary Easty to the Court in Salem: “God knowing I am innocent, and I knowing the cunning deceptions of my

accusers, your petitioner respectfully requests your Honors to consider that other accused persons are innocent too. The Lord, who knows I am innocent, will declare it on earth and in heaven on judgment day. I ask that no more innocent blood be shed, as it will surely be if you continue going the wrong way. “I ask you to examine strictly and separately the girls who claim affliction by witches, and in the same way question the accused who have confessed to witchcraft to save themselves. Both the girls and those who falsely confess to witchcraft are lying, and their lies will be revealed if not now, then in the world to come. “I have not confessed and will not, for I am innocent as the Lord, searcher of all hearts, knows. The girls say I will not confess because I am in league with the Devil. They lie about me, and they lie about the others they have falsely

accused. I know not the least thing of witchcraft. I cannot, I dare not, betray my own soul. I beg your Honors not to deny this petition from a condemned but innocent person.” Historian George Lincoln Burr wrote, “More than once it has been said that the Salem witchcraft was the rock on which theocracy shattered.” If so, the rock which helped shatter it was the selfless plea of an ordinary, honest and faithful church woman. Mary Towne Easty was my great-grandmother, seven generations back. Any person may receive gifts of faith, courage and conviction such as she exhibited, and descendancy is of no advantage in acquiring them. Yet somehow a blood line gives special meaning to her example. Who among us would keep faith at the cost of life? She did. Let us hope, by God’s grace, none again need make the choice.

❦ Other businesses from this area are featured in the color section.

H.L. PLUMBING & HEATING

COMPLETE HYDRAULIC

JACKING & HOUSE MOVING PAUL MUSHERO & SONS Fully Insured Excavation • Site Preparation Foundations • Floors • Sill Repairs Steel Installation & Welding

Over 50 Years • Ask About Our 3 Year Guarantee For Free Estimates Call Anytime Day or Night

453-9759 EVERGREEN Memere’s Antiques SELF-STORAGE Over 200 Units • 24 Hour Access All New Units • Large 9 Foot Doors Sizes From 6x10 to 10x40 Easy Access

Located at Hammond Tractor Exit 132 West off I-95, Rte. 139 216 Center Road, Fairfield

FIRST MONTH

FREE 4 month minimum

877-483-2473 • 453-7131

Harry Luce ~Owner

“We Can Tackle Any Job!” Free Estimates • Fully Insured Fully Licensed ~ Over 10 Years Experience ~

207-692-6163 (cell)

Free Insured 71Estimates Davis Road •• Fully Fairfield, ME

& Furniture

Antiques ~ Collectibles ~ Furniture

Featuring Fenton, North Wood, and Roseville Glass

A Great Selection of Clean, Used Furniture and Cast Iron Pans by Griswold!

Wed.-Sun. 10a-5p ~ Open Rain or Shine ~ 207-453-2460 57 Pirate Lane, Fairfield, ME

BAKERY

CAKES • DONUTS • TOURTIERE PIE COFFEE • LASAGNA • BAKED BEANS PIES • PASTRIES

Come in and taste why we have been feeding the people of the Fairfield area for over 50 years!

Mon-Fri 5a-7p • Sat 5a-5p Closed Sunday

453-6300

16 Western Avenue, Fairfield


67

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

f y o d

k

d

s

f

l g

,

Water Street in Skowhegan (Smith & Bussey, Post Office, Walter Ordway Dry Goods) Item #102459 from the Eastern Illustrating & Publishing Co. Collection and www. PenobscotMarineMuseum.org

26 Years of Serving You! 1987 - 2013 Here is your next generation!

Family Pet Connection

& Grooming

Gerald G Dunn, OD, PA D. Alex Pakulski, OD, PA • Family Eye Care • Sports/Safety Glasses David Benes, OD • Contact Lenses • Fashion Eye Wear

Everyday Low Prices! Great Selection of Pets and Pet Supplies

It’s time to make that appointment! New Patients Welcome Insurance Welcome

Mon. 9-5 • Tues.-Thurs. 9-6 • Fri. & Sat. 9-7 • Sun. 10-5

474-7700

Skowhegan Village Plaza • Skowhegan, ME www.familypetconnection.com

sackettandbrake.com

10 High Street Skowhegan, ME

474-9613


68

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

Skowhegan House, Skowhegan. Item #103171 from the Eastern Illustrating & Publishing Co. Collection and www.PenobscotMarineMuseum.org

Yogi Bear‛s Jellystone Park

* Celebrating 20 Years of Service *

R.F. Automotive Repair ROSS FRAZIER, OWNER/OPERATOR

Complete Diagnostic Service Chassis Dyno Testing A/C Servicing (New and Old)

(207) 474 -9656

188 Madison Ave., Skowhegan

Voted #1 Best Custom Cut Meats Bakery • Deli Grocery • Produce Open 7 days a week • 8a-8p

207-474-3121

121 North Ave., Skowhegan, ME www.georgesbananastand.com

Skowhegan’s Oldest Business

Since 1865

Graf Mechanical 866 Middle Road Skowhegan, ME

474-3449

www.quinnhardware.com 125 Waterville Road Skowhegan OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

474-3910 Plumbing • Heating • HVAC Work LP & Natural Gas • Local 24 Hour Service ~ Free Estimates ~ Fully Insured ~ FALL & WINTER SPECIALS on Heating Upgrades Call for details

at

Yonder Hill

A Family Camping Resort

“The Gateway to Maine’s Scenic Highway” ~ Full Service Heated Cabins that sleep 4 ~ 40 Minutes from Whitewater Rafting ~ We offer all styles of Camping ~ Bar with Food ~ Large Swimming Pool 60‛ x 100‛!

Check out our website at:

www.yonderhill.com yonderhill@beeline-online.net

(207) 474-7353 221 Lakewood Road Madison, ME 04950


69

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

Ward and Philbrick Block, Skowhegan. (Charles F. Ward Company) Item #111853 from the Eastern Illustrating and Publishing Co. Collection and www.PenobscotMarineMuseum.org

Now Representing All Domestic Manufacturers

Celebrating 102 years of dedication and service to Central Maine

We pride ourselves on servicing what we sell.

Our longevity has proven that price is what you pay and value is what you get!

Memorial Day 1911

SKOWHEGAN (207) 474-3334

SKOWHEGAN • (207) 474-7171 FARMINGTON • (207) 778-3354

MADISON (207) 474-7171

HIGHT

HIGHT

HIGHT

hightchryslerdodgejeep.com • hightchev.net • hightford.dealerconnection.com • hightchev.com


70

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

Central Maine Power Station, ca. 1930 in Skowhegan. Item #6307 from the collections of the Maine Historical Society and www.VintageMaineImages.com

2 Great Businesses – One Great Location!

To Heat or Cool & Propane too!

Convenience

260 Water Street Skowhegan 386 Madison Avenue Skowhegan 60 Fairgrounds Marketplace at Wal-Mart

Cold Beer Free Small Gas Hot Coffee w/ Gas Purchase! Snacks Lots of items

164 Main Street, Route 148 Madison

Open 5am - 10pm 7 Days for your convenience

247 Main Street at Canaan One Stop Canaan

260 Water Street Skowhegan, Maine

1573 Main Street Palmyra at Wal-Mart

Depot Street, Unity L

Newtion oca

Church St, Dexter

call 1-800-598-3835

Heating Oil, Kerosene & Propane Delivery With 24 Hour Repair Service

Certified Natural Gas & Geothermal Heating and Cooling Installation Available

Bobs Cash Fuel.indd 1

5/13/13 1:48 PM

Maple Syrup • Candy Jams • Honey • Gifts Open Mon-Fri 8 to 5 449 Lakewood Road, • Madison, ME

1-800-310-3803 www.mainemaple.com Mention Discover Maine Magazine for a 15% discount

414 Lakewoodexpires Rd, Rt 201 | Madison ME 8/21/14


Andover’s Henry V. Poor The man who gave us Standard & Poor’s by Charles Francis

W

hen Alfred Chandler was a graduate student at the University of North Carolina he turned to family history for the subject of his Master’s thesis. Specifically, Chandler used papers of his great-grandfather John Varnum Poor of Andover as the wellspring for his research. Alfred Chandler would have earned a Doctorate in history from Harvard in the early 1940s but for the fact his education was interrupted by World War II. Eventually he did, though. The subject of his dissertation was the same as that as his Master’s thesis, his great-grandfather. Chandler went on to a distinguished career as a uni-

versity professor. He taught at M.I.T. and Johns Hopkins before settling in at Harvard Business School. In 1981 the dissertation on his great-grandfather was published as Henry Varnum Poor: Business editor, analyst and reformer. Four years earlier Chandler had won the Pulitzer Prize for The Visible Hand: The Managerial Revolution in American Business. Alfred Chandler is credited with founding a whole new genre of history, business history. Prior to Chandler what there was on the subject had been viewed as a relatively unimportant adjunct to the study of economics. Alfred Chandler died in 2007 after a long and distinguished academic ca-

reer. Would he have had that career and would he have created an entire new field of history but for the happenstance of being the great-grandson of Henry Varnum Poor? It is tempting to draw this conclusion, but one cannot. Alfred Chandler was a brilliant man, one who made use of family papers plus much more original research to write a thesis, dissertation and book on a very important man in American history. So, just who was Henry V. Poor? Simply put, Henry Poor is the man who gave the world of finance Standard & Poor’s. Today Standard & Poor’s (S&P) is known for its research on and analysis of the stock and bond market. S&P, a division of McGraw-Hill, com(Continued on page 72)

JT’S FINEST KIND SAW

TRIPLE D REDEMPTION & TANNING SPA

Saws • Tractors Brush Cutters • Ice Augers

Mon-Sat 9-4 Featuring State of the Art Tanning by Tropical Rayz

579 Skowhegan Rd. (Rte. 2) Norridgewock www.finestkindsaw.com

Call for information

207-634-2774

Oosoola Park, Rte. 2 Norridgewock, ME 04957

474-9377 FINE FOOD CREATIONS!

Fresh Homemade Salads Sandwiches•Pizza•Groceries BUTCHER SHOP: Finest Cuts of Beef • Pork •Chicken GREAT FOR BARBEQUES!

634-5876 71 Main St •Norridgewock

HARDYS MOTORSPORTS • Zero Turn Mowers • Generators • Wood Splitters

• Leaf Blowers • Trimmers Financing Available!

_____________

YORK’S MARKET

_____________

3 1:48 PM

71

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

• Lawn Equipment • Snow Thro • Wood Splitters

*All Units full of gas ready to be used. Delivered within 20 miles*

634-3452

74 Mercer Rd., Norridgewock, ME

hardysmotorsports@tds.net


72

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

(Continued from page 71) piles stock market indexes like the S&P 500, the index that gets flashed on our television screens every day as a part of the national and international news. The S&P of today traces its origin to 1860 and a book Henry Poor published that year. The book was History of Railroads and Canals in the United States. History of Railroads and Canals in the United States is a good deal more than a history book. It is a statistical analysis of the operational and financial details of the most important industry in the United States of the early industrial age, the railroad. Henry Poor’s book has been described as “the grandfather of all investment publications.” For the first time past and present conditions of an industry were brought together between the covers of a single work for investors and anyone else concerned to access with ease. The book was an im-

mediate success when it came out, so much so that it set Henry Poor on a new career path, producing Poor’s Manual. Poor’s Manual consisted of regular railroad industry updates. The updates made Henry Poor the acknowledged authority on railroad development in the United States. Just what was Henry Poor’s background that he produced such a monumental and seminal a work as History of Railroads and Canals in the United States? How was it that Henry Poor became the founder of a new form of journalism, financial reporting? Henry Poor was one of the sons of Sylvanus Poor, an Andover farmer and sometime town treasurer. He was the first of the Poor family to attend college, graduating from Bowdoin. Henry was also the brother of John A. Poor. Ironically, if a Maine secondary school child knows the name Poor, the

Phil Carter’s Garage “Serving you since 1960” Air Conditioning Specialist Registered With International Mobile Air Conditioning Certification Association (IMACA)

From Foreign & Domestic to 18-Wheelers When It Comes To Air Conditioning, Phil Carter’s Garage Is The Only Name! Tune-Ups • Exhausts • Brakes Complete Car Care Needs

453-6310

1 Pleasant Drive, Benton Station

DAC DISTRIBUTORS, INC. Auto Parts & Accessories Domestic & Foreign Car & Truck

Radiators • Drums & Rotors Turned • We Make Hydraulic Hoses Bench Test Starters & Alternators • Most Parts Same Day Service

Open Mon-Fri 7am-6pm, Sat 7am-2pm 1153 Main Street, Clinton 426-8402

Poor they know will be John. This is so even though Henry had the greater and more significant influence. Part of this ironic situation has to do with the fact few connect Henry Poor and Standard & Poor’s. And part of it has to do with the fact John Poor is mentioned in most secondary school Maine history classes. Because of John A. Poor, the Grand Trunk Railroad came to Maine. The Grand Trunk came to Maine because of John A. Poor’s daring sleigh ride from Portland to Montreal. At least that’s the tale that has been used by teachers over the years to catch the imagination of generations of Maine students. John A. Poor did have something to do with this brother’s career. The two practiced law together in Bangor. John set Henry up as editor of the American Railroad Journal in New York City. John Poor purchased the publication to further his own dreams of becoming a

Our 60th Year

CLINTON FAIR

Lions Agricultural 2 Miles East of Exit #138, o° 1-95

SEPT. 5th-8th, 2013 A True Family Fair. Cleanest Midway Ever! Animal & Mechanical Pulling Events Entertainment • Woodsman’s Events Exhibits • Bracelet Days on Thurs. & Sun.

www.clintonlionsfair.com

LINKLETTER & SONS, INC. Athens, Maine 207-654-2301

Professional loggers for nearly 50 years

We selective cut, buy lots and buy stumpage


o d s t d h t d e f m e r f

o o n n . o a

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

2013 Greater Kennebec Valley Edition

great railroad magnate. It was because of his work on the American Railroad Journal that Henry Poor became an expert on the U.S. railway industry. What Henry Poor did with his various publications was to give in-depth analyses of particular companies within the railroad industry as a whole. He reported on expenditures, profits and losses. He reported on potential. Was a line being built where there was good farm land to be developed? What industries might be drawn to a particular community because of railroad development? In short, as ‘the’ expert on American railroading, Henry Poor became a reasoned voice for U.S. economic expansion. The position made him one of the most influential figures in the country. In his book on his great-grandfather Alfred Chandler points to Henry Poor as the first journalist to apply statistical

analysis to describe a company’s successes and failings. The byproduct of this was Poor’s Manual being viewed as a useful tool by rail companies for attracting investors. For example, if Poor reported crop production was up along a particular line, the line could point to the information as an inducement for investors to buy its stocks and bonds. In short, Henry Poor founded the financial research and analysis industry in the U.S.. What was to become the Standard & Poor’s of today was a three-generation family business. In 1865 Henry William Poor joined his father to establish the H.V. and H.W. Poor Company. This company in turn became Poor’s Railroad Manual Company. Henry V. Poor II, the son of Henry W. Poor, finished out the Poor line of succession. The final name change for Henry Poor’s company during the Poor family

Doug’s Garage Complete Car Repair Domestic & Foreign

Air Conditioning Service & Repair Exhaust, Brakes, Tune-ups, Shocks & Struts Tire Sales & Service • Computer Analysis State Inspections Open M-F 7:30am-5pm

453-7720

425 Albion Road, Benton

MICHAEL A. WHEELER BUILDER Frame to Finish

New Homes Remodeling Finish Work Porches Decks Garages Michael Wheeler

(207) 639-5001 Cell (207) 441-5372 PO Box 72 • Phillips, Maine 04966

EARTHWORK CONTRACTORS SAND • LOAM • GRAVEL CRUSHED PRODUCTS

696-3084 45 Main Street • Anson, Maine

73

years was Poor’s Publishing Company. In 1941 Poor’s Publishing merged with Standard Statistics, hence the designation Standard & Poor’s. McGraw-Hill acquired S&P in 1966. Henry Poor, the Andover-born man who changed the American financial landscape, died in 1905. He was ninety-two. The book his great-grandson Alfred Chandler wrote on Poor is well worth taking the time to read. Not only does it provide insight into the workings of nineteenth century finance and railroading, it also gives a vivid picture of Andover and Maine during the formative years of brothers Henry and John Poor.

❦ Other businesses from this area are featured in the color section.


74

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

Saddleback Lake Camps in Rangeley. Item #102148 from the Eastern Illustrating & Publishing Co. Collection and www.PenobscotMarineMuseum.org

J&J Haines Excavation, INC.

Excavation • Wells • Sand • Gravel • Loam

Septic Sytems • Roads Snow Plowing • Logging

KELVIN’S AUTO REPAIR State Inspection Station

Tires • Brakes • Exhaust • Tune-ups 20 years experience keeping Western Maine rolling! Kelvin Pillsbury

207-491-6116 kelvinsauto@yahoo.com Tel: 639-3011 • Cell: 491-6522 29 Mt. Blue Pond Road • Avon, Maine

212 Rangeley Rd. • Avon, ME

EDMUNDS MARKET

Full Line of Grocery Items Full Deli • Fresh Meats • Seafood Beer • Soda • Agency Liquor Store 24/7 Sunoco Fuel • ATM Available Small Town Service Low Prices & Best Selection 639-3721 • Route 4, Phillips edmundsmarket.com

W ILBER HEATING & PLUMBING Madrid, Maine 04966

Service, repair, or replacement of Radiant boilers, Monitors, & hot air systems Over 25 years experience • Fully Insured 24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE

John Wilber

207-639-2251


75

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

The Sandy River Valley’s Augustus Stinchfield Mayo Clinic co-founder by Charles Francis

I

n 1964 the U.S. Postal Service issued a five-cent stamp honoring the doctors Mayo. The stamp shows the profiles of two figures. The implication is that these are ‘the’ Mayos, that there were just two individuals to be associated with the founding of the famous Mayo Clinic. For this reason the stamp is misleading. There were several other doctors associated with the earliest years of the clinic. Indeed, one of them did not even bear the name Mayo. He was Dr. Augustus Stinchfield. Augustus Stinchfield’s name is seldom associated with the Mayo Clinic. Yet he was one of the two original

co-founders of the practice that evolved into the medical facility and academic institution devoted to training physicians that bears the Mayo name. Augustus Stinchfield was a Maine man. He was born in Phillips and spent a good portion of his adolescence in Strong. His medical background includes an M.D. from Bowdoin. The two doctors whose profiles adorn the 1964 five-cent stamp are Charles Horace and William James Mayo. Charles Horace and William James Mayo were the sons of William Worrall Mayo. Dr. William Worrall Mayo and Dr. Augustus Stinchfield

Coos Canyon Campground & Cabins ~ Roger & Judy Boucher ~

Year R Recr ound eatio n!

Gold-Panning

Auto Repair • Complete Auto & Truck Repair • Your Local AAA Towing Contractor • 24 Hour Towing

Hunting, fishing, swimming, hiking, skiing, wildlife & foliage viewing! Located on ATV & Snowmobile Trails www.cooscanyoncabins.com

RP

Serving you successfully for over 20 years Roger Palmer Sr., Roger Palmer Jr.

Registered Maine Guide Packages Available

445 Swift River Rd. Byron, ME 04275

formed the original partnership that gave rise to the famous Mayo Clinic. Of the two, it was Stinchfield who continued the association to see it reorganized as a not-for-profit medical practice, a format which would help make the Mayo Clinic known around the world. There are, of course, reasons why the Mayo Clinic is famed besides its not-for-profit existence. The Mayo Clinic is one of the foremost medical research and treatment facilities in the world. It was one of the first medical facilities to demand that its operating rooms be sterile. It was (Continued on page 76)

207-364-3880

864-2141 (cell) 592-4255

37 School Street • Rangeley

Flagstaff Fuel

Your full service convenience

store!

24-Hour Fuel

Beer • Wine • Soda

Take-out Menu

Sandwiches • Pizza • Calzones Fried Food & More!

207-246-2300 108 Main St. • Stratton, Maine

Logging & Construction (207) 246-3226 70 Fox Farm Road Stratton, Maine 04982

www.umeconomicministry.org 9-3


76

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

(Continued from page 75) the first medical facility to have an integrated group practice with specialists in different areas working as a unit, consulting and cooperating. It was also one of the first — if not the first — medical facility to keep patient’s medical histories. These histories extended to a patient’s immediate family as well as his or her immediate progenitors. Augustus Stinchfield had a part in the development of all of these now-standard but then revolutionary medical practices. Augustus White Stinchfield was born in Phillips in 1842. He was the son of Jacob and Jane (Whitney) Stinchfield. The Stinchfield and Whitney families go back for several generations in Phillips. They were a settled people. That is, they were settled until Jacob and Jane decided to move to Strong. Quite possibly the Stinchfield family move was motivated by the fact that Strong was a hotbed of abolitionist sen-

timent in the early 1850s. The Maine Republican Party had its birthplace in Strong in 1854. And, quite possibly it was this abolitionist sentiment that led Augustus Stinchfield to enlist in the Union Army in 1864. 1864 is a rather late date for an ardent opponent of slavery to decide to dedicate his efforts to the cause of defeating the Confederacy. The reason why Augustus did not enlist earlier may have something to do with where he was in the early years of the war. Augustus was on the frontier. He was pioneering in the Wisconsin Territory. Regardless, Augustus served with the 39th Wisconsin as a private. Following his service he returned to Maine. The 39th Wisconsin was one of the “100 days” regiments. These were regiments formed up for the final push to defeat the South. Men in these regiments were exposed to the results of

Jordan Lumber Co.

Discover Maine Magazine

Your Local Source for: Lumber & Building Materials Roofing Materials & Masonry Products Honda Generators & Power Equipment

Stratton Plaza Hotel & Lounge

Husqvarna Chainsaws & Mowers

Home Of

Monitor & Rinnai Heaters

Stratton Pizza & Traitor Lounge

Excavation & Site Work

Home Cooked Meals ~ Pizza ~ Burgers

Free Estimates On-site Sales Assistance Free Delivery Service

1-800-750-2231 207-265-2231 www.jordanlumber.com

354 Main Street • Kingfield, Maine

all the fighting that had gone on before. They saw the maimed, wounded and mentally unbalanced. They saw the effects of war on the human body and mind in all its horrors. What brought Stinchfield back to Maine was a desire to administer to those who suffered as those he saw on the battlefield, in battlefield hospitals and in hospitals well away from the lines where the sick waited through their agony and suffering to see what the future might hold. Augustus came back to Maine to study medicine at Bowdoin. Stinchfield graduated Bowdoin with his medical degree in 1868. He then headed back to the frontier again, this time to Missouri, where he opened a practice in Verona. Verona, Missouri was situated in flat, treeless country. It was a far cry from the rolling, wooded slopes of Wisconsin that Stinchfield had loved and

has been brought to you free through the generous support of Maine businesses for the past 21 years, and we extend a special thanks to them.

Steak ~ Fish ~ Hot & Cold Sandwiches Drink & Draft Specials Arcade ~ Pool Tables ~ Horse Shoe Pits Live Entertainment on Weekends Trailer Parking ~ Camping on Flagstaff Lake NEW ROOMS ATV & Snowmobile Trail Access out back Great Cross Country Skiing! Check out our new Trailside DECK With open Fire Pit! 149 Main Street (Rt. 27) • Stratton

strattonplazahotel.com 207-246-2000

Please tell our advertisers how much you love Discover Maine Magazine by doing business with them whenever possible. Thanks for supporting those businesses that help us bring Maine’s history to you!


77

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

were so much like those around Phillips and Strong. Then one day he had an invitation to visit Minnesota from an old Strong friend named E. D. Dyar. E. D. Dyar was a practicing pharmacist in Eyota, Minnesota. And even though the town had a pharmacist, it didn’t have a doctor. Stinchfield decided the Minnesota community was the place for him. There were a variety of reasons for this. Dyar wanted him to settle there. The countryside and climate was like that of Franklin County, Maine. And Augustus fell in love, subsequently marrying. It was 1892 when William Worrall Mayo asked Stinchfield to join him as a partner in his Rochester, Minnesota practice. Stinchfield had a thriving practice in Eyota and was recognized as one of the most competent general practitioners in Minnesota by this time. However, Mayo’s reputation drew him.

For his part, Mayo was nearing retirement and wanted a solid middle-age physician to balance out his two sons who were just beginning practice. In addition, the Mayo sons were specialists, in different forms of surgery. William James Mayo specialized in abdominal surgery; Charles Horace Mayo in eye surgery. The agreement between William Worrall Mayo and Augustus Stinchfield was for a profit sharing partnership. This was different from most physician-partnerships of the time where each doctor simply pocketed his fees, using them as he saw fit, for business or personal expenses. This sort of arrangement placed the business first — or at least treated it as an equal partner. William Worrall Mayo formally retired a year after Augustus Stinchfield joined him as a partner. Stinchfield and Charles Horace and William James

Mayo then went into partnership. As their practice grew they took on more associates, some of whom became partners. The great change came when what had hitherto been a private practice was reorganized as a not-for-profit business. This occurred in 1919. The change guaranteed the continuation of the clinic’s existence no matter who was running it. It marks the formation of the Mayo Clinic of today. Augustus Stinchfield died the same year as the birth of the not-for-profit Mayo Clinic. He clearly had a major role in the creation of this world-renowned medical institution. One can see the same philosophy which led Augustus Stinchfield to study medicine at Bowdoin as playing an important part in the guiding rationale behind the founding of the Mayo Clinic. His is a remarkable legacy to both current and future generations. ❦ Other businesses from this area are featured in the color section.

The

ABSOLUT SERVICES, INC.

`

Looney Moose Cafe

Caring for your home and camp

• Snow Plowing, Sanding and Removal

We specialize in home-cooked specials! Daily Homemade Soups!

Legendary Homemade Corned Beef Hash! 9 Main Street, Eustis, Maine

Andy Brann

Open 7 Days A Week 7am-2pm

246-7932 Todd West welcomes you to

JIMMY’S SHOP ‘N SAVE Since 1895

Convenient to ITS 87 • Custom Fresh Cut Meats • Fresh Produce • All Your Grocery And Snack Needs • Agency Liquor Store MAIN STREET • BINGHAM

672-5528

JIMMYSBINGHAM.COM

• Septic System Installation and Repair

P.O. Box 571 Stratton, ME 04982

• Excavation and Foundations

(207) 246-5709 (207) 650-4309

• Carpentry and Remodeling

**Licensed and Insured**

• Gravel, Stone and Loam • Plumbing and Heating • Camp Opening and Closing

MAINE GUIDE

SNOWSHOES & FURNITURE CO. Store Now Open! • Wooden Snowshoes • Maine Guide Boot Bindings • Locally Made Maine Gifts • Sporting Goods

First Snowshoe with Reverse!

207-672-4011

Main St. •Bingham, ME WWW.MGSNOWSHOES.COM


78

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

B

i g

M p o i C l h b l r i R

National Open Canoe Championship at the Forks on August 23,1970, on Dead River at Big Eddy in Stratton in the canoe slalom. Item #17055 from the Boutilier Collection and www.PenobscotMarineMuseum.org

E.W. Moore & Son Pharmacy Established 1894

Big Enough To Serve you... Small Enough To Care

Prescriptions • Health & Beauty Boyds Bears • Yankee Candles Maine Souvenirs & Postcards Jewelry • Toys, Games & Models Chet Hibbard, R Ph.

(Tel) 672-3312 1-800-814-4495 337 Main Street, Bingham

The Gateway to the Maine Woods Bingham Moscow Solon Caratunk The Forks West Forks

Pierce Hill Construction Tobin Belanger, Owner “Serving Greater Bingham for 20 years”

ITS 84 & 87

Accommodations & Restaurants

207-672-4100

www.upperkennebecvalleychamber.com ukvcofc@yahoo.com Upper Kennebec Valley Chamber of Commerce

New Homes • Remodeling Garages • Site Clearing *Estimates on request*

207-416-8540 Moscow, ME


79

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

How Bingham Got Its Name Town took its name from a Pennyslvania banker by Brian Swartz The new town was named for William Bingham, who in Maine would have definitely qualified as someone “from away.” Born in Philadelphia in 1752, Bingham attended the College of Philadelphia. He survived a sea adventure that began aboard the 16-gun American brig Reprisal after it departed Philadelphia in late June or early July 1776 to deliver Bingham to Martinique as an official representative of the American colonies. Under Captain Lambert Wickes, the Reprisal assisted the six-gun Continental brig Nancy as her crew attempted to evade pursuing British warships. Finally reaching the West Indies, Wick-

es and his ship — with Bingham as an eyewitness and likely not as a participant — captured British vessels and, after trading cannon fire with a British warship, reached Martinique. By investing in fast ships and experienced crews that engaged in commerce and privateering, Bingham profited from the Revolution. When the war ended, several colonies started selling vast tracts of land to speculators who hoped to make a killing by selling smaller lots to the settlers now expected to pour into the United States. Bingham probably never planned on buying land in the District of Maine; being a Pennsylvanian, he had no reason to travel north of the Piscataqua (Continued on page 80)

0

The handling you’d expect from Can-Am. The power you’d expect from no one.

50

BERRY’S STORE

1

478,0

THE RIDE SAYS IT ALL

Gas • Groceries • Beer Lottery Tickets • Agency Liquor Pizza • Deli • Sandwiches 663-4461 • West Forks, ME Winter Hours 5am - 7pm

With 101 hp, the Can-Am® Maverick™ is the most powerful side-by-side vehicle ever built. But power means nothing without control. That’s why we paired its Rotax® 1000R engine with a new TTA (Torsional Trailing A-arms) rear suspension for an unbeatable combination of power and control. Add in advanced ergonomics for maximum comfort and optimal access to cockpit controls, and the Can-Am Maverick lets you easily handle a variety of terrain, from dunes to desert to trail. What does all of this mean? Nothing until you get behind the wheel and experience the new Can-Am Maverick for yourself.

Maverick 1000R X rs

16 00

B

ingham in Maine shares nothing in common with Binghamton in New York — except for a similar name and the Pennsylvanian who gave it to both places. On Thursday, February 6, 1812, the Massachusetts General Court granted permission to “the township number one on the first range of townships within the Bingham purchase” in Somerset County to be “incorporated and established as a town by the name of Bingham.” The law laid out the new town’s boundaries: “south, by the town of Solon, east, by number two [township] in range aforesaid, north, by number one in second range east of the Kennebec River.”

Maverick 1000R

150

472,0

Jean Paul Carrier

LOGGING CONTRACTOR

207-668-4457

PO BOX 489 • JACKMAN, ME 04945 Email: jean.carrier@ejcarrier.com

Dealer Imprint Goes Here

207-695-2020

Find the one that’s right for you at can-am.brp.com.

© 2012 Bombardier Recreational Products Inc (BRP). All rights reserved. ™, ® and the BRP logo are trademarks of Bombardier Recreational Products Inc. or its affiliates. In the U.S.A., the products are distributed by BRP US Inc. BRP reserves the right, at any time, to discontinue or change specifications, prices, designs, features, models or equipment without incurring obligation. Some models depicted may include optional equipment. Read the side-by-side vehicle Operator’s Guide and watch the Safety DVD before driving. For your safety: wear a helmet, eye protection and other protective gear. Fasten lateral net and seat belt at all times. Always ride responsibly and remember that riding and alcohol / drugs don’t mix. Side-by-side vehicles are for off-road use only. Never ride on paved surfaces or public roads. Operator must be at least 16 years old. Passenger must be at least 12 years old and able to hold handgrips and plant feet while seated against the backrest. Never engage in stunt driving and avoid excessive speed. Drive responsibly. 5108335


80

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

(Continued from page 79) River. Land speculation could earn a man riches if done at the right time; when Massachusetts officials sought to pay their state’s war debt by holding a lottery in 1786 to sell land in Maine, Bingham gambled that he could win — and big. The young United States had not yet set its sight on a limitless western horizon; virgin forests in Maine offered greater potential for economic gain (if only in timber values) than did unknown lands beyond Kentucky. Via the lottery and outright purchase, Bingham acquired 1 million acres in Maine. Then he acquired 1 million acres formerly owned by Gen. Henry Knox, who would give his name to a county, fort, and town in Maine. Suddenly William Bingham was a major Maine landowner. He owned 2 million acres, including what would

today be considered prime coastal real estate, plus wide forests drained by the Kennebec River. Settlers bought land from him. In Township No. 1 in Somerset County, men like Abner Baker, Daniel Foster, and the Goodrichs — Abijah, Job, and William Joshua — built homes and carved farms from the forest alongside the Kennebec. Joining them were Edward Howes, Luther Moore, Calvin Russell, and other “pioneers”; the term applied as well to Maine’s post-war settlers as it did to other settlers traveling through the Cumberland Gap to reach Kentucky. The long Indian wars might be over in the District of Maine, but much of the region remained a howling wilderness. Yet Township No. 1 was not unknown to Americans; Benedict Arnold and his soldiers had poled their leaky

bateaux past the township’s rocky shore while en route to Quebec City during the past war. By 1812, however, the Arnold Expedition had long since passed into history. The residents of Township No. 1 wanted to govern themselves. In late winter 1812 — the next war already lurked beyond the horizon — “all the inhabitants of said Bingham, qualified by law to Vote in town affairs,” were urged by Justice of the Peace Caleb Jewett “to meet at the dwelling house of William Joshua Goodrich” at 11 a.m., Thursday, March 26 to elect town officers. William Bingham did not attend this meeting in his namesake town, and he could not attend even if he had wanted to do so. He had served in the Pennsylvania Legislature and in the United States Senate, but his banking affairs

RIVERDRIVERS Whitewater Rafting

Daily raft trips on Maine’s premier whitewater rivers Whitewater information • Camping RV Camping/Hookups • Cabins Canoe Rentals • Ducky Trips • ATV Park & Ride and of course... Whitewater rafting!

866-748-7378

Call today for a brochure and reservations PO Box 41 • Route 201 • West Forks, Maine 04985

www.riverdrivers.com


81

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

often kept him in England. There Bingham died at Bath on February 6, 1804 — exactly eight years before the Massachusetts legislature voted to establish the Town of Bingham in the District of Maine. ❦ Other businesses from this area are featured in the color section.

DID YOU KNOW?

Maine contains 542,629 acres of State and National Parks

˜

Lawrence’s Lakeside Cabins & Guide Service Open Year Round on Moosehead Lake in Rockwood

Hunting ~ Fishing ~ Snowmobiling Family Vacations

207-534-7709

Box 101 • Rockwood, ME 04478 cabins101@aol.com www.lawrencescabins.com

American Woolen Co., Brown Mill Dam in Dover-Foxcroft. Item #116123 from the Eastern Illustrating & Publishing Co. Collection and www.PenobscotMarineMuseum.org

Four Seasons Restaurant O˜ ering

Steak & Ribs Open Daily 6am-9pm Thank you for dining with us! Timothy & Sandra Bent

668-7778

417 Main Street • Jackman, ME

Morrell’s

Hardware & Home Center

Decorating Center • Gifts Housewares • Lawn & Garden Outdoor Furniture

695-2897

Serving the Moosehead Area For Over 50 Years Lily Bay Road, Greenville morrells.maine@gmail.com


82

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

Mining For Heirlooms Treasures from the past by Charles Francis

T

reasures from the past link generations in a deep, personal way. Anyone who has seen or has in their possession great-grandfather’s war medals (circa 1917) a picture of grandmother’s brother with fishing rod in hand, a father’s worn wallet, or an aunt’s old china doll, knows how moving these pieces of history can be. They are treasured items, passed down from generation to generation. They are items that provide insight into the lives of ancestors and a richer understanding of family history. Many of us are not quite lucky enough to have memorabilia that our genetic forbears once knew intimately on an almost daily basis. That doesn’t mean, though, that we can’t collect items from that past, treasures that provide insight into the lives of those who gave us the particular coloring of our eyes, the bump of our nose or the widow’s peak a loved one finds so endearing. It doesn’t mean we can’t collect or create our own family heirlooms. I have a distant relative who was a nineteenth century blacksmith. His

surname was Humphrey. Because I bear that name as a middle name I have always been interested in what the lives of that branch of my family were like, especially my blacksmith relative. There is something more than a bit romantic about this once-common occupation. Sadly, I have nothing that comes down from this long-gone relative. Many of us are in the same situation. We know an ancestor or relative had an interesting occupation, but have nothing that recalls his or her person. This doesn’t mean that we can’t go out and find something that recalls the individual’s particular uniqueness, though. My interest in my blacksmith relative led me to an exploration of that now almost extinct occupation. The place I started my investigation was Dover-Foxcroft. Dover-Foxcroft has a wonderful old blacksmith museum, the Blacksmith Shop Museum. It is run by the Dover-Foxcroft Historical Society. The Blacksmith Shop Museum has a lot of the original equipment used by its first proprietor Nicholas Chandler. There is a forge, anvil and a lot of

smith tools. There is even an ox-lifter. The latter device was patented by Joseph Bachelor. Its purpose was to make it easy to shoe an ox, however stubborn the creature might prove. Anvils and forges, much less ox-lifters, no matter how symbolic they may be of the blacksmith profession, are not the stuff of family memorabilia. However, Dover-Foxcroft’s Blacksmith Shop Museum did give me an idea for what would be the perfect item to recall my blacksmith relative, a bellows for the fireplace. Bellows and blacksmiths just seem to go hand-in-hand. Thanks to my visit to the Dover-Foxcroft Historical Society I started a search for the perfect old bellows. And I found one, in an old treasures and trash barn on Route 7. Though I don’t know if the old bellows was used by a blacksmith, it certainly could have been. The above little tale is an example of how we can go about recreating family history. It is an example of mining for family heirlooms. There are other ways we can do this, too. A couple of years ago the price of (Continued on page 84)

I’ll Arrange That at ˛ e Cottage

Florist, Home & Garden, Plants, Gifts, Events & More (207)695-2271 9 Cottage St. • Greenville, ME

Green Door Framing Full Picture Framing Services Gallery Featuring local artists

VICKI WOLFERTZ MAINE LICENSED ARCHITECT

Full Service Architectural Practice

Open Mon.-Fri. 11a-5p Sat. 11a-4p or by appt. Dave Lockwood ~ Owner

207-564-8407 / 207-564-8618 Next door to the Blacksmith Shop Museum

105 Dawes Road • Dover Foxcroft, ME

www.greendoorframing.com

Phone: 207-997-3543 • Fax 207-997-2007 www.vwarchitect.com Email: vw_architect@myfairpoint.net


83

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

Main Street in Dover-Foxcroft. Item # 100537 from the Eastern Illustrating & Publishing Co. Collection and www.PenobscotMarineMuseum.org

KC‛s

Country

Store

OFFICIAL TAGGING STATION We offer building materials, roofing, plumbing and electrical supplies — wood pellets and livestock feed

66 Water Street • Guilford lovellsguilfordhardware.com

Open 7 Days

Hunting & Camping Supplies Sit-down Breakfast Every Day 678 State Hwy (Rt. 150) Parkman, Maine

876-4111 Hours: 5am-8-pm • Fri. & Sat. 5am-9pm


84

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

(Continued from page 82) gold went up significantly. One result of this upswing was a spate of television advertisements suggesting individuals send in their old gold jewelry for cash. Think of what you can do with the money, the spokespersons tantalized. You can get that new pair of boots you want or that flat screen television so hubby can sit back and watch the Sunday game. Of course, in sending in that old unwanted jewelry you are getting rid of a potential heirloom. There are better uses for old gold jewelry than simply exchanging it for cash to spend at the moment’s whim. Old gold can be made into new jewelry. In effect, it can become a future heirloom. Gold can be recreated into new jewelry. Many jewelers are master craftsmen. In acquiring a new and unique piece of personal jewelry, you may just be acquiring something that granddaughter or grandniece may hold dear. The idea is to reduce, re-use and recycle. It is an environment-friendly practice. That ugly, quite possibly impure, gold pin or broach can be refined and turned into the design of a master craftsmen. County Extension used to do a wonderful program called Who Gets Grandma’s Yellow Pie Plate? Every one of us has personal belongings such as photograph albums, a pocket knife, or a

yellow pie plate that contains meaning for us, and whether we know it or not, for other members of the family. Who Gets Grandma’s Yellow Pie Plate was the kind of program that helped people think about passing along their heirlooms long before they turned into a subject of contention among grandchildren, nieces and nephews. It is the kind of program that makes us consider the intrinsic value of the knickknacks that are part and parcel of our daily lives. How we share our family heritage, traditions, and memories is a matter for serious deliberation. We need to give thought to things that have been passed down to us and make sure that we’re making arrangements for them to be passed to further generations. We must also consider that we have some items that are new to us and that we have very special memories associated with them. These are the sorts of things that should be passed along with an accompanying story. In other words, we should be thinking of being remembered as a good ancestor. Family history truly comes alive when you hold in your hands a brush used by your great-grandmother, a photograph of your grandparents on their wedding day, or an antique writing desk where your great, great-grandfather once sat. Not all of us are so lucky

Rideout’s

DOVER

Seasonal Services

• Lawn Mowing • Landscaping • Camp Maintenance • Fall & Spring Cleanups • Plowing, Etc.

717-8158

Kris Rideout

Dover-Foxcroft, ME

Start Right. Start Here. STIHL CHAINSAWS SALES & SERVICE We Are Now Your Supplier For Building Materials 69 East Main St. • Dover-Foxcroft • 564-2274 ~ Come See Us For All Your Home Projects ~ DoverTrueValue.com

to have such family treasures in our possession, though. It’s when we don’t that it’s time to begin mining for heirlooms. One way to do this is to connect with cousins. Your parents and siblings may not know of a family bible, ancestor’s pictures or other treasure. This, however, doesn’t mean they aren’t still in the family. I’ve found old photos, a family bible, and even have word of the chest of an early eighteenth century ancestor – all in the hands of distant relatives. I would never have known of these things if I hadn’t tried to connect with them. And while the cousins aren’t willing to part with originals, I now have photocopies of pictures of ancestors and relatives born in the nineteenth century. I have also acquired a bit of related bric a brac by visiting antique stores, flea markets and the like. Old photo albums, postcards, jewelry and other family items with value to collectors often end up in local antique stores. Dealers buy up such treasures cheaply at estate sales, or sell them on commission for family members looking to make a little money off the contents of Grandma’s attic. Antique stores near where your ancestors lived can hold all sorts of buried treasure – if not that of your family, at least bits and pieces of local history that can give you


r t t

insight into what it was like when great grandfather and grandmother were alive. The point to all this is ‘an heirloom is what you make it’!

t , e e y t f t t w h f e

❦ Other businesses from this area are featured in the color section.

o e s m s e e d f d u

85

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

DID YOU KNOW?

Maine was admitted to the Union as the 23rd state on March 15, 1820

ANDERSON BUILDING & WOODWORKING CO.

Dover-Foxcroft Bridge & Mayo’s Mill. Item #101648 from the Eastern Illustrating & Publishing Co. Collection and www.PenobscotMarineMuseum.org

Do you love Maine like we love Maine? Subscribe to Discover Maine Magazine

- BUILDING CONTRACTOR “Professional Building Services”

• • • • •

Complete Log Homes Custom Homes Additions Garages Full Scale Remodeling

~ FREE ESTIMATES ~ FULLY INSURED

Cell: 207-441-7093 Scott D. Anderson

Subscription Form on Page 33

Call 1-800-753-8684 • (207) 874-7720 www.discovermainemagazine.com

Bruce Thomas

Bonsey Brothers Inc.

Weatherizing Maine Homes since 1953

Buying Junk Cars up to $300 Serving Northern/Central Maine for 30 years

Energy Audits, Complete Weatherization Services Spray Foam Insulation • Blown Cellulose Insulation Replacement Windows • Siding Ken Richardson Maine Certified Weatherization Technician

Home: 997-3249 • Cell: 343-1498

207-564-2081 800-499-2081

Goodell Corner, Willimantic, ME

79 E. Main St. • Dover-Foxcroft, Maine


86

Western Lakes & Mountains Region

Cabin at Belgrade Lake Camps, Belgrade Lakes. Item # 103259 from the Eastern Illustrating & Publishing Co. Collection and www.PenobscotMarineMuseum.org

1 A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D E E E E E E E E F F F F F F F


87

DiscoverMaineMagazine.com

Business

Directory of Advertisers Page

18 below Raw bar, grill & Lounge...................back Cover A.E. Robinson ...................................................................... 56 A-1 Seamless gutters ....................................................... 9 Abbot Village bakery ....................................................... 54 Absolut Services, Inc. ....................................................... 77 AbT Plumbing, Heating & Cooling ............................... 38 Across The River Counseling .......................................... 45 Adrenaline Motor Sports .................................................. 47 American Legion Post 51 ............................................... 39 Ames Construction ........................................................... 55 Anderson building & Woodworking Co. .... ................ 85 Andrew Ames Logging ....................................................... 6 Apollo Salon and Spa ......................................................... 40 Archie’s Inc. Rubbish Removal ................................... 20 At Home Electric .................................................................. 35 Atlantic Horse Transport .................................................. 59 Autobahn Hi-Performance ............................................ 59 b&F Fresh Vegetables ........................................................ 42 b. Lamarre Carpentry ........................................................ 62 bay Street Redemption .................................................... 65 berry’s Store .......................................................................... 79 bessey Motor Sales ........................................................... 17 big Dawg Concrete ............................................................. 31 blanchet builders, LLC ....................................................... 46 bob’s Cash Fuel .................................................................... 70 bolster Monumental Works ............................................. 14 bolt Fabrics ........................................................................... 45 bonsey brothers Inc. .......................................................... 85 boomers Restaurant & Saloon ...................................... 16 boy Locksmith ...................................................................... 7 bRC Carpentry Inc. ............................................................. 14 brian Thorndike builder ..................................................... 73 bridgton Highlands Country Club ................................. 11 bridgton Hospital ................................................................ 26 brill Lumber Co. .................................................................... 24 brown’s Construction ........................................................ 12 bruce Thomas ....................................................................... 85 b’s Home Service ................................................................. 60 C&C Sprayfoam .................................................................... 49 Canaan Motel ........................................................................ 47 Carrabassett Real Estate & Property Management... 53 Center Theatre ....................................................................... 84 Central Maine Community College .................................. 5 Central Maine Sandblasting ............................................. 67 Central Maine Septic ............................................................ 3 Chris’ Electric ......................................................................... 30 CJ’s Appliances ...................................................................... 60 Cliff gray Cremation-Funeral Services, LLC................. 19 Cliff Roderick, Inc. general Contractor.......................... 27 Clinton Lions Agricultural Fair ......................................... 72 CMS ............................................................................................. 3 Cobb’s Pierce Pond Camps ................................................ 48 Collins Enterprises ................................................................ 3 Colonial Valley Motel ........................................................... 3 Conlogue’s building & Property Management ...........62 Connell’s Auto Collection ................................................. 27 Cooper Farms ........................................................................ 31 Coos Canyon Campground & Cabins............................. 75 Cornish Associaton of businesses ................................. 45 County Seat Realty ............................................................. 60 Crosstone Conference Center & Restaurant ............... 32 Cushing Construction ....................................................... 29 Custom Curtains by Linda Heilig.................................... 45 D.A. Wilson & Co. .................................................................. 33 D.H. Pinnette & Sons, Inc. .................................................... 7 D.R. Salisbury ........................................................................ 51 DAC Distributors, Inc. ......................................................... 72 Daddy O’s ............................................................................... 15 Debra Achramowicz CPA, PA .......................................... 42 Decker-Simmons American Legion Post 51............... 39 Den’s Automotive Services ................................................ 9 Designed Living ....................................................................56 Devaney, Doak & garrett booksellers ............................62 Dionne & Son builders ........................................................47 Dirigo Timberlands ............................................................. 48 Don’s Auto body ...................................................................36 Doug’s garage .......................................................................73 Douins Market & Diner .......................................................39 Dover True Value .................................................................. 84 Drake & Son Contractor, Inc. ........................................... 30 Dream On A Stream Alpaca Ranch ................................ 59 Dunkin Donuts ..................................................................... 70 Dunn & Pakulski Optometrists ........................................ 67 Dyer Septic Service ..............................................................25 E.H. Ward & Son .....................................................................71 E.J. Carrier, Inc. Logging Contractor ...............................79 E.R. Palmer Lumber Co. ........................................................7 E.W. Moore & Son Pharmacy ............................................78 Edmund’s Market .................................................................74 Ellis Pond Variety & Cabins ................................................. 8 Eric’s Restaurant ....................................................................41 Evergreen Self Storage .......................................................66 Fairfield Antiques Mall ......................................................... 4 Family Pet Connection & grooming ..............................67 Farmington Fair .....................................................................61 Farmington Farmers union .............................................. 61 Fayette Country Store ........................................................ 13 Fireside Inn & Suites Waterville ...................................... 42 Five Fields Farm & X-Country Skiing.............................. 12

Business

Page

Flagstaff Fuel .................................................................... 75 Flint Construction ........................................................... 83 Four Seasons Restaurant .............................................. 81 Framemakers .....................................................................41 Franklin County Chamber of Commerce ................ 61 Franklin Health Dermatology ......................................63 Franklin-Somerset Federal Credit union ................. 8 Fraternal Order of Eagles #1248 ............................... 57 Fryeburg Fair ..................................................................... 23 Fryeburg glass ................................................................... 9 Fryeburg Health Care Center ...................................... 10 Full Circle Artisan’s gallery & bead Emporium....... 45 g3 Firearms ........................................................................12 gallant Funeral Home, Inc. ......................................... 64 galloping goose Woodworking .................................11 george’s banana Stand ................................................. 68 gilber t Plumbing & Heating Inc. ............................... 28 goin’ Postal ........................................................................18 graf Mechanical ...............................................................68 greater bridgton Lakes Region Chamber ...............11 green Door Framing ...................................................... 82 group Adams Propane Services ................................ 58 grover Hinckley American Legion Post 14 .............43 Hadley’s ...............................................................................19 H.L. Plumbing & Heating .............................................. 66 Hairbuilder’s .......................................................................39 Hall Farms Maple Products ...........................................23 Hammond Lumber Company .................................... 44 Hanson Landworks .........................................................54 Hardys Motorsports ....................................................... 71 Harris Drug Store .............................................................54 Harris Real Estate ............................................................ 37 HealthReach Community Health Centers ............... 6 Heart & Hand Inc. .............................................................22 Hemphill, LLC ....................................................................42 Highland Lake Resort .....................................................25 Hight Chevrolet ................................................................69 Hillman’s bakery .............................................................. 66 Hodgdon Well Drilling, Inc. .............................................9 Houston-brooks Auctioneers .........................................3 Howie’s Welding & Fabrication, Inc. ...........................35 Hoyt Chiropractic Center .................................... ........ 13 Hungry Hollow Country Store .......................................6 Hydraulic Hose & Assembly ........................................... 4 I’ll Arrange That At The Cottage ..................................82 Imelda’s Fabric & Design ............................................... 62 Insulation Solutions Inc. ................................................42 J&J Haines Excavation, Inc. ...........................................74 J.L. brochu, Inc. ..................................................................75 J.R.’s Trading & Pawn ........................................................64 J.T. Reid’s gun Shop ...........................................................8 Jackman Auto Parts .........................................................53 Jackman Hardware & Sporting goods ........................7 Jackman Power Sports ...................................................52 Jake’s garage .....................................................................34 Jason Nadeau & Sons Excavation ...............................53 JCZ Yard Care & Tree Service ........................................28 Jean Castonguay Excavating .......................................35 Jean’s Moosehead Rentals ............................................55 Jimmy’s Shop ‘N Save .....................................................77 Jim’s Small Engine Service ........................................... 35 Johnny Castonguay Logging & Trucking ............... 34 Johnson Foundations ................................................... 56 Jordan Lumber Company ............................................76 JT’s Finest Kind Saw ........................................................71 Judy’s Variety ....................................................................20 K.S. Whitney Excavation ................................................23 Karl’s Auto Repair ............................................................18 Karma Salon and Day Spa ............................................45 Katie Q Convenience .....................................................70 KC’s Country Store ..........................................................83 Keith Hadley Inc. .............................................................19 Kelvin’s Auto Repair ...................................................... 74 Kevin Hawes general Contracting ...........................59 Kiesman Drywall Inc.......................................................24 KMD Auto Repair ............................................................72 Knopp Chiropractic .......................................................15 KR builders ....................................................................... 48 Kramers Inc. ......................................................................13 Krista’s Restaurant ..........................................................45 KSW Federal Credit union .......................................... 64 L&C Lobster Pound and Clams ................................. 46 L&W Construction ..........................................................26 La Fleur’s Restaurant .....................................................34 Lacroix Plumbing & Heating ......................................52 Lake Region Auto Supply ............................................11 Lakeside Antiques ..........................................................13 Lakewood Continuing Care Center ..........................41 Larsen’s Electric ...............................................................20 Larsen’s Jewelry ...............................................................65 Lavallee’s garage ............................................................79 Lawrence’s Lakeside Cabins & guide Service.........81 Leavitt Realty ....................................................................34 Lily’s Fine Flowers & Antiques .....................................45 Linkletter & Sons, Inc. .....................................................72 Logan Home builders ....................................................10 Loon Ridge of belgrade ............................................... 36 Lovell’s guilford Hardware ...........................................83 M. Thai Restaurant ..........................................................44

Business

Business

Page

MacCrillis Rousseau VFW Post 8835 .....................65 Maine guide Snowshoes & Furniture Co. ...........77 Maine Historical Society .............................................5 Maine-ly Foam .............................................................24 Maine Maple Products Inc. ......................................70 Maine Survey Consultants, Inc. ..............................12 Maine-ly Elder Care ....................................................40 Major’s Heating Services ..........................................14 Marshall’s Automotive Machine Inc. ....................46 Martin’s building and Remodeling .......................18 Martin’s Service & Sales ............................................50 Maurice Restaurant ....................................................30 Maynard’s In Maine.....................................................53 McAllister Accounting & Tax Services...................58 MEI Excavation .............................................................31 Memco Supply .............................................................58 Memere’s Antiques & Furniture .............................66 Merle Lloyd & Sons Earthwork Contractors........73 Metcalf’s Trading Post ...............................................22 Michael A. Wheeler builder .....................................73 Mid-Maine Equine & Canine Therapeutics.........36 Midway Country Lodging ........................................45 Mike Wainer Plumbing & Heating ........................36 Mill St. Cafe ...................................................................35 Mind, body & Soul ......................................................30 Ming Lee Chinese Restaurant ................................40 Mollyockett Motel & Swim Spa .............................32 Montello Heights Retirement Community........27 Moosehead Motorsports ........................................79 Moosehead Sled Repair & Rentals, LLC...............54 Moosehead Trail Home & Hearth .........................56 Morgan Construction & Logging ........................ 24 Morrell’s Hardware & Home Center .....................81 Morrison Motors Inc. ................................................19 Morrow’s garage, Auto body & Sales ................ 39 Motor Supply Co. .........................................................8 Mountain Mechanical Inc. .................................... 49 Mountain View Motel .............................................. 51 Mount blue Motel ........................................................3 Mt. blue Drug ..............................................................37 Nadeau’s Excavation ................................................ 53 Naples Packing Co., Inc. ..........................................19 Narrow gauge Depot .............................................. 48 Nightingale Carpentry .............................................63 Northeast gems .........................................................22 Northeast Laboratory Services ...............................7 Northwood builders .................................................. 5 Old Mill Stream Ice Cream Shoppe .....................13 Oquossoc Marine .......................................................51 Orr Excavation ............................................................36 Otis Federal Credit union .......................................58 Oxford Federal Credit union .................................34 Oxford Hills Taxi .........................................................16 P&A Mechanics ..........................................................29 Packard Appraisal, Inc. ............................................26 Paul Mushero & Sons ...............................................66 Penobscot Marine Museum ................................. 21 Perkins Management ..............................................41 Pete’s Hardware ........................................................ 50 Phil Carter’s garage ................................................ 72 Photos by Rowley .....................................................45 Pierce Hill Construction ..........................................78 Pigley’s Treasures ......................................................38 Plum Creek ..................................................................43 Polly’s Variety .............................................................14 Poor bob’s u-Store It ............................................... 22 Prime Financial Inc. ................................................. 41 Printing WareHouse, Inc. ........................................38 Quinn Hardware ........................................................68 R&b’s Home Source ..................................................52 R.A. Thomas Logging .............................................. 55 R.E. Lowell Lumber Inc. ...........................................30 R.F. Automotive Repair ....................................... ....68 Ralph Libby Chain Saws ..........................................28 Rangeley Electric .......................................................49 Rangeley Saddleback Inn ...................................... 51 Ray Ray’s Cafe and Sweet Treats ......................... 38 RDM Electric ................................................................61 Record building Supply, Inc. .................................14 Redington-Fairview general Hospital ...............46 Rick’s garage ...............................................................48 Rideout’s Seasonal Services ................................. 84 Riverdrivers Whitewater Rafting......................... 80 River Valley Chamber of Commerce....................57 River Valley grill .........................................................57 Riverbend Campground ........................................12 Riverside Kwik Stop ..................................................58 Riverside Realty ........................................................ 57 Rob Elliott Excavation & Trucking .......................49 Robert Riggs Realtor ...............................................34 Robert W. Libby & Sons, Inc. ...................................4 Rocky Mountain Terrain Park ................................33 Rockwood Snowmobile Rentals .........................54 Rodney Ellis Jr. Construction ................................36 Roland H. Tyler Logging Inc. .................................20 Ron’s Market .............................................................. 62 Rooster’s Roadhouse .............................................. 18 Rowell’s garage ........................................................ 56 RP Auto Repair ...........................................................75

Rufus Porter Museum ...................................10 Russell & Sons Towing ..................................17 Russell’s Lakeside Rentals ............................74 S.S. Milton ..........................................................31 S.W. builders Inc. .............................................38 S.W. Daye Tree Services ..................................9 Sackett & brake Survey, Inc. ....................... 67 Sandy River Farms ..........................................37 Scott Design .....................................................45 Scotty’s Lobster Pound & Fish Market..... 50 Scuba Diving Services & Retrieval ........... 35 Shamrock Stoneworks & Landscaping, Inc. .29

Shelly’s Hometown Market .........................38 SignWorks .........................................................37 Sironen’s Radiator Sales & Service ............67 Slattery’s Stables .............................................14 Small Engine Specialty ....................................4 Smedberg’s Crystal Spring Farm ...............16 Smile Again Dentures, Inc. ........................ 13 Snow’s Excavation, Inc. .................................11 Sojourner Cleanout Services & Scrap Metal 10

Solon Corner Market .....................................53 Solon Superette ..............................................52 Somerset Propeller ........................................65 Spillover Motel ................................................52 Stan’s French Fries ..........................................67 Stetson’s Auto Service ..................................15 Stevens Electric & Pump Service Inc.......... 6 Stevens Forest Products ..............................29 Steve’s Tune ‘N Tire .........................................59 Stratton Pizza .................................................. 76 Stratton Plaza Hotel & Lounge ..................76 Stress Free Moose Pub & Cafe ....................55 Strong Hardware & building Supply.........73 Swimming Pool Repair .................................35 Tall Tales Tavern ...............................................50 Taste Of Eden Vegan Cafe .......................... 16 Taylor’s Drug Store ........................................ 46 The Almost New boutique ..........................64 The black Frog ................................................ 54 The black Horse Tavern ................................24 The Christmas barn .......................................29 The Crawling Craftsman ..............................28 The Flatlanda Diner .......................................65 The Inkwell ...................................................... 45 The Irregular .....................................................51 The Lake Store .................................................17 The Looney Moose Cafe ...............................77 The Pickup Cafe .............................................. 47 The River View Resort ...................................19 The Smith Co. .................................................. 45 The Solon Hotel .............................................. 77 The Sterling Inn ...............................................52 The White Elephant Country Store........... 49 Tindall’s Country Store & Dam Diner.........48 Town & Lake Motel and Cottages .............50 Town Of Mexico ..............................................20 Town Taxi ...........................................................60 Traitor Lounge .................................................76 TR&H, Inc. Welding & Fabrication .............17 TRH & Sons Excavation .................................27 Triple D Redemption & Tanning Spa ........71 undercover Flea Market ...............................15 united Methodist Economic Ministry.......75 upper Kennebec Valley Chamber .............78 uptown boutique ...........................................45 Vicki Wolfertz Architect ................................82 Village Jewelers ...............................................44 Village Market ..................................................43 Vintage Maine Images ....................................5 W. Skidgell Excavation ..................................20 W.D. bickford Machinery ..............................43 Ward Cedar Log Homes .............................. 27 Warren’s Florist ................................................26 Water’s Edge gallery and Studio ...............22 West Paris general Store .............................19 Western Maine Flooring ..............................33 Western Maine Screen Doors Co. .............37 Western Maine Towing & Recovery .........28 Whitewater Farm Market .............................63 Whittemore Realty group ...........................34 Whynot Electric .............................................. 28 Wicked good Electric, LLC .......................... 22 Wilber Heating & Plumbing ........................74 Wiles body Shop ........................................... 17 Wilson & Son Logging ................................ 39 Wilson Excavating, Inc. .................................18 Windowman LLC .......................................... 60 Wind Swept Acres Arabians .......................36 Wings Hill Inn & Restaurant ........................60 Woodlawn Rehab & Nursing Center ....... 43 Wood-Mizer of Maine ...................................57 Woods Edge Custom built Furniture........40 Woody’s bar & grill ........................................ 54 Yonder Hill Campground .............................68 York’s Market ....................................................71


88

2013 Western Lakes and Mountains Region Western Lakes & Mountains Region

W˜lc°m˛ t˝ W˙tˆˇville’s Nˆwest Rest˙ur˙ nt

RAW BAR ENTREES Oysters on the half shell Bermuda Onion Crusted Little Neck Clams Yellow Fin Tuna Panko Crusted Lobster Cutlets APPETIZERS Caramelized Diver Sea Scallops Oysters Rockefeller Maine Crab Stuffed Haddock Maine Crab Cakes Chipotle Grilled Collossal Shrimp P.E.I. Mussles Maple Glazed Cedar Plank Salmon Pan Seared Yellow Fin Tuna Seafood Paella Rosemary Marinated Rack of Lamb Char~Grilled Prime NY Strip AMAZING FARE Spinach & Roasted Tomato Stuffed PLEASING ATMOSPHERE Portabellas

TRENDY AND BEAUTIFUL LOUNGE

All Items Listed On ° is Menu Are Fresh, Never Frozen, Locally Procured When Possible From Maine Farmers & Fishermen. Enjoy!

CORRECT SERVICE THINK GLOBALLY ACT LOCALLY DRESS CASUALLY

TUESDAY ~ SATURDAY 4PM~1AM 18 SILVER STREET • WATERVILLE • 861-4454

Baseball team of the Coburn Classical Institute of Waterville in 1924. Item #40422 from the collections of The Maine Historical Society and www.VintageMaineImages.com


Western Lakes & Mountains 2013