Page 1

NOW THAT’S

AMAZING

A LOOK AT

SPRING’S

TOP WINNERS HOW MAXIMUM

IMPACT CAN BE YOURS

PLAN & DESIGN WITH

YOUR READERS

IN MIND


ALL PHOTOS BY CRIMSON STAFF, duPONT MANUAL HS, LOUISVILLE, KY

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Ann Akers, MJE

LAYOUT EDITOR

Nichole Mango Smith

DESIGNERS

Erin Doran, Katherine Morgan and Stacey Reed

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Dan Austin, yearbook adviser Casa Roble HS, Orangevale, CA

To those who know him, there are few surprises when it comes to the experiences and successes of Julian Wright.

“I was a political junkie. I read and watched everything I could about the presidential race in 2008. Before it was over, I realized I was more interested in the storytelling and analysis than I was in

While not many 11-year-olds are making high school plans, Julian had already set his sights set on duPont Manual, Louisville’s top public high school which is currently ranked #50 nationwide by Newsweek. By 13, the Atlanta native — who had moved to Louisville as a child — had come to the realization that he wanted to be a journalist, which worked out perfectly since Manual had a renowned media arts magnet. As a freshman, Julian took intro courses in the magnet and impressed advisers Liz Palmer and Jamie Miller with his interest and intensity. In fact, he remembers specifically that it was during his second major trip with the academy group that he was approached about joining yearbook the following year, a privilege usually reserved solely for upperclassmen. His CMA (the magnet is now called Journalism + Communication) career was impressive. He did stints on yearbook, online and broadcast staffs as well as an internship at a local TV station. He attended summer workshops and retreats and travelled to eight national student journalism conventions.

the information…” He rose to leadership roles and expanded his opportunities by continuing a practice that had produced results he liked. “I am all about emailing people and asking for advice or maybe the chance to talk,” he explained. “I might get a thousand people who say no. Some people don’t respond at all. But when they do, what unfolds can be amazing.” Like meeting Cyndi Lauper, interviewing the governor and spending time with Anderson Cooper — including a lengthy chat, a personal studio tour and an invitation to a 360 taping session while he was in NYC for the CSPA convention as a junior. Or being fully credentialed at political events galore, where media students from duPont observed, conducted interviews, shot video and photographed debates, rallies and the inauguration. (See more about duPont Manual’s election coverage on pages 22-23.) While journalism is Julian’s passion — he has enrolled at Columbia University and has already arranged for a first-year internship with The Daily Beast — his success extends to other aspects of life as well. As senior class president last year, he rallied Manual’s student body to raise funds for and build a Habitat for Humanity House. Because he has always been about setting goals and making things happen, even when those who haven’t seen him in action before might be doubtful, Julian believes in making the most of opportunities that come his way.

Paul Ender, Herff Jones Special Consultant Charla Harris, CJE, yearbook adviser Pleasant Grove HS, Texarkana, TX Erinn Harris, CJE, yearbook adviser Thomas Jefferson HS for Science and Technology, Alexandria, VA Jed Palmer, yearbook adviser Sierra MS, Parker, CO Teri Scott, yearbook adviser Woodside Priory, Woodside, CA Leslie Shipp, MJE, yearbook adviser Johnston (IA) HS Beth Ward, yearbook adviser Mauldin (SC) HS Julian Wright, Class of 2013 duPont Manual HS, Louisville, KY

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Matt Finchum Mauldin (SC) HS

Liz Palmer, CJE, yearbook adviser duPont Manual HS, Louisville, KY Journalism + Communication students, duPont Manual HS, Louisville, KY

HJ LOCATIONS

Gettysburg, PENNSYLVANIA gettysburg@herffjones.com Kansas City, KANSAS kansascity@herffjones.com Logan, UTAH logan@herffjones.com Montgomery, ALABAMA montgomery@herffjones.com Winnipeg, CANADA winnipeg@herffjones.com Herff Jones Yearbook Discoveries Volume Eighteen Issue One was produced electronically using Adobe® InDesign CS6, Adobe Illustrator® CS6 and Adobe Photoshop® CS6. This magazine was created on a Mac Pro, 2.66 GHz with 6 GB of RAM and printed by Herff Jones, Inc., at its Logan, UT printing facility. The cover was printed on White Vibracolor Endsheet stock using four-color process. The magazine itself was printed on 80# Premier stock using four-color process inks. The fonts used in this issue were AHJ News Gothic, AHJ Letter Gothic EB and AHJ University Oldstyle. Herff Jones and the Herff Jones logo are registered trademarks of Herff Jones, Inc. Apple and Macintosh are registered trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc. Adobe and Photoshop are registered trademarks of Adobe Systems, Inc.


WINNERS GALORE

We’re delighted that so many of your 2012 books were recognized for journalistic excellence in last spring’s Crown and Pacemaker competitions.

WHAT’S INSIDE

DISCOVER MORE DOWNLOAD THE FREE DIGIMARC DISCOVER MOBILE APP FOR YOUR SMARTPHONE AND ENJOY EXTRA CONTENT WHEREVER YOU SEE THIS ICON. APP AVAILABLE FOR IPHONE & ANDROID DEVICES.

06 ORGANIZING YOUR WAY TO SUCCESS

Creating systems for staffers, the staff room and deadlines will allow the students to succeed and provide you peace of mind.

08 READER SERVICE FROM THE START 18 NEW AND DIFFERENT EVERY YEAR 10 YET ANOTHER WAY TO COVER THE YEAR 20 EVERYBODY HAS A STORY Your contents listing is one of the first places to show the readers you made lots of decisions with them in mind.

Part of the fun — and a major responsibility of the staff — is figuring out how to make each volume different than its predecessors.

If you’re looking for a way to change things up, maybe umbrella coverage is a option — throughout the book or within a section.

Including more students in the book means you might sell more yearbooks; here’s a plan to increase the scope of the students you cover.

12 TRULY DOMINANT PHOTOS

Size is the obvious way to make a photo dominant, but these guidelines can help provide even greater impact.

14 FROM TEACHER TO ADVISER

More than just a change in scheduling, becoming an adviser is really a change in mindset which offers new opportunities.

16 THERE IS A BEST WAY TO TELL A STORY Rather than make an arbitrary decision about copy formats, consider the topic itself and the story’s function on a spread.

COVER STORY

AMAZING OPPORTUNITIES

In addition to the communications skills and myriad related lessons that publications students learn, being on staff can present many other interesting possibilities.

24 YBK, ETC.

The international Premier Print Awards competition recognizes great work by printers worldwide, including some that might look familiar.


Screams in the newsroom. Cheers at convention ceremonies. Hardware on the walls. It’s a wrap-up of 2012’s

YOUR SMILES MAKE US SMILE!

BOOKS

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PACEMAKER WINNERS

02

YEARBOOKDISCOVERIES.COM VOLUME EIGHTEEN ISSUE ONE

PACEMAKER FINALISTS


WINNERS & FINALISTS From left to right: The Prowl, Powell MS, Littleton, CO Nugget, Cupertino HS, Cupertino, CA Quiver, Lake Central HS, St. John, IN

PACEMAKER WINNERS HERFF JONES BOOKS COMPRISE

48%

OF ALL PACEMAKER WINNERS.

HERFF JONES BOOKS COMPRISE

53%

OF ALL CROWN & PACEMAKER FINALISTS.

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VOLUME SEVENTEEN ISSUE TWO YEARBOOKDISCOVERIES.COM

03


WHEN YEARBOOKS WERE FORMULAIC AND COOKIE CUTTER, THERE WAS A SINGULAR CORRECT WAY TO PROVIDE A BOOK’S CONTENTS LISTING. EVEN THEN, MY FIRST ADVICE HELD TRUE. NO NEED TO LABEL THE LISTING. NOT CONTENTS AND CERTAINLY NOT TABLE OF CONTENTS. WHEN YOU LIST SECTIONS AND PAGE NUMBERS, THAT’S OBVIOUS. Two other guidelines, suggested then and still true, are worth a mention. There’s no excuse for an inaccurate listing. Double and triple check page numbers to ensure that the page listed corresponds to the lefthand page of that divider. And, if you are renaming your sections to advance your concept, make sure that the section’s traditional name (sports, student life, academics) runs alongside the new section title. As more staffs switch up their content and cover the year in different ways, the need for more detail in that preliminary listing is highlighted. If a book contains fewer (or more!) sections, it might be that each section includes content traditionally found in several sections (perhaps sports and clubs are grouped together, in which case those categories should be listed with the new section name). Or, perhaps, the staff will arbitrarily decide where each topic will be covered. If that’s the case, the listing needs to show where each topic is covered. Any time you rearrange content, you need to make it easy for the reader who is specifically looking for drama coverage or golf or Math Club to locate it. This should occur both in the contents listing at the front of the book and in the index where you might create a separate topical roster in addition to the all-inclusive alphabetical listing. Chronological coverage presents different opportunities for dividers, depending on whether a staff chooses to break contents into monthly or seasonal blocks. Either way, that reader who is seeking specific content should find it both in the contents listing and the index. After all, the most important decisions a yearbook staff makes are all about making the book easy for the readers to use, and the hard work of the reporters, designers and photographers easy to locate!

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YEARBOOKDISCOVERIES.COM VOLUME EIGHTEEN ISSUE ONE

by Paul Ender

Conspiracy, Canyon Crest Academy, San Diego, CA Traditional sections and page numbers provide all needed information. Reflector, Thomas Dale HS, Chester, VA When sections are renamed to further the theme — as they were here in “Choices” — the names of traditional sections remain important to aid readers. Salinian, Saline (MI) HS While only three sections make up this volume, finding content is easy. Wingspan, James Enochs HS, Modesto, CA Despite the book’s chronological flow, the contents are displayed in traditional section groupings. Summit, Smoky Hill HS, Aurora, CO A full bleed of the cover photo is layered with contents listings, displayed both chronologically and broken down to include every spread/topic.


One of the first services you provide for your readers comes as early as the endsheets. Make the

EASY TO FIND and your coverage logic easy to follow.


An alternative to traditional sections and chronological coverage, allows staffs to use

UMBRELLA COVERAGE

to link seemingly unrelated coverage together in new and interesting ways.

by Erinn Harris

WHEN JUST ONE IDEA IS USED TO BRAINSTORM IDEAS FOR COVERAGE OF MULTIPLE TOPICS ON A SINGLE SPREAD, THE PREDICTABILITY THAT PLAGUES SOME YEARBOOKS DISAPPEARS. UMBRELLA COVERAGE MAY SEEM DAUNTING, BUT GREAT COVERAGE ALWAYS MEANS DOING THE WORK. CONSIDER THESE TIPS, AND YOU’LL SEE THAT THIS IDEA CAN MAKE YEARBOOK COVERAGE MORE EXCITING (FOR BOTH STAFFERS AND READERS!) THAN EVER BEFORE. START WITH A CONCEPT Don’t think about the traditional sections (student life, sports, academics, etc.), think about verbal aspects of your concept. Think word play.

DO AS MUCH PRE-PLANNING AS IS HUMANLY POSSIBLE Once you’ve decided on spread topics, brainstorm a list of potential stories. Start with the “must-haves,” and then add to the living document as you hear of great new stories.

WORK TO ENSURE EQUITABLE COVERAGE Hang posters for each of the traditional sections. List each traditional spread topic as many times as you would normally cover it, counting the main story, supporting layers and even the dominant photo cluster as one each. Every time you do a story on or include a photo of summer or the fall play, mark it off the list. This way you don’t OVER cover any one thing... and you don’t forget anything, either.

KEEP DEADLINES IN MIND WHEN PLANNING It’s a great idea to have a “Games” spread, but if you want to cover homecoming in October and the Gatsby board

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YEARBOOKDISCOVERIES.COM VOLUME EIGHTEEN ISSUE ONE

game project in March, that spread needs a later deadline. Create a list of “evergreen” stories (that are not time-based) for each spread just in case you can’t wait until March to turn it in. If you’re not ready to jump head-first into umbrella coverage, start small. Organize academics by umbrella topics, covering multiple classes per spread. Opportunities for coverage are so exciting, you’ll soon be ready to make the leap into full umbrella coverage.


START WITH A CONCEPT Consider the theme, “There’s No Such Thing as a Comfort Zone.” Once it was established, the staff asked themselves these questions: Even if your content is in traditional sections, it is important to give your readers all the tools they need to find the coverage that matters to them. When you change things up, this consideration becomes even more crucial. Don’t consider this repeated information redundant; it’s key to helping your readers appreciate the work you have

1 What happens when you don’t live life with a comfort zone? 2 What types of people live without a comfort zone? (This question resulted in a list of adjectives − motivated, dynamic, outspoken, innovative, creative, quirky, fearless, resilient, disruptive − and these became our nine sections.) 3 If our sections’ adjectives describe the characteristics of people who live without a comfort zone, what should our spread topics cover? (This question resulted in spread topics that covered specific types of people that live without a comfort zone — leaders, comedians, activists, interns, artists, friends, heroes, fighters, etc…)

done.

ON THE ENDSHEETS Print a traditional table of contents on your endsheets, as well as a table of contents that lists your umbrella sections. No matter what your dividers say, a reader should still be able to locate the fall play, the faculty section and coverage of any

Techniques, Thomas Jefferson HS for Science & Technology, Alexandria, VA

Humanities 178

CLUBS Honor Societies 018 Building a Better Community 020 Student Government 036 UNICEF 044 Key Club 046 Namaste 048 Model United Nations 158

PEOPLE Seniors 182 Juniors 202 Sophomores 214 Freshmen 226 Faculty 238

MOTIVATED 010 DYNAMIC 026 OUTSPOKEN 056 INNOVATIVE 088 CREATIVE 108 QUIRKY 128 FEARLESS 148 RESILIENT 166 REFERENCE 182 INDEX 286

ENDSHEET

groups to which they belong.

ON THE DIVIDERS Create another opportunity for helping readers find the coverage they seek by including a mini-table of contents on each

DIVIDER

division page.

IN THE INDEX

In the “Dynamic” section, the staff equated leadership and energy, linking swimming, a holiday concert, energy drinks, powerlifting and an engineering course. The “Creative” section’s spread on foodies covered invitations to Sadies, activities of four different clubs, Restaurant Week and a Geosystems activity where pudding simulated the magma crust. Later in the “Dynamic” section, a spread centered on support included coverage of JV cheer, freshman elections and three academic courses.

The index should always list more than student names. Consider going one step further than including all teams, spread topics, clubs, events and advertisers in the main alphabetical listing by adding a separate index that shows all academics coverage, and another each for clubs, sports and events. INDEX

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YEARBOOKDISCOVERIES.COM VOLUME EIGHTEEN ISSUE ONE


YOUR STAFF HAS CREATED A GREAT LAYOUT AND YOUR PHOTOGRAPHERS HAVE CAPTURED SEVERAL STRONG IMAGES. HOW DO YOU MARRY THE TWO IN A WAY TO CREATE YOUR STRONGEST VISUAL PRESENTATION? BY PAYING ATTENTION TO DOMINANCE, DIRECTION AND STORYTELLING, YOU WILL BE ABLE TO CAPTURE YOUR READERS’ ATTENTION, DRAW THEIR EYES INTO THE PAGE AND MOVE THE READER THROUGH THE LAYOUT. The most important element to consider is finding the dominant image from your set of photos. Often, but not always your best photo, the largest photo must certainly be one of your strongest. Dominance within the set of photos is determined by head size and action. Begin by viewing your photo set as a group. Which photo draws your attention? Will the faces be larger in the dominant than in your secondary photos? Is there a bright color or powerful action within one photo? Viewers will naturally look to faces and bright colors first. Make sure your dominant photo has those elements.

A strong photo should have a directional element that leads the viewer in and out. This could be a leading line, the sight line created by the subjects’ eyes or the flow of the action in the shot. This should be easy to see. If the photo is stagnant, it shouldn’t be used as a dominant (and possibly not at all). Once you have determined the photo’s direction, you should plan to use that flow to your advantage. Your dominant photo should flow into the page or toward your primary headline/copy block. You will need to select a photo that leads your reader in the correct direction. You do not want a dominant photo that guides your reader immediately off the page. Having flexibility in your layout should allow you to adjust photo placements to fit your dominant photo. Your last consideration should be the storytelling potential of your photo. Your primary headline and copy block should have a direct tie to your dominant photo. The dominant photo should mirror the story angle. If your dominant photo doesn’t assist your copy angle, one of the two should be reconsidered. The same process should be used within photo packages in your secondary and tertiary coverage. If your staff can remember these three considerations, you will be able to create even stronger layouts that maximize the impact of your photographers’ hard work.

Aerie, Brentw ood

School, Los An geles, CA

Invictus, Ward Melville HS, East Setauket, NY

Demonstrating the importance of not just the size of the dominant image, but also the size of the subjects in the shot, the importance of action and/ or emotion and the role of eye flow, these examples provide evidence that you can increase the impact of your dominant images exponentially by making informed choices.

GA emy, Monroe, ge Walton Acad or Ge è, m su Rè

VOLUME EIGHTEEN ISSUE ONE YEARBOOKDISCOVERIES.COM

13


SURVIVAL TIPS FOR

While I had some experience and lots of related interests, I also know I am not the best at teaching and coaching writing skills. Or proofing and grammar. So when I finally inherited the yearbook program and the next year’s editors, I felt a little nervous. I realized I needed to help make sure that the students met the school’s expectations. That first year, it was all about meeting deadlines and making a book the staff was proud of. I went to camp with my editors and we learned a lot together. Over and over I called my rep; I had lists of questions to ask. I saw the yearbook as a community document, our history over one school year. I wanted the students to produce amazing photos and incredible, compelling stories.

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YEARBOOKDISCOVERIES.COM VOLUME EIGHTEEN ISSUE ONE

by Teri Scott

I think of myself as a coach. Having taught art for 15 years, I saw my AP Studio Art class as my individual sport and Yearbook as my first-ever team. My goal was to coach the best out of each student, allowing their talents to shine. I think in terms of building a program over a period of a few years, asking how can we improve on what was done the year before. Begin by creating three goals that take precedence each year. In year one, ours were making all deadlines, being financially successful and delivering a book that made the yearbook team proud. Make it tough on the kids to not do the work. Grades may or may not be an incentive, but a strong team makes deadline completion more likely. And food often plays a role in getting things done on time.


Lots to learn. Lots of questions. But also lots of fun. HONESTLY, I HAD BEEN WANTING TO DO YEARBOOK FOR YEARS. I WOULD ALWAYS ASK THE FORMER ADVISER ABOUT THE STAFF AND THEIR WORK. IN COLLEGE (AND AFTER!), I WORKED ON NEWSPAPERS. I LOVE INFORMATION AND I LOVE GOOD DESIGN.

Remember, the students are the leaders. It is their book. You can help them figure out how they can work with the allotted time and budget to create a volume that is different and original but relates to the school. Learn who you can trust and what they can handle. Get them inspired and passionate about yearbook.

Plan ahead and keep to the schedule. It’s not a bad idea to keep your evenings free the week before a deadline, just in case. Your students need to know you’re serious about making deadlines. If they miss the first one and there are no repercussions, there’s no reason to even think about making the deadlines that follow. And when in doubt, order pizza.

Go to workshops and conventions. Learn as much as you can about yearbook. Magic happens when your students meet others who share their interests and challenges. Soon, you’ll learn to love it. It has been great for me to feel a new passion for teaching; yearbook has provided a jump in my step, a new perspective on the school. And I have gained a new understanding of what a school is for and what kids get out of school.

VOLUME EIGHTEEN ISSUE ONE YEARBOOKDISCOVERIES.COM

015 15


I AM A LIT NERD WHO STUMBLED INTO JOURNALISM, AND I HAVE ALWAYS LOVED LONG-FORM STORIES. I was reluctant to jump on board nearly two decades ago when USA Today and then later design guru Tim Harrower insisted that journalists needed new ways to help people absorb information. I believed we were helping our yearbook students be more journalistic when we taught text-heavy layout dominated by a meaty quote-transition story. Truth is, we were doing those staffers a great disservice by suggesting a predictable formula rather than teaching them to think conceptually. I believe the very best yearbook staffs today understand they must marry story concepts to the message established by the theme. A strong theme for a book functions just like a strong thesis for a paper. It is a claim that every single verbal package in the book must support. And the best books never stray off message. Several years ago I had a very talented section editor who brought in a rough draft for a sports layout for a book themed “Our Better is Better Than Your Better.” His design exploded visually, dominated by a beautiful cut-out-background photo that framed the primary story, but when we asked what the concept for the story was, he said he had no idea; he had simply pasted place-holder copy from the previous year. He was, however, very proud of his secondary mod on the top ten moments from the year — a platitude only loosely connected to theme, one that required almost

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YEARBOOKDISCOVERIES.COM VOLUME EIGHTEEN ISSUE ONE

no conceptual thinking. My message to him was simple, and in fact, is the message of this entire article: find a concept that gets on message, and then we can begin. The next day he brought in a story idea that gathered several small copy bites packaged together to create a primary story that bragged about specific season highlights. The package was framed by a deck that said, “We Know It’s not Polite to Brag, But…” We started calling them brag bites, and knew we had our concept that married to the message. He had added two other mods: “It’s Good to be Casa,” reporting details about our sports program like the new weight room and the newly finished pool; and “Coach Knows Best,” covering very specific training techniques suited to a particular sport. These mods conceptually layered the coverage beyond a clever catch phrase. And they all stayed on message. This is not to say that all copy must be alternative; long form is not dead. But it’s no longer enough to include boring quote/transition stories that are on topic, but not on message. A story about homecoming on the homecoming spread or a story about football on the football spread might be on topic, but not necessarily on message. Yearbook advisers need to remember that these are not your grandfather’s yearbooks. Message matters here. Teach your students to get on message and you will be teaching 21st century journalism. Rampages, Casa Roble HS, Orangevale, CA Casa’s 2013 staff incorporated several types of long-form stories with the theme: 1589 Moments. One School. The “moments” idea opened the door for long-form stories they called “Ten Minute Moments” — super detailed shownot-tell stories that captured specific human experiences written in present tense. Each piece was time-stamped with transitions through the story, such as “three minutes later” or “as the clock passed 7.”


The long-form, interrupter features broke the cadence of the traditional content pages where an array of alternative formats and concept-building layers of supporting coverage advanced the message of the unifier. The “one” idea opened the door to profile students the staff called “One of a Kind” that allowed the reporter to use first person and be included in the story telling. Well done long form is still valid and beautiful — as long as it is on message.

While trends in copy have suggested change through the years, best practices today clarify a powerful intention. Give your unifier strength by requiring that

ALL STORY CONCEPTS by Dan Austin

with the main theme. VOLUME EIGHTEEN ISSUE ONE YEARBOOKDISCOVERIES.COM

17


You rarely read the same book twice, so why create the same yearbook year after year? Your design, ladder and coverage should be fresh and unique. If you’ve been stuck in a design or coverage rut, it may be

TIME TO

It’s true, there are some parts of a yearbook that are essential. No matter what the plan, it’s important that you create a complete and accurate history of the year. Regardless of what you decide to switch up, your staff will definitely want to ensure the use of portraits/mugs and the inclusion of solid reference aids like scoreboards, folios and a complete index.

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YEARBOOKDISCOVERIES.COM VOLUME EIGHTEEN ISSUE ONE

by Charla Harris

There’s no better solution than a plan that provides coverage of all aspects of life at your school. The best books allow the content to drive design. That means there’s a plan for the book’s look, but it varies from spread to spread — and that the readers can tell how the designers intend for them to consume the information on each spread. The copy and captions that tell the story of the year separate the yearbook from other accounts of the year.


LET YOUR CONCEPT DRIVE YOUR COVERAGE AND DESIGN EVERY YEAR.

Build all aspects of your book around the concept. Develop your book’s personality and let it “wiggle” into every part of the book. Both photo and verbal coverage, as well as graphics, colors and font choices, can make a difference. BE CREATIVE WITH YOUR LADDER.

ve HS, Pleasant Gro The Hawk,

There’s no rule that you have to organize by traditional sections. Think about what makes sense to the reader and have some fun. In 2013, we did 13 chapters with topical coverage like “You Must Be Imagining Things” for creative activities like art and theater and “She’s a Lady . . . Hawk” for a never-done-before section on all things female. In 2010, we had sections based on ten words that described the year and our students. RESEARCH DESIGN TRENDS BEFORE YOU EVER START ON A SPREAD.

Spend some time on Zinio (magazine app) or at the bookstore to see what’s current and how you can adapt it to your book. PAY ATTENTION TO THE DETAILS.

, 34, 33 | Volumes 35 Texarkana, TX

Change the way you handle bylines, folios and caption starters. Look for a new headline font every year to set your book apart. TWEAK YOUR COVERAGE.

There are some things you have to cover; if you have to cover it, look for different photo perspectives and avoid stereotypical photos. Use secondary packaging to cover small, background stories that add variety. Spend time interviewing to find unique stories and look for interesting angles. Put a twist on regular features, taking an untraditional approach to copy. Last year we used some round-table discussions and quote packages to add variety. ALLOW FOR SOME PAGES TO COVER ORIGINAL STORIES.

Find something you’ve never included in your book before instead of sticking to the same spread topics year after year. There’s no rule that you have to include a fashion page or lunch. One school last year covered the “zombie apocalypse” and another had a flow chart about the differences between girls and guys. AND FINALLY, ADD SOMETHING SPECIAL.

It doesn’t have to be expensive. One year we included a strip of mustache and heart stickers (printed on our classroom printer) in every book for something fun. Last year we printed cards (similar to those that fall out of magazines). One had a story and photos (submitted by students) from the repeating date 12/12/2012. Another was a postcard that students could actually send. The best books deliver new content in different ways each year.

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Dragon, Johnston (IA) HS Profiles from this exercise appeared on all 28 spreads of the book’s portrait section, telling the stories of 56 students in all grade levels/ faculty members and revealing a wide array of interests and achievements.

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Every person has the potential to become an interesting profile if staffers believe they do.

by Leslie Shipp

IMPROVES INTEREST STEVE HARTMAN HAD IT RIGHT. A DART CAN LEAD TO A GOOD PROFILE. THROWING A DART AT A MAP AND RANDOMLY SELECTING SUBJECTS FROM THE LOCAL TELEPHONE BOOK DETERMINED THE PEOPLE HARTMAN PROFILED FOR HIS CBS NEWS SERIES THAT RAN FOR SEVEN YEARS. Whoever answered the phone and agreed became Hartman’s subject. No exceptions. Even if a four-year-old answered. Even when one woman answered most of his questions with, “No comment.” The name of Hartman’s series, Everyone Has a Story, pegs a worthwhile philosophy for yearbook staffs. Instead of using a dart to select subjects, use a random number selector site on the internet. A random system alleviates questions like “Why was she selected to be highlighted in the yearbook?” It requires staff members to dig for a good angle. Staffers tend to skip over the process of finding an angle and go directly to writing. They interview and jot down quotes, and then often write a story that lacks focus. Finding an angle requires talking and hanging out with the person. Follow the person to tennis practice. Talk in a place the person feels comfortable. Both help establish an atmosphere in which an angle might be spotted.

The subject’s friends and family may offer angles. The inner circle is helpful when the subject says — and about half of them do — “I’m boring.” Sometimes staffers do not recognize a good angle. They might take piles of notes during the angle-finding expedition and read them back to the editors stumped about what to write. Then, in an aside, they’ll say, “It was so sad talking to her because she had to put her dog to sleep yesterday.” Yearbook rooms should be equipped with bells and lights so the adviser can push a button when a beautiful angle suddenly appears. Finding an interesting angle eliminates writers’ block because then the story has direction. Good angles lead to staffers having quality conversations (some call this interviewing) with subjects because it is fun to talk with someone who tells a good story. Writing a profile that students will read becomes less daunting when equipped with information from several conversations. The problem then becomes what to cut!

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WE’RE FROM OUR

THAT WAS THE PHRASE, MOST OFTEN RECIPROCATED BY RAISED EYEBROWS AND OPEN MOUTHS, THAT WE GAVE JOURNALISTS ALL ACROSS THE COUNTRY. THEY WEREN’T STUDENT JOURNALISTS LIKE US, THEY WERE GRAY-HAIRED, AUTOGRAPH-WORTHY, PETER JENNINGS-MENTORED JOURNALISTS. THEY’D SEEN WARS, FAMINE AND EVERY ELECTION SINCE 1988, AND IN THAT MOMENT, THEY WERE CAMERA-TO-CAMERA WITH US. It all started as a ridiculous idea. I had signed up for the White House Press email list and every day hundreds of emails would flood my inbox detailing the President’s schedule and providing media credential opportunities. One October morning, I read an email which included the application for media credentials for the first presidential debate of 2012 in Denver, CO.

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Half-jokingly, I ran to my adviser and asked if we could cover it. I recognized the familiar expressions. First, it was the “it might be possible” face. Next came the “let me look into this” face and, ultimately, it was the “I definitely want this to happen” face. So, off we went to Denver. I took the same contacts I’d hoarded for so long waiting for a

YEARBOOKDISCOVERIES.COM VOLUME EIGHTEEN ISSUE ONE

by Julian Wright

duPONT MANUAL MEDIA PHOTOS BY YAZMIN MARTINEZ, TARA STEIDEN, ALLISON TRAYLOR AND LIZ PALMER

There were lots of glances our way, and many questioning looks. But our answers were consistent:


valid opportunity and finally got to use them. We got credentialed to cover the landing of Air Force One at Buckley Air Force Base and an Obama rally following the debate. That’s how it started. From the first debate to the Obama victory night rally and the 2013 inauguration to the vice presidential debate, our election coverage was an ambitious attempt to defy the natural laws of student journalism and leap onto the same playing field as veteran journos. Through the power of persistence, emails, phone calls and passion we were able to have our publications’

names on a paper that designated a spot on the riser alongside CNN, Fox News, AP and NPR. We saw the President more times than we could’ve imagine. We built the resume of a college graduate. We went to Denver, Danville, Chicago, Cincinnati and Washington, D.C. We captured history. The lesson we learned is simple. Nothing is impossible. As journalists, our obligation is to seek and find and make a way. That’s what we did. As naive and inexperienced as we may have seemed, we were still there. And any time we were asked, we were more than happy to say,

Rally in Cincinnati Julian Wright broadcasts live from the press stand at an Obama rally at Fifth/Third Arena on the Sunday before Election Day. Due to its status as a known battleground state, both candidates made last-minute stops in Ohio. The Governor The duPont Manual media team also had a chance to interview Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear when they were at the Centre College vicepresidential debates in October. Cameras Everywhere Almost everyone who attended the inauguration had a camera in hand and was able to shoot and share photos and videos, thanks to their phones. Never Too Young Even the Manual advisers’ son, 8-year-old Kieran, took photos at the rally in Chicago’s Grant Park after the election was called and at the inauguration. Official Entrance The staff made arrangements to be on site for the landing of Air Force One at Buckley Air Force Base before the Denver presidential debate. From Every Angle In addition to both still photography and videography, the staffers conducted an array of interviews so they could live tweet as well as producing stories in print, on air and online.

Crimson, duPont Manual HS, Louisville, KY In addition to localizing election coverage by including lots of student opinions and experiences, the staff hit the campaign trail alongside the professional media. All election images in the yearbook were shot on location.

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ETC. Long after the yearbooks arrive, staffs everywhere can be proud of what they accomplished together.

ANOTHER MEASURE OF

WE OPENED THIS ISSUE WITH A RECAP OF ALL THE AWARDS SCHOOLS WON LAST SPRING WHEN THE NATIONAL PRESS ASSOCIATIONS RECOGNIZED TOP 2012 YEARBOOKS. WE’RE PROUD TO PARTNER WITH STAFFS THAT STRIVE FOR EXCELLENCE AND SUCCEED IN THESE COMPETITIONS. But those awards are just one of many ways to be successful in the world of yearbook. Delighting your student readers and delivering an on-time book that makes the school community proud should be every staff’s goal. We’ve covered lots of ways to make sure the book appropriately represents the entire school and the whole year. And many schools have local traditions that set their volumes apart in the eyes of their buyers.

AWARD OF RECOGNITION: Bugle, Virginia Tech; Blacksburg, VA CERTIFICATES OF MERIT: Titanium, Antelope (CA) HS Crimson, duPont Manual HS, Louisville, KY Cavalier, George Washington HS, Danville, VA Wingspan, James Enochs HS, Modesto, CA La Pantera, Palos Verdes Peninsula HS, Rolling Hills Estates, CA 

We’re here to help you and your staff create the book you want, no matter what your goals/needs are. We work with schools serving students of all ages and we deliver top quality yearbooks to grammar school campuses and universities alike. Herff Jones uses environmentally friendly processes to produce books that beautifully showcase the events and memories of the year. Our industry-leading color correction program, Color Plus, makes your photos shine. We are delighted to share the news that a number of Herff Jones yearbooks recently received another kind recognition; the Premier Print Awards annually honor printers worldwide for their work. Volume 18 of Ideas That Fly, the HJ showcase of creativity and excellence, won a Best in Category “Benny” and six 2012 yearbooks earned honors as well.

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YEARBOOKDISCOVERIES.COM VOLUME EIGHTEEN ISSUE ONE


DON’T FORGET TO FOLLOW US! We invite you to follow HERFF JONES YEARBOOKS on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Instagram as all challenges will be delivered via these channels.You must follow us in order to be eligible to be considered for the monthly and grand prizes.

USE THE HASHTAG! To be considered eligible, your submission must use hashtag #HJTOGETHER.

GAME ON!

FOLLOW US. ENGAGE. WIN BIG. SEPT 2 - DEC 6

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JAN 27 - MAY 2

Participate in Herff Jones Yearbooks’ Together We Can social media challenge and you could win monthly prizes of $25 and a grand prize of $250. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Instagram where we will present you with weekly challenges. Post your submissions using #HJTOGETHER and be entered for a chance to win! The more you engage, the better your chances.

For details and rules, visit http://bit.ly/twcchallenge

Be sure to check out the challenge on the back of the outer cover of this issue. During the week of Nov. 18-22, Herff Jones will be challenging you to use the sign in your post. Post as often as you like using #HJTogether. The more unique entries you submit, the more chances you will have to win. Good luck!


BE A PART OF SOMETHING BIGGER.

TELL MORE STORIES. Stitch moves as fast as life at your school does. It gives everyone on campus a new way to connect as they access, share and preserve the very best of their common school experiences. Imagine the power of the student body coming together to tell the story of the year, from their many, varied perspectives — and the ability to archive their digital memories forever. A safe, online community exclusive to your school is the perfect digital complement to the printed yearbook.

IT'S FREE. IT'S FUN. IT'S FROM HERFF JONES. Learn more at HJStitch.com

DISCOVERIES VOL18 ISS01  

Welcome to the world of Yearbook Discoveries, where the latest yearbook information is at your fingertips. Yearbook information galore! The...

DISCOVERIES VOL18 ISS01  

Welcome to the world of Yearbook Discoveries, where the latest yearbook information is at your fingertips. Yearbook information galore! The...