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CONCORD Welcome Back

SUMMER 2020

CONCORD REOPENS

FOLLOWING IN THE

Footsteps of Thoreau

PLUS!

LESSONS OF HISTORY:

CONCORD & THE 1918 INFLUENZA PANDEMIC


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FOUNDERS

A Summer to Remember

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How do you put together a magazine about a town’s revolutionary and literary history while experiencing a moment in living-history that none of us will ever forget? How do you convey the modern-day resilience of a community dealing with an international pandemic; the innovation, inspiration, and undeniable sense of fortitude that makes Concord what it is? As we put this issue together, we watched our local and national news, studying how our communities responded to the pandemic – and helping where we could. What used to be so simple – a trip to the grocery store, meeting friends, or spending time with our extended families – became risky behaviors, almost overnight. And yet, people were there for each other - sewing masks, bringing food and supplies to those who could not leave their homes, providing financial and moral support for struggling small businesses, fundraising, and sometimes simply checking in on one another. We were struck by how people all across America reached out to help friends and neighbors in a way that gave us hope. In this issue we celebrate Concordians, be they colonials or 21st century citizens, and their incredible strength in the face of difficulty. In The Minutemen Would be Proud, we share just a handful of the amazing stories of compassion, community, and innovation that we’ve seen and experienced throughout our community. As these past months brought financial challenges that few businesses are ever prepared to weather, Concordians rallied to protect the shops and restaurants that are truly a part of their cultural heritage. Now that restrictions are being cautiously lifted, those shops and restaurants are looking forward to seeing you again! Safe Shopping

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| Summer 2020

Made Fun, West Concord Welcomes You Back, and our guide to what restaurants are doing to reopen, all show the resilience and creativity of our local business community. We hope these articles will inspire you to shop locally - and often - to help them recover. We love history and we know that our readers do too. This isn’t the first time that Concord has faced a pandemic. Lessons of History shares shocking similarities between the current COVID crisis and the 1918 Influenza pandemic here in Concord. Transcendentalism as a movement may have ended 150 years ago, but its impact on our nation’s literary history endures. Transcendentalism 101 will introduce you to these men and women who sought to create a better world. And fans of Walt Whitman’s poetry will enjoy reading about his links to Concord in The Concord Sage and an American Poet. A Beginner’s Guide to Concord’s Beautiful Outdoors, Enjoying Our National Parks, and Made for Sauntering: Concord’s Bruce Freeman Rail Trail celebrate the beauty of nature, which has been faithfully going about her work, even as we sheltered in place. Happily, picnics never go out of style as our article, The Perfect Picnic Makes a Comeback reminds us. And while we can’t gather ‘round our favorite local bar just yet, we can mix up the perfect cocktail at home and even host a virtual cocktail party. Check out Easy Breezy Summer Cocktails with local mixologist Brigette MT Sanchez for tips on what’s hot in cocktails right now.

Day trippers will appreciate recommended itineraries for time spent in Concord and neighboring Lexington. And while you’re seeking out new adventure, why not try Following in the Footsteps of Thoreau and create your own walking map of some of the routes that Henry David Thoreau once explored. As summer beckons and life begins, ever so carefully, to return to what we’ve known, we hope that each of us will remember this time - especially the compassion, resilience, and creativity that have defined our collective response to a struggle that may well be generationally defining…truly, living history. Stay safe.

Cynthia L. Baudendistel Co-Founder

Jennifer C. Schünemann Co-Founder


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©Nancy Arkuss “The Secret: Sid and the Kids”

contents

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T he Minutemen Would be Proud: Concordians Answer the Call Virtual Garden Tour Safe Shopping Made Fun H eaven Under Our Feet: Exploring the Delights of Concord The North Bridge Inn A Day in Lexington C oncord Restaurants Welcome Guests Back

Hundreds Rally Around The Robbins House Hope & Keep Busy

The Little Shop That Could

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ade for Sauntering: M Concord’s Bruce Freeman Rail Trail W est Concord Welcomes You Back

| Summer 2020

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G uide to Shops, Restaurants & Lodging Walking Maps of Concord Appleton Design Group

The Concord Sage and an American Poet Transcendentalism 101 Henry’s Sunflowers Concord Trivia

Contents Continued on Page 8

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©wikimediacommons

© Pierre Chiha Photography

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978-318-3061

visitconcord.org

Historic Concord is the home of the American Revolution as well as some of the greatest literary and transcendentalist minds in America.

The Visitor Center Offers Walking tours of Historic Concord New

Little Women Walking Tour

Information services for bus tours, leisure travelers, and school groups


Discover CONCORD discoverconcordma.com CO-FOUNDER Cynthia L. Baudendistel

©Marshall Farm

CO-FOUNDER Jennifer C. Schünemann

© Ideal Mixology

p.46 p.60

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ART DIRECTOR Beth Pruett DISTRIBUTION DIRECTOR Wilson S. Schünemann ADMINISTRATIVE DIRECTOR Olga Gersh

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SOCIAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Ricky Ortiz ADVISORY BOARD Bobbi Benson North Bridge Antiques

Patricia Clarke Sara Campbell

Michael Glick Concord’s Colonial Inn

Alida Orzechowski Concord Tour Company

contents

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Carol Thistle Concord Museum

© Wikimedia Commons

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F ollowing in the Footsteps of Thoreau Fresh From The Farm A Beginner’s Guide to Concord’s Beautiful Outdoors

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Lessons of History: Concord & the 1918 Influenza Pandemic njoying our National Parks in E the time of COVID-19

Jerry Wedge Public domain

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Jan Turnquist Louisa May Alcott’s Orchard House

58 59 60 56

The Perfect Picnic Makes a Comeback Fuel the Fight Concord 2020

The Umbrella Arts Center

Jim White Concord Market/Trail’s End

COVER PHOTO: Dining al fresco in Concord ©Pierre Chiha Photographers, used with permission Photo staging courtesy of Carolyn Bunch Reich AUTHORS/CONTRIBUTORS:

Join the Summer Solstice Passport Event asy Breezy Summer E Cocktails

© 2020 Voyager Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form by any means without the prior written permission of the publisher. ISSN 2688-5204 (Print) ISSN 2688-5212 (Online) For reprint and permission requests, please contact cynthia@voyager-publishing.com 314.308.6611

Susan Bailey Cynthia Baudendistel Bonnie Beaudet Victor Curran Katie Johnson Jaimee Leigh Joroff Chris Lyons Alida Orzechowski Jennifer C. Schünemann Richard Smith Nancy Snyder Dave Witherbee PUBLISHED BY:

FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION:

Jennifer C. Schünemann jennifer@voyager-publishing.com | 978.435.2266 8

Discover CONCORD

discoverconcordma.com | Summer 2020


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The Minutemen Would be Proud:

Concordians Answer the Call

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Concord has always been a very special place. The people who call this town home have never shied away from a challenge, nor have they hesitated to do the right thing in trying times. From mustering the courage to fire the “Shot Heard ‘Round the World” to creating a space which fostered a generation of literary legends, to standing up to fight for the abolition of slavery, Concordians are steadfast in the face of adversity. With a triple crisis of COVID-19, an economic shutdown, and a heightened demand for social justice, one might think that people would turn inward and hide away until the threat had passed. And yet, the spirit of the Minuteman endures. The stories of compassion, community, and innovation are too many to list here – but they all weave together to show the true nature of the Concord spirit. “The people of Concord are – at a minute’s notice – dropping their metaphorical ploughs and taking up metaphorical arms to aid their fellow citizens,” said Concord Town Manager Stephen Crane. “It is so clear to me that it is built right into the DNA of this town…the amazing people who live here truly believe that they are a part of something bigger than themselves. Their willingness to put community above self – to jump in and help where needed – is inspiring and gives us all a sense of hope and pride.”

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| Summer 2020

BY JENNIFER C. SCHÜNEMANN

Messages of gratitude at the Umbrella Arts Center

COMPASSION All across Concord, people have stepped up to do their part to help. Costume makers, dry cleaners, tailors, and volunteers jumped in to sew masks when they were suddenly scarce. Groups of private citizens rallied to raise funds or volunteered to help everything from food banks, to hospital workers, to small businesses in crisis. Concord’s youngest citizens have been just as active. Teenagers wrote letters and sent treats to lonely nursing home residents and helped deliver meals and thank you notes to

stressed and tired health care workers. Children as young as eight took to social media to raise money for local food pantries. College students stuck at home gave their time and talent to help families with online tutoring for younger children. The Council on Aging was flooded with young volunteers happy to do grocery shopping – or even do spring cleaning yardwork - for older residents at higher risk.


Tea Time at Barrow Bookstore

©Nancy Arkuss “The Secret: Sid and the Kids”

INNOVATION Essential businesses mean more than a place to purchase items in Concord. They are often the very fabric of their neighborhoods. Debra’s Natural Gourmet, Verrill Farm, and the Concord Market all stayed open throughout the pandemic, determined to be there for the community. These family run businesses quickly pivoted, mid-pandemic, to offer curbside no-contact pickup, delivery services, and special time slots for older shoppers to ensure that Concordians could eat well, at home. The stress and strain of keeping staff and guests safe – while adding extra tasks to clean, sanitize, and even shop on behalf of customers – has been difficult all around. But the outpouring of gratitude from residents makes it worth it. Farfalle Italian Marketplace and Café owner Gina Nasson was an early innovator in the COVID-19 crisis – partnering with fellow busines owners at Copper Penny Flowers and Revolutionary Concord to bring some joy to Concord families in lockdown. Hand delivered

COMMUNITY Like so many others across the country, the Concord Carlisle High School was obligated to cancel many of the rights-of-passage that mark the transition into adulthood for graduating Seniors. The community rallied around these young adults – posting congratulatory signs at the home of every graduating senior, putting together a ‘parade’ of cars emblazoned with the universities where students were bound, and even creating a special CCHS Facemask for use at a delayed (outdoor) graduation ceremony. To help maintain a feeling of connection, the Barrow Bookstore hosted regular 4pm

“Tea Time” on their social media outlets, with characters ranging from Piglet and Owl to May Alcott and featuring tips on how to make a perfect cup of tea. Virtual movie hour encouraged homebound families to revisit classic films such as Anne of Green Gables or the Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. Early in the pandemic, residents craned their necks when driving through an otherwise empty Concord Center when they noticed a series of inspirational messages suddenly start to appear on the “Stairway to Nesting.” Each week, Wendi Snider of this charming little shop (Nesting) would surprise passers-by with a new phrase of hope or inspiration.

care packages (dropped at doorsteps, no-contact) created a ‘fun night in” that included a family meal with dessert, a toy or puzzle for the kids, and beautiful flowers to brighten everyone’s spirits. The Umbrella Arts Center, sensing the need for parents to give their children an alternative to Zoom calls and schoolyear distance learning, launched a series of free, at-your-own-pace activities for kids of different ages. They also lit up their newly renovated building with messages of deep gratitude for the essential workers who kept the town going through the crisis. And finally, a beloved Concord tradition was rescued when Verrill Farms found a way to allow ‘pick your own strawberries’ to happen in a world of social distancing. The team there cordoned off mini strawberry patches and used a new reservation system to ensure that families were not placed next to each other while picking the precious fruit. “The system worked so well – everything went so smoothly – that I think we will use it again next year!” said owner Steve Verrill.

Strawberry picking at Verrill Farms

© Pierre Chiha Photography

Safety first at the Umbrella Arts Center

KNOWING WHAT’S IMPORTANT Keeping a community united isn’t always about one single leader or initiative. It’s often the many gestures of goodwill, and the outpouring of care from so many unsung heroes, that come together to inspire courage and fortitude in the face of difficulty. Years – decades – from now, scholars and historians will look

back on 2020 as a a defining moment in the character of “small town America.” Let it be remembered that our town was filled with creativity and compassion when called to step up and support one another. Let it be remembered that the spirit of the Minuteman still runs strong here in Concord.

Discover CONCORD

| discoverconcordma.com

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When it is dark enough, you can see the stars Upsetting

Upsetting Upsetting months in in months in We’ve allmonths spent the America but past months separated but America America but we love. And we all arefrom those all are while wewe miss friends we all are making lots and extended family, we making lots making lots the memories of happy celebrate of happy we’re making now. of happy memories!Pets are happy memories! because we’re memories! home more! —Ralph Waldo Emerson

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• Kids can sleep longer and spend more time with their parents!

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• We have time to prepare healthy, delicious meals and spend dinner time with the family!

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those trails! More time spent on the X-boxes, whether this isCon go  Kids canowners all sleep and havetheir parents around!  Dogs are all happy because their arelonger at home now!

 Discovering around our homes that we did no  and More timetheir spent on the X-boxes, whether this is trails good or bad who knows!  Kids can all sleep longer have parents around! • We can learn a new language,

Rediscovering the fun cooking healthy meal an  X-boxes, Discovering trails around ourorhomes thatknows! we did not know existed!  More time spent on the whether this is good badwho a new skill, orof just mastera that  Too manyvideogame! snacks and too many unwanted extra pou  Rediscovering of cooking a healthy meal and sharing it with the whole famil  Discovering trails around our homes thatthe we fun did not know existed!  Time for each other!

Too many snacks and unwanted extra pounds!  Rediscovering the fun  of cooking a healthy mealtoo andmany sharing it with the whole • We canfamily! find creative ways  Time to watch your favorite movies again! to support our beloved local  Time each other!  Too many snacks and too manyfor unwanted extra pounds!  Creative ways to support our beloved local busines businesses!  Time for each other!  Time to watch your favorite movies again!  Creative  Time to watch your favorite movies ways again!to support our beloved local businesses!  Creative ways to support our beloved local businesses!

Senkler, Pasley & Dowcett Top Award Winning Team at Coldwell Banker Realty

Senkler, Pasley & Dowcett Award Winning Team at Coldwell Banker Realty Senkler, Pasley &TopDowcett thesenklerteam.com | Top Award Winning Team at Coldwell Banker Realty

the Con

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Direct Team Line: 978.505.2652 | 23 Monument Street, Concord Real estate agents affiliated with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. ©2020 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Operated by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker, the Coldwell Banker logo, Coldwell Banker Global Luxury and the Coldwell Banker Global Luxury logo are service marks registered or pending registration owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.


© Pierre Chiha Photographers

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© Pierre Chiha Photographers

Virtual Garden Tour

The Concord Museum’s Guild of Volunteers were heartbroken when COVID-19 restrictions cancelled their 31st Annual Garden Tour. This beloved tradition provides a peek behind the garden gate at some of Concord’s most stunning homes, and is a sort of unofficial opening of Spring in the town. It was a deep disappointment in the community to miss such an anticipated event. In the spirit of true innovation, the Guild of Volunteers turned on a dime and quickly created a virtual tour to allow the event to happen. Garden Guide Ellen Whitney brought

viewers on a lovely saunter through five different gardens online – bringing sunshine and flowers into the homes of so many in isolation. Bonus content included gardening tips and DIY project ideas. Delightfully, the program was able to reach people all around the world as well. Nearly 1,000 people participated – with donations helping to support the Concord Museum’s ongoing educational initiatives online and (when safe to do so) in person. You can learn more about this charming event at concordmuseum.org.

Safe Shopping Made Fun

Revolutionary Concord and their Tricorn hat distance markers 14

Discover CONCORD

| Summer 2020

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Shops all across Concord have worked hard to reconfigure their storefronts, install plexiglass sneeze guards, create distance markers, integrate no-touch or low-touch point of sale technology, and train their teams to be in compliance with all sanitizing and safety standards put forth by the state. And while the shops are all business when it comes to safety, they are truly so happy to see their friends and customers again! All around town, you will see signs celebrating the reopening of Concord’s shops and restaurants. Concord’s fun side shines through hand-drawn signs welcoming visitors. Walk-up take-out windows make curbside pickup easy. And social distancing markers take on a whimsical spirit in so many creative ways - in the shape of a tricorn hat, a painter’s easel, a charming bird’s nest, and more. Strolling the shopping districts of Concord is a fun way to spend a day with the whole family! For a list of where to shop and where to eat, please see the center spread of this publication or visit us at discoverconcordma.com/virtual-visit.


Food is always at the heart of Community, which is why we are always here for you.

Whether you need groceries, prepared meals to go, or just a special pastry to brighten your day, the team at Concord Market is eager to help. Our no-contact curbside pickup and careful set up for social distancing are welcome comforts in these uncertain times. Our patio is open at Trail’s End and we hope you’ll join us for an al fresco dinner or a take-out meal. We happily deliver too. And Concord Market Catering is there for family sized meals or all the fixin’s for a backyard BBQ with close friends and family. By coming together, we will come through this crisis. We’re here for you and look forward to feeding you - with love.

Jim, Elizabeth, Carol, Manny, Marisa and the whole crew

Millbrook Tarry, 77-97 Lowell Concord food Concord’s destinations forRoad, gourmet www.theconcordmarket.com | 978.369.7500

Concord Market: www.thetrailsendcafe.com | 978.610.6633 Artisanal Prepared Foods & Deli


Heaven Under Our Feet:

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Concord is a favorite destination for visitors from all over the world: literary pilgrims, Revolutionary War buffs, and nature lovers crowd our streets all summer long, right through foliage season. But in 2020, many travelers want to steer clear of crowds, so we Concord-area residents have the place pretty much to ourselves. There was never a better time to enjoy the local attractions. In the words of our favorite townie,1 Henry David Thoreau, “It is worth the while to see your native village . . . as if you were a traveler passing through it.”2 The summer has brought ideal weather for fresh-air fun, and outdoor spaces are now welcoming visitors. Minute Man National Park lands are open, including the North Bridge and Meriam’s Corner areas, and Battle Road trails. Public rest rooms are open, too. Watch for a future announcement about when the Visitor Center will reopen. Next door to the North Bridge is the Old Manse. Like many other properties of the Trustees of Reservations, the Manse invites visitors to its beautiful grounds right on the Concord River, and will soon offer guided tours of the property, highlighting “the shot heard ’round the world” and Concord’s literary community. Concord’s historic cemeteries are just a few steps from the town center. The Old Hill Burying Ground is the final resting place of early Puritan ministers, Minutemen, and John Jack, whose eloquent epitaph tells of his journey from slavery to freedom. At Sleepy Hollow Cemetery you can pay your respects to Concord’s literary celebrities, including Alcott, Hawthorne, and Emerson. Thoreau is there, of course, and so is the guy who put him in jail, Sam Staples. Sleepy Hollow is renowned for its beautiful landscaping, and you can also feast your eyes on the Daniel Chester French sculpture, Mourning Victory, which adorns the

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Discover CONCORD

| Summer 2020

BY VICTOR CURRAN

grave of three Melvin brothers, Concord men who lost their lives while serving the Union in the Civil War. The Emerson-Thoreau Amble is a well-kept secret that many tourists miss. This nature trail connects the Emerson house on Cambridge Turnpike with Walden Pond. Highlights include the secluded Fairyland Pond and Brister’s Spring, named for Brister Freeman, a Concord African American who emancipated himself from slavery. Another seasonal favorite is Walden Pond State Reservation, where you can saunter along a one-way trail loop designed to facilitate social distancing. Swimming is allowed, and Concord Visitor Center boat house rest rooms are open. At this writing, Massachusetts’ reopening of businesses the Visitor Center is closed, but you can stop (which may have happened—or changed— by the Thoreau Society’s shop for soft drinks, by the time you read this). Look for apparel, gifts, and of course, books. announcements from each of Concord’s Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, museums and historic houses, telling when about a mile and a half from the town center, they will open, and what steps they will take is one of the best inland birding areas in the for visitor health and safety. state. Visitors can hike the trails and observe, Until then, it’s the perfect time to enjoy photograph, and study a rich diversity of Concord’s great outdoors. As Thoreau animal and plant life. reminds us, “Heaven is under our feet as You can stop by Concord’s own Visitor well as over our heads.”3 Center at 58 Main Street daily 10:00 to 4:00 1 Among Concord’s literary celebrities, Thoreau is the only and chat about your own local adventures. one who was born here. Their public rest rooms are also open. 2 The Journal of Henry David Thoreau, September 4, 1851 3 July is the scheduled time for Phase 3 of Henry David Thoreau, Walden, or Life in the Woods (1854)

©Concord Visitor Center

Exploring the Delights of Concord


The North Bridge Inn:

A Hospitality Gem in the Heart of Concord Center

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Welcome to Concord! Our history, literary legacy, and charming downtown will enchant you. We invite you to stay with us at the North Bridge Inn, just off Monument Square… a short walk from the Concord Center shopping district and local Concord historic attractions. Here in this charming town, Innkeeper Heidi Godbout has lovingly cared for guests from around the world for more than 20 years.

Photos © Richard Pasley Photography

Classic New England Charm Each of the six elegant suites at this ideal location feature unique charm and individual décor, with a separate seating area for relaxing and unwinding. Several of the suites feature a full kitchen – a wonderful option for those who prefer to cook in or enjoy take out in a private setting. The top floor suite is even set up for longer term rental – with a whole floor of comfortable, relaxing space. Extra Care During Uncertain Times With COVID-19, guests can take comfort in knowing that Heidi and her team have adopted strict protocols to ensure the health and safety of all who frequent the Inn, including: • Suites remain vacant for 24 hours between guest stays – during which, air is filtered through a HEPA filter, a UV light treatment, and an ozone generator to optimize clean and fresh air • Thorough cleaning and disinfecting, with extra focus on sanitizing high touch areas, furniture, linens, and amenities • Once your room is cleaned and prepared for you, no one enters your room prior to arrival • Each suite has its own air conditioning system – air is not recycled from other areas • Staff are trained to comply with all state guidelines regarding COVID-19 safety • Courtesy masks, hand sanitizer, and disposable gloves provided for all of our guests Summer Specials Enjoy having the town to yourself during our slower summer season. Last minute specials are available at northbridgeinn.com. We also offer extended stay specials for those who are renovating, building, or who simply have fallen in love with Concord and are relocating to make this their new home! Come experience the charm, comfort, and personalized care that our classic New England Inn offers you. Call or email us today to make your reservation and discover Concord’s hidden hospitality gem – the North Bridge Inn.

North Bridge Inn | 21 Monument Street | Concord, MA 01742 | 978.371.0014 | northbridgeinn.com

Discover CONCORD

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A Day in Lexington

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It’s the perfect time to rediscover Lexington… Here in Massachusetts, we are lucky enough to live and work in an area rich in history and natural resources. It’s easy to take this for granted sometimes, and we forget how much there is to see and do right here in our own backyard. But this summer, local attractions may have the advantage over more exotic places. The pandemic has turned tourism on its side, but at least one positive trend has emerged: the desire to seek enjoyment locally. So if

Visitors Center directly across from the iconic Minuteman Statue and Lexington Battle Green at 1875 Massachusetts Avenue. In keeping with social distancing and safety guidelines, we’ve created an outdoor, onehour “Let it Begin Here” guided walking tour of the Battle Green. Travel back in time with your costumed guide to the morning of April 19, 1775, where “the first blood was spilt in the dispute with Great Britain,” as George Washington wrote in his diary. Eight Minutemen lost their lives and 10 were

you’ve postponed your European trip or canceled that tropical island getaway, fear not. Adventure awaits but one town away… We invite you to travel east on Battle Road through Minute Man National Historical Park to spend a day in Lexington Center. Grab a coffee and check out our brand new

wounded. Two British soldiers were also injured. After the battle, Samuel Adams exclaimed to John Hancock, “What a glorious morning for America!” On this one-hour walking tour of Lexington Battle Green, you’ll explore the many notable sites surrounding this National Historic

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Discover CONCORD

| Summer 2020

BY KATIE JOHNSON

Landmark. It is considered consecrated ground, both for the blood shed on it and for the Minutemen who are interred here. Some highlights include: • The iconic Henry H. Kitson Minuteman Statue • The Revolutionary War Monument, a granite obelisk erected in 1799, where the remains of seven militiamen killed in the battle are buried. • Captain John Parker monument inscribed with: “Stand your ground. Don’t fire unless fired upon, but if they mean to have a war, let it begin here.” • The Old Belfry, which sounded the alarm on April 19, 1775, calling the militia to the common. • The Old Burying Ground where Captain John Parker, ministers John Hancock and Jonas Clarke, and an unknown British soldier are buried. After your tour concludes, stop for lunch at one of several great family-friendly outdoor spots, and then stroll by the three witness houses in and around Lexington Center. They are: the Hancock-Clarke House, Paul Revere’s final destination; Buckman Tavern, the militia’s headquarters; and Munroe Tavern, used as a British field hospital on April 19, 1775. To plan your day in Lexington, visit tourlexington.us for Visitors Center hours, tour schedules, or to purchase Battle Green tour tickets. Tickets can also be purchased in person at the Visitors Center, 1875 Massachusetts Avenue, Lexington. $15 for Adults; Children 5-12 $12; Children 5-under are free. For historic house hours and info visit lexhistory.org, as hours may have changed due to Covid-19 concerns. Hope to see you this summer! ———————————————————————— Katie Johnson oversees the Lexington Visitors Center, its tours, and its retail shoppe.


Experience sustainable farm to table cuisine right here in Experience sustainable farm to table cuisine right here in West Concord. Choose from fine dining at Woods Hill Table West Concord. Choose from fine dining at Woods Hill Table or relaxed, casual Mexican cuisine at Adelita! or relaxed, casual Mexican cuisine at Adelita! For more information, or to make a reservation, visit: For more information, or to make a reservation, visit: www.woodshilltable.com www.adelitaconcord.com www.woodshilltable.com www.adelitaconcord.com 978.254.1435 978.254.0710 978.254.1435 978.254.0710 We hope to see you soon! We hope to see you soon! Outdoor dining and curbside takeout available.

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Concord Restaurants Welcome Guests Back

W With hospitality ranging from curbside pickup, to dining al fresco, to indoor table service, restaurants have pivoted with lightning speed to ensure safety and compliance with state regulations as they reopen their doors and their kitchens to eager diners. We caught up with a few of our favorite spots to find out more about what they are offering guests this summer.

CONCORD’S COLONIAL INN It’s just not summer without cocktails and dining on the gorgeous wrap-around porch at Concord’s Colonial Inn. Distancing regulations mean fewer tables (although they have created space on the front lawn as well) and seating is first come, first served. If you prefer to enjoy their delicious food at home, the Inn is offering curbside pickup from 11:30am – 7:30pm throughout the summer. Updates at www.concordscolonialinn.com “We are very excited to see our guests again – and we are working hard to keep our guests and staff safe by following the guidelines carefully. We want to thank

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BY JENNIFER SCHÜNEMANN

everyone for their patience as we navigate our way to our ‘new normal’.” THE CHEESE SHOP This bucket list worthy destination for delectable cheese, artisanal foods, and perfect pairing wines has been serving the community with curbside pickup throughout the pandemic and will continue to do so all summer. The Cheese Shop is now inviting customers into the shop – five at a time – with The Cheese Shop

safety guidelines that include face masks and requiring hand sanitizing upon entering. “We are a close-knit group who love to serve great foods and wines. We look forward to welcoming you.” Find more information – including details on the creative specials such as Friday Night Dinners or holiday-themed promotions - at concordcheeseshop.com or on social media. FARFALLE ITALIAN MARKET CAFÉ Owner Gina Nasson continues to offer curbside pickup all summer – and even has a few outdoor tables (properly distanced) to allow people to enjoy their takeout or one of the delicious Giovanna Gelatos that are made to order especially for the café. “The amazing support of our local customers is the reason why we are still here after 13 years! Please come back and see us often.” Fresh salads, paninis, delectable desserts and easy to reheat athome meals are all staples of this wonderful gem of a market café. Find out more at farfalleitalianmarket.com.

Restaurant staff photos courtesy of Pierre Chiha Photography ©

Distanced dining in at Fiorella’s Cucina in Concord Center


80 Thoreau

Woods Hill Table Trails End Café

FIORELLA’S CUCINA Shouts of joy rang out in Concord when the beloved Fiorella’s reopened for curbside pickup, which will continue all summer. They even include a little bottle of lemon scented hand sanitizer in your to-go bag. The option for family sized meals is a welcome addition, so watch for promotions throughout the summer. The amazing staff at Fiorella’s have worked hard to ensure total compliance with state guidelines – placing the safety of their crew and their guests before everything. Whether you dine indoors, or pickup to go, you’ll always be greeted with a smile. Find out more at fiorellascucina.com. SALTBOX KITCHEN There are plenty of opportunities to enjoy the fresh and inspired cuisine of Ben Elliott and his team by stopping by Saltbox Kitchen in the heart of West Concord. CSA bags can be picked up at the restaurant, along with prix fix meals, a la carte treats, or catering for family gatherings. As of press time, outdoor dining plans were still being formed. Check for more information at saltboxkitchen.com. TRAILS END CAFÉ Trails End Café remained open for delivery and curbside pickup throughout the pandemic, and plans to continue offering both services all summer. They are thrilled to open their outdoor patio – replete with bistro lights – to welcome guests for a full meal or a coffee and a snack. They now feature gourmet frappes and ice cream prepared by their in-house pastry chef. Book a reservation to be sure to get one of their outdoor tables. More information at thetrailsendcafe.com. “Our staff has worked hard to make the restaurant part of the community over the past almost ten years. We are so grateful for the support we’ve

Fiorella’s

received over the past few months as we’ve offered takeout and delivery. It has been a difficult time. But we are excited to be able to have people back at the restaurant for table service.” WOODS HILL TABLE AND ADELITA These two restaurants, together with owner Kristin Canty, are pillars of the West Concord community. While Adelita offered curbside pickup of their fresh tacos and Mexican-inspired cuisine throughout the crisis, diners are delighted to hear that sister restaurant Woods Hill Table is – at last – open again. Both restaurants now offer curbside pickup as well as al fresco dining on expanded patios that reach into the parking lots to better serve a community eager to eat well once more! As of press time, both restaurants are open 5-8pm, Tuesday through Saturday. They hope to expand their hours soon, so check woodshilltable.com and adelitaconcord.com. “The support from the community has been tremendous the past few months. Thank you to everyone who continues to support us during this time. As we all have seen, restaurants are a vital part of so many industries. The relationships we have cultivated over the past years with small farmers, fishmongers and mushroom foragers, have not grown distant but stronger. This crisis has brought us closer to our partners and communities.”

Concord Restaurants with Outside Seating (as of July 1st) 80 Thoreau 99 Restaurant & Pub Adelita Concord’s Colonial Inn Farfalle Italian Market Café Haute Coffee Karma Concord Asian Fusion Main Street’s Market & Café Papa Razzi Trail’s End Café Woods Hill Table State guidelines are constantly changing, so please check your favorite restaurant’s website or social media for updates.

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Hundreds Rally Around The Robbins House

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to Show Support for Social Justice

Close to 500 people gathered at The Robbins House with masks, signs, and an open mind to listen, learn, and add their thoughts to a difficult and painful dialogue happening across the country around inequity and the quest for social justice for people of color. The peaceful gathering of solidarity was organized in less than 24 hours and moderated by Nikki Turpin, Robbins House Programming Chair. Held on June 1st, the talks ranged from the pioneering work of Ellen Garrison who advocated for civil rights in the 1800’s, to the 1921 “Black Wall Street” massacre outside of Tulsa, to the recent nationwide protests triggered by the deaths of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, and Breonna Taylor.

Maria Madison In the tradition of the Quakers, the gathering ended in a moment of silence, after which community, and to condemn the actions anyone who felt moved of the police officers in Minneapolis. to speak was invited to Many events have taken place around do so. Speakers ranged Concord since then, including a June 14th from a very young girl webinar featuring Jan Turnquist of Louisa who talked about feeling May Alcott’s Orchard House interviewing compelled to draw people Maria Madison of The Robbins House, of color in her coloring and Sandra Petrulionis, author of To Set book because they are beautiful and because This World Right: The Antislavery Movement In ‘the books seem too white to me’…to Concord Thoreau’s Concord. Police Chief Joseph O’Connor who came For more information, please visit up to the microphone unexpectedly to give robbinshouse.org. an emotional speech of solidarity with the

Hope and Keep Busy

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Louisa May Alcott’s Orchard House Executive Director Jan Turnquist knew that thousands of fans would be disappointed not to be able to visit the home of the world-renowned author during the pandemic – particularly in light of the Little Women film, released this past Christmas. Drawing inspiration from the classic novel’s words of wisdom “Hope and Keep Busy,” Jan launched a series of Facebook Live events to bring the Orchard House experience to viewers around the world. Her hour-long virtual tours covered topics ranging from a ‘get to know’ session on the various Alcott family members, to tours of the house, to a peek at the emerging Spring gardens. Several of the events drew more than 3,000 viewers! You can see the sessions on Facebook @louisamayalcottsorchardhouse.

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Be Well Be Here REVITALIZE YOUR PURPOSE with our online and outdoor

Mindful WellBeing Offerings * Meditation & Mindfulness * Experiential Family Practices * Intuitive Healing * Return to Nature * Subtle Body Energy Yoga * Wellness Walks & Forest Bathing * Writing & Journaling

BeWellBeHere.org ! 978-203-2823 a 501c3 non-profit mindful wellbeing collaborative


The Little Shop That Could:

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Debra Stark, founder of Debra’s Natural Gourmet, has published a new book that is simply delightful. In its pages, Debra tells the tale of a young woman with a crazy dream to bring organic foods and a holistic way of living to the neighborhood of West Concord in the early 1990s. This book is a fun, lighthearted, and compelling story that reveals through its pages why Debra has become such a beloved figure in and around Concord (and nationwide!). The story tells tales about regulatory law and potlucks, explains why Debra ordered 6,000 pounds of olives in 5-gallon pails just in time for the shop’s opening in 1989, and shares lessons learned along the way.

For those Seeking a Heartwarming Tale of Family and Friends

You can find a copy of The Little Shop That Could at the Concord Bookshop or at Debra’s Natural Gourmet in West Concord. To sign up for Debra’s monthly newsletter with terrific articles and recipes, go to www.DebrasNaturalGourmet.com.

Debra’s Natural Gourmet started with Debra’s mom – who reared her children on organic foods (there was no Jiffy® peanut butter in the Stark household) and natural medicine. Years later, and armed with great recipes and lots of knowledge from her mother, Debra would take that same philosophy (think garlic, green tea, and laughter), and apply it to her fledgling shop. “When I started my shop,” said Debra. “most people in the neighborhood thought I was crazy. People in town actually placed bets that we’d go belly up in a couple of months.” Now, a generation later, Debra’s son Adam is partnering with Debra to lead the way for this little shop in Concord. The book shares their funny and heartwarming stories of friends who have gathered in the aisles of the shop over the years to share their happy moments, comfort each other through trying times, and to rejoice in one another’s successes. Reading the book, you will start to learn what makes Debra’s Natural Gourmet such a special treasure for so many. For the Entrepreneur In the 1990s, organic foods and natural medicine sounded more like voodoo than good advice to the

Debra outside of Debra’s

The Stark Family, Debra and Adam Natural Gourmet

©Debra’s Natural Gourmet

A Retailer’s Love Affair with Community & Food

people in Concord. Most people had never heard of things like chia seeds or tofu. Some bemoaned the replacement of the local knitting shop with a store selling ‘kale’. And the men in the neighborhood missed their bar, too. Why did Debra’s have to move in and ‘change everything’?! Thirty years later, Debra’s Natural Gourmet is a pillar of the thriving and creative West Concord business community. The Little Shop That Could is teeming with great lessons for entrepreneurs: How to create alliances. How to pivot and learn in real time as you grow your business. And how to slowly and steadily use networking, community building, and education to shape your environment to be more receptive to your products and services. For Foodies The plethora of easy, delicious, and tempting recipes found in the pages of this book make it worth buying just to try them all! The recipes are creative, and will tempt the reader to experiment with ‘organic’ foods. Debra believes you’ll love them! “I hope that people in the town read this book and are proud of what we have all achieved together,” said Debra. “I want everyone to know how wonderful organic foods and natural medicine are – and, most of all, I hope the readers laugh like crazy at all the shenanigans that go on in this wonderful little shop that could.”

Order a copy of this wonderful book at debras.storebyweb.com/s/1000-1/ for curbside pickup. Or order a copy on Facebook @DebrasLittleShopThatCould and Debra herself will walk your copy to the post office for you!

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©Judy Perrin

Made for Sauntering: Concord’s Bruce Freeman Rail Trail BY NANCY SNYDER

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“It is a great art to saunter,” Henry David Thoreau, 1841, Journal

One can easily imagine how pleased Concord’s favorite son, Henry David Thoreau, would have been upon the opening of Concord’s 2.5 mile section of the Bruce Freeman Rail Trail on September 27, 2019. The ribbon-cutting ceremony began with brief remarks by Jonathan Gulliver, the Massachusetts Highway Administrator, members of the Massachusetts Legislature, and officials from Concord - but the excitement of the day was for the trail itself. Concordians wanted to venture onto the trail that runs from Commonwealth Avenue south to Powder Mill Road and experience the natural and historic delights the trail offers. Concord is a link in the chain of the grand Bruce Freeman Rail Trail (BFRT). The BFRT has a ten-foot-wide, paved, multi-use trail that welcomes walkers, bicyclists, roller bladers, and snow skiers (anything that is non-motorized). When completed, the BFRT will encompass 25 miles of rail trail running from Lowell to Framingham. In April, Concord’s Boy Scout Troop 132 implemented their service project 24

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| Summer 2020

by installing a bike repair station in West Concord near Route 62. The bike station includes a tire pump and tools for basic bike maintenance. A fascinating public arts project, Go Out Doors, will take place from July 1st through November 15, 2020 along the Concord section of the BFRT. Under the direction of the Umbrella Arts Center, an exhibition of nine doors painted by nine local artists will ask Concord walkers to consider the possibilities of nature. The exhibition will challenge you to consider “What happens when you open the door and step outside? What happens when we find ourselves in a path through the woods hidden from the roads we travel daily? What might change?” https://theumbrellaarts.org/go-out-doors The Concord phase of the Bruce Freeman Rail Trail also placed Concord into an elite category of outstanding public works projects with its recognition by the American Public Works Association’s Public Works Projects of the Year for 2020. Concord’s selection epitomizes the very best

achievements for the public works profession in the Small Cities/Rural Communities Transportation category. Planning for the Bruce Freeman Rail Trail began over a decade ago. The Town of Concord, in its Vision Statement of 2007, saw a trail that “to the greatest degree possible, retains the look and feel of a Concord woods path where appropriate; we are particularly interested in alternatives to asphalt. The trail will provide opportunities for nature education, quiet reflection, and exercise that refresh and strengthen mind, body, and spirit.” Concord’s section of the Bruce Freeman Rail Trail remains open during the Covid-19 crisis. Please wear masks and maintain social distancing as you go outside and enjoy the delights of summer in Concord. The BFRT is a tonic for what ails us during these pandemic days. https://brucefreemanrailtrail.org/ ———————————————————————— Nancy Snyder is a freelance writer who, after 30 years working at the City and County of San Francisco, is now absorbed in learning everything about Henry David Thoreau.


West Concord Welcomes You Back!

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As state restrictions cautiously ease, there is a palpable buzz of excitement as shops and restaurants reconnect with old friends – and make new ones as well! “An unexpected silver lining to the COVID-19 crisis has been a newfound appreciation for the variety of food, shops, and services we have right here in West Concord,” said Meg Gaudet of A New Leaf. “Even while our shops were closed, the outpouring of support from the town – the people who jumped in to order gift cards, curbside pickup, or home delivery – helped us so much. It gave us all a renewed sense of pride in our amazing community. Continued support will be key in ensuring our vibrant town center comes through the crisis.” With this renewed focus on shopping locally, Concord residents and visitors alike are delighted to discover that West Concord has most everything a family needs – all in just a few walkable blocks! You can even charge your electric car while you peruse the amazing offerings of West Concord.

The iconic West Concord 5 & 10 provides everything from household goods to sewing and crafting supplies, to toys and penny candy. A stroll down Commonwealth Ave. reveals a treasure trove ranging from puzzles, games, or pool floats, to whimsical gifts, stunning pottery, and thoughtful cards. You will even find collectable art, handmade jewelry, clothing, and antiques. Everyday needs are met with a local pharmacy, convenience store, banks, nail shops, hair salons, shoe repair, upholstery, pet supplies, dry cleaning, and even computer repair. And can we talk about food?! West Concord offers everything from ice cream, to delectable baked goods, artisanal breads, coffee and lattes, farm fresh CSA and ready to eat meals, organic groceries, fresh seafood, quick and tasty take out, and gourmet dining (farm to table, no less!). All of this is completed with shops that offer fine wines, beers, liquors, and specialty beverages.

Spending more time at home is a delight with offerings that range from sporting goods, to fresh flowers, to elegant home décor, and gently used or magically restored furniture. There are even design services - and the tile supplies - for your home renovation project! And as the town continues to reopen, be sure to take advantage of fencing lessons, dance academies, and the family-oriented Village Art Room – where creativity and fun meet. “Once you discover the delights of West Concord’s shopping and eating district, you’ll wonder why you haven’t been spending more time here,” said Debra Stark of Debra’s Natural Gourmet. “There is a warm welcome for every visitor…and an invitation to be a part of this thriving community any time.” West Concord welcomes you – come see us soon! For a list of where to shop and where to eat in West Concord – as well as a walking map – please see the center section of Discover Concord magazine or visit us online at DiscoverConcordma.com/virtual-visit.

Discover CONCORD

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& Allin in the the Heart Heart of All of Historic HistoricConcord Concord

GUEST LIVE ENTERTAINMENT – DINING GROUPS& EVENTS EVENTS GUESTROOMS ROOMS– — INDOOR & OUTDOOR DINING —–GROUPS

Make the Inn your home while visiting Concord. Walk to Concord Center’s charming sights and Thenunique come home to afternoon tea, meal. sights and shops. Then come home toshops. a relaxing cocktail and a delicious a unique cocktail, a delicious meal. Welcome to Concord! We or look forward to your visit. Welcome to Concord! We look forward to your visit. Make the Inn your home while visiting Concord. Walk to Concord Center’s charming

www.concordscolonialinn.com www.concordscolonialinn.com 48 Monument Square - Concord, MA 01742 48 Monument Square – Concord, MA 01742

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Discover978.369.9200 CONCORD | Summer 2020 Hotel: Restaurants: 978.369.2373 Hotel: 978.369.9200 Restaurants: 978.369.2372

Groups & Events: 978.341.8201

Groups and Events: 978.341.8201


CONCORD& Surrounding Areas WHERE TO STAY Concord Center Concord’s Colonial Inn Hawthorne Inn North Bridge Inn

West Concord 48 Monument Sq 462 Lexington Rd 21 Monument Sq

Best Western Residence Inn by Marriott

740 Elm St 320 Baker Ave

WHERE TO SHOP Concord Center *Albright Art Supply + Gift Artinian Jewelry Artisans Way Barrow Bookstore Be Well Be Here Blue Dry Goods Cheese Shop of Concord Comina Concord Bookshop Concord Lamp and Shade Concord Market Copper Penny Flowers Dotted i Fairbank and Perry Goldsmiths Footstock Fritz & Gigi French Lessons George Vassel Jewelry Gräem Nuts and Chocolate Grasshopper Shop Irresistables J McLaughlin Jack & Toba Lacoste Gallery Lyn Evans Montague Gallery Nesting North Bridge Antiques Patina Green Priscilla Candy Shop *Revolutionary Concord Sara Campbell Ltd Tess & Carlos The Umbrella Arts Center Thistle Hill Thoreauly Antiques Vanderhoof Hardware Viola Lovely Walden Liquors Walden Street Antiques

West Concord 32 Main St 39 Main St 18 Walden St 79 Main St 91 Main St, Suite 302 16 Walden St 29 Walden St 9 Walden St 65 Main St 21 Walden St 77 Lowell Rd 9 Independence Court 1 Walden St 32 Main St 46 Main St 79 Main St 8 Walden St 40 Main St 49 Main St 36 Main St 16 Walden St 14 Walden St 17 Walden St 25 Main St 29 Main St 10 Walden St 44 Main St 28 Walden St 59 Main St 19 Walden St 32 Main St 41 Main St 81 Main St 40 Stow St 13 Walden St 25 Walden St 28 Main St 38 Main St 18 Walden St 23 Walden St

A New Leaf Belle on Heels Concord Firefly Concord Flower Shop Concord Outfitters *Debra’s Natural Gourmet Forever Tile J’Aim Joy Street Life + Home Nu Yu Salon Rare Elements Reflections Three Stones Gallery Village Art Room Vintages Adventures in Wine *West Concord 5 & 10 West Concord Wine & Spirits

93 Thoreau St 75 Thoreau St 89 Thoreau St 211 Sudbury Rd 111 Thoreau St 82 Thoreau St 89 Thoreau St

West Concord

Thoreau Depot ATA Cycles Concord Provisions Concord Toy Shop Crosby’s Supermarket Frame-ables Juju The Toy Shop of Concord

* Money Saving Coupon on p.64

74 Commonwealth Ave 23 Commonwealth Ave 23 Commonwealth Ave 135 Commonwealth Ave 113 Commonwealth Ave 98 Commonwealth Ave 45 Commonwealth Ave 84a Commonwealth Ave 49 Commonwealth Ave 9 Church St 33 Bradford St 101 Commonwealth Ave 115 Commonwealth Ave 152 Commonwealth Ave 53 Commonwealth Ave 106 Commonwealth Ave 1215 Main St

WHERE TO EAT Concord Center Caffè Nero Comella’s *Fiorella’s Cucina Haute Coffee Helen’s Restaurant Liberty at the Colonial Inn Main Street’s Market & Café Merchant’s Row at the Colonial Inn Sally Ann’s Bakery & Food Shop Trail’s End Cafe

55 Main St 33 Main St 24 Walden St 12 Walden St 17 Main St 48 Monument Square 42 Main St 48 Monument Square 73 Main St 97 Lowell Rd

Thoreau Depot 80 Thoreau Bedford Farms Ice Cream Chang An Restaurant Dunkin’ Donuts Farfalle Italian Market Café Karma Concord Asian Fusion New London Style Pizza Sorrento’s Brick Oven Pizzeria Starbucks

99 Restaurant & Pub Adelita Club Car Café Concord Teacakes Dino’s Kouzina & Pizzeria Dunkin’ Donuts Nashoba Brook Bakery Reasons to Be Cheerful Saltbox Kitchen Walden Italian Kitchen Woods Hill Table

80 Thoreau St 68 Thoreau St 10 Concord Crossing 117 Thoreau St 26 Concord Crossing 105 Thoreau St 71 Thoreau St 58 Thoreau St 159 Sudbury Rd

13 Commonwealth Ave 1200 Main St 20 Commonwealth Ave 59 Commonwealth Ave 1135 Main St 1191 Main St 152 Commonwealth Ave 110 Commonwealth Ave 84 Commonwealth Ave 92 Commonwealth Ave 24 Commonwealth Ave

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Concord Museum 200 Lexington Rd Concord Visitor Center 58 Main St Louisa May Alcott’s Orchard 62 House 399 Lexington Rd Minute Man National Historical Park 250 N. Great Rd (Lincoln) The North Bridge

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Barrett Sotheby’s Int’l Realty Barrow Bookstore Be Well Be Here The Cheese Shop Coldwell Banker Residential

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Concord Players

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William Raveis Real Estate

Trail’s End Café

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Hawthorne Inn

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Compass Real Estate

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West Concord Wine & Spirits

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Three Stones Gallery *West Concord 5 & 10 Woods Hill Table

* Money Saving Coupon on p. 64

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W With longer days, fresh breezes, and the bright colors of summer, many of us will be looking to refresh our spaces to make the most out of time at home. West Concord is proud to welcome a new gem in the design and build world – Appleton Design Group. Owner Nathalie Appleton and her building partner Tino Fazio help make renovation dreams come true through a seamless experience that offers everything from architectural services, to general contracting, to interior design - all under one umbrella. Big Dreams, Local Shop “There’s something comforting about working with people you trust,” said Nathalie Appleton. “We make a point to take the time to get to know our clients. We want to understand their vision so we can help them make their design dream a reality. We are a small shop – so the same people that help walk you through the creative process are

right there to swing the hammers and make it happen for you.” Your Kitchen – the Hearth in Every Home “With kitchens, it’s more than just a new look,” said Nathalie. “Creating a better flow, optimizing new (and greener!) technologies to make cooking a pleasure, and making

space for kids to hang out and do homework while we cook and chat makes the kitchen a real center piece of the household.” Tub or Shower – the Beauty of a WellDesigned Bathroom Utility and comfort come together in an ideal bathroom. From deep soaker tubs, to sophisticated tiled showers, the subtle touches of bathroom fixtures can add elegance or whimsy to any home. Appleton Design Group helps clients create a peaceful haven from the stresses of everyday life through creative touches that connect a moment of calm to even the smallest of spaces. “Renovating a home doesn’t have to be overwhelming – and you don’t need to do the whole project at once,” said Nathalie. “I tell my clients that if they do nothing else, renovating and modernizing their kitchen and bath will make the whole house feel new and updated. It’s a great place to start!”

Appleton Design Group would be delighted to meet with you to discuss your home design and build dream. No project is too small, so they encourage you to stop by for an informal chat or to make an appointment to dive deeper into your dream. Call or visit today! Appletondesigngroup.com | Tel. 978-369-3322 | nathalie@appletondesigngroup.com | 51 Commonwealth Avenue, Concord MA 01742

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BY ALIDA ORZECHOWSKI

an American Poet - a voice In 1855, Ralph Waldo Emerson wrote a letter that was so encompassing that would become one of the most famous and powerful that it could be pieces of correspondence in American representative of the country literary history. as a whole. That year was a difficult time for the “The poet is the person adolescent country. Already sharply in whom these powers are divided over the issue of slavery, “free in balance, the man without soilers” and pro-slavery factions were impediment, who sees and quickly disintegrating into bloody violence. handles that which others The ongoing gold rush and westward dream of, traverses the whole expansion was continuing to displace native scale of experience, and is populations, while the same year, and representative of man, in without irony, a white, anti-immigrant party virtue of being the largest in Cincinnati would attack a local Germanpower to receive and to American neighborhood for being foreigners. impart,” he wrote. In Concord, Emerson’s wife Lidian protested In that tense July of 1855, the state of the Union and slavery by hanging Emerson felt he had finally black bunting from their house on the 4th of found his Poet and a few days July. Thoreau was ill almost that entire year later wrote to the 36-year-old and Waldo fretted about his friend’s decline. Whitman, saying “I greet you Hawthorne and his family were away in at the beginning of a great England, and the Alcotts were scattered, still career…I am not blind to the worth of the a few years away from taking up residence at wonderful gift of Leaves of Grass…” Emerson what would become Orchard House. then delivered his highest In this anxious compliment, stating “I find environment it the most extraordinary Emerson piece of wit and wisdom received a thin that America has yet book of poems, contributed.”1 anonymously sent from New The letter would eventually York, but bearing be published (without the name Walter Emerson’s knowledge) and Whitman along would serve to ensure the Walt Whitman, with that of the book’s success. In later publisher. This was years, there would be some Song of Myself XXXI the first edition backtracking by both men of Leaves of Grass. with Emerson asking the poet To Emerson, that little book of poetry was a to tone down some of the volume’s explicit direct answer to a call that was issued more sexual references, and with Whitman later than a decade previously. denying Emerson was ever an influence, In his 1844 Essays: Second Series, Emerson despite a mountain of evidence to the contrary. had included an essay called The Poet, in Regardless of their eventual disagreements, which he expressed the need and desire for the gentle transcendentalist and the rough

I believe a leaf of grass is no less than the journey-work of the stars

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| Summer 2020

Walt Whitman

©wikimediacommons

I

The Concord Sage and an American Poet

New York native were now inextricably linked to each other and to American literary history. The Sage of Concord called, and was answered by the first “poet of democracy” - a man who spoke not as himself, but as the voice of the country, in all its horror and glory, its beauty and sorrow. Or as Whitman famously put it in Song of Myself, his epic ode to America, Do I contradict myself? Very well then I contradict myself, (I am large, I contain multitudes.) ————————————————————————— Alida Vienna Orzechowski has served as the Director of Marketing and historic interpreter at The Old Manse, Board Member of Thoreau Farm Trust, and a member of the Concord Historical Collaborative. She is the founder of Concord Tour Company and is a licensed Concord guide. Letter, Ralph Waldo Emerson to Walt Whitman extolling Whitman’s poetry, 21 July 1855. Manuscript/Mixed Material. https://www.loc.gov/item/mcc.012/.

1


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33


I

BY RICHARD SMITH

34

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In the mid-1830’s, a new word entered the American lexicon; Transcendentalism. It was a word that was vague and confusing, a word that seemed mystical, spiritual, and possibly even blasphemous. Even today, 170 years later, Transcendentalism is still misunderstood, and many people have a hard time explaining what it was and what it means. Lexico.com defines Transcendentalism as “an idealistic philosophical and social movement which developed in New England around 1836 in reaction to rationalism. Influenced by romanticism, Platonism, and Kantian philosophy, it taught that divinity pervades all nature and humanity, and its members held progressive views on feminism and communal living. Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau were central figures.” Simply put, it is the idea that God is present in all things, that we are surrounded by divinity. All of nature is divine, and therefore, since man is a part of nature, we have the capability to be divine as well. Of course, in the ultra-religious 19th century, this was seen as irreligious and dangerous. Almost every Transcendentalist was a Harvard graduate and a Unitarian. At a time when the Unitarian Church was fairly conservative, progressive minded

| Summer 2020

ministers like Emerson and Theodore Parker, looking for a direct, intimate relationship with God, decided that the church wasn’t giving them the connection they desired. They needed to transcend their senses and rationality, to look outward to nature and inward toward their souls in order to find God. They needed to be transcendental. The Unitarian hierarchy was, as you can imagine, less than excited by these spiritual upstarts, whom they called blasphemous and insane. One Unitarian leader called Transcendentalism “the latest form of infidelity.” Some ministers, like Emerson, left the church. Others, like Theodore Parker and Thomas Wentworth Higginson, remained with the church and continued to preach their “abundant heresies” (as Parker proudly called them) of spiritual reform to a growing number of followers. Transcendentalism was not really organized; the like-minded men and women didn’t decide to be rebellious and create a movement. It just happened as they discovered and met others who thought like them. Many of them didn’t even like the word “Transcendentalism”! But once it started, people began to look to Emerson and others for answers and direction. The Transcendentalists were young men and women in their 20s. Like

freepik.com/@jigsawstocker

Transcendentalism 101


There would be no need for government; we would all be self-governing, in touch with the Higher Laws of God and, as Thoreau called it, the universal constitution inside each and every one of us. ideal world. In a Transcendentalist’s eyes, all men are created equal and we should do unto others as we would have others do unto us. In the Transcendental world all creatures, great and small, would cohabitate and share the earth and her resources. There would be no need for government; we would all be self-governing, in touch with the Higher Laws of God and, as Thoreau called it, the universal constitution inside each and every one of us. As a movement, Transcendentalism was short lived. It started in 1835 and by 1860 it had died out. Some of their ideas for reform, especially the abolition of slavery, education for all, and women’s rights became part of the American mainstream. Emerson became a celebrity, known far and wide as The Sage of Concord and essays like Self Reliance became American classics. What was strange or blasphemous in 1836 was now charming and quaint, especially when viewed through the bloodshed and horror of the Civil War. As a spiritual movement it had limited appeal, but many of the Transcendentalists were brilliant writers, and as a literary movement it had a far reaching effect, with books like Emerson’s Essays, Thoreau’s Walden, and Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass becoming part of the American literary canon. Those books, and those writers, are the legacy of Transcendentalism. They remind us of what’s good and right about the human condition, how we can become better people, and how we can create a better world. Emerson wrote that Transcendentalism was merely “Idealism for the 19th century.” But really, aren’t the notions of equality for all and harmony with nature just as important now as in 1836? Maybe we still need Transcendentalism. Maybe we all need to be more idealistic.

Bronson Alcott

Ralph Waldo Emerson

—————————————————————————— Richard Smith has worked as a public historian in Concord for 21 years, specializing in Henry David Thoreau, the Transcendentalists, the Anti-Slavery movement, and the Civil War. He has written six books for Applewood Books and is a tour guide for the Concord Tour Company.

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Photos ©Wikimedia Commons

many social and cultural movements, it was the younger generation who led the way in trying to create a better world and each one brought his or her own beliefs into the fold. For instance, Henry Thoreau was influenced by Hinduism and Native American spirituality, while Margaret Fuller’s interest in Göethe and other Romantic literature from Germany led her to Transcendentalism. This wasn’t a wide-spread movement. Rather, many of the Transcendentalists lived in Boston, Cambridge, or Concord, which became ground zero for the movement because of Emerson and Thoreau. The first important book of Transcendentalism, Emerson’s Nature, was written in Concord, at the Old Manse. And, of course, Thoreau lived at Walden Pond for two years and wrote his ode to Transcendental living, Walden, about that experience. The Transcendentalists were reform-minded people. Their belief in the perfectibility of man led them to be involved in many of the era’s social and cultural reform movements. Bronson Alcott wanted to improve the American educational system and he was also a vegetarian. Margaret Fuller was an advocate for women’s rights; her Woman in the Nineteenth Century is considered the first American feminist book. And many of the Transcendentalists were also involved in the anti-slavery movement and wrote about, lectured on, and protested for the immediate abolition of slavery. Meanwhile, in the hope of improving society, some Transcendentalists decided to find their own way apart from society and create heaven on earth. The 1840’s saw a rise in the creation of Utopian communities throughout the Northeast. Not all of these communities were Transcendental, but almost all, like the Shakers, were spiritual. The two best known Transcendental communities were Brook Farm in West Roxbury, Massachusetts and Bronson Alcott’s Fruitlands in Harvard, Massachusetts. Both were doomed to failure, however. Brook Farm lasted several years, but Fruitlands fell apart after only six months. Another word for Transcendentalism is Idealism. That’s what they were looking for, the

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Henry’s Sunflowers

H BY BONNIE BEAUDET

Henry’s sunflowers greeted me as I walked the path to the old farmhouse. This is a peaceful place – this house where Henry David Thoreau was born in 1817. He lived here only eight months. The cold summer caused all the crops to fail and his family had to abandon the farm and move to Concord center where his father ran a store. It was difficult making ends meet in those days. Life was hard. The family moved around, to Chelmsford then on to Boston before returning to Concord for good when little Henry was five. So Henry David Thoreau grew up in Concord, though not on this farm where he was born. Many people are at least somewhat familiar with Henry David Thoreau, most notably known for a small house he built on the shores of Walden Pond where he lived for two years, two months, and two days. But that is another story. This is a story about the farmhouse where the acclaimed Mr. Thoreau “first saw the light in the easternmost of its upper chambers”.1 This old house, whose path to the back door is now lined with glorious sunflowers, was built in 1730. The original owner sold it to his cousin, a deacon’s son, in 1756 who transformed the plain old saltbox farmhouse into a stately property with corner quoins, Georgian doors, and decorative moldings over the windows. Inside, raised panels and carved banisters showed off the prosperity of the farmer. Those were good years for the house. The family lived here until the deacon’s son died in 1813. His wife was granted a widow’s third – also another story – which allowed her to stay in the house.

©B. Beaudet

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The widow was Henry David Thoreau’s maternal grandmother and that is how he came to be born here. But after the cold summer caused its residents to flee, the lovely house began to fail. Over the next half century, the house was used as a tenant farm. In 1878 it was removed from its foundation, put on sleds and moved by teams of oxen 300 yards down Virginia Road to its current location. The last private owner of the house died in 1995 and the house was at risk of demolition. But a group of Thoreau disciples screamed “No! We must save this sacred place for it is where our native son was born.” And thus, with the efforts and determination of so many dedicated people, it happened. The old house was not only saved from being torn down, it was lovingly and painstakingly brought back to its finest days of the mid to late eighteenth century. I was blessed to be hired as a docent to share the history of this house and its occupants, some famous, some obscure. On this late summer day I sit on the back porch and gaze at the tall sunflowers, grateful for Henry David Thoreau and the people he inspired. I smile and agree with Henry’s observation that “Happy we who can bask in this warm September sun.”2 ———————————————————————— Bonnie Beaudet is a licensed Concord Tour Guide and Docent at Thoreau Farm, birthplace of Henry David Thoreau. She is a freelance writer and lives in Littleton, MA. 1 Ellery Channing, Thoreau The Poet-Naturalist. (Charles E Goodspeed, Boston, 1902) 2 Thoreau, A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers


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Barrow Bookstore Presents:

Trivia

CONCORD

Q 1

Some diseases occur in alarming resurgences. What disease repeatedly plagued Massachusetts and America in the 17th, 18th, and early 19th centuries?

2

Massachusetts Puritan Minister Cotton Mather is darkly memorialized in several of Concord author Nathaniel Hawthorne’s short stories. Mather was involved in the Salem Witch Trials where he shared his opinion that the accused were indeed witches, evil, and worthy of death. But Mather was also interested in science and was a key figure in introducing which of the following to Massachusetts? a) Swimming lessons b) Inoculations c) Cardiopulmonary resuscitation d) Jogging (preferably away from the gallows)

3

Dr. Benjamin Rush, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence, prescribed which of the following for patients about to receive an inoculation? a) A cup of weak chocolate and a biscuit b) A cup of tea and two tablespoons of honey 40

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| Summer 2020

c) Strong coffee with a thimble of rum d) A dram of whiskey

4

In 1721, so many people were dying from smallpox in Massachusetts that selectmen in Boston limited which of the following? a) Visits to friends b) Number of people allowed in churches c) Number of times funeral bells could toll d) Right to assemble

5

The Boston Tea Party occurred on December 16, 1773. Covert events like that can be stressful and lifting heavy chests of tea could put strain on your heart. If you were among the 18th century colonists dumping the tea into the harbor and one of your comrades went into sudden cardiac arrest, which of the following actions might you take? a) Leave him behind as a scapegoat b) Throw his torso over a barrel, grab his legs and start rolling him back and forth c) Find the most odiferous seaweed in the harbor, expose his chest, and beat him with the seaweed

d) This is not a real tea party and there is no time for sentiment! Dump him into the harbor with the East Indian Trading Company chests

6

Have a fever? Stomachache? Sore throat? If you lived in 1780’s Concord, you might try making Harvard-educated physician Cotton Tufts’ recommended concoction of lime or lemon juice, salt, loaf sugar, and distilled cordial water served in a wine glass. But why might this treatment not be available to everyone in 18th century Concord?

7

In 1801, twenty-six years after “the shot heard ‘round the world” was fired in Concord, MA, the threat of smallpox once again loomed heavy over America. The highly contagious illness required the newly independent America to act. Although historically Massachusetts residents and other Americans clearly did not like an authoritarian figure telling them what to do or curtailing their freedom, in many places, politicians, clergy, and local town leaders worked together for the public good. Actions taken included which of the following?


A 1. Smallpox

a) Quarantining newly arrived visitors or people who were sick b) Restricting travel in areas of known illness c) Putting sick people in the stocks so everyone knew whom to avoid d) Inoculating citizens

8 ©istock.com/Givaga

True or False: During the 1918 Spanish Flu pandemic, Concord schools stayed open to encourage herd immunity.

2. b) Inoculations. Mather is said to have learned about inoculation from Onesimus, an enslaved man from West Africa, who told Mather about an inoculation he had received in Africa that would forever save him from smallpox. When smallpox reappeared in Boston in 1721, Mather approached the medical community to share the foreign concept of inoculation. Most physicians dismissed him, but Doctor Zabdiel Boylston was intrigued by Mather’s insistence and research. Boylston began experimenting with inoculation

aid in chest movement: backward barrel rolls compressed the chest for expiration; forward barrel rolls released pressure for inspiration. Seaweed might have been used as a much earlier and primitive method of resuscitation where the suddenly deceased person was beaten with odiferous items, sticks, stinging nettles, pelted with dung, or anything else unpleasant that was on hand. Want to try something much better? Sign up for a CPR course at the Thoreau Club in Concord (https://www.thoreau. com/water-safety-courses/cpr-aed) or anywhere approved classes are offered. No barrel needed. 6. Because sugar was expensive. Considered a luxury item, most sugar in the Colonial era came in loaves wrapped in blue paper. The paper could then be used to create dye for things like clothing. 7. a, b, and d. 8. False. As described in a past exhibit at the Concord Library, Spanish Flu began appearing in Concord in September of 1918, and became a full crisis by October. Concord’s schools were closed for the month of October, but reopened in November.

9

Today, when you see a Concord Fire Department emergency medical services (EMS) vehicle, you can be assured that you are in good, well-trained hands. But decades before ambulances and formal pre-hospital services were created, another motorized vehicle was commonly used to transport sick and injured patients to the hospital, and its arrival at your side might have been more alarming than the emergency you were experiencing. What was the vehicle?

10

Covid-19 has inspired many wonderful Concordians to sew masks for the community. The Spanish Flu of 1918 also called for mask wearing by Americans, and inspired what 1918 women’s fashion trend?

and Mather and Boylston tracked the data. The results showed inoculations were effective, and the introduction of smallpox inoculations began in Boston and throughout the Colonies. 3. a) A weak cup of chocolate with a biscuit 4. c) Number of times funeral bells could toll. The high number of deaths would have resulted in bells tolling all day. 5. b) In the mid to late 1700’s, the barrel method was used to attempt resuscitation. Rolling the stricken person’s torso back and forth on the barrel was thought to

9. A hearse. By the 1960’s, hospitals in America were providing an advanced and wide scope of care. Pre-hospital medicine was not yet on the same improvement pace. In 1966, if you summoned help, there was a 50/50 chance that a hearse would show up. Driven by a mortician, the hearse was convenient; there might not be any flowers, but you could lie down and be miserable all the way to the hospital. 10. Influenza veils (“flu veils”). Described as a “necessity in malady’s wardrobe”, common material for influenza veils included colorful chiffons and Shetland mesh. Wearers were described as looking like mummies or ready for a motor car ride.

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Boaz’s Meadow

Following in the Footsteps

I

of Thoreau BY SUSAN BAILEY

In the early 1960’s a high school freshman watched a quiz show, “College Bowl.” Little did he know how that random act would change his life. Many years later, he tells the story: “The moderator asked what noted book began with the following words. Before he had said fifteen words, one of the college whiz kids gave the correct answer — Walden by Henry David Thoreau. Then the moderator read the complete sentence, which captivated me.” It was the first line in Thoreau’s iconic work: “When I wrote the following pages, or rather the bulk of them, I lived alone, in the woods, a mile from any neighbor, in a house which I have built myself, on the shore of Walden Pond, in Concord, Massachusetts, and earned my living by the labor of my hands only.” 42

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| Summer 2020

That high school freshman was Ray Angelo. “I got hold of Walden, read it, and was instantly attracted to Thoreau’s values of independence, simplicity, and deep appreciation for the natural world of Concord and New England,” he said. Mr. Angelo would devote much of his life to the study of Henry David Thoreau, Thoreau’s friend Minot Pratt (a co-founder of Brook Farm, one of the more successful nineteenth century utopian communities), and their shared passion for the flora and fauna of Concord. Mr. Angelo’s interest has manifested itself in many ways: as co-curator of Natural History Collections for Harvard University’s Concord Field Station (19761999) and assistant curator, and then curator, of Vascular Plants for the New England

Botanical Club (1979-2008). He continues to be an associate of the Harvard University Herbaria and is a regional reviewer for the Flora North American project. Mr. Angelo has several published works related to trees and shrubs of the Concord area, along with the Catalog of Plant Specimens and Index for Emily Dickinson’s Herbarium, and a Botanical Index to the Journal of Henry David Thoreau. His most recent project (which is ongoing) pinpoints as many of Henry David Thoreau’s place names in Concord and Lincoln, Massachusetts as possible using latitude and longitude coordinates applicable with Google Maps. Entries are supplemented with commentary and all Thoreau journal references. The title of the project is Place Names of Henry David


Photos © 2020 Cherrie Corey

Lime Quarries, Estabrook Woods

Fairhaven Cliff

Ray Angelo, Fairhaven Cliff, 1981

Thoreau in Concord, Massachusetts (and in Lincoln, Massachusetts) & Other Botanical Sites in Concord. This illustrated document is available free online at www.ray-a.com. With this remarkable resource, any Thoreau enthusiast can create their own pilgrimage, exploring the places where Thoreau walked. Currently residing in Ipswich with his wife, Erika Sonder, Mr. Angelo came to Concord in the late 1970s and spent eight years studying the same trees, shrubs, and wildflowers of which Thoreau had written. “When I finally started exploring Concord after having read through Thoreau’s complete journal twice, I felt so honored to be treading the same paths and seeing descendants of the very same trees, shrubs, and wildflowers that he admired,” Mr. Angelo said. “And I was thrilled

to find some notable ones that were certainly there in his time but missed by him.” Asked to imagine what it might have been like to live in Concord during the time of transcendentalism, Mr. Angelo mused, “Alas, if I had lived in Concord in the time of Thoreau, I know I would not have been able to keep up with them. Certainly, if not overburdened with making a living I would have been delighted to explore on my own and share whatever discoveries I might happen to make that they might not have already known about.” With the publication of his work on places Thoreau had visited and referenced in his journal, Mr. Angelo has provided a wonderful resource to those who wish to follow in the footsteps of the

transcendentalist naturalist. “My hope is that Thoreau devotees might use my reference to understand where everything is in Concord and adjacent towns to which Thoreau refers, often using his own coined names. He added, “I envision the possibility that my reference might help Concord residents and fans of Concord appreciate many of the secluded, natural locales that Henry David Thoreau treasured that still endure.” ———————————————————————— Susan Bailey is the author of two books (Louisa May Alcott: Illuminated by The Message and River of Grace) and webmaster for the Louisa May Alcott is My Passion blog at louisamayalcottismypassion.com. She is a correspondent for the Catholic Free Press and contributes regularly to BookTrib.com.

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Fresh Farm

T

from the

BY CYNTHIA BAUDENDISTEL

The COVID-19 virus has taken a toll on area farmers. With mandated closures coming right at the beginning of spring, the fresh fruits and vegetables that we all love were out of reach for a time.

We have good news, though. Many farms are open once again with online ordering, curbside service, no-contact purchasing stations, and other programs to ensure that you can easily and safely get your five-a-day of fresh fruits and veggies. Here is a quick round-up of just a few of Concord’s gems where you can find some of the freshest fruits and vegetables this summer.*

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Zinnia and chicken photo ©Marshall Farm

Barrett’s Mill Farm grows more than 50 types of Certified Organic fruits, vegetables, and flowers and the Farm Store is open. You can order your produce online and pick it up curbside or you are welcome to stop by and browse the fresh, healthy options and beautiful hand-picked bouquets. www.barrettsmillfarm.com Cucurbit Farm is a fifth-generation family farm where you can choose from a selection of fresh vegetables, fresh fish (on Fridays), and even their very own popcorn. They also carry a wide array of garden plants, including annuals, perennials, and herbs. www.cucurbitfarm.com

Millbrook Farm has suffered from a double crisis – in addition to the challenges of COVID-19, ongoing construction near the Concord Museum discourages lots of customers from visiting this lovely farm stand. Take a trip to 215 Cambridge Turnpike and you’ll be rewarded with beautiful flowers and more! Saltbox Farm is the place for organically grown produce, eggs, lamb, and flowers. The Farm Stand is open or, if you prefer, order the Farmer’s Choice Produce Bag and pick it up curbside at Saltbox Kitchen’s restaurant in West Concord. Either way, the fresh produce, herbs, and even lamb are sure to make dinner at home a night to remember. saltboxfarmconcord.com

Scimone’s Farm, established in 1923, is a family run farm that produces great corn and a variety of produce, including berries, beans, corn, and zucchinis. The trendy vegetables that locavores love – such as Swiss chard, ramps, and kales — can also be found at their charming stand on Old Bedford Road. Verrill Farm has been growing beautiful produce in Concord since 1918 - and not even a pandemic slows them down. While pick-your-own strawberry season may be over (and we hope you were able to enjoy a day in the strawberry fields last month), the mid-summer bounty of vegetables is just beginning. From arugula to Swiss chard you’re sure to find something tasty at the Farm Stand. Not sure what to do with all those fresh veggies? Pick up a copy of their book, Verrill Farm Cookbook: A Farm Grows in Concord for great recipes. verrillfarm.com *All information current as of press time. Please check websites for the most current information, including requirements concerning masks, social distancing, etc.

©J. Schunemann

Tomato photo ©Barrett’s Mill Farm, produce ©Wikimedia Commons

Marshall Farm is a third-generation family farm that provides fruit, vegetables, milk, organic eggs, and more to the Concord area. Pick up a jar of their honey to top your waffles or a chicken pie for dinner, along with fresh vegetables and some flowers for the table. marshall-farms.com

©J. Schunemann

Hutchins Farm is committed to growing organically and preserving the land for future generations. The Farm Stand is open or check out their Farmer’s Choice Bag o’ Veggies, which can be ordered online and picked up curbside at the Farm Stand. www.hutchinsfarm.com

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Great Meadows

A Beginner’s Guide to Concord’s

BEAUTIFUL OUTDOORS

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Summer has always been a wonderful time to explore the many trails, parks, historic sites, and other natural wonders of Concord. During these stressful times, it’s more important than ever to take time to enjoy nature - to get outside and feel the sun and the breezes, to marvel at the plants and animals with which we share this world, and to find our best selves again. I’ve spent many years walking these trails and photographing the plants and animals found there. Over the years I’ve found a number of places that have become favorites. Here are a few I recommend to locals and visitors alike: GREAT MEADOWS is a favorite place for those who enjoy quiet walks with lots of birds, critters, and special plants. It is an easy walk from town via the rail bed off Monument Street. There are several nice viewing spots including the tower at the parking lot off Munson Road, the deck on the causeway, and benches scattered around the trails. Great Meadows encompasses (looking west to east) Borden Pond, the upper impoundment, and 48

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| Summer 2020

STORY AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVE WITHERBEE

the lower impoundment. The causeway runs between the upper and lower impoundments, and leads down to the Concord River. A trail to the left (north) of the causeway goes around the lower impoundment and back to the rail bed and parking lot. The best times to visit are early and late in the day – these are the best times to see the wildlife and to take pictures. Buttrick Mansion

Concord River to the north and the North Bridge to the east. Look for the remains of the home of Captain David Brown and his wife Abigail. The remaining cellar hole shows the footprint of where they lived with 10 children and Uncle Elias. Your job is to figure out how they managed to all live in a place not much bigger than the wood shed. It is a pleasant walk from town to get to this cluster of interesting places, although it may take several visits to see everything. THE WILD & SCENIC RIVERS ACT enacted by Congress in 1968 sought to preserve certain rivers with outstanding natural, cultural, and recreational values in a freeflowing condition for the enjoyment of present and future generations. Concord is Sudbury River

NORTH BRIDGE, BUTTRICK MANSION, THE ROBBINS HOUSE, AND THE GROUNDS OF THE OLD MANSE combine to make a delightful place to stroll, check up on history, or have a picnic. The formal gardens of the Buttrick Mansion have beautiful views of the


Walden Upper Trail

blessed to have three Wild & Scenic Rivers; the Sudbury, the Assabet, and the Concord rivers. The Sudbury and the Assabet rivers convene at Egg Rock and form the Concord River, which flows north into the Merrimack River in Lowell and eventually flows out to sea at Newburyport and Plum Island. Both the Sudbury and the Assabet start and bow out from Westborough, Ma. To paddle or trail walk on these rivers is a different visual experience because they each have their own style. The Sudbury is slow moving and wider, the Assabet is faster moving, narrow and winding, while the Concord River is a mixture of the other two. Access points can be found using maps on the Organization for the Assabet, Sudbury, and Concord Rivers site at http://oars3rivers.org/ THE BATTLE ROAD is a very nice place to stroll, jog, or bike on a hard-packed dirt road that the British followed during their retreat from the Battle of the North Bridge. The road meanders about five miles through beautiful farm fields and wooded areas. A footbridge crosses a marsh and passes many

lot near Meriam’s Corner on Lexington Road where the Willow Pond Kitchen used to be (the lobster and beer was very good if one did not mind hanging animal heads staring at you from the walls). One could also drive to the Minute Man National Historical Park headquarters on route 2A in Lexington in order to break the distance up and then travel the eastern end of the Battle Road. WALDEN POND is not just a lovely pond. It is a glacially formed kettle hole with many glacial features such as eskers and vernal pools. Walden is the deepest lake in Massachusetts with clear, blue-green water (a lake is determined by depth and whether Battle Road

cellar holes of past farms, an old tavern, and homes. It is an easy walk now - but it was a tough trip for the British soldiers who marched the road while being shot at from behind stone walls by the Minutemen. The route can be accessed from the parking

light reaches the bottom). Despite its extensive number of visitors and swimmers, it has an interesting way of staying clear…so far. There are many books about Walden that tell us of the history, geology, and hydrology and many are worth reading such as those of

Robert Thorson. The pond was once owned by families such as Emerson, Wyman, and Hayward and then controlled by Middlesex County, and currently by the State Park and Recreation Department. Henry Thoreau made Walden famous during his stay of two years, two months and two days (and wrote about his experience there). The majority of people wandering around the pond follow the Pond Trail along the pond edge. There is a special route on the north side that few use that I call the upper trail. It can be accessed by crossing Walden Street from the parking lot toward the paved ramp to the beach, but then following the path along the road toward Rt 2 for about 50 yards and taking a left turn and left again up an incline. This esker route drops down to Wyman’s meadow and across the wooden foot bridge. There is also an upper route on the western side from just beyond Thoreau’s cabin site that returns to the pond edge at Ice Fort Cove (this is where the ice was taken out to the railroad). The Thoreau Society shop at the visitor center has books about the pond that one would find interesting regarding this very special lake. These are just a few of Concord’s stunning natural gems. I would encourage you to explore these treasures and more. Time in nature is time well spent, and balancing for the mind and the body. Enjoy! ———————————————————————— David Witherbee is a Concord native, an avid nature enthusiast, and a wildlife photographer.

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Thank you.

These past months have been challenging for all of us, but the Concord community has come together to encourage, support, and sustain each other in ways we never could have imagined. We want to thank the following companies who gave a little extra to help make our Summer issue possible. This generosity allowed us to lower our ad rates to make sure that more of our amazing shops and restaurants could be included during this difficult time. After all, we’re all in this together! Barrett Sotheby’s International Realty Coldwell Banker The Senkler Team

Cummings Printing

Pierre Chiha Photographers

Debra’s Natural Gourmet

Revolutionary Concord

Minuteman Guitars

Spaulding Management LLC

North Bridge Antiques


WWW.PIERRE.COM

978-369-9949

PCHIHAPHOTO@GMAIL.COM

PORTRAITS

NOW IS THE TIME

NOW, MORE THAN EVER, CAPTURING THOSE PRECIOUS FAMILY MOMENTS IS SO IMPORTANT

MENTION

THIS

PUBLICATION

TOWARDS

PRINTS

AND

AND

RECEIVE

DIGITAL

$100

IN

IMAGES

CREDIT


LESSONS OF HISTORY:

Concord & the 1918 Influenza Pandemic

A

A week before Thanksgiving 1917, the Concord Enterprise printed a letter from a young Maynard man named Hugh Connors. The United States had entered the First World War seven months earlier, and Connors had shipped out with New England Sawmill Unit No. 3, a team of American lumbermen stationed in Scotland.1 “I am writing this letter in bed,” he wrote, “as I have been laid up for a week with the grippe. Over here they call it influenza,” he added, as if translating a foreign word. “I am not at the hospital, but have engaged a room about five minutes’ ride by bicycle, from our camp.”2

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Red Cross volunteers assemble gauze masks at Fort Devens, Devens, MA

He didn’t seem too worried about his illness. His bunkmates, felling trees to supply lumber for the war effort, probably mocked him as he pedaled off to his cozy sickbed. Friends and family back home never suspected that this might be their first warning of an imminent global tragedy. The first wave of the influenza pandemic took its heaviest toll among the oldest and youngest populations. Fit young adults like Hugh Connors often recovered quickly. Americans knew little about the disease, because wartime censorship kept the European press from reporting on it. Spain

remained neutral, so the Spanish press were free to document the outbreak, leading many to refer to it as “Spanish flu.” In March 1918, a case of influenza was reported at Fort Riley in Kansas, and quickly spread as soldiers were moved from base to base. In the late summer, a more lethal strain of the flu emerged, and Concord found itself dead center between two of the U.S. hot spots, less than 20 miles from both Boston Navy Yard and Camp Devens. On September 20, a soldier at Devens died “after but a few hours’ illness [of the] influenza now so prevalent among both soldiers and civilians.”

Public domain

BY VICTOR CURRAN


©Acton Historical Society . Pharmacy photo Public domain

A Red Cross nurse attending the sick at Camp Devens was another victim. In September 1918, Maynard reported “200 cases under treatment.” In three weeks that number had jumped to more than a thousand, and “churches of every denomination were closed” as advised by health authorities. Concord closed its schools for the month of October, and Acton, Maynard, and other nearby towns followed suit. Concord’s Board of Health documented “between 250 and 400 cases” of the flu, including 25 fatalities, in mid-October. They noted an encouraging trend over one weekend when “On Friday there were 21 new cases, on Saturday nine, and from Saturday until Monday only 7,” but warned against a false sense of security, declaring “Every precaution should be taken by all to help check this epidemic.” The Massachusetts State Department of Health issued familiar guidelines: “Wash your hands before each meal. Smother your cough in your handkerchief. Avoid the person who coughs or sneezes. Don’t go to crowded places. Walk to work if possible.” Other recommendations were to stay warm, avoid dampness, and get plenty of fresh air and sunshine, all thought to help fight off the flu. A Maynard pharmacist ran a prominent newspaper advertisement urging readers to “prevent disease” with a “Disinfectant, Germicide, and Antiseptic” called Sulpho-Tol, perhaps the Purell of its day. State, county, and district elections were just a few weeks away, but the Concord Enterprise noted that they stirred up little interest, because “the minds of the voters are occupied with news of the war, [and] the ravages of the influenza epidemic.” Even those who escaped infection felt the impact of the epidemic. The flu took a devastating toll among coal miners, and local residents were urged to “save what anthracite you can” because coal was in short supply. The Concord Board of Health noted the town experienced food shortages and

ABOVE: New England Sawmill Unit LEFT: Pharmacy Advertisement from Concord Enterprise, Oct 2, 1918

“unsatisfactory” garbage collection due to widespread illness of workers.3 School Superintendent Wells A. Hall worried over how to make up the students’ progress lost over the four weeks that schools were closed due to the epidemic. He toyed with the idea of prolonging the school year to July 4, but wisely concluded “we shall get only diminishing returns.”4 By the beginning of November, the epidemic was thought to be “almost at a standstill, there being but a very few new cases reported.” Schools reopened and a headline declared “Places May Open for Business Monday—Danger Thought to Have Passed.” Residents’ optimism was premature. In January 1919, the flu surged back with “[m]any new cases” in Concord, Acton, Bedford, and Sudbury. Acton and Boxboro closed their schools. The dedication of the new Harvey Wheeler School was “indefinitely postponed” due to influenza. (It would eventually take place on March 12.) The Concord Enterprise warned its readers, “There is considerable danger at the present time, as influenza is paying Boston and vicinity a return visit. Do not neglect a cold, and beware of coughers and sneezers.” By mid-February the outbreak had subsided, and Concord and its neighbors 1

paused to reflect on what they had learned from this trauma. The Town of Maynard acknowledged that the restrictions placed on businesses, though unpleasant, were “for the common good of the community.” “Much was accomplished but still more could have been done by earlier organization,” the Concord Enterprise observed. The American Red Cross proposed taking a Survey of Nursing Resources, a house-to-house canvass to identify those “capable of giving assistance in the care of not only the Army but the great number of those who must remain at home.” Concord expressed gratitude not only to government agencies, but to private citizens and nonprofit groups who had stepped up to the help those afflicted by the epidemic. The Board of Health declared that the “real work of taking care of the victims of this epidemic was undertaken by the Women’s Charitable Society, with the aid of the Red Cross . . . obtaining nurses, opening of food kitchens, and carrying food to the homes where all were stricken.”5 Concord in 1918 shows us valuable examples of how to follow good health practices and work together as a community to face a crisis. ———————————————————————— Victor Curran teaches the Concord Town Guide Course, gives tours of historic Concord, and is an interpreter at the Old Manse and the Concord Museum.

actonhistoricalsociety.org 2 This and other text quoted from issues of the Concord Enterprise, 1917-1919, archived by the Acton Memorial

Library. 3 1918 Concord Town Report, courtesy of William Munroe Special Collections, Concord Free Public Library. 4 Ibid. 5 Ibid.

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Enjoying Our National Parks

in the time of COVID-19

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Concord is well known for its rich history and stunning natural beauty. Residents and visitors alike deeply appreciate having access to national parks which showcase these features. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the parks are working hard to make visitors feel welcome – while doing all they can to help stop the spread of the virus. Here, we present some updates from two of our most popular destinations.

MINUTE MAN NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK Welcome to one of Concord’s most popular destinations! If you are visiting Minute Man National Historical Park this summer, the park has modified its operations during the Covid-19 pandemic. The park grounds and trails are open for your enjoyment – stroll the grounds, have a picnic with friends or family, or stop to learn the history presented on plaques and signage throughout the park. Three comfort stations are now available during the day at North Bridge, Merriam’s Corner, and Hartwell Tavern. Please be aware, the park has converted all bathrooms to be family style - allowing for one person or family at a time. Soon, you will likely see park rangers staffing an outside information desk with the plan to eventually open park visitor centers as state guidelines permit. Park ranger programs are not being offered as we went to press on July 1st, but rangers are still posting cool things via the park’s social media. Here are some suggestions if you are visiting the park: • Walk over the Concord River on the North Bridge, site of “the shot heard ‘round the world,” featuring the famous Minute Man statue sculpted by Daniel Chester French. • Walk, bike, or run the Battle Road Trail. This 5.5 mile (8.9km) historic trail follows the footsteps of British soldiers and colonial Minute Men through the battlefield and the heart of the park. Today, you’ll pass many historic farms, witness structures, and serene woods. Visit the website to take the Cell Phone Tour. www.nps.gov/mima/cell-phone-audio-tour.htm • Dogs are welcome, but please pick up after them and keep them leashed, and do not leave them in your vehicle. Please follow the park website (nps.gov/mima) and social media (@MinuteManNPS) for updates and information.

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WALDEN POND – SWIMMING, BOATING, AND HIKING A visit to Walden Pond State Reservation will bring you back in time to the mid-1800s, where you can experience the connection with nature that inspired Henry David Thoreau’s “Walden.” Bring the family and enjoy a day of swimming, walking the trail that loops around the famous pond, or boating out on the water. You can also visit the replica of Thoreau’s single-room cabin where he took inspiration for his work (visits inside are not available during the COVID-19 pandemic, but you can see it from the outside). Picnic areas and the Walden Pond Visitors Center are closed as we went to press, to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. The gift shop IS open, with limited capacity for your safety. To promote social distancing and reduce close contact of trail users at the state park during the COVID-19 public health emergency, trail heads throughout the reservation will be clearly marked with signage indicating a one-way loop. Summer is a busy time, so it’s important to plan ahead. A state mandate limits the number of people allowed on the property at any one time to 1,000 and is strictly enforced. COVID-19 guidelines may further limit capacity. It’s a good idea to check before heading to the Park by calling 978-369-3254 or by following their Twitter account @waldenpondstate. Life guards are on duty Memorial Day to Labor Day. There is a daily parking fee of $8 for Massachusetts license plates, $30 for all other plates. To protect the grounds and water quality for future generations, the state only allows registered service animals. For more information, please visit www.mass.gov/locations/waldenpond-state-reservation. When visiting the Parks or the Reservation, please continue to follow CDC guidance and Massachusetts state guidelines to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Maintain a safe distance between yourself and others, and wear a face covering when you cannot. Please wash your hands frequently - with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Most importantly, stay home if you feel sick. On April 19th, 1775, it took the Minutemen coming together to accomplish their mighty feat. Today, we ask you do your part to help protect fellow visitors and park resources as you enjoy the history and nature that make Concord such a wonderful place to visit.

©Wikimedia Commons

BY JENNIFER C. SCHÜNEMANN


New England’s Handmade Guitar Gallery Located in beautiful historic Concord Custom, Commissions, New & Pre-Owned

By Appointment Only | wilson@minutemanguitars.com | 617.460.9610 | www.minutemanguitars.com

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Picnic photo ©istock.com/AnjelaGr, sandwich and olive photos courtesy of the Cheese Shop

The Perfect Picnic Makes a Comeback

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With COVID-19 restrictions easing, and outdoor gatherings with reasonable social distance being allowed, picnics present the perfect opportunity to enjoy blue skies, green grass, sunshine, and tasty food! Concord is blessed with an abundance of green space. Beyond the obvious choices like Walden Pond and Minute Man National Historical Park are such gems as South Meadow or Emerson playgrounds, Mattison Field, and even the shady lawns of historic attractions like The Old Manse or The Robbins House. Choose a location, pack up a ground cover, camp chairs, some lawn games, and a cooler and you’re ready to go. But wait a minute, what’s to eat? Tuna fish from home just won’t cut it, so make your first stop The Cheese Shop of Concord on Walden Street, a delightfully retro emporium that’s been filling the most discerning picnic baskets for more than 50 years. Check out the daily blackboard specials, or customize a hot or cold sandwich from dozens of bread, cheese, and charcuterie choices. Better yet, grab a crusty baguette and ask the cheesemonger to cut you a selection of three or four cheeses from the more than 100 varieties generally available. You can please just about everyone with some French chevre, a sharp Irish cheddar, a creamy round of Harbison from Jasper Hill Farm in Vermont, and the Cheese Shop’s

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BY CHRIS LYONS

signature crucolo cheese – imported from Trentino, Italy in large wheels. Olives, pickled veggies, condiments and crackers add spice, crunch and flavor accents. A mouthwatering array of cookies (shortbread, gingersnaps) and candies (artisan chocolate bars, Danish licorice) make a grab-and-go dessert. And to drink? Simply reach into the cold case; fully stocked with high end juices and sodas, and - for the adults - refreshing chilled bottles of wine and beer. We’ve all been cooped up at home for months, so why not make this day extra special by popping open some sparkling wine or refreshing hard cider? If there’s an ice chest in the trunk of your car (and there should be), you can pick out any bottle or can from the shop’s extensive selection, and cool it down en route to your picnic destination. Some of Concord’s parks have walking/bicycling trails, others have ponds, streams or sports fields, but honestly, reading or relaxing under a tree over a game of Go Fish or Bananagrams is what picnicking is all about, so don’t hesitate to be a “grass potato” if that’s what the day calls for. However you choose to spend it, put on some sunscreen and enjoy a revitalizing (and delicious) day picnicking in Concord’s great outdoors. ———————————————————————————————— Chris Lyons is a writer and marketing consultant for the Cheese Shop and other Concord area businesses.


T HREE S TONES G ALLERY

T R I P L E V I S I O N S : Textiles | Ceramics | Watercolors

MERILL COMEAU

MARTY WALLACE

JILLIAN DEMERI

Our spacious gallery is infused with creativity and inspiration — a beautiful oasis for the soul. Stop in to view our current show (through August 14) as well as works by our represented artists. The gallery is an airy and safe place to visit with room for social distancing. We also offer private appointments, curbside pickup and free delivery to local areas. Open Tuesday - Saturday, 11 am - 6 pm; Sunday, 12 noon - 5 pm www.threestonesgallery.com Closed Monday 115 Commonwealth Ave. • Concord, MA • 978-254-5932 Three Stones Gallery / Contemporary Art

@ThreeStonesGallery

Specializing in delicious everyday & custom designed cakes & cupcakes for every occasion. Fantastic scones, coffee cakes, muffins & a wide variety of wonderful, freshly baked goods, including hand-painted shortbread cookies. 59 Commonwealth Ave. West Concord • 978-369-7644 1 mile from Route 2 and Concord Rotary Mon-Fri 6 am - 5 pm • Sat 7 am - 5 pm • Sun 8 am - 1 pm

www.concordteacakes.com

What’s easier than a drink run?

Relaxing at home. Same day wine, beer, and liquor delivery means one less item on your to do list. We even offer no-contact curbside pickup for phone or online orders.

Order online or call us today at www.westconcordwine.com or 978.369.3872 Discover CONCORD

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FUEL

Debra’s Natural Gourmet

the Fight

Concord 2020

Emerson Hospital on the Frontlines

Courtesy of Fuel the Fight Concord

O

On March 30th, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and inspired by similar programs in other cities, Concord citizens Rob Costello, Hilary Steinert, Susie Winstanley, Pamela Loos Gildehaus, Karen Croff Bates, Anne Elton, and Virginia Shannon launched Fuel the Fight (FTF-Concord). This communitybased effort had one goal: to raise money to provide meals for Emerson Hospital staff while supporting local restaurants in the process. FTF-Concord worked directly with the administrative team at Emerson Hospital to feed medical staff working on the frontlines, and to streamline the many food donations they were receiving. Within just 10 days of launching, FTFConcord raised $43,000 from 367 donors ranging from local students contributing $5 to citiizens contributing as much as $1,000. In just two months, 22 local restaurants brought 5,535 meals to hospital workers, reaching every single department at Emerson Hospital. Some days, multiple restaurants delivered breakfast, lunch or dinner, and a snack along with hand-written thank you notes. “Fuel the Fight gave my employees an opportunity to work during a time of uncertainty“ said Tony Haddadeen, owner of Walden Italian Kitchen. “We were so happy to be able to contribute,” said Debra Stark, owner of Debra’s Natural Gourmet “Fuel the Fight not only boosted sales in our kitchen, but it boosted morale, and our staff felt a strong sense of purpose.” Throughout it all, Concord’s restaurants remained steadfast in their willingness to help their community. Emerson Hospital President and CEO,

Chris Schuster, shared “You cannot imagine the support our staff felt from FTF-Concord and the local participating restaurants. The meals that were delivered provided both nourishment and a real sense that the community was behind our doctors, nurses, and staff. We salute the hard working restaurants workers, knowing they face different challenges in this pandemic, and hope that this amazing community will continue to do their part to support our local restaurants and help them through these difficult times.” The surge of the spring is behind us, but the challenge facing local restaurants continues. While many of us admire how quickly, creatively, and thoughtfully restaurants have

pivoted to offer curbside take-out, delivery, and distanced/outdoor dining, we may not realize the full impact the pandemic has had on their businesses and livelihoods. “If you are lucky enough to open your own restaurant (and I feel very lucky) you have the tremendous privilege of becoming part of the fabric of the community,” said Ben Elliott, chef/owner of Saltbox Farm and Kitchen. “We are in this together, committed to remaining a part of this special town.” You can do YOUR part to help by supporting Concord’s restaurants. Please consider ordering online, treating yourself to takeout, dining with them (inside or out!), or simply buying a gift card to keep them going. Thank you Concord!

RESTAURANT HEROES 80 Thoreau • Bisousweet Confections • Comella’s • Concord Cheese Shop • Concord Provisions and Country Kitchen • Concord Teacakes Debra’s Natural Gourmet • Dino’s Kouzina and Pizzeria • Dunkin Donuts of Concord • Farfalle • Fiorella’s • Haute Coffee • Helen’s • Karma Minuteman Diner • Nashoba Brook Bakery • Sally Ann’s Bakery • Saltbox Kitchen • Trail’s End Cafe • Twin Seafood • Verrill Farm • Walden Italian Kitchen 58

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Join the Summer Solstice Passport Event Shop – Dine – Support Local - and Win Prizes!

To provide a fun incentive to support the shops and restaurants still recovering from being closed for so many months during the pandemic, the Concord Together initiative is launching the “Summer Solstice Passport Event” which will run through August 20th. The event is a shopping challenge. The goal is to collect 10 stamps or signatures when you buy from any of the Concord shops or restaurants. If you buy online or pick up curbside, just note the store name and date in one of the spots on your passport yourself. It all counts! Your 10 stamps must include at least three different businesses - making this the perfect time to try a new shop or restaurant! Once your Passport is full, simply add your name, email, and phone number and

email a copy to visitors@concordma.gov or drop it off in person at the Visitor Center at 58 Main Street. You’ll be entered to win gift cards in any of the weekly drawings, starting July 1st. You receive one spot in the ongoing weekly drawings for each completed passport. There is no limit to how many Passports you can enter – keep shopping and dining all summer to increase your chances of winning! Weekly winners are automatically re-entered for the grand prize drawing on August 20th. Gift cards range from $25 to $100 and include shops, restaurants, and farms! The grand prize drawing includes an iPad and more than $500 in gift cards! To download and print your Summer Solstice Passport – or to learn more please visit www.ConcordTogether.com.

©istock.com/max-kegfire

Concord Together Business Fund Supporting local businesses

Concord Together has partnered with the Concord-Carlisle Community Chest to create the Concord Together Business Fund, providing financial grants to local businesses impacted by the COVID-19 crisis.

Together we can help Concord retailers and restaurants survive, thrive, and flourish! Visit www.cccommunitychest.org to donate. Every gift counts. And...now you can DOUBLE YOUR IMPACT as two Concord families have pledged to match gifts up to $115,000! Discover CONCORD

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Easy Breezy

Summer Cocktails

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BY CYNTHIA BAUDENDISTEL

Summertime . . . the perfect time for lazing in a hammock with a good book and a perfect cocktail. Concord’s excellent bookstores can see to your reading needs and we’re here to bring you three of our favorite summer cocktails created by one of Concord’s best mixologists, Brigette M.T. Sanchez of Ideal Mixology. You may know Brigette from Fiorella’s restaurant, where you can find her behind the bar creating amazing cocktails and chatting with her ‘family’ of guests. Brigette started Ideal Mixology in 2012 to provide custom bar service for in-home and commercial

DESERT SUNRISE 1 oz cachaça (Brazilian rum)

KIWI BREEZE 1.5 oz gin 1/2 oz green chartreuse 1/4 oz calvados 1/2 oz Torani kiwi syrup 1 oz lime juice 1 oz pear nectar

/ oz mezcal / oz Luxardo liqueur 1/4 oz orgeat (almond syrup) 1/4 oz pineapple juice 3 4 1 2

Combine all ingredients in shaker. Add ice and shake for 15 seconds. Strain over fresh ice in a high ball or collin’s glass. Garnish with a slice of kiwi and a slice of lemon. 60

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events. With the advent of COVID-19, she took her unique program online. Using Zoom, Brigette delivers fun, interactive, hands-on virtual cocktail hours for groups large or small. Working with ingredients most of us have on hand, Brigette teaches how to create restaurant-quality drinks at home. Brigette was nominated by the Massachusetts Restaurant Association for “Stars of the Industry: Bartender of the Year” for her unique cocktail creations and unrivaled hospitality. Visit her website to book a Zoom cocktail hour: www.idealmixology.com.

| Summer 2020

1.5 oz guava nectar 1 oz lime juice Combine all ingredients in shaker. Add ice and shake for 15 seconds. Strain over fresh ice in hurricane glass. Garnish with three Luxardo cherries and a lime wheel.

THE LIMBO MARTINI 1 3/4 oz vodka 1/2 oz limoncello 1.5 oz limbo mix (1/2 oz pineapple juice, 1/2 oz lemon juice, and1/2 oz orgeat syrup) 2 oz prosecco Splash pomegranate liqueur Gummy bears Thread brightly colored gummy bears onto a skewer. In a shaker, combine vodka, limoncello, and limbo mix. Add ice and shake for 15 seconds. Strain into a martini glass and drizzle pomegranate liqueur down the side of the glass so that it drops to the bottom. Place your dancing gummy bears on top. Perfect for a fun dessert drink.


The Shop Heard Round the World American made gifts | New England Souvenirs

Something for Everyone! T-Shirts, Scarves, Candy, Toys, Postcards, Colonial Candle®, Simon Pearce® Glass, Concord Souvenirs 32 Main St. Concord, MA | (978)371-1635 Down the stairs, next to Albright Art Supply

Mon-Sat 10am-6pm | Sun Noon-5 | www.revolutionaryconcord.com

For the Artist in All of Us Knowledgeable & Friendly Staff | Affordable Prices Art Supplies for All Levels & Gifts for All Ages 32 Main St. Concord, MA

Down the stairs, next to Revolutionary Concord

(978)369-7300

Come Home to Concord! Cathy Folts | Realtor® 85 Main Street | Concord | MA 01742 email: Cathy.Folts@raveis.com website: CathyFolts.raveis.com Cell: 978-201-9537

Mon-Sat 10am-6pm | Sun Noon-5 | www.albrightartsupply.com

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Shop Locally and Make a Difference Here’s how much of your $100 purchase stays in your community when you spend at . . .

$48

… an independent local store

$14

… a local chain store

$1

… a remote online store (if the delivery driver resides locally)

Source: American Independent Business Alliance


Fresh Flowers • House Plants • Balloon Bouquets Delivery or Curbside Pickup Available Summer Hours Mon-Fri 9-4 Sat 9-1

135 Commonwealth Ave. in West Concord | www.concordflowershop.com | 978-369-2404

WHY AVEDA COLOR? 93% naturally derived. Fade-resistant. New guests receive $20 off their first coloror $10 off their first cut.

Acton 978-263-9027

Concord 978-369-1009

www.nuyu-naturallyyou.com nuyusalon@verizon.net We are following all safety requirements & regulations

A unique shop with gifts you love to give…and receive!

WOMEN’S CONSIGNMENT BOUTIQUE 101 Commonwealth Ave West Concord www.ReflectionsConcord.com Facebook/Instagram: @ReflectionsConcord

49 Commonwealth Ave. Concord MA 01742 joystreetgifts.com

A little bit of everything in 4000 sq. ft.!

45 Commonwealth Ave. Concord, MA 978-371-1256

Summer Fun Toys, Back to School Supplies, and More! Made Here!

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T CONCORD you A unique WES shop with gifts love to give…and receive!

& 510

49 Commonwealth Ave. Concord MA 01742 joystreetgifts.com

106 Commonwealth Ave. 978.369.9011

Mon-Fri 9am - 5pm | Sat 9am - 6pm Next to Debra’s Natural Gourmet

ST CONCORD WEwestconcordfiveandten.com

& 510

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Alcohol excluded. Expires 10/1/20

T CONCORD WES

& 510

106 Commonwealth Ave. West Concord

T CONCORD WES

& 510

10% OFF $20 PURCHASE 15% OFF $35 PURCHASE Valid through 10/1/20

To include your business in our next edition, please contact Jennifer C. Schünemann: jennifer@voyager-publishing.com or 978.435.2266

Delightfully Unexpected Treasures

74 Commonwealth Ave. Concord MA 01742 | 978.341.8471 64

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| Summer 2020

CONCORD

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32 Main St. Concord

One per person. *Excludes Simon Pearce Valid through 10/1/20

CONCORD

24 Walden St. Concord

20% OFF ONE ITEM

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$10 OFF $40

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Exp. 10/1/20

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(your choice of scent) 98 Commonwealth Ave. West Concord

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FREE Mi Tierra fresh organic tortillas, farm fresh local from Springfield, MA. + FREE bar of Sappo Hill creme glycerin soap

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photography by Greg Premru

imagine opening up to new views

During this time, using every corner of our homes has become more crucial than ever. At Platt Builders, we are open for business, continuing with current projects, and working safely. We are ready to help you create a new corner you will want to spend all your together-time in.

Let us help you reimagine your space. PLATTBUILDERS.COM | 978.448.9963


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Discover Concord magazine - Summer 2020  

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