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CD Pacific:

Capacity Development Programme in Multilateral Diplomacy for Pacific Island States and 15 years of capacity building in the Pacific Region

With support of Federal Department of Foreign Affairs of Switzerland


CD Pacific: Capacity Development Programme in Multilateral Diplomacy for Pacific Island States

Table of Contents 1 3

Introduction About CD Pacific

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Shareeni Kala

10 Dalsie Greenrose Kalna Baniala

12 Fine Tuitupou-Arnold

14 Sam Goundar

18 Anju Mangal

22 Sala Tamanikaiwaimaro

24 Gisa Fuatai Purcell

28 Setaita Tupua Kalou

32 Diplo’s alumni from Pacific States


and 15 years of capacity building in the Pacific Region

Introduction This publication has been prepared on the occasion of the launch of CD Pacific - the Capacity Development Programme in Multilateral Diplomacy for Pacific Island States - by the Swiss Federal Councillor Mr Didier Burkhalter. CD Pacific, run by DiploFoundation with the support of the Federal Department of Foreign Affairs of Switzerland, aims to strengthen the participation of Pacific states in multilateral diplomacy in general, and in Geneva-related activities in particular. The programme combines the convenience of tutored online learning and research for geographically dispersed participants with the immediate benefits of faceto-face coaching and policy immersion in Geneva. CD Pacific builds on Diplo’s 15 years of capacity building activities in the Pacific region. This publication features personal stories by participants about the impact these activities have had. Shareeni Kala from Fiji talks about her experience of Internet governance courses that broadened her horizons while teaching at the Fiji National University; she also recounts how she discovered her passion for e-learning which holds a lot of potential in this remote region. Dalsie Greenrose Kalna Baniala from Vanuatu shares how her success on Diplo’s online Internet governance course helped her work at the Office of the Telecommunications Regulator, especially when it came to drafting an Internet policy for Vanuatu. Fine Tuitupou-Arnold from the Cook Islands explains how the humanitarian diplomacy course helped her to promote humanitarian causes and become a disaster law champion in the region. Sam Goundar, an academic and a DiploFoundation alumnus, talks about Fiji and IT and in particular IT’s role in tertiary education. He is convinced that Diplo’s Internet governance courses made him a better and more knowledgeable academic. Anju Mangal from the Secretariat of Pacific Communities shares her passion for helping and increasing participation of the most neglected groups in ICT, including women, youth, people with disabilities and the disadvantaged in general. Sala Tamanikaiwaimaro, also from Fiji, credits DiploFoundation as being the catalyst for her subsequent immersion in the world of Internet governance. Gisa Fuatai Purcell from Samoa speaks about how the lack of computer experience made it difficult to find a job outside Samoa. And how she - over the years - managed not only to become computer-literate but also fell for online learning. Today, Fuatai, as an ITU official, is the champion and promoter of the small states’ cause in telecommunication field. Setaita Tupua Kalou from Fiji participated at Diplo’s Master in Contemporary Diplomacy programme and shares how it provided her with a more holistic approach which featured the mainstream key players perspective as well as the often ‘silent’ dimension of small states. These are just a few of Diplo’s alumni from the Pacific region – a complete list can be found inside.

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CD Pacific: Capacity Development Programme in Multilateral Diplomacy for Pacific Island States

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and 15 years of capacity building in the Pacific Region

About CD Pacific

The Capacity Development Programme for Pacific Island States (CD Pacific) aims to strengthen the participation of Pacific island states in multilateral diplomacy in general, and in International Geneva-related activities in particular. The programme combines the convenience of tutored online learning and research for geographically dispersed participants with the immediate benefits of face-to-face coaching and policy immersion in Geneva. It is designed for diplomats and officials from Pacific island states, and has three phases: • A six-week interactive online learning phase focused on topics governed by Geneva-based institutions of special relevance for Pacific Island nations (trade, health, environment, etc.) • A four-week policy research phase, where participants investigate and analyse topics of particular relevance for their own countries, under the guidance of research tutors • A ten-day policy immersion phase in Geneva focused on building skills for multilateral diplomacy and gaining deeper insight into the workings of Genevabased institutions

Why is this programme needed? The geographically remote small island states in the Pacific strongly depend on international order and law. For some nations, it is a question of their very existence: for example, without effective global action on climate change, states such as Kiribati may disappear because of the rise in sea level. Multilateral diplomacy conducted in International Geneva is particularly important for the social and economic development of Pacific Island States, as Geneva is the main governance hub for issues such as trade, climate change, health, and migration. Small states with limited geographical, human, and financial resources face the challenge of doing more with less: they need to employ all available methods to increase their representation, including networks and alliances, and information technology tools. In addition, diplomats from the Pacific Island States often lack the experience and exposure to Geneva-based institutions and processes that would allow them to ensure that the interests of their nations are well represented.

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CD Pacific: Capacity Development Programme in Multilateral Diplomacy for Pacific Island States

Programme structure (three segments)

1. During the online learning phase, participants attend a six-week online training course delivered using Diplo’s collaborative online learning methodology. The course covers the main diplomatic issues of high relevance for Pacific Island States that are governed by Geneva-based institutions: • Environment and climate change diplomacy • Human rights diplomacy • Trade diplomacy • Health diplomacy • Internet governance and telecommunication policy • Humanitarian diplomacy 2. During the online course, participants will start planning their individual policy research projects. Each participant will select a topic of relevance to their country, connected with the multilateral diplomatic scene in Geneva. Following the online course, participants will continue their research under the guidance of a research tutor, and with access to expert consultants for advice as needed. 3. The policy immersion phase in Geneva, for the ten top participants from the online course, will include visits to international organisations in Geneva, meetings with officials working on small state issues, discussion of the diplomacy of small island states (main issues and challenges in multilateral diplomacy), and an introduction to International Geneva (main players, approaches, plans). It will also have a skill-development element, including a simulation exercise on multilateral negotiations, training on drafting and use of language, and consultancy on the relevance of Geneva’s diplomatic activities to the multilateral diplomacy of the participants’ countries (e.g. the relevance of the World Trade Organization (WTO) for Vanuatu).

Timetable 20 November 2013

Deadline for the nominations of participants

11 December 2013

Announcing list of selected participants

January/February 2014

Online learning phase

February/March 2014

Policy research phase

April 2014

Online graduation ceremony

June 2014

Policy immersion in Geneva (10-day visit to Geneva) One-day event in Geneva: ‘Effective participation of the Pacific Island States in Geneva-based multilateral diplomacy’

July 2014

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Project completion – final report


and 15 years of capacity building in the Pacific Region

Diplo and small island states

Diplo is informally considered the diplomatic academy of small island states. Due to their physical remoteness, many small island states use Diplo’s online programmes to supplement their own diplomatic training. Diplo has a well-established online course in Diplomacy of Small States (http://www.diplomacy.edu/courses/ smallstates) and a number of faculty members from small states, including highlevel Maltese diplomats with extensive experience in small state diplomacy. Diplo supports research and publications on small state diplomacy (available in the resource repository - http://www.diplomacy.edu/resources/general) and has an active network of alumni from small island states, particularly in the fields of climate change diplomacy (http://climate.diplomacy.edu/) and Internet governance (http://www.diplointernetgovernance.org/). CONTACT For more information about the CD Pacific please contact Dr Tereza Horejsova, Project Coordinator: DiploFoundation, Rue de Lausanne 56, Geneva, 1202 / Email: terezah@diplomacy.edu / tel: 022 741 0420.

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CD Pacific: Capacity Development Programme in Multilateral Diplomacy for Pacific Island States

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and 15 years of capacity building in the Pacific Region

Emerging leaders The following excerpts from essays in Emerging Leaders for the Digital World (http://www.diplomacy.edu/ig/emerging-leaders) showcase some of the results of Diplo’s capacity development work in the Pacific.

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CD Pacific: Capacity Development Programme in Multilateral Diplomacy for Pacific Island States

Shareeni Kala from Fiji makes the link between Internet governance and e-learning

Shareeni works for the University of South Pacific as a coordinator. She previously worked for Fiji National University (FNU) as a lecturer in Computing and Information Systems and has over ten years of experience as a teacher. She has pursued her career focusing on information systems and holds a Master’s degree in this area. The emergence of Internet governance in Fiji Fiji is a Pacific island with a little over 800 000 people. Fiji trains and produces qualified graduates in science, medicine, agriculture, commerce, and ICT. There are two universities in Fiji, the University of the South Pacific (USP) and FNU. USP caters not only to Fijians but to the regional countries of the Pacific Islands as well. For the local people of Fiji, FNU was recently erected as an affordable and quality education provider. Both universities produce ICT experts, who work in the private and public sectors and in universities. Internet governance (IG) is an emerging area within telecommunication, the judiciary, trade, commerce, and academia. In the last two years, the telecommunications sector has gone through major reforms. The regulated framework has given greater flexibility to and placed

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greater importance on Internet access, cost, and bandwidth. Legislation in the countries Crime Decree now includes cyber protection and covers privacy issues. Internet governance and Diplo In 2010, IG training from DiploFoundation reached not just Fiji but generated awareness through the Pacific Island Forum Secretariat in Fiji. Other Pacific Island countries were also trained in the importance of IG issues. It is a challenge to have capacity-building workshops and to train policymakers in the area of IG; Fiji is no exception. The Information Ministry and stakeholders are working together to develop awareness and create better IG in the region. Although I worked as an ICT academic, I never directly used IG as the focus of my teaching. I began to understand IG better when I joined the Internet


and 15 years of capacity building in the Pacific Region

Society Forum with the Pacific Islands Chapter of the Internet Society (PICISOC). The IG 2010 call for the Capacity Building Programme through scholarship made it all possible for me. The essence of IG only became clear to me when the theory was covered and discussions facilitated by the e-learning medium. I successfully completed up to the research portion of the ICT Strategies online course. I managed to write a proposal for FNU to test the e-learning system. I was able to find out about and elaborate on the requirements of obtaining e-learning for the university. My paper emphasised the advancement of learning technology. Students and teachers do not have to sit in the classroom or be face-to-face but can now take part in e-learning from anywhere in the world and at any time, thanks to online facilities.

The literature review in my paper covers similar attempts to establish e-learning in nearby, developed countries, like New Zealand. E-learning as an IG issue is becoming widespread, technologically tested, and refined to suit targeted audiences. For FNU, it is vital that a curriculum for identified e-learning courses is developed. Online learning theory and practical assessment needs to be tested. The next step is to secure the technological infrastructure for e-learning. Discovering new meaning in learning E-Learning is important to me, and DiploFoundation has been an important supporter of e-learning. I encourage others in the field of ICT and the Internet to go through the programmes. I have discovered new meaning in learning by doing this research and hope that when others are given the opportunity, they will take heed of my success story.

E-learning as an IG issue is becoming widespread, technologically tested, and refined to suit targeted audiences. For FNU, it is vital that a curriculum for identified e-learning courses is developed. Online learning theory and practical assessment needs to be tested.

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CD Pacific: Capacity Development Programme in Multilateral Diplomacy for Pacific Island States

Dalsie Greenrose Kalna Baniala from Vanuatu

is raising awareness of Internet governance issues

In 1992, Dalsie was selected to attend the Institut Nationale Technologie Vanuatu (INTV) and got a scholarship to attend the Solomon Island College of Education in 1994. She graduated in 1997 with a diploma in Finance and Administration. In 2003, she completed her BA at USP and in 2010, was accepted to USP to pursue an MBA. Dalsie manages the Consumer and Corporate Affairs at the Telecommunications and Radiocommunications Regulator’s Office in Vanuatu. Establishing a professional life In 2003, armed with my BA, I was promoted to senior clerical assistant. I worked really hard until 2008, when I left USP to join the newly established Office of the Vanuatu Telecommunications Regulator, which was just in its second week of operation, as office manager. The Office of the Telecommunications Regulator is still my baby today. In 2010, under the former regulator’s leadership, I was promoted to operations manager. I was pleased to take up the post, although telecommunications was fairly new for me. As operations manager, I have travelled to many different countries. I’m currently managing Consumer and Corporate Affairs of the Telecommunications and Radiocommunications Regulator’s office in Vanuatu. Capacity building In the last two and a half years, I have been concentrating on upgrading my

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skills in telecommunications, as well as information communications technology (ICT) as a whole. I thank our good Lord for the opportunity I had to attend the ICANN meetings and, in particular, for learning about and coming to understand the issues regarding the Internet. From the ICANN meetings, I learnt about DiploFoundation and had the opportunity to apply for the course


and 15 years of capacity building in the Pacific Region

From the ICANN meetings, I learnt about DiploFoundation and had the opportunity to apply for the course modules. It was tough for me at that time because the Internet was another world. At the end of the course I took on Internet governance (IG); I realised that it had really broadened my knowledge base.

modules. It was tough for me at that time because the Internet was another world. At the end of the course I took on Internet governance (IG); I realised that it had really broadened my knowledge base. Through DiploFoundation, I ended up in countries I don’t think I would otherwise have gone to. With the number of training courses I have attended, including attending the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) in Sharm El Sheik, I have learnt a lot. I now have an idea of what IG is about, and managed a project on drafting an Internet Regulatory Practice and well

as other Consumer Affairs Guidelines (Consumer Protection Guidelines, Advertising Guidelines), for Vanuatu. I’m currently undertaking a role in consumer affairs of ICT where I have also taken the lead on raising awareness in both urban and rural areas, and as well as in the Parliament Chamber to members of parliament in 2011 and 2012, on consumer protection and responsibilities, the benefits of the Internet and other ICT tools. In addition, I have also helped out with running meetings on Internet issues in Port Vila. As part of the public consultation on IG, public meetings has been held in July 2011 and identified the main issues faced by consumers of ICT in Vanuatu. The Regulator of that time, with my assistance, has consulted the main stakeholders for raising awareness of and providing training on the Internet issues facing Vanuatu. This is great news. More and more awareness programmes are also being planned and are about to be implemented.

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CD Pacific: Capacity Development Programme in Multilateral Diplomacy for Pacific Island States

Fine Tuitupou-Arnold from the Cook Islands

Fine works for the Cook Islands Red Cross Society. A graduate of Diplo’s Humanitarian Diplomacy online course, for Fine, disasters are a part of everyday life. In her role as International Humanitarian Law Officer for the Cook Islands Red Cross Society  (CIRCS), she has taken on responsibilities for both IHL and International Disaster Response Law (IDRL), and has become a disaster law champion in the region. Actually, I did not know there was such a course until the Federation office in Fiji contacted me and asked me if I would be interested in taking it. I went online and had a loo. It seemed very interesting, so I applied and I’m really glad I did it. It was very interactive. Different participants from every corner of the world shared experiences and activities in their countries. This was of great benefit for me. I’am from a small

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island state and having to share my experiences with others and get their feedback was very helpful. It’s very important for my work with the Red Cross because a big part of my work is advocacy with government officials and departments in advocating for our auxiliary status, and of course the work we do. How I should approach our government was something I did


and 15 years of capacity building in the Pacific Region

not learn at school or when I went to university; I had to learn on the job. But on this course, I had to go through a structured learning platform. This was also an excellent way of learning from other participants’ real life experiences, which I think is just awesome. On online learning The online learning and the methods used to teach in the virtual classroom were very convenient. I travel a lot and it was something that I felt very comfortable with because I could access my course online from anywhere in the world. I travelled three times to Geneva and to Cairo and I could access the course and just follow it through. I was a bit sceptical about the purely online learning to start off with because I’m used to having to go into a classroom, and talking face-to-face with the lecturers and students but it worked out very well. The participants were very dynamic, very interactive. We still keep in contact now, after the course. During group work, we communicated very well through Skype,

How I should approach our government was something I did not learn at school or when I went to university; I had to learn on the job. But on this course, I had to go through a structured learning platform. This was also an excellent way of learning from other participants’ real life experiences, which I think is just awesome.

through chat. In the end, it wasn’t a problem. Actually, I think it was really good.

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CD Pacific: Capacity Development Programme in Multilateral Diplomacy for Pacific Island States

Sam Goundar from Fiji is working to develop

awareness of Internet governance issues

Sam is an academic and has been teaching at universities for the past fifteen years. He has also worked in the IT industry as a data entry operator, computer operations supervisor, and IT manager in private organisations, as well as in government ministries. He has also taught in commercial schools and secondary schools. My introduction to ‘Computers,’ as IT was known then, was not my choice. After finishing secondary school, I couldn’t afford to go to university, as my marks were not good enough to get a scholarship. I took on odd jobs, like cutting grass, farm work, and for a while laboured for a construction company. One of my soccer teammates was going to enrol in a computer course at our local university (computer courses were becoming very popular at that time), and I joined him. I had saved enough money to pay the year’s tuition fee to complete a Certificate course in Applied Computing. My career in academia was accidental as well. There was a military coup in my country, and many of the qualified teachers migrated overseas. The university was closed, and when the schools reopened, there was a shortage of teachers. Non-graduates were given the opportunity to teach. I was

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a semester away from graduating with my Certificate in Applied Computing. I applied for a teaching position and was appointed to teach in a commercial school. At the age of 18 I was a newly appointed computer teacher and went to teach my first class. I can still remember the moment when I started that class with ‘What is a computer?’ Part-time student, full-time teacher I completed a Certificate in Applied Computing, a Diploma in Computing, and a Bachelor of Arts degree, majoring in Computing Science and Information Systems. All these qualifications were completed while I was working fulltime as a computer teacher and studying part-time or through the University of the South Pacific’s Distance and Flexible Learning (DFL) mode. In 1996, I joined the University of the South Pacific’s Fiji Centre as a computer tutor. While tutoring at the University,


and 15 years of capacity building in the Pacific Region

I completed a Postgraduate Certificate in Tertiary Teaching, a Postgraduate Diploma in Management, and a Master’s of Business Administration. In 2007, I started on a PhD, focusing on e-government in Fiji. In 2009, I moved to New Zealand to teach at the Bay of Plenty Polytechnic and continue my PhD with a New Zealand university. I have published 12 research papers and presented my research on e-government in Fiji and have lately presented my paper on cloud computing at more than 12 international conferences. At the moment, my research focus is on using mobile devices in education. My research has taken me to countries, like the Solomon Islands (2007), Samoa (2007), India (2008), Thailand (2008), New Zealand (2008), Malaysia (2009), Hong Kong (2011), and Indonesia (2011).

six years when the telecommunications industry was deregulated and ISP packages became affordable.

I count my success by the number of students that successfully learn from me and advance in their lives. Many of my students have completed their PhDs and are respected academics at their own universities. Once I complete my PhD, I intend to apply to teach at universities in developing countries with a three-year tenure in each country until I reach 60. I hope to live that long because that’s when I am going back home to the same tiny island that made me what I am today – where I can live to the end of my days and contribute towards my country in whatever way I can.

Building IG capacity As an Internet user and an Internet teacher, IG issues have been an integral part of my life. Meetings, fellowships, and conferences are part of my learning and teaching process on IG. The most positive outcome of the Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme (IGCBP) for me was being able to pass on the knowledge I learned

I started deliberating with others on the issue of IG and attended forums on IG and ICANN meetings. I have also been a member of the Pacific Chapter of the ISOC (PICISOC) since 2006 and have regularly attended their annual conferences. We have now formed a Pacific Internet Governance Forum, as we feel that some issues are unique to the Pacific Islands and one-size-fits-all policies cannot be applied to our tiny, remote, and Internet-connectivitydeprived nations. Fiji is being introduced to IG at the moment, and a few amongst us are developing awareness amongst the rest of the countries about IG issues.

Fiji and IT: one size doesn’t necessarily fit all While employers and tertiary institutions have been providing Internet access to their employees for the last 10–12 years, the majority of Fijians have only been able to afford Internet access at home within the last five or

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CD Pacific: Capacity Development Programme in Multilateral Diplomacy for Pacific Island States

to my students and making them aware of IG issues. In addition, I have started a ‘snowball’ effect that will see the flow of knowledge about IG issues to the entire country and region. I have insisted that my students speak about IG issues to their parents, siblings, friends, and families. Professionally and personally, I have benefitted a lot from the IGCBP. I am now able to better advise my students, friends, and family about the importance of IG and other related issues, as almost everyone nowadays is using social media websites, like Facebook, to keep in touch, as well as for entertainment. The knowledge gained from the IGCBP has made me a better and more knowledgeable academic, as I am better able to relate to the issues when

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fiji

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addressing questions from my students. Professionally, the programme has enabled me to look at my PhD research from the IG perspective as well. Fijian Sam Goundar teaches in New Zealand at the Bay of Plenty Polytechnic while he researches his PhD on e-government in Fiji. As an Internet user and an Internet teacher, IG issues have been an integral part of my life. Meetings, fellowships, and conferences are part of my learning and teaching process on IG. The most positive outcome of the Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme (IGCBP) for me was being able to pass on the knowledge I learned to my students and making them aware of IG issues. In addition, I have started a ‘snowball’ effect that will see the flow of knowledge about IG issues to the entire country and region. I have insisted that my students speak about IG issues to their parents, siblings, friends, and families.


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CD Pacific: Capacity Development Programme in Multilateral Diplomacy for Pacific Island States

Anju Mangal from Fiji defines development in the context of current realities

Anju works for the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC), a regional and international organisation providing technical assistance to the 22 Pacific Island Countries and Territories (PICTs). Anju is an information and knowledge management specialist/coordinator, providing an advisory role on ICT and IKM development to the staff and Pacific countries. She provides leadership and advice as a trainer on the use of social media and e-learning platforms in the Pacific.

Keeping development in mind The most interesting task for me is to define development in the context of current realities in the Pacific. I have successfully achieved a BSc degree and an MA in Governance. My mini research paper for the Governance course was titled: Internet Governance in the Pacific – whether the IGF Forum is a Multi-stakeholder process. Developed in 2009, the paper talks about Pacific participation and understanding, and its impact across Internet Governance Forum (IGF) issues. The survey helped me understand concerns, ideas, and expectations relating to the IGF. My research was a step towards understanding the Internet and ICT development in the Pacific. It helped me reach out to stakeholders, policymakers and decision-makers at national and international level who are or will be interested in improving Internet accessibility. It was geared towards helping

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government sectors to consider and implement a policy and strategy that would benefit people in the Pacific. In 2009, I successfully completed DiploFoundation’s Internet Governance Capacity Building Program (IGCBP). Diplo has given the Pacific countries an opportunity to understand the concept of Internet governance and improve their knowledge on ICTs to better manage the challenges we face in the region. I am now a part-time tutor on Diplo’s ACP 2011 ICT Strategy Course and was selected as a research expert for the Research Phase. I was also an ISOC Ambassador to the 2008 IGF in Hyderabad, India and a Commonwealth IG Secretariat fellow in Sharm-el Sheikh, working in close collaboration with the UN-IGF Secretariat team. With Diplo’s support, I was selected to work as a fellow for the UN-IGF Secretariat in Geneva, Switzerland and


and 15 years of capacity building in the Pacific Region

I thank them for recognising my talent and ability to be a powerful agent of change in addressing the key challenges in our Pacific region related to IG, ICT, inclusiveness, human rights, and diversity. I was also selected to represent my country and organisation in the Emerging Pacific Leaders Dialogue (EPLD) in 2010. EPLD 2010 brought together 120 high-calibre mid-career participants from business, government, trade unions and the community service sector selected through an open call from more than 20 Pacific region countries/territories. It was funded and sponsored by government agencies and the private sector across the Pacific, particularly the Australian Government. During the EPLD tour, I was fortunate to meet great leaders in the Pacific and also had the opportunity to meet Princess Anne (Royal) who was the guest of honour at the EPLD conference.

Reaching out I am continuously inspired to help facilitate discussions on Internet governance, ICT policy and diplomacy through the participation of all stakeholders in diplomatic practice and international relations in the Pacific region. I received my introduction to the field of Internet Governance five years ago through the Pacific ICT mailing list - Pacific Chapter of the Internet Society (PICISOC). I was a Board member of PICISOC and served the board for two years. I continue to serve the interests of the Internet community and am determined to increase participation of women, youth, people with disabilities and the disadvantaged who are amongst the most neglected group in ICT. I am also the Chairwoman of the Pacific Women in ICT Special Interest Group, which aims to help Pacific women better, understand the current state of access, participation and leadership of Pacific Women in ICTs. As the Chairwoman of PICISOC_Women in

Diplo has given the Pacific countries an opportunity to understand the concept of Internet governance and improve their knowledge on ICTs to better manage the challenges we face in the region.

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CD Pacific: Capacity Development Programme in Multilateral Diplomacy for Pacific Island States

technology (WIT), I try to assess issues such as applications, technology and content, and determine use of ICTs and women’s participation in ICTs and development. Regionally, the SPC works to promote a regional IGF and discussions. Today, we are reaching out to a number of Pacific Islanders to study the Introductory Internet Governance and ICT Policy course. My role is to coordinate and develop new regional capacity building programmes in information, communication and knowledge management, and ICT for development. I provide leadership on IG issues to young people and our stakeholders in the Pacific. I have assisted with the formulation of the youth in agriculture

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strategy towards fostering ICT for development. I provide advisory and support role to the Youth and Agriculture Coordinator for administering and delivering programmes for youth and ICT in the community. Collaborating with others I am keen to work with others within my organisation, and with development partners and stakeholders to contribute to the improvement in the livelihood of our people in the Pacific Island Countries. I also promote participatory approaches to support sustainable management of natural resources through participatory geographical information systems (GIS) and continue to


and 15 years of capacity building in the Pacific Region

coordinate appropriate training to build capacity in ICTs using the Internet to access web-based information systems within the 22 Pacific Island Countries. In 2005, our project was won the World Summit Award in the category e-culture for Participatory 3D Modelling (P3DM) for Resource Use, Development Planning and Safeguarding Intangible Cultural Heritage. This was one of my biggest achievements. I continue to strengthen collaboration and improve the capacity in sharing the information among our stakeholders and regional and international networks. Throughout my personal and professional life, I have come to respect the professionalism that characterises any organisation, its employees and the people we work for.

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CD Pacific: Capacity Development Programme in Multilateral Diplomacy for Pacific Island States

Sala Tamanikaiwaimaro from Fiji is on

the lookout for ways to strengthen capacity in the region and to impact policy Sala is an executive director at Pasifika Nexus Limited. She is just finishing a two-year term as Internet Governance Caucus co-coordinator. An international cyber legislation expert, Sala also co-coordinates the Civil Society Internet Governance Caucus. At a very young age, I witnessed the first recorded major political upheaval, 17 years after Fiji’s independence from Great Britain. As a seven-year-old, I saw the impact this had on the various communities that I would eventually become a part of, and this left its mark on me. Segregation consciously started, and I witnessed my friends migrate. At this early age, I saw how the economy was affected by the political turbulence. Career and introduction to ICT I continue to witness the challenges that most Pacific island countries are facing. High oil prices affect energy grids, transportation, and subsequently information and communication technologies (ICT) deployment. Whilst there are moves by governments in the region to invest in alternative renewable energy programmes, even these are expensive to start up. I worked as an associate in a law firm, and then as a senior analyst within the Regulator of Capital Markets and subsequently interned as a young professional within the Political, Governance and Security Division of the Pacific Islands Forum Secretariat, so I have had the opportunity to see and appreciate the structures that hold things together. My introduction to the ICT realm took place when I joined a licensed telecommunications operator. I engaged in this world with a passion to absorb and

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assimilate as much new information as possible. I found this world fascinating, so dynamic. I did a few telecommunications courses with the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) on universal services obligations and with Neotelis on telecommunications essentials. Introduction to the IG world My immersion in the world of IG began with DiploFoundation. I was excited about studying with classmates from around the world. The dynamic facilitation created an enabling environment. My classmates, all established professionals from around the world, rocked. My brother also enrolled in the class. It was great to attend the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) in Vilnius, Lithuania, where I met great people from all walks of life and most especially my wider Diplo ‘online’ family. This was possible through the generous


and 15 years of capacity building in the Pacific Region

sponsorship of the Canadian government through the ITU. I also was fortunate enough to have been sent by Diplo to Noumea earlier this year, where I attended the inaugural Pacific Regional Internet Governance Forum (PrIGF), where I met interesting people. I actively participated in the PrIGF and raised the challenges that I saw facing the Pacific region and the need for a multistakeholder process to policy-making, training, capacity development, etc. Keith Davidson from Pacific Internet Partners, one of the organisers of PrIGF, approached me a few months later to ask me to represent the Pacific at the Asia Pacific Regional Internet Governance Forum (APrIGF) and to speak about the PrIGF in Singapore, which I did. I was also invited by Dot Asia’s Edmon Chung, one of the organisers, to help judge the Youth IGF at the Nanyang Technological University, where the themes discussed were cyber-addiction, digital divide, and privacy. I was also invited to speak at the ISOC Advisory Meeting, which was a closed meeting on the PrIGF. I have

seen post-liberalisation challenges facing the telecommunications industry and the capacity development needs within regulators. As a practitioner, I have also seen how Pacific Island countries are often ill-advised about adopting model laws without first conducting clear, holistic, empirical research on matters on the ground. I have witnessed the challenges and bottlenecks that come with this approach. I am a strong advocate of empirical research preceding policy formulation, which precedes regulation. The future There is still a lag in the region as key stakeholders are slow to recognise the importance of IG and its impact on the economic, sociocultural, and political structures within the country. Our Pacific leaders have had the foresight to create a Pacific Plan. I believe that IG needs to be incorporated into that plan. My training with Diplo has helped me better understand the issues and has also allowed me to tap into the network of Diplo alumni and the global IG community from whom I can draw on.

My immersion in the world of IG began with DiploFoundation. I was excited about studying with classmates from around the world. The dynamic facilitation created an enabling environment. My classmates, all established professionals from around the world, rocked. My brother also enrolled in the class.

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CD Pacific: Capacity Development Programme in Multilateral Diplomacy for Pacific Island States

Gisa Fuatai Purcell from Samoa

Gisa is the Head of the LSE Division of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) based in Geneva, Switzerland. Her responsibility includes managing a professional team that provides ICT assistance for least developed countries, landlocked countries and small island developing states. She is also responsible for ITU’s emergency telecommunication and climate change adaptation. Prior to working for the ITU, Gisa was the Secretary of the National ICT Committee in Samoa. She was also the Assistant CEO of the Ministry of Communications and Information Technology of Samoa. Apart from developing ICT at the national level, her other responsibilities were to represent Samoa in regional and international ICT conferences, workshops and other gatherings. Gisa contributed a lot to Samoa’s liberalization of its telecommunication sector.I was born in Falealupo village, in the island of Savaii, Samoa, a small island developing state in the South Pacific. I was educated up to college level in Apia, Samoa. My university education did not start until much later in life, when I was 43 years old in 1998. I went to Victoria University in 1997 to enquire about a formal qualification. I was told that I could not attend the university because I did not have a first degree. I gave them my CV and asked them about the possibility of someone like me with exceptional experience and no university qualification as the consulting competition was starting to be fierce and I needed that degree to maintain my competitive edge. After many discussions and arguments with

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the university, I was offered two courses to do part time while continuing to work full time starting in 1998. I passed the Certificate of Management and Postgraduate Diploma in Information Systems courses with flying colors and I graduated in 1999. Immediately after graduation, I enquired about doing my Master of Commerce and Administration with a major in Information Systems, by thesis only. I completed my Master’s in 2003. It was the same year in October that I moved to Samoa to answer a phone call from the Prime Minister to help the government develop a national ICT policy for Samoa. As a result, I could not attend my Master’s graduation ceremony because it clashed with the first summit of the World Summit of the Information Society (WSIS) held in Geneva, Switzerland, where I represented Samoa, taking a dancing group and handicraft to be displayed in the Samoa booth. The cost of the booth and the office for


and 15 years of capacity building in the Pacific Region

Samoa and other expenses were all met by the Government of Switzerland and I acknowledge this support. Otherwise, my country would not have been able to showcase her culture and handicraft which were the two main component of Samoa wanting to advance the developing her ICT infrastructure in order to use the Internet to help market Samoa to the outside world. Going back in time, I see a journey that was filled with great experience. In 1983, my husband and I decided to move to New Zealand to give our children a better education in order to get hold of better opportunities available that never had in Samoa. It was a challenging experience. While our CVs and references were of highest standard, the simple fact that we did not have computer experience was against us. We both interviewed well, but when prospective employers asked what computer experience I had, I answered them by a question, “what is a computer?” Computers were unheard of in Samoa at the time. Other people I met said they simply answered that they had data entry experience. But I did not even know what data entry was, as I knew only the typewriter. My husband and I were depressed over difficulties in finding jobs and we felt we had only two options: either we looked for a factory jobs or returned to Samoa.

Just when we discussed returning back home, the New Zealand government recognized the big gap in computer experience and offered courses for those people wanting to learn computer skills, for free. Two types of computers courses were offered for free. One course was called the “computer user’s course” and the other one was called the “computer operator’s course.” I wanted to take the latter, but no seat was available, so I started with the computer user’s course. However, after three weeks, a student from the computer operator’s course left and I quickly took up the challenge. After this nine-month course, I got the first job I interviewed for. Capacity building During the WSIS preparatory phases, I learnt a lot about the Internet issues which I felt is useful to ensure the people of Samoa are protected for when the times comes for everyone to have access. During the process, I learned about the Diplo Foundation and the Internet governance courses it was offering on-line for the first time. I jumped at the opportunity and studied Internet governance course. I thoroughly enjoyed the course and after I completed and received a certificate, I started promoting the same course to younger people of the Pacific Islands because I knew at the time that the

Providing online learning tools to those living in rural village can also help in reducing migration from rural villages to the city.

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CD Pacific: Capacity Development Programme in Multilateral Diplomacy for Pacific Island States

younger people will be the main users of Internet once it becomes widely available. The Diplo Foundation IGCBP helped me a great deal with understanding issues around Internet governance and it has been helpful for my work as a national ICT project manager in Samoa. I have attended numerous conferences and in particular, the WSIS summits, the ITU World Development conferences and Study Groups, and, regional or international donor workshops. I have built a great international network that I work very closely with, and thoroughly enjoy online meetings. What I really enjoyed is learning not just about Internet governance, but about other issues that affect the secure and affordable use of the Internet. I studied Internet governance at a time when the World Summit of the Information Society (WSIS) was in progress. This course allowed me to understand the key issues of Internet governance and it also allowed me to be very diplomatic when I delivered the views of my country during discussions. In September 2007, I was appointed the Rapporteur for the new ITU study question for small island developing states. My experience gained from the IGCBP became very useful in studying the issues surrounding Internet governance in small island developing states. The vast knowledge I now possess for Internet governance issues through the IGCBP with Diplo has helped and continued to help me advance my education as well as job prospective. The evidence speaks for itself now that I am the first ever Pacific Island person and a woman at that to work for the ITU

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Headquarters, let alone a very senior position. Learning with Diplo was my first exposure to using online learning tools. It is amazing how classmates from the four corners of the world can all discuss issues online. It made me enjoyed my job more and strived to ensure that online learning can be established in Samoa so that those students in rural villages no longer have to move to the city to attend good schools. Providing online learning tools to those living in rural village can also help in reducing migration from rural villages to the city. Furthermore, online learning from my experience means cheaper tertiary education because families and governments do not have to spend so much money in sending people overseas to study. Online learning will also assist in combating the issue of lack of tutors and teachers especially in the field of information and communication technology. There is a huge need for online learning infrastructure at the national level in my country and I am sure it is the same in other small island developing states, in particular, remote islands and rural villages. While this need exists, Samoa has an online course for doctors and this is an initiative that needs expansion to formal and informal education in other Pacific Island countries as well. Leaders, regardless of any age, culture and beliefs must continue to learn and keep abreast with what is happening worldwide, in order to help their families, villages and churches attain knowledge and an thereby move a country towards a knowledge information society.


and 15 years of capacity building in the Pacific Region and 15 years of capacity building in the Pacific Region

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CD Pacific: Capacity Development Programme in Multilateral Diplomacy for Pacific Island States

Ms Setaita Tupua Kalou, from the Ministry of

Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation of Fiji

Setaita established a better understanding of 21st century diplomacy and small island dimensions of small island states as her goals for the Master/ Postgraduate Diploma in Contemporary Diplomacy.

Interests and goals I was interested in the deeper intricacies of diplomacy in the 21st century, given the major tectonic shifts in today’s geopolitics. The Master in Contemporary Diplomacy programme delivered by providing us with a more holistic approach which featured the mainstream key players perspective as well as the often ‘silent’ dimension of small states. The courses exceeded my expectations in the sense that I did not expect the coverage of some issues to have so much depth. The substantive course content at DiploFoundation was demystified on a number of levels by the lecturers so it was relatively easier for students to understand, yet at the same time, it pushed our traditional boundaries to expand our body of knowledge beyond our comfort zones.

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On online learning I had extensively searched online for a Master’s programme on diplomacy which best suited my needs in terms of distance and flexible learning, content, availability to international students and affordability. The Diplo course was reasonably flexible and convenient. The


and 15 years of capacity building in the Pacific Region

lecturers were quite accommodating in ensuring that the students’ work and study needs were in tune with each other in the best and worst of times. The biggest challenge would be the timezone difference which could mean having online classes at odd hours. However, Diplo is quite flexible and allows you to notify in advance if you are unable to attend a session and to provide your contributions post-session.

It was an interactive learning process, flexible enough to develop a closer and more personal relationship between students and lecturers and among the students themselves, without derogating the expected high standard that we would want from such exchanges. In particular, the online chat sessions were enjoyable and a value-added dimension in the online learning experience.

The courses exceeded my expectations in the sense that I did not expect the coverage of some issues to have so much depth. The substantive course content at DiploFoundation was demystified on a number of levels by the lecturers so it was relatively easier for students to understand, yet at the same time, it pushed our traditional boundaries to expand our body of knowledge beyond our comfort zones.

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CD Pacific: Capacity Development Programme in Multilateral Diplomacy for Pacific Island States

Diplo’s alumni from Pacific States First name

Surname

Institution

Country

Courses

Ano

Tisam

Cook Islands

Donye

Numa

Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2010 Climate Change diplomacy 2008

Fine

Tuitupou-Arnold

Maureen

Hilyard

Ministry of Education Pacific Islands Forum Secretariat Cook Islands Red Cross Society Office of the Prime Minister

Myra

Moeka’a/Patai

Government of the Cook Islands

Cook Islands

Robert

Matheson

Cook Islands

Tepua

Ngamata

Anju

Mangal

Ashel

Reuben

Ministry of Education Office of the Prime Minister University of Southern Queensland Hewlett-Packard

Ashraf

Mohammed

Fiji

Ashwin

Nand

Esala Fipe

Nayasi Tagicakibau

Fred

Christopher

Jemesa

Robarobalevu

Information Technology And Computing Services [ITCS] ITC Services, Government of Fiji Government Fiji Telecom Fiji Limited Pacific Islands Telecommunications Association Fiji Police Force

Kelera R

Baleinatotoka

Fiji

Lepani

Bevu

Megan

Streeter

Ministry of Finance/Information Technology & Computing Services (ITC) Telecom Fiji Limited Secretariat of the Pacific Community

Meriama Tuiloma Mudaliar Moape Qiolevu Momoivalu

Solomone

Naibuka

Sigasiganavanua

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ITC Services Colonial -Suva/ Fiji Telecom Fiji Limited

Cook Islands Cook Islands Cook Islands

Cook Islands Fiji Fiji

Fiji Fiji Fiji Fiji Fiji

Fiji Fiji Fiji Fiji Fiji Fiji

Humanitarian diplomacy 2012; Diplomacy of Small States 2013 Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2008, Climate Change diplomacy 2009 Postgraduate Diploma in Contemporary Diplomacy 2004; Climate Change diplomacy 2010 ACP ICT Strategy 2011 Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2009 Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2007 Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2007 Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2010 Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2006 Climate Change diplomacy 2009 Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2009 Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2009 Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2011; ACP Security 2011 Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2009

Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2011 ACP ICT Strategy 2011; Multilateral Diplomacy 2011 IT and Diplomacy 1998 ACP ICT Strategy 2011; Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2012 Multilateral Diplomacy II 2012 Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2009


and 15 years of capacity building in the Pacific Region First name

Surname

Institution

Country

Courses

Salanieta Tudrau

Tamanikaiwaimaro

Fiji

Sam

Goundar

Telecom Fiji Limited Bay of Plenty Polytechnic

Sanjay

Maharaj

Fiji

Sashi

Singh

Telecom Fiji Limited Ernst Young

Selevasio Naivala

Tagivuni

Fiji

Sereana

Narayan

Setaita Tupua

Kalou

Shareen

Taiyab

Shareeni

Kala

Sila

Balawa

Tevita

Tamanikaiwaimaro

Vaia

Tuuhia

AndrĂŠ

Reiffer

Chontelle

Perucich

Mike

Foon

Temaiana

Temareti

Capacity Development (MEA) National Capacity Self Assessment Project (NCSA), Department of Environment, Suva. Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC) Fiji Embassy, Belgium Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC) Fiji National University Ministry of Foreign AffairsSuva, Fiji Fiji Sugar Corporation Government of French Polynesia World Health Organization Australian Youth Ambassadors for Development-Kiribati Environment and Conservation Division KPC

Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2010 Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2010, Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2012 Advance Cybersecurity Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2011 Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2011 Climate Change diplomacy 2010

Joseph

Tibon

Chubasco

Diranga

Emani

Fakaotimanava-Lui Internet Niue

Niue

Scan

Mitiepo

Niue

Fiji

Fiji

Fiji

Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2011 ; ACP ICT Strategy 2011

Fiji

Postgraduate Diploma in Contemporary Diplomacy 2012 Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2011

Fiji Fiji Fiji Fiji French Polynesia Kiribati

Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2010; ACP ICT Strategy 2011 Climate Change diplomacy 2009 Global health diplomacy 2013

Kiribati

Climate Change diplomacy 2011

Kiribati

Climate Change diplomacy 2008

Kiribati

Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2009 Marshall Islands Climate Change diplomacy 08

Office of Environmental Planning and Policy Coordination ICT Center Nauru

Government of Niue

Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2010; ACP Privacy 2011 Climate Change diplomacy 2009

Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2012 Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2012 Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2013 Research, Introduction to Internet Governance

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CD Pacific: Capacity Development Programme in Multilateral Diplomacy for Pacific Island States First name

Surname

TaniRose

Fakaotimanava-Lui IUSN www.iusn. org Tomon Papua New Guinea (PNG) University of Technology (Unitech) Cholai Manus Professionals for Community Development Inc. Vere Manager at National Maritime Safety Authority Kisokau Magisterial Services of Papua New Guinea Ani Department of Petroleum & Energy, PNG Government Osao Maximum IT Systems & Consultancies Gairo Papua New Guinea University of Technology Woruba Telikom PNG Limited Posini Ministry o Foreign Affairs-Samoa Yang WHO Tafua-Rivers Office of AG of Samoa Kohlhase Office of the Regulator Faamau National University of Samoa Strickland Ministry of Foreignn Affairs-Samoa Purcell National ICT Secretariat-Samoa Leilua Womans Time Magazine Fonoti Ministry of Foreign Affairs-Samoa Faasino National University of Samoa Malielegaoi Samoa High Commission in Wellington Aiolupotea Ministry of Finance Agaiava Ministry of Women, Community and Social Development

Bill

Carole Iamo Parkop Saskia

Stanley Patrick Russell Amorette F Baoping Constance Elisa Foilagi Francella Maureen Fuatai Lemalu Nele Luciano Nikko Matinia Miriama Ronnie Sovala

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Institution

Country

Courses

Niue

Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2012 Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2009 ; ACP ICT Strategy 2011

Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea

ISOC Next Generation Leaders 2012

Papua New Guinea

Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty 2009

Papua New Guinea

Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2010; ACP Infrastructure 2011

Papua New Guinea

Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2011

Papua New Guinea

ACP ICT Strategy 2011

Papua New Guinea

Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2011

Papua New Guinea Samoa

Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2011 Postgraduate Diploma in Contemporary Diplomacy 2007 Global health diplomacy 2013 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty 2009

Samoa Samoa Samoa Samoa Samoa Samoa Samoa Samoa Samoa Samoa Samoa Samoa

Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2012 Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2007 Postgraduate Diploma in Contemporary Diplomacy 2008 Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2005 Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2010 Postgraduate Diploma in Contemporary Diplomacy 2006 Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2007 Postgraduate Diploma in Contemporary Diplomacy 2005 Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2011 Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2007; Climate Change Diplomacy 2010


and 15 years of capacity building in the Pacific Region First name

Surname

Institution

Country

Courses

Christina

Kuper Wini

Solomon Islands

Hoasiuhu

Francis

Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2006; Multilateral Diplomacy 2013 Climate Change 2011

Lynnold Misifea

Wini

Peter

Robertson

Peter Psalm

Ramofolo

Tim

McInerny

Alfred K

Ghemu

Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries Agency Ministry Of Environment, Climate Change, Disaster Management & Meteorology-Honiara/Solomon Islands Solomon Telekom Company LtdSolomon Islands Office of the Prime Minister Citizens Rights Advocacy Network Solomon Islands Australian Red Cross Central Bank of Solomon Islands

Kaimana H. Kathleen Nina Viela

Aleamotu’a Tupou Tupou

Sela

Moengangongo

Tonga High Commission in London

Tonga

Misalaima Andrew

Nelesone Molivurae

Dalsie GRK

Baniala

Lloyd

Fikiasi

Louise

Nasak

Vira

Josiah

Palepa Ng

Chok

Telecom Vanuatu

Solomon Islands

Solomon Islands

Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2006

Solomon Islands Solomon Islands

Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2006 Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2010

Solomon Islands Solomon Islands Tonga Tonga Tonga

Humanitarian diplomacy 2012

Tuvalu Vanuatu

Vanuatu InterimTelecommunications Regulator’s Office Pacific Lawyers

Vanuatu

ANZ Bank Vanuatu Ltd Parliamen of Vanuatu

Vanuatu

Vanuatu

Vanuatu Western Samoa

Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2011 IT and Diplomacy 1995 Bilateral Diplomacy 2005 IT and Diplomacy 1997, Postgraduate Diploma in Contemporary Diplomacy 2000 Postgraduate Diploma in Contemporary Diplomacy 2003 IT and Diplomacy 1995 Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2007; ACP ICT Strategy 11 Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2009 Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2012 Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2012 Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme 2011 IT and Diplomacy 1995

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About Diplo Among the top 100 NGOs in the world in 2012 Alumni from 189 countries Leading provider of Internet governance training De facto diplomatic academy for small island states

You can find more information about Diplo at

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Cd Pacific: Capacity Development Programme in Multilateral Diplomacy for Pacific Island States  

Capacity Development Programme in Multilateral Diplomacy for Pacific Island States and 15 years of capacity building in the Pacific Region

Cd Pacific: Capacity Development Programme in Multilateral Diplomacy for Pacific Island States  

Capacity Development Programme in Multilateral Diplomacy for Pacific Island States and 15 years of capacity building in the Pacific Region