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A Special Issue of

Newspaper of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Trenton, N.J. Newspaper of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Trenton, N.J.

January 2012

V ol. 58 | No . 27

www .T renton M onitor . com

ALSO INSIDE …

Ministrare Non Ministrari

In his annual State of the Diocese message, Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M., reports to the diocesan community on his first full year as Chief Shepherd, and sets priorities for the coming year. Begins on P3.

The Bishop’s Annual Appeal rolls out Jan. 21 and 22 in all parishes with an expanded goal of $8 million, including $1 million for parish-based and social service agency efforts to help the poor. Begins on P13.

Save the Date See center spread pullout for a listing of 2012 diocesan events.

Craig Pittelli photo

Ken Falls photo

Jeff Bruno photo

Serve ’ Served

‘to and not to be

Annual Financial Report Begins on P21.

Serving the Catholic Community in Burlington, Mercer, Monmouth and Ocean Counties.

Jeff Bruno photo

David Karas photo

Ken Falls photo


State of the Diocese

2 • January 2012

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‘To Serve and not to Be Served’

Inside

Staying in touch through the State of the Diocese

Formed in Christ. . . . . . . . P6 For those men who will serve as priests, formation is cooperation

By Rayanne M. Bennett Associate Publisher

with the Grace of God and the weaving of human, spiritual, in-

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tellectual and pastoral elements

t’s once again that time of year when we reach out to every Catholic household across Burlington, Mercer, Monmouth and Ocean Counties through the publication of the annual State of the Diocese issue.

of the vocation

Called to Service . . . . . . . . . P8 The life of a permanent deacon is a life of service to the Church with a three-fold ministry of service of the Word, of liturgy and of charity

This special issue gives Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M., and all of the offices and departments that support his ministry, an opportunity to report to the people of the diocese about some of the important work that has taken place in the past year, and what is slated for the coming year. It is a chance to have all of you come to know the diocesan community to which you belong a little better, and to provide you with ways to stay informed and connected. In addition to the bishop’s own comprehensive State of the Diocese message, there are several articles that take an in-depth look at some of the subjects he has addressed in his message, including his recent “ad limina” visit to the Vatican with the other bishops of New Jersey; the formation of seminarians, efforts to enhance our permanent diaconate program and ministry, and the many ways that the diocese partners with parishes in ministering to their people. Once again, we have provided members of our diocese with the Annual Financial Report, accounting for all the funds that come into the diocese and are returned to the parishes in real services and resources.

Priorities and Plans . . . . . . . P9 The Quinquennial Report presented by Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M., to Pope Benedict XVI during the recent ad limina visit offers insight into the life of the diocese

Partners in Faith . . . . . . . . P10 The collaborative relationship between diocese and parish brings life to ministries that serve the people of God

Also included in this issue is an overview of the 2012 Bishop’s Annual Appeal, which has as a special focus this year the ever-growing needs of the poor across our four counties. The theme of this year’s appeal: “One Family, Our Family in Christ,” can really be applied to everything we do as a diocesan community, not only this year but every year. We ask you to consider responding generously to the Bishop’s Annual Appeal, which can put as much as $1 million in the hands of parish-based and Catholic agency programs for the poor. A convenient pullout section in our center spread (page 18) listing the major events and initiatives of the diocese is something you’ll want to hang on to for easy reference through a good part of this year. And don’t miss page 20 for a “map” of the many places you will find the Diocese of Trenton online. We invite you to not only connect with these sites, but to give us your feedback as opportunities arise. The last year has been a time of great change, and it seems that 2012 will be no less historic. The best way to stay informed of developments as they happen is to become a subscriber of The Monitor. With your subscription you will receive the diocesan newspaper mailed to your home every other week, as well as access to a digital replica of the paper online. You will have at your fingertips news from the diocese, its 111 parishes, its many schools, ministries and programs, and a digest of important news from around the nation and the world that affects our lives as Catholics. We have put an incredible subscription offer together for this State of the Diocese issue … one year of print and digital editions for only $15. Don’t pass it up. If anything in this State of the Diocese issue raises questions for you, or inspires you to share your insight, connect with us on Facebook as The Catholic Diocese of Trenton and Trenton Monitor, and let us hear from you. God bless you all in 2012.

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State of the Diocese

January 2012 • 3

‘To Serve and not to Be Served’

State of the Diocese 2010-2011 Report

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Jeff Bruno Photo

Pittelli Photography

"I have been impressed by the manner in which the Diocese of Trenton responds to its faithful and their needs."

very five years, the bishop of every diocese is required to meet with the Holy Father in Rome and to visit the offices of the Holy See along with his fellow bishops of the region. The meetings and visit are called “ad limina apostolorum (‘to the threshold of the apostles’).” This past year was such an occasion for me, as I joined with the bishops of New Jersey and Pennsylvania (Region III of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops) in Rome December 1 through 11. It was, for all practical purposes, my final official act of the 2010-2011 year, the first full year of my tenure as Bishop of Trenton. I was accompanied on this journey by my priest-secretary, Father Alberto Tamayo; the Diocesan Vicar General, Msgr. Gregory Vaughan; and, my predecessor, Bishop John M. Smith. For the 10 months preceding this Chrism Mass, St. Mary of Assumption Cathedral, Trenton trip, officials of the Diocese, especially the Chancellor and Chief Administrapromulgation. I established a committee of pastors and priests tive Officer, Mr. Anthony Mingarino, and Msgr. Vaughan worked for that purpose, under the leadership of Msgr. Leonard F. very diligently to compile the required “Quinquennial (every Troiano, pastor of St. Pio of Pietrelcino Parish in Lavalette. Its five years) Report,” collaborating with the staffs of the various work should be completed by late summer 2012 and will be offices of the Chancery. In July, I added my own commentary presented to the Diocesan Curia and Presbyteral Council for and submitted the report to the Holy See for review, prior to review and for my approval and promulgation in the fall. my arrival in Rome. This document is, in effect, a “State of the The Diocese enjoys good and competent leadership at the DiDiocese” report and it chronicled the major activities and trends ocesan or “Curial” level and in its parishes and schools. A recent within the Diocese since the last ad limina visit. Since most of re-organization of the Diocesan Curia has already demonstrated the time period covered preceded my becoming Diocesan Bishop effectiveness in the functional areas of central administration. here, I found it interesting and instructive reading myself. Relationships between the Diocesan offices and the parishes are It is my judgment, based upon the report itself and my own steadily improving, according to pastors. Vicar General Msgr. observations this past year, that the Diocese appears healthy on Vaughan serves as Moderator of the Curia. the many levels of its existence — spiritual, pastoral and temSo that I may be present to all the pressing social needs poral. Although relatively new to the role of Diocesan Bishop, and concerns of the Diocese, I appointed Daughter of CharI have been impressed by the manner in which the Diocese of ity Sister Joanne Dress to serve in a new position as Executive Trenton responds to its faithful and their needs. Director of Catholic Social Services. Her role will be to coordinate all diocesan efforts to respond to these needs through A Good Foundation regular contact with organizations and agencies dedicated to A recently formulated pastoral plan, “Led By the Spirit the poor and those in special circumstances. (2009),” has guided major decisions affecting the Diocese as a whole. Finances are carefully and centrally monitored by Personnel in Ministry Chancellor and Chief Administrative Officer Mr. Mingarino The morale of the priest clergy seems positive and the and audited externally, although we ended this fiscal year with pastoral needs of the People of God in the Diocese seem ada deficit, due to a downturn in anticipated contributions to the equately met by them in conjunction with our large contingent Diocese. The Diocesan Finance Council, under the leadership of permanent deacons. I do receive periodic letters of concern of its chairman, Mr. Lawrence Downes, meets four times a year (or complaint) from parishioners about some few situations and reviews all diocesan revenue, investments and expendior circumstances in various parishes. I have tried to address tures. things that appear to be “trends” with the appropriate indiHuman Resources also seem well-handled through the work viduals concerned but I have tried to make it very clear that I of a central office in the Chancery and its Director, Mr. Joseph do not and will not “micro-manage” parishes or overturn deciBianchi. Easy and frequent conversations between these Diocesions made by legitimate and competent pastors in accord with san offices responsible for these areas and the parishes, schools established policies. Such an approach requires honesty and and other institutions / organizapatience by all. tions of the Diocese take place, with The number of seminarians (34) is rising slowly although positive results. Administrators in the increasing number of priests anticipating retirement looms both functional areas — finances large on the not too distant horizon. That will require careand human resources — are wellful planning and adjustment of the way things have “always respected and their interventions been.” I established a committee for priestly recruitment whose are well-received throughout the work will be chaired by Msgr. Vaughan, the Director of VocaDiocese. tions, and Father Dennis Apoldite, pastor of Sacred Heart ParThe policies enacted by the ish in Trenton and coordinator of the House of Priestly FormaFourth Diocesan Synod (1991) contion there. On June 4, 2011, I ordained and assigned six new tinue to inform and guide internal priests for the Diocese. I also established an Episcopal Council and external pastoral activities and of pastors to serve as a personnel board of advisors to me as operations of the Diocese, although Diocesan Bishop. I am reviewing many of these poliThe Diocese has many extraordinarily gifted permanent cies with a view toward updating deacons but their distribution and ministries seem uneven them to reflect current realities not contemplated at the time of their See Diocese | P4


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State of the Diocese

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Diocese strives to fulfill mission Continued from P3 and inconsistent. It was recently reported that the Diocese of Trenton has the second largest number of permanent deacons in our country. I have established a committee of pastors and deacons, under the leadership of the newly appointed Vicar for Clergy (Priests and Deacons) and Consecrated Religious, Father Thomas Mullelly, to study the permanent diaconate in our Diocese and to make recommendations to me in its regard by October 1, 2012. Other U.S. dioceses have or are conducting similar studies. Several retreat and continuing professional education days were conducted by Father Mullelly for our priests this past year as well as a convocation for our permanent deacons. The Diocese is grateful to Msgr. Ronald Bacovin, pastor of St. James Parish in Pennington for his 13 years of service as Director of Priest Personnel and to Msgr. Ralph Stansley, pastor of Our Lady of Good Counsel Parish in Trenton, and Sister Donna Watson, IHM, who stepped down from their positions as Director of the Permanent Diaconate and Delegate for Religious, respectively.

Ongoing Priorities

The crisis concerning the sexual abuse of minors in the Catholic Church continues to be felt in the Diocese of Trenton, as we still address “old cases.” I am currently working with the Vatican Congregation for the Doctrine of Faith to resolve those situations. Gratefully, the Diocese has not suffered the number and severity that other Dioceses have faced, but even one case is “one too many.” The Diocese of Trenton has been found by external auditors to be “in compliance” with the policies of The Charter for the Protection of Youth promulgated and recently updated by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. Former Chancellor Msgr. Joseph N. Rosie, current pastor of St. Paul Parish in Princeton, and the Diocesan Review Board are to be commended for their diligence in regard to diocesan efforts. I continue to be concerned about the declining attendance at Sunday Mass (now at only 25 percent) and the tenuous situation of some of our Catholic schools and Catholic religious education programs. Strategies to address both are in the planning stages. This past year, the Annual Bishop’s Appeal took as its motto “Go Teach” and invited an extra $1 million dollars in contributions to help with Catholic school tuition assistance and other educational needs. By year’s end, the Appeal approached its total goal of $8 million, the largest single goal in diocesan history. The Office of Catholic Education welcomed its new Vicar for Catholic Education, Father Douglas Freer, former pastor of St. Rose Parish in Belmar. To address the decline in Church attendance and parish participation, I commissioned a survey of Catholics who have drifted away from the Church — a type of “exit interview”­— developed by the Villanova University Center for Church Management, presented to, edited and approved by the Diocesan Presbyteral Council. The results of this study will be presented to me this spring and will be subsequently published to the Diocese. The good news in all of this is the increase in Church membership by people in the Spanish and Portuguese speaking communities within the Diocese. Father Joseph Roldan, rector of St. Mary of the Assumption Cathedral in Trenton, has been appointed Diocesan Liaison to these communities. I will be meeting with priests from these groups and other pastors serving them this spring to determine and discuss how best to respond to their presence and participation in the local Church and to meet their needs within currently existing parishes. Mass is celebrated beautifully and well throughout the Diocese. I base that assessment on my pastoral visits to many of our parishes to date. Effective catechesis helped to prepare our parishioners for the introduction of the third edition of the Roman Missal, the so-called “new translation” that became effective on the First Sunday of Advent. Much credit for this catechesis is owed to our pastors, parish priests and deacons, and to the good work of the Diocesan Office of Worship, under the leadership of its Director, Msgr. Sam Sirianni, pastor of St. Robert Bellarmine Parish in Freehold, and his diocesan assistant, Mercy Sister Eleanor McCann. I have also appointed Father Brian Woodrow, who serves as chaplain to the hospitals of Mercer County, to coordinate the work of providing Mass in the Extraordinary Form within the Diocese.

Priest Ordination, St Mary of the Assumption Cathedral, Trenton

Unfortunately, I anticipate more parish mergers and school closures within the next few years which will bring with it some anxiety in the areas affected. Such decisions are painful and difficult but will be necessary as we, like other Dioceses, face the realities of life in the contemporary Church. It is important for all of us to recognize that the Diocese of Trenton is not unique in this regard as dioceses throughout the country are facing similar situations. I am most grateful to the Chairman of the Expansion and Restructuring Commission Father Jeffrey E. Lee, pastor of Our Lady of Angels Parish in Trenton, and Mrs. Terry Ginther, Executive Director of Pastoral Life and Mission, for their effective work leading these efforts and their pastoral implementation. It is under the direction of the Office of Pastoral Life and Mission that the Diocese fulfills one of its most essential roles – that of partnering with the parishes in ministering to their people. I often say “the Diocese lives in its parishes” and “our responsibility in the Chancery is to help the parishes in every way possible.” I am grateful for the good work that is done by the Diocese on behalf of its parishes, so that ministries to such groups as families, youths, young adults, the bereaved, and seniors, to name but a few, can be delivered in an effective and meaningful way. Conscious of the constant need for good and accurate communication throughout the Diocese and the unique opportunities presented by rapidly advancing technologies, I have maintained regular contact with the Executive Director of Communications, Mrs. Rayanne Bennett, and her staff. The Diocesan publication, The Monitor, and the Diocesan website have become important and effective tools for such communication with the broader diocesan community. I have also begun hosting an hour-long monthly radio broadcast, “The Shepherd’s Voice,” on WFJS radio station (1260 AM and 89.3 FM) that presents Catholic information and invites audience participation through a “call-in” format. In general, recognizing that there is always room for improvement, the State of Diocese of Trenton is good and we seem to be fulfilling the Church’s mission effectively and well. The Diocese is poised for embracing and addressing its challenges with energy and enthusiasm. In the year ahead, the Diocese will hold its first Eucharistic Congress at the PNC Bank Arts Center in Holmdel, NJ, October 12 – 14, 2012, to begin the diocesan observance of the “Year of Faith,” announced by Pope Benedict XVI, for 2012-2013. A committee will be appointed this spring to coordinate diocesan activities for the Congress and throughout the year, in response to the Church’s call for a “new evangelization.” Let us all continue to pray for our Diocese, that we may all grow in faith, holiness and love as, together, we respond to Christ’s example and call “to serve and not to be served.” Respectfully submitted,

Most Reverend David M. O’Connell, C.M. Bishop of Trenton

Pittelli Photography

Ken Falls photo

"The Diocese is poised for embracing and addressing its challenges with energy and enthusiasm."


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State of the Diocese

January 2012 • 5


State of the Diocese

6 • January 2012

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On the Road to the Priesthood “Any young man pursuing the priesthood must become well versed in understanding Scripture, Church dogma, moral principles, canon law, liturgy and Church history.

Mass with seminarians in Sacred Heart Church, Trenton. Photo courtesy of Robert Van Doren, member of Sacred Heart Parish, Trenton

Diocese companions future priests through robust formation process

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Priestly ordination, St. Mary of the Assumption Cathedral, Trenton

ost parishioners come to know their parish priests though the many ways that he is present to their lives – baptizing babies, marrying young couples, anointing the sick and dying, visiting the hospitalized, homebound and imprisoned, hearing and forgiving the sins of their people, celebrating the Eucharist, lending a listening ear to the troubled, offering comfort to the grieving and praying for the dead. But the path that “Father” took to lead him from a young man who said “yes” to God’s call, to the man who stands before his community today is not so well known or understood. Msgr. Gregory D. Vaughan, diocesan director of vocations, welcomed the opportunity to share insights on how the Trenton Diocese journeys with a man from the time he decides to pursue a vocation until he reaches that great, grace-filled day of when he is ordained a priest.

For men who are “on the fence,” Msgr. Vaughan said there is the option of them remaining at home and continuing with work or school. They also have the option to move to the House of Priestly Formation which is located on the grounds of Sacred Heart Parish, Trenton. While living in the House of Formation, the men continue to hold down their regular jobs, yet they live in community with others where they will experience the many facets of parish life. There are also men who are further along in their discernment and want to enter the seminary as soon as possible, Msgr. Vaughan said. Before a man enters the seminary, there is much to do by way of paperwork, including the application process and writing a comprehensive autobiography, obtaining physical and dental exams and undergoing a psychological evaluation, background check and fingerprinting.

‘I think I want to be a priest…’

Seminary Formation

For a young man considering the priesthood, the first step is usually meeting with his parish priest. As a means of directing his discernment, the priest often encourages the man to be more involved in parish life by becoming a lector, an extraordinary minister of Holy Communion, an assistant in the youth ministry program or a catechist in the religious education program. With priestly guidance, parish involvement and a regular presence at various liturgical functions, the potential candidate for the seminary is in a better position to take the second step, that is, making an appointment with the diocesan director of vocations. Msgr. Vaughan said when a young man calls to make an appointment he usually has done all the above, as well as researched several priestly vocation websites. Naturally, he is somewhat anxious as this is a major step which may well determine the path he will travel for the rest of his life. “Initially, we talk about his life and the key points that have led him to this moment,’ said Msgr. Vaughan. “Through such conversation, you can pretty well tell those who are still on the fence about entering the seminary and need more time. “

Msgr. Vaughan works closely with each candidate to determine which seminary will best meet his individual needs and assist him in further developing his spiritual well-being, his academic abilities and his social skills, so that he can better serve the people of God. In the Trenton Diocese, men who are preparing for the priesthood are sent to one of the following four seminaries: St. Mary Seminary and University, Baltimore.; Immaculate Conception Seminary on the campus of Seton Hall University, South Orange; Theological College on the campus of The Catholic University of America, Washington, and St. Charles Borromeo Seminary in Overbrook, Pa. Msgr. Vaughan said that once the candidate is in the seminary, regardless of which seminary he attends, his years of training will be based on “The Four Pillars of Formation” – academic, spiritual, social and pastoral development. Any young man pursuing the priesthood must become well versed in understanding Scripture, Church dogma, moral principles, canon law, liturgy and Church history. “We stress to every man the importance of doing his best in See Formation | P34


State of the Diocese

www .T renton M onitor . com

January 2012 • 7

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State of the Diocese

8 • January 2012

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Heralds of the Word A look at the ministry of service through the permanent diaconate Story by Mary Stadnyk News Editor

Mass for Catholic School students, St. Mary of the Assumption Cathedral, Trenton Craig Pittelli photo

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hances are most folks in the pews have some idea about “permanent deacons,” what these men do and the role they have in parish communities. A simple and succinct definition of a permanent deacon might be a man who lives a life of service that integrates family life, the workplace, the community and ministry. His life of service is generally rooted within his parish and extends in outreach to the community and those on the margins. His threefold ministry includes: service of the Word, service of liturgy and service of charity.

What a deacon is and what he does

There are some obvious observations that the average parishioner might make about permanent deacons — they are the men who stand next to the priest during Mass, they read the Gospel and offer an occasional homily. You might see deacons baptizing children, witnessing weddings and officiating at wakes and burial services. Some parishioners might note how the deacon’s garments differ from that of priests. Deacons, like priests and bishops, wear the stole, however, deacons place the stole over their left shoulder and it hangs across their right side, while priests and bishops wear it around the neck. The vestment that is most particularly associated with the Roman Catholic deacon is called the dalmatic, which is more of a fitted tunic-style garment with sleeves. The color of the garments reflects the colors of the liturgical year or the nature of the liturgical activity. Their appropriate title is “Deacon.” In addition to their duties in the parish church, deacons might lead baptismal and marriage preparation programs, the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults (the process by which adults prepare to become full members of the Catholic Church), serve as hospital

and prison chaplains and engage in social justice ministries. There are some who might have full-time jobs in parish administration or serve on a diocesan level. In essence, deacons are called to be living images of the servanthood of our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. A permanent deacon can be single or married. If the latter, he must be married before being ordained a deacon. A widowed deacon, however, may not remarry. Unmarried men who seek to be ordained deacons make a promise of celibacy before they are ordained.

Becoming a deacon takes work, prayer

A simple and succinct definition of a permanent deacon might be a man who lives a life of service that integrates family life, the workplace, the community and ministry.

Deacons of the Trenton Diocese have undergone an extensive formation process which lasted four years. This process included an initial period of discernment by the prospective deacon and his wife along with the recommendation of the parish pastor. An “aspirant year” followed in which candidates participated in weekly pre-formation classes that offered the men more opportunities to discern whether God was calling them to become a deacon. The candidates then spent two years traveling to the Diocesan Pastoral Center twice a week where they attended classes that covered topics including Scripture, canon law, moral theology, Church history, See Permanent | P33


State of the Diocese

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January 2012 • 9

‘To Serve and not to Be Served’

Priorities, Plans and Challenges Reporting to Rome on the life of a diocese Compiled by Mary Morrell Managing Editor

Time with the Holy Father — Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M., left, leans forward to listen as Pope Benedict XVI addresses bishops from New Jersey and Pennsylvania Dec. 5 during their “ad limina” visits to the Vatican. Seated with Bishop O’Connell, from left, Bishop Arthur J. Serratelli of Paterson, Bishop Paul G. Bootkoski of Metuchen, retired Auxiliary Bishop David Arias of Newark, Auxiliary Bishop Manuel A. Cruz of Newark, and Archbishop John J. Myers of Newark. Bishop Donald W. Trautman of Erie, Pa., also attended the meeting. CNS photo/ L’Osservatore Romano

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n an ancient tradition of the Church, bishops journey every five years to pray at the tombs of Sts. Peter and Paul. During this pilgrimage, the bishops meet with the pope as the Chief Shepherd of the Church and present to him a report on the status of their dioceses. This pilgrimage is called the “ad limina Apostolorum” – which means, “to the threshold of the Apostles.” Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M., made his first 10-day “ad limina” visit as Chief Shepherd of the Diocese of Trenton, Nov. 30 – Dec. 9, along with the bishops of the (arch) dioceses of New Jersey and Pennsylvania and a number of Trenton diocesan officials. The group was one of 15 groups of United States bishops scheduled to make their ad limina visits to the Vatican during a several month period, which began in November with the visit of the New England bishops. The Diocese of Trenton last made an “ad limina” visit in 2004 for the period 1998 through 2003, a “quinquennial” period of five years, and was actually due for its next visit in 2009. However, the death of Pope John Paul II and the elevation of Pope Benedict XVI to the papacy in that year resulted in a delay in the regular schedule. Bishop O’Connell’s visit was really a report on the state of the diocese for a seven-year period, 2004 through 2010. The Quinquennial Report presented to Pope Benedict XVI is a comprehensive view of the state of the diocese for the prescribed period, and includes a three- to four-page summary section in which the bishop provides an overview of the diocese, the priorities, the challenges, and a general blueprint for the future. Since Bishop O’Connell was the diocesan bishop for only one month of the seven-year period, the report reflected more on his plans for the future.

Other sections, to name a few, report on efforts put in place in the diocese in the areas of liturgical and sacramental life; Catholic education; catechesis; life and ministry of the clergy; the laity; pastoral care of the family; social communications; social justice, and Christian charity. The report also includes a financial State of the Diocese and a General Assessment and Outlook for the Future. Key to the Quinquennial Report is a side-by-side comparison of statistics and other measurable indicators from January 2004 and December 2010, points at the beginning and end of the seven-year period. The statistics reflect trends, growth and changes in the four counties of the Diocese of Trenton – Burlington, Mercer, Monmouth and Ocean. In his preliminary observations, Bishop O’Connell recounts having spent most of his time during the first 11 months of his service to the diocese in visiting parishes and schools, and has made Catholic education a pastoral priority, stating, “Catholic education is integral to carrying out the mission of the Church. It is our foundation and our future.” In addition, the bishop identified vocations to the diocesan See Report | P12

“Catholic education is integral to carrying out the mission of the Church. It is our foundation and our future.”


State of the Diocese

10 • January 2012

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Eugenia M. Kelly Holy Cross Parish, Rumson – Bereavement Ministry Training “The training enabled the group to gain a body of knowledge about grief and mourning as well as some very basic information (do’s and don’ts) and techniques to use with grievers … We have the practice of following up with our bereaved families through the entire first year with notes, calls, advice and even referral for counseling or support groups. Paramount is the stress on “listening” which comes from the training, i.e., being a holy listener, not needing to “say” something but being present to the bereaved.”

Partners in Ministry A partnership for ministry, rooted in the essence of Church By Lois Rogers Features Editor

Patrick Gatton

St. Mary of the Lake, Lakewood – Certificate Program in Pastoral Care “As part of the program we learned that the elderly may be unresponsive to any sound in the room and then respond to prayer in remarkable ways. After that lesson, my wife and I were asked to pray with an elderly woman who had been quite unresponsive to all sounds for several months. We began a prayer with her, ‘Hail Mary…’ The woman’s lips moved as she prayed with us. After the prayer, I held the woman’s hand. She pulled my hand to her lips and kissed it. It was a remarkable act of appreciation of a simple act of praying with her.”

Paula Little St. Pius X Parish, Forked River – Rainbows Program for children grieving a loss “We have had sessions since 2005, and plan to continue. We have four fantastic facilitators, all trained through the Diocese of Trenton, and have 14 children in four different levels this year. Several members are in their fifth year having experienced continual losses … We have had consistently excellent feedback from both parents and their children.”

Summer catechetical program in St. Anselm Parish, Wayside. Scott Alessi photo

T

here’s only one mission for the whole Church: living the Gospel of Christ. But local needs differ from parish to parish as each community seeks to live out that mission, said Terry A. Ginther, executive director of the diocesan Office of Pastoral Life and Mission. “We know that the Church is a living communion,” Ginther said. “St. Paul reminds us that we are ‘one body’ in Christ…the services of the diocesan offices are to build up the ‘one body,’ increasing the capability of parishes to praise and worship God, to proclaim and teach, to heal and reconcile, to seek justice and serve with charity in Jesus’ name.” Reflecting this understanding, she said, Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M., has directed the diocesan offices and ministries to take a more relational approach, providing customized assistance to parishes and offering programs that respond, first and "Examples of this foremost, to parish collaborative relationship needs. “This is a partnercan be found in every parish ship for ministry rooted in the very essence of the diocese from the of the Church,” said Atlantic and Delaware Ginther. Helping the shorelines, to the pines and parishes meet the wide spectrum of their memeverywhere in between.." bers needs, she noted, the diocesan offices have responded on many levels, from the changes in the New Roman Missal to intergenerational support for new mothers, families and singles, the separated, widowed, divorced and bereaved of all ages. Ginther noted that the diocese (increasingly) reaches out to partner with its 111 parishes with programs geared toward youth, young adults, marriage and family life, pastoral care and reconnecting with the Church. She quoted from Bishop O’Connell’s 2010-2011 State of the Diocese Address in which he wrote that the “Diocese is living out one of its most essential roles,” by partnering so that ministries to such groups as “families, youths, young adults, the bereaved and seniors, to name but a few, can be delivered in an effective and meaningful way.” This reflects, Ginther said, the teaching of Blessed Pope John Paul II in “Pastores Gregis,” the Post-Synod-

al Apostolic Exhortation considered a model of ‘pastoral rule’ for the life and work of the bishops, that the “parish is basic to the life of the Church.” It is in the parish, wrote John Paul, that “the most intimate concerns of individuals and the broadest reaches of the Church’s mission come together.” The “intimate concerns” embrace all strata of society and realms of human experience, said Ginther who added that the staff of the diocesan offices are there “to build up the one body of Christ by increasing the capability of parishes (parishioners and their leaders) to praise and worship God, to proclaim and teach, to heal and reconcile, to seek justice and serve with charity in Jesus’ name." Examples of this collaborative relationship can be found in every parish of the diocese from the Atlantic and Delaware shorelines, to the pines and everywhere in between. St. Gregory the Great Parish, Hamilton Square, for instance, partnered with the diocesan Department of Youth, Marriage and Family Life, in gearing up for the new “Home Life” Ministry program designed to help couples support and enhance their marriages and family life in the home with a series of 120-day “intentional” challenges – praying together as a family at home for instance – to bring couples and their children closer together. The program was drawn from a highly successful evangelical model and the materials had to be reviewed and revised before the rollout to make “sure they reflected the full Catholic view,” said Mary Ann Isaac, who organized and co-directs the program with Camille Froelich. Linda Richardson, the director of the Department of Youth, Marriage and Family Life, provided just the assistance they needed, said Isaac. To date, some 640 of the 5,000 families registered at the parish, have helped themselves to those packets of materials that enabled them to take part in the first of several 120 day campaigns that focus on family life, said Isaac. She sees the program as “something so needed by parishioners. “The Church,” she said, “is always on the defense, reacting to (contemporary) problems. We believe Home Life is on the offense, leading the charge … saying we care enough to go deeper into the Sacrament of Marriage and we want families to work together to pass on the faith.” See Diocese | P28


www .T renton M onitor . com

State of the Diocese

January 2012 • 11

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State of the Diocese

12 • January 2012

T he M onitor

‘To Serve and not to Be Served’

Report highlights diocese's changes, challenges Continued from P9 priesthood and the transmission of faith through proper catechesis and evangelization, as two additional pressing priorities, noting that current reports demonstrate that Mass attendance and reception of the sacraments has decreased, with only 25 percent of the Catholic population in the diocese attending Mass. The notable exception was adult Baptisms which increased by 239 percent.

Addressing Change

The Quinquennial Report notes that the Catholic population in the diocese increased from 780,925 to 831,707, a growth of 6. 5 percent, while the number of diocesan priests decreased from 202 to 194 and the number of religious priests decreased from 51 to 32. The trend is similar for religious women, whose numbers decreased from 405 to 321. Conversely, the number of seminarians increased from 24 to 35. The report also indicates that, in spite of New Jersey’s ranking as having one of the highest per capita incomes in the United States, there are many immigrants and minorities residing here who suffer from poverty due to the high cost of living in this area of the country and to a lack of educational skills in a technologically advanced work environment. Among the Catholic population in the diocese is an increasing number of immigrants, including current refugee populations of Iraqis, Bhutanese from Nepal and the Karen and Karenni Burmese from Thailand who are being resettled. To meet the needs of increasingly diverse ethnic and cultural populations, including a growing Hispanic and Latino population, a significant number of parishes offer liturgies and the sacraments in native languages, bilingual programs, as well as social and economic assistance. In response to shifting populations, a decline in the number of priests and an influx of new Catholic immigrants, a number of parish communities entered into consultative processes to study how parish restructuring would ensure a vibrant Catholic presence in their communities into the future. These parish studies resulted in recommendations for parish mergers or suppression which decreased the number of parishes from 127 to 111. In spite of the increased number of Catholics in the diocese, Catholic schools have decreased in number. The rising cost of tuition, low enrollment and limited parish resources are all factors impacting the schools, and leading to a significant decline in students attending Catholic schools and receiving a Catholic education. During the reporting period, 13 Catholic schools closed due to declining enrollment, leaving 39 elementary and 11 secondary Catholic schools (including diocesan, regional, parish and private). Enrollment during this period decreased from 26,410 to 20,631, with attendance in elementary and secondary religious education also experiencing a 7 percent decline. Children receiving parish religious education has decreased from 68,194 to 63,389. With tuition a challenge for many Catholic families, especially the poor, efforts continue to find ways to make Catholic schools available and affordable.

Societal Trends

According to the report, disappointing trends within society are reflected among Catholics and include such things as a disregard for the sanctity

of life and the failure to embrace Church teachings on issues of abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment, artificial contraception, in vitro fertilization and embryonic stem cell research. Catholic-Christian norms, standing against a secular and materialistic mentality, are viewed as out-of date, a trend which continues to affect marriage and family values. The divorce rate among diocesan Catholics is 6.7 percent. In addition, 30 percent of couples are in civil, and not sacramental, marriages. To provide support in this area, and in collaboration with all the dioceses of New Jersey, the Diocese of Trenton has renewed its efforts in the area of marital preparation through the revision of the Common Policy for Marriage Formation and Preparation. In further moves to counter the effects of societal trends on diocesan Catholics, the diocese developed and promulgated a pastoral plan in 2009 with seven priorities for mission and ministry within the diocese: Sunday Mass; Living as Disciples; Growing

in Faith; Leadership; Charity and Justice; Youth and Young Adults, and Ethnic Diversity. There has also been an increase in diocesan youth and young adult outreach, and adult faith formation efforts, with an action plan for adult faith formation implemented in 2005. Forty-five parishes participated in a diocesan process of adult faith formation designed to initiate and sustain their catechetical efforts. Continuing formation of priests has been a high priority, as well, with the diocese conducting clergy study days, a yearly convocation of priests and the encouraging of personal study weeks. In a closing summary of the report, Bishop O’Connell noted that the diocese enjoys responsible financial health and oversight, good and dedicated priests, deacons and religious and generous lay people who are eager and willing to advance their own baptismal calling and commitment to build the Kingdom of God.

Use of Funds Fye 2011, Baa 2010 Source of all Revenue

n n n n

Assessments Bishop's Annual Appeal Investments Miscellaneous - Bequests, Gifts, etc.

Use of All Funds

Use of Assessments, Investment Income, Bequests, Gifts, Etc.

n n n n n n

h b c d e g

Ministerial Offices Adminsitrative Expense Vocations/Seminarians Retired Priests Support - Non-Diocesan Parish Assistance

Use of Bishop Annual Appeal Funds

n n n n n n n n

a b c i d e f g

Ministerial Offices Administrative Vocations/Seminarians Parish Rebates Retired Priests Support - Non-Diocesan Support to DOT social agencies Parish Assistance

Key to Charts a Ministerial Offices - Pastoral Life & Mission, Clergy, Education, Communications b Offices of Bishop, Bishop Emeritus, Child Protection, Temporal Administration, Canonical Services, Miscellaneous (Legal expense, Property taxes, etc.)

n n n n n

i Parish Rebates a Education a Ministerial Formation and Priestly Life a Charitable Missions a Evangelization, Communication and Outreach

e

 ssessment Payments to Holy See, U.S. Conference of A Catholic Bishops, New Jersey Catholic Conference, NJ School Marketing

f

 ubsidy to Catholic Social Agencies, i.e Catholic S Charities, Mt. Carmel Guild

g

 ssistance to parishes - usually for emergency repairs A of facilities

c

Vocations Office, Seminarian Educational Expense

h Ministerial Offices not covered by Bishop's Annual Appeal Funds

d

Villa Vianney, Long Term Care Facility at St. Lawrence

i

Rebates to parishes which meet or exceed their goal

Note: Reports are exclusive of extraordinary expense. i.e Episcopal Ordination, Parish Increased Offertory Program


State of the Diocese

www .T renton M onitor . com

January 2012 • 13

‘To Serve and not to Be Served’

‘If you love me … feed my sheep.’ The video for this year’s Bishop’s Annual Appeal tells the story of the struggle against poverty from both sides of the experience – by individuals who have found themselves without adequate financial means to provide for their families’ basic needs, and by representatives of parishes and other Church-run agencies who are working diligently to help those who need it. This year’s appeal will provide an additional $1 million to help parishes and other programs in responding to individuals in their communities who need assistance with food, clothing, shelter or emergency medical needs.

Debra Client of Catholic Charities Parish Emergency Services, Trenton

“I felt like somebody cared.”

Jeff Bruno photo

Debra was a registered nurse, raising her young son, when her life changed in an instant with the onset of multiple sclerosis. Having both cognitive and physical abilities impaired, and needing to re-learn many ordinary things, like how to walk and use utensils, Debra found it difficult to live in her two-floor residence, breaking several bones in repeated falls down the stairs. After a number of years adjusting to the ups and downs of her illness, Debra would learn, through a multiple sclerosis newsletter, about a housing complex for people with multiple sclerosis which would be the perfect solution for her. Before the complex was even built, Debra filled out the application to be considered for a unit, and then she waited. When she received notification that she had been selected as a resident, Debra was overjoyed. But her excitement soon turned to disappointment when a large car repair bill depleted her funds and she did not have enough money for a deposit. “What am I going to do?” Debra remembers asking herself. “With other things like rent and utilities, this is not going to work. This is my last chance to do anything to help myself.” That’s when Catholic Charities came to her assistance. A friend recommended that Debra apply for Catholic Charities Parish Emergency Services through Blessed Sacrament-Our Lady of the Divine Shepherd Parish, Trenton. “There is no way to describe how I felt when they said yes, we are going to help you. I cried with joy,” Debra acknowledged, grateful for the funds needed to secure her new home. “It’s hard to explain. I felt like somebody cared.” The Catholic Charities’ Parish Emergency Assistance Program was established in 2008 and is funded through the generous support of the Diocese of Trenton. It is designed to assist parishes in responding to individuals and families through modest monetary grants to help with utilities payments and rent.

Father Daniel F. Swift Pastor of St. Benedict Parish, Holmdel

Appeal set at $8 million, $1 million earmarked to help the poor By Rayanne Bennett | Associate Publisher

H

elping families caught in the rip tide of today’s economic crisis is a primary goal of the 2012 Bishop’s Annual Appeal. Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M., is once again asking the people of the diocese to dig just a little deeper so that an expanded goal of $8 million can be met. In addition to the $7 million needed to fund diocesan operations, ministries and initiatives, the new goal will include $1 million that will be used exclusively for parish-based programs and other Catholic social service agencies that work to serve the basic and emergency medical needs of the growing number of poor living in Burlington, Mercer, Monmouth and Ocean Counties. The appeal, which has as its theme “One Family, Our Family in Christ,” will roll out during Masses in See Sharing | P15

“We are there for the people who would fall through the cracks of the cutbacks." When Father Daniel F. Swift became pastor of St. Benedict Parish, Holmdel, in 2005, social ministry was a small and personal operation run mainly by one devoted parishioner. “Someone would come with an electric bill that needed to be paid and (the volunteer) would give the bill to me and (I’d) take care of it,” Father Swift said. How things have changed since then. These days, among the 89 parish and school ministries at the 3,300family parish, 26 are devoted to the Corporal Works of Mercy for all generations, young, middle aged or elderly. Among these are the St. Vincent de Paul Society which collects over $200,000 per year through donations from parishioners, grant solicitations and corporate matching funds administered through intake volunteers who make home visits. SVDP disbursements average between $7,000 - $8,000 a month for the Food Pantry. SVDP also provides funds to other parishes and Project Paul outreach in Keansburg who ask for financial help for their cases. In addition, they provide holiday meals at Thanksgiving and Christmas as well as Christmas gifts for more than 1,000 children each year. The parish food program includes a volunteer-run garden that harvested more than 1,300 pounds of produce for the food pantry and a crew of volunteers who prepare and deliver food to the homes of shutins, the infirm and those who are without transportation. There’s an extensive senior support program designed to help seniors tap into available resources and navigate an increasingly complex web of social services and the medical infrastructure. The entire network reflects the parish mandate to “deny no one and refuse nothing if anyone seeks help,” said Father Swift. “If anyone is in need of anything, we help.” The area of outreach embraces a wide geographic range, including families in Holmdel – “We’re a small corner of Holmdel,” he said – “we’re more Hazlet, Aberdeen and Matawan. A lot of our folks worked on Wall Street and have lost their jobs. They are doing their best to keep their homes by cutting back on food and utilities. They are just scraping by. We are there for them.” The growth of social ministry at the parish resulted, he said, in a real recognition that “we know government is doing its level best but the system doesn’t work a lot of the time. It’s an overwhelming See Meeting | P15


State of the Diocese

14 • January 2012

T he M onitor

‘To Serve and not to Be Served’

Parishes meet appeal goal

If you Love Me...

The 2011 Bishop’s Annual Appeal was a tremendous success. The goal of $8 million was reached with the support and hard work of many people in the Diocese of Trenton. Congratulations to the following parishes that have achieved goal for the 2011 Bishop’s Annual Appeal: St. Anthony Parish | Red Bank

Resurrection Parish | Delran

St. Elizabeth Parish | Avon

St. Barnabas Parish | Bayville

St. Rose Parish | Belmar

Our Lady of Good Counsel Parish | Moorestown

St. John Parish | Allentown

St. Martha Parish | Point Pleasant

St. Joseph Parish | Trenton

Our Lady of Sorrows-St. Anthony Parish | Hamilton

Jesus the Lord Parish | Keyport Sacred Heart Parish | Trenton St. Alphonsus Parish | Hopewell St. Mary Cathedral | Trenton St. Robert Bellarmine Parish | Freehold St. Catharine Parish | Holmdel St. Paul Catholic Parish | Princeton St. Benedict Parish | Holmdel Nativity Parish | Fair Haven Holy Innocents Parish | Neptune Christ the Redeemer Parish | Mount Holly Sacred Heart Parish | Bay Head St. David the King Parish | Princeton Junction St. Ann Parish | Lawrenceville St. Anthony of Padua Parish | Hightstown St. Monica Parish | Jackson St. Ann Parish | Browns Mills

St. Dominic Parish | Brick Town Divine Mercy Parish | Trenton St. Dorothea Parish | Eatontown St. Mary Parish | Bordentown St. Catherine Parish | Farmingdale St. Mary Parish | Barnegat

Feed My Sheep.

St. Mary of the Lakes Parish | Medford St. Pio of Pietrelcina Parish | Lavallette St. Rose of Lima Parish | Freehold

Our work to help those in need has never been more critical.

Holy Eucharist Parish | Tabernacle St. John Neumann Parish | Mount Laurel

Please join us in this effor t.

St. Denis Parish | Manasquan St. George Parish | Titusville St. Gregory the Great Parish | Hamilton Square

Bishop sAnnualAppeal.com | Follow us on Facebook

St. Mary of the Lake Parish | Lakewood BAA_2012_poster.indd 1

12/20/2011 12:13:50 PM

Our Lady of Good Counsel Parish | West Trenton

St. Luke Parish | Toms River

Blessed Sacrament -Our Lady of the Divine Shepherd Parish | Trenton

St. James Parish | Pennington

Sacred Heart Parish | Mount Holly

St. Joseph Parish | Toms River

Our Lady of Perpetual Help Parish | Highlands

St. Andrew Parish | Jobstown

Corpus Christi Parish | Willingboro

St. Aloysius Parish | Jackson

St. James Parish | Red Bank

St. Mary Parish | Middletown

St. Francis Parish | Brant Beach

St. Joseph Parish | Millstone Township

Epiphany Parish | Brick

St. Justin Parish | Toms River

St. Raphael-Holy Angels Parish | Hamilton

St. Catharine/St. Margaret Parish | Spring Lake

St. Jerome Parish | West Long Branch

St. Leo the Great Parish | Lincroft

Holy Cross Parish | Rumson

Our Lady of the Angels Parish | Trenton

St. William the Abbot Parish | Allenwood

Our Lady Queen of Peace Parish | Hainesport

St. Francis and St. Clare Parish | Florence Twp

St. Pius X Parish | Forked River

Incarnation-Saint James Parish | Trenton

Holy Spirit Parish | Asbury Park

St. Clement Parish | Matawan

Ascension Parish | Bradley Beach

St. Maximilian Kolbe Parish | Toms River

St. Anthony Claret Parish | Lakewood

St. Mark Parish | Sea Girt

Our Lady of Providence Parish | Neptune

St. Katharine Drexel Parish | Burlington

St. Thomas More Parish | Manalapan

St. John Parish | Lakehurst

St. Catherine Parish | Middletown

Korean Martyrs Parish | Lawrenceville

St. Joan of Arc Parish | Marlton

Christ the King Parish | Long Branch

St. Gabriel Parish | Marlboro

Precious Blood Parish | Monmouth Beach

St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Parish | Whiting

St. Mary Parish | Deal

Prayer for

Generosity St. Ignatius Loyola

Lord, teach me to be generous. Teach me to serve you as you deserve; To give and not to count the cost; To fight and not to heed the wounds; To toil and not to seek for rest; To labor and not to ask for reward; Save that of knowing that I do your work.


State of the Diocese

www .T renton M onitor . com

January 2012 • 15

‘To Serve and not to Be Served’

Meeting those who struggle with, fight against poverty Continued from P13 problem and you realize that the Church has to be there. “We are there for the people who would fall through the cracks of the cutbacks. When someone comes to us who makes just over the allowable income for (government) help, we are able to evaluate with heart,” said Father Swift.

Dorothy Client of Simon’s Soup Kitchen, Seaside Heights

Sharing Christ's love Continued from P13

all parishes the weekend of Jan. 21 and 22 with the screening of a video and presentation by priests and other parish leaders. The kick-off will also include a mailing of BAA campaign materials to Catholic households in the diocese and the launch of a new web package that affords visitors an opportunity to learn more about the appeal, and donate in a safe and convenient way online. In his message announcing the appeal, Bishop O’Connell writes: We are members of one family of God, called by Christ to care for every one of our brothers and sisters through the Word of God and by helping all experience Christ’s love and compassion. We are asked to share this love by feeding the hungry, ministering to the sick, and providing assistance for basic needs that currently go unmet.” The bishop explains, “Each year, thanks to your support of the Bishop’s Annual Appeal, the diocese is able to feed and nurture the family of God – through our parishes, our ministries, and our schools. However, the programs and agencies we have in place to help the poor and most vulnerable are experiencing severe shortfalls of donations and contributions, while the number of people and families in need has risen dramatically.” It is Bishop O’Connell’s second appeal since assuming the role of Chief Shepherd of the diocese in December 2010, and the second year that an additional $1 million for an extraordinary need has been included in the yearly campaign. Bishop O’Connell asked the people of the diocese in 2011 to help to raise an extra $1 million for the purpose of Catholic education, most especially in the form of Catholic school tuition assistance. The cause resonated with the people of the diocese and the $1 million was reached, resulting in an $800K shot in the arm for tuition assistance, along with the additional $200K going for catechist formation and seminarian education. Once again, the diocese will bring its appeal to a broader audience with the use of radio spots and billboards, strategies that contributed to the success of the 2011 goal. Despite economic adversity affecting many within the diocesan community both the number and the amount of the gifts coming in had increased.

This Year’s Focus The brochure for this year’s appeal emphasizes that with poverty in the United States projected at 49 million persons, the highest rate in modern history, the basic needs of food, clothing and shelter go unmet for an unacceptable number of men, women See Offering | P16

“What they do is great.” As foster parents, Dorothy and her husband have raised 12 children. “Now we’re in a position where we need help,” Dorothy said. A former nurse, Dorothy explained that for her family, a diagnosis of cancer for her hit them hard. For the past two years, the family has been getting help from Simon’s Soup Kitchen, operating in the parish center of Our Lady of Perpetual Help, Seaside Heights, an area well-known for its popular boardwalk and summer tourism. But the seasonal status of the community is hard on those who are struggling, said John Salemi, executive director. When the season is over, businesses leave the area, there are no jobs and no public transportation to the mainland where jobs might be found. “I never thought I’d be in this position, but they make you feel like a family member here,” said Dorothy, “not just as somebody who needs help. They give the children a lot of love and give them breakfast, too. What they do is great.” Simon’s Soup Kitchen fills in the gaps for poor, underemployed and fixed income residents in the Seaside area from October through April, providing some 500 meals a week through a two-day meal schedule.

Mercy Sister Kathleen O'Halloran Director of client services for Project Paul, Keansburg

“They don’t come here unless they absolutely have to.” Mercy Sister Kathleen O’Halloran can speak to the consistent increase of people coming through the doors of Project Paul, Keansburg. But the most “dramatic” increase, said Sister Kathleen, director of client services for the past 22 years, has occurred during the past several years since the nation has fallen into hard economic times. People, as a result, have turned to Project Paul for help with basic immediate needs such as food, shelter and utility expenses. “I have seen many more people who never would have dreamed that they would come to a place like this,” said Sister Kathleen. Sister Kathleen cited the two main hardships facing Project Paul clients are unemployment and health-related circumstances, whether it’s a person with an illness in constant need of medical attention or a person that has a health care plan, but is unable to cover additional expenses such as purchasing medicines or meeting insurance co-pays. Of the more prevalent populations Sister Kathleen has seen in financial distress are the unionized construction workers; young women and young mothers who were “just starting out” in the workforce and lost their entry level positions, and senior citizens who, because they are on a fixed budget, cannot afford to meet all of their living expenses and as a result they rely on Project Paul’s food pantry to access food. There is also an increase in the single population – people ranging in age 19 to mid-60s with an array of problems including not being able to work because they can’t find jobs and having emotional and mental health issues. In all, she noted that in November, 2011, Project Paul assisted a total of 131 single parents and 967 children; some 340 “intact families” with 1,338 children; 27 grandparents caring for 165 grandchildren; 39 senior citizens without dependents, and 228 single people without children. While financial assistance from individuals and businesses is a top priority for Project Paul to continue its outreach efforts, Sister Kathleen said it’s equally important for the agency to receive assistance from people who can “give of their time and talents” as well. “We couldn’t survive without our volunteers,” said Sister Kathleen. “They keep us going.” In addition to volunteers who help to man the office, Sister Kathleen also extended appreciation to the women who don their knitting skills to make warm clothing items for distribution, and schools and parishes in the area holding various collections throughout the school year. “Just think if we assist families with diapers and personal items that might leave them money to pay their electric bills,” she said. “If people stepped up to the plate with additional funding available, we could continue to do what we do and perhaps even improve what we do,” said Sister Kathleen. See Diocese | P16


16 • January 2012

State of the Diocese

T he M onitor

‘To Serve and not to Be Served’

Diocese reaches out to those in need in various ways Continued from P15

Judy Client of St. Vincent de Paul Food Pantry at St. Benedict Parish, Holmdel

“We really appreciate it.” Judy is a hard-working grandmother who started working at the age of 15. “I’m 68 now. I’ve been working a long time,” she said, stressing that she was a good worker who “didn’t take off. I always went to work.” Today, because of the strained economy, she is a grateful beneficiary of the St. Vincent de Paul food pantry in St. Benedict Parish, Holmdel, an organized outreach to perform the Corporal Works of Mercy and to meet the needs of the poor in the Bayshore area. “Now I can’t find a {full-time} job. I’m at the age when they don’t want to hire me,” she stated matterof-factly. “I never thought I’d have to do this. It’s terrible when you’re trying to give kids the right stuff to eat. This helps me with the food I can’t afford to buy all the time. It (the food pantry) really helps; it really helps.” Judy explained that even with a part time job and social security benefits she “still can’t make it,” expressing appreciation for the bags of high quality food she and her young granddaughter, Faith, would be taking home through the generosity of parishioners and members of the community. “I got milk, I got eggs, I got potatoes. You know, $4 for a bag of potatoes out there! You don’t have that money all the time,” pointing out the need to still pay so many other bills, including rent and utilities. “I wish we didn’t have to use it this much. I notice it’s more crowded now. More people are losing their jobs. If we didn’t have this we would be out in the streets, some of us,” Judy reflected. “Thank God we have this to back us up.” Judy, who helps to care for her grandchildren, says she teaches them to give back as well, and often passes along clothes to those who need them. “We are trying to do our share,” she acknowledged.

Sister Joanne Dress, D.C. Executive secretary for Catholic Social Services

“Our work to help the poor has never been more difficult and more critical.” Daughter of Charity Sister Joanne Dress, diocesan executive secretary for Catholic Social Services, is impressed with the many ways outreach is made available through the Church to help folks in need with basic necessities of food, clothing, shelter and fulfilling prescriptions. “They do a magnificent job of trying to address the needs of people,” said Sister Joanne. “I’m amazed at what the people in these agencies and parishes do to help others. There is no question that they do all they can to fulfill those needs, one person at a time,” she said. But, because of cutbacks in government funding and private donations, all of the agencies are experiencing difficulty in providing adequate service to the increasing number of people coming to them for assistance. Sister Joanne said that folks in need of assistance represent a cross section of both working and non-working individuals and families who are suffering due to unemployment, underemployment, job loss and illness requiring medical care and/or prescriptions. “New Jersey’s unemployment rate, which stands at nearly 10 percent, is among the highest in the nation and driving our state’s growing poverty rate up,” said Sister Joanne. She noted that there has also been an increase in the number of working families – people who have never needed to ask for help before – seeking assistance, adding, “These ‘newly’ poor join the multitude of persons who are already struggling to provide their families with basic needs.” Sister Joanne also spoke of the many people put in the position of having to choose between purchasing food or paying their rent and utility bills. Most often, they will choose the latter because they believe that they could access food through a local food pantry or social service site. However, a problem arises in that many pantries provide only a two- to three-day supply of food and most pantries allow people access to food only once a month. The crunch in assistance requested in the diocese is a result of trends reflected recently in a statewide survey conducted by the NJ Federation of Food for 2010. Statistics showed that the number of households in the state unable to buy food has increased from an average of 7.7 percent (20042006) to 11.5 percent (2007-2009). Sister Joanne pointed to Catholic Charities’ Emergency and Community Services in Burlington County as an example of these trends. Over the course of five years, the agency has reported a 48 percent increase in the demand for emergency food; that the number of families with children seeking emergency food assistance has increased 67 percent, and from September, 2010 to September, 2011, the number of households seeking food increased by eight percent. In August, 2011, the pantry served a record 934 households, the largest amount in the pantry’s history. In order to handle the increased need for assistance, Sister Joanne suggested that Catholic Charities, parishes and other organizations “first need to acknowledge that the scope of economic and social forces driving the increasing number to our doors exceeds the capacity of any one institution, no matter how dedicated or compassionate, to respond completely.” Sister Joanne noted that one possible way for agencies to enhance their outreach efforts is See Collaboration | P17

Watch the Video Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M. addresses his flock in the opening sequence of this year’s Bishop’s Annual Appeal video. The video will be screened in parishes the weekend of Jan. 21 and 22, and will be available online for viewing anytime at bishopsannualappeal.com.

Offering hope, assistance Continued from P15

and children. It is estimated that in New Jersey alone, 800,000 persons have fallen into poverty in the past few years. This growing scourge of poverty has spread beyond basic needs into every support system that helps families build lives of dignity and hope – from the ability to earn a living wage, to securing safe and affordable child care and, most importantly, to providing a quality education for their children. While a network of care has long been in place in the Church to respond to the needs of the poor, parish programs and agencies on the front lines of this battle have been caught between an increase in the number of people needing help, and a decrease in the amount of help that people can give due to economic constraints. Indeed, some of the people who once supported their area food pantries and contributed to programs that provide rental or medical assistance for the poor have found that they need help themselves this year and must now turn to the very same agencies. The $1 million of the overall $8 million will be restricted for emergency services, including food, clothing, medical needs and shelter (rent, utilities and mortgage). According to Daughter of Charity Sister Joanne Dress, executive director of Catholic Social Services, the funds from the appeal will be distributed evenly across every deanery of the diocese, and will be awarded following an application process for parishes and social service agencies. A grant review committee will ensure grants are only given to providers that have submitted a complete and correct application. All entities who receive funding will have to report on the use of that funding on an interim and final basis. The remaining $7 million will be used for the regular operating and ministerial needs of the diocese, which include education (Catholic schools, catechesis and lay ministry formation); pastoral life and mission (youth and young adults, family life, marriage, pastoral care of the sick, respect life, multicultural ministry and campus ministry); clergy and consecrated life (coordinating and providing for seminarians, active and retired priests, permanent deacons and religious sisters and brothers); communications (radio and television programming, The Monitor newspaper, digital media and social media), and the parish rebate program. See Promoting | P17


www .T renton M onitor . com

State of the Diocese

January 2012 • 17

‘To Serve and not to Be Served’

Promoting work of the Church Continued from P16

Goals within the Goal This is the first appeal under the leadership of Stephen J. Nicholl, the diocese’s new director of the Department of Development. Nicholl came to the diocese in the fall, after serving as vice-president of marketing, and community and government relations for St. Clare’s Health System in Denville. For Nicholl, reaching the $8 million goal for the Bishop’s Annual Appeal is only one of his priorities this year. While the number of gifts had increased last year, the amount has stayed within the same range for the last 10 years – hovering between 12 and 13 percent of the diocesan community, he said. The national average for diocesan participation in their annual appeal is 20 percent, Nicholl reported. “We’d like to see the number of gifts increase dramatically, coming closer to the national average,” Nicholl stated, adding, “We can certainly raise more money that way, but we’re also looking to get more people engaged in the work of the Church.” A Succasunna resident and member of St. Theresa Parish there (Diocese of Paterson), Nicholl has no shortage of ideas on how to do that, even beyond the official timeline of the Bishop’s Annual Appeal. “Consistent with our theme, we are all part of the same Catholic community. That is the message I will be consistently taking out to the diocese.” Nicholl will focus on relationship building with pastors, getting out to visit with pastors more regularly, offering consultation when requested and integrating more into the life of the parishes and the communities they serve. Another piece of this initiative is the creation of a new Facebook page for the Bishop’s Annual Appeal. “We want to be able to communicate with people more regularly, and give them an opportunity to interact with us,” he stated. “With Facebook, we will try to build a deeper understanding of what we are trying to do and how we help the communities that we serve. It gives us another way to ask for their support, be it through volunteering or donations.” Most importantly, Nicholl said, is that Facebook will direct people to the website, bishopsannualappeal.com, where they can access expanded information about the appeal and other fundraising initiatives. Online gifts now represents only five percent of the total BAA donations, Nicholl noted, adding that through these initiatives he wants to see that number double. He also expects to implement a Major Gifts Campaign that will run parallel with the Bishop’s Annual Appeal. He noted, “While we work to build the appeal and discover some of the major gift possibilities that have not yet been engaged in our efforts, we’ll be looking to focus attention on some of the many other needs we have in the diocese.” Among the needs Nicholl cited are continued requests for Catholic school tuition assistance; renovations for St. Mary of the Assumption Cathedral in Trenton, and the bookend responsibilities of seminarian formation and providing for priests in their retirement. To learn more about this year’s Bishop’s Annual Appeal, contact Nicholl at develop@dioceseoftrenton.org, or 609-403-7197, or visit bishopsannualappeal.com.

Collaboration among agencies may be key in providing outreach Continued from P16 through collaboration, trying to “combine our strengths and resources in order to keep families from falling through the safety net we labored to create over the past few decades.” “I believe each of us can do something,” she said. “No one can do everything, but everyone can do something.” “I think we ought to remember that we as Church as well as human services agencies, and even the government, have limited resources and cannot meet everyone’s needs all of the time,” said Sister Joanne. “We contribute what we can of our time, skills and finances and we do it with a spirit of generosity and faith.”

Ismael and Frances Clients of Mount Carmel Guild, Trenton

“Some people need a step up.” Ismael and his fiancée, Frances, are professionals in the teaching and health fields. He is a substitute teacher, martial arts instructor and conflict resolution specialist. She is a nurse and home health aide. Both are out of work. “We are professionals, and look what has happened to us,” Ismael said, pointing to the reality that hard times can fall on anyone. For this couple, hard times have meant needing help with the basic necessities of life, food and clothing, but even more, as they strive to move out of their present situation, there has been a need for job leads, schooling and honing interview skills. In all these areas, said Frances, Mount Carmel Guild “has been very helpful to me and my family.” “Mount Carmel Guild is doing excellent and wonderful things,” much of which is in response to services depleted by a lack of government funding, Ismael acknowledged. “These are just nice people … running a program that opens its doors to people of all races and creeds … which is something I really respect. It is not a waste of time to support or donate to this organization. Some people need a hand up. That’s what they do.”

Joyce Campbell Associate executive director of External Affairs for Catholic Charities

Catholic Charities Parish Social Ministries: Reaching Out as One Lifting people over the ever-expanding barrier of economic decline has been at the heart of Joyce Campbell’s mission for Catholic Charities for nearly 16 years. As the one-time coordinator of the agency’s emergency services program and now its associate executive director of external affairs, Campbell’s efforts have run the gamut from helping to meet the basic needs of food, shelter and clothing for upwards of 100,000 people annually throughout Monmouth, Ocean, Mercer and Burlington counties to overseeing the agency’s development, fundraising and advocacy campaigns. Ask Campbell the best way for Catholic faithful to help overcome the economic adversity plaguing so many of their brothers and sisters, and she answers without hesitation: the possibilities are as limitless as the demand. Especially these days. Since the current economic downturn began in 2008, need for assistance has been growing at what she terms a “tremendous rate.” “People are in need of a variety of things and we could use anything – food, clothing, household items, financial assistance…” said Campbell, who pointed out that sudden changes in employment status – a job loss, cut in hours, cut in pay – are the factors most likely to propel families into crisis situations. “There are so many ways to help,” says Campbell, who suggests that families might focus on “just one thing – food for the parish pantry each month or one month’s rent for a local family. That could make a tremendous difference in their lives.” They could also advocate for those in need, she said. “We know the economy is tough. Use your voice, speak up. Get the message out that we all share the mission,” which, she said, “is working together to keep families together.” Since 2008, Catholic Charities’ Parish Social Ministry program, organized by Mary Ellen Blackwell, director of Parish Social Ministry, has been helping to do just that for about 200 families a year around the diocese with one-time grants of $500 to help ease emergency situations for families and individuals. The five-year program, is modeled after a similar one in the Metuchen Diocese, and receives $100,000 a year from a fund established under Bishop Emeritus John M. Smith, said Campbell. “The majority of the grants are used for rent or mortgage, then utilities,” said Campbell. The program is a “bridge” between Catholic Charities and the parishes, some 61 of which have participated in the Social Ministry program since it began. “The program is clearly a bridge between Catholic Charities and parish based ministries, such as food pantries and St. Vincent de Paul,” she said. “It’s an additional resource, not only in terms of finances but through this program, parishes are able to help share other types of assistance such as referrals to community services. “It’s an important collaboration, one that really improves people’s lives,” she said.


State of the Diocese

January 2012 • 18-19

‘To Serve and not to Be Served’

Save the Date 2012 The following diocesan events and observances have been announced: Jan. 29 to Feb. 5

April 15

May 12

National observance of Catholic Schools Week.

Why NATURAL FAMILY PLANNING? Certified Natural Family

Diaconate Ordination will be held in St. Mary of the

This year’s theme is “Catholic Schools: Faith. Academics. Service.” For open house information and a schedule of events go to dioceseoftrenton.org. Go to TrentonMonitor. com for full coverage.

Feb. 12 World Marriage Day Champagne Luncheon hosted

by The Department of Youth, Marriage and Family Life in celebration of World Marriage Day will be held in Crystal Point Yacht Club, Point Pleasant, from noon to 3 p.m. The cost of the luncheon is $75 per couple. The theme of this year’s World Marriage Day celebration is “Catholic Marriage in High-Def: Keeping it Holy, Healthy and Real.”  Couples may register online at www.dioceseoftrenton.org/ worldmarriageday or by calling Beatriz at 609-403-7151.

FeB. 19 Why NATURAL FAMILY PLANNING? Certified Natural Family Planning instructors Peter and Claudia Vanderschaff will discuss natural family planning in St. Paul Church, 214 Nassau St., Princeton, from 1 to 3:30 p.m. To register, visit www.ccli.org.

March 11 Diocesan Youth Celebration, “FAITHBOOK…the

Good News Network!” will be held in St. Aloysius Church, 935 Bennetts Mills Road, Jackson, from 8:45 a.m. to 5 p.m. The annual celebration is for high school youth grades 9 to 12 of the Diocese of Trenton to come together for a day of prayer, dynamic sessions, lunch and Mass with Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M. For information, contact Frances Koukotas, Department of Youth, Marriage and Family Life at 609-406-7410.

March 17 Sixth annual Spanish Charismatic Renewal Celebration sponsored by The Department of Multicultural

Ministry will be from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. with the location to be determined. Mass will be celebrated at 3 p.m. The keynote presenter will be Father Dario Bencosme from the Dominican Republic.  For information, call the Department of Multicultural Ministry, Sandra Lopez at 609-403-7138.  All are welcome.

March 18 Why NATURAL FAMILY PLANNING? Certified Natural

Family Planning instructors Peter and Claudia Vanderschaff will discuss natural family planning in St. Paul Church, 214 Nassau St., Princeton, from 1 to 3:30 p.m. To register, visit www.ccli.org.

Planning instructors Peter and Claudia Vanderschaff will discuss natural family planning in St. Paul Church, 214 Nassau St., Princeton, from 6 to 8:30 p.m. To register, visit www.ccli.org.

April 19 to 29 Diocesan pilgrimage to the shrines of France led by Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M. will include

several religious and historical sites. Cost is $4,295 per person and will include roundtrip airfare from Newark International Airport (airport taxes and fuel surcharges of $585 included, but are subject to change at time of ticketing); basic travel insurance; Englishspeaking tour guide; daily buffet breakfast and dinner; first class hotel accommodations; farewell dinner at the Eiffel Tower, all admission and sightseeing charges; tips and gratuities. (Prices based on minimum of 40 persons per bus.) Reservation deadline is Feb. 10; final payment must be submitted by March 2. For information, contact Father Trammell or Kathy Head at 609-587-4877, ext. 270 or Marianne Murphy at Select International Tours at 800-842-4842 or e-mail: mmurphy@select-intl. com, or visit TrentonMonitor.com.

April 27-28 A two-day Parish Social Ministry Regional Training Workshop will be held in St. Anthony of

Padua Parish, Hightstown. The workshop, which will be hosted by the Catholic Charities offices for the Trenton and Metuchen Diocese along with Catholic Charities USA, will feature a panel of speakers including Msgr. Kevin Sullivan, executive director of Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York on April 27. The following day, presenters include Lucreda Cobbs, Catholic Charities USA; Jan Jamroz, from Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Rockville Centre, N.Y., who will talk on Outreach, and Rachel Lustig from Catholic Charities USA who will speak on Development. The closing keynote address on April 28 will be given by Judge Jay Jorgensen, superior court of New Jersey. For more information, contact Joyce Campbell, Catholic Charities, Diocese of Trenton, 609-394-5181, ext. 1138 or e-mail: JCampbell@cctrenton.org.

April 28 Now and at the Hour of Our Death: Treading on Sacred Ground: The Ministry of Compassionate

Relating presented by Via Lucis, The Samaritan Hospice Ministry for Catholic Patients and Families will be held in Resurrection Parish, 260 Conrow Road, Delran, from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Featured keynote speaker will be Beverly Musgrave, Ph.D. of Fordham University, NYC. For information, call Patricia Martin, Department of Pastoral Care at 609-403-7207.

March 20

May 6

13th Annual Mass of Law Enforcement (Blue Mass) will be held in St. Mary of

Third annual RE-IMAGE Film Festival

the Assumption Cathedral, 151 N. Warren St., Trenton, at 10:30 a.m. The Mass, celebrated by Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M. will praise and thank God for the work of those in federal, state, city and municipal protective services. A special remembrance will be offered for those who have died in the line of duty. For information, call Jennifer Britton, Office of Communications at 609-403-7199.

March 31 CYO Clean up, help prepare the camp at 453 Yardville-Allen-

town Road, Yardville, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. for spring by helping to rake, move tables, put down mulch, pick up branches and generally spruce up the camp and the grounds. This event is for eighth graders, high school students and adult chaperones.  For information, call Frances Koukotas, Department of Youth, Marriage and Family Life at 609-406-7410.

April 2 Annual Chrism Mass will be held in St. Mary of the As-

sumption Cathedral, 151 N. Warren St., Trenton, at 7:30 p.m. All diocesan priests will renew their priestly vows and the sacramental holy oils used during the coming year in all parishes of the diocese are blessed. Parishioners throughout the diocese are invited to gather in the Cathedral for the annual celebration during Holy Week. For information, call Kathy Hughes, Office of Worship at 609-403-7171.

presented by the Diocese of Trenton, will be held in The Algonquin Arts Theatre, 173 Main St., Manasquan, beginning at noon. Entries may be submitted in one of three categories: high school competition, college/young adult competition and general competition. Entry fee and form must be submitted by Jan. 31. Late fees apply for submissions from Feb. 1 to 29. To enter, visit http://www. reimagefilmfestival. com/submissions/. For information, call Rose Kimball, Department of Radio and TV at 609-406-7405.

May 6

Assumption Cathedral, 151 N. Warren St., Trenton, at 10 a.m. Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M. is expected to ordain the men as permanent deacons.

May 16 Spirituality/Education Day for Maturing Adults hosted by the Ministry for Maturing Adults (55+) will be held May 16 in St. Gabriel Parish, 100 N. Main St., Marlboro, from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. The day will include a spiritual presentation, education, and Mass. A Continental breakfast and boxed lunch will be offered. Registration deadline is two weeks prior to event. To register, call Janis Bell, coordinator of the Ministry for Maturing Adults at 609-4037194 or Christina Aliseo at 609-404-7151 or email jbell@dioceseoftrenton.org.

May 19 Transitional Deacon Ordination will be in St.

Mary of the Assumption Cathedral, 151 N. Warren St., Trenton, at 10 a.m. Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M. is expected to ordain seminarians of the Diocese of Trenton who have completed their college and theological studies to the Order of Deacons.

May 20 Annual NJ Catholic Youth Rally sponsored by the

Diocese of Trenton, Department of Youth, Marriage and Family Life, will be held in Six Flags Great Adventure, Jackson. This year’s theme is “I Am Still in The World.” Cost for admission is $45 per person and includes parking, admission to the park, picnic lunch, safari and more. Hurricane Harbor tickets are $20. This event is open to all ages. For information, call Frances Koukotas, Department of Youth, Marriage and Family Life at 609-406-7410.

May 23 Spirituality/Education Day for Maturing Adults hosted by the Ministry for Maturing Adults (55+) will be

held May 23 in St. Maximilian Kolbe Parish, 130 St. Maximilian Lane, Toms River, from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. The day will include a spiritual presentation, education, and Holy Mass. A Continental breakfast and boxed lunch will be offered. Registration deadline is two weeks prior to event. To register, call Janis Bell, coordinator of the Ministry for Maturing Adults at 609-403-7194 or Christina Aliseo at 609-404-7151 or email jbell@dioceseoftrenton.org.

May 30 Spirituality/Education Day for Maturing Adults hosted by the Ministry for Maturing Adults (55+) will be

held May 30 in Holy Eucharist Parish, 520 Medford Lakes Road, Tabernacle, from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. The day will include a spiritual presentation, education, and Holy Mass. A Continental breakfast and boxed lunch will be offered. Registration deadline is two weeks prior to event. To register, call Janis Bell, coordinator of the Ministry for Maturing Adults at 609-403-7194 or Christina Aliseo at 609-404-7151 or email jbell@dioceseoftrenton.org.

June 9 Priest Ordination will

take place in St. Mary of the Assumption Cathedral, 151 N. Warren St., Trenton, at 10 a.m. Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M. is expected to ordain the men to the diocesan priesthood.

Adult Confirmation will be held in St. Mary of the

Assumption Cathedral, 151 N. Warren St., Trenton, at 10:30 a.m. for adult Catholics who will receive the Sacrament of Confirmation. For information, contact the Office of Worship at 609-403-7171.

May 9 Spirituality/Education Day for Maturing Adults hosted by the Ministry for Maturing Adults (55+) will be

held May 9 in St. David the King Parish, 1 New Village Road, West Windsor, from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. The day will include a spiritual presentation, education, and Holy Mass. A Continental breakfast and boxed lunch will be offered. Registration deadline is two weeks prior to event. To register, call Janis Bell, coordinator of the Ministry for Maturing Adults at 609-403-7194 or Christina Aliseo at 609-404-7151 or email jbell@dioceseoftrenton.org.

August 8 splasH 2012, a summer celebration will include breakfast, dis-

cussion, Mass and the beach. This event is for high school students, including youth that will be entering high school in September, 2012 and adults.  Location to be assigned. Rain date is Aug. 8. For information, call Frances Koukotas, Department of Youth, Marriage and Family Life at 609-406-7410.

October 12, 13, and 14 Eucharistic Congress will be held at PNC Bank Arts Center, Holmdel. Further details to follow.


20 • January 2012

State of the Diocese ‘To Serve and not to Be Served’

T he M onitor


of the State Diocese STATe oF THe DioceSe

www .Trenton onitor . com | JANUARY 22 12, M 2012

January 2012 • 21 THE MONITOR

Diocese of Trenton Financial Statements | For the Years Ended June 30, 2011 and 2010

Statements of Financial Position | THE DIOCESE OF TRENTON THE DIOCESE OF TRENTON STATEMENTS OF FINANCIAL POSITION STATEMENTS OF FINANCIAL POSITION

M. Deborah Pitt, E.A. Colleen Cooke-Varallo, CPA Veronica M. Plousis, CPA Edward W. Doran, CPA Michael Pozielli, CPA Albert L. Elko, CPA Steven Scaduto, CPA Sandra S. Lutz, CPA Robert G. Morlock, CPA, CExP Marc R. Simmons, CPA Gregory D. Stratoti, CPA, MST John J. Nihill, CPA Richard J. Thomas, CPA, CVA, CFFA

JUNE 30, 2011 JUNE 30, 2010 2011 2010

ASSETS ASSETS

CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS

Cash and cash equivalents Cash and cashnotes equivalents Assessments, and other receivables, net Assessments, notesnet and other receivables, net Pledges receivable, Pledges expenses receivable, net Prepaid Prepaid expenses Investments Investments Property and equipment, net Property and equipment, net TOTAL ASSETS TOTAL ASSETS

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT Most Reverend David M. O’Connell, C.M., J.C.D. Bishop of The Diocese of Trenton Trenton, New Jersey We have audited the accompanying statements of financial position of The Diocese of Trenton as of June 30, 2011 and 2010, and the related statements of activities, and cash flows for the years then ended. These financial statements are the responsibility of Diocesan management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audits.

LIABILITIES LIABILITIES Accounts payable and other accrued liabilities Accounts payable and other accrued liabilities Claims payable Claims payable Contribution payable to charitable trust Contribution payable to charitable Grant payable to retirement home trust Grant payable retirement home Funds held for to others Funds held for others Deferred revenue Deferred revenue Postretirement benefits obligation Postretirement benefits obligation Total Liabilities Total Liabilities NET ASSETS NETUnrestricted: ASSETS Unrestricted: Property and equipment, net Property andfor equipment, Designated insurance net funds Designated for capital insurance Designated for andfunds financing expenditures Designated for capital and financing expenditures Undesignated TotalUndesignated unrestricted Total unrestricted Temporarily restricted Temporarily Permanentlyrestricted restricted Permanently restricted Total Net Assets Total Net Assets TOTAL LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS See accompanying notes. TOTAL See accompanying notes. LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS THE DIOCESE OF TRENTON STATEMENTS OF ACTIVITIES

In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of The Diocese of Trenton as of June 30, 2011 and 2010 and the changes in its net assets, and its cash flows for the years then ended, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

Elko & Associates Ltd October 26, 2011

2 West Baltimore Avenue, Suite 210 – Media, PA 19063 610-565-3930 – Fax: 610-566-1040 www.elkocpa.com

Operating activities: Operating revenues, gains and other support: Assessments Contributions from participating organizations Interest and dividend income Donations and pledges Other Net Assets released from restriction: Satisfaction of program restrictions Total operating revenues, gains and other support Operating expenses: Grants and subsidies Seminary tuition and support Claims incurred Insurance premiums Legal and professional Provision for doubtful accounts Personnel Facilities Depreciation Administrative and other costs Total operating expenses Excess (deficiency) of operating revenues, gains and other support over operating expenses

$ 12,392,685 $ 12,392,685 18,829,346 18,829,346 880,614 880,614 1,544,772 1,544,772 75,068,354 75,068,354 25,557,902 25,557,902 $ 134,273,673 $ 134,273,673

$ 1,799,479 $ 10,287,389 1,799,479 10,287,389 6,605,030 6,605,0303,194,2233,194,223 62,450 62,450 12,055,821 12,055,821 34,004,392 34,004,392

$ $

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS

We conducted our audits in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

Statements of Activities |

$ 13,020,213 $ 13,020,213 21,001,123 21,001,123 899,025 899,025 1,446,137 1,446,137 56,752,193 56,752,193 26,194,710 26,194,710 $ 119,313,401 $ 119,313,401

Unrestricted

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2011 Temporarily Permanently Restricted Restricted

TOTAL

Unrestricted

26,181,073 25,587,739 26,181,073 25,587,739 (5,249,872) (3,551,277) (5,249,872) (3,551,277) 9,060,000 10,280,000 9,060,000 10,280,000 31,077,193 29,757,629 31,077,193 29,757,629 61,068,394 62,074,091 61,068,394 62,074,091 23,248,792 28,042,795 23,248,792 28,042,795 991,823 991,823 991,823 991,823 85,309,009 91,108,709 85,309,009 91,108,709 $ 119,313,401 $ 134,273,673 $ 119,313,401 $ 134,273,673

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2010 Temporarily Permanently Restricted Restricted

See accompanying notes. See accompanying notes.

$ 8,340,542 32,792,195 1,438,560 842,145 2,519,034

$

760,293 6,298,080 28,720

$

-

45,932,476

7,087,093

-

14,878,849

(14,878,849)

60,811,325

(7,791,756)

$

8,340,542 32,792,195 2,198,853 7,140,225 2,547,754

$

8,631,943 30,062,871 1,280,542 485,858 2,967,742

2,154,425 2,154,425 9,158,574 9,158,574 13,722,202 13,722,202 3,732,423 3,732,423 3,260,166 3,260,166 64,789 64,789 11,072,385 11,072,385 43,164,964 43,164,964

$

1,215,671 5,544,932 4,559

$

2 2 -

TOTAL

$

8,631,943 30,062,871 2,496,213 6,030,790 2,972,301

53,019,569

43,428,956

6,765,162

-

-

-

23,425,469

(23,425,469)

-

-

-

53,019,569

66,854,425

(16,660,307)

-

50,194,118

50,194,118

4,420,229 1,394,776 4,745,385 28,379,381 1,560,480 1,980,274 8,476,040 1,631,462 1,214,893 3,784,304

-

-

4,420,229 1,394,776 4,745,385 28,379,381 1,560,480 1,980,274 8,476,040 1,631,462 1,214,893 3,784,304

6,211,783 1,135,995 5,160,719 26,902,459 1,384,321 1,158,895 8,694,494 1,376,651 1,019,323 2,634,427

-

-

6,211,783 1,135,995 5,160,719 26,902,459 1,384,321 1,158,895 8,694,494 1,376,651 1,019,323 2,634,427

57,587,224

-

-

57,587,224

55,679,067

-

-

55,679,067

3,224,101

(7,791,756)

-

(4,567,655)

11,175,358

(16,660,307)

-

(5,484,949)

Nonoperating items: Amortization of discount and change in actuarial assumption on split-interest agreements Net gain on sale of properties Contribution to retirement home Contributions to charitable trusts Net realized and unrealized gains on investments Postretirement benefit changes other than net periodic postretirement benefit cost

(5,365) (814,327) (6,605,030) 3,537,528

2,997,753

-

(5,365) (814,327) (6,605,030) 6,535,281

(9,230) 9,362,563 (4,150,000) (13,722,202) 2,801,346

3,923,583

-

(9,230) 9,362,563 (4,150,000) (13,722,202) 6,724,929

(342,604)

-

-

(342,604)

6,316,299

-

-

6,316,299

Total nonoperating items

(4,229,798)

2,997,753

-

(1,232,045)

598,776

3,923,583

-

4,522,359

Change in net assets Net assets - beginning of year

(1,005,697) 62,074,091

(4,794,003) 28,042,795

991,823

(5,799,700) 91,108,709

11,774,134 50,299,957

Net assets - end of year

$ 61,068,394

$ 23,248,792

$

991,823

$ 85,309,009

$ 62,074,091

(12,736,724) 40,779,519 $ 28,042,795

991,823 $

991,823

(962,590) 92,071,299 $ 91,108,709

See accompanying notes.

Continued | P 22 See accompanying notes. 3


of the STATe oF The DioCeSe State Diocese

WWW MONITOR.COM • January 22.TRENTON 2012

| 23 JANUARY T 12, he2012 M onitor

Diocese of Trenton | For the Years Ended June 30, 2011 and 2010

THE DIOCESE OF TRENTON STATEMENTS OFOF CASH FLOWS THE DIOCESE TRENTON STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

Statements of Cash Flows | CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES net assets CASHChange FLOWSinFROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES Adjustments reconcile change in net assets to net cash Change in nettoassets used in operating activities: Adjustments to reconcile change in net assets to net cash Depreciation used in operating activities: Provision for doubtful accounts Depreciation Net gain on of properties Provision forsale doubtful accounts investments Net gain on sale of properties Changes in assets and liabilities: Net gain on investments Assessments receivables Changes in assetsand andother liabilities: Pledges receivable Assessments and other receivables Prepaid expenses Pledges receivable Accounts payable and other accrued liabilities Prepaid expenses Claims payable Accounts payable and other accrued liabilities Contribution payable to charitable trust Claims payable Grant payable to retirement home trust Contribution payable to charitable Fundspayable held for to others Grant retirement home Deferred revenue Funds held for others Postretirement benefits obligation Deferred revenue Postretirement benefits obligation Net Cash Used in Operating Activities Net Cash Used in Operating Activities CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES of property and equipment CASHPurchase FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES Proceeds of from disposal property and equipment Purchase property andofequipment Proceeds from disposal sale of investments of property and equipment Purchase of investments Proceeds from sale of investments Notes andof loans receivable Purchase investments Notes and loans receivable Net Cash Provided by Investing Activities Net Cash Provided by Investing Activities

FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, ENDED YEARS FOR THE 2011 JUNE 30, 2010 2011

1 | Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Continued)

2010

Investment income earned on permanently restricted net assets and certain temporarily restricted net assets is restricted as to use (see Note 10). All other investment income is unrestricted as to use.

Property and Equipment

$

(5,799,700) $

(962,590)

$

(5,799,700) $

(962,590)

1,214,893 1,980,274 1,214,893 1,980,274(6,535,281) -

1,019,323 1,158,895 1,019,323 (9,362,563) 1,158,895 (6,724,929) (9,362,563)

(6,535,281) (3,792,100) (18,411) (3,792,100) 98,635 (18,411) (354,946) 98,635 1,128,815 (354,946) 6,605,030 1,128,815 (3,732,423) 6,605,030 (65,943) (3,732,423) (2,339) (65,943) 983,436 (2,339)

(6,724,929) (2,240,446) 138,625 (2,240,446) (115,968) 138,625 363,649 (115,968) 1,174,654 363,649 13,722,202 1,174,654 3,732,423 13,722,202 (445,296) 3,732,423 (67,817) (445,296) (4,775,857) (67,817)

983,436 (8,290,060)

(4,775,857) (3,385,695)

(8,290,060)

(3,385,695)

(1,851,701) (1,851,701) 18,478,959(7,349,719) 18,478,959 (359,951) (7,349,719)

(2,607,095) 10,941,193 (2,607,095) 19,041,352 10,941,193 (24,997,135) 19,041,352 (469,364) (24,997,135)

(359,951) 8,917,588

(469,364) 1,908,951

8,917,588

1,908,951

627,528

(1,476,744)

NET CHANGE IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS - BEGINNING OF YEAR

627,528 12,392,685

(1,476,744) 13,869,429

CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS - BEGINNING OF YEAR CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS - END OF YEAR

12,392,685 $ 13,020,213

13,869,429 $ 12,392,685

CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS - END OF YEAR

$ 13,020,213

$ 12,392,685

SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURE OF NON-CASH INVESTING ACTIVITY: SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURE OF NON-CASH INVESTING Contribution of investments to the Charitable Trust for ACTIVITY: Catholic Education and Religious FormationTrust for Contribution of investments to the Charitable

$ 13,722,202

$

-

$ 13,722,202

$

-

NET CHANGE IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS

See accompanying notes.

Catholic Education and Religious Formation

See accompanying notes.

Depreciation is calculated on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful lives of the assets, as follows: Buildings and improvements 5 - 74 years Furniture and equipment 3 - 10 years

Contributions

Contributions received, including unconditional promises to give, are recognized as revenue in the period received at fair values. The Diocese reports gifts of cash and other assets as restricted revenue if they are received with donor stipulations that limit the use of the donated assets. When a donor restriction expires, that is, when a stipulated time restriction ends or purpose restriction is accomplished, temporarily restricted net assets are reclassified to unrestricted net assets and reported in the statement of activities as net assets released from restrictions. Support that is restricted by the donor is reported as an increase in unrestricted net assets if the restriction expires in the reporting period in which the support is recognized. The Diocese reports gifts of land, buildings and equipment as unrestricted support unless explicit donor stipulations specify how the donated assets must be used. Gifts of long-lived assets with explicit restrictions that specify how the assets are to be used and gifts of cash or other assets that must be used to acquire long-lived assets are reported as restricted support. Absent explicit donor stipulations about how long those long-lived assets must be maintained, the Diocese reports expirations of donor restrictions when the donated or acquired long-lived assets are placed in service.

Fair Value Measurements

Fair value is defined as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. Accounting standards set a framework for measuring fair value using a three-tier hierarchy based on the extent to which inputs used in measuring fair value are observable in the market. Level 1: Quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities. Level 2: Observable inputs other than Level 1 prices such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities, quoted prices in markets that are not active, or inputs (interest rates, currency exchange rates, commodity rates and yield curves) that are observable or corroborated by observable market data for substantially the full term of the assets or liabilities. Level 3: Inputs that are not observable in the market and reflect management’s judgment about the assumptions that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability.

Other Postretirement Benefit Plans

The Diocese records costs and obligations/assets for various types of nonpension postretirement benefits provided to retirees (see Note 14).

Tax Status

Notes to Financial Statements |

See accompanying notes.

Real estate development sites have been purchased for future parishes, schools and similar purposes, and are carried at cost. Carrying costs on such non-operating properties are expensed. When such properties are transferred to recipients, the Diocese treats such transfers as outright grants in cases where such amounts will not be reimbursed by the Diocesan organization. All other property and equipment are also carried at cost.

4 4

1 | Summary of Significant Accounting Policies General

The Diocese of Trenton (the “Diocese”), a non-profit organization, is affiliated with Catholic parishes, schools and various other social service agencies in Burlington, Mercer, Monmouth and Ocean counties - New Jersey, which provide services to the communities located within these counties. Funding to support the Diocese and its programs is primarily received from assessments, contributions and income on investments. The accompanying financial statements include the assets, liabilities, net assets, revenues and expenses of the Diocese of Trenton Operating Funds, Trust Funds, Seminary Funds, Plant Funds, Insurance Funds, Custodial Funds, Bishop’s Annual Appeal Fund and Capital Campaign Funds which are not separately incorporated under civil law. Certain organizations within the Diocese are not included in the accompanying financial statements because they operate independent of the Diocese, maintain separate accounts and carry on their own services and programs. Some of these organizations are as follows: Priests’ and Lay Retirement Funds Catholic Charities Health Care Facilities Cemeteries Parish and Diocesan Schools Campus Ministries Special Catholic Ministries Diocesan Parishes Diocesan Charitable Trusts The Diocese has financial transactions with these organizations consisting primarily of grants, subsidies for operations, new equipment, certain receivables and is a guarantor for certain notes and mortgages payable by these organizations (see Notes 7 and 8).

Basis of Presentation

The Diocese qualifies as an organization described in Internal Revenue Code Section 501(c)(3) and, accordingly, is exempt from federal taxes on income. The Diocese is also exempt from state income taxes.

Insurance Funds

The Diocese maintains Insurance Funds which are unrestricted net assets and account for the financial activity of its two insurance programs (see Note 9). The activity in these funds consists primarily of contributions from affiliated organizations, investment income, cost of insurance, claims incurred and administrative fees. The assets of the Insurance Funds are currently internally designated as restricted to the insurance programs and are currently not available for any other Diocesan purposes. Claims are recognized in the accompanying financial statements at the time the loss is incurred. The provision for claims is based on the best estimate of the ultimate cost of the claims. At June 30, 2011, the Diocese changed its estimate for claims by including a provision for claims incurred but not recorded (IBNR). The change resulted in a $1,680,000 decrease in the change in net assets for the year ended June 30, 2011 and is included in the statements of activities as Claims incurred.

Pension and Retirement Plans

The Diocese has a noncontributory pension plan. The Plan is a defined benefit pension plan covering substantially all lay employees of the Diocese. Prior service costs are amortized over a period of twentyfive years. The Plan provides for 100% vesting of benefits after five years of credited service. The Diocese’s policy is to fund pension costs currently. Contributions to the Plan are made by the parish or organization that employs the lay employee. Effective October 1, 2005, full-time employees hired after the effective date are eligible to participate in a Section 403(b)(7) Pension Trust and can contribute up to the Internal Revenue Service’s dollar limit set by law, which is $16,500 for the years 2011 and 2010. Participants who have completed one year of employment are eligible for matching contributions by THE the Diocese of upOF to 5% of the participant’s gross salary. A nominal DIOCESE TRENTON contribution was made by the Diocese for each of FINANCIAL the years ended June 30, 2011 and 2010. NOTES TO STATEMENTS

THE YEARS JUNE 30, Annuity 2011 AND 2010Contributions to this The priests of the Diocese FOR are covered by the ENDED Priests’ Retirement Program. program are made by the parish or organization to which the priest is assigned.

Reclassifications

prior year amounts have been reclassified to conform to the current year’s presentation. 2Certain . Fair Value Measurements

The following tableMeasurements sets forth by level, within the fair value hierarchy, the Diocese's financial instruments 2 | Fair Value carried at fair value: The following table sets forth by level, within the fair value hierarchy, the Diocese’s financial instruments carried at fair value:

June 30, 2011

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared on the accrual basis of accounting. Additionally, the Diocese reports information regarding its financial position and activities according to three classes of net assets: unrestricted net assets, temporarily restricted net assets, and permanently restricted net assets.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the financial statements and accompanying notes. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

Cash and Cash Equivalents

All highly liquid investments with maturity dates of three months or less when purchased are considered cash equivalents.

Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

The Diocese provides allowances for each type of receivable reported in its financial statements. These allowances are maintained at a level management considers adequate to provide for subsequent adjustments and potential uncollectible accounts. The allowance is increased by provisions charged to the statements of activities and reduced by the amount of receivables written-off. Management has determined the allowance by considering the type of receivables, responsible party, historical collection patterns and comparative aging. These estimates are reviewed periodically and as changes become necessary, they are charged or credited to operations in the periods in which they become known.

Investments

The Diocese carries investments in equity securities with readily determinable fair values and all investments in debt securities at their fair values in the statements of financial position. Realized and unrealized gains and losses are included in the statements of activities. Purchases and sales of securities are recorded on a trade-date basis. Interest income is recorded on the accrual basis. Dividends are recorded on the date the dividends are payable.

Level 1 Investments: Mutual funds Equity International equity Fixed income Marketable equity securities Consumer goods and services Business products and services Capital goods Financial Other International Corporate bonds Certificates of deposit Total

$

6,453,399 5,993,270 29,658,355

Level 2

$

920,155 780,384 435,365 378,579 335,309 143,351 $

45,098,167

10,598,060 -

Total

$

44,930 1,011,036 $

11,654,026

17,051,459 5,993,270 29,658,355 920,155 780,384 435,365 378,579 335,309 143,351 44,930 1,011,036

$

56,752,193

Continued Notes to Financial Statements | P 23 June 30, 2010 Level 1 Investments: Mutual Funds Equity

$

4,894,127

Level 2

$

16,317,806

Total

$

21,211,933


Mutual funds Equity International equity Fixed income www renton M onitor .com Marketable securities | J.T 24 ANUARY 12,equity 2012 Consumer goods and services Business products and services Capital goods Financial Other International Corporate bonds Certificates of deposit

$

6,453,399 5,993,270 29,658,355

$

10,598,060 -

$

Assessments Assessments Due Due fromfrom participating participating organizations organizations for insurance for insurance Notes Notes Loans Loans Seminary Seminary tuition tuition Due Due fromfrom charitable charitable truststrusts Accrued Accrued interest interest Other Other

17,051,459 5,993,270 29,658,355

of the State Diocese STATe oF THe DioceSe

920,155 780,384 435,365 378,579 335,309 143,351 -

44,930 1,011,036

920,155 780,384 435,365 378,579 335,309 143,351 44,930 1,011,036

Diocese of Trenton | For the Years Ended June 30, 2011 and 2010

Notes to Financial Statements | Total

$

45,098,167

$

Continued from P 22

11,654,026

$

56,752,193

June 30, 2010 Level 1

Total

$ 21,001,123 $ 21,001,123 $ 18,829,346 $ 18,829,346 As of AsJune of June 30, 2011, 30, 2011, notesnotes totaling totaling $326,000 $326,000 are collectible are collectible in the in next the next year year and and the remainder the remainder are are collectible collectible in 2 in - 13 2 -years; 13 years; loansloans totaling totaling $16,200 $16,200 are collectible are collectible in the in next the next year year and and the remainder the remainder are are collectible collectible in 2 -in72years. - 7 years. As ofAs June of June 30, 2011, 30, 2011, $937,600 $937,600 of the ofallowance the allowance for doubtful for doubtful accounts accounts relates relates to to notesnotes and and $3,090,300 $3,090,300 relates relates to loans. to loans. As of AsJune of June 30, 2010, 30, 2010, $930,800 $930,800 of the of allowance the allowance for doubtful for doubtful accounts accounts relates relates to notes to notes and $3,077,400 and $3,077,400 relates relates to loans. to loans.

Level 2

JuneJune 30, 2011 30, 2011

Total

CostCost

$

4,894,127 6,617,405 37,430,451

$

16,317,806 -

1,386,425 1,186,731 781,374 531,215 261,362 176,491 $

53,265,581

$

21,211,933 6,617,405 37,430,451

4,466,455 1,018,512 $

8,321,040 $ 8,321,040 $ 7,385,203 $ 7,385,203 11,072,112 11,072,112 10,122,709 10,122,709 10,102,821 10,102,821 9,726,670 9,726,670 5,527,969 5,527,969 5,544,169 5,544,169 January 2012 • 23 1,313,594 1,313,594 1,337,283 1,337,283 THE MONITOR 1,925,979 1,925,979 81,832 81,832 162,133 162,133 177,732 177,732 94,197 94,197 38,523,079 38,523,079 34,372,364 34,372,364 (17,521,956) (17,521,956)(15,543,018) (15,543,018)

44 .| Investments Investments 4 . Investments A summary ofofinvestments type shown below: A summary A summary of investments investments bybytype by type isisshown is shown below: below:

2 | Fair Value Measurements (continued)

Investments: Mutual Funds Equity International equity Fixed Income Marketable equity securities Consumer goods and services Business products and services Capital goods Financial Other International Corporate bonds Certificates of deposit

LessLess allowance allowance for doubtful for doubtful accounts accounts

$

1,386,425 1,186,731 781,374 531,215 261,362 176,491 4,466,455 1,018,512

21,802,773

$

75,068,354

The following methods and assumptions were used to estimate the fair value of each class of financial instruments:

Mutual Mutual funds: funds: Equity Equity International International equity equity Fixed Fixed income income Marketable Marketable equity equity securities securities Marketable Marketable debtdebt securities securities Certificates Certificates of deposit of deposit

JuneJune 30, 2010 30, 2010

Fair Fair Value Value

CostCost

Fair Fair Value Value

$ 16,376,398 $ 16,376,398 $ 17,051,459 $ 17,051,459 $ 25,911,744 $ 25,911,744 $ 21,211,933 $ 21,211,933 5,740,377 5,740,377 5,993,270 5,993,270 8,304,230 8,304,230 6,617,405 6,617,405 28,390,949 28,390,949 29,658,355 29,658,355 35,525,371 35,525,371 37,430,451 37,430,451 2,166,202 2,166,202 2,993,143 2,993,143 4,141,120 4,141,120 4,323,598 4,323,598 38,620 38,620 44,930 44,930 4,224,745 4,224,745 4,466,455 4,466,455 1,011,036 1,011,036 1,011,036 1,011,036 1,018,512 1,018,512 1,018,512 1,018,512 $ 53,723,582 $ 53,723,582 $ 56,752,193 $ 56,752,193 $ 79,125,722 $ 79,125,722 $ 75,068,354 $ 75,068,354

Net Net unrealized unrealized gain gain on investments on investments of $7,085,979 of $7,085,979 in 2011 in 2011 and and net unrealized net unrealized gain gain on investments on investments of of Net unrealized gain on investments of $7,085,979 in 2011 and net unrealized gain on investments of $7,934,330 $7,934,330 in 2010 in are included are in net in net realized realized andand and unrealized unrealized gains gains onon investments on investments ininthe in statements the statements of of $7,934,330 in 2010 2010 are included included in realized net unrealized gains investments the statements $53,495 andand and $84,928 $84,928 forfor the for the years ended ended JuneJune 30,2011 2011 30, and 2011 and and 2010, 2010, activities. activities. Investment Investment expense expense of $53,495 of$53,495 of activities. Investment expense of $84,928 theyears years ended June 30, 2010, respectively, respectively, are are included areincluded included in legal legal and professional and professional fee fee expense in statements the statements activities. of activities. respectively, ininlegal and professional feeexpense expense in the theinstatements ofofactivities. These These investments investments areare exposed are exposed totovarious to various risksrisks suchas such asmarket market as market volatility, volatility, interest interest ratecredit rate and and credit risks.risks. These investments exposed various risks such volatility, interest rate and risks.credit Due Due Due to the the tolevel level the of level ofrisk risk of associated risk associated with investments, investments, itOF is at itTRENTON isreasonably least at least reasonably reasonably possible that that changes changes in the in the THE DIOCESE to associated withwith investments, it is at least possible thatpossible changes in the values values values of these ofsecurities these securities securities will occur will occur innear the interm near the near term term and and that that suchsuch changes changes couldcould materially affect affect the the NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS of these will occur in the and that such changes could materially affectmaterially the amounts amounts amounts reported reported theinstatements the statements of financial of financial position. position. FOR YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2011 AND 2010 reported in theinstatements ofTHE financial position.

8 5. Property and Equipment 5 | Property and Equipment

10 10

Cash and cash equivalents, accounts payable and other accrued liabilities, and funds held for others - The A summary of property andand equipment is isasasfollows: A summary of property equipment follows: carrying amount approximates fair value because of the short-maturity of those instruments. Assessments, notes and other receivables, net - The carrying amount of assessments and other receivables, net approximates fair value because of the short-maturity of those instruments.

2011

$ 14,136,885 15,393,454 5,204,997 194,670 34,930,006

Real estate development sites Land, buildings and improvements Furniture and equipment Deposits

The fair value of the interest bearing notes and loans receivable are based on current rates and terms. Fair value for non-interest bearing notes and loans is estimated by discounting the future cash flows, using the current rates at which similar loans would be made to borrowers with similar credit ratings and for the same remaining maturities, of such loans. The estimated fair value of the non-interest bearing notes and loans receivable was approximately $275,000 and $252,000 less than the carrying value at June 30, 2011 and 2010, respectively.

June 30,

(8,735,296)

Less accumulated depreciation

$ 26,194,710

Property and equipment, net

2010

$ 14,054,816 14,514,655 4,637,235 194,670 33,401,376 (7,843,474) $ 25,557,902

Pledges receivable - The carrying amount approximates fair value because the unconditional promises to give 6. Bishop's Annual Appeal Fund have been recognized at net realizable value.

The Diocese conducts its Bishop's Annual Appeal each year beginning in January and ending in August. 6 | Bishop’s Annual Fund various social service and other programs administered The proceeds of the Appeal areAppeal used to support 2011 inand 2010and Appeals was to raise by theThe Diocese affiliated organizations. The each goal year of the Dioceseand conducts its Bishop’s Annual Appeal beginning January ending in August. Mutual funds - Valued at the net asset value of shares held by the Diocese at year-end. $6,000,000 each year. parish receives 15%various of its social goal ifservice its goal reached, and administered an additional The proceeds of theEach Appeal are used to support andisother programs by50% The net asset value of the Equity index fund (Level 2) is calculated based on a compilation of comparable of the the amount realized inliated excess of its target Diocese and affi organizations. Thegoal. goal of the 2011 and 2010 Appeals was to raise $6,000,000

Investments - The fair values of investments are as follows:

observable market information.

each year. Each parish receives 15% of its goal if its goal is reached, and an additional 50% of the amount As of June 30, 2011, the Diocese raised 2011 Appeal pledges of approximately $7,300,000 of which realized in excess of its target goal. Marketable equity securities - Shares in companies traded on national securities exchanges are valued at approximately $899,000 remained unpaid at that date. As of June 30, 2010, the Diocese raised 2010 the closing price reported in the active market in which the individual securities are traded. of June of 30,approximately 2011, the Diocese raised 2011 Appeal pledges of approximately $7,300,000 of which AppealAspledges $6,400,000 of which approximately $880,000 remained unpaid at that $899,000 that2010 date.are As reported of June 30, the Diocese raised 2010 Pledges receivable at remained June 30,unpaid 2011 at and at 2010, net realizable value which is the Marketable debt securities - Corporate bonds are valued at quoted market prices or valuations provided date. approximately Appeal pledges expects of approximately $6,400,000 of which approximately $880,000 remained unpaid at that by commercial pricing services or the mean of bid and ask prices provided by investment brokers. amount the Diocese to collect. date. Pledges receivable at June 30, 2011 and 2010 are reported at net realizable value which is the amount Certificates of deposit - Fair value of fixed-maturity certificates of deposit are estimated using rates 7. Commitments the Diocese expects to collect. and Contingencies currently offered for deposits of similar remaining maturities.

The Diocese is a guarantor of debt represented by certain bonds, notes, mortgages and letters of credit of parishes and other Catholic agencies and institutions. Such guarantees approximated $65,000,000 in

Claims payable - The carrying amount represents fair value as it is estimated based on the amount the insurance principal at June 30, 2011. These amounts are not included in the accompanying financial statements. adjuster and management believes the Diocese may be liable for in the future. 7 | Commitments and Contingencies

8. Notes toaBank ThePayable Diocese is guarantor of debt represented by certain bonds, notes, mortgages and letters of credit of parishes otherline Catholic agencies institutions. Such guarantees approximated $65,000,000 Postretirement benefits obligation - The carrying amount represents fair value as it is determined by calculating The Diocese which expires on March 31, 2012.in The hasand a bank of credit in theand amount of $2,000,000 principal at June 30, 2011. These amounts are not included in the accompanying financial statements. the present value of future benefit payments to be using the assumptions disclosed in Note 14. bank has THEexpected DIOCESE OFpaid TRENTON a security interest in the Diocese deposit accounts and investments with the bank. The interest NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2011 AND 2010

charged equals the bank's prime rate less 1.5%, which was 1.75%, or LIBOR plus 1.25%, which was 1.44% at June 30, 2011. The Diocese had no amounts outstanding at June 30, 2011 under this line of credit.

8 | Notes Payable to Bank

3 | Assessments, Notes and Other Receivables

The Diocese has a bank line of credit in the amount of $2,000,000 which expires on March 31, 2012. The bank has a security interest in the Diocese deposit accounts and investments with the bank. The interest charged equals the bank’s prime rate less 1.5%, which was 1.75%, or LIBOR plus 1.25%, which was 1.44% at June 30, 2011. The Diocese had no amounts outstanding at June 30, 2011 under this line of credit.

3. Assessments, Notes and Other Receivables

Assessments, notes and other receivables consist of the following:

Assessments, notes and other receivables consist of the following: 2011 $

Assessments Due from participating organizations for insurance Notes Loans Seminary tuition Due from charitable trusts Accrued interest Other Less allowance for doubtful accounts

June 30,

2010

8,321,040 $ 7,385,203 11,072,112 10,122,709 10,102,821 9,726,670 5,527,969 5,544,169 1,313,594 1,337,283 1,925,979 81,832 162,133 177,732 94,197 38,523,079 34,372,364 (17,521,956) (15,543,018)

$ 21,001,123

$ 18,829,346

As of June 30, 2011, notes totaling $326,000 are collectible in the next year and the remainder are collectible in 2 - 13 years; loans totaling $16,200 are collectible in the next year and the remainder are As of Junein30, notesAs totaling $326,000 are collectible year andfor thedoubtful remainderaccounts are collectible collectible 2 -2011, 7 years. of June 30, 2011, $937,600 in ofthe thenext allowance relates to in 2 -and 13 years; loans totaling $16,200 are collectible in the30, next2010, year and the remainder collectible for in 2 doubtful -7 notes $3,090,300 relates to loans. As of June $930,800 of theareallowance years. As of June 30, 2011, $937,600 of the allowance for doubtful accounts relates to notes and $3,090,300 accounts relates to notes and $3,077,400 relates to loans. relates to loans. As of June 30, 2010, $930,800 of the allowance for doubtful accounts relates to notes and

relates to loans. 4 .$3,077,400 Investments

A summary of investments by type is shown below: June 30, 2011 Cost

Fair Value

June 30, 2010 Cost

Fair Value

9 | Insurance Funds The Diocese’s Insurance Funds consist of the following: Loss Payment Fund: The Diocese has a modified protected liability and casualty, workers’ compensation and property self-insurance program for affiliated organizations described as a “loss payment fund.” Under this program, the Diocese has obtained insurance coverage of $40,000,000 for most liability and casualty claims with a deductible of $250,000 per occurrence during the policy period. The Diocese has insurance coverage for property claims to a blanket limit of $75,000,000 per occurrence, with a deductible of $500,000 per occurrence. Actual claims not covered by insurance are funded by the affiliated organizations’ contributions and the assets of the loss payment fund. The Diocese is involved in several pending legal matters. In the opinion of the Diocese’s management, the final resolution of these matters will not have a material adverse effect on the Diocese’s financial position. To the extent a liability has been determined, a reserve has been accrued at June 30, 2011 and 2010. Medical Fund: The Diocese’s medical benefit plan provides reimbursement for the cost of medical expenses, subject to various limits, for Diocesan clergy and lay employees. The Diocese has obtained

Continued Notes to Financial Statements | P 24

11


FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2011 AND 2010

9. Insurance Funds

of the State Diocese STATe oF The DioCeSe

24The January 2012 Diocese's WWW .T•RENTON MInsurance ONITOR.Funds COM consist of the following:

he 2012 M onitor | 25 JANUARY T 12,

Loss Payment Fund: The Diocese has a modified protected liability and casualty, workers' compensation and property self-insurance program for affiliated organizations described as a "loss payment fund." Under this program, the Diocese has obtained insurance coverage of $40,000,000 for most liability and casualty claims with a deductible of $250,000 per occurrence during the policy period. The Diocese has insurance coverage for property claims to a blanket limit of $75,000,000 per occurrence, with a deductible of $500,000 per occurrence. Actual claims not covered by insurance are funded by the affiliated organizations' contributions and the assets of the loss payment fund.

Diocese of Trenton | For the Years Ended June 30, 2011 and 2010

Notes to Financial Statements |

The Diocese is involved in several pending legal matters. In the opinion of the Diocese's management, the final resolution of these matters will not have a material adverse effect on theP 23 Continued from Diocese's financial position. To the extent a liability has been determined, a reserve has been accrued at June 30, 2011 and 2010.

Fund: The Diocese's medical benefit plan provides reimbursement for the cost of medical 9 |Medical Insurance Funds (continued)

$6,605,030 and $13,722,202 was reported in the financial statements as of and for the years ended June 30, 2011 and 2010, respectively.

expenses, subject to various limits, for Diocesan clergy and lay employees. The Diocese has insurance coverage for these costs. The plan The also plan includes provision for life insurance obtained insurance coverage formedical these medical costs. also aincludes a provision for life benefitsbenefits of $2,000, plus modest disability and dental for Diocesan clergy. clergy. The benefi ts insurance of $2,000, plus modest disability and benefi dentaltsbenefits for Diocesan The paid by these funds and the insurance premiums are funded by assessments to the participating benefits paid by these funds and the insurance premiums are funded by assessments to the organizations. participating organizations. Revenues expenses years ended June 2011 2010 net assets at June 2011 andand 2010 and and net assets at June 30, Revenues andand expenses forfor thethe years ended June 30,30, 30,and 2011 andfor 2010 for the loss payment fund the medical fund, which the postother 2011 2010 the loss payment fund and theand medical fund, which includeinclude the other postretirement benefi t obligation costs (see Note 14), are as follows: retirement benefit obligation costs (see Note 14), are as follows: Loss Payment Fund

2011 Medical Fund

Loss Payment Fund

For the years ended June 30, 2011 and 2010, amounts were released from restriction for these contributions to the charitable trusts of $6,605,030 and $13,722,202, respectively.

12 | Endowment Funds Accounting standards for the classification and disclosure of endowments of not-for-profit organizations provide guidance on the net asset classification of donor-restricted endowment funds for a not-for-profit organization that is subject to an enacted of the Prudent Management of Institutional THE version DIOCESE OFUniform TRENTON Funds Act of 2006 (UPMIFA) and require disclosures about an organization’s endowment NOTES TOadditional FINANCIAL STATEMENTS funds. The state of New Jersey has adopted UPMIFA. The following disclosures are made as required FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2011 AND 2010 THE DIOCESE OF TRENTON by accounting standards. The endowment of the Diocese of Trenton consists of approximately 17 TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS donorrestricted endowment fundsNOTES established for various purposes.

2010 Medical Fund

FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2011 AND 2010

Management has interpreted New Jersey UPMIFA as requiring the preservation of the fair value of the

12.original Endowment (continued) gift as ofFunds the gift date of the donor-restricted endowment funds absent explicit donor stipulations

Operating and nonoperating revenues $ 5,687,259 $ 27,373,578 $ 5,497,886 $ 25,441,882 THE DIOCESE OF TRENTON Expenses 6,779,067 27,980,365 7,136,731 19,599,798 NOTES TO(3,740,960) FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Net deficit (1,508,912) (2,649,152) (902,125)

the contrary. As a result of this interpretation, the Diocese classifies as permanently restricted net In to accordance with New Jersey UPMIFA, the Diocese considers the following factors in making a (a) the original of gifts donated to the permanent endowment, (b) the original value of 12.assets Endowment Fundsvalue (continued) determination to appropriate or accumulate donor-restricted endowment funds, subsequent gifts to the permanent endowment and (c) accumulations to the permanent endowment made

THE DIOCESE OF TRENTON FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2011 AND 2010 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2011 AND 2010

10 | Temporarily Restricted and Permanetly 10. Temporarily Restricted and Permanently Restricted NetRestricted Assets

accordance withduration the direction of UPMIFA, the applicable donor gift instrument the following time the accumulation In in accordance with New Jersey the Diocese considersatthe factors in is making a (1) the and preservation of the fund added to thetofund. The remaining portion ofdonor-restricted the donor-restricted endowment that is not classified in determination appropriate or accumulate endowment funds, (2)restricted the purposes of theisDiocese the donor-restricted endowment fund permanently net assets classifiedand as temporarily restricted net assets until those amounts (1) thefor duration and preservation ofinthe fund consistent with the standard of prudence are appropriated expenditure by the Diocese a manner general economic prescribed(3) by New Jersey UPMIFA.conditions (2) the purposes of the Diocese and the donor-restricted endowment fund (4) the possible effectUPMIFA, of inflation deflation In accordance with New Jersey theand Diocese considers the following factors in making a (3) to general economic conditions determination appropriate or accumulate donor-restricted endowment funds, (5) the expected total return from income and the appreciation of investments (4)duration the possible effect of inflation and deflation (1) the and preservation of the fund (6)purposes other resources of theand Diocese (2) the of the Diocese the donor-restricted endowment fund (5) the expected total return from income and the appreciation of investments (3) general conditions (7) theeconomic investment policies of the Diocese (6)possible other resources ofation the Diocese (4) the effect of infl and deflation

Assets

Temporarily restricted assets arerestricted restrictedfor for the the following following purposes and amounts: Temporarily restricted netnet assets 10. Temporarily Restricted and are Permanently Restricted Net purposes Assets and amounts:

Temporarily restricted net assets are restricted for the following purposes and amounts: June 30, 2011 2010 June 30, 2011 2010 Capital Campaign Fund: $ - $ 414,049 Morris Hall/Villa Neumann Capital Campaign Catholic CharitiesFund: 5,838,932 $ - $ 6,252,981 414,049 Morris Hall/Villa Neumann Catholic Charities 5,838,932 6,252,981 Trust Funds: Underprivileged children 1,276,038 895,773 Trust Funds: Catholic missions 8,664 8,584 12 1,276,038 895,773 Underprivileged Senior citizens children 2,225,776 1,938,757 Catholic missions 8,664 8,584 Parishes 5,122,528 5,901,698 Senior 2,225,776 1,938,757 Tuition citizens assistance 4,487,786 4,016,799 Parishes 5,122,528 5,901,698 Others 914,770 870,534 Tuition assistance 4,487,786 4,016,799 14,035,562 13,632,145 Others Annual Appeal: 914,770 870,534 Bishop's 14,035,562 13,632,145 Apostolic ministry and priestly support 1,875,000 1,719,000 Bishop's Annual Appeal: Evangelization and family life 1,630,000 1,390,000 1,875,000 1,719,000 Apostoliceducation ministry and priestly support Catholic 2,623,000 2,555,000 Evangelization and family lifeneeds 1,630,000 1,390,000 Charitable works and parish 1,579,000 1,535,000 Catholic 2,623,000 2,555,000 Other education 140,364 98,822 Charitable works and parish needs 1,579,000 1,535,000 7,847,364 7,297,822 Other Funds: 140,364 98,822 Seminary 7,847,364 7,297,822 Education of Diocesan seminarians 284,982 248,768 Seminary Funds: 284,982 248,768 Education of Diocesan seminarians Operating Funds: Priests' retirement 321,079 321,079 Operating Catholic Funds: schools 290,000 290,000 321,079 321,079Priests'Hall/Villa retirement Morris Neumann 469,805 Catholic schools 290,000 290,000 1,080,884 611,079 Morris Hall/Villa Neumann 469,805 1,080,884 $ 28,042,795 611,079 $ 23,248,792

(5) the total return from income and the appreciation of investments (7)expected the investment policies of the Diocese Endowment net assets composition by type of fund as of June 30, 2011 is as follows: (6) other resources of the Diocese (7) the investment policies of the Diocese

Endowment net bytype typeofoffund fundasas of June 2011 as follows: Permanently Endowment netassets assetscomposition composition by of Temporarily June 30,30, 2011 is asisfollows: Restricted Restricted Donor-restricted endowment funds

Permanently Total $ Restricted 991,823 $ 3,771,073

Donor-restricted endowment funds

$ 2,779,250

$

991,823

$ 3,771,073

Changes in endowment net assets for the year ended June 30, 2011 are as follows: Changes in endowment net assets for the year ended June 30, 2011 are as follows:

Changes in endowment net assets for the year ended June 30, 2011 are as follows: Temporarily Permanently THE DIOCESE OF TRENTON Restricted Restricted NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Temporarily FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2011Permanently AND 2010 Endowment net assets, beginning year $ Restricted 2,108,436 991,823 $ THEofDIOCESE OF TRENTON $ Restricted NOTES Interest and dividend incomeTO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 118,408 FORunrealized THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2011$AND991,823 2010 Net realized and Endowment net assets, beginning of year $ 2,108,436 $ 12. Endowment Funds (continued) 669,694 -appreciation Interest and dividend income 118,408 appropriated for Endowment Amounts net assets composition byexpenditure type of fund as of (117,288) June 30, 2010 is as follows: Net realized and unrealized 669,694 $ 991,823- $ appreciation Endowment net assets, end of year $ 2,779,250 12. Endowment Funds (continued) Amounts appropriated for expenditure (117,288) Permanently Temporarily Endowment net assets composition by type of fund as of June 30, 2010 is as follows: Restricted Endowment net assets, end by of year 2,779,250 $ Endowment net assets composition type of fund as of$June 30, 2010 $ is Restricted as 991,823 follows:

Permanently restricted net assets are restricted to investment in perpetuity for the following purposes and $ 23,248,792 $ 28,042,795 amounts: Permanently restricted net assets are restricted to investment in perpetuity for the following purposes Permanently restricted net assets are restricted to investment in perpetuity for the following June 30, purposes and and amounts: amounts: 2011 2010 June 30, 2011 2010 Trust Funds: $ 179,778 $ 179,778 Underprivileged children Trust Funds: Catholic missions 21,467 21,467 $ 179,778 179,778 Underprivileged Senior citizens children 296,037 $ 296,037 Catholic 21,467 21,467 Others missions 267,668 267,668 Senior citizens 296,037 296,037 764,950 764,950 Others Funds: 267,668 267,668 Seminary 764,950 764,950 226,873 226,873 Education of Diocesan seminarians Seminary Funds: THE DIOCESE THE DIOCESE OF TRENTON OF TRENTON 226,873 226,873 Education of Diocesan NOTES seminarians $ 991,823 $ 991,823 NOTES TO FINANCIAL TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS STATEMENTS FOR THE FOR YEARS THE YEARS ENDEDENDED JUNE 30, JUNE 201130, AND 2011 2010 AND 2010 $ 991,823 $ 991,823 13

11. Net11 11. Assets Released Released from Restriction from from Restriction | Net NetAssets Assets Released Restriction

Total

Temporarily $ Restricted 2,779,250

13

Total Total 3,100,259 118,408 3,100,259 669,694 118,408 (117,288) 669,694 3,771,073 (117,288) Total 3,771,073

Donor-restricted endowment funds

Temporarily Permanently $Restricted 2,108,436 $Restricted 991,823

$ 3,100,259 Total

Donor-restricted endowment funds

$ 2,108,436

$ 3,100,259

$

991,823

Changes in endowment net assets for the year ended June 30, 2010 are as follows: Changes in endowment net assets for the year ended June 30, 2010 are as follows:

Temporarily Permanently Changes in endowment net assets for the year ended June 30, 2010 are as follows: Restricted Restricted Temporarily Endowment net assets, beginning of year $Restricted 1,698,521 Interest and dividend income 126,043 Net realized and unrealized Endowment net assets, beginning of year $ 1,698,521 421,076 appreciation Interest and dividend income 126,043 Amounts appropriated for expenditure (137,204) Net realized and unrealized Endowment net assets, end of year $ 2,108,436 421,076 appreciation Amounts appropriated for expenditure (137,204) Endowment net assets, end of year $ 2,108,436 Funds with Deficiencies Funds with Deficiencies

Permanently $Restricted 991,823 $ $ $

Total $ 2,690,344 Total 126,043

991,823 $ 2,690,344 421,076 126,043 (137,204) 991,823 - $ 3,100,259 421,076 (137,204) 991,823 $ 3,100,259

15 15

Net assets Netassets were assets released were released fromfrom donor from restrictions donor restrictions by by incurring expenses expenses satisfy to the satisfy restricted the restricted programprogram Net were released donor restrictions byincurring incurring expenses toto satisfy the restricted program At times, the fair value of assets associated with individual donor-restricted endowment funds may fall At times, the fair value of assets associated with individual donor-restricted endowment funds may fall purposes purposes as follows: follows: purposes asas follows: June 30, 2011 below the donorororNew NewJersey Jersey UPMIFA requires the Diocese to as retain asofa perpetual fund of perpetual Funds with Deficiencies below thelevel levelthat that the the donor UPMIFA requires the Diocese to retain a fund duration. wereno nosuch suchdefi deficiencies of this nature of June 30, 2011 and 2010. duration.There There were ciencies of this nature as ofas June 30, 2011 and 2010. June 30, June 30, At times, the fair value of assets associated with individual donor-restricted endowment funds may fall Return Objectives Parameters Return Objectives and Risk Parameters below the level thatand the Risk donor or New Jersey UPMIFA requires the Diocese to retain as a fund of perpetual 2011 2011 2010 2010 duration. There were no such deficiencies of this nature as of June 30, 2011 and 2010. TheDiocese Diocesehas has adopted adopted investment and spending policies for endowment assetsassets that attempt to provide The investment and spending policies for endowment that attempt to provide Capital Campaign Capital Campaign Fund Fund $ 6,929,689 $ 6,929,689 $ 14,959,014 $ 14,959,014 a predictable stream funding totoprograms supported by its while seeking to maintain the a predictable stream of funding programs supported byendowment its endowment while seeking to maintain the Return Objectives andof Risk Parameters Trust Funds Trust Funds 2,077,428 2,077,428 2,701,518 2,701,518 purchasingpower power of of the Endowment assets include those assets of donor-restricted purchasing the endowment endowmentassets. assets. Endowment assets include those assets of donor-restricted Bishop'sBishop's Annual Appeal Annual Appeal 5,864,248 5,864,248 5,746,663 5,746,663 funds thatthe the Diocese hold perpetuity. TheThe primary long-term management objective is the The Diocese hasDiocese adoptedmust investment spending policies for endowment assets that attempt to provide funds that must holdininand perpetuity. primary long-term management objective is the preservationof ofprincipal, principal, both and real terms. Seminary Seminary Funds Funds 7,484 7,484 18,274 18,274 apreservation predictable stream of funding to programs supported both ininnominal nominal and real terms. by its endowment while seeking to maintain the purchasing of the endowment assets. Endowment assets include those assets of donor-restricted Strategiespower Employed for Achieving Objectives Strategies for Achieving funds that Employed the Diocese must holdObjectives in perpetuity. The primary long-term management objective is the $ 14,878,849 $ 14,878,849 $ 23,425,469 $ 23,425,469 To satisfy its objectives, Diocese relies on a total return strategy in which preservation of long-term principal, rate bothofinreturn nominal and realthe terms. Toinvestment satisfy itsreturns long-term rate of through return objectives, Diocese (realized relies on total returnand strategy are achieved both capital the appreciation anda unrealized) current in which During the years ended June 30, 2011 and 2010, the Diocese established the Charitable Trust for investment returns are achieved through both capital appreciation (realized and unrealized) and current Strategies Employed for Achieving Objectives yield (interest and dividends). At a minimum, the investment performance of endowment assets should During Catholic the During years the ended yearsJune ended 30,June 2011Formation 30, and 2011 2010, andthe 2010, Diocese the Diocese established the Charitable the Charitable Trust forTrust Catholic for Catholic Education and Religious and the Charitable Trust forestablished Catholic Charities (the “Trusts”), yield (interest and return dividends). At infl a minimum, the investment performance of endowment assets an annual of at least ation (as measured by the Consumer Price Index [CPI]) plus four (4) should Education and Religious Religious Formation Formation and theand Charitable theDiocese Charitable Trust Trust Catholic for Successor Catholic CharitiesCharities (the "Trusts"), (the "Trusts"), to to achieve toEducation support theand religious education programs of the or itsfor Canonical and to support To satisfy its long-term rate of return objectives, the Diocese relies on a total return strategy which achieve an annual of at be least inflation measured by periods. the Consumer Price Index [CPI]) in plus four percentage points. return This should averaged over(as rolling three-year supportand support thepromote religious thethe religious education education programs of the Diocese of theofDiocese or Catholic its Canonical or its Canonical Successor and of to Trenton, support and to support and and charitable works andprograms social programs the Charities of the Successor Diocese investment returns are This achieved through both capital appreciation (realized and unrealized) and current (4) percentage points. should be averaged over rolling three-year periods. promote promote the charitable the and works social and social the programs of the Catholic ofcommitted the Catholic Charities Charities of the of the Diocese offrom Trenton, of Trenton, respectively. Ascharitable of works June 30, 2011 andprograms 2010, Diocese to transfer the Diocese net assets yield (interest and dividends). At a minimum, the investment performance of endowment assets should its Capital Campaign Funds toand the Trusts. A2010, contribution and corresponding contribution payable of respectively. respectively. As of June As of30, June 2011 30, 2011 2010, andthe Diocese the Diocese committed committed to transfer to transfer the net the assets net from assets its from achieve its Spending and Howof the Objectives RelateNotes to Spending PolicyPrice Financial Statements | P 25plus four anPolicy annual return atInvestment least inflation (asContinued measured by the to Consumer Index [CPI]) Capital Capital Campaign Campaign Funds to Funds the to Trusts. the Trusts. A contribution A contribution and corresponding and corresponding contribution contribution payablepayable of of percentage points. This should be averaged over rolling three-year periods. (4) The Diocese has a spending policy that is primarily demand driven. In determining the amounts $6,605,030 $6,605,030 and $13,722,202 and $13,722,202 was reported was reported in the financial in the financial statements statements as of and asfor of the andyears for theended yearsJune ended June appropriated for and expenditure, the DioceseObjectives considers Relate the accumulated earnings Spending Policy How the Investment to Spending Policy on each of the endowment 30, 201130, and 2011 2010, andrespectively. 2010, respectively. gifts. In establishing this policy, the Diocese considers the long-term expected return on its endowment. The Diocese has a spending policy that is primarily demand driven. In determining the amounts For theFor years the ended years June ended30, June 2011 30,and 2011 2010, and amounts 2010, amounts were released were released from restriction from restriction for these for these appropriated for expenditure, the Diocese considers the accumulated earnings on each of the endowment contributions contributions to the charitable to the charitable trusts oftrusts $6,605,030 of $6,605,030 and $13,722,202, and $13,722,202, respectively. respectively. gifts. In establishing this policy, the Diocese considers the long-term expected return on its endowment. 12. Endowment 12. Endowment Funds Funds


14. Other Postretirement Benefit Plans (continued)

Other changes in plan assets and benefit obligations previously recognized in changes in unrestricted ne assets for the year ended June 30:

State STATe ofof the the Diocese DioceSe

www .Trenton onitor . com | JANUARY 26 12, M 2012

January 2012 25 ONITOR THE M• 2011

Net loss Diocese of Trenton | For the Years Ended June 30, 2011 and 2010 Prior service cost

Notes to Financial Statements |

Amounts previously recognized in unrestricted net assets, not yet recognized as periodic postretirement benefit cost

Continued from P 24

2010

$

790,093 520,498

$

385,818 582,169

$

1,310,591

$

967,987

The estimated net loss and prior service cost that will be amortized from changes in unrestricted ne

THE DIOCESE OF OF TRENTON TRENTON THE DIOCESE NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR ENDED JUNE JUNE 30, 30, 2011 2011 AND AND 2010 2010 FOR THE THE YEARS YEARS ENDED

12 | Endowment Funds (Continued) NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

2012 $0 and $61,671, respectively. assetsnet to loss net periodic The estimated and prior benefit service cost cost in that will are be amortized from changes in unrestricted net assets to net periodic benefit cost in 2012 are $0 and $61,671, respectively.

Spending Policy and How the Investment Objectives Relate to Spending Policy

Assumptions: Assumptions:

The Diocese has a spending policy that is primarily demand driven. In determining the amounts appropriated for expenditure, the Diocese considers the accumulated earnings on each of the endowment 12. Endowment Funds 12. gifts. Endowment Funds (continued) In establishing this(continued) policy, the Diocese considers the long-term expected return on its endowment.

The rate discount used to the benefi postretirement benefitand cost was for 5.16% and 6.25% for the years The discount used torate determine thedetermine postretirement t cost was 5.16% 6.25% the years 2011 and 2010, respectively. ended June and 30, 2010, ended June 30, 2011 respectively.

The target spending rate aspart partofof of total return, satisfies these conditions (a) permits permits target spending rateis that which, which, as total return, satisfi es thesethese conditions - (a) permits The The target spending rate isisthat that which, as part total return, satisfies conditions -- (a) reinvestment of preservethe the real purchasing power of current current funds, (b) permits reinvestment of enoughtotal totalreturn return to to preserve real purchasing power of current funds,funds, (b) permits apermits aa reinvestment of enough enough total return to preserve the real purchasing power of (b) level of and stability in programs of the the Diocese, Diocese,(c) (c)is is is sustainable sustainable over time regardlessof of of consistency stability theprograms programs of the sustainable overover timetime regardless levellevel of consistency consistency andand stability ininthe the Diocese, (c) regardless of periodic variations the levels required to satisfy (a), and (d) recognizes circumstances maypreclude periodic variations in levels required to satisfy satisfy (a), and and (d) recognizes recognizes thatthat circumstances may preclude periodic variations in the the in levels required to (a), (d) that circumstances may preclude achievement of all three objectives any one year. achievement of in oneinyear. year. achievement of all all three three objectives objectives in any any one 13. Costs 13. Pension Pension Costs 13 | Pension

Costs

The health care cost trend used to measure benefits cost covered by the plan are The health care rates cost trend rates usedthe to expected measurecost the of expected of benefits covered by the plan are as as follows: fiscal year 2012 - 7.2%, 2013 - 5.6%, 2014 and thereafter - 4.0%.

follows: fiscal year 2012 - 7.2%, 2013 - 5.6%, 2014 and thereafter - 4.0%.

Cash Flows:

$691,000 and The pension and expense included in these these financial statements was $691,000 The pension andretirement retirement plan plan included in these financial statements was $691,000 and and The total totaltotal pension and retirement plan expense expense included in financial statements was $659,000 for ended June 2011 and 2010, respectively. $659,000 for years the years ended June30, 30,2011 2011and and2010, 2010,respectively. respectively. $659,000 for the the years ended June 30, 14. Postretirement Benefit 14. Other Other Postretirement Benefit Plans Plans 14 | Other Postretirement Benefit

The discount used torate determine thedetermine postretirement t obligation benefit was 5.22% and 5.16% the and 5.16% for the The rate discount used to the benefi postretirement obligation wasfor5.22% years ended June 30, 2011 2011respectively. and 2010, respectively. years ended Juneand 30,2010,

Plans

In to Diocese's benefit pensionplan, plan, the Diocese sponsors an unfunded unfunded defined In addition addition to the thethe Diocese sponsors an In addition to Diocese’sdefined defined benefi t pension thethe Diocese sponsors an unfunded defined defined benefit health care and benefits plan retired priests who have been incardinated incardinated prior to to benefit health care retired priests been benefi t health care andlife lifeinsurance insurance benefi ts plan to to retired priests whowho havehave been incardinated prior to prior their 65th birthday andand have age 70 while in service service with the Diocese. Diocese. The theirtheir 65th65th birthday andattained attained age while in with the The birthday haveworked worked 10 10 years years and age 70 70 while in service with the Diocese. The plan is and such as deductibles deductibles and coinsurance. coinsurance. The is noncontributory andcontains contains cost-sharing cost-sharing features as as deductibles and coinsurance. The plan plan is noncontributory noncontributory featuressuch such and The accounting for plan anticipates changes to written the written written plan that are consistent consistent with accounting for plan anticipates future future cost-sharing changes to the plan that are consistent with accounting for the thethe cost-sharing changes to the plan that are with the Diocese’s expressed intent increasethe thecost-sharing cost-sharing annually annually general inflinflation ation the expressed intent to to increase annuallyfor forthe theexpected expected general inflationrate rate the Diocese's Diocese's expressed for the expected general rateyear. for thatThe year.Diocese's The Diocese’s policy to fund costofofmedical medical benefi ts inin determined at at for policy is tois fund medical benefits inamounts amounts determined at the the for that that year. The thethecost benefits amounts determined the discretion of management. discretion of discretion of management. management.

Cash Flows:

The Diocese expects to contribute $624,000 to the postretirement benefit plans in the next fiscal year.

The Diocese expects to contribute $624,000 to the postretirement benefit plans in the next fiscal year.

The following benefits, which reflect expected future service, as appropriate, are expected to be paid for following the yearsThe ended June 30:benefits, which reflect expected future service, as appropriate, are expected to be paid fo

the years ended June 30:

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 THE 2017DIOCESE to 2021 OF TRENTON NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2011 AND 2010 Total

The annual measurement date is June 30 for other postretirement benefi ts. The following tables provide The postretirement benefits. The following following tables provide provide The annual annual measurement measurement date is June 30 for other postretirement benefits. The tables further information about the Diocese’s postretirement benefit plans: further benefit plans: plans: further information information about the Diocese's postretirement benefit

$

624,000 672,000 719,000 745,000 778,000 4,619,000

$

8,157,000

Obligations and Funded Status

Obligations Obligations and and Funded Status

June 30, 30, June 2011 2011

Benefit obligation obligation Benefit Fair value value of plan assets Fair Funded status - reported as postretirement benefits Funded benefits obligation in the statements of financial position obligation Employer contributions contributions Employer Participant contributions Participant Benefits paid paid Benefits

2010 2010

$$ 12,055,821 12,055,821 $$ 11,072,385 11,072,385 ---

15. Functional Expenses

15 | Functional Expenses

The costs of providing the Diocese's programs and activities have been summarized on a functional basis The costs of providing the Diocese’s programs and activities have been summarized on a functional basis below. Accordingly, certaincertain costscosts havehave been allocated programsand and supporting services below. Accordingly, been allocatedamong among the the programs supporting services benefitedbenefi based square footage. tedon based on square footage. For the Years Ended June 30, 2011 2010

$$ (12,055,821) (12,055,821) $$ (11,072,385) (11,072,385) $$

506,509 506,509 $$ -(506,509) (506,509)

448,339 448,339 -(448,339) (448,339)

Amounts recognized recognized in the statements of activities for the years ended June 30, consist of: Amounts years ended June consist Amounts recognized in the statements of activities for the years ended June 30, 30, consist of: of: 2011 2011 Net (gain) (gain) loss loss $$ 468,893 Net 468,893 THE DIOCESE OF TRENTON Amortization of of prior prior service service NOTES cost and net loss (126,289) Amortization cost andTO netFINANCIAL loss (gain) (gain) STATEMENTS (126,289) FOR THEchanges YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2011 AND 2010 Total postretirement postretirement benefit changes other periodic Total benefit other than than periodic 342,604 postretirement benefit benefit cost cost 342,604 postretirement Net periodic periodic postretirement postretirement benefit benefit cost 1,147,341 Net cost 1,147,341 $$ 1,489,945 1,489,945 14. Other Postretirement Benefit Plans (continued)

18 Program Services Management and General Fundraising

2010 2010 $$ (5,843,948) (5,843,948) (472,351) (472,351) (6,316,299) (6,316,299) 1,988,781 1,988,781 $$ (4,327,518) (4,327,518)

Total Operating Expenses

$ 49,561,135 6,950,520 1,075,569

$ 49,232,780 5,586,236 860,051

$ 57,587,224

$ 55,679,067

16. Related Entities The Diocese and the Catholic Education and Religious Trust (see Note 11) share a common purpose of 16 | Related Entities supporting the religious education programs of the Diocese. In 2011, the Trust distributed $1,392,000 to the Diocese which inand turn $792,000 from these directly elementary secondary The Diocese the transferred Catholic Education and Religious Trustfunds (see Note 11) to share a commonand purpose of supporting the religious education programs of the Diocese. In 2011, thethe Trust distributed schools in the Diocese. The Diocese used the remaining distribution from Trust to fund$1,392,000 education and the Diocese which inadministered turn transferredby $792,000 from these funds directly to elementary and secondary religious to formation programs the Diocese. schools in the Diocese. The Diocese used the remaining distribution from the Trust to fund education and

17. Financial Instruments - Concentrations Risk religious formation programs administeredof byCredit the Diocese.

As of June 30, 2011 and 2010, the Diocese held financial instruments, which potentially subject it to concentrations of credit risk. The financial instruments consist primarily of checking accounts, savings 17and | Financial Concentrations of Credit RiskThe Diocese has not certificates Instruments of deposit in -excess of federally insured limits. Other changes in plan assets and benefit obligations previously recognized in changes in unrestrictedaccounts net experienced losses in such instruments. believeswhich the Diocese not exposed As ofany June 30, 2011 andfinancial 2010, the Diocese heldManagement financial instruments, potentiallyissubject it assets for the year ended June 30: Other changes in plan assets and benefit obligations previously recognized in changes in unrestricted to concentrations credit to risk. Theand financial to17 any significant credit riskofrelated cash cash instruments equivalents.consist primarily of checking accounts, 17 net assets for the year ended June 30:

savings accounts and certificates of deposit in excess of federally insured limits. The Diocese has not

2011 Net loss Prior service cost Amounts previously recognized in unrestricted net assets, not yet recognized as periodic postretirement benefit cost

$

$

2010

790,093 520,498

$

1,310,591

$

385,818 582,169

18. Subsequent Events experienced any losses in such financial instruments. Management believes the Diocese is not exposed to any significant credit risk related to cash and cash equivalents.

In preparing these financial statements, management has evaluated events and transactions for potential recognition or disclosure through October 26, 2011, the date the financial statements were available to be issued.

967,987

18 | Subsequent Events

In preparing these financial statements, management has evaluated events and transactions for potential recognition or disclosure through October 26, 2011, the date the financial statements were available to be issued.

The estimated net loss and prior service cost that will be amortized from changes in unrestricted net assets to net periodic benefit cost in 2012 are $0 and $61,671, respectively. Assumptions: The discount rate used to determine the postretirement benefit cost was 5.16% and 6.25% for the years ended June 30, 2011 and 2010, respectively. The discount rate used to determine the postretirement benefit obligation was 5.22% and 5.16% for the years ended June 30, 2011 and 2010, respectively. The health care cost trend rates used to measure the expected cost of benefits covered by the plan are as follows: fiscal year 2012 - 7.2%, 2013 - 5.6%, 2014 and thereafter - 4.0%. Cash Flows: The Diocese expects to contribute $624,000 to the postretirement benefit plans in the next fiscal year.

19

The following benefits, which reflect expected future service, as appropriate, are expected to be paid for the years ended June 30: 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 to 2021

$

624,000 672,000 719,000 745,000 778,000 4,619,000

Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M. comforts Barbara Minervino, whose husband Louis was killed in the a 10th anniversary Total9-11 attacks and remembered during $ 8,157,000 Mass. Ken Falls photo

Students pray the “Our Father” during the diocese's first Catholic Schools Mass, March 17. Craig Pittelli photo


26 • January 2012

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28 • January 2012

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Diocese, parishes work as one body in Christ Continued from P10 Holy Cross Parish, Rumson, and St. Joseph Parish, Keyport, also tapped into the diocesan resources, with parishioners gaining training that ranged from bereavement ministries to those that tend to the spirituality and well being of senior citizens. Six members of the bereavement team at Holy Cross completed Bereavement Ministry training with the diocese said Eugenia Kelly, pastoral assistant. “We have the practice of following our bereaved families through the entire first year, with notes, calls, advice and even referral for counseling or support groups,” said Kelly, who added that the body of knowledge gained from training helped the team “feel comfortable and actually helpful in ministry.” Wendy Walnock of St. Joseph Parish, is a member of the steering committee of the Ministry for Maturing Adults in the diocesan Department of Pastoral Care. The steering committee is composed of persons, like Walnock, a parish nurse, who are professionally involved with those 55 to 105. Walnock brought the knowledge she gained from the ministry’s “Train the Trainer” certificate program back to her parish. The program focused on the work of gerontologist and psychologist Richard S. Johnson, a pioneer in spiritual gerontology. When she was certified in the first program, “12 Keys to Spiritual Vitality,” she led a 12-week study session with elderly parishioners. “For some it was a social gathering to be with friends and gain some introspection on themselves. For others, it was a reconnection with a religion they had forgotten. It was a chance to be a happier and more content person.” As Walnock experienced, many of the programs are designed in ways that will help prop open the parish door for those interested in returning to Church.

Partnering in ministry is an answer to the Gospel call for unity.

Perhaps no instance of diocesan-parish collaboration is aimed more in that direction that the successful Christmas Carol Festival initiative. The festival concept was developed by John Boucher, associate director of evangelization in the department of Catechesis and Evangelization Ministry and his wife, Therese, and designed with an eye toward extending an open invitation to families during the Advent season to reconnect with their Catholic heritage. This year, the festivals drew 5,300 children and adults to 19 parishes throughout the region which had prepared for the events with study sessions in the summer. Each parish worked with packets of information prepared by the couple but were able to make additions that were meaningful for their own community. The festivals, which began in 2007, invite people to come together to sing faith-based carols such as “O Come All Ye Faithful” and “Hark! The Herald Angels Sing.” But singing festive songs is only the beginning. While each parish adds its own special flavor to the festival, common elements include Scripture readings, faith witnessing, shared prayer and lessons about the meaning behind the songs. Sacred Heart, Mount Holly, was among four parishes hosting the festival for the first time last year. Merry Marcellino, assistant pastoral administrator, who organized the festival, said parishioners asked for it after attending a CCF in St. Joan of Arc, Marlton, the year before.“It developed in response to the requests of parishioners who wanted it and we were so very glad they came,” she said. The scope of collaborative ministry between the diocese and its parishes is broad. From coordinating such practical efforts as maintaining a parish data base, to providing resources for catechist training or respect life ministry, and extending to the profound in transforming the lives of those who are grieving or dealing with terminal illness, is an answer to the Gospel call for unity.


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State of the Diocese

January 2012 â&#x20AC;¢ 29

Be sure to check the following upcoming issues of The Monitor for special content: January 19

Catholic Schools Week

This annual supplement will celebrate Catholic Schools Week in the diocese and contain information on upcoming Open House dates for our schools.

February 2

Healthcare February 16

Wedding Guide

The Monitor is planning its first Wedding Guide, scheduled to contain listings of many businesses in the diocese catering to the needs of those planning a wedding.

March 1

Annual Bereavement Guide March 15

Retreats Guide

COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL of the SACRED HEART

Girls K-12 Co-ed Pre-School/JK

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30 • January 2012

State of the Diocese

T he M onitor

LEADING LIKE

J E SUS

ENCOUNTER A full-day, multi-media experience exploring the concepts of S3 Leadership: Servant, Steward, Shepherd for Catholic Adults who want to develop the way they influence others in the family, at work, in the community

Feb. 18, 2012 – for Catholic Charismatic Renewal Missionary Teams ONLY March 3, 2012 – for St. Charles Borromeo, Cinnaminson Parish Leaders ONLY March 17, 2012 – Open Registration, host: St. Peter Parish, Pt. Pleasant Beach May 19, 2012 – Open Registration, host: St. Raphael-Holy Angels, Hamilton

Register Today!

Please see events page at www.dioceseoftrenton.org or contact Pastoral Planning Dept at (609) 403-7213, cmacre@dioceseoftrenton.org for details and registration information.

Call to find out how you can host an Encounter at your parish!


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State of the Diocese

January 2012 • 31

DIOCESE of TRENTON and BISHOP DAVID M. O’CONNELL, C.M. invite you on a pilgrimage to

The SHRINES of FRANCE Including Lourdes, Nevers, Lisieux, & Paris

April 19 to 29, 2012

$4,295.00 per person from Newark

Airport taxes and fuel surcharges of $585.00 included, but are subject to change at time of ticketing. Price also includes bus transportation from Diocese to Newark Airport, basic travel insurance, and tips. Price based on minimum of 40 people per bus.

Diocese of Trenton Pilgrimage Shrines of France Itinerary DAY 1: April 19 Depart U.S.A. DAY 2: April 20 Toulouse - Lourdes DAY 3: April 21 Lourdes: Footsteps of St. Bernadette DAY 4: April 22 Lourdes: Excursion to Dax DAY 5: April 23 Lourdes - Paris DAY 6: April 24 Paris - Nevers DAY 7: April 25 Paris - Versailles DAY 8: April 26 Paris: Vincentian Sites DAY 9: April 27 Lisieux - Chartres DAY 10: April 28 Paris at Leisure DAY 11: April 29 Return to U.S.A.

For complete itinerary and RESERVATION FORM visit

TrentonMonitor.com Your Trip Organizer: Rev.

Ian W. Trammell Ask for Kathy Head • 609-587-4877 x 270

Or Contact Marianne Murphy at Select International Tours 800-842-4842 • mmurphy@select-intl.com

From Bishop O’Connell

“Please consider joining me on this special pilgrimage to the great Marian Shrines of France. As a member of St. Vincent de Paul’s Congregation of the Mission, I would like to introduce you to our special devotion to the Mother of God, our mother.” YOUR COMPREHENSIVE RATE INCLUDES • Roundtrip airfare Newark/Toulouse/Paris/Newark (airport tax and fuel surcharges subject to change). • Bus transfer from Diocese to Newark Airport (RT). • Basic travel insurance policy. • English speaking tour guide. • Daily buffet breakfast and dinner as per itinerary, including non-alcoholic beverages. One lunch in Nevers. • First Class hotel accommodations. • Farewell dinner at the Eiffel Tower. • Private air conditioned tour bus. • All admission & sightseeing charges, scheduling of Daily Mass. • All tips and gratuities. • Porterage for one suitcase at all hotels. • TGV train Lourdes/Paris. • Select International Tours Travel Portfolio. (BBreakfast included, D-Dinner included) RATES DO NOT INCLUDE Personal expenses, lunches and dinners where noted, alcoholic beverages with meals, church offerings at Mass, anything not mentioned above.


32 • January 2012

State of the Diocese

T he M onitor

‘To Serve and not to Be Served’

Diocese by the Numbers Parishes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Active Priests . . . . . . 176 Deacons . . . . . . . . . . . 365 Elementary Schools . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 (parish and regional)

2011-2012

Secondary Students. . . . . . . . Religious Education Students . . . . . .

2 M 6,925 $

illion

The money awarded to Catholic school families in the Diocese of Trenton for tuition assistance in

60,744

(Pre-K, elementary and secondary)

Youth Ministry . . . . . . . . .

1,500 Elementary Students . . . . . . 13,022 Catechist High Schools . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Certificate (diocesan and parish) Recipients . . . . . . . . . . . 60

the 2011-2012 year. The diocese has long had a tuition assistance program, which awarded $1.2 million from a subsidy provided by parishes that do not sponsor their own schools. Because of an additional $800,000 raised through the 2011 Bishop’s Annual Appeal the amount of tuition assistance paid for the current school year reached $2 million.


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State of the Diocese

January 2012 • 33

‘To Serve and not to Be Served’

Permanent deacons provide vital ministry in diocese, parishes Since the permanent diaconate was established by Bishop George W. Ahr in 1974 there has been an increase in the number of permanent deacons serving in nearly every parish.

Ministers of Word, Liturgy and Charity – Deacon Christian M. Nnajiofor of Blessed Sacrament-Our Lady of the Divine Shepherd Parish, Trenton, was among 12 men whom Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M., ordained permanent deacons May 14, 2011, in St. Mary of the Assumption Cathedral, Trenton. Jeff Bruno photo

Continued from P8 homiletics and liturgy. Lastly, their formation also gave them opportunities for practical parish experience and attending retreats, both individually and with their wives, that helped the candidates to further discern their roles in the Church. The courses offered during the fourth year, or intern year, focused further on spirituality and the practical aspects of ministry such as assisting at Mass, officiating at weddings, wakes and committal services and celebrating Baptisms. The wives of candidates have had a critical role in the diaconate formation process. A wife was initially required to give her permission prior to her husband being accepted into the formation program; she was also encouraged to attend classes with her husband throughout the formation process as well. There are many couples who, once the husband was ordained a deacon, continue to work together in ministry such as in the RCIA and in Baptism and wedding preparation programs.

Big diocese, many deacons

Since the permanent diaconate was established by Bishop George W. Ahr in 1974 there has been an increase in the number of permanent deacons serving in nearly every parish. The current number of deacons serving the diocese as of July 1 is reported to be 365. Of the 365, there are 240 deacons who are active in their ministries and 50 retired deacons who minister as they are

able. There are another 75 deacons who have either relocated and are ministering in other dioceses or are on leave of absence.

Changes Underway

In an effort to enhance and strengthen the ministry of deacons in the diocese, a study, which officially commenced Oct. 31, 2011, of the diaconate formation program is underway. The study is being conducted by a committee of priests and deacons who were appointed by Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M. This committee, chaired by Father Thomas J. Mullelly, vicar for the diocesan office of Clergy and Consecrated Life, will address a number of factors including the process by which deacon candidates are recruited; the distribution and utilization of diaconate personnel; the types of ministries that deacons serve in as well as the utilization of deacons in other ministries beyond the parish level. In light of the study, an aspirant year class was not accepted in September, 2011. Father Mullelly emphasized that the diaconate program is “going forward” in providing formation for those who comprise the current three classes of interns as well as first- and second-year candidates. “The bottom line,” said Father Mullelly, “is that it’s Bishop O’Connell’s desire that the permanent diaconate be a vital and vibrant ministry.”


34 • January 2012

State of the Diocese

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‘To Serve and not to Be Served’

Formation strengthens prayer life, social skills Continued from P6 each of these disciplines,” said Msgr. Vaughan. The seminarian is also assigned to a spiritual director, as well as a mentor who guides and assists him in further developing his personal prayer life and introduces him to communal forms of prayer. Although the academic and spiritual pillars of formation are extremely important, it is necessary for a seminarian to realize the importance of strong social skills, Msgr. Vaughan said. “Again, the seminary helps the young man to see both his strengths and weaknesses in this area, so he may build up skills that will allow him to be approachable and empathetic to the needs and concerns of his future parishioners,” said Msgr. Vaughan. Finally, during his time in semi-

nary, a man is given opportunities to develop his pastoral skills through practical experience serving in parishes, hospitals, nursing homes and in ministry to the hungry and homeless. The Vocations Office, said Msgr. Vaughan, works to place seminarians in summer parish assignments with pastors who act as mentors during the seven-week program. “The seminarians really enjoy this program and many of them become friends with the priests they ministered with during the summer,” Msgr. Vaughan noted. Msgr. Vaughan was pleased to tell about the 34 seminarians who are currently preparing for the priesthood in the diocese, including one who is completing his studies in The Pontifical North American College in Rome. He

is also excited that, as of this month, the Vocation Office has another six men who are expected to begin the seminary formation process in the fall. Reflecting on the seminarians, Msgr. Vaughan spoke of the overall trend in the increased number of vocations taking place in the United States. According to a Catholic News Service report published in November, there were 3,608 post- baccalaureate U.S. seminarians last year, a net increase of 125 seminarians, or four percent over the previous year, and the highest number since the early 1990s. Msgr. Vaughan stated that about six years ago, the diocese began to see an increase in the number of vocations to the priesthood. The increase was, and continues to be, due to the introduction of international seminarians to

assist the diocese with its ever-growing diverse population. As a result, for the past three years, the diocese has been “holding steady” with more than 30 seminarians.

Besides the seminary…

Because it is so important to foster a spirit of camaraderie among the seminarians of the diocese, the Vocations Office provides opportunities for them to come together for a time of prayer, worship and fellowship. One occasion is the four-day summer retreat held in Stella Maris Retreat House, Elberon, upon the completion of their parish assignments. The retreat is always led by one of the priests of the diocese and it is also a chance for the seminarians, who attend four different seminaries, to become better acquainted. Another gathering is the Christmas Mass and dinner with Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M., that is held in Sacred Heart Parish, Trenton. There are also diocesan liturgical celebrations where the seminarians gather, such as the Chrism Mass and the ordinations for diaconate and priesthood. Finally, there are dinners for the seminarians that are hosted by Knights of Columbus councils.

Reaching High Schoolers

As a new initiative, Msgr. Vaughan said that Bishop O’Connell has established a Vocation Recruitment Team who will visit high schools around the diocese in February and March. “Obviously, the initiative is meant to generate interest in the priesthood among our teenagers and hopefully encourage those who are possibly discerning a priestly vocation,” said Msgr. Vaughan. The Team has been divided into two groups with each group visiting five high schools. One group is headed by Msgr. Thomas Gervasio, pastor of Our Lady of Sorrows-St. Anthony Parish, Hamilton. Serving in Msgr. Gervasio’s group are Father Alberto Tamayo, diocesan vice-chancellor and secretary to Bishop O’Connell; Father Carlos Florez, parochial vicar of Mary, Mother of God Parish, Middletown, and Father John Testa, parochial vicar of Precious Blood Parish, Monmouth Beach. The other group is headed by Father Dennis Apoldite, pastor of Sacred Heart Parish, Trenton, and director of the House of Priestly Formation. Serving in Father Apoldite’s group are Father Joseph Jakub, Catholic chaplain at Rider University and Notre Dame High School, both in Lawrenceville; Father Fernando Lopez, parochial vicar of St. Aloysius Parish, Jackson, and Father Christopher Picollo, parochial vicar of St. James Parish, Red Bank. Any young man who believes he may have an interest in a priestly vocation is welcome to contact Msgr. Vaughan at the Diocesan Chancery/Pastoral Center, by e-mailing: gvaugh@dioceseoftrenton.org or by calling him at 609-406-7448.


State of the Diocese

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January 2012 • 35

Read it for your faith A

mong the most important responsibilities of a Bishop is to nurture in his people a stronger sense of Catholic identity and a deeper practice of the faith. While there are many ways we are striving to do this, one of the most accessible and consistent means we have available to us is regular reading of the diocesan newspaper, The Monitor. Since first coming to the Diocese of Trenton in 2010, I have been extremely impressed with the quality of this award-winning newspaper and its potential for enriching the faith lives of everyone who reads it. The Monitor has content that speaks to every segment of our Catholic family – the old and the young, married and single, in ministry and in the marketplace. It delivers essential information about the Church around the world and all the issues that should be of concern to Catholics. The Monitor also offers

me the opportunity, as your shepherd, to write directly to you and your family. We are fortunate in the Diocese to have this Catholic newspaper that publishes both print and online editions, and makes breaking news available to readers and users immediately. I both support and endorse the work of The Monitor, believing it is a wonderful way of conveying a powerful message of faith and love of Jesus Christ and the Church. In closing, I am reminded of something once written by the late Cardinal John P. Foley, a long-time advocate of the Catholic press and someone I have always admired and respected: “Like the crucifix above the bed in every Catholic home, a Catholic publication in the living room or the family room is a continuing reminder of our identity as Catholics.” As your shepherd, I urge you to begin a subscription to The Monitor. Not only will reading this newspaper help you grow in faith, but your subscription will help support and sustain The Monitor as the valuable resource it has come to be for the Diocese.

Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M.

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