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Health & Wellness

Reaching wellness goals easier with faith, friends Story by Mary Morrell, Contributing Editor

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ith the New Year in the rear view mirror, and resolutions in varied states of accomplishment or abandonment, parishes around the Diocese are providing programs to keep participants on the road to mental, physical and spiritual health, emphasizing the important integration of faith and wellness. “For most people, faith contributes to good health. Study after study shows that people who attend religious services enjoy better health, live longer and recover from illness faster and with fewer complications. They also tend to cope better with illness and experience less depression. Among those who are seriously ill, many use their spiritual beliefs to cope with their illness,” said Kathy Marchese, a registered nurse and coordinator of the parish nursing ministry in St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Parish, Whiting. Among the principle functions of the parish nursing ministry is promoting an understanding of relationships between faith and health, and providing educational activities which explore the relationship between values, attitudes and lifestyles. The ministry also coordinates support groups, including an exercise club and stretching and balancing class, with prayer an important part of both.

“For most people, faith contributes to good health.” “A survey of Americans on prayer reported that more than 90 percent of Americans pray, 74 percent at least once a day. Engaging in ritual activities such as prayer or meditation, promotes relaxation, which is characterized by lowered blood pressure, heart rate, breathing rate and metabolic rate. This may have a protective effect, particularly against high blood pressure,” stressed Marchese.

Faith & Decision-Making Now in its third year, St. Denis Par-

ish, Manasquan, offers the Daniel Plan, a groundbreaking healthy lifestyle program founded on biblical principles and focused on five essentials: faith, food, fitness, focus and friends. The program, developed by Christian Pastor Rick Warren, author of “The Purpose-Driven Life,” and Drs. Daniel Amen and Mark Hyman, offers an innovative approach to achieving a healthy lifestyle where people get better together by optimizing their health in each of these five life areas. The program is open to anyone who is looking to improve their health using Bible-based principles. Monica Butler, parish facilitator of the Daniel Plan, explained that the program begins with the faith element, which serves as the foundation of the entire program and teaches that God is the power and energy behind all transformational change, including the lifestyle choices necessary to become healthy. “We help people realize that we should depend on God for everything, and ask for divine help and support when we find we can’t get healthy on our own,” said Butler, who introduced the program to the parish after successfully losing 40 pounds by following the plan. If the thank-you notes he’s received

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Marginal Gains Move toward where you want to be by improving yourself just 1% every day. By the end of the year, you would have improved 365%. from participants are any metric, the program has been well-received and successful, said Father William Lago, pastor. “It’s a holistic approach that addresses all aspects of a person’s life. It’s not just diet. There’s a positive impact to the friendship of the group, and in their learning more about faith and health,” he said.

It’s All Connected This focused outreach, touching on the varied aspects of life, has also been successful in St. Robert Bellarmine Co-Cathedral, Freehold, where a monthly discussion series addresses a number of important topics including Getting Healthy: Body, Mind and Spirit; Love and Marriage; Declutter Your

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Health & Wellness

The Monitor • FEBRUARY 21, 2019

Providing Comfort

Morris Hall residents find peace in World Day of the Sick commemoration Story by Lois Rogers Correspondent

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ell before the start of Mass in the chapel of Morris Hall, Lawrenceville, residents gathered not only inside the sacred space but in the spacious hallway outside and upstairs choir loft for prayer and fellowship. “Everyone would like to receive the anointing,” Lee Tagliaferri said before the Feb. 11 Mass commemorating World Day of the Sick, which includes the Sacrament of Anointing of the Sick. Tagliaferri and fellow residents Betty Leedom and Marianite of Holy Cross Sister Sylvia Asseline shared their enthusiasm for the observance and noted the importance of having daily access to the Sacraments. Each described it as a key reason for choosing to live in the Morris Hall community. “In order to get to the dining room, residents have to pass by the chapel six times a day,” Tagliaferri said. “It’s six opportunities a day for Eucharistic Adoration.” Leedom, a bubbly resident of St. Joseph Skilled Nursing, nodded her head in agreement. “If you pass by the chapel, it’s very hard not to go in,” she said. Added Sister Sylvia, an extraordinary minister of Holy Communion, “The reason we came here is for health and wellness.”

Sharing In Faith The World Day of the Sick commemoration, organized by the diocesan Department of Pastoral Care, included a Mass celebrated by Father Angelo Amaral, Morris Hall chaplain, and concelebrants Msgr. Hugh Ronan, Msgr. Ralph Stansley and Father Daniel G. Cahill. Afterward, they dispersed throughout the campus, anointing all residents unable to attend the liturgy. In his homily, Father Amaral spoke of the blessings associated with Morris Hall being a place where medicine melds with faith and sacramental observance. “Receiving the anointing is God’s blessing,” he said, noting how the commemoration was instituted by St. John Paul II in

Msgr. Hugh Ronan, a retired priest of the Diocese, administers the Sacrament of Anointing of the Sick to a Morris Hall resident during the Mass celebrated Feb. 11, World Day of the Sick. John Blaine photo

1992. He encouraged the faithful to “call upon Mary to ask for her intercession in healing of the body, mind, spirit and soul.” Further, he asked for “prayer for all those who dedicate themselves to the care of the sick and work in ministries that serve the sick. It is a beautiful trust,” he said, to know that Jesus is here for us.”

Precious Memories After Mass, residents Sarah Hoffman and Celia Ghazi expressed their appreciation for being a part of the celebration, held yearly on the Feast of Our Lady of Lourdes. “I looked forward to this Mass for a long time,” said Hoffman, who lives in the Grace Garden Assisted Living and Memory Care on the second floor of Morris Hall. “I feel right at home here.” Ghazi lives in one of the houses in The Meadows, an innovative and contemporary approach to nursing home care where residents and their relatives have input into the communal style of living. Her son, who is a physician, researched facilities before they settled on The Meadows, she explained. “He wanted a place where he felt I would be well looked after,” Ghazi said. “I wanted some place that was very Catholic. I was brought up in a Catholic home and schools. I wanted to follow my religion.”

Volunteers reflect on the graces gained in helping the infirm By Lois Rogers, Correspondent

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hose who volunteer in the Morris Hall senior care communities say their ministry is about giving, yes, but it’s about receiving, too. “It’s definitely a two-way street,” said Janice Haggerty, who has volunteered for Morris Hall for 16 years. Volunteers “get as much, if not more than the residents. It’s joyful and spiritual. It shines a lot of light.” On Feb. 11, as scores of residents, medical professionals and volunteers tucked into Morris Hall Chapel – the heart of the 40-acre diocesan health care campus in Lawrenceville – for World Day of the Sick, volunteers discussed what it means to share their time, attention and friendship with those living in the communities of St. Mary Assisted Living, St. Joseph Skilled Nursing and the houses that comprise Morris Hall Meadows, a Medicare and Medicaid residence. Phyllis Vannozzi, a retired educator and one of more than 100 volunteers from parishes around the Diocese, serves as a reader regularly in Morris Hall Chapel. Reflecting on the day’s Mass, celebrated by Father Angelo Amaral, Morris Hall chaplain, she said she was moved during the administering of the Sacrament of Anointing of the Sick and the blessing of the hands of the medical professionals who serve them. “I was so proud of the moment when Father [Amaral] blessed the hands of the doctors. I prayed for people to feel that moment when Peter said, ‘Rise and walk.’ I [prayed] they would feel the fact that this is a place where miracles do happen – where friendships and attachments are formed, where faith is renewed.”

Caring Spirits Vannozzi first started volunteering in the chapel six years ago when she was newly retired. “My husband was volunteering in Morris Hall’s rehabilitation center, and I began attending Mass in the chapel. One day, there was a need for a reader at the Mass, and I filled in. It was one Mass, but you know what happens, one Mass leads to more.” She reads three days a week now, whenever a special program is being held as well as funerals and feast day Masses, she said. What she is most fond of, however, is connecting with residents, many of whom she knows by name and seek her out for conversation. “They are always

For more photos from World Day of the Sick,visit TrentonMonitor.com>Multimedia> Photo Galleries

happy to see you, they smile at you, give you a kiss. Many just want to talk,” Vannozzi said. She describes the chapel as a “vibrant, growing community,” adding, “People come because they feel comfortable” since there is always help and companionship. “Every volunteer who comes pushes a wheelchair to help a resident go to Mass. I think we are doing God’s work.”

Reaching Out That’s the sense throughout the campus, where God’s work includes a host of opportunities to contribute. In 2018, more than 100 volunteers contributed more than 7,576 hours in pastoral care, friendly visits, pet therapy, music, activities, and arts and crafts, said Haggerty, a member of nearby St. Ann Parish. “There are so many ways to volunteer, and we are always looking for more dedicated volunteers,” she said. A member of the Morris Hall Community Board, which concentrates on funding and coordinating the many activities that fill the resident’s calendar and enhance the environment, Haggerty is also the coordinator of extraordinary ministers of Holy Communion, many of whom bring the Eucharist to the rooms of residents unable to make it to chapel. “It is a spiritual experience to pray with them, to give them the host, to share the peace they get from receiving the Sacrament,” said Haggerty, speaking of the bond that develops between volunteers and residents. “Having had the experience myself, it becomes so familiar – they are happy to hear about our families, they want to see pictures of our children and grandchildren and talk,” she said. Deanna Sass, director of the diocesan Department of Pastoral Care, said pastoral visits to the residents send the message “that they are precious in God’s eyes, they are loved and worth your time. I find that when I make a pastoral visit, I experience the presence of God in such a profound way.” “I have never made my rounds in a hospital or nursing home without feeling very blessed, knowing that I have received more than I have ever given,” she added. Phyllis Vannozzi serves as a reader during the World Day of the Sick Mass Feb. 11 in Morris Hall Chapel. John Blaine photo


Health & Wellness

FEBRUARY 21, 2019 • TrentonMonitor.com

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‘We Are Not Alone’

Conference explores end-of-life measures from a Catholic perspective  EXPLORING THE OPTIONS • Deacon John Bertagnolli speaks on the differences between palliative care and hospice during the annual Via Lucis conference Feb. 15 in St. Paul School, Burlington.

By Mary Stadnyk Associate Editor

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“All of us have to face the end of life one day, but no one has the right to end it.” Nasife was among 100 participants, including health care practitioners, chaplains, priests, religious, deacons and their wives, parish volunteers, lay ministers and parishioners who gathered for the annual Via Lucis Conference sponsored by Samaritan Healthcare and Hospice, in collaboration with the Dioceses of Trenton and Camden.

‘Life is a Gift’ Deacon John Bertagnolli, the keynote speaker for the conference held Feb. 15 in St. Paul School, Burlington, gave an overview on both palliative care and hospice and how they seek to relieve pain and other distressing symptoms and side effects from treatments. The two measures also help patients identify their personal goals, wishes and values that will guide their care plan and optimize their quality of life. The main difference between palliative care and hospice, he pointed out, is that while hospice is for patients with a life expectancy of months, palliative care may be administered at any time during a patient’s illness, whether or not the patient had received a terminal diagnosis. Basing much of his presentation on a recent report published by a group of physicians and health care experts working with the Vatican-based Pontifical Academy for Life, Deacon Bertagnolli, a physician with

Mary Stadnyk photos

 DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVES •

Following Deacon Bertagnolli’s keynote, a panel discussion on palliative care and hospice was facilitated by Marge McGinley, chaplain at Virtua Hospital and national chair of formation, Society of St. Vincent de Paul, standing at the podium.

Samaritan Healthcare and Hospice, said palliative care and hospice must be brought to the fore because “life is a gift from God and should be respected. We should also respect the goals of the patients within the teachings of the Catholic faith.

Pending Legislation Father Joe Noche, pastor of Our Lady Queen of Peace Parish, who attended the conference with members of his staff, said he was given a clearer understanding between the two types of cares and that he appreciated how the spiritual side of hospice “in connection to what we believe as Catholics” was addressed along with the medical position. He was also interested to learn more about end-of-life options, especially in light of the “Aid in Dying for the Terminally Ill Act” that advanced in the state Legislature Feb. 7. The bill (S1072/A1504) would allow adult residents of New Jersey to obtain a prescription for life-ending drugs if a doctor has determined they have six months or less to live. “This bill is against our faith and in what believe as Catholics,” said Father Noche, speaking from the perspective as a priest as well as one who was a practicing physician before he began studies for the priesthood. “I pledged the Hippocratic Oath to ‘do no harm’ and to treat the sick to the best of my ability,” he said. “Yes, physicians are supposed to treat and cure the ill but not to kill. But in times when medical treatment stops working and the end of life is imminent, as Catholics we have an option and that is hospice care [that has as its] goal to assist and comfort those who are dying and accompany them in their pain and suffering by giving them support not only through pain medication but also by helping them in their spiritual needs. “For Catholics who believe that God is the creator of all human life and God alone has the right to determine our lives natural end,” Father Noche emphasized that there is a need for more information about hospice and palliative care. “Yes all of us have to face the end of life one day, but no one has the right to end it, and that includes physicians and legislators,” he said.

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here were several reasons Carol Nasife attended the conference that addressed the similarities and differences between palliative care and hospice. Given that she works as the secretary for Our Lady Queen of Peace Parish, Hainesport, Nasife said she often finds herself speaking with parishioners or their family members facing serious to life-threatening illness and believed the conference would give her a better understanding about the options that are available to patients prior to entering into hospice. Plus, she thought it critical to hear from an organization that addresses medical needs as well as spiritual support. “I believe it is important to incorporate faith into these serious health and end-oflife situations [and be able] to give strength, guidance and spiritual comfort to our parishioners and their loved ones at possibility the most difficult time of their lives,” she said. “As Catholics, we are reminded that we are not alone on this journey.”


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Health & Wellness

The Monitor • FEBRUARY 21, 2019

Workshop explores the ‘why’ and ‘how’ to

forgive

Story by Dorothy K. LaMantia, Correspondent

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eople need to learn how to deal with their anger and learn how to forgive. Otherwise, “If you don’t forgive, it’ll destroy you physically,” said Brother Loughlan Sofield during a presentation on “Forgiveness – It’s Good for Your Health” in St. Peter Parish, Point Pleasant Beach, on Jan. 29. Anger, said the 54-year veteran of the Missionary Servants of the Holy Trinity, “will close your heart making it hard to receive God’s love and mercy. If you want to be like Christ, you’ll forgive. It’s a process. To understand forgiveness, you must understand “Hopefully, I’ll continue anger.” to feel the wash of Sponsored by the parish’s Office of Lifelong Faith Formaforgiveness and not tion, Brother Loughlan’s presentation used prayer, audience hold onto anger.” input and his years of expertise to explore anger’s causes, the role of forgiveness and the difference between forgiveness and reconciliation. “Church teaching and the mental health field identify forgiveness as the treatment of choice for anger,” said Carol Pisani, parish pastoral associate and director of adult faith formation. “Wherever SHARING [Brother Loughlan] goes, he is an agent of forgiveINSIGHTS • ness, healing and laughter.” Workshop Brother Loughlan explained that anger occurs participants engage when people are frustrated, feel personally insulted in conversation and or undervalued, see or receive injustice or physical discuss points they injury or experience loss. heard from Brother Loughlan. “These situations don’t produce emotions.

It’s our perceptions. How we see the situation creates anger,” he said. “Anger is not a sin. Didn’t Jesus get INSPIRING PRESENTER • Carol Pisani, pastoral associate and director angry? It’s not what of adult faith formation in St. Peter Parish, Point Pleasant Beach, introduces Brother Loughlan Sofield, seated, who was the keynote speaker at a recent you feel, but what you presentation on forgiveness. Dorothy K. LaMantia photos do that makes it sinful. It’s energy which can be constructive or destructive. Many social justice victims of violence, who may be put in dangerous ministers use anger to find solutions to injustice. situations,” he said, then went on to share stories The problem is that religiously-oriented people, of modern day models of forgiveness, including who think anger is sinful, bury their anger, which St. John Paul II, St. Oscar Romero, and everybecomes a form of depression.” He noted subday people who chose forgiveness in the face of stance abuse, passive-aggressive behavior, illnesses, tragedy. and boredom are also symptoms of suppressed He then challenged his listeners to ask themanger. selves, “When have I been a model of forgiveness?” To address anger, Brother Loughlan recomAfterward, participants lingered to browse mended that one needs to “feel the emotion.” through Brother Loughlan’s books and discuss the “You can’t change anything if you don’t deal. insights they had gained. Ask: Why am I angry?” he said, then offered sug“I am devoted to Divine Mercy,” said St. Peter gestions such as talking with someone who can parishioner Marie Mylod. “Everything I heard fit listen and respond objectively and praying for the in with it. We can’t be forgiven if we don’t forgive. desire to forgive. We have to pick up our Cross, like Christ, and fol“Forgiveness is a gift to yourself and an act of low his example.” will. You have complete control of it. Without it, “Very informative and inspirational,” said you remain frozen in the past,” he said. Roger Pisani, Sr., of St. Anselm Parish, Tinton Brother LoughFalls. “It changed my way of thinking. I learned it’s lan addressed some a process and doesn’t happen automatically. We common misconwant to forgive, but it takes a long time, especially ceptions about when the hurt is deep.” anger, saying that Pisani’s wife, Barbara, commented, “For“The dumbest thing giveness is tough. We think other people should to say is ‘Forgive and forgive, not us. We need to get over anger. It’s forget.’ easier as you get older. With age, you realize what’s “Christianimportant. You gain wisdom.” ity is not about Roseanne Palladino, St. Denis Parish, forgetting. It’s about Manasquan, said she learned more about the idea remembering,” he of forgiveness, “that feeling anger is OK, but not said because when acting on it, like slapping someone.” you do [forget], you “I had no huge expectations, but I’m changed must forgive again. after what I learned,” said Palladino. “Hopefully, Brother LoughI’ll continue to feel the wash of forgiveness and not lan also pointed out hold onto anger.” that forgiveness is Brother Loughlan, a prolific writer of articles separate from recon- on ministry and books on forgiveness, has worked ciliation. in 300 dioceses on six continents and served “You can try as director of the Archdiocese of Washington’s reconciliation, but it Consultation and Counselling Center and assistant doesn’t have to hapdirector of the Center for Religion and Psychiatry pen, especially for in Washington.


Health & Wellness

FEBRUARY 21, 2019 • TrentonMonitor.com

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CCDOT addiction program expands to reach vulnerable young adults

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n an effort to reach more young people HELP AVAILABLE who struggle with addiction in Mercer • Catholic Charities County, a program geared toward teenDiocese of Trenton is expanding its New agers is expanding its services to serve those Choices program to up to age 21. help young people The Catholic Charities Diocese of up to age 21 with adTrenton program, called New Choices, rediction. Pixabay photo ceived $110,833 in county funding to serve young adults age 18 to 21 through the end of this year. The change is meant to bridge And while the gap between childhood and adulthood someone who’s 18 is – a vulnerable time when troubled young technically an adult, adults with unresolved adolescent problems Wimbush added, can get lost in an adult system with adult “they aren’t really. consequences. Most of the clients “Once they’re 18, they age out [of we see who are that services]. But their problems aren’t always age still live with their resolved, and so they get lost in the cracks,” parents or grandparsaid Aida Albino Wimbush, New Choices job to getting a home to securing public ents. They’re still struggling to get a job or program supervisor. “Once they get lost in assistance. finish school. They’re still closer to childthe cracks, their actions can have lifelong Further, a juvenile who commits a hood than adulthood, and so they need this consequences.” crime to support his or her addiction could additional support.” L Take, as an example, someone have the offense forgiven by completing a IAwho C E addiction. 9 commits a crime to support program like New Choices, while adults inSPtheir Reaching More People 201 ! R , E 1 A juvenile’s criminal record is not pube stead are likely to be ordered into inpatient T y e N uar h fr New Choices is a substance-abuse relic record and so Iwon’t hurt their treatment or even jail. W annecessarily nt J S o ’ covery program with staff who specialize in e m RofYbecoming chances adult. But Expanding the New Choices program to for 2nda successful e A treating adolescents age 13 to 17, and now, b . Ma echild in turns once age 21 gives young adults the opportunity to he 18, the system charges t ST t v young adults up to 21. e o as angadult. An adult criminal record them recover from their addiction and find stabilM d L L L L L L L L L L L I I I I I I I I I I I C C C C C C C C C C C P P P P P P P P P P P A A A A A A A A A A A P P P P P P P P P P P T T T T T T T T T T T A A A A A A A A A A I I I I I I I I I I I O O O O O O O O O O O G G G G G G G G G G G N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N I I I I I I I I I I I S S S S S S S S S S S T T T T T T T T T T • • • • • • • • • • • S S S S S P P P P P P P P P C C C C C C C C C C E E E E E E E E E H H H H H H H H H H H C C C C C C C C n E E E E E E E E E E E C C C C C C C C D D D D D D D D D D D A A A A A A A A U U U U U U U U U U L L L L L L L L L L L W W W W W W W Staffers offer wraparound support to E E E E E E E E L L L L I I I I C C C C P P P P A A A A P P P P T T T T A A A A O O O O O O O I I I I O O O O G G G G N N N N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N N N N I I I I S S S N N N T T T T • • • • O O O O O O O O O O O S S S a P P P P C C C C • • • • • • E E E E U U U U U U U U U U U H H H H C C C C E E E C C C C E E E E E R R R R R R R R R R R D D D D A EO EA EisA E FE U T T T T T T T T T T T LU L L FO FY F W W O O O O O O O O O O O EL E E E O Y Y Y Y Y Y Y U U U U U U U U U U U N O O O O R R R R R R R R R R R R U U U U T T T R R R R T T T T T T T T T T T T T T N N O O O O O O O O O O O O O O public record and can haunt a person for E E D D D D D D D D D D DAY ityUwithin aU community-based, therapeutic U U U U R R R A A A A A A A A AT AY Y Y Y Y YR Y Y YR YO T T T T O O O O D D D D A A A A YR Y Y Y encourage long-term abstinence by addresslife, affecting everything from enrolling in program, instead of the harsher environment ing the youth’s needs relating to health, college or vocational school to landing a of jail or a drug rehab, Wimbush said.

peer and family relationships, education, mental health, legal Do you or someone issues and social you know need help? activities. The program Call New Choices at provides free 609-984-9042, ext. 2444 transportation or ext. 2448. The Access, and a daily meal. All activities are Help and Information scheduled after Center can be reached at school, ensuring 1-800-360-7711. participants are able to attend school regularly. Family counseling can be arranged, and organized outings are regularly planned to foster positive recreation without the use of drugs or alcohol. The program can accommodate up to 43 teenagers ages 13 to 17 at a time. The new funding enables New Choices to serve up to 12 young adults age 18 to 21 at a time. Most program participants typically spend eight to 14 weeks in the program before “graduating.” The program aims to better serve clients by ensuring staff get specialized training to address the unique needs of its teenagers. For example, counselor Jenna Mitchell

What You Can Do

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mpus shared with St. Lawrence Rehabilitation CenterCenter Center shared Campus with Campus shared St. shared with St.Rehabilitation with Lawrence St. Lawrence Rehabilitation Center Rehabilitation Morris HallLawrence • One Bishop’s Drive, Lawrenceville, NJ 08648

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Since the early 1920s, our retreat house in Long Branch has been Located Located inLocated Lawrenceville, in Lawrenceville, in Lawrenceville, in Lawrenceville, NJ NJ NJ NJ Located Located Located in Located Lawrenceville, in Lawrenceville, in Located Lawrenceville, Located in Located in Located NJ Lawrenceville, in Located NJ Lawrenceville, in Located NJ Lawrenceville, inLocated NJ Lawrenceville, in in NJ Lawrenceville, in NJ Lawrenceville, NJ Located inLawrenceville, Lawrenceville, NJ Located inLocated Lawrenceville, Located Located in Lawrenceville, NJ inLawrenceville, Lawrenceville, NJNJ NJ NJ NJNJ 609-896-0006 •www.morrishall.org offering a variety of retreats, days of prayer and recollection, and other For For more For more information, For more information, more information, information, please please please visit visit please uswww.morrishall.org visit at us visit www.morrishall.org at us www.morrishall.org at us www.morrishall.org at www.morrishall.org more or For more information, more For information, For more information, For more please information, For more please information, For more please visit information, For more visit please us information, For more visit at us information, please more visit www.morrishall.org at us information, please at us please information, visit www.morrishall.org at visit please www.morrishall.org us please visit at us please visit www.morrishall.org at us visit please www.morrishall.org at usvisit www.morrishall.org at usvisit www.morrishall.org at uswww.morrishall.org at uswww.morrishall.org at www.morrishall.org more information, please visit us at www.morrishall.org eer information, information, For more For information, please more visit information, us please at www.morrishall.org visit please us at visit www.morrishall.org us at www.morrishall.org St. Joseph’s Morris HallHall St. Mary’s St. Mary’s St. Mary’s St. Mary’s Grace Grace Garden Grace Garden Grace Garden Memory Memory Garden Memory Memory St. Joseph’s St. Joseph’s St. Joseph’s Hall Morris ontact contact oror contact or us contact at us mhadmissions@morrishall.org at us mhadmissions@morrishall.org at us mhadmissions@morrishall.org at mhadmissions@morrishall.org or (609) or or 895-1937 (609) or (609) 895-1937 895-1937 ntact us at mhadmissions@morrishall.org or (609) 895-1937 spirit-filled programs, as well providing a quiet Morris place Morris of peace toHall reflect ct ntact contact at us mhadmissions@morrishall.org at us contact or mhadmissions@morrishall.org at us contact or mhadmissions@morrishall.org at contact or mhadmissions@morrishall.org us contact or at us contact mhadmissions@morrishall.org or at us contact mhadmissions@morrishall.org or at usmhadmissions@morrishall.org contact at usmhadmissions@morrishall.org at usmhadmissions@morrishall.org at usmhadmissions@morrishall.org or at(609) or mhadmissions@morrishall.org (609) or (609) or 895-1937 (609) or 895-1937 (609) or 895-1937 (609) or (609) or 895-1937 (609) or 895-1937 (609) or (609) or 895-1937 (609) 895-1937 895-1937 srsor at contact mhadmissions@morrishall.org or us contact at mhadmissions@morrishall.org us at mhadmissions@morrishall.org or895-1937 (609) 895-1937 or895-1937 (609) or895-1937 895-1937 (609) 895-1937 J8939760-01

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on God’s call inNursing our lives, including the call to “Be holy,Meadows for I am holy,” Assisted Living Skilled Skilled Nursing Nursing Meadows Meadows Assisted Assisted Assisted Living Assisted Living Living Living CareCare Assisted Care Care Assisted Living Assisted Living Living Skilled Skilled Nursing Meadows which leads this year’s theme:

Campus shared with St. Lawrence The Rehabilitation Center Call to Holiness

Located Located Located inLocated Lawrenceville, in in Lawrenceville, in Lawrenceville, NJ NJ NJ NJ Lent is a perfect time to visit for one of these upcoming events: Located inLawrenceville, Lawrenceville, NJ Formore For more For more information, For more information, more information, information, please please please visit visit please usvisit at us visit www.morrishall.org at usFebruary www.morrishall.org at uswww.morrishall.org at22www.morrishall.org Women’s Retreats -24th & each weekend in March For information, please visit us at www.morrishall.org contact or contact or contact or uscontact at usmhadmissions@morrishall.org at usmhadmissions@morrishall.org at usmhadmissions@morrishall.org at mhadmissions@morrishall.org or (609) or (609) or (609) or 895-1937 (609) 895-1937 895-1937 Days of Prayer March 6th and April 8th or or contact us at mhadmissions@morrishall.org or895-1937 (609) 895-1937 Holy Week retreat April 17 -21 (open to all)

755 OCEAN AVE, LONG BRANCH, NJ 07740 732 -222 -2731 info@sanalfonsoretreats.org www.sanalfonsoretreats.org


S6

Health & Wellness

The Monitor • FEBRUARY 21, 2019

Goals for healthier life achieved with faith, friends Life; Positive Aging; Be Prepared: Final Wishes, and a host of others. The series, now in its fourth year, was developed and sponsored by Kathy Lo Bue, parish chairwoman for Faith in Our Future and managing director of Glen Eagle Advisors, Freehold. She is assisted by Loretta Kuhnert, co-chair with Lo Bue of the FIOF evangelization sub-committee. Kuhnert does all the research on topics and arranges for the speakers.

“Socialization is important to promote health benefits.” Lo Bue explained that her work as a financial adviser has put her in the unique position of being front and center to the challenges of people’s lives – caring for loved ones, dealing with chronic illness, losing a spouse and facing loneliness, particularly as a senior. It became apparent to her that giving people the information and resources

they needed to help meet those challenges and reduce their anxiety would lead to better health. The series begins with the Getting Healthy: Body, Mind, Spirit discussion, said Lo Bue, which, this year, was facilitated, in part, by Louis Monticchio, a parishioner in St. Gregory the Great Parish, Hamilton, and director of pastoral care at Visiting Nurse Association Health Group hospice. Monticchio’s presentation on spiritual health, said Lo Bue, establishes a foundation for the series that resonates with participants of all faiths, noting that “there is something bigger than us, and we need to let that into our lives.” In St. Mary of the Lakes Parish, Medford, the Light Weigh Catholic Bible Study DVD program being introduced will provide participants an opportunity to grow in faith and lose weight at the same time, focusing more on decision-making made in the light of faith. The program will be faciliFreepik.com photo

Continued from • S1

health benefits, and having strong connections with the outside world appears to reap many rewards,” stressed Marchese. According to a panel of experts appearing before a Senate Committee on Aging in 2017, isolation is the silent killer affecting some eight million seniors in the United States. The resulting loneliness increases the risk for depression, dementia and premature death. When helping people envision the next step in life, whether in light of a death or simply when moving toward achieving some goal, said Lo Bue, “It’s important to be able to discuss things freely, in an environtated by Liz Deluhery, who was successful ment where no one feels judged, in a place in her own weight-loss challenge when that feels safe.” participating in the program in 2011. Very often, that safe place is a faith Suzanne Fowler, creator of the nationally known-program, now celebrating its 20th community. Marchese agrees, noting that belongyear, explained, “Peace with food is a process ing to a faith community often impacts – but the process is not that long in the behavior and emotions. “People who belong scheme of things, when you are talking about to religious communities are less likely to a lifetime of freedom from overeating or any smoke or abuse alcohol or drugs, and are of the other numerous struggles people have more inclined to view physical activity as a used [the program] to overcome.” priority.” Forgiveness as a religious practice, alMoving Forward Together lowing for the release of anger and hatred, is Integral to the success of all these initiaalso an important factor. “Th ere’s evidence tives is the ability to build community and Kathy Galleher, Ph.D that forgiving others promotes mental and form relationships. People in m physical well-being,” Marchese stressed. “Socialization is important to promote self-care sk physical an manageme Kathy Galle from Color healthy mi Institute fo Kathy Galleher, Ph.D: And I Will Give You Rest: Self-care and Volunteer N

San Alfonso Retreat House San Alfonso Summ

SUMMER CLERGY INSTITUTE

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People in ministry are often so busy meeting the needs of those arou Himes, OFM self-care skills so that our ministry can Kenneth be fruitful and life-giving to ou th In these le • Stipend physical and$695 emotional health. Participants will be invited to examine Bishop Rob management, deepening self care, healthy boundary setting, and inc and civic v Kathy Galleher, x Ph.D REGISTRATION: 732-222-2731 140is a licensed psychologist who specializes in wo Kenneth from Colorado State University. She was a staff psychologist at the SR or EMAIL: info@sanalfonsoretreats.org healthy ministry by providing psychological education and Minor, supportthe fo role of the Institute for Religious Formation th The Insitute reserves our facility for yourFormation, exclusiveReligious use, including a Conference, Fr. Himes w Volunteer Network. She has also worked with numerous men’s and prayer garden, shrines, chapels, gazebo, boardwalk, beach, library, and editor

JULY 7th to 12 , 2019 INCLUDES: All meals Accommodations Conferences Daily Liturgy Personal Time

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giftshop and bookstore, in a serene and relaxing environment.

and Theol

Kenneth Himes, OFM, Ph.D: Catholic Social Teaching in Conte

Ciarán O’Callaghan, C Kathy Galleher, Ph.D: And I Will Give You Rest: Self-care and Renewal for Ministry In these lectures and discussions we will examine what Catholic soci People in ministry are often so busy meeting the needs of those around them that they fail to care for themselves. This workshop This is an opportu series Bishop Robert McElroy's (San Diego) callsigns for aand revitalized Catholic Po Kenneth Himes, Ph.D. Ciarán O’Callaghan, C.Ss.R., self-care skills so that OFM, our ministry can be fruitful and life-giving to ourselves as well as others. We Ph.D. will discuss sources oflecture depletion in seri physical and emotional health. Participants will be invited to examine the current challenges in self-care. And will be offered a series of practica and civic virtues as we consider how Catholic social teaching can sha Catholic Social Teaching in Proclaiming Christ in a Confused Pauline Let

management, deepening self care, healthy boundary setting, and increasing joy in everyday life. Contemporary American Life and Uncertain World: St. Paul’s Early of theological ethics and a for Kenneth R. Himes, OFM, is professor Kathy Galleher, Ph.D is a licensed psychologist who specializesPreaching in working with Catholic priests, religious and deacons. She has doctoral degree Ciarán O’Ca People in ministry are often so busy meetIn these lecturesState and discussions will was ex- a staff psychologist at the Minor, theInstitute Franciscans. Awarded the from Duke University in from Colorado University.weShe St. Luke for 8 years. In 2006, shePh.D. started “KMG Consultation”, whic Northern Ir ing the needs of those around them that amine what Catholic teaching has to This series of lectures will in focus primarily on Paul’sto healthy ministry by social providing psychological education and support forofthose in ministry. She has presented a number offormer nationalpresident and internat role the church American public life. He is a o they fail to care for themselves. This worksay to thefor political and economic challenges Letterthe to the Galatians,Conference which takes the ChristianReligious, the National Religious College, Du Institute Religious Formation, Religious Formation Conference, Leadership of Women Vocat Fr. Himes the editor Review shop is an opportunity to renew and deepen our self-care skills we face in the U.S. Following Robert movement outwas of the orbitfounding of Judaism associate into a radically new of New Theology reconciliati Volunteer Network. She hasupon alsoBishop worked with McElroy’s numerous men’s and women’s congregations. so that our ministry can be fruitful and life-giving to ourselves (San Diego) call for a revitalized Catholic Political Imagination, context. The lecture series will exploreHe the religious, and dozens ofself-unders and editor of three others. has alsosocial written essays for as well as others. We will discuss signs and sources of deple- Himes, the OFM, sessions will explore topics like economic inequality, polit- in political influences thatAmerican shaped Paul’s proclamation of Jesus Kenneth Ph.D: Catholic Social Teaching Contemporary Life and Theological Studies. tion in ministry and its impact on our physical and emotional ical polarization, and civic virtues as we consider how Catholic as God’s Messiah. Keeping in mind the wider context of the In these lectures and discussions we will examine what social teaching has to say to the political and economic challenges we face in t health...And will be offered a series of practical tools for healthy social teaching can shape our perceptions of what is going on Catholic Pauline Letters, the lecture series will pay particular attention to Bishop Robert McElroy's (San Diego) call for a revitalized Catholic Political Imagination, the sessions will explore topics like economic inequality stress management, deepening self care, healthy boundary and what our social agenda might be. issues that have current resonance in the Church. and civic virtues as we consider how Catholic social teaching can shape our perceptions of what is going on and what our social agenda might setting, and increasing joy in everyday life. This series of lectures will focus primarily on Paul’s Letter to the Gala Kenneth R. Himes, OFM, is professor of theological ethics and a former chairperson of the Theology Department at Boston College. He is a me lecture seriesand will explore religious, political Minor, the Franciscans. Awarded the Ph.D. from Duke University in religion public policy,the Fr. Himes has asocial specialand interest in theinfluences areas of Ca role of the church in American public life. He is a former president of the Catholicthe Theological of America. Pauline Letters, lecture Society series will pay particular attention to issu Fr. Himes was the founding associate editor of New Theology Review, and later served for five years as editor-in-chief of that journal. Fr. Himes and editor of three others. He has also written dozens of essays for a O’Callaghan variety of periodicals America, Commonweal, Concilium, Journ Ciarán CSsR isincluding a member of the Dublin Province of the Re and Theological Studies.

Ciarán O’Callaghan, C.Ss.R., Ph.D.: Proclaiming Christ in a Co

Northern Ireland. Ciarán earned his Licentiate in Sacred Scripture fro


Medicare and Medicaid Accepted!

Health & Wellness

FEBRUARY 21, 2019 • TrentonMonitor.com St. Francis Medical Center School of Nursing students Jason Ongradi and Stefany Jones with School of Radiologic Technology students Kiele Eichlin and Emily Reese.

S7

Medicare Medicareand and Medicare and Medicaid MedicaidAccepted! Accepted! Medicaid Accepted! Medicare and Medicare Medicare and and Medicaid Accepted! Medicaid Medicaid Accepted! Accepted!

Take a closer Take Takeaalook at closer look at Take a LIFE St. Francis! closer look at Take Takea a

Courtesy photo

Nursing school programs to host open house St. Francis Medical Center’s Schools of Nursing and Radiologic Technology will hold an open house March 7 from 4 to 6:30 p.m. in Crean Hall Auditorium at 601 Hamilton Ave., Trenton. At the open house prospective students will have an opportunity to tour the schools, meet faculty and staff and ask questions. Students of the School of Nursing earn a diploma in nursing and an associate’s degree in science upon graduation through a longstanding cooperative partnership with Mercer County Community College. The two-year program offers nursing students excellence in nursing and clinical education.

The School of Nursing also offers an LPN to RN Transition program. Students in the School of Radiologic Technology can become certified radiologic technologists with St. Francis’ two-year hospital-based program. Certified radiologic technologists are skilled in radiographic procedures, equipment operation, quality control, image production and evaluation, radiographic protection and patient care and education. No reservations for the open house • are required. Free parking is available at the medical center’s parking garage. For more • information, call 609-599-5190.

Additional support available to fight addictions Continued from • S5

recently got certified in trauma-informed treatment. For many program participants, it’s not uncommon to experience or witness violence in their neighborhoods. In fact, three program participants were seriously injured, and one killed, in separate shooting incidents in the past year. Mitchell also now is pursuing her certification from the Council on Compulsive Gambling of New Jersey to treat clients who struggle with gambling addiction. Some teenagers regard gambling as a way to make money faster than working a low-wage job, Mitchell said. “It’s really about coming up, financially,

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seniors to help them continue to live at home seniors toFrancis help them continue tosolution live at home as long as LIFE St. is aLIFE health care for Comprehensive and coordinated medical and nursing care as long aspossible. possible. LIFEprovides: provides: as long as possible. LIFE provides: LIFE LIFE St. Francis St. Francis is a health is a health care solution care solution for for home seniors to help them continue to live at • Comprehensive and coordinated medical and nursing care • Comprehensive and coordinated medical and nursing care Socialization and caregiver support seniors seniors to help help them them continue continue to live toat live home at care home as long asto possible. LIFE provides: Comprehensive and coordinated medical and nursing • •Socialization and caregiver support • Socialization and caregiver support • Home and personal care as••Home long as long as possible. asand possible. LIFE LIFE provides: provides: caregiver support •Socialization Comprehensive and coordinated medical and nursing care and personal care • Home and personal care • Physical, occupational and recreation •Physical, and personal care • •Comprehensive • Comprehensive and and coordinated medical medical andtherapy nursing and nursing care care •Home Socialization andcoordinated caregiver support occupational and recreation therapy

for them,” said Mitchell. “It’s also about taking risks, so it fulfills something, in that • sense, too.” Yet gambling can easily become an ad- • diction, Mitchell said. It can also lead to additional criminal trouble, because gambling typically is restricted to casinos and online betting in New Jersey. The National Council on Problem Gambling that 4 percent to 5 percent of all teens age 12 to 17 meet one or more criteria for having a gambling problem. New Choices welcomes new applicants. Participants often are referred by the court or child-welfare systems, but walk-ins and family referrals are welcome, too.

• Physical, occupational and recreation therapy • Socialization • Socialization and and support support • occupational and recreation therapy •Physical, Home and personal care • Transportation and caregiver from all medical appointments Transportation totocaregiver and all medical appointments • Transportation to andfrom from all medical appointments • •Home • Home and personal and personal care •Transportation Physical, occupational and recreation •Prescription tocare andand from all medicaltherapy appointments coverage more! • Prescription coverageand and more! more! Prescription coverage Transportation to and from allrecreation medical appointments • Physical, • Physical, occupational occupational and and recreation therapy therapy ••Prescription coverage and more! • Transportation • Transportation to andto from and all from medical all medical appointments appointments • Prescription coverage and more! • Prescription • Prescription coverage coverage and more! and more!

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S8

Health & Wellness

The Monitor • FEBRUARY 21, 2019

ADVANCED HEART CARE A ADVANCED HEARTBEATHEART AWAYCARE A HEARTBEAT AWAY

YouRHEART HEART iS iMpoRTANT. YouR iMpoRTANT. FiNDiNgTHE THE RigHT RigHT CARDiAC TEAM. SoSo iS iS FiNDiNg CARDiAC TEAM. You can be confident that your heart is in the best of hands at St. Francis Medical

You can be confident that your heart is in the best of hands at St. Francis Medical Center. Using leading-edge diagnostics and technology, St. Francis offers patients Center. leading-edge diagnostics technology, St. Francis offers patients theUsing highest level of cardiovascular care and including: the highest level of cardiovascular care including: • Mercer County’s only open-heart surgery center • Mercer County’s only open-heart surgery • Mercer County’s only electrophysiology labcenter

• OneCounty’s of the region’s experienced cardiothoracic surgery teams • Mercer only most electrophysiology lab • Aofhybrid room that integrates a cardiaccardiothoracic catheterization lab with an • One the region’s most experienced surgery teams operating theater • A hybrid room that integrates a cardiac catheterization lab with an • A nationally-certified vascular lab operating theater

Advanced cardiovascular carelab that’s convenient and easily accessible. • A nationally-certified vascular That’s St. Francis Medical Center.

Advanced cardiovascular care that’s convenient and easily accessible.

That’s St. Francis Medical Center.

St. Francis Medical Center • 601 Hamilton Avenue, Trenton, NJ

855-599-SFMC | StFrancisMedical.org St. Francis Medical Center • 601 Hamilton Avenue, Trenton, NJ

855-599-SFMC | StFrancisMedical.org

Profile for Diocese of Trenton

2019 Health and Wellness Supplement  

The Monitor brings you its special issue focusing on how faith, friendship, and forgiveness are good for your soul.

2019 Health and Wellness Supplement  

The Monitor brings you its special issue focusing on how faith, friendship, and forgiveness are good for your soul.