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State Diocese OF THE

2018

DIOCESE of TRENTON FEBRUARY 2018


State of the Diocese 2018 I

frequently visit our Catholic schools throughout the Diocese. On one of those occasions, a student assigned to accompany and lead me around the school asked: “What does a bishop do?” I thought of the words of the psalmist: “Out of the mouth of children, you have formed strength (Psalm 8:2).” It is a good question and an important one in any diocese entrusted to its bishop’s care. The answer is as ancient as the Apostles whose A message from “Successors” the Church’s bishops are. A diocesan bishBishop David M. O’Connell, C.M. op’s primary “job” is to share and carry on the Lord Jesus Christ’s mission in and for the Church: “to teach; to govern; to sanctify” the diocese assigned to him by the pope. The ways a bishop fulfills that mission are always “works in progress” as they attempt to meet the evolving needs of the Church in his diocese. For my purposes in developing this State of the Diocese Report 2018, I will use the three-fold mission of Christ, the Church and the bishop/diocese as my guide.

TO TEACH Personally, as the Bishop of Trenton, I try to fulfill this element of mission --- teaching and handing on the Catholic faith --- by preaching in the Cathedral and Co-Cathedral and in the parishes of the Diocese during pastoral visits, Confirmations and other important diocesan/parish occasions. It is important for the Bishop to speak and the people of God to hear him. Similarly, with my extensive background in Catholic education, I attempt “to teach” through the things I write and publish in The Monitor and across our diocesan media, and through my presentations on Domestic Church Radio each month. The mission to teach the Catholic faith, however, is not restricted or limited to the bishop although he is the “Chief Teacher.” Here in the Diocese of Trenton’s 106 parishes, pastors, priests, and deacons primarily

The State of the Diocese 2018 was produced by The Monitor for the Diocese of Trenton’s Office of Communications and Media. To order extra copies of this publication (cost of $5 each to cover printing and postage), call (609) 4037131, or send your request by email to (dotcomm@ dioceseoftrenton.org). Visit dioceseoftrenton.org/state-of-the-diocese for a digital edition of this publication, as well as additional articles and reports. Direct all other inquiries to Rayanne Bennett, Executive Director of Communications and Media, at (609) 403-7188; rbenne@dioceseoftrenton.org

through their homilies, as well as other parish lay ministers, religious, and Catholic educators all work to help fulfill that mission. We cannot forget or ignore the role of parents either, the “first teachers of the faith,” who share this mission because of their own Baptism and their decision to have their children Baptized and later Confirmed. Our Catholic schools and religious education programs are one primary means, after the home, for the transmission of faith. Sometimes, they are the first or only means and, so, they deserve and need our prayerful encouragement and financial support. In 2012, I commissioned a large, diocesan-wide group of Catholic educators, parents and others with a vested interest in Catholic education to work with a nationally recognized expert in Catholic schools to develop a “Catholic Schools Sustainability Plan” for the Diocese with criteria for their sustainability and other recommendations that I accepted. In 2017, after five years, I commissioned another task force to review and update that study in order to ensure that its focus and content remain current.

There are times, however, when a long history of downward trends cannot be reversed, despite the best of efforts. In December, after years of careful analysis, steadily declining enrollment and $13.8 million in diocesan subsidies, I announced that the Diocese could no longer sustain and subsidize Holy Cross Academy in Delran as a diocesan high school. Rather than closing the school outright in June 2018, I accepted the proposal of a group of dedicated alumni and benefactors to pursue “independent Catholic status” for Holy Cross Academy following the model of Mater Dei Prep High School in Middletown in 2015. I pray that they can attract the enrollment and revenues necessary to make the transition and stay open. Our Catholic schools are enriched by competent and devoted lay administrators, faculty and staffs, supportive priests and parish communities and committed parents. All are agreed that our Catholic schools are effective

“It is important for the Bishop to speak and the people of God to hear him.” at teaching and handing on the faith. The issues they face, however, are declining enrollments and, therefore, shrinking financial resources to support their Catholic educational mission. The reality of shifting demographics, escalating costs, competition from tax-supported public schools, and a growing secularization in society at large are added challenges that our Catholic schools confront in our Diocese and in other dioceses all over the country. I believe we are doing everything possible to sustain our Catholic schools,

Inside the State of the Diocese 2018: FAITH IN OUR FUTURE

FAITH TO MOVE MOUNTAINS

Being Church: Cohorts develop new and different ways to grow, thrive...... starts on P5 All about focus and follow-through.... starts on P8 Centers for Ministry: Forward thinking bridges the cultural divide.............. starts on P10

Endowment campaign raises over $71 million for future needs ..................... starts on P30

ANNUAL CATHOLIC APPEAL

Numbers; Connect with the DOT on digital/ social media; Support groups for those in need.

ACA highlights work done in love ...... starts on P20

2 • State of the Diocese • February 2018

ANNUAL REPORT Q & A with Diocese’s CFO ......................... P23 Financial Statements .................... start on P24

ALSO INSIDE … Save the Date; Diocese by the


including providing tuition assistance and financial support to the extent the Diocese is able. The job is not easy. Neither are the decisions that sometimes I must make. But our diocesan resources are not unlimited and other needs compete for them as well. Catholic education, however, is not only about Catholic schools. Most of our parishes run good religious catechetical programs for those children who cannot or do not attend Catholic schools for whatever reason. Their numbers far exceed those enrolled in Catholic schools. Parishes and their religious education teachers must be affirmed and supported in this monumental effort. Understanding and living the Catholic faith depend upon the strength of religious catechetical formation in the Diocese up to and beyond Confirmation. The involvement and encouragement of parents is without equal in this effort. Religious catechetical instruction is not simply offered for the future of the Church: it is for the present.

TO GOVERN Here, the bishop of a diocese can be compared to the governor of a state or, perhaps better, to a CEO of a large corporation, although one that is faith-based and spiritual in nature. I know people do not like that comparison but I sit “in the Chair” and regularly experience it that way. The bishop guides the diocese in an administrative way and the goal of his administration is evangelization. He is responsible for diocesan personnel (training and assigning clergy, supporting retirements and health needs, motivating lay ministers and staff); facilities; overseeing diocesan finances and fundraising; promoting good stewardship of diocesan resources; administering parishes and Catholic organizations and agencies; providing Catholic pastoral and social services, and fostering the spiritual welfare of the Diocese he serves. That list is extensive but not exhaustive. My days are full but thank God, I do not exercise these responsibilities to govern alone! The effective governance and administration of all aspects of diocesan life and ministry bear many,

many fingerprints of incredibly dedicated personnel – clergy and lay faithful alike – who give of themselves generously and without reservation to the service of the Church in the Diocese of Trenton. On January 25, 2017, I announced the conclusion of a three year, diocesan-wide initiative called Faith in Our Future. Beginning with consultations at the parish level, the 107 parishes in the four counties of the Diocese of Trenton were divided into “Cohorts” or groupings of neighboring parishes – primarily composed of members of the lay faithful – in each county or “Vicariate” which, in turn, studied the reports of these parishes and presented them to a diocesan commission. The commission, in turn, evaluated these reports and formulated recommendations to me. At that point, I analyzed and prayed about these recommendations with diocesan officials, pastors and others in the Diocese in order to develop a comprehensive plan to support, quite literally, the Diocese’s Faith in Our Future. I am happy to report that I accepted the overwhelming majority of these recommendations. The work of implementation has now begun in the Diocese and will continue. A full report on these efforts begins on page 5. To support this renewed “vision” for the Diocese of Trenton, I simultaneously initiated a diocesan fundraising campaign --- the first of its kind since 1992 --- to build an endowment for future ministry in service to the Diocese and all its works. Entitled Faith to Move Mountains, this campaign relied extensively on the work of pastors and parishes and the amazing, characteristic generosity of the people of the Diocese of Trenton. A goal was set --- $75 million --- and by December 2017, nearly $72 million was raised. A formula was established to return a percentage of the funds generated directly to the parishes. All but five parishes in the Diocese of Trenton actively participated in the Faith to Move Mountains initiative. It is my hope and prayer that the pledges made to the Diocese will be honored in the next three to five years. As Bishop, my gratitude knows

Bishop O’Connell preaches his homily before a throng of some 2,000 faithful who journeyed on the diocesan pilgrimage to the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception, Washington, in November 2017. Ken Falls photo

no bounds. For more on the Faith to Move Mountains campaign, turn to page 30 in this booklet. Annual diocesan fundraising efforts will now focus on the Annual Catholic Appeal --- formerly called The Bishop’s Appeal --- first established in 1990. In 2017, the Annual Catholic Appeal raised $5.8 million, slightly behind previous years, no doubt because of the simultaneous Faith to Move Mountains campaign. I was advised by the expert fundraising counsel we enlisted not to discontinue the Annual Catholic Appeal since experience in other dioceses demonstrated that once it was interrupted, it would be very hard to reintroduce and re-engage. Whereas the Faith to Move Mountains campaign secures needed funding for the financial health of the Diocese in the future, the Annual Catholic Appeal supports diocesan operations year by year. Currently, the Diocese of Trenton shows an operating deficit of over $3 million. It is my hope that the endowment campaign and the Annual Appeal will help reduce that debt along with positive gains in Diocesan investments. The financial management of the Diocese received a “clean audit” from the auditing firm with “no material conditions” reported. Please turn to page 23 in this booklet for a breakdown of our financial status and a copy of our audit report. Continued on • 4

Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M., center, and Msgr. Thomas J. Mullelly, diocesan episcopal vicar for clergy and consecrated life, far left, stand with the four men who were ordained priests June 3 in St. Mary of the Assumption Cathedral, Trenton. From left, they are Father Michael Kennedy, Father Michael A. Gentile  Jr., Father Thomas J. Barry Jr. and Father Roy Aris B. Ballacillo.  Craig Pittelli photo

February 2018 • State

of the Diocese • 3


Continued from • 3 This past July, the Diocese welcomed to the Chancery staff a new Chief Financial Officer, Mr. Kevin Cimei, and promoted a new Chief Administrative Officer from its ranks, Mr. Joseph Bianchi. Mrs. Terry Ginther, Executive Director of Pastoral Life and Mission, was promoted to become Chancellor of the Diocese and Ms. Brenda Rascher was appointed Executive Director of Diocesan Catholic Social Services. From my vantage point, they and their staffs, along with the rest of our curia, serve the Diocese effectively. New pastors and parish priests assumed their parish responsibilities or other assignments in July and four priests began their retirements. On May 20, four men were ordained transitional deacons for the Diocese, moving on to their final year in the seminary and, on June 3, four men were ordained to the priesthood. Nineteen other men began or continued seminary studies at St. Charles Seminary, Philadelphia; Mount St. Mary Seminary, Emmitsburg, Maryland, and St. Mary Seminary, Baltimore. One of our priests continues to serve on the seminary faculty at Seton Hall University, West Orange. Another priest was appointed to the Pontifical Ecclesiastical Academy for diplomatic service in Rome, and a third priest began graduate studies in Canon Law in Rome’s Gregorian University. A fourth priest of our Diocese continues to serve the Holy See at the Vatican. Closer to home, one priest serves as a U.S. Navy chaplain at Annapolis, Maryland. At this time, there are just over 200 fulltime, active diocesan, religious order and adjunct priests; 197 deacons, and over 260 women and men religious serving in the Diocese of Trenton. As we all know, the Catholic Church in

our country continues to address the devastating toll of the sexual abuse of minors by clergy and Church personnel. The Diocese of Trenton, sadly, was not spared its own part in that story over the years, but we have made an earnest and dedicated effort to respond responsibly and appropriately, and to insure that these abuses never happen again. As a Bishop, I feel deep grief and grave sadness for the victims. The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops has required that all bishops and dioceses implement the most stringent measures to protect the young under our pastoral care. To that end, the USCCB has mandated an audit in every diocese to evaluate the effectiveness of these measures. This past year, once again, the results of that audit have indicated that the Diocese of Trenton is in full compliance with the audit’s provisions. That is not a source of pride but, rather, a reflection of our determination that we must, and will, remain absolutely vigilant in protecting the young. As Diocesan Bishop, I serve as ex officio president of Catholic Charities, the Mount Carmel Guild and Mercer CYO. Effective Executive Directors and Boards of Directors of each of these Diocesan organizations and agencies make these responsibilities a positive experience not to mention the amazing contributions they make to the lives of people served. In addition, several priests and deacons joined by many of the Catholic lay faithful provide service in prisons, hospitals and high school and college campus ministries throughout the Diocese’s four counties. If the Diocese of Trenton could be compared to a “machine,” I would say it runs pretty well. The evidence can easily be found in the pages of The Monitor and throughout our diocesan digital and social media sites. For a guide on diocesan media, turn to page 33 in this booklet.

TO SANCTIFY

A group of Red Bank Catholic High School graduating seniors flank Bishop O’Connell following the Baccalaureate Mass he celebrated last year. In his State of the Diocese message, the Bishop reflected on the mission of Catholic schools as being one of the primary means for transmitting the faith to young people. The Bishop also talked about the progress made by the Catholic Schools Sustainability Plan that was established in 2012. Craig Pittelli photo

Whatever else happens in a Diocese, it matters little unless it’s all about Jesus Christ, all about the Church he established, all about the People of God and all about evangelization and the call to holiness. As Bishop, I am personally called to lead efforts here to sanctify the people of the Diocese of Trenton, not only through Masses I celebrate or sacraments I administer --- as critically important as they are --- but also by my own personal witness and commitment, where I place my energies and the motivation and inspiration I offer to those with whom I share my mission and ministry. “To sanctify” means that I incorporate the call to holiness --- my own and those who work with me --- in the responsibilities “to teach” and “to govern.” We need God’s help. I think of St. Paul’s Letter to the Romans: But how can they call on him in whom they have not believed? And how can they believe in him of whom they have not heard?

4 • State of the Diocese • February 2018

And how can they hear without someone to preach? And how can people preach unless they are sent (Romans 10:14)? Throughout this past year, the Diocese of Trenton has offered many “opportunities” to grow in holiness and sanctity. In addition to the regular, daily and weekly schedules for Masses, sacraments and confessions of the 106 parishes of the Diocese in multiple languages; special parish missions and celebrations are regularly offered; adult formation classes and spiritual talks are presented; special diocesan liturgies are celebrated especially in the Cathedral and the newly established Co-Cathedral, retreats for people of all ages are offered in our several retreat houses and in parishes and schools; a Diocesan Pilgrimage to the National Shrine in Washington, DC was held along with participation in the Annual March for Life as well as many other pilgrimages to holy places sponsored by parishes; Advent and Lenten penance services offer special times for Confession; extraordinary ministers bring Communion to the sick and homebound and parish priests and chaplains visit the sick; pastoral care and training sessions are regularly provided; people receive spiritual direction from priests, deacons and lay people; diocesan publications present articles focused on personal and communal spiritual growth; diocesan spiritual organizations like the Legion of Mary, parish or regional altar and Rosary societies, Cursillo, Holy Innocents Society, parish-based Knights of Columbus and many similar Catholic groups reach out to their members; Catholic Men for Jesus Christ, Charismatic Renewal, Women of Zion, Pro-life activities, Rachel’s Vineyard, Diocesan Youth Conference, the Diocesan Departments of Catechesis, and Evangelization and Family Life sponsor annual conferences and gatherings; Catholic service agencies and parishes link their work to the Gospel throughout the Diocese; individual parishes and other groups visit the elderly; parishes sponsor prayer groups and the list goes on and on. There is no lack of “opportunities” for spiritual growth in the Diocese of Trenton. The real evidence for such growth, however, comes down to those who participate or take advantage of these opportunities and, ultimately, to the personal spiritual life and personal prayer of the clergy, religious and faithful of the Diocese, young, old and in between. The “universal call to holiness” proclaimed by the Second Vatican Council, echoes throughout the Diocese of Trenton and acknowledges no exceptions. The State of the Diocese is as strong and healthy as those who respond positively to that call in our families, parishes, organizations and personal lives. “In the end, three things last: faith, hope and love. And the greatest of these is love (1 Corinthians 13: 13).” That is the foundation and goal of our mission from the Lord Jesus Christ: to teach, to govern and to sanctify. May God bless the Diocese of Trenton.


Being Church Cohorts move forward with faith, hope and collaboration By Mary Morrell, Correspondent

G

reat things are happening in the Diocese of Trenton, exciting things, things that are “building on the benefit of coming together and being Church,” said Deacon John Wedemeyer.

Deacon Wedemeyer serves as one of five project managers for the 25 Cohorts created through the Faith In Our Future initiative, a pastoral planning process that began to take shape mid-2015 that would allow the Diocese to respond in a positive, life-giving way to the sobering realities facing the Church.

“I believe it is a case of ‘doing more WITH less.’” The process was designed to lead each parish in an assessment of its own strengths and challenges, and explore ways that neighboring parishes could work together for the benefit of parish members and the mission of the Church in general. It has been, in effect, what Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M., describes as “a ‘grass roots’ team effort involving the laity as well as the clergy throughout the Diocese.” In his “Pastoral letter on our future together,” Bishop O’Connell reflected on the changing dynamics of the Church, with fewer

vocations, dwindling numbers of priests and active Catholics, as well as financial challenges, saying, “Some within the Church have concluded that Catholics should simply accept the ‘fact’ that we are destined to become less, to become a smaller Church. While statistics and other data might suggest such a view, the Church’s duty to undertake a ‘new evangelization’ argues against it. I believe that it is not so much a case of growing smaller or ‘becoming less’ as a Church, a Diocese or a parish; I believe it is a case of ‘doing more WITH less.” The challenge before us all is to figure out ‘how.’” Spearheading the FIOF initiative has been Msgr. Leonard F. Troiano, episcopal vicar for diocesan planning, and Terry Ginther, diocesan chancellor and executive director of Pastoral Life and Mission. Ginther noted that it is through cooperation, connection and coordination that parishes begin crossing the line into collaboration, working on ministry together and doing something new. “We must be willing to be change agents,” she said, not just in times of agreement and accomplishment, but also “through complaints and uncertainly, because we see the value of the process.” The No. 1 principle and priority of the process is evangelization, “the allimportant and all-encompassing effort to bring the Gospel prayerfully and effectively to the parishes and people of the Diocese for our future,” wrote Bishop O’Connell, stressing that stewardship, accountability and service are undertaken for the sake of evangelization.

The Process FIOF was formally launched at the start Terry Ginther, left, diocesan executive director of Pastoral Life and Mission, speaks with members of the Implementation Commission during a small group discussion during the Faith in Our Future working retreat June 21 in Lawrenceville.

of Advent, 2015. As part of that process, all 107 parishes were identified as belonging to one of 25 Cohorts of neighboring parishes. Following 18 months of consultation and conversation in town hall style meetings, in Cohort deliberations and in the work of the Diocesan Planning Commission, Bishop O’Connell chose Jan. 25, 2017, the Feast of the Conversion of St. Paul, to announce his decisions in response to recommendations made as part of the FIOF pastoral planning process. The Bishop’s decisions called for a range of new models for selected locations, including merger, linkage, the suspension of operations in a few churches and the designation of Centers for Cultural Ministry. For the past year, the FIOF process has been in its implementation stage, which began with the formation of parish-based implementation teams selected by the pastor. The teams, consisting of four lay, non-staff parishioners and the pastor, took part in workshops and then worked together from February through May to create their Year 1 Implementation Plan for the Cohort. While implementation teams function and consult at times at the parish-level, the bulk

Joe Moore photo

February 2018 • State

Continued on • 6

of the Diocese • 5


Implementation process develops new relationships Continued from • 5 of their efforts are spent working as Cohorts – the groups of two to six neighboring parishes upon which the FIOF recommendations and decisions are based. Msgr. Troiano explained that the Cohorts have been charged with developing a year-over-year action plan that will ensure that the Bishop’s decisions for those parishes are fulfilled.

veloping relationships, getting to know each other,” where they may not have previously because they are from different parishes. Toman underscored that relationship building is also a process, one that will, hopefully, include more people in the pews as FIOF moves forward.

Meeting the Challenges As the implementation process continues, Ginther offered an important reminder to the success of the initiative, noting that FIOF is about “a sense of possibility, of agency and of confidence. Any planning process has to be done in both a spirit of realism and a spirit of believing that, in Christ, all things are possible.” That spirit is evident in many of the lay members of the implementation teams, relayed John Toman, project manager for Cohorts 12, 13, 14, 15 and 23. “Lay people are very engaged in the process and really have a love for the Church and their parishes. A lot of good will is coming out of these teams,” said Toman. He added, “Cohort team members are de-

“Communication is all important.”

Deacon Wedemeyer, project manager for Cohorts 17, 18, 19, 25, sees a similar trend happening. “For the most part, the laity have embraced this process and the need to move forward,” he said, adding that “the biggest things to come out of this process so far have been the sense of collaboration [and]of recognizing that there is a bigger Church out there.”

The wider Church includes many unique parishes, offered Deacon Wedemeyer. “There are different flavors, different focuses. Some are social justice oriented; some have a strong evangelization outreach. We can’t cookie cutter this. We have to be open, listening, flexible with parishes coming together as a Cohort. I think we are all learning a lot as we go forward with this process,” he said.

Creative Communication Many of those facilitating the FIOF process agree that among the many positive things happening in collaboration is an embracing by the parishes of their identity as a Cohort, which has resulted in some creative branding, often as part of a broader communication initiative. “Communication is all important,” said Father Harry Cullen, pastor, St. CatharineSt. Margaret Parish, Spring Lake. “If information is not disseminated to the people in the pews, the process will go nowhere,” he said, stressing that dissemination can take place by talking about the process at church, in homilies, announcements and in bulletins. “The Continued on • 12

Reshaping the Diocese: Fewer but stronger parishes for the future

W

hen Faith in Our Future launched in 2015, 107 parishes began the process of collaboration, with some following models of linkage, merger or designation as Centers for Ministry. Presently, there are 106 parishes. The mergers in July 2018 will create seven new parish communities from 14 parishes, bringing the total number of parishes to 99. The 2020 merger in Lakewood (see list) will bring the number down to 98. Further mergers are possible. As the process unfolds, there may be additional recommendations for the Bishop’s consideration brought forward. These will be reviewed by the Diocesan Implementation Commission and Bishop O’Connell, who will decide when and if to act on these future changes.

Designated centers for Hispanic Ministry effective July 1, 2018 (in addition to those already designated)

Mergers effective July 1, 2018:

n St. Vincent de Paul, Yardville, and St. John the Baptist, Allentown n St. Dorothea, Eatontown, and Precious Blood, Monmouth Beach n St. Mary of the Lake, Lakewood, and St. Anthony Claret, Lakewood

n St. Ann, Browns Mills n St. Mary, Barnegat, at the St. Mary of the Pines Church, Manahawkin

Parishes under review this year (recommendations will be made to the Bishop in June): n Potential linkage for St. Ann, Keansburg, and St. Catherine (Laboure), Middletown n Epiphany, Brick

Linkages expected July 2019

n Sacred Heart, Trenton, and Blessed Sacrament-Our Lady of the Divine Shepherd, Trenton n St. Mary, Bordentown, and St. Francis & St. Clare, Florence Township n Assumption, New Egypt, and St. Andrew, Jobstown n St. Joseph, Keyport, and Jesus the Lord, Keyport n St. Jerome, West Long Branch, and St. Mary, Deal n Ascension, Bradley Beach, and St. Elizabeth, Avon n Our Lady of Perpetual Help, Seaside Heights, and St. Catharine of Siena, Seaside Park

Parishes to be reviewed in 2019:

Linkages effective July 1, 2018:

Mergers expected July 2020

n Sacred Heart, Bay Head, and St. Pio of Pietrelcina, Lavallette

n St. Mary of the Lake, Lakewood, and St. Anthony Claret, Lakewood

6 • State of the Diocese • February 2018

n Potential linkage for Holy Family, Union Beach, with new parish in Keyport n St. Monica, Jackson n St. Francis of Assisi, Brant Beach


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For more information, call:

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Keep your eyes on the ball and follow through

H

ave you ever taken a golf lesson? There are usually two things you hear from the instructor: “keep your eyes on the ball” and “follow through.” When you forget to do either, you either miss the ball entirely or it fails to go where you intended. My golf escapades were loads of fun, but I never really became proficient. I was a bit better at bowling and archery. But in all of these sports, I learned that aim and execution are required. You have to look at your target and orient your whole body in that direction. It seems to me that in any of these endeavors, there is a lesson for us about the importance of focus and follow-through. Our Diocese is in the middle of implementing Cohort plans in our Faith in Our Future initiative. Remembering our goals and why they are important gives us focus. Focus keeps us pointed in the same direction, gives us motivation to overcome obstacles and helps us to avoid distraction. The follow-through comes when we are able to work together and hold ourselves accountable to these shared goals. Both are necessary – keen focus and consistent follow-through – in order to respond in faith to the challenges and opportunities of our time. There are five goals for the Faith in Our Future initiative. These goals, each from a different angle, are designed to increase our capacity for evangelization. We are all called to be mindful of them as we participate in and support the important and sometimes difficult work of serving our mission – to proclaim and advance the Kingdom of God here

By Terry A. Ginther Diocesan Chancellor and Executive Director of Pastoral Life and Mission

“ ... There is a lesson for us about the importance of focus and followthrough.” in the Diocese of Trenton.

Strong Parishes

Goal 1: Strengthen and enliven the parishes of the Diocese as well as diocesan-sponsored organizations and ministries. Every parish can improve. Even the “best” engage only a fraction of their parishioners in any substantial way. Some parishes struggle more than others. They don’t have the

leadership they need or enough interested parishioners to carry out ministry. They can’t pay their bills. Some need more space; others have too much to maintain. Some cannot seem to manifest the “joy of the Gospel” and enthusiasm of which Pope Francis speaks. This disparity in vitality results in Catholic parishioners moving from parish to parish until they feel their spiritual needs are met. Sometimes they wind up in other Christian churches or they walk away entirely. Some of our parishes have more funerals than baptisms. In 2017, 3,000 fewer people are participating in Masses on an ordinary weekend than were there just last year – 15,000 fewer people over 5 years. Each parish has to have its own initiatives to improve its circumstances and the effectiveness of its ministry, but it must also see itself in relation to its neighbor parishes. Cohort parishes can partner on things that strengthen all parishes. Cohort parishes can and should help one another to thrive.

Leadership

Goal 2: Explore new models of leadership in parishes and ministries in institutional settings in order to address the challenges presented by the anticipated retirement of a large number of clergy and religious during the next ten years. Currently, there are 207 priests (diocesan, religious order and adjunct priests from other dioceses) serving the Diocese of Trenton; this is fewer than when Faith in Our Future began. Even with the assistance of retired priests, our parishioners are beginning to notice limitations on the availability of priests to serve among their communities. The number of active diocesan priests who are eligible to retire continues to grow each year. Of the approximately 153 diocesan priests in assignments within the Diocese, 20 are older than 70 and can retire any time before they turn 75. Fifteen of these are pastors. Nine more priests Continued on • 34

8 • State of the Diocese • February 2018

In October, Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M., was principal celebrant of a Mass for seminarians who attend St. Charles Borromeo Seminary, Wynnewood, Pa. Here Bishop O’Connell is pictured with Auxiliary Bishop Timothy Senior of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and seminary rector, and those men from the Trenton Diocese who are preparing for the priesthood. The number of seminarians entering the priesthood for the Diocese will soon not offset the number of priests who are retiring. Craig Pittelli photo


Catholic Schools

HAVE it ALL!

FA I T H • A C A D E M I C E X C E L L E N C E • AT H L E T I C S • S E R V I C E • C O M M U N I T Y Applications are now being accepted for the Catholic schools in the Diocese of Trenton. BURLINGTON COUNTY

Our Lady of Good Counsel • Moorestown Our Lady of Perpetual Help • Maple Shade Pope John Paul II Regional School • Willingboro Sacred Heart • Mount Holly St. Charles Borromeo • Cinnaminson St. Joan of Arc • Marlton

St. Mary of the Lakes • Medford St. Paul • Burlington

MERCER COUNTY Notre Dame High School • Lawrenceville Our Lady of Sorrows • Mercerville St. Ann • Lawrenceville St. Gregory the Great Academy • Hamilton Square

St. Paul • Princeton St. Raphael • Hamilton Trenton Catholic Academy • Hamilton

MONMOUTH COUNTY

Holy Cross • Rumson Holy Innocents • Neptune Our Lady of Mt. Carmel • Asbury Park Red Bank Catholic High School • Red Bank

St. Benedict • Holmdel St. Catharine • Spring Lake St. James • Red Bank St. Jerome • West Long Branch St. John Vianney High School • Holmdel St. Leo the Great • Lincroft St. Mary • New Monmouth St. Rose • Belmar St. Rose High School • Belmar

St. Rose of Lima • Freehold St. Veronica • Howell

OCEAN COUNTY

All Saints Regional • Manahawkin Donovan Catholic High School • Toms River St. Aloysius • Jackson St. Dominic • Brick St. Joseph • Toms River St. Peter • Pt. Pleasant Beach

Space availability will vary by grade for each school.

TAKE THE STEP that will make a powerful difference in your child’s future! REACH OUT to the Catholic school near you to learn more.

To learn more about your local Catholic school… GO TO dioceseoftrenton.org/catholicschools OR CatholicSchoolsHaveItAll.org February 2018 • State

of the Diocese • 9


Centers for Ministry Forward thinking bridges the cultural divide Story by Matthew Greeley, Associate Director of Communications

A

s an integral part of the Faith in Our Future process, 19 parishes have been designated by Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M., to serve as Centers for Ministry throughout the four counties of the Diocese. As centers, the parishes intentionally develop and integrate ministries that serve the specific cultural community that is part of their parish identity, and while the designation is an added responsibility, being named as a Center for Ministry is a notable distinction. “These designated parishes lead the way for the Diocese at large,” shared Terry Ginther, diocesan chancellor and executive director of Pastoral Life and Mission. These centers, these parishes, in their experience and growth together will teach us as a Diocese what it means to be a multicultural Church.” As stated in the working definitions of Faith in Our Future, for a parish to minister to a particular cultural ministry, the parish provides both ministerial outreach and liturgical celebrations for the named ethnic group or language group. The Diocese of Trenton has named 18 centers of Hispanic ministry, two centers of Portuguese and Brazilian ministry, and two centers of Haitian ministry. The “centers” are not meant to be seen as given locations. They are an extension of parish life, which is also so much more than a church building or parish facility. As a Center This mother and child were among the more than 1,000 of the Diocese’s faithful to take part in the second annual “Las Antorchas Guadalupanas”  pilgrimage and Mass, celebrated in December 2017 by Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M., in St. Mary of the Assumption Cathedral, Trenton. The Cathedral has been designated as a Center for Hispanic Ministry. Craig Pittelli photo

“We are just trying to open doors.”

for Ministry, the life of the parish is called to embrace and integrate the cultural communities of the area. The parishes are called to invest in the care of the cultural community to seek to consciously develop and form future leaders of the Catholic Church in the Diocese. Ginther explains that the centers are “about openness to new possibilities. They are a rejection of rigidity.”

Walking Together Some pastors have explained that the recognition as centers has not always been easy for the Anglo-Catholic community. Some parishioners have expressed fear that doing more with the Spanish-speaking community means doing less with the English-speaking community. “People have said to me, ‘Now we will have everything in Spanish,’ implying that English ministries will be pushed out,” said Father Edwin Mathias, pastor of St. Ann Parish, Browns Mills. He highlighted the importance of clear communication about the goals of these centers for

10 • State of the Diocese • February 2018

Some 150 parish-level Hispanic ministry leaders gather Sept. 30, 2017, for a V Encuentro retreat and Mass celebrated in Holy Trinity Church, part of Christ the King Parish, Long Branch, which has been designated as a Center for Hispanic and Portuguese Ministry. Kyle Plumstead photo

ministry, citing that walking with one given community does not mean leaving the other behind. As if in response to this fear, Father Carlos Aguirre, parochial vicar in St. Joseph Parish, Toms River, expressed what the creation of their Hispanic ministry has meant to him. A native of Colombia, Father Aguirre said he used to see the Anglo-Catholic community as closed off. “I used to judge them, but I hadn’t tried to get to know them. When you explain the realities of the immigrant community, that Hispanics have lived a very different reality, the response of the English speakers is so open and generous. We are now sharing our stories.” Father Aguirre also offered the example of the listening session that parish representatives had with Bishop O’Connell on Sept. 27, 2017, in St. Anthony Claret Parish, Lakewood. He said that it meant, and continues to mean, so much to the communities as a whole to share stories with Bishop and be heard.

Open Doors, Open Hearts Jesus the Good Shepherd Parish, Riverside, is “going fishing,” said Hispanic religious education secretary Eneida Perez. “We are trying new things to simply meet people and be inviting.” Perez highlighted that a recently offered Zumba class has served to bring back people who had fallen away from the Catholic faith. “We are just trying to open doors. People who never came to Mass are now coming Continued on • 32


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of the Diocese • 11


Technology will be essential in FIOF implementation Continued from • 6 idea is still new to many, and it will take a long time for it to become part of the vocabulary of everyone.” Part of many Cohort communication plans includes making the most of technology and social media. “We are well on our way to trying to get the parishes working together in faith and fellowship,” said project manager Deacon Patrick Stokely of Cohorts 5, 6, and 9, who shared an eCommunity page developed by St. Gregory the Great Parish, Hamilton Square, and linked it to the website for Cohort 6 information and updates. A noticeable feature of that page is a logo built around a flame and the words, “Lumen Christi” (www. stgregorythegreatchurch.org/ cohort). The vision statement for Cohort 6 explains the logo: “We are visibly ‘On Fire!’ for Christ in all we do. We worship with a profound sense of grat-

itude, joy, adoration and praise. We are a beacon of love and hope to those who are seeking a meaning and purpose in life. We are a bridge: between generations, between God and those that have fallen away from active practice of faith and sacraments, and between ethnic communities. We preach by our example that all are loved and wanted by God and can be saved by the Risen Christ.” Similarly, Cohort 19 has developed a website, gatheredasone.com, designed “as a way for folks at one end of the Cohort to connect with folks on the other end of the Cohort,” explained Tom Mullooly, Cohort chairperson and member of the tech subcommittee. The website logo is the image of five hands, representing five parishes, joined in a circle. As part of the page, all events in all the parishes will be listed in one calendar. “One member called it silo-busting,” said Mullooly, explaining that being aware of events and meetings in all parishes allows for the creation of new projects together, or the gathering of members of parish groups who can then share ideas about what has and hasn’t worked. A second website, Cohort19. com, was implemented much earlier in the process to help team members and oth-

A Burlington County parish core team member takes the microphone during a parish Cohort training session held in St. Isaac Jogues Parish, Marlton, in 2016. Craig Pittelli photo

12 • State of the Diocese • February 2018

Terry Ginther, diocesan chancellor and executive director of Pastoral Life and Mission, reviews information with Planning Commission members during a 2016 retreat in Eatontown. Joe Moore photo

ers “stay up to speed” with what was happening at meetings by posting all the meeting minutes for the year, explained Mullooly. In addition, parishes have signed on to Flocknote, a text messaging

“It enlivens parish life when you are doing something grand together.”

and email service for churches that allows for quick messaging from the church to its parishioners. When Flocknote was introduced to St. Rose Parish, Belmar, more than 1,000 parishioners signed up. A similar response was seen in St. Catharine-St. Margaret Parish. Now, the Cohort is rolling out the program to the remaining parishes. All the communication initiatives, said Mullooly, “keep people in the loop.” Cohort 5 has also developed a logo that is visible in the banner of the newly created Diocese of Trenton Cohort 5 Facebook page, a social media tool that not only encourages the interaction of members of the Cohort but also of an unlimited broader community, while Cohort 13 has made use of the FIOF logo and the words “Connecting Our Catholic Community” to express their

understanding of their shared mission. Deacon Barry Tarzy, project manager for Cohorts 1, 2, 3 and 7, spoke about the successful collaboration in Cohort 3 with the implementation of “Basecamp,” an online collaboration app that allows for managing information between groups. “It’s a good tool to keep parishes connected in the future,” he said.

Shared Vision Many Cohorts have already completed one or more notable shared events, like the August 2017 Mass near the beach in Belmar hosted by Cohort 19, celebrated by Bishop O’Connell and drawing nearly 1,000 worshippers, or the shared parish mission of Cohort 6 in May 2017, which drew more than 1,200 attendees. Other cohorts are following suit, with ideas for Rosary rallies, communion breakfasts, picnics, retreats and women’s and men’s events. Reflecting on these shared occasions, Msgr. Troiano said, “It enlivens parish life when you are doing something grand together. There is a Catholicity about it that brings a certain excitement.” But there is also a need for “a deeper dive into collaboration,” said Msgr. Troiano. “How can we benefit from sharing staff, ministries, resources? Our parishes are beginning to talk about it” and do something about it, he said. Msgr. Troiano gave the example of Cohort 19, which after considerable planning and discussion, is hiring one youth Continued on • 13


Process strengthened by pastoral leadership Continued from • 12 minister to oversee five youth ministry programs with the help of a team of volunteers from each parish. At the same time, the Cohort is making inroads into engaging youth by having juniors and seniors from the local Catholic high school facilitate classes for parishioners on how to use Facebook and other social media to connect with all the Cohort parishes and fellow parishioners. Other Cohorts are sharing religious education leaders, busi-

“The process allows leadership to well-up within the parishes.”

ness managers, music leaders and facilities. Subcommittees are holding focus groups to develop new initiatives in a variety of areas including outreach to parents of the newly baptized and developing broader communication plans to not only keep parishes connected and informed, but to evangelize. There is an energy in these new endeavors, said Msgr. Troiano. “Parishes are not losing any of their identity” in the collaboration process, he stressed, but “in terms of reinforcing Catholic identity, we are strengthening our ministries through an excitement about our faith. What wonderful things can be accomplished!”

opportunities. Pastoral leadership is the most important piece of the whole transformative process, said Father Cullen. “Without that energy and vision coming from the pastor, I doubt the process will work. There also has to be confidence in dynamic lay leadership. We are fortunate that we have some very strong leaders. With the vision of the pastor and competent lay leadership, all kinds of great things can happen.” Msgr. Michael Walsh, pastor of the three linked parishes of St. James, Pennington; St. Alphonsus, Hopewell, and St. George, Titusville, agreed. “It is very important that the priest really participates in the process, embraces the process, sharing leadership with other people. We are all on the same team. As the pastoral leader, we cannot continue to do all the pieces of work we used to do. As the number of priests becomes less and less, we have to let go of some areas of Church life and focus on proclaiming the Word of God and celebrating the Sacraments.” Msgr. Walsh recalled that

Several hundred participants gathered in St. David the King Parish Hall, Princeton Junction, for a February 2017 workshop on resiliency designed to help parishes deal with change in light of diocesan reorganization stemming from the Faith in Our Future initiative. Joe Moore photo

“the process allows leadership to well-up within the parishes, individually and within the context of linked relationships with the parishes.” This work of lay leadership, stressed Msgr. Edward Arnister, pastor in St. Rose Parish, Belmar, is also essential to the success of the FIOF process. “We have a great group of people from the parishes, committed Catholics who embraced the vision of what FIOF will be, who have a good understanding of the mission of the Church, the vision of the Bishop and the challenge to the Cohort.” “We have to have a vision,” said Msgr. Arnister. “This is a different Church now with different issues. What worked before won’t

work now.”

Moving Forward With the first year of the implementation phase closing in June, Cohort teams and subcommittees are developing plans and goals for year two, which will be submitted to the implementation commission, composed of 25 people from across the diocese, including clergy, religious and laity from a wide variety of backgrounds. In light of the five goals of FIOF, the commission will review the work of the Cohorts during the past year and evaluate each Cohort’s plans for year two, making suggestions for improvement if they can. As FIOF moves forward, Continued on • 14

32

Role of Pastoral Leadership In his pastoral letter on the FIOF initiative, Bishop O’Connell highlighted the importance of transforming challenges into February 2018 • State

of the Diocese • 13


Some 1,000 faithful gather for Mass Aug. 13, 2017, with Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M., at the Silver Lake gazebo near Belmar Beach. The Mass was prepared as an inaugural event by the five Monmouth County parishes that make up Cohort 19 – St. Catharine-St. Margaret, Spring Lake; St. Mark, Sea Girt; St. Elizabeth of Hungary, Avon; Ascension, Bradley Beach, and St. Rose, Belmar. Joe Moore photo

Moving forward while building new relationships Continued from • 13 Father Cullen stressed keeping in mind that this is an “ongoing process which must continue over time before becoming part of our consciousness, before we can think in broader terms than our own parish boundaries.

“With all of us working together, we are winners, building God’s Kingdom.” But if you don’t take the risk of stepping out into unknown territory, things won’t go anywhere.” Reflecting on the work of the past year, Msgr. Walsh acknowledged, “Relationship is the key. Not a hierarchical relationship; not about adopting everything of one community as opposed to another, but relationships generating life within all communities, which will then develop the spiritual life, as well.” Using the analogy of a blended family, Msgr. Walsh said, “You have to work at relationships,

at all the new pieces and the old pieces. It’s the same with our parishes. Things are not the same as when we started. We are working with changing parameters within the life of the Church. We have to work with new concepts and not jettison all of the old ones.” Msgr. Walsh encouraged those who are struggling to make a start with the FIOF process to “sit back and do some more praying together, to keep looking at the Church and what the goals are, and to remember our primary relationship is with the Lord and the Lord’s people.” “We have to shift our mindset away from winners and losers,” said Msgr. Walsh. “If we become stuck in what we think we are losing, we won’t be able to share our gifts with any new entity. With all of us working together, we are winners, building God’s Kingdom in our particular piece of the world.” Msgr. Walsh also offered to “spend time with anyone who

EWTN radio host and charismatic teacher Father Larry Richards poses for a photo with Sister Juanita Chunga at the 2017 Cohort 6-sponsored mission held in St. Gregory the Great Parish Church, Hamilton Square. The mission drew some 1,000 faithful nightly. Rose O’Connor photo

14 • State of the Diocese • February 2018

is struggling, with pastors or priests who would just like to chat about what they are trying to make happen in their parishes, and doing their best to work within the context of something new. “We don’t have all the answers, but we are working at it, sometimes struggling with it, but striving to allow the Lord to touch our hearts,” acknowledged

Msgr. Walsh. In the light of faith, said Msgr. Arnister, it is important to move forward “with hope, confidence and assurance, to build community and work together, to take up the Gospel challenge and bring it to our people. There is always more that the Lord asks of us and treasures of our Catholic faith that can be uncovered and explored.”


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of the Diocese • 15


Diocese of Trenton By the numbers from January/February 2016 unless otherwise stated

 Covers

Mercer Monmouth

2,380 square miles and comprises four Burlington

Central New Jersey counties: Burlington, Mercer,

Ocean

Monmouth and Ocean.

735,000 (estimate) Catholic Households: 271,382 Parishes: 106 (as of 7/1/17) Catholic Population:

 Residents in the diocesan territory that are white,

73.7%; black, 10 %; Hispanic, 9.7%; Asian, 4.7%, and Pacific Islanders/American Indian, 1.9%

 Weekend Masses celebrated in the Diocese in English,

89%, Spanish, 7%

 Religious education students (Pre-K, elementary and secondary):

31 Elementary schools (parish and regional): 9,611 students 3 Private elementary schools: 484 students



 Eighth-grade graduates (parish and regional):

1,135

There are also a small number of Masses celebrated in Polish, Korean, Haitian/Creole, Slovak, Tagalog, Italian and

Private elementary eighth-grade graduates:

Vietnamese  Baptisms (includes infants, children and adults):

6,890

7,438 Confirmations: 7,551 Weddings:1,300 Funerals: 5,736 Full-time active priests: 207 Deacons: 197 Priests ordained in 2017: 4 Transitional deacons ordained in 2017:

42

7

 High schools (diocesan and parish):

97

4,590

students

4 Private high schools: 1,501 students  2017 High school graduates (including private high schools): 1,684

First Communions:

Priests in a religious order:

40,156

Five college campus ministries Since the inception of the Catholic Alumni Partnership in 2013, more than $500,000 has been raised for the

4

51  Women religious: 217 Consecrated virgins: 3 Member of a secular institute: 1 Brother religious:

16 • State of the Diocese • February 2018

Catholic schools of the Diocese. In 2017-2018, 1,163 elementary students received tuition assistance for a total amount of $806,505 In 2017-2018, 1,493 high school students received tuition assistance for a total amount of $507,500. High schools also provide tuition assistance directly from their schools


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Diocese of Diocese Trenton of Trenton We are pleased We are to have pleased our Bishop, to have the our Most Bishop, the Most BISHOP DAVID M.M.O’CONNELL BISHOP DAVID O’CONNELL Reverend David Reverend M. O’Connell, David M. return O’Connell, return BISHOP DAVIDDiocese M. O’CONNELL Diocese Trenton of of Trenton as presider ashave and presider homilist and forthe homilist Wethe are pleased tothe have our Bishop, theMost Most for of Trenton WeDiocese are pleased to our Bishop, of celebration theM.Holy Mass. ofMost the return Holy Mass. Reverend David M. O’Connell, return Reverend David O’Connell, We are pleasedcelebration to have our Bishop, the

BISHOP DAVID M. O’CONNELL, C.M. Diocese of Trenton as the presider andhomilist homilist for presider and for Reverend Davidas M.the O’Connell, return celebration HolyMass. Mass. celebration of of thethefor Holy as the presider and homilist

celebration ofMAUREEN the AND Holy Mass. BOB ANDBOB MAUREEN DIGAN DIGAN

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be healed duringnun a trip tointhe Divine Mercy Sanctuary inMaria Krakow, Poland. 2000 she was Canonized miraculousand healings. Maureen’s miracle Saint was used inFaustina 1993 toKowalska. Beatify this holy Through the intercession of Sister Faustina, the Digan family experienced two nun and in 2000 she was Canonized Saint Maria Faustina Kowalska. miraculous healings. Maureen’s miracle was used in 1993 to Beatify this holy nun and in 2000 she was Canonized Saint Maria Faustina Kowalska.

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(609587-4877 ) 587-4877 (609(609) )RALPH MARTIN RALPH MARTIN 587-4877

a Resource Preaching Christian Spirituality. Shefor chaired the mysticism group in the AAR, edited for The DR. RSMShe has experience in teaching Way,JANET and was on theRUFFING, Editorial Board for Presence. and religious formation. ASr.Radiant Indigo Moment: Ruffing is a Sister of Mercy, professor emerita of Spirituality and Spiritual Direction at Fordham professor in the FROpening LARRYUniversity, LEWIS, MM, Poetry as an toandPHDnowYale Practice of SpiritualityOur andIncompleteness Ministerial Leadership as a GatewayDivinity to God:School. Film Religious Experience and as She has published books and articles on spiritual direction and and the Spiritual Life supervision, spirituality and other topics. She is a frequent lecturer in a for Preaching Fr. Lewis served Taiwan atmember the Hua Ming CounseltheResource US and internationally. She is a in founding of Spiritual

Catholic Radio Catholic & TVRadio Host,&Author TV Host, andAuthor Evangelist and Evangelist Ralph MartinRalph has been Martin a leader has been in renewal a leadermovements in renewal movements in the Catholic in the Catholic RALPH RALPH Church for many Church years. for many He was years. named He MARTIN by wasMARTIN Pope named Benedict by Pope XVIBenedict as a Consultor XVI as a Consultor RALPH MARTIN Catholic Radio & TV Host, Author and Evangelist Radio &New TV Host, Author and Evangelist to the Pontifical toCatholic the Council Pontifical for the Council for Evangelization the New Evangelization and was alsoand appointed was also appointed Martin leader in renewal movements in theinCatholic Ralph Martinhas hasbeen been a leader in Author renewal movements the Catholic Catholic Radio &a to TV Host, and as anRalph “expert” as to anthe “expert” Synod on the the Synod New Evangelization on the New Evangelist Evangelization in 2012. Currently, in 2012. Currently, Church for many years. He was named by Pope Benedict XVI as a Consultor Church for many years. He was named by Pope Benedict XVI as a Consultor Ralph has been aRenewal leader inMinistries. movements in The the Catholic RalphMartin is president Ralph is ofCouncil president ofrenewal Renewal HeMinistries. also hosts also Choices hosts The Choices tofor Pontifical forfor the New Evangelization andHeXVI was also appointed tothe the Pontifical Council the New Evangelization andas wasConsultor also appointed Church many was named by Pope Benedict We Face, a“expert” widely Weyears. Face, viewed aHewidely weekly viewed Catholic weekly television Catholic and television radioaCurrently, program and radio program asasanan to Synod on the New Evangelization in 2012. “expert” tothe the Synod on the New Evangelization in 2012. Currently, todistributed the Pontifical Council for the New Evangelization andprofessor, was also appointed throughout distributed the throughout world. Ralph the world. is a college Ralph is a college an professor, author of an author of Ralph is president of Renewal Ministries. He also hosts The Choices Ralph istopresident of on Renewal Ministries. He also inhosts TheCurrently, Choices asnumerous an “expert” theand Synod the New Evangelization 2012. books, numerous an books, internationally and anCatholic internationally acclaimed speaker. acclaimed speaker. We a awidely viewed weekly television and radio program WeFace, Face, widely viewed weekly Catholic television and radio program

RALPH MARTIN Catholic Radio & TV Host, Author and Evangelist

Ralph isdistributed presidentthroughout of Renewal Ministries. He also hosts The Choices the world. Ralph is a college professor, an author of distributed throughout the world. Ralph is a collegeradio professor, an author of We Face, a widelybooks, viewed Catholic television numerous andweekly an internationally acclaimed and speaker. program numerous books, an GEZ internationally acclaimed speaker. distributed throughout theand world. RalphFORD is a college professor, an author of GEZ FORD numerous books, andYouth an internationally acclaimed speaker.Co-founder Youth Minister, Tabor Minister, House/Carmel House/Carmel House House Co-founder GEZTabor FORD Gez Ford (born GezinFord Manchester, (born in Manchester, England)GEZ hasEngland) devoted has himself devoted to thehimself new to the new FORD Youth Minister, Tabor House/Carmel House Co-founder evangelization for the past 30 foryears. the past During 30hasyears. that time, During heHouse that hastotime, spoken hetohas groups spoken to groups Youth Tabor House/Carmel Co-founder Gez Fordevangelization (born in Minister, Manchester, England) devoted himself the new GEZ FORD of young and of old young all over and the old world, all over from the single world, digits from to single thousands, digits to Gez Ford (born in Manchester, England) has devoted himself to the newthe about the evangelization for theTabor past 30House/Carmel years. During that time, he has spoken about tothousands, groups Youth Minister, House Co-founder Good News Christ’s News of Christ’s the call love, tofrom holiness thesingle calland to holiness the for the need conversion. daily conversion. for the past 30 years. that time, heand hasdaily spoken toforgroups youngofGood old alllove, over the world, toneed thousands, about the Gez Fordofevangelization (born inand Manchester, England) has During devoteddigits himself to the new You probably You already probably already himthe asworld, know thetoworship him leader the atneed our conferences. ourabout conferences. Now Now of young and oldknow all over fromassingle digits to leader thousands, the Good News love, holiness and worship the for dailyatconversion. evangelization for of theChrist’s past 30 years.call During that time, he has spoken to groups You probably know him as the of worship leader at ourhow conferences. hear his amazing hear already life hisChrist’s amazing story oflove, conversion lifethe story and conversion how this Troubadour this Troubadour theNow Lord for the Lord Good News of call to holiness andand the need forfor daily conversion. of younghear andhisoldamazing all overlifethe world, from single digits to thousands, about the story of conversion how this Troubadour for the Lord Now Youthe probably already know him as theand worship leader at our conferences. came to Diocese came to of theTrenton. Diocese of Trenton. Good News of Christ’s love,ofthe call to holiness and the need for daily conversion. came Diocese hear to histhe amazing life Trenton. story of conversion and how this Troubadour for the Lord You probably already know him as the worship leader at our conferences. Now came to the Diocese of Trenton. hear his amazing life story of conversion and how this Troubadour for the Lord came to the Diocese of Trenton.

GEZ FORD Youth Minister, Tabor House/Carmel House Co-founder

Center, and taught at Wuhan University of Study Directors Internationalingand pastTaipei president of The Society for the Technology in China. was rectorgroup of seminarians and of Christian Spirituality. She chaired theHe mysticism in the AAR, edited for The Way, and was on the Editorial Board for Presence. She coordinated bishops in China sending priests and sisters to FOR FOR ADDITIONAL ADDITIONAL INFO: INFO: FOR ADDITIONAL INFO:Sr. Ruffing is a Sister of Mercy, professor emerita of Spirituality CATHOLICMENFORJESUSCHRIST.ORG CATHOLICMENFORJESUSCHRIST.ORG experience and Larry religious formation. FOR ADDITIONAL INFO: hasstudy CATHOLICMENFORJESUSCHRIST.ORG in the U.S.intoteaching serve in China. offered retreats and taught spirituality and

FOR ADDITIONAL INFO: Spiritualthroughout Direction at Currently Fordham University, China. serving at the Cenacleand Retreatnow Center,professor he is in the in the

(609(609) ) 587-4877 (609) 587-4877 • info@catholicmenforjesuschrist.org • info@catholicmenforjesuschrist.org • info@catholicmenforjesuschrist.org 587-4877 CATHOLICMENFORJESUSCHRIST.ORG (609) 587-4877 • info@catholicmenforjesuschrist.org CATHOLICMENFORJESUSCHRIST.ORG YOUNG MEN’S TRACK IN PARTNERSHIP WITH CATHOLIC ATHLETES FOR CHRIST (609) 587-4877 • info@catholicmenforjesuschrist.org Order tickets at CatholicMenForJesusChrist.org FOR YOUNG MENMEN FROM 8TH GRADE TO COLLEGE AGE AGE FOR YOUNG FOR MEN YOUNG FROM 8TH FROM GRADE 8THTOGRADE COLLEGE TO COLLEGE AGE Order tickets at CatholicMenForJesusChrist.orgFOR | Or send your check withFROM a self-addressed envelopeTO Catholic Men For Jesus Christ | P.O. Box 816, Morrisville, PA 19067 YOUNG MEN 8THsend GRADE COLLEGE Order tickets at CatholicMenForJesusChrist.org | Or yourto:check withAGE a self-addressed envelope to:

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PRE-REGISTRATION FOR ADDITIONAL FR LARRY MM, PHD $25$25 PRE-REGISTRATION FOR ADDITIONAL INFO:LEWIS,INFO: (609) 587-4877 info@catholicmenforjesuschrist.org the US and internationally. She is a founding member of Spiritual

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ATDOOR THE| DOOR | $10 FORCATHOLIC STUDENTSATHLETES $30 AT$30 $10 FOR STUDENTS CATHOLICMENFORJESUSCHRIST.ORG YOUNG MEN’S TRACK INTHEPARTNERSHIP WITH FORCATHOLICMENFORJESUSCHRIST.ORG CHRIST past Incompleteness as a for the Study Directors International andOur president of The Society Order tickets at CatholicMenForJesusChrist.org | Or send your check with a self-addressed envelope to: Catholic Men For Jesus Christ | P.O. Box 816, Morrisville, PA 19067

YOUNG MEN’S INCatholicMenForJesusChrist.org PARTNERSHIP WITH CATHOLIC FOR (609 )CHRIST February 2018 ••info@catholicmenforjesuschrist.org State of the Diocese • 17 (609) 587-4877 • info@catholicmenforjesuschrist.org Order tickets at CatholicMenForJesusChrist.org 587-4877 OrderTRACK tickets at FOR YOUNG MEN FROM 8TH GRADE TO COLLEGE AGE ATHLETES Gateway to mysticism God: Filmgroup and in the AAR, FOR YOUNG MEN FROM 8TH GRADE TO COLLEGE AGE of Christian Spirituality. She chaired the Order tickets at CatholicMenForJesusChrist.org | Or send your check with a self-addressed envelope to: Catholic Men For Jesus Christ | P.O. Box 816, Morrisville, PA 19067 Order tickets at CatholicMenForJesusChrist.org | Or send your check with to: Catholic Men For Jesus CATHOLIC Christfor | P.O. The Box 816, Morrisville, PAand 19067 was Spiritual Life for Presence. She edited Way, onthe the Editorial YOUNG MEN’S TRACK INa self-addressed PARTNERSHIP WITH ATHLETES FOR CHRIST YOUNG MEN’S TRACK INenvelope PARTNERSHIP WITH CATHOLIC ATHLETES FORBoard CHRIST FOR YOUNGFOR MENYOUNG FROM 8TH TO8TH COLLEGE has experience in COLLEGE teaching MENGRADE FROM GRADEAGE TO AGEand religious formation.


Save the Date The following diocesan events and observances have been announced:

February

FEBRUARY 18  RITE OF ELECTION will be celebrated in St. Robert Bellarmine Co-Cathedral, 61 Georgia Road, Freehold, at 3 p.m. The Rite of Election closes the period of the catechumenate in the RCIA process. All unbaptized persons who will be initiated at the 2018 Easter Vigil and their godparents will participate. All are welcome at this solemn Rite. For more, contact Doreen Griffin-Gallway, 609-403-7144, dgallw@dioceseoftrenton.org.

March MARCH 1 (See Feb. 22)  ANNULMENT INFORMATION EVENINGS will be hosted by Our Lady of the Angels Parish, Trenton for Mercer County at 21-23 Bayard St., in Spanish. A session will also be held that day in English hosted by St. Michael Parish, West End for Monmouth County at 800 Ocean Ave. MARCH 8 (See Feb. 22)  ANNULMENT INFORMATION EVENING will be hosted by St. Mary Parish, Barnegat for Ocean County at 747 W. Bay Ave., in English. A session will also be held that day in Spanish hosted by Christ the King Parish, Long Branch for Monmouth County at 380 Division St. MARCH 10  NOBODY TOLD ME! an event for teens on healthy relationships will be presented by guest speaker Pam Stenzel, who holds a psychology degree and is former director of the Alpha Women’s Center, Prior Lake, Minn., from 9 a.m. to noon in St. John Vianney High School, 540 Line Road, Holmdel. For more, contact Cristina Imparato, 609-403-7410; cimpar@ dioceseoftrenton.org

MARCH 26  ANNUAL CHRISM MASS will be celebrated in St. Robert Bellarmine Co-Cathedral, 61 Georgia Road, Freehold, beginning at 7:30 p.m. All diocesan priests will renew their priestly vows and the sacramental holy oils used during the coming year in all parishes of the Diocese will be blessed by Bishop David. M. O’Connell, C.M. Parishioners throughout the Diocese are invited to attend the annual celebration during Holy Week. For more, call Carolyn Norbut, Office of Worship, 609-403-7171; cnorbu@dioceseoftrenton.org.

April

Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M., and the Roman Catholic Diocese of Trenton invite LAW ENFORCEMENT PERSONNEL of all FAITHS who live or serve in Burlington, Mercer, Monmouth and Ocean Counties to the…

Mass

APRIL 17  19TH BLUE BLUE MASS AND LUNCHEON A celebration of (MASS OF LAW ENFORCELaw Enforcement MENT) will be held in St. Mary of the Assumption Cathedral, 151 N. Warren St., Trenton, at 10:30 a.m., followed by a luncheon Tuesday, April 17, 2018 • 10:30 in the church hall. The Family & Friends Welcome Mass will praise and thank God for the work of those in federal, state, city and municipal protective services. A special remembrance will be offered for those who have died in the line of duty. A luncheon donation of $20 per person is requested. Immediate families of law enforcement personnel are free. For tickets, contact Jennifer Britton, Office of Communications, 609-403-7199 or visit http://www. dioceseoftrenton.org/bluemass.

& LUNCHEON

am St. Mary of the Assumption Cathedral, 151 N. Warren St., Trenton

Luncheon donation of $20 per person requested. Immediate families of law enforcement personnel are free.

For further information, call 609-403-7199, or visit www.bluemass.org Reservations required by April 10 • JBritt@dioceseoftrenton.org • 609-403-7199

MARCH 12 (See Feb. 22)  ANNULMENT INFORMATION EVENING will be held in English in St. Mary Parish, Colts Neck for Monmouth County at 1 Phalanx Road. MARCH 22 (See Feb. 22)  ANNULMENT INFORMATION EVENING will be held in English in Our Lady of Perpetual Help Parish, Maple Shade for Burlington County at 236 E. Main St. FEBRUARY 22  ANNULMENT INFORMATION EVENINGS sponsored by the diocesan Office of Canonical Services and Tribunal will be held throughout the Diocese. The first to be held Feb. 22 hosted by Jesus the Good Shepherd Parish, Beverly for Burlington County at 805 Warren St., in Spanish. All events are from 7:30 to 9 p.m. The sessions are designed to teach interested persons about the annulment process and misconceptions. For more, contact Roseimelda Moore, 609-406-7434; rmoore@dioceseoftrenton.org. FEBRUARY 24  21ST ANNUAL CATHOLIC MEN FOR JESUS CHRIST CONFERENCE will be held in St. Gregory the Great Church, 4620 Nottingham Way, Hamilton Square from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. The theme “The Age of Mercy.” Mass will be celebrated by Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M. The cost is $25 per person in advance; $30 at the door; $10 for students. For information or to register, visit www.catholicmenforjesuschrist.org.

MARCH 24 RITE OF CHRISTIAN INITIATION FOR ADULTS LENTEN RETREAT sponsored by the diocesan Department of Catechesis for candidates, catechumens and RCIA team members will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Jesus, the Good Shepherd Church, St. Peter Campus, Bridgeboro and Hancock Streets, Riverside. Presenter Father Javier Diaz, pastor of Christ the King Parish, Long Branch, will speak on “The Seven Last Words of Christ.” Cost is $15. Registration is required by March 17, which can be completed online at https://dioceseoftrenton.org/events/2018-rcia-lenten-retreat-1. For more, contact Doreen Griffin-Gallway, 609-4037144, dgallw@dioceseoftrenton.org.

FEBRUARY 27 (See Feb. 22)  ANNULMENT INFORMATION EVENING will be hosted by Our Lady of Sorrows-St. Anthony Parish, Hamilton for Mercer County at 3816 E. State St. Ext. in English.

18 • State of the Diocese • February 2018

To order lunch tickets, submit checks made payable to: Diocese of Trenton-Blue Mass and mail to:

Attn: Jennifer Britton, 701 Lawrenceville Rd., P.O. Box 5147, Trenton, NJ 08638-0147

May MAY 4  12TH ANNUAL PASTORAL CARE RETREAT sponsored by the diocesan Department of Pastoral Care will be held from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. in San Alfonso Retreat House, 755 Ocean Ave., Long Branch for all pastoral caregivers to experience a day of prayer, reflection and renewal. This year’s theme “We’re All Un-Free and on the Road to Freedom, God is the Key!” The day will include guest speakers, lunch and Mass. To register, contact Deanna Sass, 609-403-7157; dsass@ dioceseoftrenton.org. MAY 12  DIOCESAN CELEBRATION TO OBSERVE THE 30TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE RESTORED RITES OF CHRISTIAN INITIATION sponsored by the diocesan Department of Catechesis will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in St. Robert Bellarmine Co-Cathedral, 61 Georgia Road, Freehold. The day is a look back at the work the Lord has done through the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults and to look forward to what God is continuing to call us to in RCIA ministry. Guest speakers, question and answer period and six different seminars will be offered. For more, contact Steve Bulvanoski, 609-403-7185; sbulva@dioceseoftrenton.org.


Diocese of Trenton MAY 19  TRANSITIONAL DEACON ORDINATION will be in St. Raphael-Holy Angels Church, 3500 South Broad St., Hamilton, at 10 a.m. Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M., is expected to ordain the seminarians of the Diocese of Trenton who have completed their college and theological studies to the Order of Deacons. For more, contact Carolyn Norbut, Office of Worship, 609-403-7171; cnorbu@dioceseoftrenton.org. MAY 19  PENTECOST CELEBRATION a joint effort by the Office of Pastoral Life and Mission, Hispanic Ministry Initiatives, Hispanic Charismatic Catholic Renewal and the Charismatic Catholic Renewal will be held from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Trenton Catholic Academy, 175 Leonard Ave., Hamilton. The day will include Mass, Adoration and Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament, reflection, guest speaker and celebration. For more, contact Sandra Lopez, 609-403-7138; slopez@dioceseoftrenton.org. MAY 26  MEMORIAL DAY MASS will be held at 10 a.m. in St. Mary Cemetery and Mausoleum, 1200 Cedar Lane, Hamilton, sponsored by the diocesan Department of Cemeteries. For more, contact Erin Gallway, 609-3942017; egallway@dioceseoftrenton.org.

June JUNE 2  PRIEST ORDINATION will take place in St. Mary of the Assumption Cathedral, 151 N. Warren St., Trenton, at 10 a.m. Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M., will be the principal celebrant. For more, contact Carolyn Norbut, Office of Worship, 609-403-7171; cnorbu@dioceseoftrenton. org. JUNE 11  SEVENTH ANNUAL BISHOP JOHN C. REISS MEMORIAL GOLF OUTING to benefit the Harris Family Trust for the Aged, Infirmed and Disabled Priests will be held at Spring Lake Golf Club, 901 Warren Ave., Spring Lake Heights. For more, visit www. dioceseoftrenton.org/golf.

July JULY 18  SENIOR SPIRITUALITY & SO MUCH MORE DAY! sponsored by the diocesan Department of Pastoral Care for all maturing adults 55+ will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The day will include guest speakers, lunch, entertainment and Mass. Location to be determined. For more, contact Deanna Sass, 609-403-7157; dsass@dioceseoftrenton.org.

November NOVEMBER 2  ALL SOUL’S DAY MASS will be held at 10 a.m. in Jesus, Bread of Life Catholic Cemetery, 3055 Fostertown Rd., Mount Laurel, sponsored by the diocesan Department of Cemeteries. For more, contact Deacon Edward Heffernan, 856-317-6400; eheffe@ dioceseoftrenton.org.

October OCTOBER 7  BISHOP’S ANNIVERSARY BLESSING MASS will be held in St. Robert Bellarmine Co-Cathedral, 61 Georgia Road, Freehold, beginning at 3 p.m. Counties designated for this celebration will be announced soon. OCTOBER 12 & 13  SPANISH FORMATION CONFERENCE (Conferencia de Formación) will be held in Trenton Catholic Academy, 175 Leonard Ave., Trenton, beginning at 5 p.m. For more, contact Laura Rivas, 609-403-7132; lrivas@dioceseoftrenton.org; Maria Guzman-Paczkowski, 609-403-7154; mguzma@ dioceseoftrenton.org. OCTOBER 20  THERE IS LIFE AFTER DIVORCE: A DAY OF HOPE AND HEALING sponsored by the diocesan Department of Pastoral Care will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. for all separated or divorced Catholics as a means of connecting them with the life of the Church and to support them on their journey. For more, contact Deanna Sass, 609-403-7157; dsass@dioceseoftrenton.org.

NOVEMBER 2  ALL SOUL’S DAY MASS will be held at 10 a.m. in St. Mary Cemetery and Mausoleum, 1200 Cedar Lane, Hamilton, sponsored by the diocesan Department of Cemeteries. For more, contact Erin Gallway, 609-394-2017; egallway@dioceseoftrenton.org.

December DECEMBER 1  DIOCESAN GUADALUPE PILGRIMAGE will leave from Immaculate Conception Church, 540 Chestnut Ave., Trenton, at 9 a.m. Pilgrims will make their way near St. Anthony Church, 626 S. Olden Ave., Hamilton, and then on to St. Joseph Church, 540 N. Olden Ave., Trenton, to begin the final walk to St. Mary of the Assumption Cathedral, 151 N. Warren St., Trenton, for Mass with Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M. and a faith-inspiring celebration. For more, contact Maria Guzman-Paczkowski, 609-403-7154; mguzma@ dioceseoftrenton.org.

OCTOBER 21  BISHOP’S ANNIVERSARY BLESSING MASS will be held in St. Mary of the Assumption, Cathedral, 151 N. Warren St., Trenton, beginning at 3 p.m. Counties designated for this celebration will be announced soon. OCTOBER 25  GOOD COUNSEL HOMES ANNUAL FUNDRAISING BANQUET will be held from 6 to 10 p.m. in the Merion Inn, Route 130, Cinnaminson. For more, contact Brenda Rascher, executive director, Office of Catholic Social Services, 609-403-7180; brasch@ dioceseoftrenton.org OCTOBER 27  TRAVELING GUADALUPE TORCHES are blessed and sent off on a journey through the Diocese of Trenton parishes by Bishop David M. O’Connell. C.M. For more, contact Maria Guzman-Paczkowski, 609-403-7154; mguzma@dioceseoftrenton. org.

2019 February FEBRUARY 9  DIOCESAN YOUTH CONFERENCE for all teens in grades eight through 12. The day will include presentations, live music, Adoration and Mass celebrated by Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M. For more, contact Dan Waddington, director of Youth and Young Adult Ministries, 609-403-7140 or dwaddi@dioceseoftrenton.org.

FOR UPDATES and new event information throughout the year, go to dioceseoftrenton. org/calendar February 2018 • State

of the Diocese • 19


Love “has eyes to see misery and want. It has ears to hear the sighs and sorrows of men.” In the Diocese of Trenton, we are those eyes and ears.

This is what LOVE looks like.

The Lord Jesus invites us to be his hands and feet, his eyes and ears in our Diocese, showing one another, especially those in need, what love looks like. Every year, the good people of our Diocese accept the Lord Jesus’ invitation and respond so generously, as their means will allow, to support and grow the essential programs, ministries and services of our Diocese. I rely on you and ask your continued support. Thanks so much for all you do for the good of others.  God bless you.

Annual Catholic Appeal

“It’s a hard week … but it’s such a fulfillingLOVE week. It’s a blessing. We help look others, and we grow ourselves.”

like?- Sara, MySt. Barnabas Parish, Bayville sisters and “Just knowing that God put me here to do brothers, his work is so powerful to me.” - Brittney, St. Barnabas Parish, Bayville it looks like Teen volunteers speak about Mission: Jersey, the you. weeklong service immersion experience sponsored by

highlights the work that is done in love Most Rev. David M. O’Connell, C.M. • Bishop of Trenton

“It’s a hard week … but it’s such a fulfilling week. It’s a blessing. We help By Mary Stadnyk, Associate others, and Editor we grow ourselves.”

I

- Sara, St. Barnabas Parish, Bayville

knowing GodSister put me Mary here to Agnes Ryan made something of mmaculate“Just Heart of that Mary do his work is so powerful to me.” a confession when- Brittney, she spoke about her vocation during the Diocese of St. Barnabas Parish, Bayville Trenton’s Annual Convocation forJersey, Religious. Teen volunteers speak about Mission: the weeklong service immersion experience sponsored by

love

the Diocese in August 2017.

“The love of my life is Jesus Christ, and for 52 years, with his grace, I have responded to his call to go wherever he wanted me to go, for as long as he’s wanted … It’s an exciting, “It wasfulfilling the culmination of everything energizing, life of I’vejustbeen studying vocation, as marriage, just for as and working single life. If it is for yourthe call,last you are toward five or six years, as happy as you can possibly be and over 40 years of discernment. on this side of eternity.”

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2018

“The love of my life is Jesus Christ, and for the Diocese in August 2017. 52 years, with his grace, I have responded to his call to go where he wanted me to go, for as long as he’s wanted.” That reflection from the diocesan director of the Department of Catechesis was one of many “Stories of Love” that are featured in the 2018 Annual Catholic Appeal, which is ofBut it was also the beginning of a ficially launched this month in every Catholic - Immaculate Heart of Mary Sister Mary Agnes parish across Burlington, Mercer, Monmouth totally kind ofthelife. Ryan speaks about new her vocation during AnnualI can already 2018 Annual Catholic Appeal Convocation for Religious in October, 2017 and Ocean Counties. see that it will impact every area of The theme for the new appeal is “This Is my life.“ It has ears to hear the sighs and sorrows of More than 1600 years ago, St. Augustine of Hippo a very powerful question: - Newly-ordained priest, Father Michael Kennedy, “It was the culmination of everything men.’ Inasked the Diocese of Trenton, we are those I’ve been studying for and working eyes and ears.” reflecting on his vocation. “We thought it would be great to come and toward for the last five or six years, In announcing the 2018 ACA, get Bishop the Bishop’s blessing, and also celebrate a and over 40 years Love, said St. Augustine, “has of thediscernment. hands to help others.encourages It has the faithful feet to hasten to the O’Connell of the Diocese year of being married. It was really great to see But it was also the beginning of a poor and needy.totally ” In the Diocese of Trenton, wetoarereflect thoseonhands and feet. For more storie kicks across25the Diocese in mid-Februthe many ways each act of love all the couples who wereoff married and 50 new kind of life. I can already ary. Parishioners can learn more about theour websit is performed through works of outreach, years. It was inspiring for both of us to see that. Love “has eyesseetothat seeitmisery andevery want. It of has ears to hear the sighs and sorrows of please visit will impact area campaign through a video that will be shown ministry and service in parishes around the Something for us to aspire to.” life.“eyes and ears. men.” In the Diocese of Trenton, we aremy those at Masses illustrating outreach and min- Vito and Erin Chiaravalloti, St. Mary Parish, Middletown, speak about thethe Bishop’s - Newly-ordained priest, Father Michael Kennedy, Diocese. istries that the donated funds help to make “Every year, the good Anniversary people of ourMass Di-in October, 2017. Blessing reflecting on his vocation. possible. According to the Diocese’s Developocese accept the Lord Jesus’ invitation and The Lord Jesus invites us to be his hands andrespond feet, hissoeyes and ears in our Diocese, ment director, Steve Nicholl, and associate generously, as their means will more of LOVE impacted by your gift, showing one another, inFor need, whatstories love looks like. director, Mariann Gilbride, the video will allow, to support and grow the essential proWhat Love Looks Like,”especially answeringthose the quesplease visit our website: dioceseoftrenton.org/catholicappeal help to shine light on the Diocese’s work in grams,the ministries and services of and our Diocese. tionEvery posedyear, 1600the years agopeople by St. August of good of our Diocese accept Lord Jesus’ invitation rebereavement, prison ministry, parish nursing I rely on you and ask for your continued supHippo: “What does love like?” spond so generously, as their means will allow, to support and grow the essential programs, and respect life advocacy. Also included will port,” he said. In a message for the appeal, Bishop David ministries and services of our Diocese. I rely on you and ask your continued support.   be the areas of marriage, forming priests and “What does love look like?” Bishop O’ConM. O’Connell, C.M., writes, “Love, said St. Thanks‘has so much for alltoyou for theItgood of bless you. growing vocations, adult faith formation, the nellothers. asked. God “My brothers and sisters, it looks Augustine, the hands helpdo others. Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults, and like you.” has the feet to hasten to the poor and needy.’ Catholic schools and religious education. In the Diocese of Trenton, we are those hands In addition to Sister Mary Agnes’ “Story of and feet. Most Rev. David C.M. • Bishop Love,” the campaign also features testimony “Love ‘has eyesM.toO’Connell, see misery and want.of Trenton With a goal of $7 million, the 2018 ACA from: • Father Michael Kennedy, now parochial vicar of St. Katharine Drexel Parish, Burlington, who shared that his June 2017 priestly ordination marked the “culmination of ev“It’s a hard week … but it’s such a erything I’ve been studying for and working “The love fulfilling week. It’s a blessing. We help toward for the last five or six years and over of my life others, and we grow ourselves.” 40 years of discernment.” - Sara, St. Barnabas Parish, Bayville • Vito and Erin ChiaravallottiisofJesus St. Mary Parish, Middletown, who reflected on the Christ, “Just knowing that God put me here to Bishop’s Anniversary Blessing Mass andthey for took 52 part in. The couple, who had been married a do his work is so powerful to me.” years, with year, stated, “It was really great to see all the - Brittney, St. Barnabas Parish, Bayville his50grace, couples who were married 25 and years. Teen volunteers speak about Mission: Jersey, the have It was inspiring for both of us toI see that. weeklong service immersion experience sponsored by responded Continued on • 22 the Diocese in August 2017. to his call to go wherever he

this is what

looks l i k e

“What LOVE look like?” “In thedoes Diocese of Trenton, we are those hands and feet.”

This is what LOVE looks like.

ACA in Action

this is what

20 • State of the Diocese • February 2018

What does LOVE look like? My sisters and brothers, it looks like you.

wanted me to go, for as long as he’s wanted … It’s an exciting, energizing, fulfilling life of vocation, just as marriage, just as single life. If it is your call, you are


W

hat does love look like ? It has the hands to help others. It has the feet to hasten to the poor and needy. It has eyes to see misery and want. It has the ears to hear the sighs and sorrows of men. That is what love looks like. ” - St. Augustine of Hippo

love

What does LOVE look like? My sisters and brothers, it looks like you.

this is what

lo o k s l i k e PLEASE GIVE GENEROUSLY.

Most Rev. David M. O’Connell, C.M. Bishop of Trenton

2018 Annual

Catholic Appeal The Diocese of Trenton

Diocese of trenton

www.dioceseoftrenton.org/catholicappeal

February 2018 • State

of the Diocese • 21


looks l i k e 2018 Annual Catholic Appeal

rything working years, nment. ng of a already area of my life.“

- Immaculate Heart of Mary Sister Mary Agnes Ryan speaks about her vocation during the Annual Convocation for Religious in October, 2017

“We thought it would be great to come and get the Bishop’s blessing, and also celebrate a year of being married. It was really great to see all the couples who were married 25 and 50 years. It was inspiring for both of us to see that. Something for us to aspire to.” - Vito and Erin Chiaravalloti, St. Mary Parish, Middletown, speak about the Bishop’s Anniversary Blessing Mass in October, 2017.

Kennedy, vocation.

uestion:

sten to the

What does For moreACA stories of LOVE impacted by stories your gift,of faith, ministry, service campaign features ows visitof our website: dioceseoftrenton.org/catholicappeal LOVE look

Diocese,

and rel programs, pport.

Continued from • 20 Something for us to aspire to.” A teen volunteer for the Diocese-sponsored Mission: Jersey service immersion experience, who stated, “Just knowing that God put me here to do his work is so powerful to me.” All of these programs and initiatives are made possible by the funds generated in the Annual Catholic Appeal.

ACA Logistics

like? My sisters and brothers, it looks like you.

Parishioners will be invited to make an in-pew contribution by using the pledge cards that will be available in all churches on Appeal Weekend. Those who wish to discern their contribution may review the appeal content

ve

hat

ike

c Appeal

“The love of my life is Jesus Christ, and for 52 years, with his grace, I have responded to his call to go wherever he wanted me to go, for as long as he’s wanted … It’s an exciting, energizing, fulfilling life of vocation, just as marriage, just as single life. If it is your call, you are as happy as you can possibly be on this side of eternity.” - Immaculate Heart of Mary Sister Mary Agnes Ryan speaks about her vocation during the Annual Convocation for Religious in October, 2017

that they had been mailed by completing and returning their pledge cards, or donate online at dioceseoftrenton.org/catholicappeal. An expanded digital and social media presence this year has been developed with younger parishioners in mind, so that donations can be made through hand-held devices. Commenting on the 2017 appeal, which raised $5.8 million of the $7 million goal, Gilbride said it fared well considering it was held in conjunction with “the historic” Faith to Move Mountains Endowment Campaign. However, now that Faith to Move Mountains

has concluded almost all of its solicitations, energies will be redirected toward the ACA and the many ways in which it supports the day-to-day works of the Diocese of Trenton. Other information that may be found on the ACA website includes various planned giving or memorial donation options; a percentage breakdown of the ministries that will receive support from the appeal and ways in which the faithful can make their donation through the mail, Diocese of Trenton, 701 Lawrenceville Road, Lawrenceville, N.J. 08648; online, dioceseoftrenton.org/catholicappeal; or by phone, 609-403-7197.

Parishes surpass goals ANNUAL CATHOLIC APPEAL • 2017

Congratulations to the following parishes that have achieved their individual goals:

Holy Innocents • Neptune Nativity • Fair Haven Precious Blood • Monmouth Beach Resurrection • Delran Sacred Heart • Bay Head St. Alphonsus • Hopewell St. Ann • Lawrenceville St. Benedict • Holmdel St. Catharine • Holmdel St. Catharine-St. Margaret • Spring Lake St. Catherine Laboure • Middletown St. David the King • Princeton Junction St. Denis • Manasquan St. Dominic • Brick Town St. Elizabeth Ann Seton • Whiting St. Elizabeth of Hungary • Avon

“We thought it would be great to come and get the Bishop’s blessing, and also celebrate a year of being married. It was really great to see 22 •who State the25Diocese all the couples were of married and 50 • February 2018 years. It was inspiring for both of us to see that. Something for us to aspire to.”

St. Gabriel • Marlboro St. James • Pennington St. John the Baptist • Allentown St. Justin the Martyr • Toms River St. Leo the Great • Lincroft St. Luke • Toms River St. Mary of the Lakes • Medford St. Mary • Barnegat St. Mary • Colts Neck St. Paul • Princeton St. Peter • Point Pleasant Beach St. Pius X • Forked River St. Robert Bellarmine Co-Cathedral • Freehold St. Rose • Belmar St. Thomas More • Manalapan St. William the Abbot • Howell


Q & A on how funds are raised, managed A. Kevin Cimei, the Diocese’s chief fiscal officer, provided the following answers to several key financial questions: What is the financial and operational relationship of the Diocese and its parishes? The Diocese exists to support the responsibilities of the Bishop to “teach, govern and sanctify” as he shepherds the parishes and Catholic community across the four counties of Burlington, Mercer, Monmouth and Ocean. The funds required to execute those responsibilities come from three sources: n Parish Assessments – each parish in the Diocese pays a percentage of its income to support the overall operations and ministries provided by the Diocese. This is the model across the country for all dioceses.

DIOCESE of TRENTON

n Fundraising – the Diocese conducts several fundraisers, from the Annual Catholic Appeal to Golf Outings to scholarship funds and school alumni giving campaigns. In addition, the recently concluded Faith to Move Mountains campaign raised funds for trusts to support ongoing operations. n Investments – The Diocese maintains funds in trusts and accounts that are invested and generate returns that can be used to fund operations while maintaining the principal of those funds.

From a financial perspective, what are some of the most significant ways the Diocese serves and supports the parishes? n Manages centralized insurance procurement for all diocesan entities. This enables better pooling of risk and purchasing power to reduce costs for insurance across all categories – medical, property, workers comp, auto, life, etc. n Administers a pension plan for diocesan employees. n Provides basic legal and real estate

Finance Council

The Diocesan Finance Council is formed in accord with Canon 492, revised Code of Canon Law (1983) from individuals appointed by the Bishop and known to be of sound integrity and who are diverse in their expertise of finance and civil law. The council meets four times a year to advise the Bishop on decisions relative to important acts of temporal administration and financial decisions. Members: Mr. Robert J. Dunne, III Chairman St. David the King Parish Most Rev. David M. O’Connell, C.M. Bishop Rev. Msgr. Thomas N. Gervasio Vicar General Mr. Michael J. Castellano Retired CFO, Lazard Ltd.

Mr. A. Kevin Cimei Chief Fiscal Officer, Diocese of Trenton Mr. William N. Dooley Executive VP CIO, American International Group Inc. – Retired Harry R. Hill, Jr. Senior Partner, Backes & Hill, LLP Mr. Edward J. Smith Retired Investment Banker Currently: Trustee and Independent Director

support services for parishes and schools. n Conducts reviews to ensure appropriate controls and best practices are in place at parishes and schools.

How has the Diocese responded to financial challenges over the past few years, and how would you describe the fiscal health of the Diocese at this time? The Diocese takes its responsibility to manage resources seriously and strives for improvements in efficiencies and operations to ensure good stewardship. A deficit in recent years, exacerbated by the impacts from Superstorm Sandy in 2012, has been reduced as a result of careful and prudent planning. (An $11 million deficit has been reduced to $3 million.) In 2016, the Diocese implemented a Reduction in Force, which included, but was not limited to, early retirement offers. Several expense items have been reduced, and constant scrutiny of all aspects of the operations is exercised. Again, the Faith to Move Mountains campaign will provide funds to support ministries and activities on an ongoing basis from trusts established to allow ongoing support.

What structures are in place to conduct financial oversight of the Diocese and ensure accountability? n Finance Council – The Diocese has a Finance Council, established under Canon law, which provides support, guidance and oversight to the Diocese. (See sidebar for list of members.) n Audit – Annually, the Diocese has a full external audit completed on its operations as well as trusts by outside auditor, WIPFLi, LLC. This audit is done to ensure the financials fairly and completely represent the results of the Diocese in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Policies. The Diocese has had a clean audit every year.

February 2018 • State

of the Diocese • 23


Diocese of Trenton Financial Statements: For the Years Ended June 30, 2017 and 2016 THE DIOCESE THE DIOCESE OF TRENTON OF TRENTON STATEMENTS STATEMENTS OF FINANCIAL OF FINANCIAL POSITIONPOSITION

INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT

Statements of Financial Position:

INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT Most Reverend David M. O'Connell, C.M., J.C.D. Trenton C.M., J.C.D. Bishop of The Diocese Most Reverend David M.ofO'Connell, Trenton, The Jersey Diocese of Trenton Bishop ofNew ASSETS ASSETS INDEPENDENT REPORT Trenton, New Jersey INDEPENDENTAUDITORS' AUDITORS' REPORT Most Reverend David M. O'Connell, C.M., J.C.D. Reportofon Financial The DioceseStatements of Trenton Bishop Cash and cash Cashequivalents and cash equivalents Report on Financial Trenton, New Jersey Statements We have audited the accompanying financial statements of The Diocese of Trenton (a nonprofit Assessments, Assessments, notes and other notes receivables, and other receivables, net net Most Reverend David M. O'Connell, C.M., J.C.D. Most Reverend David M. O'Connell, C.M., J.C.D. of financial position as ofDiocese June 30,of2017 and 2016, and the organization) which Diocese comprise the statements Trenton (a nonprofit We have audited the accompanying financial statements of The of Trenton Bishop of Pledges receivable, Pledges receivable, net net The of Diocese ofthe Trenton Bishop of The statements activities, and cash flows for the years then ended, and the related notes to the related statements of financial position as of June 30, 2017 and 2016, and the organization) which comprise New Report Trenton, on Financial Statements Trenton, New Jersey Jersey financial statements. statements of activities, and cash flows for the years then ended, and the related notes to the Prepaid expenses related Prepaid expenses financial We havestatements. audited the accompanying financial statements of The Diocese of Trenton (a nonprofit Investments Investments Management's Responsibility for the Financial Statements Report on Financial Statements organization) comprise the statements of financial position as of June 30, 2017 and 2016, and the Reportwhich on Financial Statements Management's Responsibility Financial Statements Property equipment, and equipment, net net statements of activities, for andthe cash flows for the years then ended, and the related notes to the Property and related Management is audited responsible for the preparation fair presentation of these statements of financial Trenton (a nonprofit in We have the accompanying financialand statements of The Diocese financialWe statements. Diocese of Trenton (aand have audited the accompanying financial statements statements ofaccepted financial position asThe of June 30, 2017 and 2016, the in organization) which comprise the preparation accordance with accounting principles generally in theofUnited States; this includes thenonprofit design, Management is responsible for the and fair presentation of these financial statements statements of for financial position as of June 2017 andnotes 2016,toand organization) whichofcomprise the statements activities, cash flows the years and30, the related thethe related TOTAL ASSETS TOTAL ASSETS implementation, and maintenance ofand internal control relevant tothen the ended, preparation and fair presentation of accordance accounting principles generally accepted the United States; the design, Management's Responsibility for the Financial Statements statements of activities, and cash flows for theinyears then ended, andthis theincludes related notes to the relatedwith financial statements. financial statements are free from materialcontrol misstatement, due to fraudand or error. implementation, and that maintenance of internal relevant whether to the preparation fair presentation of financial statements. financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due fraudfinancial or error. statements in Management is responsible for the preparation andStatements fair presentation of to these Management's Responsibility for the Financial Auditor's Responsibility Management's Responsibility the Financial Statements LIABILITIES LIABILITIES AND NETAND ASSETS NET ASSETS accordance with accounting principlesforgenerally accepted in the United States; this includes the design, Auditor's Responsibility Management responsible for preparation fair presentation of these and financial statements in of implementation, andismaintenance of the internal controland relevant to the preparation fair presentation Our responsibility isis to expressprinciples an the opinion on these statements based on ourstatements audits. Management responsible for preparation and financial fairinwhether presentation of fraud these in with accounting generally accepted the United thisorfinancial includes design,We financialaccordance statements that are free from material misstatement, dueStates; to error. the LIABILITIES LIABILITIES conducted our audits inexpress accordance with auditing standards generally accepted infair the United States. accordance with accounting principles generally accepted into the United States; this includes the design, Our responsibility is to an opinion oncontrol these financial statements based on our audits. implementation, and maintenance of internal relevant the preparation and presentation ofWe implementation, and maintenance ofand internal control relevant to preparation fair presentation of Accounts payable Those financial standards require that perform the audit to the obtain assurance about conducted our statements audits in that accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States. arewe freeplan from material misstatement, whether due to reasonable fraud orand error. Accounts and payable other accrued and other liabilities accrued liabilities Auditor's Responsibility financial statements that free fromand material misstatement, due reasonable to fraud or error. whether the financial statements are free from material misstatement. Those standards require thatare we plan perform the auditwhether to obtain assurance about Claims payable Claims payable Auditor's Responsibility whether the financial statements are free fromon material misstatement. Our responsibility is to express an opinion these financial statements based on our audits. We Auditor's Responsibility An audit involves performing procedures to obtain standards audit evidence aboutaccepted the amounts andUnited disclosures in for others held for others conducted audits inisaccordance withopinion auditing generally inonthe States. Our our responsibility to express an on these financial based our audits. We the Funds heldFunds the audit financial statements. The procedures selected depend ontostatements the auditor’s judgment, including An involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in Those standards require that we plananand perform the audit obtain reasonable assurance about Our responsibility is to express opinion on these financial statements based on our audits. We conducted our audits in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States. Postretirement benefits obligation benefits obligation assessment of the risks ofThe material misstatement ofdepend the financial statements, whether due to fraudthe or Postretirement the financial statements. procedures selected on generally the auditor’s judgment, including whether the financial arewe free from material misstatement. Those standards require that plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable about conducted ourstatements audits in accordance with auditing standards accepted in assurance the United States. error. In making risk assessments, the auditor considers internal controlwhether relevantdue to to thefraud entity’s assessment thethose risksrequire of material misstatement of the financial statements, or whether the financial statements are free misstatement. Those of standards that we planfrom and material perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in order to design audit procedures are error. In making those riskstatements assessments, auditor internal control relevant to the that entity’s An audit involves procedures to the obtain auditconsiders evidence about the amounts and disclosures in whether theperforming financial are free from material misstatement. Total Liabilities Total Liabilities appropriate instatements. the circumstances, butthe notfinancial forselected theobtain purpose ofevidence expressing an opinion onprocedures the disclosures effectiveness of preparation and fair presentation of statements inon order toauditor’s design audit thatinthe are An audit involves performing procedures to audit about the amounts and the financial The procedures depend the judgment, including the entity’s internal control. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes evaluating the the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgment, including the appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of Page 2 An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or therisk risks ofpolicies material misstatement the financial statements, whether dueto to fraud orthe appropriateness ofof accounting used and the reasonableness ofaudit significant accounting estimates NET ASSETS NET ASSETS the entity’s internal control. Accordingly, we express noof such opinion. An also includes evaluating themaking financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgment, including error. Inassessment those assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant the entity’s error. In making those risk assessments, theoverall auditor considers internal control relevant todue thetoestimates entity’s made by management, asrisks well as evaluating the financial statements. assessment the of material misstatement ofpresentation theinfinancial whether fraudare or Opinion appropriateness of of accounting policies and the reasonableness ofthe significant accounting preparation and fair presentation of the used financial statements order of tostatements, design audit procedures that Unrestricted: Unrestricted: preparation and fair of the financial statements in orderof tothe design audit relevant procedures that entity’s are error. Inthe making those assessments, auditor considers internal control to the made by management, aspresentation wellrisk asbut evaluating thethe overall presentation financial statements. appropriate in circumstances, not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of Page 2 appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on theprocedures effectiveness Weour believe that the the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for preparation and fair presentation ofwe the financial statements in order to design thatofthe are Property and equipment, net Property and equipment, net In opinion, financial statements referred to above present fairly, in allaudit material respects, the the entity’s internal control. Accordingly, express no such opinion. An audit also includes evaluating the entity’s internal control. Accordingly, wefor expresspurpose no suchofopinion. An audit also includes evaluating the of2 Page appropriate in the circumstances, but not expressing an opinion on provide the effectiveness our audit opinion. The Diocese ofwe Trenton as the of 30, 2017 and 2016, and the changes in its net financial position of We believe that of the audit evidence have obtained is sufficient and to aestimates basis for Opinion appropriateness accounting policies used and theJune reasonableness ofofappropriate significant accounting appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness estimates DesignatedDesignated for insurance for funds insurance funds the entity’s internal control. Accordingly, weended express no such opinion. Ansignificant audit alsoaccounting includes evaluating the assets and its cash flows for the years then inpresentation accordance with accounting principles generally our audit opinion. made by management, as well as evaluating the overall of the financial statements. made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. of accounting policies used and thepresent reasonableness of material significant accounting Opinion In our appropriateness opinion, financial statements referred to above fairly, in all respects, the estimates DesignatedDesignated for capital and for capital financing andexpenditures financing expenditures accepted in thethe United States. by management, as of well as evaluating the 30, overall presentation of the financial statements. Trenton as of June 2017 and 2016, and the changes in its net financialmade position of The Diocese We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficientand and appropriate appropriate to a abasis forfor We believe that the audit evidence wethen have obtained is sufficient to provide provide basis Undesignated Undesignated assets and its cash flows for thestatements years ended in accordance with accounting principles generally In our opinion, the financial referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the our audit opinion. our audit opinion. We believe that theDiocese audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and2016, appropriate to changes provide a in basis for accepted in the United States. The of Trenton as of June 30, 2017 and and the its net financial position of assets our andaudit its opinion. cash flows for the years then ended in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States.

$ 109,709,850 $ 109,709,850 $ 108,942,152 $ 108,942,152

$

1,730,726 $ 1,730,726 $ 1,932,823 $ 1,932,823 7,706,799 7,706,799 7,380,174 7,380,174 34,981,05534,981,055 31,731,60131,731,601 17,495,42017,495,420 15,212,36315,212,363 61,914,00061,914,000 56,256,96156,256,961

22,625,02822,625,028 26,121,34926,121,349 (12,945,914) (12,945,914) (11,869,673) (11,869,673) 594,000 594,000 581,000 581,000 25,895,82025,895,820 27,101,34027,101,340 36,168,93436,168,934 41,934,01641,934,016 10,814,87110,814,871 9,939,130 9,939,130 812,045 812,045 812,045 812,045

Temporarily Temporarily restricted restricted Permanently Permanently restricted restricted

47,795,85047,795,850 52,685,19152,685,191

Total Net Assets Total Net Assets

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania November 28, 2017

JUNE 30, JUNE 30, 2017 2016 2016

$ 11,781,820 $ 11,781,820 $ 14,162,132 $ 14,162,132 29,276,36129,276,361 29,897,64929,897,649 30,832,73930,832,739 21,447,06921,447,069 1,291,322 1,291,322 2,112,464 2,112,464 13,945,56913,945,569 15,236,78415,236,784 22,582,03922,582,039 26,086,05426,086,054

Total unrestricted Total unrestricted

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania November 28, 2017

$ 109,709,850 $ 109,709,850 $ 108,942,152 $ 108,942,152

TOTAL LIABILITIES TOTAL LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS AND NET ASSETS See accompanying notes.

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania November 28, 2017

THE DIOCESE OF TRENTON STATEMENTS OF ACTIVITIES

Statements of Activities:

Unrestricted

Operating activities: Operating revenues, gains and other support: Assessments Insurance and employee benefit programs Interest and dividend income Donations and pledges Other

$ 9,078,308 42,475,392 283,589 490,248 1,359,724

Net Assets released from restriction: Satisfaction of program restrictions

2017

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2017 Temporarily Permanently Restricted Restricted

$

-

$

-

$

TOTAL

Unrestricted

9,078,308

$

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2016 Temporarily Permanently Restricted Restricted

170,002 5,710,971 -

-

453,591 6,201,219 1,359,724

9,112,609 42,066,302 415,400 1,043,194 1,572,256

53,687,261

5,880,973

-

59,568,234

54,209,761

4,929,831

-

5,365,498

(5,365,498)

See accompanying See accompanying notes. notes. 42,475,392

$

210,378 4,719,453 -

$

-

TOTAL

$

9,112,609 42,066,302 625,778 3 5,762,647 1,572,256 59,139,592

-

-

5,791,049

(5,791,049)

-

-

59,052,759

515,475

-

59,568,234

60,000,810

(861,218)

-

59,139,592

2,710,363 713,807 4,895,172 34,381,367 1,706,198 4,659,644 7,993,063 2,025,444 1,168,351 2,492,883

-

-

2,710,363 713,807 4,895,172 34,381,367 1,706,198 4,659,644 7,993,063 2,025,444 1,168,351 2,492,883

3,286,856 965,319 3,529,666 34,269,261 1,703,675 4,098,889 9,568,677 1,942,944 1,191,753 3,050,208

-

-

3,286,856 965,319 3,529,666 34,269,261 1,703,675 4,098,889 9,568,677 1,942,944 1,191,753 3,050,208

62,746,292

-

-

62,746,292

63,607,248

-

-

63,607,248

(3,693,533)

515,475

-

(3,178,058)

(3,606,438)

(861,218)

-

(4,467,656)

Nonoperating items: Amortization of discount and change in actuarial assumption on split-interest agreements Net loss on sales of properties Net realized and unrealized gain (loss) on investments Postretirement benefit changes other than net periodic postretirement benefit cost

(15,333) (1,117,932) 286,739

360,266

-

(15,333) (1,117,932) 647,005

(16,629) (62,346)

(150,025)

-

(16,629) (212,371)

(1,225,023)

-

-

(1,225,023)

(817,279)

-

(817,279)

Total nonoperating items

(2,071,549)

360,266

-

(1,711,283)

(896,254)

(150,025)

-

(1,046,279)

Change in net assets Net assets - beginning of year

(5,765,082) 41,934,016

875,741 9,939,130

812,045

(4,889,341) 52,685,191

(4,502,692) 46,436,708

(1,011,243) 10,950,373

812,045

(5,513,935) 58,199,126

Total operating revenues, gains and other support Operating expenses: Grants and subsidies Seminary tuition and support Claims incurred Insurance premiums Legal and professional Provision for doubtful accounts Personnel Facilities Depreciation Administrative and other costs Total operating expenses Excess (deficiency) of operating revenues, gains and other support over operating expenses

Net assets - end of year

$ 36,168,934

$ 10,814,871

See accompanying notes.

24 • State of the Diocese • February 2018 See accompanying notes. 4

$

812,045

$ 47,795,850

$ 41,934,016

-

$

9,939,130

$

812,045

$ 52,685,191

3


THE DIOCESE OF TRENTON NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2017 AND 2016

Diocese of Trenton Financial Statements: For the Years Ended June 30, 2017 and 2016 1. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (continued)

THETHE DIOCESE DIOCESE OF TRENTON OF TRENTON STATEMENTS STATEMENTS OF CASH OF CASH FLOWS FLOWS

Statements of Cash Flows:

CASH CASH FLOWS FLOWS FROM FROM OPERATING OPERATING ACTIVITIES ACTIVITIES Change in assets net assets Change in net Adjustments Adjustments to reconcile to reconcile change change in net in assets net assets to net to cash net cash usedused in operating in operating activities: activities: Depreciation Depreciation Provision Provision for doubtful for doubtful accounts accounts Net Net lossloss on sales on sales of properties of properties Net Net (gain) (gain) lossloss on investments on investments Changes Changes in assets in assets andand liabilities: liabilities: Assessments Assessments andand other other receivables receivables Pledges Pledges receivable receivable Prepaid Prepaid expenses expenses Accounts Accounts payable payable andand other other accrued accrued liabilities liabilities Claims Claims payable payable Funds Funds heldheld for others for others Postretirement Postretirement benefits benefits obligation obligation

Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

YEARS YEARS ENDED ENDED FORFOR THETHE JUNE JUNE 30, 30, 2017 2017 2016 2016 $

$(4,889,341) (4,889,341) $ $(5,513,935) (5,513,935)

Investments

1,168,351 1,168,351 4,659,644 4,659,644 1,117,932 1,117,932 (647,005) (647,005)

1,191,753 1,191,753 4,098,889 4,098,889 - 212,371 212,371

(5,413,730) (5,413,730) (6,456,062) (6,456,062) (9,385,670) (9,385,670) (12,819,632) (12,819,632) 821,142 821,142 (628,408) (628,408) (202,097) (202,097) (25,921) (25,921) 326,625 326,625 (1,737,311) (1,737,311) 3,249,454 3,249,454 19,542,636 19,542,636 2,283,057 2,283,057 1,464,968 1,464,968

CASH CASH FLOWS FLOWS FROM FROM INVESTING INVESTING ACTIVITIES ACTIVITIES Purchase of property equipment Purchase of property andand equipment Proceeds Proceeds fromfrom salesale of investments of investments Purchase Purchase of investments of investments Notes Notes andand loans loans receivable receivable Proceeds Proceeds fromfrom salesale of property of property

(415,721) (415,721) (673,364) (673,364) 2,324,265 2,324,265 7,929,331 7,929,331 (386,045) (386,045) (2,649,043) (2,649,043) 1,375,374 1,375,374 (602,105) (602,105) 1,633,453 1,633,453 - 4,531,326 4,531,326

4,004,819 4,004,819

NETNET CHANGE CHANGE IN CASH IN CASH ANDAND CASH CASH EQUIVALENTS EQUIVALENTS

(2,380,312) (2,380,312)

3,334,167 3,334,167

CASH CASH ANDAND CASH CASH EQUIVALENTS EQUIVALENTS - BEGINNING - BEGINNING OF YEAR OF YEAR

14,162,132 14,162,132 10,827,965 10,827,965

Net Net Cash Cash Provided Provided by Investing by Investing Activities Activities

$ 11,781,820 $ 11,781,820 $ 14,162,132 $ 14,162,132

SUPPLEMENTAL SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURE DISCLOSURE OF NON-CASH OF NON-CASH OPERATING OPERATING ANDAND INVESTING INVESTING ACTIVITY: ACTIVITY: Transfer Transfer of Assessments of Assessments andand other other receivables receivables to Notes to Notes $ receivable receivable

$

-

1. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

Property and Equipment Real estate development sites have been purchased for future parishes, schools and similar purposes, and are carried at cost. Carrying costs on such non-operating properties are expensed. When such properties are transferred to recipients, the Diocese treats such transfers as outright grants in cases where such amounts will not be reimbursed by the Diocesan organization. All other property and equipment are also carried at cost. Buildings and improvements Furniture and equipment

5 - 74 years 3 - 10 years

Donations and Pledges Donations received, including unconditional promises to give, are recognized as revenue in the period received at fair value. The Diocese reports gifts of cash other assets as restricted revenue if they are THE DIOCESE OFand TRENTON received with donor stipulations that limit the of the donated assets. When a donor restriction expires, NOTES TO use FINANCIAL STATEMENTS that is, when a stipulated time restriction ends or purpose restriction is accomplished, temporarily FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2017 AND 2016 restricted net assets are reclassified to unrestricted net assets and reported in the statements of activities as net assets released from restrictions. Support, as well as any related investment income, that is restricted by the donor is reported as an increase in unrestricted net assets if the restriction expires in the reporting period in which theAccounting support is recognized. 1. Summary of Significant Policies (continued)

The Diocese reports gifts of land, buildings and equipment as unrestricted support unless explicit donor stipulations specify how the donated assets must be used. Gifts of long-lived assets with explicit restrictions that specify how the assets are to be used and gifts of cash or other assets that must be used to acquire long-lived assets are reported as restricted support. Absent explicit donor stipulations about how long those long-lived assets must be maintained, the Diocese reports expirations of donor restrictions when the donated or acquired long-lived assets are placed in service.

-

Fair value is defined as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. Accounting standards set a framework for measuring fair value using a three-tier hierarchy based on the extent to which inputs used 7 in measuring fair value are observable in the market. Level 1: Quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities.

THE DIOCESE OF TRENTON NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2017 AND 2016

SeeSee accompanying accompanying notes. notes.

Investment income earned on permanently restricted net assets and certain temporarily restricted net assets is restricted as to use. All other investment income is unrestricted as to use.

Fair Value Measurements

$ 964,531 964,531 $

See accompanying notes.

Notes to Financial Statements:

The Diocese carries investments in equity securities with readily determinable fair values and all investments in debt securities at their fair values in the statements of financial position. Realized and unrealized gains and losses are included in the statements of activities. Purchases and sales of securities are recorded on a trade-date basis. Interest income is recorded on the accrual basis. Dividends are recorded on the date the dividends are payable.

(670,652) (670,652) Depreciation is calculated on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful lives of the assets, as follows:

(6,911,638) (6,911,638)

Net Net Cash Cash Used Used in Operating in Operating Activities Activities

CASH CASH ANDAND CASH CASH EQUIVALENTS EQUIVALENTS - END - END OF YEAR OF YEAR

The Diocese provides allowances for each type of receivable reported in its financial statements. These allowances are maintained at a level management considers adequate to provide for subsequent adjustments and potential uncollectible accounts. The allowance is increased by provisions charged to the statements of activities and reduced by the amount of receivables written-off. Management has determined the allowance by considering the type of receivables, responsible party, historical collection patterns and comparative aging. These estimates are reviewed periodically and as changes become necessary, they are charged or credited to operations in the periods in which they become known.

5

5

General The Diocese of Trenton (the "Diocese"), a nonprofit organization, is affiliated with Catholic parishes, schools and various other social service agencies in Burlington, Mercer, Monmouth and Ocean counties New Jersey, which provide services to the communities located within these counties. Funding to support the Diocese and its programs is primarily received from assessments, insurance and employee benefit program fees, donations and income on investments. The accompanying financial statements include the assets, liabilities, net assets, revenues and expenses of the Diocese of Trenton Operating Fund, Trust Funds, Seminary Funds, Plant Fund, Insurance Funds, Custodial Funds, Annual Catholic Appeal Fund and Endowment Campaign Fund which are not separately incorporated under civil law. Certain organizations within the Diocese are not included in the accompanying financial statements because they operate independent of the Diocese, maintain separate accounts and operate their own services and programs. Some of these organizations are as follows: Priests' and Lay Retirement Funds Catholic Charities Health Care Facilities Cemeteries Parish and Diocesan Schools Campus Ministries Special Catholic Ministries Diocesan Parishes Diocesan Charitable Trusts The Diocese has financial transactions with these organizations consisting primarily of grants, subsidies for operations, new equipment, certain receivables and is a guarantor for certain notes and mortgages payable by these organizations (see Note 7). Basis of Presentation The accompanying financial statements have been prepared on the accrual basis of accounting. Additionally, the Diocese reports information regarding its financial position and activities according to three classes of net assets: unrestricted net assets, temporarily restricted net assets, and permanently restricted net assets. Use of Estimates The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the financial statements and accompanying notes. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Cash and Cash Equivalents All highly liquid investments with maturity dates of three months or less when purchased are considered cash equivalents.

Level 2: Observable inputs other than Level 1 prices such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities, quoted prices in markets that are not active, or inputs (interest rates, currency exchange rates, commodity rates and yield curves) that are observable or corroborated by observable market data for substantially the full term of the assets or liabilities. Level 3: Inputs that are not observable in the market and reflect management’s judgment about the assumptions that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability. Tax Status The Diocese qualifies as an organization described in Internal Revenue Code Section 501(c)(3) and, accordingly, is exempt from federal taxes on income. The Diocese is also exempt from state income taxes. Funds Held For Others The Diocese receives assets from donors and agrees to use the assets on behalf of or to transfer the assets, the return from investment of those assets, or both to a specified beneficiary. Resources received under those types of agreements are measured at fair value and reported as Funds held for others in the statements of financial position. Insurance Funds The Diocese maintains Insurance Funds which are unrestricted net assets and account for the financial activity of its two insurance programs (see Note 9). The activity in these funds consists primarily of insurance and employee benefit program fees from affiliated organizations, investment income, cost of insurance, claims incurred and administrative fees. The assets of the Insurance Funds are currently internally designated to the insurance programs and are currently not available for any other Diocesan purposes. Claims are recognized in the accompanying financial statements at the time the loss is incurred. The provision for claims is based on the best estimate of the ultimate cost of the claims which includes a provision for claims incurred but not recorded (IBNR). THE DIOCESE OF TRENTON NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Reclassification FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2017 AND 2016 Certain items reported in the prior year's financial statements have been reclassified to conform to the current year's classification. The changes primarily relate to reclassifying expenses from administrative and other costs to grants and subsidies. 1. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (continued) Recently Issued Accounting Standards On August 18, 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-14 (Topic 958), Presentation of Financial Statements of Not-for-Profit Entities (“Update”). The Update reduces the number of net asset classes from 8 three to two, those with donor restrictions and those without, requires all nonprofit organizations to report expenses by nature and function and improves information presented in financial statements and notes that is useful in assessing a not-for-profit's liquidity, financial performance, and cash flows. The guidance in this ASU is effective for the Diocese's year ending June 30, 2019, and for interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018. Early application of the amendments in this Update is permitted. The Diocese is currently in the process of determining the impact of the new standard, and has not elected to early implement the amendments. 2 . Fair Value Measurements

Continued on • 26

The following table sets forth by level, within the fair value hierarchy, the Diocese's financial instruments carried at fair value: Level 1

February 2018 • State

Investments: Mutual funds Equity International equity Fixed income Common stocks

$

2,588,467 410,678 8,380,488

June 30, 2017 Level 2 Level 3

Total

of the Diocese • 25 $

-

$

-

$

2,588,467 410,678 8,380,488


THE DIOCESE OF TRENTON NOTES FINANCIAL STATEMENTS THETO DIOCESE OF TRENTON FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2017 AND 2016 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2017 AND 2016

FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2017 AND 2016

Diocese

Fair Value Measurements (continued) Trenton Financial Statements: For the2. Years Ended June 30, 2017 and 2016

1. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (continued) of

1. Summary of Significant Accounting Recently Issued Accounting StandardsPolicies (continued) Recently Issued Accounting Standards On August 18, 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-14 (Topic 958), Presentation of Financial Statements Not-for-Profit TheNo. Update reduces the number of net asset classes from On August of18, 2016, the Entities FASB (“Update”). issued ASU 2016-14 (Topic 958), Presentation of Financial three to two,ofthose with donor restrictions and those without,reduces requires allnumber nonprofit to report Statements Not-for-Profit Entities (“Update”). The Update the of organizations net asset classes from expenses by those naturewith anddonor function and improves information financial organizations statements and notes three to two, restrictions and those without, presented requires allinnonprofit to report that is useful assessing a not-for-profit's liquidity, financial presented performance, and cashstatements flows. Theand guidance expenses by in nature and function and improves information in financial notes in this for athe Diocese's year ending June 30, 2019, and for periods within fiscal that is ASU usefulisineffective assessing not-for-profit's liquidity, financial performance, andinterim cash flows. The guidance years after December 15, 2018. Early application of the in thiswithin Update is in this beginning ASU is effective for the Diocese's year ending June 30, 2019, andamendments for interim periods fiscal permitted. The Diocese is currently 15, in the process of determining of the new standard, and has years beginning after December 2018. Early application the of impact the amendments in this Update is • Continued from 25 not electedThe to early implement the amendments. permitted. Diocese is currently in the process of determining the impact of the new standard, and has

Notes to Financial Statements:

not elected to early implement the amendments. 2 . Fair Value Measurements

2 . Fair Value table Measurements The following sets forth by level, within the fair value hierarchy, the Diocese's financial instruments carried at fair value: The following table sets forth by level, within the fair value hierarchy, the Diocese's financial instruments carried at fair value: June 30, 2017 Level 1

Investments: Mutual funds Investments: $ Equity Mutual funds International equity $ Equity Fixed incomeequity International Common stocks Fixed income Consumer goods and services Common stocks Business andservices services Consumerproducts goods and Energy Business products and services Financial Energy Healthcare Financial Industrials Healthcareand materials Information technology Industrials and materials Certificates of deposit Information technology Total investments in Certificates of depositthe fair value $ hierarchy Total investments in the fair value $ hierarchy THE Investments measured at NAV

Level 2 Level 3 June 30, 2017 Level 2 Level 3

Level 1 2,588,467 410,678 2,588,467 8,380,488 410,678

$

8,380,488 73,201 237,482 73,201 4,361 237,482 68,787 4,361 85,650 68,787 66,912 85,650 74,359 66,912 74,359-

11,990,385

---

$

$ $

------828,978-

Total

Total ---

$ $

--------

2,588,467 410,678 2,588,467 8,380,488 410,678

8,380,488 73,201 237,482 73,201 4,361 237,482 68,787 4,361 85,650 68,787 66,912 85,650 74,359 66,912 828,978 74,359

828,978 828,978

$

-

828,978 12,819,363

11,990,385 OF $ TRENTON 828,978 DIOCESE

$

-

12,819,363 1,126,206

$

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Investments measured FOR at NAV THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2017 AND 2016 Total investments at fair value

1,126,206 $ 13,945,569

Total investments at fair value

$ 13,945,569

THE DIOCESE OF TRENTON NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 2. Fair Value Measurements (continued) FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2017 AND 2016 June 30, 2016

Total

-

$

2,094,829 Total 467,283 8,745,490

----

$

2,094,829 79,440 Total 467,283 344,615 8,745,490 37,951

2,028 9 79,440 -- $ 2,094,829 147,394 467,283 344,615 -34,078 9 8,745,490 37,951 -25,857 2,028 -900,324 79,440 147,394 -827,971 344,615 34,078 37,951 25,857 -13,707,260 2,028 900,324 147,394 1,529,524 827,971 34,078 - $ 15,236,784 25,857 13,707,260 900,324 fair value is estimated 1,529,524 827,971 -

$ 15,236,784 13,707,260

Unfunded Redemption Redemption The Investments following table sets forth additional disclosures for the investments whose fair value is estimated measured at NAV 1,529,524 Fair Value Commitments Frequency Notice Period using net asset value (NAV) as of June 30, 2017 and 2016: 2017 Total Blackrock investmentsEquity at fair value $ 15,236,784 Index $ 1,126,206 $ Unfunded Daily 1 day Non-lendable Fund Redemption Redemption The following table sets forth additional disclosures for the investments whose fair value is estimated Fair Value Frequency Commitments Notice Period using 2016 net asset value (NAV) as of June 30, 2017 and 2016: 2017 Blackrock BlackrockEquity EquityIndex Index $ Daily 1 day day Non-lendable $ 1,529,524 1,126,206 $ $ Unfunded -- Redemption Daily 1 Non-lendableFund Fund Redemption Fair Value Commitments Frequency Notice Period 2016 2017 The Blackrock Equity Index Non-lendable Fund ("Fund") is a privately-held commingled vehicle consisting Blackrock Equity EquityIndex Index of USBlackrock large cap equities. It is passively-managed with the goal of replicating the performance of the S&P $ 1,126,206 1,529,524 $ $ Daily day Non-lendable Fund $ -11 day Non-lendable 500 Index. The Fund Fund has daily liquidity with a one-day notice period andDaily has a T+3 settlement process before releasing funds to the client. 2016 The Blackrock Equity Index Non-lendable Fund ("Fund") is a privately-held commingled vehicle consisting The following is Equity a description Blackrock Index of the valuation methodologies used for investments measured at fair value: of US large cap equities. It is passively-managed with the goal of replicating the performance of the S&P $ 1,529,524 $ Daily 1 day Non-lendable Fund 500 Index. The funds Fund -has dailyatliquidity a one-day and a T+3 at settlement Mutual Valued the netwith asset value of notice sharesperiod held by thehas Diocese year-end.process Mutual before releasing funds to the client. are open-end mutual funds that are registered with the Securities and funds held by the Diocese Exchange Commission. These funds are required to publish their daily NAV and to transact at The Blackrock Equity Index Non-lendable Fund ("Fund") is a privately-held commingled vehicle consisting The following is a description of the valuation methodologies used for investments measured at fair value: that cap price. These Itmutual funds held by thewith Diocese are deemed to bethe actively traded. of the S&P of US large equities. is passively-managed the goal of replicating performance 500 Index. The funds Fund -has dailyatliquidity a one-day and a T+3 at settlement Mutual Valued the netwith asset value of notice sharesperiod held by thehas Diocese year-end.process Mutual Mutual fund - Blackrock Equity Index fund is a mutual fund that is not actively traded; valued at the before releasing funds to the client. are open-end mutual funds that are registered with the Securities and funds held by the Diocese net asset value of shares held by the Diocese at year-end. Exchange Commission. These funds are required to publish their daily NAV and to transact at The following is a description of the valuation methodologies used for investments measured at fair value: that price.stocks These- mutual held by the Diocese are deemed to beexchanges actively traded. Common Sharesfunds in companies traded on national securities are valued at the closing price reported market in which the individual areat traded. Mutual funds - Valuedinatthe theactive net asset value of shares held by securities the Diocese year-end. Mutual Mutual fund - Blackrock Equity Index fund is a mutual fund that is not actively traded; valued at the funds held by the Diocese are open-end mutual funds that are registered with the Securities and net asset value of shares held by the Diocese at year-end. 10 Exchange Commission. These funds are required to publish their daily NAV and to transact at THE DIOCESE OF that price.stocks These- mutual held by the Diocese are deemed to beexchanges actively traded. Common Sharesfunds in companies traded onTRENTON national securities are valued at the NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS closing price reported in the active market in which the individual securities are traded. Mutual fund - Blackrock Equity Index ENDED fund is aJUNE mutual that is not actively traded; valued at the FOR THE YEARS 30,fund 2017 AND 2016 net asset value of shares held by the Diocese at year-end. 10 Common stocks - Shares in companies traded on national securities exchanges are valued at the closingMeasurements price reported in(continued) the active market in which the individual securities are traded. 2. Fair Value 10 U.S. government agency issues - are based on institutional bond quotes and evaluations based on various market and industry inputs. Certificates of deposit - Fair value of fixed-maturity certificates of deposit are estimated using rates currently offered for deposits of similar remaining maturities. 3. Assessments, Notes and Other Receivables Assessments, notes and other receivables consist of the following:

3. Assessments, Notes and Other Receivables Assessments, notes and other receivables consist of the following: 2017

June 30,

2016

$ 16,622,686 $ 15,366,424 28,386,368 24,887,728 12,024,273 13,094,101 6,482,272 5,823,287 1,418,953 1,315,725 1,135,825 1,877,974 40,869 20,123 1,326,704 2,390,765 67,437,950 64,776,127 (38,161,589) (34,878,478)

Assessments Due from participating organizations for insurance Notes Loans Seminary tuition Due from charitable trusts Accrued interest Other Less allowance for doubtful accounts

$ 29,276,361

$ 29,897,649

As of June 30, 2017, notes totaling approximately $200,000 are collectible in the next year and the remainder are collectible in 2 - 8 years; loans are collectible in 2 - 5 years. As of June 30, 2016, notes totaling approximately $1,688,000 are collectible in the next year and the remainder are collectible in 2 - 9 years; loans are collectible in 2 - 6 years. Notes and loans receivable are funds advanced to parishes and other affiliates for various purposes. Interest on interest-bearing notes and loans is recognized over the term of the note or loan and is calculated monthly using the simple-interest method on principal amounts outstanding. Generally, the notes and loans are not considered past due or delinquent. Management considers the notes and loans to be impaired when the note or loan, or a portion of the note or loan, is deemed uncollectible based on: the Diocese's historical collection patterns, the borrower's failure to repay the note or loan, adverse situations that may affect the borrower's ability to repay, the estimated value of underlying or potential collateral, and current economic conditions. Activity in the allowance for doubtful accounts for notes and loans is as follows:

$ 16,622,686 28,386,368 12,024,273 6,482,272

$ 15,366,424 24,887,728 13,094,101 5,823,287

2016

Balance - beginning of year $ 4,332,319 $ Increase in allowance for specific and loans 18,000 THEnotes DIOCESE OF TRENTON Decrease in allowance forNOTES specificTO notes and loans FINANCIAL STATEMENTS(1,077,391) FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2017 AND 2016 Balance - end of year $ 3,272,928

$

4,354,144 18,175 (40,000) 4,332,319

4 . Pledges Receivable, net Pledges receivable consist of the following at June 30, 2017 and 2016: Faith to Move Mountains Endowment Campaign In 2015, the Diocese embarked on a Diocesan-wide campaign, "Faith to Move Mountains", seeking to 11 raise contributions to secure sustainable endowments needed to support the following needs: Diocesan Parish Assistance, Catechesis and Evangelization, Ordained Ministry, Catholic Schools, and Social Services. Additionally, Parishes will receive 30% of the cash raised from their parishioners up to their goal amount, and 70% will be transferred to charitable trusts to establish endowments for the aforementioned purposes. Once their goal has been reached, parishes will receive 70% of the amount over their goal, with the trusts receiving the remaining 30%. As of June 30, 2017 and 2016, there are unpaid pledges of approximately $32,244,000 and $22,321,000, respectively. As of June 30, 2017 and 2016 approximately $33 million and $29 million, respectively, of cash and pledges receivable not yet transferred to parishes and charitable trusts is included in Funds held for others in the statements of financial position. Annual Catholic Appeal Fund The Diocese conducts its Annual Catholic Appeal each year beginning in January and ending in December. The proceeds of the Appeal are used to support various social service and other programs administered by the Diocese and affiliated organizations. The goal of the 2017 and 2016 Appeals was to raise $7,000,000 each year. Each parish receives 15% of its goal if its goal is reached, and an additional 50% of the amount realized in excess of its target goal. As of June 30, 2017, the Diocese raised 2017 Appeal pledges of approximately $4,700,000 of which approximately $491,000 remained unpaid at that date. As of June 30, 2016, the Diocese raised 2016 Appeal pledges of approximately $4,700,000 of which approximately $488,000 remained unpaid at that date. As of June 30, 2017 and 2016, approximately $108,000 and $799,000, respectively, of cash and pledges receivable not yet transferred to parishes is included in Funds held for others in the statements of financial position. Amounts to be received under the Faith to Move Mountains Endowment Campaign and the Annual Catholic Appeal Fund as of June 30, 2017 and 2016 are as follows:

Receivable in less than one year Receivable in one year to five years Receivable in five years or more Total unconditional promises to give Less: Effect of discount to net present value Unconditional Promises to Give - Net

2017 2016 $ 12,984,710 $ 8,008,483 18,682,177 14,650,816 1,068,588 149,329 32,735,475 22,808,628 (1,902,736) (1,361,559) $ 30,832,739 $ 21,447,069

THE DIOCESE OF TRENTON NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Pledges that are due beyond one year are discounted using a discount rate of 2.9%. Pledges receivable at FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2017 AND 2016 June 30, 2017 and 2016 are reported at net realizable value which is the amount the Diocese expects to collect. 5 . Investments A summary of investments by type is reported below: June 30, 2017 Cost Mutual funds: Equity International equity Fixed income Common stocks U.S. government agency issues Certificates of deposit

$

2,580,208 298,477 8,323,391 288,148 828,978

$ 12,319,202

June 30, 26 • State of the Diocese • February 2018 2017 2016 Assessments Due from participating organizations for insurance Notes Loans

Certificates of deposit - Fair value of fixed-maturity certificates of deposit are estimated using rates currently offered for deposits of similar remaining maturities.

2017

Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 THE DIOCESE OF TRENTON NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Investments: 2. Fair Value Measurements (continued) FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2017 AND 2016 Mutual funds

June-30,$2016 $ 2,094,829 $ Equity Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 International equity 467,283 Investments: Fixed Income 2. Fair Value Measurements (continued) 8,745,490 Mutual funds Common stocks June--30,$2016 $ 2,094,829 Equity Consumer goods and services 79,440 $ Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 International equityand services 467,283 Business products 344,615 Investments: Fixed Income 8,745,490 Capital goods 37,951 -Mutual funds Common stocks Energy 2,028 $ 2,094,829 Equity 79,440 $ Consumer goods and services Financial 147,394 -- $ International equityand services 467,283 Business products 344,615 Other 34,078 -Fixed 8,745,490 CapitalIncome goods 37,951 International 25,857 -Common stocks 2,028U.S.Energy government agency issues 900,32479,440 Consumer goods and services Financialof deposit 147,394Certificates 827,971Business products and services 344,615 Other 34,078 Total investments in the fair value Capital goods 37,951 International 25,857 $ 1,728,295- $ $ 11,978,965 hierarchy 2,028U.S.Energy government agency issues 900,324Financialofmeasured 147,394Investments Certificates deposit at NAV 827,971Other 34,078 Total investments in the fair value Total investments at fair value International 25,857 $ 1,728,295- $ $ 11,978,965 hierarchy U.S. government agency issues 900,324 The Certificates following table sets forth additional disclosures- for the827,971 investments whose Investmentsofmeasured deposit at NAV using net asset value (NAV) as of June 30, 2017 and 2016: Total investments in the fair value Total investments $ 11,978,965 $ 1,728,295 $ hierarchy at fair value

U.S. government agency issues - are based on institutional bond quotes and evaluations based on various market and industry inputs.

June 30, 2016

Fair Value $

3,714,673 410,678 8,380,488 610,752 828,978

$ 13,945,569

Cost $

2,823,142 424,733 8,562,395 344,057 900,286 827,971

$ 13,882,584

Fair Value $

3,624,353 12 467,283 8,745,490 671,363 900,324 827,971

$ 15,236,784

Continued on • 27

Net unrealized gain on investments of $272,167 in 2017 and net unrealized loss on investments of $(1,288,246) in 2016 are included in net realized and unrealized gain (loss) on investments in the statements of activities. Investment expense of $10,386 and $14,738 for the years ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, respectively, are included in legal and professional fee expense in the statements of activities. These investments are exposed to various risks such as market volatility, interest rate and credit risks. Due to the level of risk associated with investments, it is at least reasonably possible that changes in the


5 . Investments

FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2017 AND 2016 Loss Payment Fund

A summary of investments by type is reported below: 5 . Investments

June 30, 2017 A summary of investments by type is reported below: Cost Fair Value

June 30, 2016

2017

Loss Payment Fund

Medical Fund

2016 Medical Fund

Operating and nonoperating: Cost Fair Value Diocese of Trenton Financial Statements: For the Years Ended June 30, 2017 and 2016 $ 10,869,175 $ 31,607,465 $ 10,050,648 $ 32,020,214 Revenues

Mutual funds: Equity International equity Fixed income Mutual funds: Common Equity stocks U.S. governmentequity agency issues International Certificates of deposit Fixed income Common stocks U.S. government agency issues • 26 Continued Certificates offrom deposit

June 30, 2017

$

2,580,208 Cost 298,477 8,323,391 288,148 $ 2,580,208 298,477828,978 8,323,391 288,148 $ 12,319,202828,978

June 30, 2016

$ Fair 3,714,673 Value 410,678 8,380,488 610,752 $ 3,714,673 410,678828,978 8,380,488 610,752 $ 13,945,569828,978

Notes to Financial Statements:

$

2,823,142 Cost 424,733 8,562,395 344,057 $ 2,823,142 900,286 424,733 827,971 8,562,395 344,057 $ 13,882,584 900,286 827,971

Expenses Transfers between funds Deficit in net assets

$ Fair 3,624,353 Value 467,283 8,745,490 671,363 $ 3,624,353 900,324 467,283 827,971 8,745,490 671,363 $ 15,236,784 900,324 827,971

2017

A summary of property and equipment is as follows:

2016

$ 12,250,866 June $30,14,835,883 18,957,241 18,869,180 2017 2016 6,298,062 6,136,770 37,506,169 $ 14,835,883 39,841,833 $ 12,250,866 18,957,241 18,869,180 (14,924,130) (13,755,779) 6,298,062 6,136,770 37,506,169 39,841,833 $ 22,582,039 $ 26,086,054 (14,924,130) (13,755,779)

Real estate development sites Land, buildings and improvements Furniture and equipment Real estate development sites Land, buildings and improvements Less accumulated depreciation Furniture and equipment Property and equipment, net Less accumulated depreciation

Property and equipment, net THE DIOCESE OF TRENTON $ 22,582,039 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2017 AND 2016

$ 26,086,054

Operating and nonoperating: Revenues Expenses Transfers between funds Deficit in net assets

Loss Payment Fund

2016

Trust Funds: Catholic missions Senior citizens

$

6,834 2,522,909

$

6,834 2,522,909 1,103,620 3,633,363

2016

$

7,347 2,166,102 1,032,119 3,205,568

1,318,000 1,259,000 2,346,000 1,427,000 105,939 6,455,939

1,545,000 948,000 1,993,000 1,413,000 73,814 5,972,814

367,352

402,531

Operating Funds: Priests' retirement 60,791 THE DIOCESE OF TRENTON Catholic schools 290,000 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Morris Hall/Villa Neumann 7,426 FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2017 AND 2016 358,217

60,791 290,000 7,426 358,217

Seminary Funds: Education of Diocesan seminarians

$

9,939,130

Trust Funds: Catholic missions Senior citizens Others

14

$

Seminary Funds: Education of Diocesan seminarians

21,467 296,037 267,668 585,172

$

21,467 296,037 267,668 585,172

226,873 $

812,045

$

812,045

11. Net Assets Released from Restriction Net assets were released from donor restrictions by incurring expenses to satisfy the restricted program purposes as follows: 2017 Trust Funds Annual Catholic Appeal Seminary Funds

June 30,

2016

$

128,743 5,227,615 9,140

$

127,746 5,654,797 8,506

$

5,365,498

$

5,791,049

12. Endowment Funds Accounting standards for the classification and disclosure of endowments of not-for-profit organizations provide guidance on the net asset classification of donor-restricted endowment funds for a not-for-profit organization that is subject to an enacted version of the Uniform Prudent Management of Institutional Funds Act of 2006 (UPMIFA) and require additional disclosures about an organization's endowment funds. The state of New Jersey has adopted UPMIFA. The following disclosures are made as required by accounting standards. The endowment of the Diocese of Trenton consists of 15 donor-restricted endowment funds established for various purposes. Management has interpreted New Jersey UPMIFA as requiring the preservation of the fair value of the original gift as of the gift date of the donor-restricted endowment funds absent explicit donor stipulations to the contrary. As a result of this interpretation, the Diocese classifies as permanently restricted net assets (a) the original value of gifts donatedTHE to the permanent DIOCESE OFendowment, TRENTON (b) the original value of subsequent gifts to the permanent endowment and accumulations to the permanent endowment made in NOTES TO(c) FINANCIAL STATEMENTS accordance with the direction of the applicable donor gift instrument the time FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2017atAND 2016the accumulation is added to the fund. The remaining portion of the donor-restricted endowment that is not classified in permanently restricted net assets is classified as temporarily restricted net assets until those amounts are appropriated for expenditure by the Diocese in a manner consistent with the standard of prudence prescribed by New Jersey UPMIFA. Funds (continued) 12. Endowment In accordance with New Jersey UPMIFA, the Diocese considers the following factors in making a determination to appropriate or accumulate donor-restricted endowment funds, (1) the duration and preservation of the fund (2) the purposes of the Diocese and the donor-restricted endowment fund

16

(3) general economic conditions (4) the possible effect of inflation and deflation (5) the expected total return from income and the appreciation of investments (6) other resources of the Diocese (7) the investment policies of the Diocese Endowment net assets composition by type of fund as of June 30, 2017 is as follows: Temporarily Permanently Restricted Restricted Donor-restricted endowment funds

$ 2,072,579

$

812,045

Changes in endowment net assets for the year ended June 30, 2017 are as follows

February 2018 • State 2016 7,347 2,166,102

15

226,873

Total $ 2,884,624

Continued on • 28

Temporarily Permanently Restricted Restricted

10. Temporarily Restricted and Permanently Restricted Net Assets Temporarily restricted net assets are restricted for the following purposes and amounts: June 30,

$

Annual Catholic Appeal: Apostolic ministry and priestly support Evangelization and family life Catholic education Charitable works and parish needs Other

14 Medical Fund

$ 10,869,175 $ 31,607,465 $ 10,050,648 $ 32,020,214 8,803,599 34,718,881 7,675,017 33,558,257 (30,401) (28,700) (4,450,134) (8,495,780) (6,485,309) (5,384,364)

2017

Trust Funds: Catholic missions Senior citizens Others

June 30,

Permanently restricted net assets are restricted to investment in perpetuity for the following purposes and amounts: June 30, 2017 2016

Revenues and expenses for the years ended June 30, 2017 and 2016 and deficit in net assets at 14 June 30, 2017 and 2016 for the loss payment fund and the medical fund, which include the other post-retirement benefit obligation costs (see Note 15), are as follows:

Medical Fund

2017

$ 10,814,871

THE DIOCESE OF TRENTON The Diocese is a guarantor of debt represented by certain bonds, notes, mortgages and letters of credit of NOTES FINANCIAL parishes and other Catholic agencies and TO institutions with STATEMENTS various financial institutions with maturities up to FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 2017guarantees AND 2016 if the parishes and other 7. Commitments and Contingencies 20 years. The Diocese would be obligated to perform under30, these Catholic agencies failed to pay principal and interest payments to the financial institutions when of due, meet The Diocese is a guarantor of debt represented by certain bonds, notes, mortgages and letters credit of debt service ratiosagencies or, in theand case of construction projects, wouldinstitutions fail to havewith sufficient funds parishes andcoverage other Catholic institutions with various financial maturities up to to 2017, the Diocese has not been required to perform under these complete the projects. As of June 30, 13 20Commitments years. The Diocese would be obligated to perform under these guarantees if the parishes and other 7. and Contingencies 2017. The Diocese is guarantees. Such guarantees approximated $78,000,000 in principal at June 30, Catholic agencies failed to pay principal and interest payments to the financial institutions when due, meet also aservice limitedcoverage for of one of the its Catholic agencies' projects. amounts are not The isguarantor a guarantor debt represented by certain construction bonds, notes, mortgages and sufficient letters of funds credit of debt Diocese ratios or, in case of construction projects, would fail toThese have to included theother accompanying financial statements. parishes and Catholic institutions with various institutions with maturities up13 to 2017, the Diocese has notfinancial been required to perform under these completein the projects. As ofagencies June 30,and 20 years. The Diocese would be obligated to$78,000,000 perform under these guarantees if the parishes and other 2017. The Diocese is guarantees. Such guarantees approximated in principal at June 30, The Diocese had a contract with a consultant, which expired in 2017, to provide comprehensive campaign Catholic agencies failed to pay and interest payments to the financial institutions when due, also a limited guarantor oneprincipal of its Catholic agencies' construction These amounts aremeet not planning, direction, and for implementation services in connection withprojects. the Faith to Move Mountains debt service coverage ratios or, in the case of construction projects, would fail to have sufficient funds to included in the financial statements. $3,760,000 plus reimbursement of certain expenses Campaign. Theaccompanying consultant received approximately complete the projects. As of June 30, 2017, the Diocese has not been required to perform under these during the term ofathe contract. These payments will expired be offsetinagainst funds comprehensive raised and transferred to The Diocese had contract with a consultant, which 2017, tothe campaign 2017. The Diocese is guarantees. Such guarantees approximated $78,000,000 in principal atprovide June 30, the parishes and charitable trusts in connection withintheconnection campaign. with For the ended JuneMountains 30, 2017 planning, direction, and for implementation services the years Faith to Move also a limited guarantor one of its Catholic agencies' construction projects. These amounts are not and 2016, total payments of received approximately $946,000 and $1,751,000, respectively, were made toward the Campaign. Theaccompanying consultant included in the financialapproximately statements. $3,760,000 plus reimbursement of certain expenses contract. during the term of the contract. These payments will be offset against the funds raised and transferred to The Diocese had contract with a consultant, which expired in 2017, to provide comprehensive campaign theNotes parishes and acharitable 8. Payable to Bank trusts in connection with the campaign. For the years ended June 30, 2017 planning, and of implementation the Faithwere to Move Mountains and 2016, direction, total payments approximately services $946,000 in andconnection $1,751,000,with respectively, made toward the Campaign. received plus which reimbursement certain expenses expired onofApril 30, 2016 and The DioceseThe hadconsultant a bank line of creditapproximately in the amount$3,760,000 of $2,000,000 contract. during term of The the contract. payments willinbe against the accounts funds raised transferred to was notthe renewed. bank hadThese a security interest theoffset Diocese deposit andand investments with 8. Payable to Bank theNotes parishes andinterest charitable trustsequaled in connection with of thethe campaign. For the June 30, 2017 the bank. The charged the lesser bank's prime rateyears less ended 1.5% or LIBOR plus and 2016, total payments of approximately $946,000 and $1,751,000, respectively, were made toward the 1.25%. The Diocese had a bank line of credit in the amount of $2,000,000 which expired on April 30, 2016 and contract. was not renewed. The bank had a security interest in the Diocese deposit accounts and investments with 9. Insurance Funds theNotes bank.Payable The interest charged equaled the lesser of the bank's prime rate less 1.5% or LIBOR plus 8. to Bank The Diocese's Insurance Funds consist of the following: 1.25%. The Diocese had a bank line of credit in the amount of $2,000,000 which expired on April 30, 2016 and Payment Fund:had The Dioceseinterest has ainmodified protected andand casualty, workers' 9. Insurance Funds was notLoss renewed. The bank a security the Diocese depositliability accounts investments with compensation property self-insurance for affiliated organizations a the bank. The interestand charged equaled the lesserprogram of the bank's prime rate less 1.5%described or LIBORas plus The Diocese's Insurance Funds consist of the following: 1.25%. "loss payment fund." Under this program, the Diocese has obtained insurance coverage of $40,000,000 for Fund: most liability and casualty with protected a deductible of $250,000 per occurrence Loss Payment The Diocese has aclaims modified liability and casualty, workers' 9. Insurance Funds during the policy period. Theself-insurance Diocese has insurance coverage fororganizations property claims to a blanket compensation and property program for affiliated described as a limit of $75,000,000 per occurrence, with a deductible of $500,000 per occurrence. Actual claims "loss payment program, The Diocese's Insurancefund." Funds Under consist this of the following:the Diocese has obtained insurance coverage of not covered by insurance are funded by the affiliated organizations' contributions and the assets $40,000,000 for most liability and casualty claims with a deductible of $250,000 per occurrence of the loss fund. Loss Payment TheThe Diocese has modified coverage protected for liability and claims casualty, during the payment policyFund: period. Diocese hasa insurance property to aworkers' blanket compensation and property self-insurance program for affiliated per organizations described as a limit of $75,000,000 per occurrence, a deductible of $500,000 Actual claims The Diocese is involved in severalwith pending legal matters. In the occurrence. opinion of the Diocese's "loss payment fund." Under this program, the Diocese has obtained insurance coverage of not covered bythe insurance are funded by the affiliated contributions the on assets management, final resolution of these matters will organizations' not have a material adverseand effect the $40,000,000 for most liability and casualty claims with a deductible of $250,000 per occurrence of the loss financial payment position. fund. Diocese's To the extent a liability has been determined, a reserve has been during the policy period. The Diocese has insurance coverage for property claims to a blanket 2017 and 2016. pending legal matters. In the opinion of the Diocese's accrued at Juneis 30, The of Diocese involved in several limit $75,000,000 per occurrence, with a deductible of $500,000 per occurrence. Actual claims management, the final resolution of these matters willorganizations' not reimbursement have a material adverse effect on the not covered insurance aremedical funded by the affiliated contributions and themedical assets Medical Fund:byThe Diocese's benefit plan provides for the cost of Diocese's financial position. To the extent a liability has and beenlaydetermined, has been of the loss payment fund. expenses, subject to various limits, for Diocesan clergy employees.a reserve The Diocese has 2017 andfor 2016. accrued at June 30,coverage obtained insurance these medical costs. The plan also includes a provision for life The Diocese is involved in several pending legal matters. In the opinion of the Diocese's insurance benefits of $2,000, plus modest disability and dental benefits for Diocesan clergy. Medical Fund: the Thefinal Diocese's medical benefit plan provides reimbursement the cost of medical management, resolution of these matters will not have a material for adverse effect on the Additionally, the plan provides for Long-Term Disability for laylay employees. TheThe benefits paidhas by expenses, subject to variousTo limits, for Diocesan clergy employees. Diocese Diocese's financial position. the extent a liability has and been determined, a reserve has been these funds and the insurance premiums arecosts. funded byplan assessments to athe participating obtained insurance coverage for these medical The also includes provision for life accrued at June 30, 2017 and 2016. organizations. insurance benefits of $2,000, plus modest disability and dental benefits for Diocesan clergy. Medical Fund: The Diocese's medical benefit OF plan provides thebenefits cost of medical Additionally, the plan provides for DIOCESE Long-Term Disability forreimbursement lay employees.for The paid by THE TRENTON expenses, subject to various limits, for Diocesan clergy and employees.to The has these funds and the insurance areSTATEMENTS funded by lay assessments the Diocese participating NOTES TOpremiums FINANCIAL obtained insurance coverage for these medical costs. The plan also includes a provision for life organizations. FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2017 AND 2016 insurance benefits of $2,000, plus modest disability and dental benefits for Diocesan clergy. Additionally, the plan provides for Long-Term Disability for lay employees. The benefits paid by these funds and the insurance premiums are funded by assessments to the participating organizations. 9. Insurance Funds (continued)

2017

33,558,257 (5,384,364)

10. Temporarily Restricted and Permanently Restricted Net Assets (continued)

THE DIOCESE OF TRENTON NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2017 AND 2016 7. Commitments and Contingencies

Loss Payment Fund

7,675,017 (28,700) (6,485,309)

Temporarily restricted net assets are restricted for the following purposes and amounts:

amounts reported inare the exposed statements financial position. These investments to of various risks such as market volatility, interest rate and credit risks. Due to the level risk associated with investments, it is at least reasonably possible that changes in the 6. Property and of Equipment values of these securities will occur in the near term and that such changes could materially affect the amounts reported in theand statements of financial position. A summary of property equipment is as follows: June 30,

34,718,881 (8,495,780)

10. Temporarily Restricted and Permanently Restricted Net Assets

Net unrealized gain on investments of$ $272,167 in 2017 and net unrealized loss on$ investments 12,319,202 $ 13,945,569 $ 13,882,584 15,236,784 of $(1,288,246) in 2016 are included in net realized and unrealized gain (loss) on investments in the statements of activities. Investment expense of $10,386 and $14,738 for the years ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, respectively, included in of legal and professional fee expense in the statements of activities.of Net unrealized gain onare investments $272,167 in 2017 and net unrealized loss on investments $(1,288,246) in 2016 included in net risks realized and gain (loss) onrate investments the These investments areare exposed to various such as unrealized market volatility, interest and creditinrisks. $14,738 for the possible years ended June 30, in 2017 statements of activities. Investmentwith expense of $10,386 Due to the level of risk associated investments, it is and at least reasonably that changes the and 2016, respectively, are will included feesuch expense in thecould statements of activities. values of these securities occurininlegal the and nearprofessional term and that changes materially affect the

6. Property and Equipment

8,803,599 (30,401) (4,450,134)

Endowment net assets, beginning of year Interest and dividend income Net realized and unrealized gain Amounts appropriated for expenditure

Total of the Diocese • 27

$ 1,794,772 $ 33,332 264,869 (20,394)

812,045 -

$ 2,606,817 33,332 264,869 (20,394)


employee or to which the priest is assigned.

(4) the possible effect of inflation and deflation (5) the expected total return from income and the appreciation of investments (5) the expected total return from income and the appreciation of investments (6) other resources of the Diocese (6) other resources of the Diocese (7) the investment policies of the Diocese (7) the investment policies of the Diocese

The plans are managed by the Diocese. The total pension and retirement plan expense included in these financial statements for these plans was approximately $537,000 and $621,000 for the years ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, respectively.

risks of participating in these multiemployer benefit pension2016 plans are different from singleDiocese of Trenton Financial Statements: For theThe Years Ended June 30,defined 2017 and employer plans because: (a) assets contributed to the multiemployer plan by one employer may be used

to provide benefits to employees of other participating employers and (b) if a participating employer stops contributing to the plan, the unfunded obligations of the plan may be required to be borne by the Diocese and the remaining participating employers. There is currently no provision in the plans to recognize an employer withdrawal.

Endowment net assets composition by type of fund as of June 30, 2017 is as follows: Endowment net assets composition by type of fund as of June 30, 2017 is as follows: Temporarily Permanently Temporarily Restricted Permanently Restricted Restricted Restricted

Notes to Financial Statements:

$ 2,072,579 $ $ 2,072,579 $

Donor-restricted endowment funds Donor-restricted endowment funds

Total Total

The following table presents information about the Diocese’s multiemployer pension plans as of and for the years ended June 30, 2017 and 2016:

812,045 $ 2,884,624 812,045 $ 2,884,624

Contributions for the years ended June 30,

Continued from • 27 Changes in endowment net assets for the year ended June 30, 2017 are as follows Changes in endowment net assets for the year ended June 30, 2017 are as follows

Pension Fund

Temporarily Permanently Temporarily Restricted Restricted Total THE DIOCESE OF TRENTON Permanently Restricted Restricted Total THE DIOCESE OF TRENTON NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NOTES FINANCIAL STATEMENTS THETO OF1,794,772 TRENTON FOR beginning THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2017$AND812,045 2016 Endowment net assets, ofDIOCESE year $ $ 2,606,817 FOR beginning THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2017 AND812,045 2016 THEofDIOCESE OF TRENTON NOTES FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Endowment year $ 1,794,772 Interestnet andassets, dividend incomeTO 33,332 $ - $ 2,606,817 33,332 NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2017 AND 2016 Interest and and dividend income 33,332 33,332 Net realized gainENDED JUNE 264,869 264,869 FORunrealized THE YEARS 30, 2017 AND 2016 Net realized and unrealized gain 264,869 264,869 Amounts appropriated for expenditure (20,394) (20,394) 12. Endowment Funds (continued) 12. Endowment Funds (continued)for expenditure Amounts (20,394) $ (20,394) Endowment netappropriated assets, end of Endowment net assets composition byyear type of fund as$of2,072,579 June 30, 2016 is812,045 as follows:$ 2,884,624 12. Endowment Funds (continued) Endowment net composition assets, end of $ is 812,045 Endowment net assets byyear type of fund as $of 2,072,579 June 30, 2016 as follows:$ 2,884,624 12. Endowment Funds (continued) Endowment net assets composition by type of fund as of June 30, 2016 is as follows: Permanently Endowment net assets composition by type of fund as Temporarily of June 30, 2016 is as follows: Temporarily Permanently Restricted Restricted Total Restricted Restricted Total Temporarily Permanently Temporarily Permanently Restricted Restricted Total $ Restricted 1,794,772 $ Restricted 812,045 $ 2,606,817 Donor-restricted endowment funds Total $ 1,794,772 $ 812,045 $ 2,606,817 Donor-restricted endowment funds Donor-restricted endowment funds Donor-restricted endowment funds

$ 1,794,772 $ 1,794,772

$ $

812,045 812,045

Lay Plan Priest Plan

Total contributions from all employers in the Plan for the years ended December 31,

Present value of accumulated plan benefits as of January 1,

Total plan assets as of December 31,

2017

2016

2016

2015

2017

2016

2016

2015

$ 420,506 115,636

$ 491,395 129,707

$ 11,726,866 1,384,661

$ 12,156,970 1,334,957

$ 214,792,431 20,894,790

$ 206,235,954 20,873,620

$ 199,882,019 18,917,407

$ 184,857,148 17,321,214

The funding ratio for the Lay Plan as of January 1, 2017 and 2016, was 93% and 90%, respectively. The DIOCESE OF and TRENTON 2016, was 91% and 83%, respectively. The funding ratio for the Priest Plan as ofTHE January 1, 2017 NOTES TOfrom FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Diocese was not subject to any surcharges either plan for the years ended June 30, 2017 and 2016. FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2017 The Diocese's contributions to the Priest Plan were over 5% of totalAND plan2016 contributions based upon the plan's years ended December 31, 2016 and 2015. 19

15. Other Postretirement Benefit Plans

In addition to the Diocese's defined benefit pension plan, the Diocese sponsors an unfunded defined benefit health care and life insurance benefits plan to retired priests who have been incardinated prior to their 65th birthday and have worked 10 years and attained age 70 while in service with the Diocese and lay people who have worked 20 years and attained age 65. The plan is noncontributory and contains costsharing features such as deductibles and coinsurance. The accounting for the plan anticipates future cost-sharing changes to the written plan that are consistent with the Diocese's expressed intent to increase the cost-sharing annually for the expected general inflation rate for that year. The Diocese's policy is to fund the cost of medical benefits in amounts determined at the discretion of management.

$ 2,606,817 $ 2,606,817

Changes in endowment net assets for the year ended June 30, 2016 are as follows: Changes in endowment net assets for the year ended June 30, 2016 are as follows: Changes in endowment net assets for the year ended June 30, 2016 are as follows: Changes in endowment net assets for the year ended Temporarily June 30, 2016 Permanently are as follows: Temporarily Permanently Total Restricted Restricted Restricted Restricted Total Temporarily Permanently Temporarily Permanently Restricted Restricted Total Endowment net assets, beginning of year $ Restricted 1,907,736 $ 812,045 $ 2,719,781 Total Endowment net assets, beginning of year $ 1,907,736 $ Restricted 812,045 $ 2,719,781 Interest and dividend income 72,213 72,213 17 Interest and dividend income 72,213 72,213 Endowment net assets, beginningloss of year $ 1,907,736 17 Net realized and unrealized (166,017) $ 812,045- $ 2,719,781 (166,017) Endowment net assets, beginning of year $ 1,907,736 $ 812,045 $ 2,719,781 Net realized and unrealized loss (166,017) (166,017) Interest and dividend income 72,213 72,213 Amounts appropriated for expenditure (19,160) (19,160) Interest and dividend income 72,213 72,213 Amounts appropriated for expenditure (19,160) (19,160) Net realized and unrealized loss (166,017) (166,017) Endowment net assets, end of year $ 1,794,772 $ 812,045 $ 2,606,817 Net realized and unrealized loss (166,017) (166,017) Endowment netappropriated assets, end of $ 1,794,772 Amounts foryear expenditure (19,160) $ 812,045-- $ 2,606,817 (19,160) Amounts appropriated for expenditure (19,160) (19,160) Funds with Deficiencies Endowment net assets, end of year $ 1,794,772 $ 812,045 $ 2,606,817 Funds with Deficiencies Endowment net assets, end of year $ 1,794,772 $ 812,045 $ 2,606,817 At times, fair value of assets associated with individual donor-restricted endowment funds may fall Funds withthe Deficiencies At times, the fair value of assets associated with individual donor-restricted endowment funds maywere fall below that the donor requires the Diocese to retain as a fund of perpetual duration. There Funds the withlevel Deficiencies below the levelfair that the donor requires Diocese to retain as a fund of perpetual duration. There At the value of assets associated with individual donor-restricted endowment funds maywere fall no times, such deficiencies of this nature as ofthe June 30, 2017 and 2016. no times, such deficiencies of this nature as ofthe June 30, 2017 and 2016. At the value of assets associated with individual donor-restricted endowment funds maywere fall below the levelfair that the donor requires Diocese to retain as a fund of perpetual duration. There Return Objectives and Risk Parameters below the level that the donor requires Diocese to retain as a fund of perpetual duration. There were no such deficiencies of Risk this nature as ofthe June 30, 2017 and 2016. Return Objectives and Parameters no such deficiencies of thisinvestment nature as of June 30, 2017 and 2016. The Diocese has adopted and spending policies for endowment assets that attempt to provide Return Objectives and Risk Parameters The Diocese has adopted investment and spending policies for endowment endowment while assetsseeking that attempt to provide a predictable stream funding to programs supported by its to maintain the Return Objectives andofRisk Parameters a predictable stream of funding to programs supported byassets its while seeking to maintain the purchasing of the endowment assets. Endowment include those assets donor-restricted The Diocesepower has adopted investment and spending policies for endowment endowment assets that of attempt to provide purchasing power of the endowment assets. Endowment assets include those assets of donor-restricted The Diocese has adopted investment and spending policies for endowment assets that attempt to provide funds that thestream Diocese must hold in perpetuity. The primary long-term management is the a predictable of funding to programs supported by its endowment while seeking objective to maintain funds that the Diocese must inassets. perpetuity. The primary long-term management is the a predictable of funding to programs supported byassets its endowment whileassets seeking to maintain preservation ofstream principal, both inhold nominal and real terms. purchasing power of the endowment Endowment include those of objective donor-restricted preservation of principal, inhold nominal and real terms. purchasing power of the both endowment Endowment assetslong-term include those assets of objective donor-restricted funds that the Diocese must inassets. perpetuity. The primary management is the Strategies Employed for Achieving Objectives funds that the Diocese both mustinhold in perpetuity. The primary long-term management objective is the preservation of principal, nominal and real terms. Strategies Employed for Achieving Objectives preservation principal, rate both of in nominal and real terms. To satisfy itsoflong-term return objectives, the Diocese relies on a total return strategy in which Strategies for Achieving Objectives To satisfy Employed its long-term rate of return objectives, the appreciation Diocese relies on a total strategy which investment returns are both capital (realized and return unrealized) andincurrent Strategies Employed forachieved Achievingthrough Objectives investment returns are achieved through both capital (realized unrealized) andincurrent yield (interest and dividends). a minimum, the investment ofand endowment assets should To satisfy its long-term rate ofAtreturn objectives, the appreciation Dioceseperformance relies on a total return strategy which yield (interest and dividends). a minimum, the investment ofand endowment assets should To satisfy long-term rate return objectives, the appreciation Diocese relies on a total return strategy incurrent which achieve anits annual return of atofAt least inflation (as measured by performance the Consumer Price Index [CPI]) four investment returns are achieved through both capital (realized unrealized) andplus achieve an annual return of should at At least inflation (as measured by performance the Consumer Price Index [CPI]) four investment returns are This achieved through both capital appreciation (realized unrealized) andplus current (4) percentage points. averaged over rolling three-year periods. yield (interest and dividends). abe minimum, the investment ofand endowment assets should (4) percentage points. This averaged over rolling three-year periods. yield (interest and dividends). abe minimum, the investment ofPrice endowment assets should achieve an annual return of should at At least inflation (as measured by performance the Consumer Index [CPI]) plus four Spending Policy and How the Investment Objectives Relate to Spending Policy achieve an annual return of should at leastbeinflation (asover measured by the Consumer Price Index [CPI]) plus four (4) percentage This averaged rolling to three-year Spending Policypoints. and How the Investment Objectives Relate Spendingperiods. Policy (4) percentage points. This should be averaged over rolling three-year periods. The Diocese has spending policy that is primarily driven. In determining the amounts Spending Policy anda the Investment Objectives Relatedemand to Spending Policy The Diocese aHow spending policy that is primarily demand driven. In determining the amounts appropriated forhas expenditure, Diocese considers the accumulated earnings Spending Policy and How the the Investment Objectives Relate to Spending Policy on each of the endowment appropriated for expenditure, the Diocese considers the accumulated earnings on each of the endowment gifts. In establishing policy, the Diocese the long-term expectedInreturn on its endowment. The Diocese has athis spending policy thatconsiders is primarily demand driven. determining the amounts gifts. In establishing policy, the Diocese considers theaccumulated long-term expected on its endowment. The Diocese athis spending policy that is primarily demand driven. Inreturn determining the amounts appropriated forhas expenditure, the Diocese considers the earnings on each of the endowment THEas DIOCESE OF TRENTON The target spending rate is that which, part of the total return, satisfies these - endowment (a) permits appropriated for expenditure, the Diocese considers accumulated earnings on conditions each of the gifts. In establishing this policy, the Diocese considers the long-term expected return on its endowment. The target spending rate is that which, as FINANCIAL partthe of real totalpurchasing return, satisfies conditions -(b)(a)permits permits NOTES TO reinvestment of enough total return to preserve power these of return current a gifts. In establishing this policy, the Diocese considers theSTATEMENTS long-term expected onfunds, its endowment. reinvestment of enough total return to preserve real purchasing power of current funds, a FOR THE YEARS JUNE 30, 2017 AND 2016 level of consistency and stability inwhich, the programs ofofthe Diocese, (c) is sustainable over time regardless of The target spending rate is that as ENDED partthe total return, satisfies these conditions -(b)(a)permits permits level of consistency and stability in the programs of the Diocese, (c) is sustainable over time regardless of The target spending rate is that which, partthe of real total return, satisfies these conditions -(b)(a)permits permits periodic variations in the levels required toas satisfy (a), andpurchasing (d) recognizes that preclude reinvestment of enough total return to preserve power ofcircumstances current funds, may a periodic variations in the levels required to satisfy (a), and (d) recognizes that circumstances may preclude reinvestment of all enough total return preserve the realDiocese, purchasing power of current funds, (b) permitsof a achievement of three intoany one year. level of consistency and objectives stability in the programs of the (c) is sustainable over time regardless achievement of all three objectives in any one year. level of consistency and stability in the programs of the Diocese, (c) is sustainable over time regardless of periodic variations in the levels required to satisfy (a), and (d) recognizes that circumstances may preclude 13. Defined Contribution Plan required periodic variations the objectives levels satisfy (a), and (d) recognizes that circumstances may preclude achievement of all in three in anytoone year. achievement of all three objectives in any one year. Full-time employees hired after the effective date of October 1, 2005, are eligible to participate in 18 a 18 Section 403(b)(7) Pension Trust and can contribute up to the Internal Revenue Service's dollar limit set by of law, which is $18,000 for the years 2017 and 2016. Participants who have completed one year 18 18 employment are eligible for matching contributions by the Diocese of up to 5% of the participant's gross salary. Total employer contributions to the plan was approximately $72,000 and $63,000 for the years ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, respectively.

The annual measurement date is June 30 for other postretirement benefits. The following tables provide further information about the Diocese's postretirement benefit plans: Obligations and Funded Status

Benefit obligation Fair value of plan assets Funded status - reported as postretirement benefits obligation in the statements of financial position Employer contributions Participant contributions Benefits paid

June 30, 2017

2016

$ 17,495,420 -

$ 15,212,363 -

$ (17,495,420) $ (15,212,363) $

415,382 $ (415,382)

516,399 (516,399)

Amounts recognized in the statements of activities for the years ended June 30, consist of: 2017 Net loss $ Amortization of prior service cost and net gain Total postretirement benefit changes other than periodic postretirement benefit cost Net periodic postretirement benefit cost $

2016

1,372,350 $ (147,327) 1,225,023 1,473,416 2,698,439

$

862,860 (45,581) 817,279 1,164,088 1,981,367

Net loss (gain) and net prior service cost recognized as changes in unrestricted net assets but not yet included in net periodic benefit cost: 2017 Net loss $ 1,675,352 $ THE DIOCESE OF TRENTON 150,472 Prior service cost NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Amounts previously recognized in unrestricted net FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2017 AND 2016 assets, not yet recognized as periodic postretirement $ 1,825,824 $ benefit cost

2016 388,658 212,143 600,801

15. Other Postretirement Benefit Plans (continued)

20 The estimated net loss, and prior service cost that will be amortized from changes in unrestricted net assets to net periodic benefit cost in 2018 are $69,201 and $61,671, respectively.

14. Multiemployer Pension Plans The Diocese of Trenton is a participating employer in two separate multiemployer defined benefit pension plans providing benefits for lay employees and priest personnel. The Pension Plan of The Diocese of Trenton, Its Churches, Institutions and Agencies (Lay Plan) EIN: 21-0634970 Plan: 001 and The Diocese of Trenton Pension Plan for Priests (Priest Plan) EIN: 21-0634970 Plan: 003 qualify as church institutions under the Internal Revenue Code and are, therefore, not subject to the provisions of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA), nor are the Plan’s benefits guaranteed by the Pension Benefit Guarantee Corporation. Plan information is not publicly available. The Lay Plan is a defined benefit pension plan covering substantially all lay employees of the Diocese. Prior service costs are amortized over a period of twenty-five years. The Lay Plan provides for 100% vesting of benefits after five years of credited service. The Diocese's policy is to fund pension costs currently. The Lay Plan provides retirement benefits to eligible lay personnel based on employee’s compensation and years of service. Effective October 1, 2005, the Lay Plan was frozen for, and excludes, employees hired on or after the effective date. The Priest Plan provides retirement benefits to priest personnel for life based on age and years of service. Contributions to the Lay and Priest Plans are made by the parish or organization that employs the lay employee or to which the priest is assigned. The plans are managed by the Diocese. The total pension and retirement plan expense included in these financial statements for these plans was approximately $537,000 and $621,000 for the years ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, respectively. The risks of participating in these multiemployer defined benefit pension plans are different from singleemployer plans because: (a) assets contributed to the multiemployer plan by one employer may be used to provide benefits to employees of other participating employers and (b) if a participating employer stops contributing to the plan, the unfunded obligations of the plan may be required to be borne by the Diocese and the remaining participating employers. There is currently no provision in the plans to recognize an employer withdrawal. The following table presents information about the Diocese’s multiemployer pension plans as of and for the years ended June 30, 2017 and 2016:

28 • State of the Diocese • February 2018 Pension Fund

Contributions for the years ended June 30, 2017

2016

Total contributions from all employers in the Plan for the years ended December 31, 2016

2015

Present value of accumulated plan benefits as of January 1, 2017

2016

Total plan assets as of December 31, 2016

2015

Assumptions: The discount rate used to determine the postretirement benefit cost was 3.29% and 4.15% for the years ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, respectively. The discount rate used to determine the postretirement benefit obligation was 3.64% and 3.29% for the years ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, respectively. The health care cost trend rates used to measure the expected cost of benefits covered by the plan are as follows: fiscal year 2018 - 6%, and 2019 and thereafter - 4.5%. Cash Flows: The Diocese expects to contribute approximately $695,000 to the postretirement benefit plans in the next fiscal year. The following benefits, which reflect expected future service, as appropriate, are expected to be paid for the years ending June 30: 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 to 2027 Total 16. Functional Expenses

$

695,000 767,000 847,000 896,000 958,000 5,420,000

$

9,583,000

Continued on • 29

The costs of providing the Diocese's programs and activities have been summarized on a functional basis below. Accordingly, certain costs have been allocated among the programs and supporting services benefited. For the Years Ended June 30, 2017 2016


YOU’LL FEEL RIGHT AT HOME AT YOU’LL FEEL RIGHT AT HOME AT YOU’LLCOMMUNITIES! FEEL RIGHT AT HOME AT ANY OF OUR SENIOR Diocese of Trenton Financial For the Years Ended June 30, 2017 and 2016 ANY OFStatements: OUR SENIOR COMMUNITIES!

follows: fiscal year 2018 - 6%, and 2019 and thereafter - 4.5%. Cash Flows:

The Diocese expects to contribute approximately $695,000 to the postretirement benefit plans in the next fiscal year.

ANY OF OUR SENIOR COMMUNITIES!

YOU’LL FEEL RIGHT AT HOME AT YOU’LLFEEL FEELRIGHT RIGHTAT ATHOME HOMEAT AT YOU’LL ANY OF OUR SENIOR COMMUNITIES! CATHEDRAL SQUARE ANYOF OFOUR OURSENIOR SENIOR COMMUNITIES! ANY COMMUNITIES! YOU’LL FEEL RIGHT RIGHT ATHOME HOME ATHOUSING CATHEDRAL SQUARE EWING INDEPENDENT SENIOR CITIZENS YOU’LL FEEL AT AT

The following benefits, which reflect expected future service, as appropriate, are expected to be paid for the years ending June 30: 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 to 2027

$

695,000 767,000 847,000 896,000 958,000 5,420,000

CATHEDRAL SQUARE ANY OUR SENIOR COMMUNITIES! LIVING ANY OF OF OUR SENIOR COMMUNITIES! SENIOR CITIZENS SENIOR CITIZENS HOUSING 26 WESTHOUSING HANOVER PLACE 1015 Whitehead Road Ext CATHEDRAL SQUARE Trenton, NJ 08608 CATHEDRAL SQUARE CATHEDRAL SQUARE Ewing, NJ 08638 CATHEDRAL SQUARE CATHEDRAL SQUARE SENIOR CITIZENS HOUSING EWING SENIORPLACE CITIZENS HOUSING SENIOR CITIZENS HOUSING 609-392-1111 SENIOR CITIZENS HOUSING EWING INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT SENIOR CITIZENS HOUSING 26 WEST HANOVER 609-883-8500 26 WEST HANOVER PLACE LIVING

Notes to Financial Statements:EWINGEWING INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT LIVING LIVING EWING INDEPENDENT Continued from • 28

EWINGINDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EWING LIVING Whitehead Road Ext LIVING 1015 Whitehead LIVING Road Ext

Total

$

16. Functional Expenses

9,583,000 1015

LIVING

• One bedroom & studio apartments • Social activities One bedroom/one bath & two bedroom/two bath accessible apart26 WEST HANOVER PLACE Trenton, NJ2608608 WEST HANOVER PLACE 1015 Whitehead Road Ext26 WEST HANOVER PLACE ments. Too many amenities to list—please come • Off-Street parking • Laundry 1015 Whitehead Road Ext 26 WEST Trenton, NJ 08608 Ewing, NJ 08638 Trenton, NJfacilities 08608 HANOVER PLACE 26 WEST HANOVER PLACE Trenton, NJ 08608 1015 Whitehead Road Ext

Whitehead Road Ext Ewing, 08638 The costs of providing the Diocese's programs and activities have been summarized on1015 aNJ functional basisRoad 1015 Whitehead Ext below. Accordingly, certain costs have been allocated among the programs and supporting services Ewing, NJ 08638 Ewing, NJ 08638 Ewing, NJ 08638 benefited.

Ewing, NJ 08638 08638 Ewing, NJ

by or call for a brochure!

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One bedroom/one bath & two bedroom/two bath accessible apartFor the Years Ended June 30,

609-392-1111 609-392-1111 609-392-1111 • Social activities 609-392-1111 TINTON FALLS SENIOR RESIDENCE • One bedroom & studio apartments • One bedroom & studio apartments • Off-Street parking

*Income limits apply* • One bedroom & studio apartments • Social activities 1655 Klockner Road ••Off-Street parking facilities 24 hour emergency maintenance • Laundry • Income restrictions apply

609-890-9401

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08619 08619 • Transportation forNJ shopping • 24 hourHamilton, emergency maintenance

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Convenience 609-890-9401 TINTON FALLS SENIOR RESIDENCE TINTON FALLS SENIOR RESIDENCE

• Adult community 62 and older

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APARTMENTS APARTMENTS ALVIN E. GERSHEN APARTMENTS

• Laundry facilities

• Off-Street parking • Laundry facilities facilities • Off-Street parking • Laundry Hamilton, NJ 08619 • Off-Street parking • Laundry facilities ALVIN for E. maintenance GERSHEN ••24 hour emergency • IncomeTINTON restrictions apply TINTON FALLS SENIORRESIDENCE RESIDENCE FALLS SENIOR Transportation shopping • 24 hour emergency maintenance • Income restrictions apply • 24 hour emergency maintenance • Income restrictions apply APARTMENTS • 24 hour emergency maintenance • Income restrictions apply 2500 Shafto Road Tinton Falls NJ 07712 • Transportation for shopping 1655 Klockner Road • Transportation shopping Road • Transportation forfor shopping

apartments

• Social activities • Social activities

• Off-Street parking • Laundry facilities ALVIN E. GERSHEN 24hour houremergency emergencymaintenance maintenance • Income restrictions apply ••24 • Income restrictions apply APARTMENTS • Off-Street parking • Laundry facilities • One bedroom & studio apartments • Social activities • Transportation forshopping shopping • One bedroom &studio studio apartments Social activities for • One bedroom apartments •• Transportation Social •activities *Income limits apply* &

• One bedroom & studio

ALVIN E.E.GERSHEN ALVIN GERSHEN ALVIN GERSHEN ALVIN E.E.GERSHEN APARTMENTS Catholic Education APARTMENTS and Religious

17. Related Entities

609-392-1111

One apartOnebedroom/one bedroom/onebath bath && two two bedroom/two bedroom/two bath bath accessible accessible apartments. to come ments.Too Toomany manyamenities amenities to list—please list—please come • One bedroom & studio apartments by or call for a brochure! by or call for a brochure!

ments. Too many amenities list—please come 2016 One& bedroom/one bathto&2017 two bath bedroom/two bath accessible apartOne bedroom/one bath two bedroom/two accessible apart- apartOne bedroom/one bath & two bedroom/two bath accessible apartOne bath & two bedroom/two bath accessible by or call forbedroom/one aToo brochure! ments. many amenities to list—please come

ments. Too many amenities to list—please come ments. Too many amenities to list—please ments. Too many amenities tocome list—please come Program Services $ 51,312,477 $ 51,501,471 by or call for a brochure! by or call for a brochure! by or call for a brochure! Management and General 10,071,897 10,759,298 by or call for a brochure! *Income limits apply* Fundraising 1,361,918 1,346,479 *Income limits apply* *Income limits apply* *Income limits apply* Total Operating Expenses *Income limits apply* $ 63,607,248 $ 62,746,292

• 24 hour emergency maintenance • Income restrictions apply Trenton, NJ 08608 NJ 08608 609-392-1111 •Trenton, Transportation for shopping Trenton, NJ 08608 609-392-1111

609-883-8500 609-883-8500

*Income limits apply*

Onebedroom bedroom&&studio studio • •One

restaurants, bus line & Hamilton

Open House

2500Shafto ShaftoRoad RoadTinton TintonFalls FallsNJ NJ07712 07712 2500 close toFor malls + shops orortotoreceive Every Wednesday information For information receivean anapplication: application:

TINTONFALLS FALLSSENIOR SENIORRESIDENCE RESIDENCE TINTON Call Call732-922-2320 732-922-2320 easy access to the jersey shore country setting Convenience Convenience 55+/Income restrictions apply close to malls + shops

24 hour emergency maintenance •• 24 maintenance

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From 1:00 P.M.-4:00 P.M.

apartments Computer access center The Diocese and the Diocese of Trenton Charitable Trusts for apartments •• Computer center on on site site Train station Open OpenHouse House Adultcommunity community62 62and andolder older Social programming • •Adult •• Social Formation, and Seminary and Diaconate a common purpose of supporting the religious 1655 Klockner Road close to malls + shops 1655 Klockner Road THEFormation DIOCESEshare OF TRENTON Every Wednesday Every Wednesday •Located Locatedclose closetotoshopping, shopping, • On On site laundry facilities • • facilities 1655 Klockner Road education programs and the seminary programs of the Diocese. In 2017 and 2016, the Road easy access totothe jersey shore 1655 Klockner easy access the jersey shore From 1:00 P.M.-4:00 P.M. From 1:00 P.M.-4:00 P.M. NOTESand TO diaconate FINANCIAL STATEMENTS restaurants,bus busline line&&Hamilton Hamilton Income restrictions apply restaurants, •• Income apply Hamilton, NJNJ 08619 Trusts contributed approximately $465,000 $67,000, to 2016 the Diocese for education and country countrysetting setting Hamilton, 08619 Trainstation station FOR THE YEARS and ENDED JUNErespectively, 30, 2017 AND INDEPENDENCE GARDENS Hamilton, NJ 08619 Train 55+/Income Hamilton, 08619 religious formation programs, and for the seminarian and diaconate programs administered byNJ the 55+/Incomerestrictions restrictionsapply apply POND RUN HOUSING Diocese. 1655 Klockner Road 9 Lamont Ave. 70 Independence Lane, INDEPENDENCE 21 INDEPENDENCE GARDENS 2500 Shafto Road Tinton Falls NJ 07712 2500 Shafto Road Tinton Falls NJ 07712GARDENS HOUSING 2500 Shafto Road Tinton Falls 07712 POND RUN HOUSING 2500 Shafto Road Tinton Falls NJNJ 07712 Hamilton, NJ 08619 Trenton, NJ 08618 18. Financial Instruments - Concentrations of Credit Risk

609-890-9401 609-890-9401 609-890-9401

Hamilton, 609-890-9401 NJ 08619

TINTON FALLS SENIOR RESIDENCE

For or to ananapplication: For information ortoreceive toreceive receive an application: 9 Lamont Lamont Ave. 70 Forinformation information application: 9 Ave. or 70Independence IndependenceLane, Lane,

For information or to receive an application: • One bedroom & studio As of June 30, 2017, the Diocese held financial instruments, which exceeded federally insured deposits by • 24 hour emergency maintenance Hamilton, NJ Trenton, NJ • One bedroom & studio • 24 •hour emergency maintenance • One bedroom & studio • 24 hour emergency maintenance Hamilton, NJ 08619 08619 Trenton, NJ08618 08618 • One bedroom & studio 24 hour emergency maintenance 609-890-9400 609-394-1300 approximately $11,560,000. The financial instruments consist primarily of savings and checking accounts apartments • Computer access center on site apartments • Computer access center on apartments • Computer access center ononsite which are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation and money market that are not apartments •accounts Computer access center sitesite • One bedroom apartments • 24 hour emergency maintenance • Adult community 62The andDiocese older •not Social programming 609-890-9400 609-394-1300 2500 Shafto Road Tinton Falls NJ 07712 federally insured by the Federal Deposit• Adult Insurance Corporation. experienced any • One bedroom & studio apartments • Adult community 62 and older •has • Social programming Heat, A/C and hot water • Friendly atmosphere •609-394-1300 Located close to shopping areas community 62 and62older Social programming close to •malls +609-890-9400 shops • Adult community and older • Social programming Every Wednesday • 24 hour • One bedroom apartments close malls +rent shops emergency maintenance • Located close shopping,is not exposed • On to siteany laundry facilities • 62 and older community close losses in such financial instruments. Management believes thetoDiocese significant Every Wednesday included Adultbedroom community 55 andWednesday older • Offemergency street parking tototo malls +inshops •• One apartments • 24 hour maintenance close malls + shops Every Wednesday Every • Located close to shopping, • On site laundry facilities • One bedroom & studio apartments • Heat, A/C and hot water easy access to the jersey shore • Friendly atmosphere • Located close to shopping areas • Located close to shopping, • On site laundry facilities • Located restaurants, close to shopping, • On•site laundry facilities From 1:00 laundry P.M.-4:00 P.M.• Located • Onetobedroom & studio easy apartments Heat, A/Cthe and hot water shore credit risk related to cash and cash equivalents. For information or to an application: shopping, • On •site social programming ••receive Friendly close to shopping areas StateFrom ofatmosphere the art facilities • Community room with activities access to jersey bus line & Hamilton Income restrictions apply• Convenient 1:00 P.M.-4:00 P.M. • 62 and older community included in jersey rent jersey easy access to to thethe shore • Adult community 55P.M.-4:00 and older • Off street parking easy access shore From 1:00 P.M. restaurants, bus line & Hamilton • Income restrictions apply • 62 and older community included in rent From 1:00 P.M.-4:00 P.M. •• Adult community 55 and older • Off •street parking country setting bus line & • Income restrictions apply line & Hamilton • Income • Income restrictions apply restaurants, Hot water included in rent Income restrictions apply linebus & Hamilton restrictions apply • Convenient to shopping, • On site social programming • State of the art laundry facilities • Community room with activities • One bedroom & restaurants, studio restaurants, • 24 hour emergency maintenance country setting Trainbus station 19. Subsequent Events • Convenient to shopping, • On site social programming • State of the art laundry facilities • Community room with activities country setting Hamilton Train Station Train station Individually controlled country setting restaurants, bus line & • Income restrictions apply • •Hot water included in rent heat and • Income restrictions apply 55+/Income restrictions apply Train station restaurants, bus line & 55+/Income • Income restrictions apply • Hot water included in rent • Income restrictions apply Train station restrictions apply maintenance Hamilton Train Station air conditioning 55+/Income restrictions apply • Individually controlled heat and apartments center on site • 24 hour emergency Subsequent to June 30, 2017, the Diocese transferred $1,200,000 •toComputer the Dioceseaccess of Trenton Charitable Hamilton Train Station • Individually controlled heat and 55+/Income restrictions apply • 24 hour emergency maintenance air conditioning Trust for Seminary and Diaconate Formation, and $950,000 to the Diocese of Trenton Charitable Trust for • 24 hour emergency maintenance air conditioning • Adult community 62 and • Social programming Catholic Education and Religious Formation, as older part of the Faith to Move Mountains Endowment close to malls + shops Every Wednesday Campaign (see Note •4). Located close to shopping, • On site laundry facilities

Call 732-922-2320 Call 732-922-2320 Call 732-922-2320 Call 732-922-2320 Open House Open House Open House Open House

Convenience Convenience Convenience Convenience

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Call 732-922-2320

Open House

INDEPENDENCE GARDENS INDEPENDENCE GARDENS CO., INC. POND RUN HOUSING INDEPENDENCE GARDENS INCOME MANAGEMENT PONDRUN RUNHOUSING HOUSINGMODERATE MODERATE INCOME MANAGEMENT CO., INC. POND INDEPENDENCE GARDENS easy access to the shore MODERATE INCOME MANAGEMENT CO., INC.P.M. In preparing these financial statements, management has evaluated events and transactions for potential From 1:00 P.M.-4:00 “Solutions tojersey your property management issues” restaurants, bus line & Hamilton

POND RUN HOUSING

• Income restrictions apply

toAve. recognition or disclosure through November 28, 2017, the date the financial statements were 9 available Lamont Lamont Ave. 99 Lamont Ave. be issued. Train station

Hamilton, NJ 08619 9 LamontNJ Ave. Hamilton, NJ 08619 Hamilton, 08619

Hamilton, NJ 08619

609-890-9400 609-890-9400 609-890-9400

POND RUN HOUSING 609-890-9400

• One bedroom & studio apartments • Heat, A/C and hot water • One bedroom & studio apartments • Heat, • Heat, A/C and water • One bedroom & studio apartments A/C and hothot water • 62 and older community included in rent • 62 and older community included in rent • 62 and older community included in rent • Convenient to shopping, • On siteand social • One bedroom & studio apartments • Heat, hotprogramming water • Convenient shopping, • A/C On social programming • Convenient to to shopping, • On sitesite social programming restaurants, bus line & • Income restrictions apply • 62 and older community included in rent restaurants, bus line & • Income restrictions apply restaurants, bus line & • Income restrictions apply Hamilton Train Station Hamilton Train Station • Convenient to shopping, • On site social programming Hamilton Train Station • 24 hour emergency maintenance • 24 hour emergency maintenance restaurants, bus line & maintenance • Income restrictions apply • 24 hour emergency

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MODERATE INCOME MANAGEMENT CO., INC. “Solutions to your property management issues” P.O. Box 3709 • Princeton, NJ 08543 22

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Visit our historic Lakewood campus on Saturday, April 7 at 9:30 am

Register now at georgian.edu/event/open-house 2018.GCU.OH.April.indd 1

February 2018 • State

of the Diocese • 29 2/12/18 11:50 AM


Success Story Nearing completion, Faith to Move Mountains raises more than $71M to help Diocese’s future By Mary Stadnyk, Associate Editor

T

he multi-year endowment campaign Faith to Move Mountains has laid a tremendous foundation in securing the Church of Trenton’s future for many years to come, say those with first-hand knowledge of its success.

The impact of the historic campaign, which was initiated in summer 2014 and is just about complete, has achieved 95 percent of its $75 million goal as of

Feb. 1, said diocesan development staff Steve Nicholl, director, and Marian Gilbride, associate director. To date, Faith to Move Moun-

tains has raised more than $71 million in pledges from 24,242 donors. More than $37 million of this amount has been collected, with three to five years remaining in the redemption process. Of the $75 million goal, earmarked funds are: $22.5 million directed toward parish support; $7.5 million for the Diocesan Parish Assistance Fund; $20 million for ordained ministers; $15 million for Catholic schools; $5 million for catechesis and evangelization; $5 million for social services.

Campaign Benefits Faith to Move Mountains – the Diocese’s largest fundraising campaign the Diocese has ever hosted since the early 1990s – was initiated to sustain the future of the Diocese, its 106 parishes, Catholic schools and diocesan ministries. At its start, Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M., explained that the campaign would be necessary to not only maintain current levels of services, but also to respond to the increasing financial demands of the future, such as struggling parish communities, the rising number of retired clergy and the growing classes of seminarians. The campaign, he noted, was “not for the sake of bricks and mortar, but rather for the flesh

First Holy Communion children from St. Hedwig Parish, Trenton, participate in a May crowning ceremony. About $5 million from the Faith to Move Mountains campaign will be used to form an endowment for catechesis and evangelization. Joe Moore photo

30 • State of the Diocese • February 2018

and blood that make up our community of faith.” As such, the campaign that was established to go beyond the Annual Catholic Appeal to support long-term and extraordinary needs, reached into every parish, with each assigned a financial target, and its parishioners responded in kind.

Faith to Move Mountains was initiated to sustain the future of the Diocese. Improvements All-Around Nicholl remarked on how in addition to helping the Diocese meet its long-term goals, the parishes, too, benefited from the campaign as parishes will receive 30 percent of every dollar collected up to its campaign amount. Should a parish collect over its goal amount, 70 percent of the overage will be returned for local needs and priorities. Each parish was asked to submit a case statement indicating how the return money would be used. The majority said they were looking to improve buildings and grounds, followed by funding new and existing ministries, especially those involving youth/young adults,


Msgr. Thomas N. Gervasio, pastor of Our Lady of Sorrows-St. Anthony Parish, Hamilton, is shown leaving the St. Anthony Church worship site. The parish will use its goal return money for improvement expenses, including better drainage and audio systems at the parish. Faith to Move Mountains video screenshot

social concerns and adult faith formation. Other ways included updating technology, debt reduction and scholarships. Among the examples of how parishes are making improvements were St. Raphael-Holy Angels Parish, Hamilton, which is refurbishing its bell tower and looking to install an elevator with outside access, and St. Rose of Lima Parish, Freehold, which is seeking to expand its chapel to create a gathering space. Some parishes, meanwhile, cited using funds for outreach ministries that offer counseling support for families or provide assistance to those struggling with addiction – St. Joan of Arc, Marlton, St. Thomas More, Manalapan, and St. David the King, Princeton Junction. St. Pius X Parish, Forked River, indicated earmarking funds to support its summer lunch program for schoolchildren and provide tuition assistance for religious education students. Parishes looking to make technology upgrades include St. Alphonsus Parish, Hopewell, which seeks to update its IT and sound system, and St. Ann Parish, Lawrenceville, for updates to its wireless technology and to install capabilities to stream liturgies and events. In all, Nicholl and Gilbride were pleased that as of Feb. 1, $10.8 million has been returned to parishes, an amount that Nicholl regarded as being a “phenomenal success.”

How It Works The Faith to Move Mountains campaign was created to raise

money for an endowment, a charitable trust wherein money is being held and invested and only the income that is earned is spent. Thus, the fund can exist in perpetuity. Each trust within the Faith to Move Mountains endowment will have a board of trustees appointed by the Bishop, consisting of clergy and laity, to ensure the funds will be used for the intended purposes. The board will hire an accounting manager and investment adviser and will adhere to the Uniform Prudent Management of Institutional Funds Act of New Jersey. The trust will be subject to an annual audit with a report to the diocesan Finance Council with oversight of the Bishop. Rollout of the campaign began in July 2014 in six pilot parishes. The campaign progressed by having the remaining parishes categorized into four separate blocks and given about a sixmonth time frame in which to solicit donations. In each parish, the campaign was conducted by the pastor, an assigned parish campaign director and a core group of volunteers.

All About the Team Reflecting on one of the aspects that made Faith to Move Mountains successful, Nicholl and Gilbride credited the pastors and parish lay leaders, commending them for the manner in which they approached promoting the campaign. That included taking time out of their busy schedules to make home visits and host receptions in the parishes during which they not only

talked about the campaign but also had one-on-one opportunities to share dialogue. In doing so, priests, lay leaders and parishioners had an opportunity to learn more about each other. “We are extremely encouraged by all those that have embraced the diocesan case and truly partnered with us,” Nicholl said, praising all those involved, including how so many parishioners gained a greater under-

standing about the workings of the Diocese. “Once the pastors made the campaign a priority, they were able to make it work. Some things may have had to move to the back burner, but they made time for what needed to happen,” he added. “The F2MM teams regarded it as a ministry. They took on the mantle of the apostles and set out in a spirit of service,” Nicholl said.

InspIred by faIth • empowered by Knowledge • unIted by CommunIty

OPEN HOUSE Preschool through 8th April 12, 2018 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm NOW ENROLLING for 2018/19 SCHOOL YEAR! Contact us for a personal tour by calling 609-585-7733 Visit our website: www.srsnj.org/srs/

151 Gropp Ave Hamilton , NJ 08610 February 2018 • State

of the Diocese • 31


Ministry centers bear fruit of intentional collaboration Continued from • 10 because they feel connected personally. They are staying,” shared Perez. “Things are moving and we’re getting bites.” Father Raphael Esquen, parochial vicar in Jesus the Good Shepherd, has seen that people want to know God more. “They want to bring their culture into the Church,” he reflected. Recognizing the cultural differences, Father Esquen described the realities of walking with cultural communities: “The Hispanic community already identifies with the Catholic Church, but now we see that they are beginning to feel more of an identity as part of the diocesan Church as well. Our focus with the Portuguese and Brazilian communities here [at Jesus the Good Shepherd] is on formation. We are working with them from a perspective of spirituality and will move from there.”

Meaningful Steps Across the Diocese of Trenton, some of these new possibilities are manifesting as staffing changes in the parishes to incorporate people who speak multiple languages and collaboration within parish Cohort groups, while other possibilities are opening doors to new ministries or services. Another small but

meaningful step has been with the phone systems. In some parishes, phone messaging services are offered in the main languages of the community, apart from English. For example, St. Anthony Claret Parish in Lakewood has begun a literacy program to teach people to read and write in Spanish. They are partnering with St. Francis of Assisi Parish, Long Beach Island, and with St. Mary of the Lake Parish, Lakewood. Participants move from the literacy program to an ESL program that takes place at the facilities at Holy Family, Lakewood. Then, people can take advantage of a GED program offered by St. Mary of the Lake and St. Francis of Assisi. “It’s the whole string to bring someone from illiteracy to a high school diploma,” Ginther said. “Hope is THE characteristic trait of Christians,” said Father Scott Shaffer, pastor of St. Joseph Parish, Toms River. With hope, he sees the role and buy-in on the part of parish leadership as vital for success in their center for Hispanic ministry. “We will thrive if we have mutual respect for one another and build open communication,” he said.

Much to Learn Father Shaffer admitted

that walking with the Hispanic community has been a learning process for him. “It was a surprise to me to realize how much I did not understand about the Hispanic cultures. I am grateful for how great the journey has

“Hope is THE characteristic trait of Christians.”

been for me in learning about my Spanish-speaking brothers and sisters. They have a deep spirituality, a willingness, to go to work for the parish,” he acknowledged. St. Joseph has a parish elementary and high school, and for those in the Hispanic community who may have financial hardships, the parish has worked out a system: to provide Catholic school education for children whose families have professional experience who can help the parish in some way. “Everything is seen as a ser-

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32 • State of the Diocese • February 2018

vice to the Church,” Father Shafer said.

United by Faith At Christ the King Parish, Long Branch, a truly multicultural parish, there are many differences, but “Faith unites. The various devotions to Our Lady unite us,” said Father Javier Díaz, pastor. “Faith plays a mega-important role.” The parish has been named a center for Portuguese ministry and for Hispanic ministry, with large immigrant communities from Portugal, Brazil and many Spanish-speaking countries. “We also have a wonderfully active Anglo and Italian-American community and they are all participating. They are all important to the life of the parish. They all have a role in parish leadership.” Father Díaz welcomes whatever cultural challenges the parish diversity might bring. “The love for Christ, the love of Christ, is all we need to unify ourselves. Christ guides us as believers.” The various devotions, noting la Aparecida in Brazil and Guadalupe in Mexico among others, offer the parish sources to celebrate unity and diversity. “People immigrated here with the notion of returning to their countries, but they made roots here. They stopped seeing themselves as ‘visitors’ and began to see our parish as the future parish of their children and grandchildren,” Father Diaz said. The future of the parish is something for all Catholics, he noted. Katie Magnusson, parish secretary in St. Mary of the Lake, echoed the value she has witnessed. “It’s been very enlivening and very enlightening,” Magnusson shared, as she expounded on the effects of intentional collaboration fostered by Faith in Our Future and the naming of Centers for Ministry.

Making Connections As a reader, catechist, music minister and more, Magnusson highlighted interparish and intercultural experiences that have Continued on • 35


CONNECT with the DOT The Diocese of Trenton has an array of traditional, digital and social media resources to engage with the Catholic community in our parishes and schools. Stay up-to-date on news from around the Diocese, messages and statements from Bishop David M. O’Connell, C.M., and information on programs and events by following the Diocese online. Here is where you will find us from your PC, tablet or phone:

WEBSITES:

DioceseofTrenton.org Here are direct links to some of our most visited pages on the main website:  Bishop O’Connell’s messages and statements (dioceseoftrenton. org/from-the-bishops-desk)  Podcasts and videos (dioceseoftrenton.org/podcasts-and-videos)  Our Diocese Today (dioceseoftrenton.org/our-diocese-today)  Calendar of events (dioceseoftrenton.org/calendar)

SOCIAL MEDIA OUTLETS:

Like us on FACEBOOK.COM at:  Catholic Diocese of Trenton  Trenton Monitor

 Find a Parish (dioceseoftrenton. org/parishfinder)

 RealfaithTV

 Find a School (dioceseoftrenton. org/schoolfinder)

 Cristo Para Todos DoT

 Find a Job (www.dioceseoftrenton.org/employment) TrentonMonitor.com CatholicSchoolsHaveItAll.com EspaTiEspaMi.com

 Catolicos de Trenton  DoT Family Life  DoT Youth and Young Adult Ministries Find us on INSTAGRAM.COM at: Catholic_DoT Follow us on TWITTER.COM at:

RealfaithTV.com CristoparatodosTV.com BuildingStrongMarriages.com FaithtoMoveMountains.org

@TrentonDiocese @TrentonMonitor @CristoParaTodosDoT @RealfaithTV Watch us on YOUTUBE.COM at:  Cristo Para Todos DoT  TrentonDiocese  RealfaithTV Listen to us on Soundcloud.com at:        Catching the Word  TrentonDiocese

Need to TALK with SOMEONE?

I

n periods of loss, transition and adversity, many of us might benefit from accessing specially designated support groups, practitioners and other ministries, where we will find people who better understand what we are going through and might assist us in the healing process. As part of the Diocese’s efforts to walk with members of the Catholic community at all stages of life, the following list of available resources has been compiled:

Check out the following links:

Bereavement Support Groups • www. dioceseoftrenton.org/bereavement-ministry

Jail & Prison Ministry Web Page • www. dioceseoftrenton.org/jail-and-prison-ministry

All Pastoral Care Related Support Groups • www.dioceseoftrenton.org/support-groups

Parishes with Ministry to Seniors • www. dioceseoftrenton.org/ministry-for-maturing-adults

Respect Life Ministries Web Page • www. dioceseoftrenton.org/respect-life-ministry

Separated & Divorced Support Groups • www.dioceseoftrenton.org/separated-and-divorced

Parishes with Addictions & Recovery Ministry • www.dioceseoftrenton.org/ addictions-ministry

Catholics with Disabilities • dioceseoftrenton.org/catholics-with-disabilities Parish Counseling Services • dioceseoftrenton.org/parish-counseling-services

February 2018 • State

of the Diocese • 33


Remembering FIOF goals gives focus Continued from • 8 will become eligible to retire in 2019; six are pastors. It is a blessing that there are four transitional deacons preparing to be ordained as priests for the Diocese in June. They will “take the place” of at least four priests retiring later that same month. In contrast, there is one seminarian on the path to ordination in 2019, but six priests are expected to retire. The Code of Canon Law provides linking, merging and other models to be used in such a circumstance. There are six parish linkages now in which priests serve more than one parish, and there will be more in the future. Declines in the numbers of religious order priests, sisters and brothers, and the aging of our permanent deacons are also realities to which we must respond. We must pray in earnest for vocations and commit to new ways of accompanying young people as they discern God’s call in their lives. The leadership of priests in our parishes must be complemented by the contributions of a pastoral team that might include deacons, religious and professional lay people. Together, a pastoral team is often able to engage a large number of parishioners in outreach and mission.

Stewardship

Goal 3: Improve our stewardship of personnel, finances, and facilities and other parish and diocesan resources. God, in his infinite goodness, gives us all the resources necessary for the mission of sharing the Good News of Jesus Christ and advancing the Kingdom of God. The temptation is for each parish, school and ministry to operate in a silo. Our resources are divided and sometimes wasted. Efforts and services are duplicated. Our lack of a united witness

handicaps our ability to draw others to Christ. Amazing things happen when resources and work are shared for the sake of the mission. Parishes are beginning to share qualified business managers and professional youth ministers. Parishes are sharing the use of buildings. Schools are working together on marketing. Staff members with specialized experience are assisting neighboring parishes. Cohorts are sharing a bus to the March for Life, or hosting huge events that build community, generate excitement and invite participation. The resources are there, but are we seeking them out and developing them? Are we using them wisely? Stewardship is about living with open hands. A pastor I visited recently said to me, “We are all one Church.” Indeed, every step we can take to share resources is a step in the right direction.

Collaboration for the Sake of Evangelization Goal 4: Establish collaborative relationships among the parishes and ministries of the Diocese that will build upon the Gospel to re/evangelize the local Church, especially those who live on the fringes of the Church, as well as those who do not yet know Christ. A house divided against itself will not be able to stand (Mk3:25). Collaboration between neighboring parishes is an “antidote” to parochialism and unhealthy competition. Without it, we are locked into a “survival of the fittest” dynamic that is antithetical to the communion we share. Every parish in the Diocese of Trenton is directed by Bishop O’Connell to collaborate with one or more of its Cohort partners. In this, we are called to manifest the Body of

34 • State of the Diocese • February 2018

“Each one, reach one.”

Christ that St. Paul describes in his Letter to the Romans (12:5), not only in a mystical or sacramental way, but in concrete ministerial and temporal ways as well. Evangelization requires that we accompany current parishioners on the journey, help them to grow in faith and equip them to share the Good News in the world. The re-proposing of faith to an increasingly secular society is not a single program that can be run by a committee. This “new” evangelization needs innumerable disciples who can be witnesses to the saving love of Christ in living rooms, classrooms and boardrooms. A mentor of mine coined the phrase “each one, reach one.” Cohorts are called to work together for the sake of making disciples. Have we got that focus? How’s our follow-through?

Hispanic Ministry

Goal 5: Provide for pastoral ministry to Hispanic Catholics, the fastest-growing segment of our diocesan population, within our parishes and organizations. Here are two surprising statistics: about 60 percent of Catholics younger than 18 in the United States are Hispanic. Ninety-three percent of them were born in the United States. Through Faith in Our Future, Bishop O’Connell has designated 18 parishes as “centers for Hispanic ministry.” These parishes are being entrusted with the pastoral care of Hispanic Catholics, in most cases in addition to their ministry among the residents in a given area. Hispanic ministry is to be integrated into, not segregated from, the broader parish, and will involve building bilingual staff and working across cultures where possible. These designated parishes must be able to count on consistent support from their Cohort partners in order for them to invest in the care of Hispanic families and in the development of Hispanic youth as leaders for the future of our Church. Parish music ministries from St. Mary of the Lake and St. Anthony Claret, both Lakewood, come together to share an afternoon of fellowship in music as part of a Cohort collaboration initiative in November 2016. Also present were musicians from Visitation Parish, Brick, and St. Mark Parish, Sea Girt. Joe Moore photo


Centers provide opportunities to build community Continued from • 32 helped deepen her experience of faith. “Language is a real barrier,” she said, but the “passion for the faith” is stronger than any obstacle, even adding that she has been encouraged by the connections built and even the little Spanish she has learned. “This is an exciting time for our Church.”

“We find that people come here from all over because we offer services other parishes do not.” The naming of centers has meant a lot of uneasy change for cultural communities across the Diocese. Masses celebrated in Spanish have moved out of some parishes to be offered in others. For instance, the community that had enjoyed the Mass in Spanish for years at Divine Mercy Parish was welcomed into the Our Lady of Angels Parish

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community when the Spanish Mass needed to end. Father Cesar Rubiano, pastor of Our Lady of Angels, recognized the feelings many people would have, being asked to leave their parish home for another. Father Rubiano worked to encourage and welcome them into his parish. He even Members of the Haitian community gather for a celebration following moved a Spanish lanNew Year’s Eve Mass in Our Lady of Sorrows-St. Anthony Parish, Hamguage Mass to the same ilton. The parish has been designated as a Center for Haitian Ministry. Courtesy photo time it had been celebrated at Divine Mercy. Ismael Rivera, one who wears many hats in centers in their communities. Whether as part of the various cultural St. Anthony Claret Parish said, “We offer the groups or part of the welcoming larger comentire gamut” of ministries, shared. “We find munity, a challenge that the centers bring to that people come here from all over because the forefront is to move people from seeing we offer services other parishes do not.” themselves as “they” to “we.” The Diocese of As the parish centers for ministry continTrenton strives to deepen its sense of unity, ue to develop, he hopes for one of two things: love and solidarity as the People of God. The that people will begin to register as parishioCenters for Cultural Ministry are a profound ners of St. Anthony Claret, or they will begin step toward that goal. to have their spiritual needs met at the parish

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on Full coverage ding a the day, inclu the newly people of God in feature on the faithful Trinity ed from that defines completed ages travel d holiness of the people of all journey towar be found nal Shrine some 2,000 he sense of Dome, can y Nov. 4 as ca of the Natio With special displa Basili age. age full the rge in was on on’s pilgrim in the six-p se of Trent bers Jersey to conve ning on unity mem n for the Dioce Central New section begin san comm n in Washingto engaged dioce Conceptio r Church of pilgrimage page 20. Immaculate the Great Uppe Christ,” the r, and later worship in “United in flock in praye learning and the theme Bishop David r, reflection, C.M., led his praye M. nnell, O’Conn of ell, C.M., and of the new P3 in a day David M. O’Co others applaud NOV. 19 • coat of arms Feb. 19 during ca. Bishop as Msgr. Sam 30 priests. the church’s Sirianni, rector THE POO R the vast Basili formal elevatio with nearly of LD DAY OF n ceremony. St. Robert Bellarmine GLORY • Mass along Co-Cathedral, • FIRST WOR Craig Pittelli celebrated ART OF GOD’S t photo Freehold, holds MESS AGE exhibi a rendering KSGI VING Laudato Si theology, NNEL L’S THAN showcases • P9 SHINING Our Counties. BISH OP O’CO nature’s beauty PLE • uth and Ocean ,D

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36 • State of the Diocese • February 2018

Diocese of Trenton, State of the Diocese 2018  
Diocese of Trenton, State of the Diocese 2018